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Sample records for intracellular redox state

  1. Redox sensor proteins for highly sensitive direct imaging of intracellular redox state.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kazunori; Nagai, Takeharu; Nakano, Masahiro; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-02-13

    Intracellular redox state is a critical factor for fundamental cellular functions, including regulation of the activities of various metabolic enzymes as well as ROS production and elimination. Genetically-encoded fluorescent redox sensors, such as roGFP (Hanson, G. T., et al. (2004)) and Redoxfluor (Yano, T., et al. (2010)), have been developed to investigate the redox state of living cells. However, these sensors are not useful in cells that contain, for example, other colored pigments. We therefore intended to obtain simpler redox sensor proteins, and have developed oxidation-sensitive fluorescent proteins called Oba-Q (oxidation balance sensed quenching) proteins. Our sensor proteins derived from CFP and Sirius can be used to monitor the intracellular redox state as their fluorescence is drastically quenched upon oxidation. These blue-shifted spectra of the Oba-Q proteins enable us to monitor various redox states in conjunction with other sensor proteins.

  2. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD(+) or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD(+)/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD(+) and NADH contents and the NAD(+)/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD(+), total NAD contents, and NAD(+)/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ.

  3. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  4. Effect of ADH II Deficiency on the Intracellular Redox Homeostasis in Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Galinina, Nina; Lasa, Zane; Strazdina, Inese; Rutkis, Reinis; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2012-01-01

    Mutant strain of the facultatively anaerobic, ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis, deficient in the Fe-containing alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme (ADH II), showed impaired homeostasis of the intracellular NAD(P)H during transition from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and also in steady-state continuous cultures at various oxygen supplies. At the same time, ADH II deficiency in aerobically grown cells was accompanied by a threefold increase of catalase activity and by about 50% increase of hydrogen peroxide excretion. It is concluded that ADH II under aerobic conditions functions to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and to protect the cells from endogenous hydrogen peroxide. PMID:22629192

  5. Effect of ADH II deficiency on the intracellular redox homeostasis in Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Galinina, Nina; Lasa, Zane; Strazdina, Inese; Rutkis, Reinis; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2012-01-01

    Mutant strain of the facultatively anaerobic, ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis, deficient in the Fe-containing alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme (ADH II), showed impaired homeostasis of the intracellular NAD(P)H during transition from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and also in steady-state continuous cultures at various oxygen supplies. At the same time, ADH II deficiency in aerobically grown cells was accompanied by a threefold increase of catalase activity and by about 50% increase of hydrogen peroxide excretion. It is concluded that ADH II under aerobic conditions functions to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and to protect the cells from endogenous hydrogen peroxide.

  6. Monitoring Intracellular Redox Changes in Ozone-exposed airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The toxicity of many compounds involves oxidative injury to cells. Direct assessment of mechanistic events involved in xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress is not easily achievable. Development of genetically-encoded probes designed for monitoring intracellular redox s...

  7. Tumor intracellular redox status and drug resistance--serendipity or a causal relationship?

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Shazib; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2004-01-01

    Reducing tumor load by therapeutic induction of cell death in the transformed phenotype is the desirable goal of most chemotherapeutic regimens. Despite the tremendous strides made in our understanding of mechanisms that endow tumor cells with the ability to evade execution signals, development of chemo-resistance is still a major obstacle in the successful management of the disease. A host of factors have been implicated in the acquisition of the resistant phenotype, such as activation of drug efflux pumps, overexpression of proteins that inhibit cell death, absence of critical members of the death circuitry, and selective loss of cell cycle checkpoints. Consequently, it is now well established that the process of carcinogenesis is not only a result of an increase in cells' proliferative capacity, but a product of increased proliferation and defective or diminished cell death signaling. To that end, one of the critical determinants of cellular response to exogenous stimuli is the cellular redox status. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is tightly regulated by the intrinsic anti-oxidant defense systems. Despite the conventional dogma that ROS are harmful to the cell, experimental evidence over the last decade or so bear witness to the fact that ROS also play an important role as signaling molecules in diverse physiological processes. Indeed, low levels of intracellular ROS have been linked to cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, which provides an explanation for the pro-oxidant state invariably associated with the transformed phenotype. Coupled to that are recent observations implicating pro-oxidant intracellular milieu in tumor cells' resistance to cell death signals delivered through the cell surface receptor or upon exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. These studies provide convincing evidence to support a direct or indirect role for intracellular superoxide anion in creating an intracellular milieu non-permissive for cell

  8. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Putker, Marrit; O'Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping.

  9. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Putker, Marrit; O’Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping. PMID:26810072

  10. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  11. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  12. Real-Time Imaging of the Intracellular Glutathione Redox Potential in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Kasozi, Denis; Mohring, Franziska; Rahlfs, Stefan; Meyer, Andreas J.; Becker, Katja

    2013-01-01

    In the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the cellular redox potential influences signaling events, antioxidant defense, and mechanisms of drug action and resistance. Until now, the real-time determination of the redox potential in malaria parasites has been limited because conventional approaches disrupt sub-cellular integrity. Using a glutathione biosensor comprising human glutaredoxin-1 linked to a redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (hGrx1-roGFP2), we systematically characterized basal values and drug-induced changes in the cytosolic glutathione-dependent redox potential (EGSH) of drug-sensitive (3D7) and resistant (Dd2) P. falciparum parasites. Via confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that hGrx1-roGFP2 rapidly detects EGSH changes induced by oxidative and nitrosative stress. The cytosolic basal EGSH of 3D7 and Dd2 were estimated to be −314.2±3.1 mV and −313.9±3.4 mV, respectively, which is indicative of a highly reducing compartment. We furthermore monitored short-, medium-, and long-term changes in EGSH after incubation with various redox-active compounds and antimalarial drugs. Interestingly, the redox cyclers methylene blue and pyocyanin rapidly changed the fluorescence ratio of hGrx1-roGFP2 in the cytosol of P. falciparum, which can, however, partially be explained by a direct interaction with the probe. In contrast, quinoline and artemisinin-based antimalarial drugs showed strong effects on the parasites' EGSH after longer incubation times (24 h). As tested for various conditions, these effects were accompanied by a drop in total glutathione concentrations determined in parallel with alternative methods. Notably, the effects were generally more pronounced in the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain than in the resistant Dd2 strain. Based on these results hGrx1-roGFP2 can be recommended as a reliable and specific biosensor for real-time spatiotemporal monitoring of the intracellular EGSH in P. falciparum. Applying this technique in further

  13. Redox state influence on human galectin-1 function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Scott, Stacy A; Pritchard, Rhys; Houston, Todd A; Ralph, Stephen J; Blanchard, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular and extracellular functions of human galectin-1 are influenced by its redox surroundings due to the presence of six cysteines within its amino acid sequence. Galectin-1 recognises intracellular-membrane-anchored Ras proteins that act as molecular switches regulating multiple signal transduction pathways. Human tumours frequently express Ras proteins that have become continuously activated due to point mutations, and this typically leads to deregulation of tumour cell growth, angiogenesis and invasion of metastatic cancer cells. Of significance is that galectin-1 preferably recognises H-Ras, one of the human Ras isoforms, and in particular galectin-1 recognition of the H-Ras farnesyl moiety is paramount to H-Ras membrane anchorage, a prerequisite step for H-Ras-mediated signal transduction regulating normal cell growth and malignant transformation. Herein the impact of the redox state on galectin-1's ability to interact with farnesyl analogues is explored. We demonstrate for the first time that reduced galectin-1 directly binds farnesyl and does so in a carbohydrate-independent manner. A K28T mutation abolishes farnesyl recognition by reduced dimeric galectin-1 whilst its carbohydrate-binding activity is retained, thus demonstrating the presence of an independent region on galectin-1 pertaining to growth inhibitory activity. Intriguingly, oxidised galectin-1 also recognises farnesyl, the biological implication of this novel finding is yet to be elucidated. Further, the redox effect on galectin-1 extracellular function was investigated and we discover that oxidised galectin-1 demonstrates a protective effect upon acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells challenged by oxidative stress.

  14. Intracellular Doxorubicin Delivery of a Core Cross-linked, Redox-responsive Polymeric Micelles.

    PubMed

    Lili, Yu; Ruihua, Mu; Li, Li; Fei, Liang; Lin, Yao; Li, Su

    2016-02-10

    Redox-responsive micelles based on amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-polymethyl methacrylate with the introduction of disulfide containing cross-linked agent (mPEG-PMMA-SS) were developed for intracellular drug release. Benefiting from the amphiphilicity, mPEG-PMMA-SS could self-assembled into core cross-linked micelles in aqueous medium with tunable sizes (85-151 nm), appropriate zeta potential (-24.8 mV), and desirable critical micelle concentration (CMC) (0.18 mg/mL). Doxorubicin (DOX) could efficiently load into the micelles with satisfactory entrapment efficiency. As expected, the in vitro release studies displayed that DOX release from mPEG-PMMA-SS micelles was about 75% within 10h under tumor-relevant reductive condition, whereas only about 25% DOX was released in non-reductive medium. SRB assays indicated that these mPEG-PMMA-SS micelles were biocompatible and nontoxic up to a concentration of 50 μg/mL. The cytotoxicity studies and the intracellular drug delivery demonstrated that the drug release behavior in cells was related to the concentration of GSH in cytoplasm. Furthermore, the cell experiments using fluorescence microscopy showed clearly that DOX was delivered by micelles to the cytoplasm, released in cytoplasm under reductive environment, and then accumulated in cell nucleus. These results suggest that such redox-responsive micelles may develop into an efficient cytoplasmic delivery for hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  15. Folic Acid and Trastuzumab Functionalized Redox Responsive Polymersomes for Intracellular Doxorubicin Delivery in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lale, Shantanu V; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, Shyam; Bharti, Alok C; Koul, Veena

    2015-06-01

    Redox responsive biodegradable polymersomes comprising of poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG-s-s-PLA-s-s-PLA-s-s-PEG] triblock copolymer with multiple disulfide linkages were developed to improve intracellular delivery and to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in breast cancer with minimal cardiotoxicity. Folic acid and trastuzumab functionalized monodispersed polymersomes of size ∼150 nm were prepared by nanoprecipitation method while achieving enhanced doxorubicin loading of ∼32% in the polymersomes. Multiple redox responsive disulfide linkages were incorporated in the polymer in order to achieve complete disintegration of polymersomes in redox rich environment of cancer cells resulting in enhanced doxorubicin release as observed in in vitro release studies, where ∼90% doxorubicin release was achieved in pH 5.0 in the presence of 10 mM glutathione (GSH) as compared to ∼20% drug release in pH 7.4. Folic acid and trastuzumab mediated active targeting resulted in improved cellular uptake and enhanced apoptosis in in vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines. In vivo studies in Ehrlich ascites tumor bearing Swiss albino mice showed enhanced antitumor efficacy and minimal cardiotoxicity of polymersomes with ∼90% tumor regression as compared to ∼38% tumor regression observed with free doxorubicin. The results highlight therapeutic potential of the polymersomes as doxorubicin delivery nanocarrier in breast cancer therapy with its superior antitumor efficacy and minimal cardiotoxicity.

  16. Electrochemical detection of intracellular and cell membrane redox systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Frankie J.; Downard, Alison J.; Baronian, Keith H.

    2014-01-01

    Redox mediators can interact with eukaryote cells at a number of different cell locations. While cell membrane redox centres are easily accessible, the redox centres of catabolism are situated within the cytoplasm and mitochondria and can be difficult to access. We have systematically investigated the interaction of thirteen commonly used lipophilic and hydrophilic mediators with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A double mediator system is used in which ferricyanide is the final electron acceptor (the reporter mediator). After incubation of cells with mediators, steady state voltammetry of the ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple allows quantitation of the amount of mediator reduced by the cells. The plateau current at 425 mV vs Ag/AgCl gives the analytical signal. The results show that five of the mediators interact with at least three different trans Plasma Membrane Electron Transport systems (tPMETs), and that four mediators cross the plasma membrane to interact with cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox molecules. Four of the mediators inhibit electron transfer from S. cerevisiae. Catabolic inhibitors were used to locate the cellular source of electrons for three of the mediators. PMID:24910017

  17. Electrochemical detection of intracellular and cell membrane redox systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Frankie J.; Downard, Alison J.; Baronian, Keith H.

    2014-06-01

    Redox mediators can interact with eukaryote cells at a number of different cell locations. While cell membrane redox centres are easily accessible, the redox centres of catabolism are situated within the cytoplasm and mitochondria and can be difficult to access. We have systematically investigated the interaction of thirteen commonly used lipophilic and hydrophilic mediators with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A double mediator system is used in which ferricyanide is the final electron acceptor (the reporter mediator). After incubation of cells with mediators, steady state voltammetry of the ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple allows quantitation of the amount of mediator reduced by the cells. The plateau current at 425 mV vs Ag/AgCl gives the analytical signal. The results show that five of the mediators interact with at least three different trans Plasma Membrane Electron Transport systems (tPMETs), and that four mediators cross the plasma membrane to interact with cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox molecules. Four of the mediators inhibit electron transfer from S. cerevisiae. Catabolic inhibitors were used to locate the cellular source of electrons for three of the mediators.

  18. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction. PMID:26904821

  19. [Monitoring the Redox States of Thioredoxin in Protein-Protein Interaction Using Intrinsic Fluorescence Probe].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Guo, Ai-yu; Chang, Guan-xiao; Ran, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Li-jun

    2015-10-01

    The cellular redox states directly affect cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and the redox states changes is particularly important to the regulation of cell survival or death. Thioredoxin is a kind of oxidation regulatory protein which is widely exists in organisms, and the change of redox states is also an important process in redox regulation. In this work, we have used the site-directed mutagenesis of protein, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism etc., to investigate redox states changes between TRX (E. coli) and glutathione peroxidase(GPX3) during their interaction. By observing the fluorescence spectra of TRX and its mutants, we have studied the protein interactions as well as the redox states switching between oxidation state TRX and the reduced state GPX3. The results demonstrate the presence of interactions and electron exchanges occurring between reduced GPX3 and oxidized TRX, which is of significance for revealing the physical and chemical mechanism of TRX in intracellular signal transduction.

  20. The Role of Copper Chaperone Atox1 in Coupling Redox Homeostasis to Intracellular Copper Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) is a small cytosolic protein with an essential role in copper homeostasis. Atox1 functions as a copper carrier facilitating copper transfer to the secretory pathway. This process is required for activation of copper dependent enzymes involved in neurotransmitter biosynthesis, iron efflux, neovascularization, wound healing, and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, new cellular roles for Atox1 have emerged. Changing levels of Atox1 were shown to modulate response to cancer therapies, contribute to inflammatory response, and protect cells against various oxidative stresses. It has also become apparent that the activity of Atox1 is tightly linked to the cellular redox status. In this review, we summarize biochemical information related to a dual role of Atox1 as a copper chaperone and an antioxidant. We discuss how these two activities could be linked and contribute to establishing the intracellular copper balance and functional identity of cells during differentiation. PMID:27472369

  1. The Role of Copper Chaperone Atox1 in Coupling Redox Homeostasis to Intracellular Copper Distribution.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) is a small cytosolic protein with an essential role in copper homeostasis. Atox1 functions as a copper carrier facilitating copper transfer to the secretory pathway. This process is required for activation of copper dependent enzymes involved in neurotransmitter biosynthesis, iron efflux, neovascularization, wound healing, and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, new cellular roles for Atox1 have emerged. Changing levels of Atox1 were shown to modulate response to cancer therapies, contribute to inflammatory response, and protect cells against various oxidative stresses. It has also become apparent that the activity of Atox1 is tightly linked to the cellular redox status. In this review, we summarize biochemical information related to a dual role of Atox1 as a copper chaperone and an antioxidant. We discuss how these two activities could be linked and contribute to establishing the intracellular copper balance and functional identity of cells during differentiation. PMID:27472369

  2. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  3. Glutamate-induced metabolic changes influence the cytoplasmic redox state of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Porras, Omar H; Stutzin, Andrés

    2011-07-22

    Brain cell metabolism is intimately associated with intracellular oxidation-reduction (redox) balance. Glutamatergic transmission is accompanied with changes in substrate preference in neurons. Therefore, we studied cytoplasmatic redox changes in hippocampal neurons in culture exposed to glutamate. Neurons were transfected with HyPer, a genetically encoded redox biosensor for hydrogen peroxide which allows real-time imaging of the redox state. The rate of fluorescence decay, corresponding to the reduction of the biosensor was found to be augmented by low doses of glutamate (10 μM) as well as by pharmacological stimulation of NMDA glutamate receptors. Acute chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) abolished the glutamate-induced effect observed on HyPer fluorescence. Additional experiments indicated that mitochondrial function and hence energetic substrate availability commands the redox state of neurons and is required for the glutamate effect observed on the biosensor signal. Furthermore, our results implicated astrocytic metabolism in the changes of neuronal redox state observed with glutamate. PMID:21708127

  4. The extracellular redox state modulates mitochondrial function, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis in murine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nocito, Laura; Kleckner, Amber S; Yoo, Elsia J; Jones Iv, Albert R; Liesa, Marc; Corkey, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB)/acetoacetate (Acoc), reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular βOHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular βOHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(P)H and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater βOHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased β-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of βOHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases.

  5. Redox State of the Neoarchean Earth Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Claire, Mark W.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Farquhar, James; Poulton, Simon W.

    2011-01-01

    A Titan-like organic haze has been hypothesized for Earth's atmosphere prior to widespread surface oxygenation approx.2.45 billion years ago (Ga). We present a high-resolution record of quadruple sulfur isotopes, carbon isotopes, and Fe speciation from the approx.2.65-2.5 Ga Ghaap Group, South Africa, which suggest a linkage between organic haze and the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and iron on the Archean Earth. These sediments provide evidence for oxygen production in microbial mats and localized oxygenation of surface waters. However, this oxygen production occurred under a reduced atmosphere which existed in multiple distinct redox states that correlate to changes in carbon and sulfur isotopes. The data are corroborated by photochemical model results that suggest bi-stable transitions between organic haze and haze-free atmospheric conditions in the Archean. These geochemical correlations also extend to other datasets, indicating that variations in the character of anomalous sulfur fractionation could provide insight into the role of carbon-bearing species in the reducing Archean atmosphere.

  6. Changes in the redox state in the retina and brain during the onset of diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Salceda, R; Vilchis, C; Coffe, V; Hernández-Muñoz, R

    1998-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is thought to result from chronic changes in the metabolic pathways of the retina. Hyperglycemia leads to increased intracellular glucose concentrations, alterations in glucose degradation and an increase in lactate/pyruvate ratio. We measured lactate content in retina and other ocular and non-ocular tissues from normal and diabetic rats in the early stages of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. The intracellular redox state was calculated from the cytoplasmic [lactate]/[pyruvate] ratio. Elevated lactate concentration were found in retina and cerebral cortex from diabetic rats. These concentrations led to a significant and progressive decrease in the NAD+/NADH ratio, suggesting that altered glucose metabolism is an initial step of retinopathy. It is thus possible that tissues such as cerebral cortex have mechanisms that prevent the damaging effect of lactate produced by hyperglycemia and/or alterations of the intracellular redox state. PMID:9580389

  7. Tripyrrindione as a Redox-Active Ligand: Palladium(II) Coordination in Three Redox States.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ritika; Loughrey, Jonathan J; Astashkin, Andrei V; Shearer, Jason; Tomat, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    The tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of urinary pigment uroerythrin coordinates divalent palladium as a planar tridentate ligand. Spectroscopic, structural and computational investigations reveal that the tripyrrindione ligand binds as a dianionic radical, and the resulting complex is stable at room temperature. One-electron oxidation and reduction reactions do not alter the planar coordination sphere of palladium(II) and lead to the isolation of two additional complexes presenting different redox states of the ligand framework. Unaffected by stability problems common to tripyrrolic fragments, the tripyrrindione ligand offers a robust platform for ligand-based redox chemistry.

  8. A Low Glutathione Redox State Couples with a Decreased Ascorbate Redox Ratio to Accelerate Flowering in Oncidium Orchid.

    PubMed

    Chin, Dan-Chu; Hsieh, Chia-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays multiple roles in plants, including stress defense and regulation of growth/development. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ascorbate (AsA) redox state is involved in flowering initiation in Oncidium orchid. In this study, we discovered that a significantly decreased GSH content and GSH redox ratio are correlated with a decline in the AsA redox state during flowering initiation and high ambient temperature-induced flowering. At the same time, the expression level and enzymatic activity of GSH redox-regulated genes, glutathione reductase (GR1), and the GSH biosynthesis genes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) and glutathione synthase (GSH2), are down-regulated. Elevating dehydroascorbate (DHA) content in Oncidium by artificial addition of DHA resulted in a decreased AsA and GSH redox ratio, and enhanced dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity. This demonstrated that the lower GSH redox state could be influenced by the lower AsA redox ratio. Moreover, exogenous application of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to inhibit GSH biosynthesis, and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), to decrease the GSH redox ratio, also caused early flowering. However, spraying plants with GSH increased the GSH redox ratio and delayed flowering. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing Oncidium GSH1, GSH2 and GR1 displayed a high GSH redox ratio as well as delayed flowering under high ambient temperature treatment, while pad2, cad2 and gr1 mutants exhibited early flowering and a low GSH redox ratio. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the decreased GSH redox state is linked to the decline in the AsA redox ratio and mediated by down-regulated expression of GSH metabolism-related genes to affect flowering time in Oncidium orchid.

  9. Direct Determination of the Intracellular Oxidation State of Plutonium

    PubMed Central

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) measurements were used to determine directly, for the first time, the oxidation state of intracellular plutonium in individual 0.1 μm2 areas within single rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). The living cells were incubated in vitro for 3 hours in the presence of Pu added to the media in different oxidation states (Pu(III), Pu(IV), and Pu(VI)) and in different chemical forms. Regardless of the initial oxidation state or chemical form of Pu presented to the cells, the XANES spectra of the intracellular Pu deposits was always consistent with tetravalent Pu even though the intracellular milieu is generally reducing. PMID:21755934

  10. Kinetics and intracellular location of intramolecular disulfide bond formation mediated by the cytoplasmic redox system encoded by vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bisht, Himani; Brown, Erica; Moss, Bernard

    2010-03-15

    Poxviruses encode a redox system for intramolecular disulfide bond formation in cytoplasmic domains of viral proteins. Our objectives were to determine the kinetics and intracellular location of disulfide bond formation. The vaccinia virus L1 myristoylated membrane protein, used as an example, has three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Reduced and disulfide-bonded forms of L1 were distinguished by electrophoretic mobility and reactivity with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Because disulfide bonds formed during 5 min pulse labeling with radioactive amino acids, a protocol was devised in which dithiothreitol was present at this step. Disulfide bond formation was detected by 2 min after removal of reducing agent and was nearly complete in 10 min. When the penultimate glycine residue was mutated to prevent myristoylation, L1 was mistargeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and disulfide bond formation failed to occur. These data suggested that viral membrane association was required for oxidation of L1, providing specificity for the process.

  11. Extracellular Redox Regulation of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Generation, Mitochondrial Function and Lipid Turnover in Cultured Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcus F.; Burritt, Nathan; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many tissues play an important role in metabolic homeostasis and the development of diabetes and obesity. We hypothesized that the circulating redox metabolome is a master metabolic regulatory system that impacts all organs and modulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, energy production and changes in lipid turnover in many cells including adipocytes. Methods Differentiated human preadipocytes were exposed to the redox couples, lactate (L) and pyruvate (P), β–hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) and acetoacetate (Acoc), and the thiol-disulfides cysteine/ cystine (Cys/CySS) and GSH/GSSG for 1.5–4 hours. ROS measurements were done with CM-H2DCFDA. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) was assessed by a modification of the thiobarbituric acid method. Lipolysis was measured as glycerol release. Lipid synthesis was measured as 14C-glucose incorporated into lipid. Respiration was assessed using the SeaHorse XF24 analyzer and the proton leak was determined from the difference in respiration with oligomycin and antimycin A. Results Metabolites with increasing oxidation potentials (GSSG, CySS, Acoc) increased adipocyte ROS. In contrast, P caused a decrease in ROS compared with L. Acoc also induced a significant increase in both LPO and lipid synthesis. L and Acoc increased lipolysis. βOHB increased respiration, mainly due to an increased proton leak. GSSG, when present throughout 14 days of differentiation significantly increased fat accumulation, but not when added later. Conclusions We demonstrated that in human adipocytes changes in the external redox state impacted ROS production, LPO, energy efficiency, lipid handling, and differentiation. A more oxidized state generally led to increased ROS, LPO and lipid turnover and more reduction led to increased respiration and a proton leak. However, not all of the redox couples were the same suggesting compartmentalization. These data are consistent with the concept of the circulating redox metabolome as a

  12. Zinc and calcium modulate mitochondrial redox state and morphofunctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Mahmoud S; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-07-01

    Zinc and calcium have highly interwoven functions that are essential for cellular homeostasis. Here we first present a novel real-time flow cytometric technique to measure mitochondrial redox state and show it is modulated by zinc and calcium, individually and combined. We then assess the interactions of zinc and calcium on mitochondrial H2O2 production, membrane potential (ΔΨm), morphological status, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), complex I activity, and structural integrity. Whereas zinc at low doses and both cations at high doses individually and combined promoted H2O2 production, the two cations individually did not alter mitochondrial redox state. However, when combined at low and high doses the two cations synergistically suppressed and promoted, respectively, mitochondrial shift to a more oxidized state. Surprisingly, the antioxidants vitamin E and N-acetylcysteine showed pro-oxidant activity at low doses, whereas at high antioxidant doses NAC inhibited OXPHOS and dyscoupled mitochondria. Individually, zinc was more potent than calcium in inhibiting OXPHOS, whereas calcium more potently dissipated the ΔΨm and altered mitochondrial volume and ultrastructure. The two cations synergistically inhibited OXPHOS but antagonistically dissipated ΔΨm and altered mitochondrial volume and morphology. Overall, our study highlights the importance of zinc and calcium in mitochondrial redox regulation and functional integrity. Importantly, we uncovered previously unrecognized bidirectional interactions of zinc and calcium that reveal distinctive foci for modulating mitochondrial function in normal and disease states because they are potentially protective or damaging depending on conditions.

  13. An intracellular redox sensor for reactive oxygen species at the M3-M4 linker of GABAAρ1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán González, Andrea N; Gasulla, Javier; Calvo, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are normally involved in cell oxidative stress but also play a role as cellular messengers in redox signalling; for example, modulating the activity of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels. However, the direct actions of ROS on GABAA receptors were not previously demonstrated. In the present work, we studied the effects of ROS on GABAAρ1 receptor function. Experimental Approach GABAAρ1 receptors were expressed in oocytes and GABA-evoked responses electrophysiologically recorded in the presence or absence of ROS. Chemical protection of cysteines by selective sulfhydryl reagents and site-directed mutagenesis studies were used to identify protein residues involved in ROS actions. Key Results GABAAρ1 receptor-mediated responses were significantly enhanced in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner by H2O2. Potentiating effects were attenuated by a free radical scavenger, lipoic acid or an inhibitor of the Fenton reaction, deferoxamine. Each ρ1 subunit contains only three cysteine residues, two extracellular at the Cys-loop (C177 and C191) and one intracellular (C364) at the M3-M4 linker. Mutant GABAAρ1 receptors in which C364 was exchanged by alanine were completely insensitive to modulation, implying that this site, rather than a cysteine in the Cys-loop, is essential for ROS modulation. Conclusion and Implications Our results show that the function of GABAAρ1 receptors is enhanced by ROS and that the intracellular C364 is the sensor for ROS actions. PMID:24428763

  14. Redox state of earth's upper mantle from kimberlitic ilmenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.; Tompkins, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    Temperatures and oxygen fugacities are reported on discrete ilmenite nodules in kimberlites from West Africa which demonstrate that the source region in the upper mantle is moderately oxidized, consistent with other nodule suites in kimberlites from southern Africa and the United States. A model is presented for a variety of tectonic settings, proposing that the upper mantle is profiled in redox potential, oxidized in the fertile asthenosphere but reduced in the depleted lithosphere.

  15. Monitoring and validating active site redox states in protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hough, Michael A

    2011-06-01

    High resolution protein crystallography using synchrotron radiation is one of the most powerful tools in modern biology. Improvements in resolution have arisen from the use of X-ray beamlines with higher brightness and flux and the development of advanced detectors. However, it is increasingly recognised that the benefits brought by these advances have an associated cost, namely deleterious effects of X-ray radiation on the sample (radiation damage). In particular, X-ray induced reduction and damage to redox centres has been shown to occur much more rapidly than other radiation damage effects, such as loss of resolution or damage to disulphide bridges. Selection of an appropriate combination of in-situ single crystal spectroscopies during crystallographic experiments, such as UV-visible absorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS), allows for effective monitoring of redox states in protein crystals in parallel with structure determination. Such approaches are also essential in cases where catalytic intermediate species are generated by exposure to the X-ray beam. In this article, we provide a number of examples in which multiple single crystal spectroscopies have been key to understanding the redox status of Fe and Cu centres in crystal structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

  16. Control of Trx1 redox state modulates protection against methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage via stabilization of p21.

    PubMed

    Gu, Li; Gao, Wei; Yang, Hui Min; Wang, Bei Bei; Wang, Xiao Na; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) is known to play an important role in protecting against cell death. However, the mechanism for control of Trx1 in cell death resulting from DNA damage has not been fully investigated. In this study, we used the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) to investigate the protective effects of Trx1 against DNA damage and cell death in HEK293 cells. We found that MMS application caused dose-dependent changes in the Trx1 redox state determined by redox western blotting. At lower concentrations, both reduced and oxidized Trx1 were observed, whereas the reduced band was fully oxidized at the higher concentration. Trx1 overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown in cells revealed that reduced Trx1 after exposure to lower doses of MMS attenuated DNA damage, assessed by comet assay, and level of the DNA-damage marker histone γ-H2AX, possibly through scavenging intracellular ROS and an increase in p21 protein level via enhancing its stability. However, oxidized Trx1 lost its protective ability to DNA damage in response to higher concentration of MMS. Corresponding to the redox state control of Trx1, cell death induced by different dose of MMS was also found, by inhibiting phosphorylations of p38 and 4E-BP1. These results indicate that reduced Trx1 plays important protective roles against MMS-induced DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that cell protection is regulated by the intracellular redox state. Control of the redox state of Trx1 and its regulating proteins may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the control of cancer.

  17. The redox switch/redox coupling hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, Sebastián; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Sierra, Alejandra; Benito, Marina; Fonseca, Luis L; Fonseca, Carla P; García-Martín, María L

    2006-01-01

    We provide an integrative interpretation of neuroglial metabolic coupling including the presence of subcellular compartmentation of pyruvate and monocarboxylate recycling through the plasma membrane of both neurons and glial cells. The subcellular compartmentation of pyruvate allows neurons and astrocytes to select between glucose and lactate as alternative substrates, depending on their relative extracellular concentration and the operation of a redox switch. This mechanism is based on the inhibition of glycolysis at the level of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by NAD(+) limitation, under sufficiently reduced cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH redox conditions. Lactate and pyruvate recycling through the plasma membrane allows the return to the extracellular medium of cytosolic monocarboxylates enabling their transcellular, reversible, exchange between neurons and astrocytes. Together, intracellular pyruvate compartmentation and monocarboxylate recycling result in an effective transcellular coupling between the cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH redox states of both neurons and glial cells. Following glutamatergic neurotransmission, increased glutamate uptake by the astrocytes is proposed to augment glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, balancing to a reduced cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH in the glia. Reducing equivalents are transferred then to the neuron resulting in a reduced neuronal NAD(+)/NADH redox state. This may eventually switch off neuronal glycolysis, favoring the oxidation of extracellular lactate in the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) equilibrium and in the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycles. Finally, pyruvate derived from neuronal lactate oxidation, may return to the extracellular space and to the astrocyte, restoring the basal redox state and beginning a new loop of the lactate/pyruvate transcellular coupling cycle. Transcellular redox coupling operates through the plasma membrane transporters of monocarboxylates, similarly to the intracellular redox shuttles

  18. Dietary restriction in cerebral bioenergetics and redox state.

    PubMed

    Amigo, Ignacio; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2014-01-01

    The brain has a central role in the regulation of energy stability of the organism. It is the organ with the highest energetic demands, the most susceptible to energy deficits, and is responsible for coordinating behavioral and physiological responses related to food foraging and intake. Dietary interventions have been shown to be a very effective means to extend lifespan and delay the appearance of age-related pathological conditions, notably those associated with brain functional decline. The present review focuses on the effects of these interventions on brain metabolism and cerebral redox state, and summarizes the current literature dealing with dietary interventions on brain pathology. PMID:24563846

  19. Establishment of a system for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum redox state in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanekura, Kohsuke; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Merksamer, Philip I.; Papa, Feroz R.; Urano, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) performs a critical role in the oxidative folding of nascent proteins such that perturbations to ER homeostasis may lead to protein misfolding and subsequent pathological processes. Among the mechanisms for maintaining ER homeostasis is a redox regulation, which is a critical determinant of the fate of ER stressed cells. Here we report the establishment of a system for monitoring ER redox state in mammalian cells. The new ER redox sensing system was developed based on the previously described monitoring system in yeast. Our system could successfully monitor the dynamic ER redox state in mammalian cells. Using this system, we find that manipulation of ER oxidases changes ER redox state. The mammalian ER redox sensing system could be used to study the mechanisms of ER redox regulation and provide a foundation for an approach to develop novel therapeutic modalities for human diseases related to dysregulated ER homeostasis including diabetes, neurodegeneration and Wolfram syndrome. PMID:24042438

  20. Thiol switches in redox regulation of chloroplasts: balancing redox state, metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-05-01

    In photosynthesizing chloroplasts, rapidly changing energy input, intermediate generation of strong reductants as well as oxidants and multiple participating physicochemical processes and pathways, call for efficient regulation. Coupling redox information to protein function via thiol modifications offers a powerful mechanism to activate, down-regulate and coordinate interdependent processes. Efficient thiol switching of target proteins involves the thiol-disulfide redox regulatory network, which is highly elaborated in chloroplasts. This review addresses the features of this network. Its conditional function depends on specificity of reduction and oxidation reactions and pathways, thiol redox buffering, but also formation of heterogeneous milieus by microdomains, metabolite gradients and macromolecular assemblies. One major player is glutathione. Its synthesis and function is under feedback redox control. The number of thiol-controlled processes and involved thiol switched proteins is steadily increasing, e.g., in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, plastid transcription and plastid translation. Thus chloroplasts utilize an intricate and versatile redox regulatory network for intraorganellar and retrograde communication.

  1. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  2. Feasibility of assessing health state by detecting redox state of human body based on Chinese medicine constitution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Ru; Wang, Qi; Wang, Ji; Wang, Qian-Fei; Yang, Ling-Ling; Zheng, Lu-Yu; Zhang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    This article discussed the feasibility of assessing health state by detecting redox state of human body. Firstly, the balance of redox state is the basis of homeostasis, and the balance ability of redox can reflflect health state of human body. Secondly, the redox state of human body is a sensitive index of multiple risk factors of health such as age, external environment and psychological factors. It participates in the occurrence and development of multiple diseases involving metabolic diseases and nervous system diseases, and can serve as a cut-in point for treatment of these diseases. Detecting the redox state of high risk people is signifificantly important for early detection and treatment of disease. The blood plasma and urine could be selected to detect, which is convenient. It is pointed that the indexes not only involve oxidation product and antioxidant enzyme but also redox couple. Chinese medicine constitution reflflects the state of body itself and the ability of adapting to external environment, which is consistent with the connotation of health. It is found that there are nine basic types of constitution in Chinese population, which provides a theoretical basis of health preservation, preventive treatment of disease and personalized treatment. With the combination of redox state detection and the Chinese medicine constitution theory, the heath state can be systemically assessed by conducting large-scale epidemiological survey with classifified detection on redox state of human body.

  3. Evolution of Fe redox state in serpentine during subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debret, Baptiste; Andreani, Muriel; Muñoz, Manuel; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Carlut, Julie; Nicollet, Christian; Schwartz, Stéphane; Trcera, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Serpentinites are an important component of the oceanic lithosphere that formed at slow to ultra-slow spreading centers. Serpentine could thus be one of the most abundant hydrous minerals recycled into the mantle in subduction zones. Prograde metamorphism in subducted serpentinites is characterized by the destabilization of lizardite into antigorite, and then into secondary olivine. The nature of the fluid released during these phase transitions is controlled by redox reactions and can be inferred from oxidation state of Fe in serpentine minerals. We used bulk rock analyses, magnetic measurements, SEM observations and μXANES spectroscopy to establish the evolution of Fe2O3Tot(BR) and magnetite content in serpentinite and Fe oxidation state in serpentine minerals from ridge to subduction settings. At mid-ocean ridges, during the alteration of peridotite into serpentinite, iron is mainly redistributed between magnetite and oceanic serpentine (usually lizardite). The Fe3+/FeTotal ratio in lizardite and the modal percentage of magnetite progressively increase with the degree of local serpentinization to maxima of about 0.8 and 7 wt%, respectively, in fully serpentinized peridotites. During subduction, the Fe2O3Tot(BR) of serpentinite remains constant (∼7-10 wt%, depending on the initial Fe content of the peridotite) while the modal percentage of magnetite decreases to less than 2% in eclogite facies rocks. The Fe3+/FeTotal ratio in serpentine also decreases down to 0.2-0.4 in antigorite at eclogite facies. Our results show that, in the first 70 km of subduction, the transition from lizardite to antigorite is accompanied by a reduction of Fe in bulk rock samples and in serpentine minerals. This redox reaction might be coupled with the oxidation of reduced oceanic phases such as sulfides, and the formation of oxidized fluids (e.g. SOX, H2O, COX). At greater depths, the beginning of antigorite dehydration leads to an increase of Fe3+/FeTotal in relict antigorite, in

  4. An evaluation of the redox state in professional scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Radojevic-Popovic, Radmila; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jeremic, Nevena; Sretenovic, Jasmina; Velicanin, Nevena; Bradic, Jovana; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Taking into consideration limited data regarding molecular interactions during and after diving, this investigation was intended to determine the oxidative status of divers before and after scuba diving by monitoring the oxidative status parameters. The prevalence study included a group of 32 male professional police scuba divers, 32 ± 5.1 years old. The examination took place twice: in a resting state before scuba diving and immediately after the dive (to 30 meters for 30 minutes). The oxidative status of the scuba divers was determined by measuring levels of the following oxidative stress markers: the index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS), nitrites (NO2-), superoxide anion radical (O2*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). Statistically significant increases in levels of NO2- and TBARS were observed after the dive, while there were no statistically relevant changes in levels of O2*-, H2O2, SOD and CAT. Our results have shown that a dive with these characteristics only slightly disturbs redox homeostasis, without serious intermolecular changes that can lead to prominent oxidative stress. PMID:26591980

  5. An evaluation of the redox state in professional scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Radojevic-Popovic, Radmila; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jeremic, Nevena; Sretenovic, Jasmina; Velicanin, Nevena; Bradic, Jovana; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Taking into consideration limited data regarding molecular interactions during and after diving, this investigation was intended to determine the oxidative status of divers before and after scuba diving by monitoring the oxidative status parameters. The prevalence study included a group of 32 male professional police scuba divers, 32 ± 5.1 years old. The examination took place twice: in a resting state before scuba diving and immediately after the dive (to 30 meters for 30 minutes). The oxidative status of the scuba divers was determined by measuring levels of the following oxidative stress markers: the index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS), nitrites (NO2-), superoxide anion radical (O2*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). Statistically significant increases in levels of NO2- and TBARS were observed after the dive, while there were no statistically relevant changes in levels of O2*-, H2O2, SOD and CAT. Our results have shown that a dive with these characteristics only slightly disturbs redox homeostasis, without serious intermolecular changes that can lead to prominent oxidative stress.

  6. Redox state of plutonium in irradiated mixed oxide fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Pin, S.; Poonoosamy, J.; Kulik, D. A.

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, MOX fuels are used in about 20 nuclear power plants around the world. After irradiation, plutonium co-exists with uranium oxide. Due to the redox sensitive nature of UO2 other plutonium oxides than PuO2 potentially present in the fuel may interact with the matrix. The aim of this study is to determine which plutonium species are present in heterogeneous and homogeneous MOX. The results provided by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) for non-irradiated as well as irradiated (center and periphery) homogeneous MOX fuel were published earlier and are completed by Extended X-ray Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis in this work. The EXAFS signals have been extracted using the ATHENA code and the analyses were carried using EXCURE98 as performed earlier for an analogous element. EXAFS shows that plutonium redox state remains tetravalent in the solid solution and that the minor fraction of trivalent Pu must be below 10%. Independently, the study of homogeneous MOX was also approached by thermodynamics of solid solution of (U,Pu)O2. Such solid solutions were modeled using the Gibbs Energy Minimisation (GEM)-Selektor code (developed at LES, NES, PSI) supported by the literature data on such solid solutions. A comparative study was performed showing which plutonium oxides in their respective mole fractions are more likely to occur in (U,Pu)O2. In the modeling, these oxides were set as ideal and non-ideal solid solutions, as well as separate pure phases. Pu exists mainly as PuO2 in the case of separate phases, but can exist under its reduced forms, PuO1.61 and PuO1.5 in minor fraction i.e. ~15% in ideal solid solution (unlikely) and ~10% in non-ideal solid solution (likely) and at temperature around 1300 K. This combined thermodynamic and EXAFS studies confirm independently the results obtained so far by Pu XANES for the same MOX samples.

  7. Mantle redox evolution and the oxidation state of the Archean atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Eggler, D. H.; Raeburn, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    Current models predict that the early atmosphere consisted mostly of CO2, N2, and H2O, along with traces of H2 and CO. Such models are based on the assumption that the redox state of the upper mantle has not changed, so that volcanic gas composition has remained approximately constant with time. We argue here that this assumption is probably incorrect: the upper mantle was originally more reduced than today, although not as reduced as the metal arrest level, and has become progressively more oxidized as a consequence of the release of reduced volcanic gases and the subduction of hydrated, oxidized seafloor. Data on the redox state of sulfide and chromite inclusions in diamonds imply that the process of mantle oxidation was slow, so that reduced conditions could have prevailed for as much as half of the earth's history. To be sure, other oxybarometers of ancient rocks give different results, so the question of when the mantle redox state has changed remains unresolved. Mantle redox evolution is intimately linked to the oxidation state of the primitive atmosphere: A reduced Archean atmosphere would have had a high hydrogen escape rate and should correspond to a changing mantle redox state; an oxidized Archean atmosphere should be associated with a constant mantle redox state. The converses of these statements are also true. Finally, our theory of mantle redox evolution may explain why the Archean atmosphere remained oxygen-deficient until approximately 2.0 billion years ago (Ga) despite a probable early origin for photosynthesis.

  8. Redox Conditions in Selected Principal Aquifers of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Cowdery, T.K.; Chapelle, F.H.; Jurgens, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) processes affect the quality of groundwater in all aquifer systems. Redox processes can alternately mobilize or immobilize potentially toxic metals associated with naturally occurring aquifer materials, contribute to the degradation or preservation of anthropogenic contami-nants, and generate undesirable byproducts, such as dissolved manganese (Mn2+), ferrous iron (Fe2+), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Determining the kinds of redox processes that occur in an aquifer system, documenting their spatial distribution, and understanding how they affect concentrations of natural or anthropogenic contaminants are central to assessing and predicting the chemical quality of groundwater. This Fact Sheet extends the analysis of U.S. Geological Survey authors to additional principal aquifer systems by applying a framework developed by the USGS to a larger set of water-quality data from the USGS national water databases. For a detailed explanation, see the 'Introduction' in the Fact Sheet.

  9. Modification of the redox state of cytochrome c oxidase of rice due to certain stress treatments.

    PubMed

    Dhage, A R; Desai, B B; Naik, R M; Munjal, S V; Naik, M S

    1992-10-01

    The redox state of cytochrome alpha 3 during in situ respiration of leaves of 20-day-old rice seedlings was assessed by in vivo aerobic assay of nitrate reductase, after 1 min exposure to carbon monoxide. Different stress treatments like water and salt stresses, disintegration of leaf tissues and darkness modified the redox state of cytochrome c oxidase. The dark treatment altered the redox state of cytochrome oxidase from reduced to the oxidized state, as judged by its reaction with CO in CO-sensitive rice cultivar. The water and salt stresses as well as the disintegration of leaf tissue on the contrary altered cytochrome oxidase from the oxidized to its reduced state in CO-insensitive cultivars; probably by changing the cellular integrity, turgidity and structure of mitochondrial membrane, and also due to decreased mitochondrial energization.

  10. Noninvasive optical cytochrome c oxidase redox state measurements using diffuse optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Yoon, David; Boss, Gerry R.; Patterson, Steven E.; Rockwood, Gary; Isom, Gary; Brenner, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A major need exists for methods to assess organ oxidative metabolic states in vivo. By contrasting the responses to cyanide (CN) poisoning versus hemorrhage in animal models, we demonstrate that diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) can detect cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) redox states. Intermittent decreases in inspired O2 from 100% to 21% were applied before, during, and after CN poisoning, hemorrhage, and resuscitation in rabbits. Continuous DOS measurements of total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxidized and reduced CcO from muscle were obtained. Rabbit hemorrhage was accomplished with stepwise removal of blood, followed by blood resuscitation. CN treated rabbits received 0.166 mg/min NaCN infusion. During hemorrhage, CcO redox state became reduced concurrently with decreases in oxyhemoglobin, resulting from reduced tissue oxygen delivery and hypoxia. In contrast, during CN infusion, CcO redox state decreased while oxyhemoglobin concentration increased due to CN binding and reduction of CcO with resultant inhibition of the electron transport chain. Spectral absorption similarities between hemoglobin and CcO make noninvasive spectroscopic distinction of CcO redox states difficult. By contrasting physiological perturbations of CN poisoning versus hemorrhage, we demonstrate that DOS measured CcO redox state changes are decoupled from hemoglobin concentration measurement changes.

  11. Hypokinesia of myocardium of perfused rat heart at different oxygenation of myoglobin and redox state of cytochrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.; Zuendorf, J.; Tauschek, D.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Questions about development of hypo-kinetic zones in myocardium of patients suffering from severe coronary heart disease are discussed controversially among heart surgeons. We established a model for isolated and hemoglobin free perfusion of rat heart in which sufficient flow was established within all capillaries and thus existence of ischemic capillaries could be excluded. A definite diagnosis of tissue anoxia is only possible by optical measurements of the oxidation and the reduction (redox state) of the cytochrome oxidase of intact myocytes. Therefore, we used an EMPHO for this kind of measurements. Intracellular oxygenation of myoglobin oxygenation (MbO2) and redox state of cytochrome aa3, b and c were recorded in the outer wall of working, hypo-kinetic and a-kinetic myocardium. As a result of our investigations we were able to prove that by lowering at the venous end of capillaries tissue pO2 and myoglobin oxygenation stepwise below 5 mmHg and 50% of saturation respectively, a continuous decrease of myocardial contractility could be achieved.

  12. Quantum-dot/dopamine bioconjugates function as redox coupled assemblies for in vitro and intracellular pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Stewart, Michael H.; Trammell, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B.; Mei, Bing C.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2010-08-01

    The use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for bioimaging and sensing has progressively matured over the past decade. QDs are highly sensitive to charge-transfer processes, which can alter their optical properties. Here, we demonstrate that QD-dopamine-peptide bioconjugates can function as charge-transfer coupled pH sensors. Dopamine is normally characterized by two intrinsic redox properties: a Nernstian dependence of formal potential on pH and oxidation of hydroquinone to quinone by O2 at basic pH. We show that the latter quinone can function as an electron acceptor quenching QD photoluminescence in a manner that depends directly on pH. We characterize the pH-dependent QD quenching using both electrochemistry and spectroscopy. QD-dopamine conjugates were also used as pH sensors that measured changes in cytoplasmic pH as cells underwent drug-induced alkalosis. A detailed mechanism describing the QD quenching processes that is consistent with dopamine's inherent redox chemistry is presented.

  13. Application of iTRAQ Reagents to Relatively Quantify the Reversible Redox State of Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Brian; Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Vázquez, Jesús; Padilla, C. Alicia; Sheehan, David; Bárcena, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Cysteines are one of the most rarely used amino acids, but when conserved in proteins they often play critical roles in structure, function, or regulation. Reversible cysteine modifications allow for potential redox regulation of proteins. Traditional measurement of the relative absolute quantity of a protein between two samples is not always necessarily proportional to the activity of the protein. We propose application of iTRAQ reagents in combination with a previous thiol selection method to relatively quantify the redox state of cysteines both within and between samples in a single analysis. Our method allows for the identification of the proteins, identification of redox-sensitive cysteines within proteins, and quantification of the redox status of individual cysteine-containing peptides. As a proof of principle, we applied this technique to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase-1 exposed in vitro to H2O2 and also in vivo to the complex proteome of the Gram-negative bacterium Bacillus subtilis. PMID:22844595

  14. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin System as a Modulator of Cyclophilin D Redox State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folda, Alessandra; Citta, Anna; Scalcon, Valeria; Calì, Tito; Zonta, Francesco; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2016-03-01

    The mitochondrial thioredoxin system (NADPH, thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin) is a major redox regulator. Here we have investigated the redox correlation between this system and the mitochondrial enzyme cyclophilin D. The peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilin D was stimulated by the thioredoxin system, while it was decreased by cyclosporin A and the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin. The redox state of cyclophilin D, thioredoxin 1 and 2 and peroxiredoxin 3 was measured in isolated rat heart mitochondria and in tumor cell lines (CEM-R and HeLa) by redox Western blot analysis upon inhibition of thioredoxin reductase with auranofin, arsenic trioxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A concomitant oxidation of thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin and cyclophilin D was observed, suggesting a redox communication between the thioredoxin system and cyclophilin. This correlation was further confirmed by i) co-immunoprecipitation assay of cyclophilin D with thioredoxin 2 and peroxiredoxin 3, ii) molecular modeling and iii) depleting thioredoxin reductase by siRNA. We conclude that the mitochondrial thioredoxin system controls the redox state of cyclophilin D which, in turn, may act as a regulator of several processes including ROS production and pro-apoptotic factors release.

  15. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin System as a Modulator of Cyclophilin D Redox State

    PubMed Central

    Folda, Alessandra; Citta, Anna; Scalcon, Valeria; Calì, Tito; Zonta, Francesco; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial thioredoxin system (NADPH, thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin) is a major redox regulator. Here we have investigated the redox correlation between this system and the mitochondrial enzyme cyclophilin D. The peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilin D was stimulated by the thioredoxin system, while it was decreased by cyclosporin A and the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin. The redox state of cyclophilin D, thioredoxin 1 and 2 and peroxiredoxin 3 was measured in isolated rat heart mitochondria and in tumor cell lines (CEM-R and HeLa) by redox Western blot analysis upon inhibition of thioredoxin reductase with auranofin, arsenic trioxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A concomitant oxidation of thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin and cyclophilin D was observed, suggesting a redox communication between the thioredoxin system and cyclophilin. This correlation was further confirmed by i) co-immunoprecipitation assay of cyclophilin D with thioredoxin 2 and peroxiredoxin 3, ii) molecular modeling and iii) depleting thioredoxin reductase by siRNA. We conclude that the mitochondrial thioredoxin system controls the redox state of cyclophilin D which, in turn, may act as a regulator of several processes including ROS production and pro-apoptotic factors release. PMID:26975474

  16. Extrinsic periodic information interpolates between monostable and bistable states in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2015-06-01

    Extrinsic periodic information including physiological cyclical and circadian replacement would affect inevitably a real cell, in this paper we investigate the effect of extrinsic periodic information on intracellular calcium dynamics by means of second-order algorithm for stochastic simulation colored noises. By simulating time evolutions and stationary probability distribution of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, the results show: (i) intracellular calcium oscillation between cytosol and calcium store shows synchronous and anti-synchronous oscillation as intensity and frequency of extrinsic periodic information vary; (ii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from bistable state → monostable state → bistable state → monostable state as frequency of extrinsic periodic information increases; (iii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from monostable state → bistable state as intensity of extrinsic periodic information increases.

  17. New redox states observed in [FeFe] hydrogenases reveal redox coupling within the H-cluster.

    PubMed

    Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Krawietz, Danuta; Siebel, Judith; Weber, Katharina; Happe, Thomas; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-08-13

    Active [FeFe] hydrogenases can be obtained by expressing the unmaturated enzyme in Escherichia coli followed by incubation with a synthetic precursor of the binuclear [2Fe] subcluster, namely: [NEt4]2[Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2] (adt = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)). The binuclear subsite Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 is attached through a bridging cysteine side chain to a [4Fe-4S] subcluster already present in the unmaturated enzyme thus yielding the intact native "H-cluster". We present FTIR electrochemical studies of the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrHydA1, maturated with the precursor of the native cofactor [Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) as well as a non-natural variant [Fe2(pdt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) in which the bridging amine functionality is replaced by CH2. The obtained active enzyme CrHydA1(adt) shows the same redox states in the respective potential range as observed for the native system (E(ox/red) = -400 mV, E(red/sred) = -470 mV). For the Hox → Hred transition the reducing equivalent is stored on the binuclear part, ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(II)Fe(I) → [4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(I)), while the Hred → Hsred transition is characterized by a reduction of the [4Fe-4S] part of the H-cluster ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(I) → [4Fe-4S](+)Fe(I)Fe(I)). A similar transition is reported here for the CO inhibited state of the H-cluster: ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(II)CO → [4Fe-4S](+)Fe(I)Fe(II)CO). An FTIR electrochemical study of the inactive variant with the pdt ligand, CrHydA1(pdt), identified two redox states H(pdt)-ox and H(pdt)-"red". Both EPR and FTIR spectra of H(pdt)-ox are virtually identical to those of the H(adt)-ox and the native Hox state. The H(pdt)-"red" state is also characterized by a reduced [4Fe-4S] subcluster. In contrast to CrHydA1(adt), the H(pdt)-ox state of CrHydA1(pdt) is stable up to rather high potentials (+200 mV). This study demonstrates the distinct redox coupling between the two parts of the H-cluster and confirms that the [4Fe-4S]H subsite is also redox active and as

  18. Measuring the redox state of cellular peroxiredoxins by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2010-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of thiol peroxidases that scavenge hydroperoxides and peroxynitrite. The abundance and reactivity of these proteins makes them primary targets for cellular H(2)O(2). The catalytic cycle of typical 2-Cys Prxs involves formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond between peroxidatic and resolving cysteines on opposing subunits. Rapid alterations in the ratio of reduced monomer and oxidized dimer have been detected in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of cultured cells exposed to various exogenous and endogenous sources of oxidative stress. Here we describe immunoblot methods to monitor the interconversion of individual 2-Cys Prxs in cultured cells. We also outline an adaptation of this method to measure the extent to which individual 2-Cys Prxs become hyper oxidized in treated cells. Together, these methods enable the redox status of cellular Prxs to be assessed and quantified in a rapid and robust manner. PMID:20609904

  19. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    PubMed

    Chausse, Bruno; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Sanchez, Angélica B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR) and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart. PMID:25749501

  20. Light, redox state, thylakoid-protein phosphorylation and signaling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zer, Hagit; Ohad, Itzhak

    2003-09-01

    Two recent publications concerning the chloroplast membrane-protein phosphorylation and state transition might lead to further progress in the elucidation of the mechanism and role of this process. A thylakoid-bound protein TSP9 is released to the chloroplast matrix upon redox-dependent stepwise phosphorylation of three threonine sites and might signal redox-dependent gene transcription. The state-transition process and phosphorylation of the light-harvesting complex II require the activity of a novel protein kinase Stt7. PMID:13678955

  1. Crosstalk of Signaling and Metabolism Mediated by the NAD(+)/NADH Redox State in Brain Cells.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ulrike; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The energy metabolism of the brain has to be precisely adjusted to activity to cope with the organ's energy demand, implying that signaling regulates metabolism and metabolic states feedback to signaling. The NAD(+)/NADH redox state constitutes a metabolic node well suited for integration of metabolic and signaling events. It is affected by flux through metabolic pathways within a cell, but also by the metabolic state of neighboring cells, for example by lactate transferred between cells. Furthermore, signaling events both in neurons and astrocytes have been reported to change the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. Vice versa, a number of signaling events like astroglial Ca(2+) signals, neuronal NMDA-receptors as well as the activity of transcription factors are modulated by the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. In this short review, this bidirectional interdependence of signaling and metabolism involving the NAD(+)/NADH redox state as well as its potential relevance for the physiology of the brain and the whole organism in respect to blood glucose regulation and body weight control are discussed.

  2. Mapping the Redox State of CHOP-Treated Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Xenografts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, He N.; Mir, Tahreem A.; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Feng, Min; Farhad, Namisa; Choe, Regine; Glickson, Jerry D.; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-01-01

    Drug treatment may alter the metabolism of cancer cells and may alter the mitochondrial redox state. Using the redox scanner that collects the fluorescence signals from both the oxidized flavoproteins (Fp) and the reduced form of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in snap-frozen tumor tissues, we investigated the effects of chemotherapy on mouse xenografts of a human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line (DLCL2). The mice in the treatment group were treated with CHOP – cyclophosphamide (C) + hydroxydoxorubicin (H) + Oncovin (O) + prednisone (P) using the following regimen: CHO administration on day 1 followed by prednisone administration on day 1–5. On day 5 the mitochondrial redox state of the treated group was slightly more reduced than that of the control group (p = 0.049), and the Fp content of the treated group was significantly decreased (p = 0.033). PMID:23852501

  3. Iron isotope constraints on the Archean and Paleoproterozoic ocean redox state.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Olivier J; Bekker, Andrey; Edwards, Katrina J

    2005-02-18

    The response of the ocean redox state to the rise of atmospheric oxygen about 2.3 billion years ago (Ga) is a matter of controversy. Here we provide iron isotope evidence that the change in the ocean iron cycle occurred at the same time as the change in the atmospheric redox state. Variable and negative iron isotope values in pyrites older than about 2.3 Ga suggest that an iron-rich global ocean was strongly affected by the deposition of iron oxides. Between 2.3 and 1.8 Ga, positive iron isotope values of pyrite likely reflect an increase in the precipitation of iron sulfides relative to iron oxides in a redox stratified ocean. PMID:15718467

  4. Iron isotope constraints on the Archean and Paleoproterozoic ocean redox state.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Olivier J; Bekker, Andrey; Edwards, Katrina J

    2005-02-18

    The response of the ocean redox state to the rise of atmospheric oxygen about 2.3 billion years ago (Ga) is a matter of controversy. Here we provide iron isotope evidence that the change in the ocean iron cycle occurred at the same time as the change in the atmospheric redox state. Variable and negative iron isotope values in pyrites older than about 2.3 Ga suggest that an iron-rich global ocean was strongly affected by the deposition of iron oxides. Between 2.3 and 1.8 Ga, positive iron isotope values of pyrite likely reflect an increase in the precipitation of iron sulfides relative to iron oxides in a redox stratified ocean.

  5. Disrupted intracellular redox balance of the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens by 5-nitroimidazoles and garlic-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Lloyd, D; Kolarich, D; Alagesan, K; Duchêne, M; Cable, J; Williams, D; Leitsch, D

    2012-11-23

    The 5-nitroimidazole, metronidazole, has traditionally been employed in veterinary medicine to treat a range of infections including the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus. This study aims to determine the mode of action of metronidazole on Spironucleus vortens, including the specific mechanism of activation of the pro-drug and subsequent cellular targets of the drug metabolites. Due to the ban on use of metronidazole in the treatment of production animals in Europe and USA, garlic-derived compounds were also investigated as natural alternatives to metronidazole chemotherapy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided an overview of gross cellular damage caused by metronidazole and garlic derivatives. Proteomic analyses by 2D gel electrophoresis identified the proteins involved in specific covalent adduct formation with nitroimidazoles. Furthermore, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and non-protein thiol concentration were assayed in extracts of S. vortens before and after treatment with nitroimidazoles and garlic-derivatives. Metronidazole and garlic-derived compounds caused severe damage of trophozoites indicated by membrane blebbing and lysed cell debris. Analysis of the S. vortens proteome identified several proteins capable of specific nitroimidazole binding, including; uridine phosphorylase, enolase, protein disulphide isomerase, aminoacyl-histidine dipeptidase and malic enzyme. Of the compounds tested, metronidazole and the garlic-derived compound ajoene were the most effective at inhibiting TrxR activity and depleting non-protein thiols. These data suggest TrxR-mediated activation of nitroimidazoles, leading to depletion of non-protein thiols. Redox imbalance due to antioxidant failure is implicated as the mode of action of nitroimidazoles and garlic-derived compounds, ultimately leading to cell death. Possible synergy between garlic derivatives and metronidazole should be further investigated in vitro in order to determine their theoretical

  6. Intracellular redox-responsive nanocarrier for plasmid delivery: in vitro characterization and in vivo studies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifen; Zhang, Yushun; Chen, Zhenzhen; He, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Although some modifications of polyethyleneimine (PEI) properties have been explored to balance the transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity, its successful plasmid delivery in vitro and in vivo to realize its true therapeutic potentials remains a major challenge, mainly due to intracellular trafficking barriers. Herein, we present a delivery nanocarrier Pluronic-PEI-SS by conjugating reducible disulfide-linked PEI (PEI-SS) to biocompatible Pluronic for enhanced DNA delivery and transfection efficiency in vitro and in vivo. Pluronic-PEI-SS strongly condensed plasmid DNA to low positively charged nanocomplexes, exhibited good stability against deoxyribonuclease I digestion, and tended to be easily degraded in the presence of reducing agent 1,4-dithiothreitol. The in vitro transfection of the complex Pluronic-PEI-SS/DNA into HeLa and 293T cells resulted in lower cytotoxicity as well as significantly higher cellular uptake, nucleus transfection, and gene expression than Pluronic-PEI (25 kDa), PEI-SS, and PEI 25 kDa given alone. Furthermore, the in vivo transfection study demonstrated that Pluronic-PEI-SS/DNA complexes induced a higher enrichment than the commercial PEI/DNA complex in the tumor, indicating their potential application as biocompatible vector in gene delivery. PMID:27785025

  7. Oxidation of Plasma Cysteine/Cystine Redox State in Endotoxin-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Smita S.; Jones, Dean P.; Brigham, Kenneth L.; Rojas, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that perturbations in the extracellular thiol/disulfide redox environment correlate with the progression and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Cysteine (Cys) and its disulfide Cystine (CySS) constitute the most abundant, low-molecular-weight thiol/disulfide redox couple in the plasma, and Cys homeostasis is adversely affected during the inflammatory response to infection and injury. While much emphasis has been placed on glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), little is known about the regulation of the Cys/CySS couple in ALI. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether endotoxin administration causes a decrease in Cys and/or an oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox state (Eh Cys/CySS), and to determine whether these changes were associated with changes in plasma Eh GSH/GSSG. Mice received endotoxin intraperitoneally, and GSH and Cys redox states were measured at time points known to correlate with the progression of endotoxin-induced lung injury. Eh in mV was calculated using Cys, CySS, GSH, and GSSG values by high-performance liquid chromatography and the Nernst equation. We observed distinct effects of endotoxin on the GSH and Cys redox systems during the acute phase; plasma Eh Cys/CySS was selectively oxidized early in response to endotoxin, while Eh GSH/GSSG remained unchanged. Unexpectedly, subsequent oxidation of Eh GSH/GSSG and Eh Cys/CySS occurred as a consequence of endotoxin-induced anorexia. Taken together, the results indicate that enhanced oxidation of Cys, altered transport of Cys and CySS, and decreased food intake each contribute to the oxidation of plasma Cys/CySS redox state in endotoxemia. PMID:18664641

  8. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Venceslau, Sofia S.; Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin S.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W.; Dahl, Christiane; Saraiva, Lígia M.; Pereira, Inês A.C.

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •DsrC is known to interact with the dissimilatory sulfite reductase enzyme (DsrAB). •We show that, however, most cellular DsrC is not associated with DsrAB. •A gel-shift assay was developed that allows monitoring of the DsrC redox state. •The DsrC intramolecularly oxidized state could only be produced by arginine treatment. -- Abstract: Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC, which has two conserved redox-active cysteines. DsrC was initially believed to be a third subunit of DsrAB. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts to show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we developed a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor the DsrC redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. The oxidized state of DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond, which is proposed to be a key metabolic intermediate, could be successfully produced for the first time by treatment with arginine.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy and cryoimaging of rat lung tissue mitochondrial redox state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Audi, S.; Staniszewski, K.; Maleki, S.; Ranji, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the utility of optical cryoimaging and fluorometry to evaluate tissue redox state of the mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) in intact rat lungs. The ratio (NADH/FAD), referred to as mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), is a measure of the lung tissue mitochondrial redox state. Isolated rat lungs were connected to a ventilation-perfused system. Surface NADH and FAD fluorescence signals were acquired before and after lung perfusion in the absence (control perfusate) or presence of potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) to reduce the mitochondrial respiratory chain (state 5 respiration). Another group of lungs were perfused with control perfusate or KCN-containing perfusate as above, after which the lungs were deflated and frozen rapidly for subsequent 3D cryoimaging. Results demonstrate that lung treatment with KCN increased lung surface NADH signal by 22%, decreased FAD signal by 8%, and as result increased RR by 31% as compared to control perfusate (baseline) values. Cryoimaging results also show that KCN increased mean lung tissue NADH signal by 37%, decreased mean FAD signal by 4%, and increased mean RR by 47%. These results demonstrate the utility of these optical techniques to evaluate the effect of pulmonary oxidative stress on tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact lungs.

  10. Redox State of Cytochromes in Frozen Yeast Cells Probed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, Konstantin A; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is a well-established technique used for the long-term storage of biological materials whose biological activity is effectively stopped under low temperatures (suspended animation). Since most biological methods do not work in a low-temperature frozen environment, the mechanism and details of the depression of cellular activity in the frozen state remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, we propose, to our knowledge, a new approach to study the downregulation of the redox activity of cytochromes b and c in freezing yeast cells in a contactless, label-free manner. Our approach is based on cytochrome photobleaching effects observed in the resonance Raman spectra of live cells. Photoinduced and native redox reactions that contributed to the photobleaching rate were studied over a wide temperature range (from -173 to +25 °C). We found that ice formation influences both the rate of cytochrome redox reactions and the balance between the reduced and oxidized cytochromes. We demonstrate that the temperature dependence of native redox reaction rates can be well described by the thermal activation law with an apparent energy of 32.5 kJ/mol, showing that the redox reaction rate is ∼10(15) times slower at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature.

  11. Redox State of Cytochromes in Frozen Yeast Cells Probed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, Konstantin A; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is a well-established technique used for the long-term storage of biological materials whose biological activity is effectively stopped under low temperatures (suspended animation). Since most biological methods do not work in a low-temperature frozen environment, the mechanism and details of the depression of cellular activity in the frozen state remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, we propose, to our knowledge, a new approach to study the downregulation of the redox activity of cytochromes b and c in freezing yeast cells in a contactless, label-free manner. Our approach is based on cytochrome photobleaching effects observed in the resonance Raman spectra of live cells. Photoinduced and native redox reactions that contributed to the photobleaching rate were studied over a wide temperature range (from -173 to +25 °C). We found that ice formation influences both the rate of cytochrome redox reactions and the balance between the reduced and oxidized cytochromes. We demonstrate that the temperature dependence of native redox reaction rates can be well described by the thermal activation law with an apparent energy of 32.5 kJ/mol, showing that the redox reaction rate is ∼10(15) times slower at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature. PMID:26636934

  12. Intracellular Redox State as Target for Anti-Influenza Therapy: Are Antioxidants Always Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Sgarbanti, Rossella; Amatore, Donatella; Celestino, Ignacio; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Fraternale, Alessandra; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Magnani, Mauro; Saladino, Raffaele; Garaci, Enrico; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Nencioni, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections represent a big issue for public health since effective treatments are still lacking. In particular, the emergence of strains resistant to drugs limits the effectiveness of anti-influenza agents. For this reason, many efforts have been dedicated to the identification of new therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting the virus-host cell interactions. Oxidative stress is a characteristic of some viral infections including influenza. Because antioxidants defend cells from damage caused by reactive oxygen species induced by different stimuli including pathogens, they represent interesting molecules to fight infectious diseases. However, most of the available studies have found that these would-be panaceas could actually exacerbate the diseases they claim to prevent, and have thus revealed "the dark side" of these molecules. This review article discusses the latest opportunities and drawbacks of the antioxidants used in anti-influenza therapy and new perspectives. PMID:25478883

  13. State of charge monitoring methods for vanadium redox flow battery control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Kazacos, Michael

    2011-10-01

    During operation of redox flow batteries, differential transfer of ions and electrolyte across the membrane and gassing side reactions during charging, can lead to an imbalance between the two half-cells that results in loss of capacity. This capacity loss can be corrected by either simple remixing of the two solutions, or by chemical or electrochemical rebalancing. In order to develop automated electrolyte management systems therefore, the state-of-charge of each half-cell electrolyte needs to be known. In this study, two state-of-charge monitoring methods are investigated for use in the vanadium redox flow battery. The first method utilizes conductivity measurements to independently measure the state-of-charge of each half-cell electrolyte. The second method is based on spectrophotometric principles and uses the different colours of the charged and discharged anolyte and catholyte to monitor system balance and state-of charge of each half-cell of the VRB during operation.

  14. Cytochrome redox states and respiratory control in mouse and beef heart mitochondria at steady-state levels of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David K; Fasching, Mario; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-11-15

    Mitochondrial control of cellular redox states is a fundamental component of cell signaling in the coordination of core energy metabolism and homeostasis during normoxia and hypoxia. We investigated the relationship between cytochrome redox states and mitochondrial oxygen consumption at steady-state levels of hypoxia in mitochondria isolated from beef and mouse heart (BHImt, MHImt), comparing two species with different cardiac dynamics and local oxygen demands. A low-noise, rapid spectrophotometric system using visible light for the measurement of cytochrome redox states was combined with high-resolution respirometry. Monophasic hyperbolic relationships were observed between oxygen consumption, JO2, and oxygen partial pressure, Po2, within the range <1.1 kPa (8.3 mmHg; 13 μM). P50j (Po2 at 0.5·Jmax) was 0.015 ± 0.0004 and 0.021 ± 0.003 kPa (0.11 and 0.16 mmHg) for BHImt and MHImt, respectively. Maximum oxygen consumption, Jmax, was measured at saturating ADP levels (OXPHOS capacity) with Complex I-linked substrate supply. Redox states of cytochromes aa3 and c were biphasic hyperbolic functions of Po2. The relationship between cytochrome oxidation state and oxygen consumption revealed a separation of distinct phases from mild to severe and deep hypoxia. When cytochrome c oxidation increased from fully reduced to 45% oxidized at 0.1 Jmax, Po2 was as low as 0.002 kPa (0.02 μM), and trace amounts of oxygen are sufficient to partially oxidize the cytochromes. At higher Po2 under severe hypoxia, respiration increases steeply, whereas redox changes are small. Under mild hypoxia, the steep slope of oxidation of cytochrome c when flux remains more stable represents a cushioning mechanism that helps to maintain respiration high at the onset of hypoxia.

  15. Can we predict the intracellular metabolic state of a cell based on extracellular metabolite data?

    PubMed

    Granucci, Ninna; Pinu, Farhana R; Han, Ting-Li; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of extracellular metabolites presents many technical advantages over the analysis of intracellular compounds, which made this approach very popular in recent years as a high-throughput tool to assess the metabolic state of microbial cells. However, very little effort has been made to determine the actual relationship between intracellular and extracellular metabolite levels. The secretion of intracellular metabolites has been traditionally interpreted as a consequence of an intracellular metabolic overflow, which is based on the premise that for a metabolite to be secreted, it must be over-produced inside the cell. Therefore, we expect to find a secreted metabolite at increased levels inside the cells. Here we present a time-series metabolomics study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-limited chemostat with parallel measurements of intra- and extracellular metabolites. Although most of the extracellular metabolites were also detected in the intracellular samples and showed a typical metabolic overflow behaviour, we demonstrate that the secretion of many metabolites could not be explained by the metabolic overflow theory. PMID:26400772

  16. Aging does not affect soluble guanylate cyclase redox state in mouse aortas.

    PubMed

    Shimosato, Takashi; Tawa, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hirotaka; Imamura, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomio

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with endothelial dysfunction, defined as a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Although the redox state of the NO acceptor soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is another determinant factor for its bioavailability and is disturbed by reactive oxygen species (ROS) known to be increased with age, it is unclear whether aging actually has an impact on vascular sGC redox equilibrium. Therefore, this study investigated this issue using two different types of compounds, the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 and the sGC activator BAY 60-2770. Plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels were markedly higher in aged (19-20 months old) mice than in young (2-3 months old) mice, whereas superoxide levels in endothelium-denuded aortas were not different between the groups. The relaxant response of endothelium-denuded aortas to either BAY 41-2272 or BAY 60-2770 was identical in aged and young mice. In addition, the vascular cGMP production stimulated with BAY 41-2272 or BAY 60-2770 in aged mice was the same level as that in young mice. These findings suggest that aging accompanied by an increase in systemic oxidative stress does not affect vascular smooth muscle ROS generation and sGC redox equilibrium. Unless ROS are increased in vascular smooth muscle, the sGC redox equilibrium might remain unchanged.

  17. Redox states of Desulfovibrio vulgaris DsrC, a key protein in dissimilatory sulfite reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Venceslau, Sofia S.; Cort, John R.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Chu, Rosalie K.; Robinson, Errol W.; Dahl, Christiane; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Pereira, Ines Ac

    2013-11-29

    Dissimilatory reduction of sulfite is carried out by the siroheme enzyme DsrAB, with the involvement of the protein DsrC having two conserved cysteine residues. Here, we report a study of the distribution of DsrC in cell extracts, a cysteine-labelling gel-shift assay to monitor its redox state and behaviour, and procedures to produce the different redox forms. We show that, in the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the majority of DsrC is not associated with DsrAB and is thus free to interact with other proteins. In addition, we successfully produced DsrC with an intramolecular disulfide bond (oxidized state) by treatment with arginine.

  18. [Redox Molecular Imaging Using ReMI].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Ito, Shinji; Utsumi, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Tissue redox status is one of the most important parameters to maintain homeostasis in the living body. Numerous redox reactions are involved in metabolic processes, such as energy production in the mitochondrial electron transfer system. A variety of intracellular molecules such as reactive oxygen species, glutathione, thioredoxins, NADPH, flavins, and ascorbic acid may contribute to the overall redox status in tissues. Breakdown of redox balance may lead to oxidative stress and can induce many pathological conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, and aging. Therefore imaging of tissue redox status and monitoring antioxidant levels in living organisms can be useful in the diagnosis of disease states and assessment of treatment response. In vivo redox molecular imaging technology such as electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRI (redox molecular imaging; ReMI) is emerging as a viable redox status imaging modality. This review focuses on the application of magnetic resonance technologies using MRI or DNP-MRI and redox-sensitive contrast agents.

  19. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time.

  20. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP.

  1. Photothermal monitoring of respiratory chain redox state in single live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Romanovskaya, Tat'yana; Gordiyko, Elena

    2002-06-01

    Due to the central role of respiratory chain (RC) in the metabolism of the cell, much attention has been directed at developing efficient techniques for diagnostics of RC at cell level. Proposed method of direct monitoring of the redox state of RC in single live cells is based on photothermal (PT) measurement of photo-induced thermal phenomena in mitochondrial hemoproteins. Thermal output of absorbed light energy depends upon their redox state (oxidized/reduced). PT microscopy method was applied for experimental studies of two in vitro models: (1) solutions of RC component - cytochrome c - and (2) for mice hepatocytes in suspension. Parameters of PT responses obtained from solution and from single cells after their irradiation with laser pulse (532 nm, 8 ns) were found to be different for oxidized and reduced forms for cytochrome c solutions and for KCN and Antimicine A treated cells in comparison to intact ones. This difference may be caused by alteration of the quantum yields of thermal (non-radiative) relaxation for light absorbing molecules - RC components - as they undergo redox state change under influence of RC inhibitors. Obtained results allow to suggest new approach for monitoring of functional activity of RC in single cell through the measurement of PT response at specific wavelengths.

  2. Apocynin and Nox2 regulate NF-κB by modifying thioredoxin-1 redox-state

    PubMed Central

    Trevelin, Silvia Cellone; dos Santos, Célio Xavier; Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Silva, Rangel Leal; Scavone, Cristoforo; Curi, Rui; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Roxo-Júnior, Pérsio; Cervi, Maria-Célia; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael Martins; Hothersall, John Stephen; Cobb, Andrew M.; Zhang, Min; Ivetic, Aleksandar; Shah, Ajay M.; Lopes, Lucia Rossetti; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    The reactive-oxygen-species-(ROS)-generating-enzyme Nox2 is essential for leukocyte anti-microbial activity. However its role in cellular redox homeostasis and, consequently, in modulating intracellular signaling pathways remains unclear. Herein, we show Nox2 activation favors thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1)/p40phox interaction, which leads to exclusion of TRX-1 from the nucleus. In contrast, the genetic deficiency of Nox2 or its pharmacological inhibition with apocynin (APO) results in reductive stress after lipopolysaccharide-(LPS)-cell stimulation, which causes nuclear accumulation of TRX-1 and enhanced transcription of inflammatory mediators through nuclear-factor-(NF)-κB. The NF-κB overactivation is prevented by TRX-1 oxidation using inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1). The Nox2/TRX-1/NF-κB intracellular signaling pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and sepsis. In fact, TrxR-1 inhibition prevents nuclear accumulation of TRX-1 and LPS-stimulated hyperproduction of tumor-necrosis-factor-(TNF)-α by monocytes and neutrophils purified from blood of CGD patients, who have deficient Nox2 activity. TrxR-1 inhibitors, either lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) or auranofin (AUR), also increase survival rates of mice undergoing cecal-ligation-and-puncture-(CLP). Therefore, our results identify a hitherto unrecognized Nox2-mediated intracellular signaling pathway that contributes to hyperinflammation in CGD and in septic patients. Additionally, we suggest that TrxR-1 inhibitors could be potential drugs to treat patients with sepsis, particularly in those with CGD. PMID:27698473

  3. Redox state, reactive oxygen species and adaptive growth in colonial hydroids.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, N W

    2001-06-01

    Colonial metazoans often encrust surfaces over which the food supply varies in time or space. In such an environment, adaptive colony development entails adjusting the timing and spacing of feeding structures and gastrovascular connections to correspond to this variable food supply. To investigate the possibility of such adaptive growth, within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out using the hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Indeed, such colonies strongly exhibited adaptive growth, developing dense arrays of polyps (feeding structures) and gastrovascular connections in areas that were fed relative to areas that were starved, and this effect became more consistent over time. To investigate mechanisms of signaling between the food supply and colony development, measurements were taken of metabolic parameters that have been implicated in signal transduction in other systems, particularly redox state and levels of reactive oxygen species. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy of P. carnea cells in vivo, simultaneous measurements of redox state [using NAD(P)H] and hydrogen peroxide (using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) were taken. Both measures focused on polyp epitheliomuscular cells, since these exhibit the greatest metabolic activity. Colonies 3-5h after feeding were relatively oxidized, with low levels of peroxide, while colonies 24h after feeding were relatively reduced, with high levels of peroxide. The functional role of polyps in feeding and generating gastrovascular flow probably produced this dichotomy. Polyps 3-5h after feeding contract maximally, and this metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of oxidation and diminishes levels of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, 24h after feeding, polyps are quiescent, and this lack of metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of reduction and increases levels of reactive oxygen species. Within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out on

  4. Effect of severe environmental thermal stress on redox state in salmon.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Kameda, Masumi; Shoji, Yui; Hayashi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiyasu; Sato, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fish are exposed to many kinds of environmental stressors and the chances of succumbing to infectious diseases may be increased a result. For example, an acute increase in temperature can induce numerous physiological changes in the body. In the present study, we examined the redox state in response to a severe acute stress resulting from heat shock in teleost coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The plasma lipid peroxides levels in fish gradually increased after heat shock treatment. By 2.5 h post-heat stress, plasma glutathione (GSH) levels had decreased, but they had returned to basal levels by 17.5 h post-stress. Plasma superoxide dismutase activities in stressed fish were significantly increased compared with those in control fish at 17.5 h post-stress, but had returned to basal levels by 48 h post-stress. Expression levels of hepatic GSH and heat shock protein 70 gradually increased after heat shock treatment. These results concerning the changing patterns of multiple important redox-related biomarkers suggest that severe thermal stressors can affect the redox state and induce oxidative stress in ectothermal animals, such as fish, in vivo. Hence, manipulation of appropriate thermal treatment may possibly be useful to control fish fitness.

  5. Glutaredoxin exerts an antiapoptotic effect by regulating the redox state of Akt.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroaki; Ihara, Yoshito; Nakamura, Hajime; Yodoi, Junji; Sumikawa, Koji; Kondo, Takahito

    2003-12-12

    Glutaredoxin (GRX) is a small dithiol protein involved in various cellular functions, including the redox regulation of certain enzyme activities. GRX functions via a disulfide exchange reaction by utilizing the active site Cys-Pro-Tyr-Cys. Here we demonstrated that overexpression of GRX protected cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis by regulating the redox state of Akt. Akt was transiently phosphorylated, dephosphorylated, and then degraded in cardiac H9c2 cells undergoing H2O2-induced apoptosis. Under stress, Akt underwent disulfide bond formation between Cys-297 and Cys-311 and dephosphorylation in accordance with an increased association with protein phosphatase 2A. Overexpression of GRX protected Akt from H2O2-induced oxidation and suppressed recruitment of protein phosphatase 2A to Akt, resulting in a sustained phosphorylation of Akt and inhibition of apoptosis. This effect was reversed by cadmium, an inhibitor of GRX. Furthermore an in vitro assay revealed that GRX reduced oxidized Akt in concert with glutathione, NADPH, and glutathione-disulfide reductase. Thus, GRX plays an important role in protecting cells from apoptosis by regulating the redox state of Akt. PMID:14522978

  6. Glutaredoxin exerts an antiapoptotic effect by regulating the redox state of Akt.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroaki; Ihara, Yoshito; Nakamura, Hajime; Yodoi, Junji; Sumikawa, Koji; Kondo, Takahito

    2003-12-12

    Glutaredoxin (GRX) is a small dithiol protein involved in various cellular functions, including the redox regulation of certain enzyme activities. GRX functions via a disulfide exchange reaction by utilizing the active site Cys-Pro-Tyr-Cys. Here we demonstrated that overexpression of GRX protected cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced apoptosis by regulating the redox state of Akt. Akt was transiently phosphorylated, dephosphorylated, and then degraded in cardiac H9c2 cells undergoing H2O2-induced apoptosis. Under stress, Akt underwent disulfide bond formation between Cys-297 and Cys-311 and dephosphorylation in accordance with an increased association with protein phosphatase 2A. Overexpression of GRX protected Akt from H2O2-induced oxidation and suppressed recruitment of protein phosphatase 2A to Akt, resulting in a sustained phosphorylation of Akt and inhibition of apoptosis. This effect was reversed by cadmium, an inhibitor of GRX. Furthermore an in vitro assay revealed that GRX reduced oxidized Akt in concert with glutathione, NADPH, and glutathione-disulfide reductase. Thus, GRX plays an important role in protecting cells from apoptosis by regulating the redox state of Akt.

  7. Effect of severe environmental thermal stress on redox state in salmon

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Toshiki; Kameda, Masumi; Shoji, Yui; Hayashi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiyasu; Sato, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fish are exposed to many kinds of environmental stressors and the chances of succumbing to infectious diseases may be increased a result. For example, an acute increase in temperature can induce numerous physiological changes in the body. In the present study, we examined the redox state in response to a severe acute stress resulting from heat shock in teleost coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The plasma lipid peroxides levels in fish gradually increased after heat shock treatment. By 2.5 h post-heat stress, plasma glutathione (GSH) levels had decreased, but they had returned to basal levels by 17.5 h post-stress. Plasma superoxide dismutase activities in stressed fish were significantly increased compared with those in control fish at 17.5 h post-stress, but had returned to basal levels by 48 h post-stress. Expression levels of hepatic GSH and heat shock protein 70 gradually increased after heat shock treatment. These results concerning the changing patterns of multiple important redox-related biomarkers suggest that severe thermal stressors can affect the redox state and induce oxidative stress in ectothermal animals, such as fish, in vivo. Hence, manipulation of appropriate thermal treatment may possibly be useful to control fish fitness. PMID:25009778

  8. Paramagnetic Molecular Grippers: The Elements of Six-State Redox Switches.

    PubMed

    Milić, Jovana; Zalibera, Michal; Pochorovski, Igor; Trapp, Nils; Nomrowski, Julia; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Ruhlmann, Laurent; Boudon, Corinne; Wenger, Oliver S; Savitsky, Anton; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Gescheidt, Georg; Diederich, François

    2016-07-01

    The development of semiquinone-based resorcin[4]arene cavitands expands the toolbox of switchable molecular grippers by introducing the first paramagnetic representatives. The semiquinone (SQ) states were generated electrochemically, chemically, and photochemically. We analyzed their electronic, conformational, and binding properties by cyclic voltammetry, ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) spectroelectrochemistry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and transient absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The utility of UV/vis spectroelectrochemistry and EPR spectroscopy in evaluating the conformational features of resorcin[4]arene cavitands is demonstrated. Guest binding properties were found to be enhanced in the SQ state as compared to the quinone (Q) or the hydroquinone (HQ) states of the cavitands. Thus, these paramagnetic SQ intermediates open the way to six-state redox switches provided by two conformations (open and closed) in three redox states (Q, SQ, and HQ) possessing distinct binding ability. The switchable magnetic properties of these molecular grippers and their responsiveness to electrical stimuli has the potential for development of efficient molecular devices. PMID:27300355

  9. The redox state of arc mantle using Zn/Fe systematics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cin-Ty A; Luffi, Peter; Le Roux, Véronique; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Albaréde, Francis; Leeman, William P

    2010-12-01

    Many arc lavas are more oxidized than mid-ocean-ridge basalts and subduction introduces oxidized components into the mantle. As a consequence, the sub-arc mantle wedge is widely believed to be oxidized. The Fe oxidation state of sub-arc mantle is, however, difficult to determine directly, and debate persists as to whether this oxidation is intrinsic to the mantle source. Here we show that Zn/Fe(T) (where Fe(T) = Fe(2+) + Fe(3+)) is redox-sensitive and retains a memory of the valence state of Fe in primary arc basalts and their mantle sources. During melting of mantle peridotite, Fe(2+) and Zn behave similarly, but because Fe(3+) is more incompatible than Fe(2+), melts generated in oxidized environments have low Zn/Fe(T). Primitive arc magmas have identical Zn/Fe(T) to mid-ocean-ridge basalts, suggesting that primary mantle melts in arcs and ridges have similar Fe oxidation states. The constancy of Zn/Fe(T) during early differentiation involving olivine requires that Fe(3+)/Fe(T) remains low in the magma. Only after progressive fractionation does Fe(3+)/Fe(T) increase and stabilize magnetite as a fractionating phase. These results suggest that subduction of oxidized crustal material may not significantly alter the redox state of the mantle wedge. Thus, the higher oxidation states of arc lavas must be in part a consequence of shallow-level differentiation processes, though such processes remain poorly understood. PMID:21124454

  10. The redox state of arc mantle using Zn/Fe systematics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cin-Ty A; Luffi, Peter; Le Roux, Véronique; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Albaréde, Francis; Leeman, William P

    2010-12-01

    Many arc lavas are more oxidized than mid-ocean-ridge basalts and subduction introduces oxidized components into the mantle. As a consequence, the sub-arc mantle wedge is widely believed to be oxidized. The Fe oxidation state of sub-arc mantle is, however, difficult to determine directly, and debate persists as to whether this oxidation is intrinsic to the mantle source. Here we show that Zn/Fe(T) (where Fe(T) = Fe(2+) + Fe(3+)) is redox-sensitive and retains a memory of the valence state of Fe in primary arc basalts and their mantle sources. During melting of mantle peridotite, Fe(2+) and Zn behave similarly, but because Fe(3+) is more incompatible than Fe(2+), melts generated in oxidized environments have low Zn/Fe(T). Primitive arc magmas have identical Zn/Fe(T) to mid-ocean-ridge basalts, suggesting that primary mantle melts in arcs and ridges have similar Fe oxidation states. The constancy of Zn/Fe(T) during early differentiation involving olivine requires that Fe(3+)/Fe(T) remains low in the magma. Only after progressive fractionation does Fe(3+)/Fe(T) increase and stabilize magnetite as a fractionating phase. These results suggest that subduction of oxidized crustal material may not significantly alter the redox state of the mantle wedge. Thus, the higher oxidation states of arc lavas must be in part a consequence of shallow-level differentiation processes, though such processes remain poorly understood.

  11. Does light scattering affect the OCT quantitation of redox state of cytochrome oxidase in bone tissue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Wang, Ruikang K.; El Haj, Alicia

    2002-06-01

    In our previous report, we have presented the possibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor the redox state of mitochondria enzyme Cytochrome oxidase (CytOx) in bone tissue. The previous results showed that reduction of the enzyme in periosteal tissue leads to a change in attenuation coefficient of 1.68 +/- 0.67mm-1 by OCT measurements. The new results from cultured cells fixed in 300 (mu) l agarose plug showed the difference in attenuation coefficient is 0.26+-0.10 mm-1 (n = 9) for 7x106 astrocytoma cells and 0.28+-0.13 mm-1 (n = 7) for 20x106 astrocytoma cells in agarose plug, respectively between cells with oxidised and reduced enzyme at 820nm. A decrease in attenuation coefficient of 0.35+-0.09 mm-1 (n = 4) for 10 million SKMES cells in agarose was also observed with the redox shift of CytOx. The absorption coefficient of the oxidized-reduced form of CytOx is measured approximately 8.4+-1.5x10-3/mm (n=3) and 8.2+-1.0x10-3/mm (n=3) at 820nm for astrocytoma cells and rat periosteum respectively by means of a biochemical assay. Thereby it can be seen that the change in attenuation coefficient of cultured cells with redox shift of CytOx mainly results from the scattering change.

  12. Differential heme release from various hemoglobin redox states and the upregulation of cellular heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Tigist; Jana, Sirsendu; Meng, Fantao; Alayash, Abdu I

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of the oxidative pathways mediated by free hemoglobin (Hb), the precise contribution of its highly reactive redox forms to tissue and organ toxicities remains ambiguous. Heme, a key degradation byproduct of Hb oxidation, has recently been recognized as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule, able to trigger inflammatory responses. Equally damaging is the interaction of the highly redox active forms of Hb with other biological molecules. We determined the kinetics of heme loss from individual Hb redox states-ferrous (Fe(2+)), ferric (Fe(3+)), and ferryl (Fe(4+))-using two different heme receptor proteins: hemopexin (Hxp), a naturally occurring heme scavenger in plasma, and a double mutant (H64Y/V86F), apomyoglobin (ApoMb), which avidly binds heme released from Hb. We show for the first time that ferric Hb (Fe(3+)) loses heme at rates substantially higher than that of ferryl Hb (Fe(4+)). This was also supported by a higher expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when ferric Hb was added to cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells (E10). The reported cytotoxicity of Hb may therefore be attributed to a combination of accelerated heme loss from the ferric form and protein radical formation associated with ferryl Hb. Targeted therapeutic interventions can therefore be designed to curb specific oxidative pathways of Hb in hemolytic anemias and when Hb is used as an oxygen-carrying therapeutic. PMID:27642551

  13. Optical cryo-imaging of kidney mitochondrial redox state in diabetic mice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, S.; Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Sheibani, N.; Sorenson, C. M.; Ranji, M.

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during diabetes, exacerbates the development and progression of diabetes complications including renal vascular and proximal tubule cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the tissue in diabetic mice kidneys using fluorescence imaging. Mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide), and FADH-2 (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels by optical techniques. The ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), called the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of metabolic state of a tissue. We examined mitochondrial redox states of kidneys from diabetic mice, Akita/+ and its control wild type (WT) for a group of 8- and 12-week-old mice. Average intensity and histogram of maximum projected images of FAD, NADH, and NADH RR were calculated for each kidney. Our results indicated a 17% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the kidney from 8-week-old mice compared with WT mice and, a 30% decrease in the mean NADH RR of kidney from12-week-old mice compared with WT mice. These results indicated an increase in OS in diabetic animals and its progression over time. Thus, NADH RR can be used as a hallmark of OS in diabetic kidney allowing temporal identification of oxidative state.

  14. Heterogeneity of intracellular polymer storage states in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR)--observation and modeling.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Vanni; Majed, Nehreen; Hellweger, Ferdi L; Gu, April Z

    2012-03-20

    A number of agent-based models (ABMs) for biological wastewater treatment processes have been developed, but their skill in predicting heterogeneity of intracellular storage states has not been tested against observations due to the lack of analytical methods for measuring single-cell intracellular properties. Further, several mechanisms can produce and maintain heterogeneity (e.g., different histories, uneven division) and their relative importance has not been explored. This article presents an ABM for the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) treatment process that resolves heterogeneity in three intracellular polymer storage compounds (i.e., polyphosphate, polyhydroxybutyrate, and glycogen) in three functional microbial populations (i.e., polyphosphate-accumulating, glycogen-accumulating, and ordinary heterotrophic organisms). Model predicted distributions were compared to those based on single-cell estimates obtained using a Raman microscopy method for a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system. The model can reproduce many features of the observed heterogeneity. Two methods for introducing heterogeneity were evaluated. First, biological variability in individual cell behavior was simulated by randomizing model parameters (e.g., maximum acetate uptake rate) at division. This method produced the best fit to the data. An optimization algorithm was used to determine the best variability (i.e., coefficient of variance) for each parameter, which suggests large variability in acetate uptake. Second, biological variability in individual cell states was simulated by randomizing state variables (e.g., internal nutrient) at division, which was not able to maintain heterogeneity because the memory in the internal states is too short. These results demonstrate the ability of ABM to predict heterogeneity and provide insights into the factors that contribute to it. Comparison of the ABM with an equivalent population-level model illustrates the effect

  15. Heterogeneity of intracellular polymer storage states in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR)--observation and modeling.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Vanni; Majed, Nehreen; Hellweger, Ferdi L; Gu, April Z

    2012-03-20

    A number of agent-based models (ABMs) for biological wastewater treatment processes have been developed, but their skill in predicting heterogeneity of intracellular storage states has not been tested against observations due to the lack of analytical methods for measuring single-cell intracellular properties. Further, several mechanisms can produce and maintain heterogeneity (e.g., different histories, uneven division) and their relative importance has not been explored. This article presents an ABM for the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) treatment process that resolves heterogeneity in three intracellular polymer storage compounds (i.e., polyphosphate, polyhydroxybutyrate, and glycogen) in three functional microbial populations (i.e., polyphosphate-accumulating, glycogen-accumulating, and ordinary heterotrophic organisms). Model predicted distributions were compared to those based on single-cell estimates obtained using a Raman microscopy method for a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system. The model can reproduce many features of the observed heterogeneity. Two methods for introducing heterogeneity were evaluated. First, biological variability in individual cell behavior was simulated by randomizing model parameters (e.g., maximum acetate uptake rate) at division. This method produced the best fit to the data. An optimization algorithm was used to determine the best variability (i.e., coefficient of variance) for each parameter, which suggests large variability in acetate uptake. Second, biological variability in individual cell states was simulated by randomizing state variables (e.g., internal nutrient) at division, which was not able to maintain heterogeneity because the memory in the internal states is too short. These results demonstrate the ability of ABM to predict heterogeneity and provide insights into the factors that contribute to it. Comparison of the ABM with an equivalent population-level model illustrates the effect

  16. Chromium basalts - Experimental determination of redox states and partitioning among synthetic silicate phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, H. D.; Haskin, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed on silicate compositions in the forsterite-anorthite-silica and forsterite-anorthite-diopside systems to determine the relative amounts of Cr(II), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures from 10 to the -10th to 1 atm at 1500 and 1550 C. Redox states were measured by visible absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and titration. It was found that Cr is present almost exclusively as Cr(III) in terrestrial basaltic liquids and as a mixture of Cr(III) and Cr(II) in lunar basaltic liquids.

  17. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism. PMID:27362337

  18. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  19. Robust Off- and Online Separation of Intracellularly Recorded Up and Down Cortical States

    PubMed Central

    Seamari, Yamina; Narváez, José A.; Vico, Francisco J.; Lobo, Daniel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2007-01-01

    Background The neuronal cortical network generates slow (<1 Hz) spontaneous rhythmic activity that emerges from the recurrent connectivity. This activity occurs during slow wave sleep or anesthesia and also in cortical slices, consisting of alternating up (active, depolarized) and down (silent, hyperpolarized) states. The search for the underlying mechanisms and the possibility of analyzing network dynamics in vitro has been subject of numerous studies. This exposes the need for a detailed quantitative analysis of the membrane fluctuating behavior and computerized tools to automatically characterize the occurrence of up and down states. Methodology/Principal Findings Intracellular recordings from different areas of the cerebral cortex were obtained from both in vitro and in vivo preparations during slow oscillations. A method that separates up and down states recorded intracellularly is defined and analyzed here. The method exploits the crossover of moving averages, such that transitions between up and down membrane regimes can be anticipated based on recent and past voltage dynamics. We demonstrate experimentally the utility and performance of this method both offline and online, the online use allowing to trigger stimulation or other events in the desired period of the rhythm. This technique is compared with a histogram-based approach that separates the states by establishing one or two discriminating membrane potential levels. The robustness of the method presented here is tested on data that departs from highly regular alternating up and down states. Conclusions/Significance We define a simple method to detect cortical states that can be applied in real time for offline processing of large amounts of recorded data on conventional computers. Also, the online detection of up and down states will facilitate the study of cortical dynamics. An open-source MATLAB® toolbox, and Spike 2®-compatible version are made freely available. PMID:17849017

  20. A cycling state that can lead to glassy dynamics in intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Monika; Burov, Stanislav; Weirich, Kimberly L.; Scholz, Bjorn J.; Tabei, S. M. Ali; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron

    Power-law dwell times have been observed for molecular motors in living cells, but the origins of these trapped states are not known. We introduce a minimal model of motors moving on a two- dimensional network of filaments, and simulations of its dynamics exhibit statistics comparable to those observed experimentally. Analysis of the model trajectories, as well as experimental particle tracking data, reveals a state in which motors cycle unproductively at junctions of three or more filaments. We formulate a master equation for these junction dynamics and show that the time required to escape from this vortex-like state can account for the power-law dwell times. We identify trends in the dynamics with the motor valency for further experimental validation. We demonstrate that these trends exist in individual trajectories of myosin II on an actin network. We discuss how cells could regulate intracellular transport and, in turn, biological function, by controlling their cytoskeletal network structures locally.

  1. Cycling State that Can Lead to Glassy Dynamics in Intracellular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Monika; Burov, Stanislav; Weirich, Kimberly L.; Scholz, Björn J.; Tabei, S. M. Ali; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Power-law dwell times have been observed for molecular motors in living cells, but the origins of these trapped states are not known. We introduce a minimal model of motors moving on a two-dimensional network of filaments, and simulations of its dynamics exhibit statistics comparable to those observed experimentally. Analysis of the model trajectories, as well as experimental particle tracking data, reveals a state in which motors cycle unproductively at junctions of three or more filaments. We formulate a master equation for these junction dynamics and show that the time required to escape from this vortexlike state can account for the power-law dwell times. We identify trends in the dynamics with the motor valency for further experimental validation. We demonstrate that these trends exist in individual trajectories of myosin II on an actin network. We discuss how cells could regulate intracellular transport and, in turn, biological function by controlling their cytoskeletal network structures locally.

  2. Three-State Single-Molecule Naphthalenediimide Switch: Integration of a Pendant Redox Unit for Conductance Tuning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghai; Baghernejad, Masoud; Qusiy, Al-Galiby; Zsolt Manrique, David; Zhang, Guanxin; Hamill, Joseph; Fu, Yongchun; Broekmann, Peter; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas; Zhang, Deqing; Lambert, Colin

    2015-11-01

    We studied charge transport through core-substituted naphthalenediimide (NDI) single-molecule junctions using the electrochemical STM-based break-junction technique in combination with DFT calculations. Conductance switching among three well-defined states was demonstrated by electrochemically controlling the redox state of the pendent diimide unit of the molecule in an ionic liquid. The electrical conductances of the dianion and neutral states differ by more than one order of magnitude. The potential-dependence of the charge-transport characteristics of the NDI molecules was confirmed by DFT calculations, which account for electrochemical double-layer effects on the conductance of the NDI junctions. This study suggests that integration of a pendant redox unit with strong coupling to a molecular backbone enables the tuning of charge transport through single-molecule devices by controlling their redox states. PMID:26403214

  3. Direct structural evidence of protein redox regulation obtained by in-cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Mercatelli, Eleonora; Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    The redox properties of cellular environments are critical to many functional processes, and are strictly controlled in all living organisms. The glutathione-glutathione disulfide (GSH-GSSG) couple is the most abundant intracellular redox couple. A GSH redox potential can be calculated for each cellular compartment, which reflects the redox properties of that environment. This redox potential is often used to predict the redox state of a disulfide-containing protein, based on thermodynamic considerations. However, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are often catalyzed by specific partners, and the distribution of the redox states of a protein may not correspond to the thermodynamic equilibrium with the GSH pool. Ideally, the protein redox state should be measured directly, bypassing the need to extrapolate from the GSH. Here, by in-cell NMR, we directly observe the redox state of three human proteins, Cox17, Mia40 and SOD1, in the cytoplasm of human and bacterial cells. We compare the observed distributions of redox states with those predicted by the GSH redox potential, and our results partially agree with the predictions. Discrepancies likely arise from the fact that the redox state of SOD1 is controlled by a specific partner, its copper chaperone (CCS), in a pathway which is not linked to the GSH redox potential. In principle, in-cell NMR allows determining whether redox proteins are at the equilibrium with GSH, or they are kinetically regulated. Such approach does not need assumptions on the redox potential of the environment, and provides a way to characterize each redox-regulating pathway separately.

  4. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Helen R.; Dias, Irundika H.K.; Willetts, Rachel S.; Devitt, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The presence and concentrations of modified proteins circulating in plasma depend on rates of protein synthesis, modification and clearance. In early studies, the proteins most frequently analysed for damage were those which were more abundant in plasma (e.g. albumin and immunoglobulins) which exist at up to 10 orders of magnitude higher concentrations than other plasma proteins e.g. cytokines. However, advances in analytical techniques using mass spectrometry and immuno-affinity purification methods, have facilitated analysis of less abundant, modified proteins and the nature of modifications at specific sites is now being characterised. The damaging reactive species that cause protein modifications in plasma principally arise from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases (NOX), nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and oxygenase activities; reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from myeloperoxidase (MPO) and NOS activities; and hypochlorous acid from MPO. Secondary damage to proteins may be caused by oxidized lipids and glucose autooxidation. In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites. PMID:24624332

  5. Thiol redox state and related enzymes in sclerotium-forming filamentous phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Georgiou, D Christos

    2008-05-01

    Thiol redox state (TRS) reduced and oxidized components form profiles characteristic of each of the four main types of differentiation in the sclerotiogenic phytopathogenic fungi: loose, terminal, lateral-chained, and lateral-simple, represented by Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Sclerotium rolfsii, and Sclerotinia minor, respectively. A common feature of these fungi is that as their undifferentiated mycelium enters the differentiated state, it is accompanied by a decrease in the low oxidative stress-associated total reduced thiols and/or by an increase of the high oxidative stress-associated total oxidized thiols either in the sclerotial mycelial substrate or in its corresponding sclerotium, indicating a relationship between TRS-related oxidative stress and sclerotial differentiation. Moreover, the four studied sclerotium types exhibit high activities of TRS-related antioxidant enzymes, indicating the existence of antioxidant protection of the hyphae of the sclerotium medulla until conditions become appropriate for sclerotium germination. PMID:18400483

  6. The role of iron redox state in the genotoxicity of ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neenu; Jenkins, Gareth J S; Nelson, Bryant C; Marquis, Bryce J; Maffeis, Thierry G G; Brown, Andy P; Williams, Paul M; Wright, Chris J; Doak, Shareen H

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPION) hold great potential for revolutionising biomedical applications such as MRI, localised hyperthermia, and targeted drug delivery. Though evidence is increasing regarding the influence of nanoparticle physico-chemical features on toxicity, data however, is lacking that assesses a range of such characteristics in parallel. We show that iron redox state, a subtle though important physico-chemical feature of USPION, dramatically modifies the cellular uptake of these nanoparticles and influences their induction of DNA damage. Surface chemistry was also found to have an impact and evidence to support a potential mechanism of oxidative DNA damage behind the observed responses has been demonstrated. As human exposure to ferrofluids is predicted to increase through nanomedicine based therapeutics, these findings are important in guiding the fabrication of USPION to ensure they have characteristics that support biocompatibility. PMID:22027595

  7. Mutual Regulation of Epicardial Adipose Tissue and Myocardial Redox State by PPAR-γ/Adiponectin Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Alexios S.; Margaritis, Marios; Verheule, Sander; Recalde, Alice; Sanna, Fabio; Herdman, Laura; Psarros, Costas; Nasrallah, Hussein; Coutinho, Patricia; Akoumianakis, Ioannis; Brewer, Alison C.; Sayeed, Rana; Krasopoulos, George; Petrou, Mario; Tarun, Akansha; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Shah, Ajay M.; Casadei, Barbara; Channon, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Adiponectin has anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models, but its role in the regulation of myocardial redox state in humans is unknown. Although adiponectin is released from epicardial adipose tissue (EpAT), it is unclear whether it exerts any paracrine effects on the human myocardium. Objective: To explore the cross talk between EpAT-derived adiponectin and myocardial redox state in the human heart. Methods and Results: EpAT and atrial myocardium were obtained from 306 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Functional genetic polymorphisms that increase ADIPOQ expression (encoding adiponectin) led to reduced myocardial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase–derived O2−, whereas circulating adiponectin and ADIPOQ expression in EpAT were associated with elevated myocardial O2−. In human atrial tissue, we demonstrated that adiponectin suppresses myocardial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity, by preventing AMP kinase–mediated translocation of Rac1 and p47phox from the cytosol to the membranes. Induction of O2− production in H9C2 cardiac myocytes led to the release of a transferable factor able to induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ–mediated upregulation of ADIPOQ expression in cocultured EpAT. Using a NOX2 transgenic mouse and a pig model of rapid atrial pacing, we found that oxidation products (such as 4-hydroxynonenal) released from the heart trigger peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ–mediated upregulation of ADIPOQ in EpAT. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time in humans that adiponectin directly decreases myocardial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity via endocrine or paracrine effects. Adiponectin expression in EpAT is controlled by paracrine effects of oxidation products released from the heart. These effects constitute a novel defense mechanism of the heart against myocardial oxidative stress. PMID:26838789

  8. Co-variation of nitrogen isotopes and redox states through glacial-interglacial cycles in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Tracy M.; Wright, James D.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-07-01

    In all aquatic environments, nitrogen cycling within the water column is strongly influenced by oxygen. We hypothesize that the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of organic matter deposited in the sediments is a proxy for the redox state of the water column at the time of deposition. We tested the hypothesis by measuring the bulk sedimentary δ15N values in a drill core from the Black Sea, a basin that alternates between oxic, less saline conditions and anoxic, marine conditions on glacial-interglacial time scales. We reconstructed these changes in Black Sea redox conditions using sedimentary δ15N, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), redox-sensitive metals, and micropaleontological data from a deep-sea core (DSDP Site 380). The sedimentary data reveal that during the transitions between oxic and anoxic conditions, δ15N values increased relative to the preceding and succeeding quasi-steady-state oxic and anoxic periods. The results indicate that the reciprocal transitional states from anoxic to oxic conditions were accompanied by intense denitrification; during the quasi-stable oxic and anoxic states (characterized by glacial fresh water and interglacial marine conditions) nitrification and complete nitrate utilization, respectively, dominate the nitrogen cycle. While other factors may influence the δ15N record, our results support the hypothesis that the variations in nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter are strongly influenced by changes in redox state in the Black Sea subphotic zone on glacial-interglacial time scales, and can be explained by a relatively simple model describing the effects of oxygen on the microbial processes that drive the nitrogen cycle in marine ecosystems. Our model suggests that the nitrogen isotopic composition of marine sediments, on geological time scales, can be used to reconstruct the redox state of the overlying water column.

  9. Multiparametric protocol for the determination of thiol redox state in living matter.

    PubMed

    Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Zisimopoulos, Dimitris; Stamatiou, Irene; Georgiou, Christos D

    2014-09-01

    Thiol redox state (TRS) evaluation is mostly restricted to the estimation of GSH and GSSG. However, these TRS parameters can estimate the GSSG/GSH potential, which might be useful for indicating abnormalities in redox metabolism. Nonetheless, evaluation of the multiparameric nature of TRS is required for a more accurate assessment of its physiological role. The present protocol extends the partial assessment of TRS by current methodologies. It measures 15 key parameters of TRS by two modular subprotocols: one for the glutathione (GSH)- and cysteine (CSH)-based nonprotein (NP) thiols/mixed disulfides (i.e., GSH, GSSG, GSSNP, CSH, CSSNP, NPSH, NPSSNP, NP(x)SH(NPSSNP), NP(x)SH(NPSH)), and the other for their protein (P) thiols/mixed disulfides (i.e., PSH, PSSG, PSSC, PSSNP, PSSP, NP(x)SH(PSSNP)). The protocol eliminates autoxidation of GSH and CSH (and thus overestimation of GSSG and CSSNP). Its modularity allows the determination GSH and GSSG also by other published specific assays. The protocol uses three assays; two are based on the photometric reagents 4,4'-dithiopyridine (DTP) and ninhydrin (NHD), and the third on the fluorometric reagent o-phthaldialdehyde (OPT). The initial assays employing these reagents have been extensively modified and redesigned for increased specificity, sensitivity, and simplicity. TRS parameter values and their standard errors are estimated automatically by sets of Excel-adapted algebraic equations. Protocol sensitivity for NPSH, PSH, NPSSNP, PSSP, PSSNP, CSH, CSSNP, PSSC, NP(x)SH(NPSSNP), and NP(x)SH(NPSH) is 1 nmol -SH/CSH, for GSSNP 0.2 nmol, for GSH and GSSG 0.4 nmol, and for PSSG 0.6 nmol. The protocol was applied on human plasma, a sample of high clinical value, and can be also applied in any organism. PMID:24996203

  10. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators.

    PubMed

    Pouvreau, Sandrine

    2014-02-01

    Redox processes are increasingly being recognized as key elements in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. They are frequently encountered at the frontier between physiological functions and pathological events. The biological relevance of intracellular redox changes depends on the subcellular origin, the spatio-temporal distribution and the redox couple involved. Thus, a key task in the elucidation of the role of redox reactions is the specific and quantitative measurement of redox conditions with high spatio-temporal resolution. Unfortunately, until recently, our ability to perform such measurements was limited by the lack of adequate technology. Over the last 10 years, promising imaging tools have been developed from fluorescent proteins. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators (GERRIs) have the potential to allow real-time and pseudo-quantitative monitoring of specific ROS and thiol redox state in subcellular compartments or live organisms. Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent proteins (rxYFP family), redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFP family), HyPer (a probe designed to measure H2 O2 ), circularly permuted YFP and others have been used in several models and sufficient information has been collected to highlight their main characteristics. This review is intended to be a tour guide of the main types of GERRIs, their origins, properties, advantages and pitfalls.

  11. Current status of solid-state lithium batteries employing solid redox polymerization cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, S.J.; Doeff, M.M.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1991-03-01

    The rapidly growing demand for secondary batteries having high specific energy and power has naturally led to increased efforts in lithium battery technology. Still, the increased safety risks associated with high energy density systems has tempered the enthusiasm of proponents of such systems for use in the consumer marketplace. The inherent advantages of all-solid-state batteries in regards to safety and reliability are strong factors in advocating their introduction to the marketplace. However, the low ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes relative to non-aqueous liquid electrolytes implies low power densities for solid-state systems operating at ambient temperatures. Recent advances in polymer electrolytes have led to the introduction of solid electrolytes having conductivities in the range of 10{sup {minus}4} (ohm cm){sup {minus}1} at room temperature; this is still two orders of magnitude lower than liquid electrolytes. Although these improved ambient conductivities put solid-state batteries in the realm of practical devices, it is clear that solid-state batteries using such polymeric separators will be thin-film devices. Fortunately, thin-film fabrication techniques are well established in the plastics and paper industry, and present the possibility of continuous web-form manufacturing. This style of battery manufacture should make solid polymer batteries very cost- competitive with conventional secondary cells. In addition, the greater geometric flexibility of thin-film solid-state cells should provide benefits in terms of the end-use form factor in device design. This work discusses the status of solid redox polymerization cathodes. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Mapping of redox state of mitochondrial cytochromes in live cardiomyocytes using Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brazhe, Nadezda A; Treiman, Marek; Brazhe, Alexey R; Find, Ninett L; Maksimov, Georgy V; Sosnovtseva, Olga V

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a nonivasive approach to study redox state of reduced cytochromes c, c1 and b of complexes II and III in mitochondria of live cardiomyocytes by means of Raman microspectroscopy. For the first time with the proposed approach we perform studies of rod- and round-shaped cardiomyocytes, representing different morphological and functional states. Raman mapping and cluster analysis reveal that these cardiomyocytes differ in the amounts of reduced cytochromes c, c1 and b. The rod-shaped cardiomyocytes possess uneven distribution of reduced cytochromes c, c1 and b in cell center and periphery. Moreover, by means of Raman spectroscopy we demonstrated the decrease in the relative amounts of reduced cytochromes c, c1 and b in the rod-shaped cardiomyocytes caused by H2O2-induced oxidative stress before any visible changes. Results of Raman mapping and time-dependent study of reduced cytochromes of complexes II and III and cytochrome c in cardiomyocytes are in a good agreement with our fluorescence indicator studies and other published data.

  13. Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress: Strategies Finalized to Improve Redox State

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Isabella; Catani, Maria Valeria; Evangelista, Daniela; Gasperi, Valeria; Avigliano, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Obesity represents a major risk factor for a plethora of severe diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer. It is often accompanied by an increased risk of mortality and, in the case of non-fatal health problems, the quality of life is impaired because of associated conditions, including sleep apnea, respiratory problems, osteoarthritis, and infertility. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may be the mechanistic link between obesity and related complications. In obese patients, antioxidant defenses are lower than normal weight counterparts and their levels inversely correlate with central adiposity; obesity is also characterized by enhanced levels of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. Inadequacy of antioxidant defenses probably relies on different factors: obese individuals may have a lower intake of antioxidant- and phytochemical-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and legumes; otherwise, consumption of antioxidant nutrients is normal, but obese individuals may have an increased utilization of these molecules, likewise to that reported in diabetic patients and smokers. Also inadequate physical activity may account for a decreased antioxidant state. In this review, we describe current concepts in the meaning of obesity as a state of chronic oxidative stress and the potential interventions to improve redox balance. PMID:23698776

  14. Covalently Attached Porphycene-Ferrocene Dyads: Synthesis, Redox-Switched Emission, and Observation of the Charge-Separated State.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masaaki; Yamada, Hiroaki; Okawara, Toru; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Two new porphycenes functionalized with ferrocenyl pendants have been synthesized and characterized spectroscopically and structurally. The porphycene-based emission in porphycene-ferrocene dyads was switched on and off by the reversible control of the ferrocenyl pendant redox states. Transient absorption spectroscopy with a femtosecond laser-pulsed technique has successfully detected the picosecond charge-separated excited state of the dyad upon Q-band excitation of the porphycene ring.

  15. Redox State of Iron in Lunar Glasses using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M. C.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.; Carey, C. J.; Mahadevan, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oxidation state of igneous materials on a planet is a critically-important variable in understanding magma evolution on bodies in our solar system. However, direct and indirect methods for quantifying redox states are challenging, especially across the broad spectrum of silicate glass compositions found on airless bodies. On the Moon, early Mössbauer studies of bulk samples suggested the presence of significant Fe3+ (>10%) in lunar glasses (green, orange, brown); lunar analog glasses synthesized at fO2 <10-11 have similar Fe3+. All these Mössbauer spectra are challenging to interpret due to the presence of multiple coordination environments in the glasses. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows pico- and nano-scale interrogation of primitive planetary materials using the pre-edge, main edge, and EXAFS regions of absorption edge spectra. Current uses of XAS require availability of standards with compositions similar to those of unknowns and complex procedures for curve-fitting of pre-edge features that produce results with poorly constrained accuracy. A new approach to accurate and quantitative redox measurements with XAS is to couple use of spectra from synthetic glass standards covering a broad compositional range with multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Mössbauer and XAS spectra from a suite of 33 synthetic glass standards covering a wide range of compositions and fO2(Dyar et al., this meeting) were used to develop a MVA model that utilizes valuable predictive information not only in the major spectral peaks/features, but in all channels of the XAS region. Algorithms for multivariate analysis t were used to "learn" the characteristics of a data set as a function of varying spectral characteristics. These models were applied to the study of lunar glasses, which provide a challenging test case for these newly-developed techniques due to their very low fO2. Application of the new XAS calibration model to Apollo 15 green (15426, 15427 and 15425

  16. High light acclimation in the secondary plastids containing diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum is triggered by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

    PubMed

    Lepetit, Bernard; Sturm, Sabine; Rogato, Alessandra; Gruber, Ansgar; Sachse, Matthias; Falciatore, Angela; Kroth, Peter G; Lavaud, Johann

    2013-02-01

    In diatoms, the process of energy-dependent chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (qE) has an important role in photoprotection. Three components are essential for qE: (1) the light-dependent generation of a transthylakoidal proton gradient; (2) the deepoxidation of the xanthophyll diadinoxanthin (Dd) into diatoxanthin (Dt); and (3) specific nucleus-encoded antenna proteins, called Light Harvesting Complex Protein X (LHCX). We used the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to investigate the concerted light acclimation response of the qE key components LHCX, proton gradient, and xanthophyll cycle pigments (Dd+Dt) and to identify the intracellular light-responsive trigger. At high-light exposure, the up-regulation of three of the LHCX genes and the de novo synthesis of Dd+Dt led to a pronounced rise of qE. By inhibiting either the conversion of Dd to Dt or the translation of LHCX genes, qE amplification was abolished and the diatom cells suffered from stronger photoinhibition. Artificial modification of the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool via 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone resulted in a disturbance of Dd+Dt synthesis in an opposite way. Moreover, we could increase the transcription of two of the four LHCX genes under low-light conditions by reducing the PQ pool using 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Altogether, our results underline the central role of the redox state of the PQ pool in the light acclimation of diatoms. Additionally, they emphasize strong evidence for the existence of a plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling mechanism in an organism with plastids that derived from secondary endosymbiosis.

  17. High Light Acclimation in the Secondary Plastids Containing Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum is Triggered by the Redox State of the Plastoquinone Pool1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lepetit, Bernard; Sturm, Sabine; Rogato, Alessandra; Gruber, Ansgar; Sachse, Matthias; Falciatore, Angela; Kroth, Peter G.; Lavaud, Johann

    2013-01-01

    In diatoms, the process of energy-dependent chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (qE) has an important role in photoprotection. Three components are essential for qE: (1) the light-dependent generation of a transthylakoidal proton gradient; (2) the deepoxidation of the xanthophyll diadinoxanthin (Dd) into diatoxanthin (Dt); and (3) specific nucleus-encoded antenna proteins, called Light Harvesting Complex Protein X (LHCX). We used the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to investigate the concerted light acclimation response of the qE key components LHCX, proton gradient, and xanthophyll cycle pigments (Dd+Dt) and to identify the intracellular light-responsive trigger. At high-light exposure, the up-regulation of three of the LHCX genes and the de novo synthesis of Dd+Dt led to a pronounced rise of qE. By inhibiting either the conversion of Dd to Dt or the translation of LHCX genes, qE amplification was abolished and the diatom cells suffered from stronger photoinhibition. Artificial modification of the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool via 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone resulted in a disturbance of Dd+Dt synthesis in an opposite way. Moreover, we could increase the transcription of two of the four LHCX genes under low-light conditions by reducing the PQ pool using 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Altogether, our results underline the central role of the redox state of the PQ pool in the light acclimation of diatoms. Additionally, they emphasize strong evidence for the existence of a plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling mechanism in an organism with plastids that derived from secondary endosymbiosis. PMID:23209128

  18. A symmetric organic-based nonaqueous redox flow battery and its state of charge diagnostics by FTIR

    DOE PAGES

    Duan, Wentao; Vemuri, Rama Ses; Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Laramie, Sydney; Dmello, Rylan D.; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Hu, Dehong; Vijayakumar, M.; Wang, Wei; et al

    2016-03-10

    Redox flow batteries have shown outstanding promise for grid-scale energy storage to promote utilization of renewable energy and improve grid stability. Nonaqueous battery systems can potentially achieve high energy density because of their broad voltage window. In this paper, we report a new organic redox-active material for use in a nonaqueous redox flow battery, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) that has high solubility (>2.6 M) in organic solvents. PTIO exhibits electrochemically reversible disproportionation reactions and thus can serve as both anolyte and catholyte redox materials in a symmetric flow cell. The PTIO flow battery has a moderate cell voltage of ~1.7 V andmore » shows good cyclability under both cyclic voltammetry and flow cell conditions. Moreover, we demonstrate that FTIR can offer accurate estimation of the PTIO concentration in electrolytes and determine the state of charge of the PTIO flow cell, which suggests FTIR potentially as a powerful online battery status sensor. In conclusion, this study is expected to inspire more insights in this under-addressed area of state of charge analysis aiming at operational safety and reliability of flow batteries.« less

  19. Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox Mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Gary F.; Hambourger, Michael; Kodis, Gerdenis; Michl, Weston; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.

    2010-11-18

    The conversion of tyrosine to the corresponding tyrosyl radical in photosytem II (PSII) is an example of proton-coupled electron transfer. Although the tyrosine moiety (TyrZ) is known to function as a redox mediator between the photo-oxidized primary donor (P680 •+) and the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex, the protonation states involved in the course of the reaction remain an active area of investigation. Herein, we report on the optical, structural, and electrochemical properties of tyrosine-histidine constructs, which model the function of their naturally occurring counterparts in PSII. Electrochemical studies show that the phenoxyl/phenol couple of the model is chemically reversible and thermodynamically capable of water oxidation. Studies under acidic and basic conditions provide clear evidence that an ionizable proton controls the electrochemical potential of the tyrosine-histidine mimic and that an exogenous base or acid can be used to generate a low-potential or high-potential mediator, respectively. The phenoxyl/phenoxide couple associated with the low-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of water oxidation, whereas the relay associated with the high-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of reducing an attached photoexcited porphyrin. These studies provide insight regarding the mechanistic role of the tyrosine-histidine complex in water oxidation and strategies for making use of hydrogen bonds to affect the coupling between proton and electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  20. Changes in the redox state of sediments following the 2010 BP blowout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, D. W.; Brooks, G.; Hollander, D. J.; Larson, R. A.; Morford, J. L.; Romero, I.; Hammaker, S.; Hogan, A.; Roeder, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    We have collected multi-core sediment cores from over 40 sites along the NE Gulf of Mexico continental slope following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We present the geochemical results from four select sites collected on August 2010, December 2010, February 2011, September 2011, and August 2012. Cores were extruded at 2 mm intervals, and sediments were analyzed for TOC, 13C, carbonate, short-lived radioisotopes (Pb-210, Cs-137, Be-7, Th-234) and grain size. Cores reveal a well-defined, internally stratified dark brown layer in the top 1-6 cm, with finer grain size than underlying sediments. Samples were digested at high temperature and pressure in concentrated nitric acid to dissolve both the oil and authigenic fractions, but not the detrital component. Samples were subsequently analyzed by ICP-MS. Although the Macondo crude oil is slightly enriched in Ni, V, and Co, with concentrations of 2.8, 0.9, and 0.08ppm, respectively, no significant enrichment of these metals is observed in Gulf of Mexico sediments. Sediment mass accumulation rates following the event range from 0.6 - 20 g/cm2/yr, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than pre-spill rates. Organic and inorganic carbon deposition rates from the 2010 and February 2011 cores are also elevated one to two orders of magnitude. 13C signatures of this recent deposited material are slightly depleted relative to pre-oil event material. Large sedimentation rates, depleted 13C values and lack of bioturbation on the surface of the deep sediments studied supports the hypothesis of a large sea-snow-like blizzard event during the oil-spill in 2010. Bacterially mediated oxidation of organic matter is reflected in a well-established sequence of oxidation-reduction reactions. We exploit redox sensitive trace elements including Mn, Fe, Re, U, Mo, and V to infer changes in the redox state of sediments following this large pulse of organic matter to the seafloor.

  1. Coupled Iron and Sulfur Isotope Constraints on the Archean and Paleoproterozoic Ocean Redox State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, O. J.; Bekker, A.

    2009-05-01

    The rise of atmospheric oxygen level by ca. 2.3 Ga have led to dramatic shifts in the iron and sulfur oceanic cycles. Past studies of non-mass dependent and mass dependent sulfur isotope record in sedimentary sulfides over geological time have placed important constraints on biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and evolution of Precambrian ocean chemistry. Recently, we applied a similar time-record approach to explore potential changes in Fe isotope composition of pyrite in black shales. Although the underlying mechanisms for Fe isotope fractionation in organic-rich sediments are debated, we identified direct link between the rise of atmospheric oxygen and changes in the Fe ocean cycle suggesting that Fe isotopes are useful proxies to the past ocean redox state. Since biogeochemical cycles of Fe and S are closely coupled in marine systems, Fe-limitation and S-limitation for pyrite formation in black shales should leave imprint on the isotopic record of both elements. Coupled Fe and S isotope systematics of Devonian pyrite display a range of 50‰ in δ34S values whereas δ56Fe values vary between - 1.0 and +0.1‰ consistent with Fe isotope variations in modern marine sediments. Similarly, pyrite in the 1.88 Ga Gunflint Formation has δ34S values ranging from - 32‰ to +10‰ and displays a range of δ56Fe values between 0 to - 0.4‰. In contrast, Archean black shales (e.g. Manjeri Fm., Belingwe Belt and Jeerinah Fm., Hamersley Basin) display a smaller range of δ34S values between together with ubiquitous non-mass dependent S-isotope fractionation but a larger range of δ56Fe values from - 3.5 to +0.2‰. A transitional period between ca. 2.3 and ca. 1.8 Ga is marked by a larger spread of δ34S values from - 34 to +28‰, disappearance of MIF and a larger range of δ56Fe values from - 1.7 to +1.1‰. These results confirm that after the rise of atmospheric oxygen by ca. 2.3 Ga, Paleoproterozoic ocean became stratified and gradually affected by an increase of seawater

  2. Proline Dehydrogenase Regulates Redox State and Respiratory Metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Lisvane Silva; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Zimbres, Flávia Menezes; Pral, Elisabeth Mieko Furusho; Diogo de Melo, Patrícia; Tahara, Erich B.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Elias, Maria Carolina; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Over the past three decades, L-proline has become recognized as an important metabolite for trypanosomatids. It is involved in a number of key processes, including energy metabolism, resistance to oxidative and nutritional stress and osmoregulation. In addition, this amino acid supports critical parasite life cycle processes by acting as an energy source, thus enabling host-cell invasion by the parasite and subsequent parasite differentiation. In this paper, we demonstrate that L-proline is oxidized to Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) by the enzyme proline dehydrogenase (TcPRODH, E.C. 1.5.99.8) localized in Trypanosoma cruzi mitochondria. When expressed in its active form in Escherichia coli, TcPRODH exhibits a Km of 16.58±1.69 µM and a Vmax of 66±2 nmol/min mg. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TcPRODH is a FAD-dependent dimeric state protein. TcPRODH mRNA and protein expression are strongly upregulated in the intracellular epimastigote, a stage which requires an external supply of proline. In addition, when Saccharomyces cerevisiae null mutants for this gene (PUT1) were complemented with the TcPRODH gene, diminished free intracellular proline levels and an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress in comparison to the null mutant were observed, supporting the hypothesis that free proline accumulation constitutes a defense against oxidative imbalance. Finally, we show that proline oxidation increases cytochrome c oxidase activity in mitochondrial vesicles. Overall, these results demonstrate that TcPRODH is involved in proline-dependant cytoprotection during periods of oxidative imbalance and also shed light on the participation of proline in energy metabolism, which drives critical processes of the T. cruzi life cycle. PMID:23894476

  3. Oxidative DNA damage in CD34+ myelodysplastic cells is associated with intracellular redox changes and elevated plasma tumour necrosis factor-alpha concentration.

    PubMed

    Peddie, C M; Wolf, C R; McLellan, L I; Collins, A R; Bowen, D T

    1997-12-01

    Ineffective haemopoiesis in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is mediated, at least in part, by apoptosis, though the mechanisms of apoptotic induction are unclear. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) promotes apoptosis via intracellular oxygen free radical production, oxidation of DNA and proteins, and is increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of MDS. Using single-cell gel electrophoresis, we have identified oxidized pyrimidine nucleotides in the progenitor-enriched bone marrow CD34+ compartment from MDS patients (P=0.039), which are absent in both CD34- MDS cells (P=0.53) and also CD34+ cells from normal subjects (P=0.55). MDS CD34+ blood cells also showed oxidized pyrimidine nucleotides compared with CD34- cells (P=0.029). Within normal subjects no differences were seen between CD34+ and CD34- bone marrow cell compartments. CD34+ bone marrow cell oxidized pyrimidines were strongly associated with elevated plasma TNF-alpha and low bone marrow mononuclear cell glutathione concentrations (5/6 patients) and the inverse relationship was also found (3/4 patients). This data implies a role for intracellular oxygen free radical production, perhaps mediated by TNF-alpha, in the pathogenesis of ineffective haemopoiesis in MDS and provides a rationale for the bone marrow stimulatory effects of antioxidants such as Amifostine in MDS.

  4. Calibration of CCD-based redox imaging for biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Wu, Baohua; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2009-02-01

    Clinically-translatable redox imaging methods developed in the Chance laboratory have been used for imaging mitochondrial metabolic states in tissues. The fluorescence of reduced pyridine nucleotide (PN or NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp) in the respiratory chain is sensitive to intracellular redox states. The redox ratios, i.e., Fp/(Fp+NADH) and NADH/(Fp+NADH) provide important metabolic information in living tissues. Usually the higher the metabolic flux, the less NADH, the more oxidized Fp, and the higher Fp redox ratio. Snap-freezing tissue samples under the liquid nitrogen condition preserves the tissue metabolic state in vivo. Here we report our work on the calibration of a homebuilt Charged Coupled Device (CCD) cryogenic redox imager using a series of snap-frozen solution standards of NADH and Fp. The NADH concentration ranged from 0-1318 μM and Fp from 0-719 μM. The sensitivity ratio of NADH and Fp channels was determined from the slope ratio of the two calibration curves and was used to correct the redox ratio of a human melanoma mouse xenograft. The NADH and Fp reference standards were placed adjacent to the tissue samples and their emission intensities were used to quantitatively determine the concentrations of NADH and Fp in a mouse xenograft of a human breast cancer line. Our method of imaging tissue samples along with reference NADH and Fp standards should facilitate the comparison of redox images obtained at different times or with different instrument parameters.

  5. The redox state as a correlate of senescence and wasting and as a target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Breitkreutz, R; Kinscherf, R; Röhrer, H; Bärtsch, P; Taut, F; Benner, A; Dröge, W

    1998-07-01

    The loss of body cell mass (bcm) in senescence and wasting is poorly understood. We now show that the plasma cystine/acid soluble thiol ratio, ie, an indicator of the redox state, is increased in old age and cancer patients and correlated with a decrease in bcm and plasma albumin. A cause/effect relationship was suggested by two independent studies with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). NAC caused an increase in the bcm of healthy persons with high plasma cystine/thiol ratios, and treatment of cancer patients with NAC plus interleukin-2 caused an increase in bcm, plasma albumin, and functional capacity. Albumin levels below 680 micromol/L were associated with an increase in body water. Our studies suggest that the shift in the redox state may contribute to the loss of bcm and may provide a quantitative guideline for therapeutic intervention. Treatment of cancer patients with thiol-containing antioxidants may improve the quality of life.

  6. Crocin Effects on Human Myeloma Cells Regarding Intracellular Redox State, DNA Fragmentation, and Apoptosis or Necrosis Profile

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Ramin; Jamialahmadi, Khadijeh; Riahi Zanjani, Bamdad; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Abnous, Khalil; Zamani Taghizadeh Rabe, Shahrzad; Tabasi, Nafiseh; Zali, Marjan; Rezaee, Marjan; Amin, Bahareh; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Well-documented studies reported several pharmacological properties for crocin, the active compound of Crocus sativus, such as its antitumor, radical scavenging, antidepressant, and memory-enhancing effects. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the possible cytotoxic activity of crocin on B lymphocytes in human myeloma (U266 cell line) after 24- and 48-hour treatment. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, cell viability was determined by the colorimetric MTT assay and cell death pattern was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. ROS (reactive oxygen species) production and DNA fragmentation were assessed using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) kit and PI staining, respectively. Results: The highest concentration of crocin significantly decreased ROS production after 48 hours of treatment. However, crocin had no effect on the expression level of HSP (Heat shock protein). Additionally, its administration caused a mild decline in cell viability and a mild increase in the population of DNA fragmented cells as well as apoptosis. Conclusions: In our study, no prominent effect was seen; therefore, in order to have a better perspective of crocin activity against cancerous cell lines, further studies are highly recommended. PMID:25625054

  7. Electrochemical Detection of Circadian Redox Rhythm in Cyanobacterial Cells via Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Pornpitra, Tunanunkul; Izawa, Seiichiro; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2015-06-01

    Recent research on cellular circadian rhythms suggests that the coupling of transcription-translation feedback loops and intracellular redox oscillations is essential for robust circadian timekeeping. For clarification of the molecular mechanism underlying the circadian rhythm, methods that allow for the dynamic and simultaneous detection of transcription/translation and redox oscillations in living cells are needed. Herein, we report that the cyanobacterial circadian redox rhythm can be electrochemically detected based on extracellular electron transfer (EET), a process in which intracellular electrons are exchanged with an extracellular electrode. As the EET-based method is non-destructive, concurrent detection with transcription/translation rhythm using bioluminescent reporter strains becomes possible. An EET pathway that electrochemically connected the intracellular region of cyanobacterial cells with an extracellular electrode was constructed via a newly synthesized electron mediator with cell membrane permeability. In the presence of the mediator, the open circuit potential of the culture medium exhibited temperature-compensated rhythm with approximately 24 h periodicity. Importantly, such circadian rhythm of the open circuit potential was not observed in the absence of the electron mediator, indicating that the EET process conveys the dynamic information regarding the intracellular redox state to the extracellular electrode. These findings represent the first direct demonstration of the intracellular circadian redox rhythm of cyanobacterial cells.

  8. Calibration of redox scanning for tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Wu, Baohua; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2009-02-01

    The fluorescence properties of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp) such as flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the respiratory chain are sensitive indicators of intracellular redox states and have been applied to the studies of mitochondrial function with energy-linked processes. The redox scanner, a threedimensional (3D) redox cryo-imager previously developed by Chance et al., can quantitatively determine the metabolic properties of tissue samples by acquiring the fluorescence images of NADH and Fp. The redox ratios, i.e., Fp/(Fp+NADH) and NADH/(Fp+NADH), obtained on the basis of relative signal intensity ratios, provide a sensitive index of steady-state of the mitochondrial metabolism that has been determined for a variety of biological tissues. This paper presents the further development of the instrument by establishing a calibration method to quantify the concentration of the fluorophores and facilitate the comparison of redox images obtained at different time or with different instrument functions. Calibration curves of both NADH and Fp have been obtained using snap-frozen standard references with NADH concentration ranging from 150-1400 μM and Fp from 80-720 μM. Snap-freeze tissue samples such as human breast tumors xenografted in mice, normal mouse pancreases and spleens were imaged. The NADH and Fp concentrations as well as the redox ratios in the tissue samples were quantified based on the adjacent solution standards of NADH and Fp. The obtained multi-slice redox images revealed high heterogeneity of the tissue samples which can be quantitatively interpreted.

  9. No Evidence of Exogenous Origin for the Abnormal Glutathione Redox State in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Alejandro; Jiang, Pan; Summerfelt, Ann; Du, Xiaoming; Chiappelli, Joshua; O’Donnell, Patricio; Kochunov, Peter; Hong, L. Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been associated with low glutathione (GSH), one of the most important substrates for natural defense against oxidative stress. This abnormality is often attributed to genetic or other pathological causes. However, low GSH in schizophrenia could also be due to insufficient antioxidant consumption or other exogenous factors. We evaluated GSH in relation to diet, smoking, and medication status in schizophrenia patients. We recruited 54 participants (29 schizophrenia patients and 25 normal controls). The Antioxidant Dietary Source Questions was used to estimate the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from participants’ diet. GSH and the oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) were assayed. We found that GSH was significantly lower (p < 0.001) while %GSSG was 2 to 5 fold higher (p = 0.023) in patients compared with controls. No evidence for lower TAC dietary intake was found in schizophrenia patients compared with controls; rather nominally higher TAC level was found in the patients diet (p=0.02). Analysis of consumption of individual food categories also failed to find evidence of reduced dietary antioxidant intake in schizophrenia patients. Smoking and medications did not significantly predict the GSH deficit either. However, there was a significant smoking by diagnosis interaction on GSH (p=0.026) such that smoking was associated with higher GSH level in controls while smoking in patients was not associated with this effect. Schizophrenia patients may have an impaired upregulation of GSH synthesis that normally occurs due to smoking-induced antioxidative response. Lower GSH was independently present in patients on clozapine (p = 0.005) and patients on other antipsychotics (p < 0.001) compared with controls. In conclusion, none of the exogenous sources played a major role in explaining abnormalities in the glutathione pathway in patients. The state of abnormal glutathione redox may therefore be a part of schizophrenia pathophysiology. PMID:23466187

  10. Proteomics Links the Redox State to Calcium Signaling During Bleaching of the Scleractinian Coral Acropora microphthalma on Exposure to High Solar Irradiance and Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Andrew J.; Dunlap, Walter C.; Beltran, Victor H.; Starcevic, Antonio; Hranueli, Daslav; Ward, Malcolm; Long, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard experiments were each performed over a 2 day period to examine the proteomic response of the symbiotic coral Acropora microphthalma exposed to acute conditions of high temperature/low light or high light/low temperature stress. During these treatments, corals had noticeably bleached. The photosynthetic performance of residual algal endosymbionts was severely impaired but showed signs of recovery in both treatments by the end of the second day. Changes in the coral proteome were determined daily and, using recently available annotated genome sequences, the individual contributions of the coral host and algal endosymbionts could be extracted from these data. Quantitative changes in proteins relevant to redox state and calcium metabolism are presented. Notably, expression of common antioxidant proteins was not detected from the coral host but present in the algal endosymbiont proteome. Possible roles for elevated carbonic anhydrase in the coral host are considered: to restore intracellular pH diminished by loss of photosynthetic activity, to indirectly limit intracellular calcium influx linked with enhanced calmodulin expression to impede late-stage symbiont exocytosis, or to enhance inorganic carbon transport to improve the photosynthetic performance of algal symbionts that remain in hospite. Protein effectors of calcium-dependent exocytosis were present in both symbiotic partners. No caspase-family proteins associated with host cell apoptosis, with exception of the autophagy chaperone HSP70, were detected, suggesting that algal loss and photosynthetic dysfunction under these experimental conditions were not due to host-mediated phytosymbiont destruction. Instead, bleaching occurred by symbiont exocytosis and loss of light-harvesting pigments of algae that remain in hospite. These proteomic data are, therefore, consistent with our premise that coral endosymbionts can mediate their own retention or departure from the coral host, which may manifest as

  11. Proteomics links the redox state to calcium signaling during bleaching of the scleractinian coral Acropora microphthalma on exposure to high solar irradiance and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Weston, Andrew J; Dunlap, Walter C; Beltran, Victor H; Starcevic, Antonio; Hranueli, Daslav; Ward, Malcolm; Long, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    Shipboard experiments were each performed over a 2 day period to examine the proteomic response of the symbiotic coral Acropora microphthalma exposed to acute conditions of high temperature/low light or high light/low temperature stress. During these treatments, corals had noticeably bleached. The photosynthetic performance of residual algal endosymbionts was severely impaired but showed signs of recovery in both treatments by the end of the second day. Changes in the coral proteome were determined daily and, using recently available annotated genome sequences, the individual contributions of the coral host and algal endosymbionts could be extracted from these data. Quantitative changes in proteins relevant to redox state and calcium metabolism are presented. Notably, expression of common antioxidant proteins was not detected from the coral host but present in the algal endosymbiont proteome. Possible roles for elevated carbonic anhydrase in the coral host are considered: to restore intracellular pH diminished by loss of photosynthetic activity, to indirectly limit intracellular calcium influx linked with enhanced calmodulin expression to impede late-stage symbiont exocytosis, or to enhance inorganic carbon transport to improve the photosynthetic performance of algal symbionts that remain in hospite. Protein effectors of calcium-dependent exocytosis were present in both symbiotic partners. No caspase-family proteins associated with host cell apoptosis, with exception of the autophagy chaperone HSP70, were detected, suggesting that algal loss and photosynthetic dysfunction under these experimental conditions were not due to host-mediated phytosymbiont destruction. Instead, bleaching occurred by symbiont exocytosis and loss of light-harvesting pigments of algae that remain in hospite. These proteomic data are, therefore, consistent with our premise that coral endosymbionts can mediate their own retention or departure from the coral host, which may manifest as

  12. Importance of the redox state of cytochrome c during caspase activation in cytosolic extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, M B; Zhivotovsky, B; Slater, A F; Burgess, D H; Orrenius, S

    1998-01-01

    The export of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm has been detected during apoptosis. Addition of cytochrome c to cytosolic extracts can activate the caspases, suggesting that this export could be an important intracellular signal for initiating the apoptotic programme. We have investigated the mechanism of caspase activation by cytochrome c. Mitochondrial cytochrome c normally shuttles electrons between complexes III and IV of the electron transport chain. Interaction with these complexes is dependent on electrostatic interactions via a polylysine binding pocket. Cytosolic caspase activation was only observed with intact holocytochrome c, and increasing the ionic composition of the extracts prevented activation, suggesting that stringent allosteric interactions between cytochrome c and other cytoplasmic factors are necessary. Cytochrome c was fully reduced within 5 min of addition to the cytosolic extracts. Potassium ferricyanide could maintain cytochrome c in an oxidized state, but care was taken to use ferricyanide at concentrations where its polyanion effect did not cause interference. The oxidized form of cytochrome c was able to activate the caspases. We conclude that reduced cytochrome c will function in the cytoplasm; however, its reduction is not a critical step, and electron transfer from cytochrome c to its cytoplasmic-binding partner(s) is not necessary in the pathway leading to apoptosis. PMID:9405280

  13. Vitamin C in Health and Disease: Its Role in the Metabolism of Cells and Redox State in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Méndez, Rodrigo; Rivas-Arancibia, Selva

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Linus Pauling published his studies, the effects of vitamin C have been surrounded by contradictory results. This may be because its effects depend on a number of factors such as the redox state of the body, the dose used, and also on the tissue metabolism. This review deals with vitamin C pharmacokinetics and its participation in neurophysiological processes, as well as its role in the maintenance of redox balance. The distribution and the concentration of vitamin C in the organs depend on the ascorbate requirements of each and on the tissue distribution of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 and 2 (SVCT1 and SVCT2). This determines the specific distribution pattern of vitamin C in the body. Vitamin C is involved in the physiology of the nervous system, including the support and the structure of the neurons, the processes of differentiation, maturation, and neuronal survival; the synthesis of catecholamine, and the modulation of neurotransmission. This antioxidant interacts with self-recycling mechanisms, including its participation in the endogenous antioxidant system. We conclude that the pharmacokinetic properties of ascorbate are related to the redox state and its functions and effects in tissues. PMID:26779027

  14. Vitamin C in Health and Disease: Its Role in the Metabolism of Cells and Redox State in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Méndez, Rodrigo; Rivas-Arancibia, Selva

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Linus Pauling published his studies, the effects of vitamin C have been surrounded by contradictory results. This may be because its effects depend on a number of factors such as the redox state of the body, the dose used, and also on the tissue metabolism. This review deals with vitamin C pharmacokinetics and its participation in neurophysiological processes, as well as its role in the maintenance of redox balance. The distribution and the concentration of vitamin C in the organs depend on the ascorbate requirements of each and on the tissue distribution of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 and 2 (SVCT1 and SVCT2). This determines the specific distribution pattern of vitamin C in the body. Vitamin C is involved in the physiology of the nervous system, including the support and the structure of the neurons, the processes of differentiation, maturation, and neuronal survival; the synthesis of catecholamine, and the modulation of neurotransmission. This antioxidant interacts with self-recycling mechanisms, including its participation in the endogenous antioxidant system. We conclude that the pharmacokinetic properties of ascorbate are related to the redox state and its functions and effects in tissues. PMID:26779027

  15. Untargeted Metabolomics Analysis Reveals a Link between ETHE1-Mediated Disruptive Redox State and Altered Metabolic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Nielsen, Camilla Bak; Johannsen, Mogens; Palmfeldt, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Defects in the gene encoding the persulfide dioxygenase ETHE1 are known to cause the severe inherited metabolic disorder ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE). In spite of known clinical characteristics, the molecular mechanisms underlying the ETHE1 deficiency are still obscure. Herein, to further analyze the molecular phenotype of the disease, we applied an untargeted metabolomics approach on cultivated fibroblasts of EE patients for pinpointing alterations in metabolite levels. Metabolites, as direct signatures of biochemical functions, can decipher biochemical pathways involved in the cellular phenotype of patient cells. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics, we identified 18 metabolites that have altered levels in fibroblasts from EE patients. Our data demonstrate disrupted redox state in EE patient cells, which is reflected by significantly decreased level of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, the down-regulation of several intermediate metabolites such as the redox cofactors NAD(+) and NADH as well as Krebs cycle intermediates revealed clear alteration in metabolic regulation. Pantothenic acid and several amino acids exhibited decreased levels, whereas the β-citrylglutamate with a putative role in brain development had an increased level in the EE patient cells. These observations indicate the severe impact of ETHE1 deficiency on cellular physiology and redox state, meanwhile suggesting targets for experimental studies on novel treatment options for the devastating metabolic disorder. PMID:27074420

  16. Regulation of the unbalanced redox state in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe tert-butyl hydroperoxide-resistant mutant.

    PubMed

    Gazdag, Z; Kálmán, Nikoletta; Blaskó, Agnes; Virág, Eszter; Belágyi, J; Pesti, M

    2014-06-01

    The one-gene mutation in the tert-butyl hydroperoxide-resistant mutant hyd1-190 of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe led to a 4-fold increase in resistance to t-BuOOH and decreased specific concentrations of superoxide and total thiols in comparison with the parental strain hyd+. It suggested an unbalanced redox state of the cells, which induced continuously increased specific activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase and decreased activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase to regulate the redox balance of the mutation-induced permanent, low-level but tolerable internal stress. These results may contribute to the understanding of internal, oxidative stress-related human diseases. PMID:24873914

  17. Can we use redox sensitive elements to indicate past stable state transitions? Preliminary results from three shallow lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeck, B. C.; Deschamp, M. L.; Hagen, S.; Theissen, K. M.; Hobbs, W.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow lakes are known to exist in two distinct stable states; either a clear-water state which is dominated by macrophytes or a turbid state which is dominated by algae. Results of past studies suggest that when lakes exist in the clear-water state they are more efficient at sequestering organic carbon. This is because lakes in the clear-water state generally have longer periods of low oxygen conditions which prevent the decomposition of organic matter, allowing lakes in this state to bury more organic carbon. With this in mind we decided to test redox sensitive elements’ ability to distinguish trends in the redox status of the lakes through time. We performed acid digestions to extract the environmentally available metals from the sediments of three shallow lakes in West-Central Minnesota. We used an ICP-AES to analyze 11 metals (Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Th, U, V and Zn) while using Al as an indicator of the erosion of weathered materials. 210-Pb age dates were determined for cores from all three lakes, providing strong chronologies for each record. Near the time of settlement there is an overall increase in metal concentrations other than Th and U, which show an overall decrease. The accumulation rates of metals show similar trends to the sedimentation rates for each lake. After normalizing against Al, both Pb and Co have sharp increases around the time of settlement and Pb:Al doubles. Most other elements show a decrease in concentrations after settlement, suggesting that something other than erosion of weathered materials is a factor in the concentrations of metals in the lake. We attempt to determine whether this signal is due to changes in redox status or another factor. Elemental and stable isotopic values for C and N were also analyzed to get a better understanding of the source of organic matter and how productive the lakes have been through time.

  18. Assignment of Individual Metal Redox States in a Metalloprotein By Crystallographic Refinement at Multiple X-Ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Einsle, O.; Andrade, S.L.A.; Dobbek, H.; Meyer, J.; Rees, D.C.; /Gottingen U. /Bayreuth U. /DRDC, Grenoble /Caltech

    2007-07-09

    A method is presented to derive anomalous scattering contributions for individual atoms within a protein crystal by collecting several sets of diffraction data at energies spread along an X-ray absorption edge of the element in question. The method has been applied to a [2Fe:2S] ferredoxin model system with localized charges in the reduced state of the iron-sulfur cluster. The analysis shows that upon reduction the electron resides at the iron atom closer to the protein surface. The technique should be sufficiently sensitive for more complex clusters with noninteger redox states and is generally applicable given that crystals are available.

  19. Cooling History and Redox State of NWA 8694 Chassignite: Comparison with Chassigny and NWA 2737

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Takenouchi, A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    NWA 8694 is a new chassignite whose constituent minerals are more Fe-rich than those in the other known chassignites (Chassigny and NWA 2737), and may suggest a petrogenetic relationship to nakhlites. In this abstract we report mineralogy of NWA 8694 to infer its cooling rate and redox state, and discuss its thermal and shock history in comparison with other chassignites. NWA 8694 is a cumulate dunite of approximately 2 mm olivine with interstitial pyroxene and feldspar. Olivine is homogeneous (Fo(sub 55-56)), but Ca decreases at the approximately 50-100 micrometer rim (0.25-0.1 wt% CaO). Because the Ca-depleted rim is narrower than those in other chassignites (approximately 50 ?micrometer), NWA 8694 may have cooled slightly faster than the others (approximately 30 C/yr), but would be in the same order. Pyroxenes are low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, both exhibiting sub-micron exsolution textures (0.2-0.3 micrometer wide lamellae with the spacing of 0.8-1.8 micrometers). Although the low-Ca pyroxene host has an orthopyroxene composition (Wo approximately 2), the EBSD analysis suggests a pigeonite structure (P2(sub 1)/c), which is also reported from the Chassigny pyroxene. The size of exsolution texture is a bit smaller, but broadly similar to those in other chassignites, implying a similar fast cooling rate (35-43 C/yr). Feldspars are isotropic (plagioclase: clustered around An25Or10, K-feldspar: approximately An19Or78), suggestive of extensive shock metamorphism, consistent with undulatory extinction of olivine. Feldspar compositions are around the equilibrium isotherm of approximately 800 C. The olivine and chromite compositions give an equilibration temperature of 760-810 C and logfO2 of QFM+/-0.3. The inferred fast cooling rate and high fO2 of NWA 8694 are both similar to those of Chassigny and NWA 2737, and suggest a common formation condition (e.g., thick lava flow or shallow intrusion) under oxidizing condition. The Fe-rich mineral compositions of NWA 8694 may be

  20. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent models with 3-iodothyronamine

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Maleki, Sepideh; Reiland, Hannah; Bütz, Daniel E; Chiellini, Grazia; Porter, Fariba-Assadi; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    This study used an optical technique to measure the effects of treating low (10 mg/kg) and high (25 mg/kg) doses of 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) on the metabolism in the kidney and heart of mice. The ratio of two intrinsic fluorophores in tissue, (NADH/FAD), called the NADH redox ratio (NADH RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. A cryofluorescence imaging instrument was used to provide a quantitative assessment of NADH RR in both kidneys and hearts in mice treated with 3-iodothyronamine. We compared those results to corresponding tissues in control mice. In the kidneys of mice treated with a high dose T1AM, the mean values of the maximum projection of NADH RR were 2.6 ± 0.6 compared to 3.20 ± 0.03 in control mice, indicating a 19% (± 0.4) significant increase in oxidative stress (OS) in the high dose-treated kidneys (P=0.047). However, kidneys treated with a low dose of T1AM showed no difference in NADH RR compared to the kidneys of control mice. Furthermore, low versus high dose treatment of T1AM showed different responses in the heart than in the kidneys. The mean value of the maximum projection of NADH RR in the heart changed from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 3.2 ± 0.6 for the low dose and the high dose T1AM-treated mice, respectively, as compared to 2.8 ± 0.7 in control mice. These values correspond to a 9% (±0.5) (P=0.045) and 14% (±0.5) (P=0.008) significant increase in NADH RR in the T1AM-treated hearts, indicating that the high dose T1AM-treated tissues have reduced OS compared to the low dose-treated tissues or the control tissues. These results suggest that while T1AM at a high dose increases oxidative response in kidneys, it has a protective effect in the heart and may exert its effect through alternative pathways at different doses and at tissue specific levels. PMID:24302559

  1. A State-of-the-Science Hg Redox Mechanism for Atmospheric Models: Constraints from Observations and Global Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Amos, H. M.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Y.; Dibble, T. S.; Slemr, F.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) in the atmosphere cycles between two redox forms, Hg0 and HgII. Hg0 has a lifetime of ~1 year allowing near-global transport, while HgII is efficiently removed by deposition within weeks. Understanding atmospheric Hg redox chemistry is critical to determining the patterns of deposition to the surface, where Hg can be transformed to the bioaccumulative neurotoxin, methylmercury. We present a state-of-the-science redox mechanism for use in atmospheric models, with new theoretical data, which we implement in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). We evaluate our simulation against atmospheric observations and examine implications for Hg deposition. Modeled HgII wet deposition depends on the oxidation of anthropogenic, ocean, and soil Hg0 emissions and the reduction of emitted anthropogenic HgII. We present a new global anthropogenic atmospheric Hg emissions inventory for 1990 - 2010 with improved speciation of power plant emissions and regional commercial Hg emissions. The seasonal cycle of ocean evasion is also critical to atmospheric Hg variability. We present an advance in our ability to model atmosphere-ocean exchange of Hg, through more realistic ocean circulation from the 3-D MITgcm. Our results suggest Br is the dominant oxidant in the stratosphere, consistent with constraints from aircraft observations of the Hg gradient with depth into the stratosphere. The proposed redox mechanism leads to increased HgII deposition to the Tropics, with implications for tropical surface ocean enrichment, and decreased deposition to the Southern Ocean. Within the uncertainty of Hg0 oxidation rates, we find atmospheric HgII reduction is still needed. We find changes in speciated Hg emissions due to emissions controls can explain recent observed regional trends in atmospheric Hg. These have shifted power plant impacts to relatively more global than local Hg deposition. Coupling to the more realistic 3-D ocean model improves simulated atmospheric Hg

  2. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  3. Novel double-decker phthalocyaninato terbium(III) single molecule magnets with stabilised redox states.

    PubMed

    Gonidec, Mathieu; Amabilino, David B; Veciana, Jaume

    2012-11-28

    Double-decker phthalocyanine lanthanide complexes are single molecule magnets (SMMs) presenting a thermally activated magnetic relaxation with relatively high effective barriers. For this reason they are potential candidates as components for data storage and spintronic devices. One of the disadvantages of these compounds is their redox instability: they are oxidized or reduced in the presence of mild oxidizing and reducing agents. To solve this issue, we designed, prepared and characterized new double-decker phthalocyanine based SMMs bearing electron withdrawing groups and therefore presenting an increased redox stability. In the present article, the synthesis and characterization of these novel compounds is presented and we demonstrate how the magnetic behavior of the complexes is virtually identical to that of the parent unsubstituted compounds.

  4. Definition of the redox states of cobalt-precorrinoids: investigation of the substrate and redox specificity of CbiL from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Spencer, P; Stolowich, N J; Sumner, L W; Scott, A I

    1998-10-20

    The enzyme CbiL from the facultative anaerobe Salmonella typhimurium exhibits a high degree of homology to CobI from the aerobe Pseudomonas denitrificans (29% identity; 51% conservation obtained by a Blastp search of the ncbi database). As CobI catalyzes the third methylation in the aerobic pathway to vitamin B12 it is proposed that CbiL catalyzes the analogous step in the anaerobic pathway. Potential metallo and metal-free substrates were characterized and their redox states defined by a combination of physicochemical techniques (MALDI-MS, NMR, UV/vis, IR, and EPR) and then used to investigate the function of CbiL. CbiL exhibited an absolute requirement for the presence of a metal ion (Co(II), Ni(II), or Zn(II)) within the tetrapyrrole substrate. CbiL had no preference for the redox state of its cobalt tetrapyrrole substrate, methylating both the reduced form, Co(II) 2, 7-dimethyl-dipyrrocorphin (Co(II)-precorrin-2), and the oxidized form, Co(III) 2,7-dimethyl-isobacterioclorin (Co(III)-factor-II). In contrast CbiL had a marked preference for the oxidized Ni(II) and Zn(II)-2,7-dimethyl-isobacteriochlorin (Ni(II) and Zn(II)-factor-II). Removal of the metal ion from a product of CbiL (Zn(II)-factor-III) allowed characterization by 13C NMR, identifying the tetrapyrrole as 2,7,20-trimethyl-isobacteriochlorin (factor-3), indicating that CbiL methylates at C20, the same site as that methylated by CobI. Competition experiments, utilizing isotopic labeling to distinguish otherwise identical mass substrates and products, revealed that oxidized Co(III) or Ni(II)-factor-II were equally good substrates, whereas Co(II)-precorrin-2 was much preferred over Ni(II)-precorrin-2. Excess Ni(II)-precorrin-2 did not decrease CbiL methylation of Co(II)-precorrin-2, implying that CbiL has a low affinity for Ni(II)-precorrin-2. These results are interpreted on the basis of tetrapyrrole ruffling occurring on the optimization of the metallo-N bond distances. The greater flexibility of the

  5. Turnover control of photosystem II: Use of redox-active herbicides to form the S[sub 3] state

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarsly, J.R.; Brudvig, G.W. )

    1992-12-02

    The O[sub 2]-evolving center of photosystem II, which contains an active-site tetramanganese-oxo cluster, catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of two water molecules to dioxygen, with the concomitant production of four H[sup +] and four electrons. During catalytic turnover, the manganese-oxo cluster steps through five intermediate oxidation states, which are known as the S[sub i] states (i = 0-4). While methods have been found to manipulate the system into S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] in high yields, efficient production of the S[sub 3] state in good yield at high concentration has not yet been achieved. Previous methods have suffered from the requirement of low protein concentration so that actinic flashes are saturating; the use of temperature to control S-state advancement under continuous illumination, which can lead to S-state scrambling; or the use of herbicides that bind to the Q[sub B] site and restrict the system to one turnover. The authors describe here a method for the high-yield production of the S[sub 3] state in highly-concentrated samples of photosystem II, through the use of electron-accepting herbicides which bind to the Q[sub B] site. Redox-active herbicides can be used, in principle, to limit S-state cycling to any desired number of turnovers, given the appropriate herbicide. This work has fundamental methodological implications not only for the study of photosystem II but also for other multistate redox protein systems.

  6. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  7. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm.

  8. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm. PMID:27677553

  9. REDOX state analysis of platinoid elements in simulated high-level radioactive waste glass by synchrotron radiation based EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Nakada, Masami; Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji; Akabori, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analyses were performed to evaluate REDOX (REDuction and OXidation) state of platinoid elements in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass samples prepared under different conditions of temperature and atmosphere. At first, EXAFS functions were compared with those of standard materials such as RuO2. Then structural parameters were obtained from a curve fitting analysis. In addition, a fitting analysis used a linear combination of the two standard EXAFS functions of a given elements metal and oxide was applied to determine ratio of metal/oxide in the simulated glass. The redox state of Ru was successfully evaluated from the linear combination fitting results of EXAFS functions. The ratio of metal increased at more reducing atmosphere and at higher temperatures. Chemical form of rhodium oxide in the simulated glass samples was RhO2 unlike expected Rh2O3. It can be estimated rhodium behaves according with ruthenium when the chemical form is oxide.

  10. PSI photoinhibition is more related to electron transfer from PSII to PSI rather than PSI redox state in Psychotria rubra.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-07-01

    Although it has been believed that wild-type plants are capable of protecting photosystem I (PSI) under high light, our previous study indicates that PSI is sensitive to high light in the shade-established tree species Psychotria rubra. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we examined the roles of electron transfer from PSII to PSI and PSI redox state in PSI photoinhibition in P. rubra by treatments with lincomycin (Lin), diuron (DCMU), and methyl viologen (MV). After exposure to 2000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for 2 h, PSI activity decreased by 35, 29, 3, and 49 % in samples treated with H2O, Lin, DCMU, and MV, respectively. Meanwhile, the MV-treated samples showed higher P700 oxidation ratio than the H2O-treated samples, suggesting the PSI photoinhibition under high light was accompanied by high levels of P700 oxidation ratio. PSI photoinhibition was alleviated in the DCMU-treated samples but was accelerated in the MV-treated samples, suggesting that PSI photoinhibition in P. rubra was mainly controlled by electron transfer from PSII to PSI. Taking together, PSI photoinhibition is more related to electron transfer from PSII to PSI rather than PSI redox state in P. rubra, which is different from the mechanisms of PSI photoinhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana and cucumber.

  11. New Approach in Translational Medicine: Effects of Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW) on NF-κB/iNOS Pathway in U937 Cell Line under Altered Redox State

    PubMed Central

    Franceschelli, Sara; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Pesce, Mirko; Ferrone, Alessio; Patruno, Antonia; de Lutiis, Maria Anna; Grilli, Alfredo; Felaco, Mario; Croce, Fausto; Speranza, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    It is known that increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can exert harmful effects, altering the cellular redox state. Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW) produced near the cathode during water electrolysis exhibits high pH, high concentration of dissolved hydrogen and an extremely negative redox potential. Several findings indicate that ERW had the ability of a scavenger free radical, which results from hydrogen molecules with a high reducing ability and may participate in the redox regulation of cellular function. We investigated the effect of ERW on H2O2-induced U937 damage by evaluating the modulation of redox cellular state. Western blotting and spectrophotometrical analysis showed that ERW inhibited oxidative stress by restoring the antioxidant capacity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Consequently, ERW restores the ability of the glutathione reductase to supply the cell of an important endogenous antioxidant, such as GSH, reversing the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on redox balance of U937 cells. Therefore, this means a reduction of cytotoxicity induced by peroxynitrite via a downregulation of the NF-κB/iNOS pathway and could be used as an antioxidant for preventive and therapeutic application. In conclusion, ERW can protect the cellular redox balance, reducing the risk of several diseases with altered cellular homeostasis such as inflammation. PMID:27598129

  12. New Approach in Translational Medicine: Effects of Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW) on NF-κB/iNOS Pathway in U937 Cell Line under Altered Redox State.

    PubMed

    Franceschelli, Sara; Gatta, Daniela Maria Pia; Pesce, Mirko; Ferrone, Alessio; Patruno, Antonia; de Lutiis, Maria Anna; Grilli, Alfredo; Felaco, Mario; Croce, Fausto; Speranza, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    It is known that increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can exert harmful effects, altering the cellular redox state. Electrolyzed Reduced Water (ERW) produced near the cathode during water electrolysis exhibits high pH, high concentration of dissolved hydrogen and an extremely negative redox potential. Several findings indicate that ERW had the ability of a scavenger free radical, which results from hydrogen molecules with a high reducing ability and may participate in the redox regulation of cellular function. We investigated the effect of ERW on H₂O₂-induced U937 damage by evaluating the modulation of redox cellular state. Western blotting and spectrophotometrical analysis showed that ERW inhibited oxidative stress by restoring the antioxidant capacity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Consequently, ERW restores the ability of the glutathione reductase to supply the cell of an important endogenous antioxidant, such as GSH, reversing the inhibitory effect of H₂O₂ on redox balance of U937 cells. Therefore, this means a reduction of cytotoxicity induced by peroxynitrite via a downregulation of the NF-κB/iNOS pathway and could be used as an antioxidant for preventive and therapeutic application. In conclusion, ERW can protect the cellular redox balance, reducing the risk of several diseases with altered cellular homeostasis such as inflammation. PMID:27598129

  13. Acid-base titration of streptococci and the physical states of intracellular ions.

    PubMed

    Marquis, R E; Porterfield, N; Matsumura, P

    1973-05-01

    Acid titrations of intact and butanol-treated cells of Streptococcus faecalis revealed that nearly all of the intracellular K(+) ions could diffuse into the suspending medium in association with small anions, including ribonucleic acid breakdown products, when the cell membrane was damaged. In contrast, nearly all of the intracellular Mg(2+) ions appeared to be firmly bound to stable internal cell components but could be displaced reversibly by hydronium ions. The cell membrane acted as a barrier to ion movements, and Mg(2+) displacement from intact cells required more acid conditions, by as much as 2.5 pH units, than did displacement from butanol-damaged cells. Some 15 to 20% of the cell magnesium appeared to be associated with surface structures in that it could be removed at pH 7 with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or displaced by Co(2+), Ni(2+), Sr(2+), or La(3+). Magnesium could be displaced from isolated cell walls and membranes by hydronium ions in the pH range from 5 to 3, over which carboxyl groups were titrated. Displacement of magnesium from ribosomes also took place between pH 5 and 3, but it was more difficult to identify the magnesium-releasing groups because both protein carboxyl groups and purine and pyrimidine ring nitrogens can become protonated in this pH range. Isolated protoplast membranes remained structurally intact when completely depleted of magnesium. Furthermore, protoplasts isolated from intact cells were found to have greatly enhanced resistance to osmotic shock in acid media, even when solute loss was not extensive. Osmotic resistance was lost when the protoplasts were again placed in neutral media, and this reversibility suggested that acidification caused changes in the physical properties of membranes as well as solute leakage from cells.

  14. Use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Redox State In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    SWARTZ, HAROLD M.; KHAN, NADEEM; KHRAMTSOV, VALERY V.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of how electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be used to measure redox-related parameters in vivo. The values of this approach include that the measurements are made under fully physiological conditions, and some of the measurements cannot be made by other means. Three complementary approaches are used with in vivo EPR: the rate of reduction or reactions of nitroxides, spin trapping of free radicals, and measurements of thiols. All three approaches already have produced unique and useful information. The measurement of the rate of decrease of nitroxides technically is the simplest, but difficult to interpret because the measured parameter, reduction in the intensity of the nitroxide signal, can occur by several different mechanisms. In vivo spin trapping can provide direct evidence for the occurrence of specific free radicals in vivo and reflect relative changes, but accurate absolute quantification remains challenging. The measurement of thiols in vivo also appears likely to be useful, but its development as an in vivo technique is at an early stage. It seems likely that the use of in vivo EPR to measure redox processes will become an increasingly utilized and valuable tool. PMID:17678441

  15. Shifting redox states of the iron center partitions CDO between crosslink formation or cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Njeri, Catherine W; Ellis, Holly R

    2014-09-15

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cysteine sulfinic acid. The mammalian CDO enzymes contain a thioether crosslink between Cys93 and Tyr157, and purified recombinant CDO exists as a mixture of the crosslinked and non crosslinked isoforms. The current study presents a method of expressing homogenously non crosslinked CDO using a cell permeative metal chelator in order to provide a comprehensive investigation of the non crosslinked and crosslinked isoforms. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of purified non crosslinked CDO revealed that the iron was in the EPR silent Fe(II) form. Activity of non crosslinked CDO monitoring dioxygen utilization showed a distinct lag phase, which correlated with crosslink formation. Generation of homogenously crosslinked CDO resulted in an ∼5-fold higher kcat/Km value compared to the enzyme with a heterogenous mixture of crosslinked and non crosslinked CDO isoforms. EPR analysis of homogenously crosslinked CDO revealed that this isoform exists in the Fe(III) form. These studies present a new perspective on the redox properties of the active site iron and demonstrate that a redox switch commits CDO towards either formation of the Cys93-Tyr157 crosslink or oxidation of the cysteine substrate.

  16. Redox state and energetic equilibrium determine the magnitude of stress in Hydrilla verticillata upon exposure to arsenate.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Suprasanna, Penna; D'Souza, Stanislaus Francis

    2011-10-01

    Arsenic (As) is a potential hazard to plants' health, however the mechanisms of its toxicity are yet to be properly understood. To determine the impact of redox state and energetic in stress imposition, plants of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle, which are known to be potential accumulator of As, were exposed to 100 and 500 μM arsenate (AsV) for 4 to 96 h. Plants demonstrated significant As accumulation with the maximum being at 500 μM after 96 h (568 μg g(-1) dry weight, dw). The accumulation of As led to a significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and percentage of DNA degradation. In addition, the activity of pro-oxidant enzymes like NADPH oxidase and ascorbate oxidase also showed significant increases. These parameters collectively indicated oxidative stress, which in turn caused an increase in percentage of cell death. These negative effects were seemingly linked to an altered energetic and redox equilibrium [analyzed in terms of ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD, NADPH/NADP, reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione, and ascorbate/dehydroascobate ratios]. Although there was significant increase in the levels of phytochelatins, the As chelating ligands, a large amount of As was presumably present as free ion particularly at 500 μM AsV, which supposedly produced toxic responses. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that the magnitude of disturbance to redox and energetic equilibrium of plants upon AsV exposure determines the extent of toxicity to plants.

  17. Novel Flurometric Tool to Assess Mitochondrial Redox State of Isolated Perfused Rat Lungs After Exposure to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Audi, Said H.; Staniszewski, Kevin S.; Haworth, Steven T.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Ranji, Mahsa; Zablocki, Clement J.

    2013-01-01

    in mitochondrial redox state of hyperoxic lungs prior to histological changes characteristic of hyperoxia. PMID:25379360

  18. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  19. Controlling the Charge State and Redox Properties of Supported Polyoxometalates via Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Johnson, Grant E.; Andersen, Amity; Du, Dan; Zhang, Weiying; Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Lin, Yuehe; Laskin, Julia

    2014-12-04

    We investigate the controlled deposition of Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) anions, PMo12O403- and PMo12O402-, onto different self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces via soft landing of mass-selected ions. Utilizing in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), ex situ cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electronic structure calculations, we examine the structure and charge retention of supported multiply-charged POM anions and characterize the redox properties of the modified surfaces. SAMs of alkylthiol (HSAM), perfluorinated alkylthiol (FSAM), and alkylthiol terminated with NH3+ functional groups (NH3+SAM) are chosen as model substrates for soft landing to examine the factors which influence the immobilization and charge retention of multiply charged anionic molecules. The distribution of charge states of POMs on different SAM surfaces are determined by comparing the IRRAS spectra with vibrational spectra calculated using density functional theory (DFT). In contrast to the results obtained previously for multiply charged cations, soft landed anions are found to retain charge on all three SAM surfaces. This charge retention is attributed to the substantial electron binding energy of the POM anions. Investigation of redox properties by CV reveals that, while surfaces prepared by soft landing exhibit similar features to those prepared by adsorption of POM from solution, the soft landed POM2- has a pronounced shift in oxidation potential compared to POM3- for one of the redox couples. These results demonstrate that ion soft landing is uniquely suited for precisely controlled preparation of substrates with specific electronic and chemical properties that cannot be achieved using conventional deposition techniques.

  20. The effects of temperature, pH and redox state on the stability of glutamic acid in hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namhey; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Cody, George D.; Hazen, Robert M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural hydrothermal vent environments cover a wide range of physicochemical conditions involving temperature, pH and redox state. The stability of simple biomolecules such as amino acids in such environments is of interest in various fields of study from the origin of life to the metabolism of microbes at the present day. Numerous previous experimental studies have suggested that amino acids are unstable under hydrothermal conditions and decompose rapidly. However, previous studies have not effectively controlled the redox state of the hydrothermal fluids. Here we studied the stability of glutamate with and without reducing hydrothermal conditions imposed by 13 mM aqueous H2 at temperatures of 150, 200 and 250 °C and initial (25 °C) pH values of 6 and 10 in a flow-through hydrothermal reactor with reaction times from 3 to 36 min. We combined the experimental measurements with theoretical calculations to model the in situ aqueous speciation and pH values. As previously observed under hydrothermal conditions, the main reaction involves glutamate cyclizing to pyroglutamate through a simple dehydration reaction. However, the amounts of decomposition products of the glutamate detected, including succinate, formate, carbon dioxide and ammonia depend on the temperature, the pH and particularly the redox state of the fluid. In the absence of dissolved H2, glutamate decomposes in the sequence glutamate, glutaconate, α-hydroxyglutarate, ketoglutarate, formate and succinate, and ultimately to CO2 and micromolar quantities of H2(aq). Model speciation calculations indicate the CO2, formate and H2(aq) are not in metastable thermodynamic equilibrium. However, with 13 mM H2(aq) concentrations, the amounts of decomposition products are suppressed at all temperatures and pH values investigated. The small amounts of CO2 and formate present are calculated to be in metastable equilibrium with the H2. It is further proposed that there is a metastable equilibrium between glutamate

  1. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  2. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  3. Nuclear Waste Package Mockups: A Study of In-situ Redox State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helean, K.; Anderson, B.; Brady, P. V.

    2006-05-01

    The Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR), located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility in the U.S. for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuels. Total system performance assessment(TSPA) has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are Np, Tc, and I. These three radionuclides are mobile in most geochemical settings, and therefore sequestering them within the repository horizon is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Corroding steel may offset radionuclide transport processes within the proposed waste packages at YMR by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron has been shown to reduce UO22+ to UO2s, and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials have been shown to adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals. Locally reducing conditions may lead to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO4-, NpO2+, and UO22+ and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Water occluded during corrosion produces bulky corrosion products, and consequently less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this study is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package corrosion products and their effects on local redox conditions, radionuclide transport, and porosity. In order to measure in-situ redox, six small-scale (1:40) waste package mockups were constructed using A516 and 316 stainless steel, the same materials as the proposed Yucca Mountain waste packages. The mockups are periodically injected with a simulated groundwater and the accumulated effluent and corrosion products are evaluated for their Fe(II)/Fe(III) content and mineralogy. Oxygen fugacities are then calculated and, thus, in-situ redox conditions are determined. Early results indicate that corrosion products are largely amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxides, goethite and magnetite. That information together with the

  4. Nuclear Waste Package Mockups: A Study of In-Situ Redox State

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Helean; B.E. ANderson; P.V. Brady

    2006-05-15

    The proposed Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR), located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility in the US for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuels. Performance assessments have indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose to a Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual are Np, Tc, and I. These three radionuclides are mobile in most geochemical settings, and therefore sequestering them within the repository horizon would provide an effective limit to their migration. Corroding steel may offset radionuclide transport processes within the proposed waste packages at YMR by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron containing materials such as magnetite have been shown to reduce UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to UO{sub 2(s)}, and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials have been shown to adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals (e.g. green rust). Locally reducing conditions may lead to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Water occluded during corrosion produces bulky corrosion products, and consequently less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this study is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package corrosion products and their effects on local redox conditions, radionuclide transport, and porosity. In order to measure in-situ redox, six small-scale (1:40) waste package mockups were constructed using A516 and 316 stainless steel, the same materials as the proposed Yucca Mountain waste packages. The mockups are periodically injected with a simulated groundwater and the accumulated effluent and corrosion products are evaluated for their Fe(II)/Fe(III) content and mineralogy. Oxygen fugacities are then calculated and, thus, in-situ redox conditions are

  5. Decrease in age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive improvement following vitamin D supplementation are associated with modulation of brain energy metabolism and redox state.

    PubMed

    Briones, T L; Darwish, H

    2014-03-14

    In the present study we examined whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive impairment by enhancing brain energy homeostasis and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, and modulating the redox state. Male F344 rats aged 20 months (aged) and 6 months (young) were randomly assigned to either vitamin D supplementation or no supplementation (control). Rats were housed in pairs and the supplementation group (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received subcutaneous injections of vitamin D (1, α25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) for 21 days. Control animals (n=10 young and n=10 aged) received equal volume of normal saline and behavioral testing in the water maze started on day 14 after the initiation of vitamin D supplementation. Tau phosphorylation, markers of brain energy metabolism (ADP/ATP ratio and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) and redox state (levels of reactive oxygen species, activity of superoxide dismutase, and glutathione levels) as well as PP2A activity were measured in hippocampal tissues. Our results extended previous findings that: (1) tau phosphorylation significantly increased during aging; (2) markers of brain energy metabolism and redox state are significantly decreased in aging; and (3) aged rats demonstrated significant learning and memory impairment. More importantly, we found that age-related changes in brain energy metabolism, redox state, and cognitive function were attenuated by vitamin D supplementation. No significant differences were seen in tau hyperphosphorylation, markers of energy metabolism and redox state in the young animal groups. Our data suggest that vitamin D ameliorated the age-related tau hyperphosphorylation and cognitive decline by enhancing brain energy metabolism, redox state, and PP2A activity making it a potentially useful therapeutic option to alleviate the effects of aging.

  6. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Wiederkehr, Andreas; De Marchi, Umberto

    2015-11-26

    Mitochondria sense, shape and integrate signals, and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca(2+) waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance, the molecular nature of the proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and down-stream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio, but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state, which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redox-sensitive sensors, real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca(2+) combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review, we describe mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings, revealing how mitochondrial Ca(2+) influences the matrix redox state. As a result, mitochondrial Ca(2+) is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  7. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Wiederkehr, Andreas; De Marchi, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria sense, shape and integrate signals, and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca2+ waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance, the molecular nature of the proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca2+ promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and down-stream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio, but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state, which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redox-sensitive sensors, real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca2+ combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca2+ and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review, we describe mitochondrial Ca2+ handling, focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings, revealing how mitochondrial Ca2+ influences the matrix redox state. As a result, mitochondrial Ca2+ is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease. PMID:26629314

  8. Inadequacy of high K+/nigericin for calibrating BCECF. I. Estimating steady-state intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Boyarsky, G; Hanssen, C; Clyne, L A

    1996-10-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in single vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells, cultured from rabbit abdominal aorta, using 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) on a microscope-based fluorescence system. Three lines of evidence are presented that using nigericin along with high external K+ to calibrate intracellular BCECF produces systematic errors in pHi. 1) The intrinsic buffering power (beta int), measured using weak bases (e.g., ammonium), was 2.5 times smaller than that measured using weak acids (e.g., propionic acid). This discrepancy became small if pHi had really been approximately 0.2 lower than what was estimated using nigericin-calibrated pHi values. 2) Total cellular buffering power (beta tot) in the presence of CO2/HCO-3 was measured and found to be much smaller than could account for the beta int, together with the contribution of CO2/HCO3 (beta CO2: assumed to be an open system buffer). If the true pHi values were approximately 0.2-0.4 lower than our nigericin-calibrated values, then the sum of beta int and beta CO2 equals beta tot. 3) A null technique was utilized for bracketing steady-state pHi; estimates of steady-state pHi using this null technique were approximately 0.2 lower than the high K+/nigericin-calibrated estimates. Four other cell types were examined: rat hepatocytes, rat corticotrophs, human keratinocytes, and rabbit fibroblasts. These other cells also displayed discrepancies between null and nigericin estimates of steady-state pHi, as well as differences between buffering power assessed using weak bases and acids. Finally, one potential source for these discrepancies is described: selecting an inappropriate external K+ to use with nigericin can produce systematic errors in pHi of approximately 0.1. PMID:8897819

  9. Real-time assays for monitoring the influence of sulfide and sulfane sulfur species on protein thiol redox states.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Romy; Dick, Tobias P

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to induce persulfidation of protein thiols. However, the process of H2S-induced persulfidation is not fully understood as it requires an additional oxidant. There are several mechanistic possibilities and it is of interest to determine which pathway is kinetically most relevant. Here, we detail in vitro assays for the real-time monitoring of thiol redox states in two model proteins with oxidizable cysteines, PTEN, and roGFP2. These allow kinetic measurements of the response of defined protein thiols (or disulfides) to sulfide and sulfane sulfur species. The combination of these assays with cold cyanolysis reveals the role of intermediary sulfane sulfur species in H2S-induced protein thiol oxidation. PMID:25747475

  10. Drought-induced changes in the redox state of alpha-tocopherol, ascorbate, and the diterpene carnosic acid in chloroplasts of Labiatae species differing in carnosic acid contents.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Alegre, Leonor

    2003-04-01

    To assess antioxidative protection by carnosic acid (CA) in combination with that of other low-molecular weight (M(r)) antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol [alpha-T] and ascorbate [Asc]) in chloroplasts, we measured endogenous concentrations of these antioxidants, their redox states, and other indicators of oxidative stress in chloroplasts of three Labiatae species, differing in their CA contents, exposed to drought stress in the field. Damage to the photosynthetic apparatus was observed neither in CA-containing species (rosemary [Rosmarinus officinalis]) and sage [Salvia officinalis]) nor in CA-free species (lemon balm [Melissa officinalis]) at relative leaf water contents between 86% and 58%, as indicated by constant maximum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry ratios and malondialdehyde levels in chloroplasts. The three species showed significant increases in alpha-T, a shift of the redox state of alpha-T toward its reduced state, and increased Asc levels in chloroplasts under stress. Lemon balm showed the highest increases in alpha-T and Asc in chloroplasts under stress, which might compensate for the lack of CA. Besides, whereas in rosemary and sage, the redox state of CA was shifted toward its oxidized state and the redox state of Asc was kept constant, lemon balm displayed a shift of the redox state of Asc toward its oxidized state under stress. In vitro experiments showed that both CA and Asc protect alpha-T and photosynthetic membranes against oxidative damage. These results are consistent with the contention that CA, in combination with other low-M(r) antioxidants, helps to prevent oxidative damage in chloroplasts of water-stressed plants, and they show functional interdependence among different low-M(r) antioxidants in chloroplasts.

  11. Real-time measurements of the redox states of c-type cytochromes in electroactive biofilms: a confocal resonance Raman Microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Virdis, Bernardino; Millo, Diego; Donose, Bogdan C; Batstone, Damien J

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM) was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208 ± 49 µA cm(-2)) and mature (57 days, j = 267 ± 73 µA cm(-2)) biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190 ± 37 µA cm(-2)) with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  12. Real-Time Measurements of the Redox States of c-Type Cytochromes in Electroactive Biofilms: A Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Virdis, Bernardino; Millo, Diego; Donose, Bogdan C.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM) was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208±49 µA cm−2) and mature (57 days, j = 267±73 µA cm−2) biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190±37 µA cm−2) with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms. PMID:24587123

  13. In situ Raman study of redox state changes of mitochondrial cytochromes in a perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Brazhe, Nadezda A; Treiman, Marek; Faricelli, Barbara; Vestergaard, Jakob H; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Raman spectroscopy-based approach for simultaneous study of redox changes in c-and b-type cytochromes and for a semiquantitative estimation of the amount of oxygenated myoglobin in a perfused rat heart. Excitation at 532 nm was used to obtain Raman scattering of the myocardial surface of the isolated heart at normal and hypoxic conditions. Raman spectra of the heart under normal pO2 demonstrate unique peaks attributable to reduced c-and b-type cytochromes and oxymyoglobin (oMb). The cytochrome peaks decreased in intensity upon FCCP treatment, as predicted from uncoupling mitochondrial respiration. Conversely, transient hypoxia causes the reversible increase in the intensity of peaks assigned to cytochromes c and c1, reflecting electron stacking proximal to cytochrome oxidase due to the lack of terminal electron acceptor O2. Intensities of peaks assigned to oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin were used for the semiquantitative estimation of oMb deoxygenation that was found to be of approximately 50[Formula: see text] under hypoxia conditions.

  14. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise on Cognitive Abilities and Redox State Biomarkers in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eisa, Einas S.

    2016-01-01

    We used a moderate aerobic exercise program for 24 weeks to measure the positive impact of physical activity on oxidative stress and inflammatory markers and its association with cognitive performance in healthy older adults. A total of 100 healthy subjects (65–95 Yrs) were randomly classified into two groups: control group (n = 50) and exercise group (n = 50). Cognitive functioning, physical activity score, MDA, 8-OHdG, TAC, and hs-CRP were assessed using LOTCA battery, prevalidated PA questionnaire, and immunoassay techniques. LOTCA 7-set scores of cognitive performance showed a significant correlation with physical activity status and the regulation of both oxidative stress free radicals and inflammatory markers in all older subjects following 24 weeks of moderate exercise. Physically active persons showed a higher cognitive performance along with reduction in the levels of MDA, 8-OHdG, and hs-CRP and increase in TAC activity compared with sedentary participants. Cognitive performance correlated positively with the increase in TAC activity and physical fitness scores and negatively with MDA, 8-OHdG, and hs-CRP, respectively. There was a significant improvement in motor praxis, vasomotor organization, thinking operations, and attention and concentration among older adults. In conclusion, moderate aerobic training for 24 weeks has a positive significant effect in improving cognitive functions via modulating redox and inflammatory status of older adults. PMID:27195073

  15. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sporty, Jennifer L.; Kabir, Md. Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2009-01-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH3CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV–Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  16. Probing the redox states at the surface of electroactive nanoporous NiO thin films.

    PubMed

    Marrani, Andrea G; Novelli, Vittoria; Sheehan, Stephen; Dowling, Denis P; Dini, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous NiO thin film electrodes were obtained via plasma-assisted microwave sintering and characterized by means of a combination of electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The aim of this study is the elucidation of the nature of the surface changes introduced by the redox processes of this nanostructured material. NiO undergoes two distinct electrochemical processes of oxidation in aqueous electrolyte with the progress of NiO anodic polarization. These findings are consistent with the sequential formation of oxyhydroxide species at the surface, the chemical nature of which was assessed by XPS. Electronic relaxation effects in the Ni 2p spectra clearly indicated that the superficial oxyhydroxide species resulted to be β-NiOOH and γ-NiOOH. We also show for the first time spectral evidence of an electrochemically generated Ni(IV) species. This study has direct relevance for those applications in which NiO electrodes are utilized in aqueous electrolyte, namely catalytic water splitting or electrochromism, and may constitute a starting point for the comprehension of electronic phenomena at the NiO/organic electrolyte interface of cathodic dye-sensitized solar cells (p-DSCs). PMID:24325361

  17. Direct determination of the redox status of cysteine residues in proteins in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Satoshi; Tatenaka, Yuki; Ohuchi, Yuya; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • A new DNA-maleimide which is cleaved by UV irradiation, DNA-PCMal, was developed. • DNA-PCMal can be used like DNA-Mal to analyze the redox state of cysteine residues. • It is useful for detecting the thiol redox status of a protein in vivo by Western blotting method. • Thus, DNA-PCMal can be a powerful tool for redox proteomics analysis. - Abstract: The redox states of proteins in cells are key factors in many cellular processes. To determine the redox status of cysteinyl thiol groups in proteins in vivo, we developed a new maleimide reagent, a photocleavable maleimide-conjugated single stranded DNA (DNA-PCMal). The DNA moiety of DNA-PCMal is easily removed by UV-irradiation, allowing DNA-PCMal to be used in Western blotting applications. Thereby the state of thiol groups in intracellular proteins can be directly evaluated. This new maleimide compound can provide information concerning redox proteins in vivo, which is important for our understanding of redox networks in the cell.

  18. Redox chemistry of copper-amyloid-beta: the generation of hydroxyl radical in the presence of ascorbate is linked to redox-potentials and aggregation state.

    PubMed

    Guilloreau, Luc; Combalbert, Sarah; Sournia-Saquet, Alix; Mazarguil, Honoré; Faller, Peter

    2007-07-23

    Aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) to amyloid plaques is a key event in Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid-cascade hypothesis, Abeta aggregates are toxic to neurons through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Copper ions play an important role, because they are able to bind to Abeta and influence its aggregation properties. Moreover, Cu-Abeta is supposed to be directly involved in ROS production. To get a better understanding of these reactions, we measured the production of HO(.) and the redox potential of Cu-Abeta. The results were compared to other biological copper-peptide complexes in order to get an insight into the biological relevance. Cu-Abeta produced more HO(.) than the complex of copper with Asp-Ala-His-Lys (Cu-DAHK), but less than with Gly-His-Lys (Cu-GHK). Cyclic voltammetry revealed that the order for reduction potential is Cu-GHK>Cu-Abeta>Cu-DAHK, but for the oxidation potential the order is reversed. Thus, easier copper redox cycling correlated to higher HO(.) production. The copper complex of the form Abeta1-42 showed a HO(.) production five-times higher than that of the form Abeta1-40. Time-dependence and aggregation studies suggest that an aggregation intermediate is responsible for this increased HO(.) production. PMID:17577900

  19. [The role of oxidative protein modification and the gluthatione system in modulation of the redox status of breast epithelial cells].

    PubMed

    Stepovaya, E A; Shakhristova, E V; Ryazantseva, N V; Nosareva, O L; Yakushina, V D; Nosova, A I; Gulaya, V S; Stepanova, E A; Chil'chigashev, R I; Novitsky, V V

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the SH-group blocker N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and thiol group protector 1,4-dithioerythritol (DTE) on the redox status of cells HBL-100 cells, oxidative modification of their proteins and the state of glutathione and thioredoxin systems have been investigated. Breast epithelial cells cultivated in the presence of NEM were characterized by decreased redox status, increased glutathione reductase activity, and increased concentrations of products of irreversible oxidative modification of protein and amino acids. Cultivation of HBL-100 cells in the presence of DTE resulted in a shift of the redox status towards reduction processes and increased reversible protein modification by glutathionylation. The proposed model of intracellular redox modulation may be used in the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat diseases accompanied by impaired redox homeostasis (e.g. oncologic, inflammatory, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease).

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers ROS signalling, changes the redox state, and regulates the antioxidant defence of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Turkan, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Inefficient chaperone activity in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes accumulation of unfolded proteins and is called ER stress, which triggers the unfolded protein response. For proper oxidative protein folding, reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 are produced in the ER. Although the role of ROS during abiotic stresses such as salinity is well documented, the role of ER-related ROS production and its signalling is not yet known. Moreover, how H2O2 production, redox regulation, and antioxidant defence are affected in salt-treated plants when ER protein-folding machinery is impaired needs to be elucidated. For this aim, changes in NADPH-oxidase-dependent ROS signalling and H2O2 content at sequential time intervals and after 48h of ER stress, induced by tunicamycin (Tm), salinity, and their combination were determined in Arabidopsis thaliana. The main root growth was inhibited by ER stress, while low levels of Tm caused an increase in lateral root density. Salt stress and Tm induced the expression of ER-stress-related genes (bZIP17, bZIP28, bZIP60, TIN1, BiP1, BiP3) and ERO1. Tm induced expression of RBOHD and RBOHF, which led to an early increase in H2O2 and triggered ROS signalling. This study is the first report that ER stress induces the antioxidant system and the Asada–Halliwell pathway of A. thaliana in a similar way to salinity. ER stress caused oxidative damage, as evident by increased H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. As a result, this study shows that ER stress triggers ROS signalling, changes the redox state, and regulates the antioxidant defence of A. thaliana. PMID:24558072

  1. Photosystem activity and state transitions of the photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutants with different redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

    PubMed

    Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Elanskaya, I V; Gorbunov, M Y; Karapetyan, N V

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how photosystem (PS) activity is regulated during state transitions in cyanobacteria, we studied photosynthetic parameters of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) in Synechocystis PCC 6803 wild type (WT) and its mutants deficient in oxidases (Ox(-)) or succinate dehydrogenase (SDH(-)). Dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant, lacking the oxidation agents, is expected to have a reduced PQ pool, while in SDH(-) mutant the PQ pool after dark adaptation will be more oxidized due to partial inhibition of the respiratory chain electron carriers. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that control of balance between linear and cyclic electron transport by the redox state of the PQ pool will affect PSII photosynthetic activity during state transition. We found that the PQ pool was reduced in Ox(-) mutant, but oxidized in SDH(-) mutant after prolonged dark adaptation, indicating different states of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants. Analysis of variable fluorescence and 77K fluorescence spectra revealed that the WT and SDH(-) mutant were in State 1 after dark adaptation, while the Ox(-) mutant was in State 2. State 2 was characterized by ~1.5 time lower photochemical activity of PSII, as well as high rate of P700 reduction and the low level of P700 oxidation, indicating high activity of cyclic electron transfer around PSI. Illumination with continuous light 1 (440 nm) along with flashes of light 2 (620 nm) allowed oxidation of the PQ pool in the Ox(-) mutant, thus promoting it to State 1, but it did not affect PSII activity in dark adapted WT and SDH(-) mutant. State 1 in the Ox(-) mutant was characterized by high variable fluorescence and P700(+) levels typical for WT and the SDH(-) mutant, indicating acceleration of linear electron transport. Thus, we show that PSII of cyanobacteria has a higher photosynthetic activity in State 1, while it is partially inactivated in State 2. This process is controlled by the redox state of PQ in

  2. Redox state of pentraxin 3 as a novel biomarker for resolution of inflammation and survival in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Friederike; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Mayr, Ursula; Yin, Xiaoke; Marshall, Melanie; Suna, Gonca; Willeit, Peter; Langley, Sarah R; Jayawardhana, Tamani; Zeller, Tanja; Terblanche, Marius; Shah, Ajay M; Mayr, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    In an endotoxaemic mouse model of sepsis, a tissue-based proteomics approach for biomarker discovery identified long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as the lead candidate for inflamed myocardium. When the redox-sensitive oligomerization state of PTX3 was further investigated, PTX3 accumulated as an octamer as a result of disulfide-bond formation in heart, kidney, and lung-common organ dysfunctions seen in patients with sepsis. Oligomeric moieties of PTX3 were also detectable in circulation. The oligomerization state of PTX3 was quantified over the first 11 days in critically ill adult patients with sepsis. On admission day, there was no difference in the oligomerization state of PTX3 between survivors and non-survivors. From day 2 onward, the conversion of octameric to monomeric PTX3 was consistently associated with a greater survival after 28 days of follow-up. For example, by day 2 post-admission, octameric PTX3 was barely detectable in survivors, but it still constituted more than half of the total PTX3 in non-survivors (p < 0.001). Monomeric PTX3 was inversely associated with cardiac damage markers NT-proBNP and high-sensitivity troponin I and T. Relative to the conventional measurements of total PTX3 or NT-proBNP, the oligomerization of PTX3 was a superior predictor of disease outcome.

  3. The impact of aging, hearing loss, and body weight on mouse hippocampal redox state, measured in brain slices using fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Kevin A; Choi, Hyun W; Ravindra, Aditya; Llano, Daniel Adolfo

    2016-06-01

    The relationships between oxidative stress in the hippocampus and other aging-related changes such as hearing loss, cortical thinning, or changes in body weight are not yet known. We measured the redox ratio in a number of neural structures in brain slices taken from young and aged mice. Hearing thresholds, body weight, and cortical thickness were also measured. We found striking aging-related increases in the redox ratio that were isolated to the stratum pyramidale, while such changes were not observed in thalamus or cortex. These changes were driven primarily by changes in flavin adenine dinucleotide, not nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride. Multiple regression analysis suggested that neither hearing threshold nor cortical thickness independently contributed to this change in hippocampal redox ratio. However, body weight did independently contribute to predicted changes in hippocampal redox ratio. These data suggest that aging-related changes in hippocampal redox ratio are not a general reflection of overall brain oxidative state but are highly localized, while still being related to at least one marker of late aging, weight loss at the end of life.

  4. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:27299603

  5. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  6. Fe and S redox states during serpentinite dehydration in subduction settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, Margarita; Munoz, Manuel; Vidal, Olivier; Brunet, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    present highly oxidizing properties. At higher P-T conditions, higher amounts of water are released with minor oxygen release. In addition, sulfur is shown to be progressively reduced at temperature 450-500°C due to pyrite to pyrrhotite transition. The reaction of pyrite reduction was observed to happen with sequestration of Fe from silicates and a release of oxygen. Effectively, the presence of sulphides in serpentinites contribute additional oxygen to the fluid, whereas the release of S may be negligible. The detailed study of the evolution of redox conditions during serpentinite dehydration in subduction zones will help constraining, 1) the behavior and mobility, from slab to the upper mantle, of elements of economical interest, as well as 2) the global geochemical cycling of elements. References: 1. Hacker et al. (2003) J. Geophys. Res. 108, article number 2029. 2. Ulmer & Trommsdorff (1995) Science 268, 858-861. 3. Debret et al. (2014) EPSL 400, 206-218. 4. Alt et al. (2013) Lithos 178, 40-54. 5. Pokrovski & Dubrovinsky (2011) Science 331, 1052-1056.

  7. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  8. Both the concentration and redox state of glutathione and ascorbate influence the sensitivity of arabidopsis to cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Jozefczak, Marijke; Bohler, Sacha; Schat, Henk; Horemans, Nele; Guisez, Yves; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential trace element that elicits oxidative stress. Plants respond to Cd toxicity via increasing their Cd-chelating and antioxidative capacities. They predominantly chelate Cd via glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs), while antioxidative defence is mainly based on the use and recycling of both GSH and ascorbate (AsA), complemented by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). In addition, both metabolites act as a substrate for the regeneration of other essential antioxidants, which neutralize and regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Together, these functions influence the concentration and cellular redox state of GSH and AsA. In this study, these two parameters were examined in plants of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to sub-lethal Cd concentrations. Methods Wild-type plants and mutant arabidopsis plants containing 30–45 % of wild-type levels of GSH (cad2-1) or 40–50 % of AsA (vtc1-1), together with the double-mutant (cad2-1 vtc1-1) were cultivated in a hydroponic system and exposed to sub-lethal Cd concentrations. Cadmium detoxification was investigated at different levels including gene expression and metabolite concentrations. Key Results In comparison with wild-type plants, elevated basal thiol levels and enhanced PC synthesis upon exposure to Cd efficiently compensated AsA deficiency in vtc1-1 plants and contributed to decreased sensitivity towards Cd. Glutathione-deficient (cad2-1 and cad2-1 vtc1-1) mutants, however, showed a more oxidized GSH redox state, resulting in initial oxidative stress and a higher sensitivity to Cd. In order to cope with the Cd stress to which they were exposed, GSH-deficient mutants activated multiple alternative pathways. Conclusions Our observations indicate that GSH and AsA deficiency differentially alter plant GSH homeostasis, resulting in opposite Cd sensitivities relative to wild-type plants. Upon Cd exposure, GSH-deficient mutants were hampered in chelation. They

  9. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes.

  10. Thiol redox transitions by thioredoxin and thioredoxin-binding protein-2 in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Eiji; Chen, Zhe; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Masutani, Hiroshi; Yodoi, Junji

    2010-01-01

    The cellular thiol redox state is a crucial mediator of metabolic, signaling and transcriptional processes in cells, and an exquisite balance between the oxidizing and reducing states is essential for the normal function and survival of cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely known to function as a kind of second messenger for intracellular signaling and to modulate the thiol redox state. Thiol reduction is mainly controlled by the thioredoxin (TRX) system and glutathione (GSH) systems as scavengers of ROS and regulators of the protein redox states. The thioredoxin system is composed of several related molecules interacting through the cysteine residues at the active site, including thioredoxin, thioredoxin-2, a mitochondrial thioredoxin family, and transmembrane thioredoxin-related protein (TMX), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-specific thioredoxin family. Thioredoxin couples with thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases (peroxiredoxin) to scavenge hydrogen peroxide. In addition, thioredoxin does not simply act only as a scavenger of ROS but also as an important regulator of oxidative stress response through protein-protein interaction. The interaction of thioredoxin and thioredoxin-binding proteins such as thioredoxin-binding protein-2 (TBP-2, also called as Txnip or VDUP1), apoptosis signal kinase (ASK-1), redox factor 1 (Ref-1), Forkhead box class O 4 (FoxO4), and nod-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) suggested unconventional functions of thioredoxin and a novel mechanism of redox regulation. Here, we introduce the central mechanism of thiol redox transition in cell signaling regulated by thioredoxin and related molecules.

  11. Organ specific mapping of in vivo redox state in control and cigarette smoke-exposed mice using EPR/NMR co-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caia, George L.; Efimova, Olga V.; Velayutham, Murugesan; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Abdelghany, Tamer M.; Kesselring, Eric; Petryakov, Sergey; Sun, Ziqi; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-03-01

    In vivo mapping of alterations in redox status is important for understanding organ specific pathology and disease. While electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) enables spatial mapping of free radicals, it does not provide anatomic visualization of the body. Proton MRI is well suited to provide anatomical visualization. We applied EPR/NMR co-imaging instrumentation to map and monitor the redox state of living mice under normal or oxidative stress conditions induced by secondhand cigarette smoke (SHS) exposure. A hybrid co-imaging instrument, EPRI (1.2 GHz)/proton MRI (16.18 MHz), suitable for whole-body co-imaging of mice was utilized with common magnet and gradients along with dual EPR/NMR resonators that enable co-imaging without sample movement. The metabolism of the nitroxide probe, 3-carbamoyl-proxyl (3-CP), was used to map the redox state of control and SHS-exposed mice. Co-imaging allowed precise 3D mapping of radical distribution and reduction in major organs such as the heart, lungs, liver, bladder and kidneys. Reductive metabolism was markedly decreased in SHS-exposed mice and EPR/NMR co-imaging allowed quantitative assessment of this throughout the body. Thus, in vivo EPR/NMR co-imaging enables in vivo organ specific mapping of free radical metabolism and redox stress and the alterations that occur in the pathogenesis of disease.

  12. Quantitative measurement of redox potential in hypoxic cells using SERS nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Auchinvole, Craig; Fisher, Kate; Campbell, Colin J.

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia is considered to be a reductive disorder of cells that is caused either by a lack of oxygen or by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways and is thought to play a role in the pathology of diseases including stroke and cancer. One aspect of hypoxia that remains poorly investigated is the dysregulation of cellular redox potential and its role in controlling biological pathway activation. Since there is currently no way of quantitatively measuring the intracellular redox potential of hypoxic cells, this provided us with the motivation to develop optical nanosensors whose Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER) spectrum provides a quantitative measure of redox potential in hypoxic cells. Our nanosensors are made from organic reporter molecules that show oxidation-state-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum and are chemically adsorbed onto gold nanoshells. These nanosensors can be taken up by cells, and by collecting the SER spectrum we can calculate the localised intracellular redox potential from single hypoxic cells in a non-invasive, reversible way.Hypoxia is considered to be a reductive disorder of cells that is caused either by a lack of oxygen or by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways and is thought to play a role in the pathology of diseases including stroke and cancer. One aspect of hypoxia that remains poorly investigated is the dysregulation of cellular redox potential and its role in controlling biological pathway activation. Since there is currently no way of quantitatively measuring the intracellular redox potential of hypoxic cells, this provided us with the motivation to develop optical nanosensors whose Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER) spectrum provides a quantitative measure of redox potential in hypoxic cells. Our nanosensors are made from organic reporter molecules that show oxidation-state-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum and are chemically adsorbed onto gold nanoshells. These nanosensors can be taken up by cells, and by collecting the SER

  13. Energy conversion based on molecular excited states: Redox splitting in soluble polymers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    A general method was developed for preparing complexes of Ru(II) with three different bidentate ligands; it is being extended to monodentate ligands for more synthetic versatility. This method was used to prepare a series of complexes with pre-designed absorption properties, with the goal of ``black absorbers`` for use as antenna chromophores in a light-to-chemical energy conversion array. The energy gap law for nonradiative decay was studied for preparing near-IR luminophores with long excited state lifetimes. The problem of destructive dd excited states in Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes was focused on, with success in preparing an extremely photo-inert complex with monodentate pyridine ligands. Time-resolved resonance Raman and infrared spectroscopy were used to study subtle excited state properties of complexes of Ru(II), Os(II), and Re(I). Success was achieved in controlled immobilization of d{sup 6} chromophores and quenchers on styrenic polymers. Having perfected our synthetic technique, we have begun to optimize the ground and excited state properties such as chromophore density, dipole orientation, and lifetime.

  14. Host Coenzyme Q Redox State Is an Early Biomarker of Thermal Stress in the Coral Acropora millepora

    PubMed Central

    Motti, Cherie A.; Miller, David J.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Bleaching episodes caused by increasing seawater temperatures may induce mass coral mortality and are regarded as one of the biggest threats to coral reef ecosystems worldwide. The current consensus is that this phenomenon results from enhanced production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt the symbiosis between corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, Symbiodinium. Here, the responses of two important antioxidant defence components, the host coenzyme Q (CoQ) and symbiont plastoquinone (PQ) pools, are investigated for the first time in colonies of the scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora, during experimentally-induced bleaching under ecologically relevant conditions. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used to quantify the states of these two pools, together with physiological parameters assessing the general state of the symbiosis (including photosystem II photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll concentration and Symbiodinium cell densities). The results show that the responses of the two antioxidant systems occur on different timescales: (i) the redox state of the Symbiodinium PQ pool remained stable until twelve days into the experiment, after which there was an abrupt oxidative shift; (ii) by contrast, an oxidative shift of approximately 10% had occurred in the host CoQ pool after 6 days of thermal stress, prior to significant changes in any other physiological parameter measured. Host CoQ pool oxidation is thus an early biomarker of thermal stress in corals, and this antioxidant pool is likely to play a key role in quenching thermally-induced ROS in the coral-algal symbiosis. This study adds to a growing body of work that indicates host cellular responses may precede the bleaching process and symbiont dysfunction. PMID:26426118

  15. Host Coenzyme Q Redox State Is an Early Biomarker of Thermal Stress in the Coral Acropora millepora.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Adrian; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Motti, Cherie A; Miller, David J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2015-01-01

    Bleaching episodes caused by increasing seawater temperatures may induce mass coral mortality and are regarded as one of the biggest threats to coral reef ecosystems worldwide. The current consensus is that this phenomenon results from enhanced production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt the symbiosis between corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, Symbiodinium. Here, the responses of two important antioxidant defence components, the host coenzyme Q (CoQ) and symbiont plastoquinone (PQ) pools, are investigated for the first time in colonies of the scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora, during experimentally-induced bleaching under ecologically relevant conditions. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used to quantify the states of these two pools, together with physiological parameters assessing the general state of the symbiosis (including photosystem II photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll concentration and Symbiodinium cell densities). The results show that the responses of the two antioxidant systems occur on different timescales: (i) the redox state of the Symbiodinium PQ pool remained stable until twelve days into the experiment, after which there was an abrupt oxidative shift; (ii) by contrast, an oxidative shift of approximately 10% had occurred in the host CoQ pool after 6 days of thermal stress, prior to significant changes in any other physiological parameter measured. Host CoQ pool oxidation is thus an early biomarker of thermal stress in corals, and this antioxidant pool is likely to play a key role in quenching thermally-induced ROS in the coral-algal symbiosis. This study adds to a growing body of work that indicates host cellular responses may precede the bleaching process and symbiont dysfunction.

  16. Host Coenzyme Q Redox State Is an Early Biomarker of Thermal Stress in the Coral Acropora millepora.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Adrian; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Motti, Cherie A; Miller, David J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2015-01-01

    Bleaching episodes caused by increasing seawater temperatures may induce mass coral mortality and are regarded as one of the biggest threats to coral reef ecosystems worldwide. The current consensus is that this phenomenon results from enhanced production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt the symbiosis between corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, Symbiodinium. Here, the responses of two important antioxidant defence components, the host coenzyme Q (CoQ) and symbiont plastoquinone (PQ) pools, are investigated for the first time in colonies of the scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora, during experimentally-induced bleaching under ecologically relevant conditions. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used to quantify the states of these two pools, together with physiological parameters assessing the general state of the symbiosis (including photosystem II photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll concentration and Symbiodinium cell densities). The results show that the responses of the two antioxidant systems occur on different timescales: (i) the redox state of the Symbiodinium PQ pool remained stable until twelve days into the experiment, after which there was an abrupt oxidative shift; (ii) by contrast, an oxidative shift of approximately 10% had occurred in the host CoQ pool after 6 days of thermal stress, prior to significant changes in any other physiological parameter measured. Host CoQ pool oxidation is thus an early biomarker of thermal stress in corals, and this antioxidant pool is likely to play a key role in quenching thermally-induced ROS in the coral-algal symbiosis. This study adds to a growing body of work that indicates host cellular responses may precede the bleaching process and symbiont dysfunction. PMID:26426118

  17. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Audi, Said; Ranji, Mahsa

    2012-04-01

    Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O(2) (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O(2)) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs.

  18. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Audi, Said; Ranji, Mahsa

    2012-04-01

    Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O2 (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O2) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs.

  19. Probing the Redox States of Iron in Steam-Treated Isomorphously Substituted [Fe,Al]MFI Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, J. B.; Overweg, A. R.; Arends, I. W. C. E.; Mul, G.

    2005-04-01

    57Fe enriched isomorphously substituted [Fe,Al]MFI zeolites with varying aluminum content were prepared and subsequently calcined, proton-exchanged, and steamed to render them active in the direct oxidation of benzene to phenol using N2O as oxidant. The different post-treatment steps cause the migration of iron from framework to extra-framework positions creating various Fe-sites as deduced from 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. An extraordinary high concentration of Fe2+ species (which were correlated to the formation of α-sites that was claimed to be responsible in the catalytic benzene-to-phenol reaction) was obtained for the sample containing 1.1% w/w aluminum. On the contrary, for the aluminum-free sample (Fe-silicalite) only Fe3+ species were observed. In-situ Fe K-edge XANES were performed to study the reactivity of the Fe-species in the steamed samples under reducing/oxidizing environment. Reduction-oxidation (redox) behavior was observed only for aluminum-containing samples, whereas the Fe3+ species in the Fe-silicalite maintain their oxidation state.

  20. Redox-mediated reactions of vinylferrocene: toward redox auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Alan A; Zhang, Xiaolu; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Long, De-Liang; Macgregor, Stuart A; Cooke, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    Chemical redox reactions have been exploited to transform unreactive vinylferrocene into a powerful dienophile for the Diels-Alder reaction and reactive substrate for thiol addition reactions upon conversion to its ferrocenium state. We have further investigated the ability of these reactions to facilitate redox-auxiliary-like reactivity by further hydrogenolyisis of the Diels-Alder adduct to the corresponding cyclopentane derivative.

  1. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in household water and biofilm samples of patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium complex respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard J; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC.

  2. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  3. The redox state of the mantle during and just after core formation.

    PubMed

    Frost, D J; Mann, U; Asahara, Y; Rubie, D C

    2008-11-28

    Siderophile elements are depleted in the Earth's mantle, relative to chondritic meteorites, as a result of equilibration with core-forming Fe-rich metal. Measurements of metal-silicate partition coefficients show that mantle depletions of slightly siderophile elements (e.g. Cr, V) must have occurred at more reducing conditions than those inferred from the current mantle FeO content. This implies that the oxidation state (i.e. FeO content) of the mantle increased with time as accretion proceeded. The oxygen fugacity of the present-day upper mantle is several orders of magnitude higher than the level imposed by equilibrium with core-forming Fe metal. This results from an increase in the Fe2O3 content of the mantle that probably occurred in the first 1Ga of the Earth's history. Here we explore fractionation mechanisms that could have caused mantle FeO and Fe2O3 contents to increase while the oxidation state of accreting material remained constant (homogeneous accretion). Using measured metal-silicate partition coefficients for O and Si, we have modelled core-mantle equilibration in a magma ocean that became progressively deeper as accretion proceeded. The model indicates that the mantle would have become gradually oxidized as a result of Si entering the core. However, the increase in mantle FeO content and oxygen fugacity is limited by the fact that O also partitions into the core at high temperatures, which lowers the FeO content of the mantle. (Mg,Fe)(Al,Si)O3 perovskite, the dominant lower mantle mineral, has a strong affinity for Fe2O3 even in the presence of metallic Fe. As the upper mantle would have been poor in Fe2O3 during core formation, FeO would have disproportionated to produce Fe2O3 (in perovskite) and Fe metal. Loss of some disproportionated Fe metal to the core would have enriched the remaining mantle in Fe2O3 and, if the entire mantle was then homogenized, the oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle would have been raised to its present-day level. PMID

  4. Oxidation state analysis of a four-component redox series [Os(pap)2(Q)]n involving two different non-innocent ligands on a redox-active transition metal.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipanwita; Sarkar, Biprajit; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Mobin, Shaikh M; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Complexes [Os(pap)(2)(Q)] (1-4) have been obtained and structurally characterized for pap = 2-phenylazopyridine and Q = 4,6-di-tert-butyl-N-aryl-o-iminobenzoquinone (aryl = phenyl (1), 3,5-dichlorophenyl (2), 3,5-dimethoxyphenyl (3), or 3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl (4)). The oxidized form (3)(ClO(4))(2) was also crystallographically characterized while the odd-electron intermediates [Os(pap)(2)(Q)](+) (1(+)-4(+)) and [Os(pap)(2)(Q)](-) (2(-)) were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) spin density and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. The results from the structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical experiments and from the computational studies allow for the assignments [Os(II)(pap(0))(2)(Q(0))](2+), [Os(II)(pap(0))(2)(Q(•-))](+), [Os(IV)(pap(•-))(2)(Q(2-))], and [Os(II)(pap(•-))(pap(0))(Q(2-))](-), with comproportionation constants K(c) ≈ 10(3.5), 10(10), 10(18), and 10(5), respectively. The redox potentials and the comproportionation constants exhibit similarities and differences between Ru and Os analogues. While the Q-based redox reactions show identical potentials, the more metal-involving processes exhibit cathodic shifts for the osmium systems, leading to distinctly different comproportionation constants for some intermediates, especially to a stabilization of the neutral osmium compounds described in this article. The example [Os(pap)(2)(Q)](n) illustrates especially the power of combined structural and EPR analysis with support from DFT towards the valence state description of transition metal complexes incorporating redox non-innocent ligands. PMID:21699145

  5. The role of cerium redox state in the SOD mimetic activity of nanoceria

    PubMed Central

    Heckert, Eric; Karakoti, Ajay; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have recently been shown to protect cells against oxidative stress in both cell culture and animal models. Nanoceria has been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity using a ferricytochrome C assay, and it is this mimetic activity that has been postulated to be responsible for cellular protection by nanoceria. The nature of nanoceria’s antioxidant properties, specifically what physical characteristics make nanoceria effective at scavenging superoxide anion, is poorly understood. In this study electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis confirms the reactivity of nanoceria as an SOD mimetic. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible analysis of nanoceria treated with hydrogen peroxide demonstrate that a decrease in the Ce 3+/4+ ratio correlates directly with a loss of SOD mimetic activity. These results strongly suggest that the surface oxidation state of nanoceria plays an integral role in the SOD mimetic activity of nanoceria and that ability of nanoceria to scavenge superoxide is directly related to cerium (III) concentrations at the surface of the particle. PMID:18395249

  6. The Oxidation State of Komatiites and the Redox History of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklas, R. W.; Puchtel, I. S.; Ash, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen fugacity (fO2) is an important intensive variable in magmatic systems. Previous studies argued that, at the level of resolution of ca. 1.0 ΔNNO log units, the mantle has been at a near-constant oxidation state since core formation [1,3]. Here, we revisit this hypothesis using the V partitioning between olivine or chromite and komatiite liquid as oxybarometers [1,2] by obtaining high-precision V abundance data for komatiite lava flows. Whole-rock samples collected across each lava flow were analyzed for V and other transition metal abundances using Standard Addition ICP-MS (SA ICP-MS); liquidus olivines and chromites were analyzed using Laser Ablation ICP-MS. Our external precision for V concentrations is 5% (2SD) for SA-ICP-MS, based on replicate analysis of standard reference materials. The V data, when plotted against wt.% MgO, define regression lines consistent with olivine control for V. Linear regressions through the V vs. MgO data for samples for each flow were used to determine V content of the emplaced lavas using known MgO contents. Calculated partition coefficients for V were used to determine the oxygen fugacity of each komatiite system using experimental calibrations of [1,2] with a precision of 0.10 - 0.05 ΔNNO log units (2SE). The calculated oxygen fugacities show a well-defined trend of increasing fO2 (>0.5 ΔNNO log units) over ~1.0 Ga of Earth's history, approaching that of modern mantle at 2.4 Ga, immediately before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). An exception is the 3.55 Ga Schapenburg komatiite, which plots 0.5 log units above the trend, likely reflecting primordial mantle heterogeneity. Our data suggest that the mantle was becoming increasingly oxidized leading up to the GOE. A change in deep Earth buffering capacity could change the oxidation state of volcanic gases, triggering the rise in atmospheric O2 at 2.4 Ga. [1] Canil (1997) Nature 389. [2] Canil, 1999; [3] Li et al. (2004) EPSL 228. Oxygen fugacity (fO2) is an important

  7. Stable Chromium Isotopes as tracer of changes in weathering processes and redox state of the ocean during Neoproterozoic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossing, L. N.; Gaucher, C.; Boggiani, P. C.; Frei, R.

    2010-12-01

    The chemistry of surface environments on Earth has essentially evolved from early anoxic conditions to a present day oxic state. How in detail this transition occurred is still a matter of debate but the last 200 million years (My) of the Neoproterozoic Era [(1000 to 542 million years ago (Ma)] show an emerging picture of large scale fluctuations in the redox state of the oceans [1-2]. The reasons for these fluctuations are to be sought in Earth’s atmospheric oxygenation which led to the rapid radiation of oxygen-utilizing macroscopic metazoans, but details regarding the nature of these fluctuations remain unclear. The Late Neoproterozoic is known for a number of widespread glaciations causing the return of ferruginous oceans which were absent for more than a billion years of Earth history. This study elaborates on the idea that Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments deposited during glacial events are suitable for tracing oxygenation of surface environments through Earth's history [3]. The focus of this study is to apply the Cr isotope system to one of the Marinoan (650-630 Ma) glacio-marine sequences (Jacadigo Group, Brazil) in order to get a detailed spatial and relative temporal resolution of changes in weathering processes and redox states of the respective ocean basin during the depositional period of the sediments. The Jacadigo Group is a glacio-marine succession which is composed of the Urucum Fm. (sandstones) at the base, the Santa Cruz Fm. (BIFs) and the Puga Fm. (Fe-rich glacial diamictites) at the top. Cr stable isotope measurements on various BIF horizons of the Santa Cruz Fm. yielded positive δ53/52Cr values range from +0.4 to+ 0.9‰, while the overlying Fe-rich glaciogenic diamictites of the Puga Fm. show δ53/52Cr values range from to +0.1 to+ 0.4‰. These positively fractionated values correspond to positive δ53/52Cr values measured in other Late Neoproterozoic BIFs and speak for the occurrence of potential oxygenation

  8. Altered apoplastic ascorbate redox state in tobacco plants via ascorbate oxidase overexpression results in delayed dark-induced senescence in detached leaves.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate oxidase (AO) is an apoplastic enzyme that uses oxygen to catalyse the oxidation of ascorbate (AA) to dehydroascorbate (DHA) via the unstable radical monodehydroascorbate (MDHA). Here, we report that transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) with an in vivo lowered apoplastic AA redox state through increased AO expression demonstrate signs of delayed dark-induced senescence compared with wild-type plants, as shown by chlorophyll loss assay. In situ localization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggests that, although transgenic plants have higher constitutive levels of H2O2 under normal growth conditions, imposed dark-induced senescence results in smaller induction levels of H2O2, an observation which correlates with increased antioxidant enzyme activities and an induction in the expression of AA recycling genes compared with that in wild-type plants. Our current findings, combined with previous studies which showed the contribution of AO in the regulation of AA redox state, suggest that the reduction in AA redox state in the leaf apoplast of these transgenic plants results in an increase in the endogenous levels of H2O2, which provides a form of 'acquired tolerance' to oxidative stress imposed by dark-induced senescence.

  9. Thioredoxins, Glutaredoxins, and Peroxiredoxins—Molecular Mechanisms and Health Significance: from Cofactors to Antioxidants to Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Godoy, José Rodrigo; Berndt, Carsten; Hudemann, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thioredoxins (Trxs), glutaredoxins (Grxs), and peroxiredoxins (Prxs) have been characterized as electron donors, guards of the intracellular redox state, and “antioxidants”. Today, these redox catalysts are increasingly recognized for their specific role in redox signaling. The number of publications published on the functions of these proteins continues to increase exponentially. The field is experiencing an exciting transformation, from looking at a general redox homeostasis and the pathological oxidative stress model to realizing redox changes as a part of localized, rapid, specific, and reversible redox-regulated signaling events. This review summarizes the almost 50 years of research on these proteins, focusing primarily on data from vertebrates and mammals. The role of Trx fold proteins in redox signaling is discussed by looking at reaction mechanisms, reversible oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins, and characterized interaction partners. On the basis of this analysis, the specific regulatory functions are exemplified for the cellular processes of apoptosis, proliferation, and iron metabolism. The importance of Trxs, Grxs, and Prxs for human health is addressed in the second part of this review, that is, their potential impact and functions in different cell types, tissues, and various pathological conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1539–1605. PMID:23397885

  10. Redox State of the Deep Ocean During the 2.22-2.1 Ga Carbon Isotope Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, A.; Shen, Y.; Scott, C.; Kacanda, M.; Lyons, T.; Kenig, F.; Anbar, A.; Rouxel, O.

    2006-05-01

    Response of the redox state of the deep ocean to the rise of atmospheric oxygen, as well as the 2.22-2.1 Ga carbon isotope excursion that followed, is not known. The c. 2.15 Ga Sengoma Argillite Formation (SAF), Botswana, is correlative with the Silverton Formation (SF), South Africa, which contains carbonates with δ °13°C values ranging from +8.3 to +11.3 ‰ PDB. Both units were deposited along the northern margin of the Kaapvaal Craton in an open-marine environment. The SAF consists of two upward- shallowing cycles with organic-rich sulfidic shales deposited in subtidal settings at the base and red beds deposited in coastal and fluvial settings at the top. Sulfur isotope data show a large range from -21.3 to +13.7 ‰ V-CDT with highly negative values confined to the lower part of the cycles and positive values to the upper part of the cycles. The Fe speciation data show similar stratigraphic trends. Carbon isotope values of organic matter are as low as -33.7 ‰ PDB, and if compared with carbonate carbon isotope record of the correlative SF, suggest significant contribution from secondary productivity via either sulfur or methane oxidation. Mo concentrations in these organic-rich shales are just above crustal levels. These data suggest deep ocean euxinic conditions during the carbon isotope excursion. Fe isotope data for sulfides from these shales show an unusually narrow range of Fe isotope values relative to other Archean and Paleoproterozoic sulfides. These data fall within the range of the hydrothermal iron flux, suggesting complete Fe reduction and precipitation as sulfide in the deep ocean. The 2.1-2.0 Ga Ludikovian black shales, Russia, were also deposited in an open marine and euxinic environment but contain much higher Mo levels up to 74 ppm and sulfides with Fe isotope values ranging from those of hydrothermal Fe flux to highly positive values. Higher Mo concentrations in these shales suggest that significant part of the ocean was not a sink for Mo

  11. In vivo simultaneous cortical and intracortical monitoring of cerebral blood flow and mitochondrial redox state in experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiro-Michaely, E.; Zuckerman, T.; Zarchin, N.; Rinkevich, S.; Knoller, N.; Hadani, M.; Mayevsky, A.

    2003-07-01

    Monitoring of intra-mitochondrial NADH redox state is a common in-vivo technique in experimental animals and is rare in clinical studies. The combination of NADH monitoring with the Laser Doppler flowmetry for cerebral blood flow monitoring was described in various publications. Until now, very small effort was made to monitor NADH and CBF inside the cortex of experimental animals. The significance of this monitoring is in its application to experimental models of Parkinson"s disease or to clinical monitoring situations in the intensive care unit, when ICP is monitored. Here we compared the responses of the gerbil or rat brain to oxygen deficiency, monitored on the brain surface and in different depths. After the animals were anesthetized, the two common carotid arteries (gerbil) were isolated and prepared for following occlusion. The brain was exposed and two optical probes were located on its surface. Ischemia was induced by occluding the two carotid arteries, and anoxia was preformed by inhalation of pure N2. After recovery, one of the probes was inserted into the cortex (0.5-3mm) and a second ischemia or anoxia was preformed. The results showed that: 1. It is possible to monitor both CBF and NADH on the brain surface simultaneously with intracortical location. 2. The responses of the brain to ischemia or anoxia was smaller inside the cortex comparing to brain surface. 3. Negative correlation was found between CBF and NADH in both locations and models. In conclusion, this new model of simultaneously monitoring of CBF and NADH in different cerebral locations can shed light on various pathophysiological situations.

  12. Effects of chronic elevated ozone concentration on the redox state and fruit yield of red pepper plant Capsicum baccatum.

    PubMed

    Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Caregnato, Fernanda Freitas; Divan, Armando Molina; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2014-02-01

    Ozone (O3) is one of the most harmful air pollutants to crops, contributing to high losses on crop yield. Tropospheric O3 background concentrations have increased since pre-industrial times reaching phytotoxic concentrations in many world regions. Capsicum peppers are the second most traded spice in the world, but few studies concerning the O3 effects in this genus are known. Thereby, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to elevated O3 concentrations in red pepper plant Capsicum baccatum L. var. pendulum with especial considerations on the leaf redox state and fruit yield. Fifteen C. baccatum plants were exposed to O3 in open-top chambers during fruit ripening (62 days) at a mean concentration of 171.6 µg/m(3) from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. We found that O3 treated plants significantly decreased the amount and the total weight of fruits, which were probably a consequence of the changes on leaf oxidative status induced by ozone exposure. Ozone exposed plants increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels on the leaves, which may be associated with the observed decrease on the activity of enzymatic antioxidant defense system, as well with lower levels of polyphenol and reduced thiol groups. Enhanced ROS production and the direct O3 reaction lead to biomacromolecules damages as seen in the diminished chlorophyll content and in the elevated lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation levels. Through a correlation analysis it was possible to observe that polyphenols content was more important to protect pepper plants against oxidative damages to lipids than to proteins.

  13. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment.

  14. α-Tocopherol administration blocks adaptive changes in cell NADH/NAD+ redox state and mitochondrial function leading to inhibition of gastric mucosa cell proliferation in rats.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Hernández-Espinosa, Diego R; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2013-12-01

    In experimentally induced chronic gastritis, a compensatory mucosal cell proliferation occurs with enhanced glucose oxidative metabolism linked to lipoperoxidative events. Therefore, this study was aimed at assessing the participation of cell NAD/NADH redox state and mitochondrial functions during gastric mucosa proliferation and the effects of in vivo α-tocopherol (vitamin E) administration. Glucose oxidation and oxygen consumption were tested in gastric mucosa samples obtained from rats with gastritis and from those also treated with α-tocopherol. Gastric mucosal mitochondria were isolated and structural and functional parameters were determined. Succinate oxidation, ADP phosphorylation, mitochondrial enzyme activities, and membrane lipid composition were measured. In addition, parameters indicative of cellular NAD/NADH redox state, proliferation, apoptosis, and nitric oxide (NO) metabolism were also determined. After ethanol withdrawal, the damaged gastric mucosa increased glucose and oxygen consumption, events associated with a more reduced cytoplasmic NAD/NADH ratio. Enhanced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increased mitochondrial enzyme activities occurred early, accompanied by recovery of lost mitochondrial protein and lipid composition in the gastric mucosa, events associated with increased NO production. When mitochondrial function and structural events were normalized, apoptosis was initiated as assessed by the mitochondrial Bax/Bcl2 ratio. Treatment with α-tocopherol inhibited cell proliferation and blocked enhanced glucose utilization, mitochondrial substrate oxidation, and changes in redox state, delaying the onset of these adaptive metabolic changes, whereas it inhibited cell proliferation. In conclusion, α-tocopherol could abolish damage-induced "stress" signaling by desynchronizing mitochondrial adaptive responses, including mitochondria biogenesis, and consequently NAD/NADH redox, which seems to regulate gastric mucosal cell

  15. α-Tocopherol administration blocks adaptive changes in cell NADH/NAD+ redox state and mitochondrial function leading to inhibition of gastric mucosa cell proliferation in rats.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Hernández-Espinosa, Diego R; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2013-12-01

    In experimentally induced chronic gastritis, a compensatory mucosal cell proliferation occurs with enhanced glucose oxidative metabolism linked to lipoperoxidative events. Therefore, this study was aimed at assessing the participation of cell NAD/NADH redox state and mitochondrial functions during gastric mucosa proliferation and the effects of in vivo α-tocopherol (vitamin E) administration. Glucose oxidation and oxygen consumption were tested in gastric mucosa samples obtained from rats with gastritis and from those also treated with α-tocopherol. Gastric mucosal mitochondria were isolated and structural and functional parameters were determined. Succinate oxidation, ADP phosphorylation, mitochondrial enzyme activities, and membrane lipid composition were measured. In addition, parameters indicative of cellular NAD/NADH redox state, proliferation, apoptosis, and nitric oxide (NO) metabolism were also determined. After ethanol withdrawal, the damaged gastric mucosa increased glucose and oxygen consumption, events associated with a more reduced cytoplasmic NAD/NADH ratio. Enhanced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increased mitochondrial enzyme activities occurred early, accompanied by recovery of lost mitochondrial protein and lipid composition in the gastric mucosa, events associated with increased NO production. When mitochondrial function and structural events were normalized, apoptosis was initiated as assessed by the mitochondrial Bax/Bcl2 ratio. Treatment with α-tocopherol inhibited cell proliferation and blocked enhanced glucose utilization, mitochondrial substrate oxidation, and changes in redox state, delaying the onset of these adaptive metabolic changes, whereas it inhibited cell proliferation. In conclusion, α-tocopherol could abolish damage-induced "stress" signaling by desynchronizing mitochondrial adaptive responses, including mitochondria biogenesis, and consequently NAD/NADH redox, which seems to regulate gastric mucosal cell

  16. Redox Redone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, John T.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an extension of the change in oxidation number method that is used for balancing skeletal redox reactions in aqueous solutions. Retains most of the simplicity of the change in oxidation number method but provides the additional step-by-step process necessary for the beginner to balance an equation. (JRH)

  17. In-vitro monitoring of redox state of cytochrome oxidase in bone by optical coherence quantitation based on low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Wang, Ruikang K.; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2001-05-01

    We present optical coherence quantitation technique to monitor the redox state of mitochondria enzyme Cytochrome oxidase (CytOx) in bone tissue by the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Superluminescent diode (SLD) with its peak emission wavelength ((lambda) = 820nm) on the absorption band of oxidized form of CytOx was used in the experiments. The reflectance returning from the liquid phantoms (naphthol green B with intralipid) and bone tissue specimens (periosteum of calvaria from newborn rats) as a function of penetration depth was used to quantify the absorption changes of the sample. Absorption coefficients of naphthol green B were accurately quantified by the linear relationship between attenuation coefficients from the slopes of the reflected signals and naphthol green B concentration. The results show that the attenuation coefficient decreases in periosteums as CytOx is reduced by sodium dithionite, demonstrating the feasibility of this method to quantify the redox state of tissues studied. A 70% +/- 7% (n=4) reduction of attenuation coefficients in periosteums was clearly observed with redox change of CytOx after 5 min reduction. In addition, the results demonstrate that the OCT system is also capable of imaging the calvaria tomographically with a resolution at 9 microns, which could only be previously obtained by the conventional excisional biopsy.

  18. Changes in the redox state and endogenous fluorescence of in vivo human skin due to intrinsic and photo-aging, measured by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Washington Y.; Obispo, Clara; Ryan, Elizabeth; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from solar exposure is a key extrinsic factor responsible for premature skin aging (i.e., photo-aging). Recent advances using in vivo multiphoton tomography (MPT) demonstrate the efficacy of this approach to assess intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging as an alternative to existing invasive techniques. In this study, we measured changes in epidermal autofluorescence, dermal collagen second harmonic generation (SHG), and the redox state of solar-exposed and solar-protected human skin by MPT with fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM). Twenty-four volunteers across four age categories (20 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, and 50 to 59 years old; six volunteers each) were recruited for MPT-FLIM imaging of the dorsal (solar-exposed; photo-damaged) and volar (solar-protected) forearm. We demonstrate a higher intensity of dermal collagen SHG within the volar forearm compared to dorsal solar-exposed skin. Redox imaging of each epidermal skin stratum by FLIM demonstrates an increase in fluorescence lifetime in the solar-exposed dorsal forearm that is more apparent in aged skin. The results of this study suggest the redox state of the viable epidermis is a key marker in assessing intrinsic and photo-damage skin aging, in combination with changes in autofluorescence and SHG.

  19. Melatonin supplementation decreases prolactin synthesis and release in rat adenohypophysis: correlation with anterior pituitary redox state and circadian clock mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Barquilla, Pilar Cano; Pagano, Eleonora S; Fernández-Mateos, Pilar; Esquifino, Ana I; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2012-10-01

    In the laboratory rat, a number of physiological parameters display seasonal changes even under constant conditions of temperature, lighting, and food availability. Since there is evidence that prolactin (PRL) is, among the endocrine signals, a major mediator of seasonal adaptations, the authors aimed to examine whether melatonin administration in drinking water resembling in length the exposure to a winter photoperiod could affect accordingly the 24-h pattern of PRL synthesis and release and some of their anterior pituitary redox state and circadian clock modulatory mechanisms. Melatonin (3 µg/mL drinking water) or vehicle was given for 1 mo, and rats were euthanized at six time intervals during a 24-h cycle. High concentrations of melatonin (>2000 pg/mL) were detected in melatonin-treated rats from beginning of scotophase (at 21:00 h) to early photophase (at 09:00 h) as compared with a considerably narrower high-melatonin phase observed in controls. By cosinor analysis, melatonin-treated rats had significantly decreased MESOR (24-h time-series average) values of anterior pituitary PRL gene expression and circulating PRL, with acrophases (peak time) located in the middle of the scotophase, as in the control group. Melatonin treatment disrupted the 24-h pattern of anterior pituitary gene expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1 and -2, heme oxygenase-1 and -2, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, and catalase by shifting their acrophases to early/middle scotophase or amplifying the maxima. Only the inhibitory effect of melatonin on pituitary NOS-2 gene expression correlated temporally with inhibition of PRL production. Gene expression of metallothionein-1 and -3 showed maxima at early/middle photophase after melatonin treatment. The 24-h pattern of anterior pituitary lipid peroxidation did not vary after treatment. In vehicle-treated rats, Clock and Bmal1 expression peaked in the anterior pituitary at middle

  20. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.31 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis. PMID:23695560

  1. Optical Cryoimaging Reveals a Heterogeneous Distribution of Mitochondrial Redox State in ex vivo Guinea Pig Hearts and Its Alteration During Ischemia and Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ranji, Mahsa; Motlagh, Mohammad Masoudi; Salehpour, Fahimeh; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Heisner, James S; Dash, Ranjan K; Camara, Amadou K S

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of substrates to generate ATP in mitochondria is mediated by redox reactions of NADH and FADH2. Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We hypothesize that IR alters the metabolic heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state of the heart that is only evident in the 3-D optical cryoimaging of the perfused heart before, during, and after IR. The study involved four groups of hearts: time control (TC: heart perfusion without IR), global ischemia (Isch), global ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) and TC with PCP (a mitochondrial uncoupler) perfusion. Mitochondrial NADH and FAD autofluorescence signals were recorded spectrofluorometrically online in guinea pig ex vivo-perfused hearts in the Langendorff mode. At the end of each specified protocol, hearts were rapidly removed and snap frozen in liquid N2 for later 3-D optical cryoimaging of the mitochondrial NADH, FAD, and NADH/FAD redox ratio (RR). The TC hearts revealed a heterogeneous spatial distribution of NADH, FAD, and RR. Ischemia and IR altered the spatial distribution and caused an overall increase and decrease in the RR by 55% and 64%, respectively. Uncoupling with PCP resulted in the lowest level of the RR (73% oxidation) compared with TC. The 3-D optical cryoimaging of the heart provides novel insights into the heterogeneous distribution of mitochondrial NADH, FAD, RR, and metabolism from the base to the apex during ischemia and IR. This 3-D information of the mitochondrial redox state in the normal and ischemic heart was not apparent in the dynamic spectrofluorometric data. PMID:27574574

  2. Optical Cryoimaging Reveals a Heterogeneous Distribution of Mitochondrial Redox State in ex vivo Guinea Pig Hearts and Its Alteration During Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Mohammad Masoudi; Salehpour, Fahimeh; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Heisner, James S.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of substrates to generate ATP in mitochondria is mediated by redox reactions of NADH and FADH2. Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We hypothesize that IR alters the metabolic heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state of the heart that is only evident in the 3-D optical cryoimaging of the perfused heart before, during, and after IR. The study involved four groups of hearts: time control (TC: heart perfusion without IR), global ischemia (Isch), global ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) and TC with PCP (a mitochondrial uncoupler) perfusion. Mitochondrial NADH and FAD autofluorescence signals were recorded spectrofluorometrically online in guinea pig ex vivo-perfused hearts in the Langendorff mode. At the end of each specified protocol, hearts were rapidly removed and snap frozen in liquid N2 for later 3-D optical cryoimaging of the mitochondrial NADH, FAD, and NADH/FAD redox ratio (RR). The TC hearts revealed a heterogeneous spatial distribution of NADH, FAD, and RR. Ischemia and IR altered the spatial distribution and caused an overall increase and decrease in the RR by 55% and 64%, respectively. Uncoupling with PCP resulted in the lowest level of the RR (73% oxidation) compared with TC. The 3-D optical cryoimaging of the heart provides novel insights into the heterogeneous distribution of mitochondrial NADH, FAD, RR, and metabolism from the base to the apex during ischemia and IR. This 3-D information of the mitochondrial redox state in the normal and ischemic heart was not apparent in the dynamic spectrofluorometric data. PMID:27574574

  3. Conditional oxidative stress responses in the Arabidopsis photorespiratory mutant cat2 demonstrate that redox state is a key modulator of daylength-dependent gene expression, and define photoperiod as a crucial factor in the regulation of H2O2-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Queval, Guillaume; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Hoeberichts, Frank A; Vandorpe, Michaël; Gakière, Bertrand; Vanacker, Hélène; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Van Breusegem, Frank; Noctor, Graham

    2007-11-01

    Photorespiration is a light-dependent source of H(2)O(2) in the peroxisomes, where concentrations of this signalling molecule are regulated by catalase. Growth of Arabidopsis knock-out mutants for CATALASE2 (cat2) in ambient air caused severely decreased rosette biomass, intracellular redox perturbation and activation of oxidative signalling pathways. These effects were absent when cat2 was grown at high CO(2) levels to inhibit photorespiration, but were re-established following a subsequent transfer to air. Growth of cat2 in air at different daylengths revealed that photoperiod is a critical determinant of the oxidative stress response. Decreased growth was observed in 8-h, 12-h and 16-h photoperiods, but lesion development was dependent on long days. Experiments at different light fluence rates showed that cell death in cat2 was linked to long days and not to total light exposure or the severity of oxidative stress. Perturbed intracellular redox state and oxidative signalling pathway induction were more prominent in short days than in long days, as evidenced by glutathione status and induction of defence genes and oxidative stress-responsive transcripts. Similar daylength-dependent effects were observed in the response of mature plants transferred from short days in high CO(2) conditions to ambient air conditions. Prior growth of plants with short days in air alleviated the cat2 cell-death phenotype in long days. Together, the data reveal the influence of photoperiodic events on redox signalling, and define distinct photoperiod-dependent strategies in the acclimation versus cell-death decision in stress conditions.

  4. Expression and phosphorylation state analysis of intracellular protein kinases using Multi-PK antibody and Phos-tag SDS-PAGE

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yasunori; Katayama, Syouichi; Kameshita, Isamu; Morisawa, Keiko; Higuchi, Takuma; Todaka, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Sakamoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase expression and activity play important roles in diverse cellular functions through regulation of phosphorylation signaling. The most commonly used tools for detecting the protein kinase are protein kinase-specific antibodies, and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies were used for detecting activated protein kinase. Using these antibodies, only one kinase was analyzed at a time, however, a method for analyzing the expression and activation of a panel of protein kinases in cells is not established. Therefore, we developed a combined method using Multi-PK antibody and Phos-tag SDS-PAGE for profiling the expression and phosphorylation state of intracellular protein kinases. Using the new method, changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of various protein kinases were detected in cells treated with anticancer agent which inhibit multiple tyrosine kinase activities. Therefore, the new method is a useful technique for analysis of intracellular protein kinases.•Multi-PK antibody recognizes a wide variety of protein kinases in various species.•Using Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, phosphorylated proteins are visualized as slower migration bands compared with corresponding non-phosphorylated proteins.•This combined method can be used for detecting changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of various intracellular protein kinases. PMID:26844212

  5. Soluble Iron as an In Situ Indicator of the Redox State of Humic Substances in Arctic Soil: Implications for Seasonal Regeneration of Oxidized Terminal Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D.; Zlamal, J. E.; Srinivas, A. J.; Raab, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic substances (HS) are important terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration in wet tundra soils of the Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, Alaska. These soils are rich in both solid phase Fe minerals (including oxides such as ferrihydrite and goethite and other minerals with reduced or mixed valence such as siderite and magnetite) and soluble Fe, chelated by siderophores and other small organic molecules. This latter pool may also include nanocolloidal Fe: extremely fine-grained minerals that pass through a 0.2 micron filter. Both the solid phase and aqueous Fe pools undergo seasonal changes in redox state as a result of biological reduction by Fe-reducing microorganisms and oxidation by a variety of potential mechanisms, both abiotic and biotic. These redox cycles of solid and aqueous pools are not in phase: solid phase Fe became progressively more reduced from mid- to late summer, while aqueous phase Fe became reduced over the first half of the summer. It is well-known that HS interact with Fe, and that HS can act as electron shuttles in the reduction of Fe oxides. In other ecosystems chelated Fe(III) has been incubated with soil samples and the resulting Fe(II) produced is used as an indicator of the reducing power of HS. In these Fe-rich Arctic soils, HS are continuously in contact with chelated Fe, and therefore we interpret the redox state of this pool as an indicator of HS redox status. To verify this we conducted redox titrations of extracted HS with both reduced and oxidized Fe chelates and showed that chelated Fe could interact with HS both as electron acceptor and donator. In a field experiment, the addition of oxidized humic acids to soils resulted in an immediate oxidation of the aqueous Fe pool within 24 hours, which we attribute to abiotic oxidation of Fe by HS, followed by a slow reduction of this pool over the next week, presumably due to biological Fe reduction of the HS/aqueous Fe pool. At the end of summer

  6. Differential Regulation of the Extracellular Cysteine/Cystine Redox State (EhCySS) by Lung Fibroblasts from Young and Old Mice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Walter H; Burke, Tom J; Zelko, Igor N; Torres-González, Edilson; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive oxidation of plasma cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS) redox state, expressed as EhCySS. Cultured cells condition their media to reproduce physiological EhCySS, but it is unknown whether aged cells produce a more oxidized extracellular environment reflective of that seen in vivo. In the current study, we isolated primary lung fibroblasts from young and old female mice and measured the media EhCySS before and after challenge with Cys or CySS. We also measured expression of genes related to redox regulation and fibroblast function. These studies revealed that old fibroblasts produced a more oxidizing extracellular EhCySS than young fibroblasts and that old fibroblasts had a decreased capacity to recover from an oxidative challenge due to a slower rate of reduction of CySS to Cys. These defects were associated with 10-fold lower expression of the Slc7a11 subunit of the xCT cystine-glutamate transporter. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (Sod3) was the only antioxidant or thiol-disulfide regulating enzyme among 36 examined that was downregulated in old fibroblasts by more than 2-fold, but there were numerous changes in extracellular matrix components. Thus, aging fibroblasts not only contribute to remodeling of the extracellular matrix but also have a profound effect on the extracellular redox environment. PMID:27642492

  7. Differential Regulation of the Extracellular Cysteine/Cystine Redox State (EhCySS) by Lung Fibroblasts from Young and Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive oxidation of plasma cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS) redox state, expressed as EhCySS. Cultured cells condition their media to reproduce physiological EhCySS, but it is unknown whether aged cells produce a more oxidized extracellular environment reflective of that seen in vivo. In the current study, we isolated primary lung fibroblasts from young and old female mice and measured the media EhCySS before and after challenge with Cys or CySS. We also measured expression of genes related to redox regulation and fibroblast function. These studies revealed that old fibroblasts produced a more oxidizing extracellular EhCySS than young fibroblasts and that old fibroblasts had a decreased capacity to recover from an oxidative challenge due to a slower rate of reduction of CySS to Cys. These defects were associated with 10-fold lower expression of the Slc7a11 subunit of the xCT cystine-glutamate transporter. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (Sod3) was the only antioxidant or thiol-disulfide regulating enzyme among 36 examined that was downregulated in old fibroblasts by more than 2-fold, but there were numerous changes in extracellular matrix components. Thus, aging fibroblasts not only contribute to remodeling of the extracellular matrix but also have a profound effect on the extracellular redox environment. PMID:27642492

  8. Differential Regulation of the Extracellular Cysteine/Cystine Redox State (EhCySS) by Lung Fibroblasts from Young and Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive oxidation of plasma cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS) redox state, expressed as EhCySS. Cultured cells condition their media to reproduce physiological EhCySS, but it is unknown whether aged cells produce a more oxidized extracellular environment reflective of that seen in vivo. In the current study, we isolated primary lung fibroblasts from young and old female mice and measured the media EhCySS before and after challenge with Cys or CySS. We also measured expression of genes related to redox regulation and fibroblast function. These studies revealed that old fibroblasts produced a more oxidizing extracellular EhCySS than young fibroblasts and that old fibroblasts had a decreased capacity to recover from an oxidative challenge due to a slower rate of reduction of CySS to Cys. These defects were associated with 10-fold lower expression of the Slc7a11 subunit of the xCT cystine-glutamate transporter. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (Sod3) was the only antioxidant or thiol-disulfide regulating enzyme among 36 examined that was downregulated in old fibroblasts by more than 2-fold, but there were numerous changes in extracellular matrix components. Thus, aging fibroblasts not only contribute to remodeling of the extracellular matrix but also have a profound effect on the extracellular redox environment.

  9. Solid-state thermolysis of a fac-rhenium(I) carbonyl complex with a redox non-innocent pincer ligand.

    PubMed

    Jurca, Titel; Chen, Wen-Ching; Michel, Sheila; Korobkov, Ilia; Ong, Tiow-Gan; Richeson, Darrin S

    2013-03-25

    The development of rhenium(I) chemistry has been restricted by the limited structural and electronic variability of the common pseudo-octahedral products fac-[ReX(CO)3L2] (L2 = α-diimine). We address this constraint by first preparing the bidentate bis(imino)pyridine complexes [(2,6-{2,6-Me2C6H3N=CPh}2C5H3N)Re(CO)3X] (X = Cl 2, Br 3), which were characterized by spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic means, and then converting these species into tridentate pincer ligand compounds, [(2,6-{2,6-Me2C6H3N=CPh}2C5H3N)Re(CO)2X] (X = Cl 4, Br 5). This transformation was performed in the solid-state by controlled heating of 2 or 3 above 200 °C in a tube furnace under a flow of nitrogen gas, giving excellent yields (≥95 %). Compounds 4 and 5 define a new coordination environment for rhenium(I) carbonyl chemistry where the metal center is supported by a planar, tridentate pincer-coordinated bis(imino)pyridine ligand. The basic photophysical features of these compounds show significant elaboration in both number and intensity of the d-π* transitions observed in the UV/Vis spec tra relative to the bidentate starting materials, and these spectra were analyzed using time-dependent DFT computations. The redox nature of the bis(imino)pyridine ligand in compounds 2 and 4 was examined by electrochemical analysis, which showed two ligand reduction events and demonstrated that the ligand reduction shifts to a more positive potential when going from bidentate 2 to tridentate 4 (+160 mV for the first reduction step and +90 mV for the second). These observations indicate an increase in electrostatic stabilization of the reduced ligand in the tridentate conformation. Elaboration on this synthetic methodology documented its generality through the preparation of the pseudo-octahedral rhenium(I) triflate complex [(2,6-{2,6-Me2C6H3N=CPh}2C5H3N)Re(CO)2OTf] (7, 93 % yield). PMID:23371831

  10. Intrinsic oxygen fugacity measurements on seven chondrites, a pallasite, and a tektite and the redox state of meteorite parent bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Sato, M.

    1984-01-01

    Intrinsic oxygen-fugacity (fO2) measurements were made on five ordinary chondrites, a carbonaceous chondrite, an enstatite chondrite, a pallasite, and a tektite. Results are of the form of linear log fO2 - 1 T plots. Except for the enstatite chondrite, measured results agree well with calculated estimates by others. The tektite produced fO2 values well below the range measured for terrestrial and lunar rocks. The lowpressure atmospheric regime that is reported to follow large terrestrial explosions, coupled with a very high temperature, could produce glass with fO2 in the range measured. The meteorite Salta (pallasite) has low fO2 and lies close to Hvittis (E6). Unlike the other samples, results for Salta do not parallel the iron-wu??stite buffer, but are close to the fayalite-quartz-iron buffer in slope. Minor reduction by graphite appears to have taken place during metamorphism of ordinary chondrites. fO2 values of unequilibrated chondrites show large scatter during early heating suggesting that the constituent phases were exposed to a range of fO2 conditions. The samples equilibrated with respect to fO2 in relatively short time on heating. Equilibration with respect to fO2 in ordinary chondrites takes place between grades 3 and 4 of metamorphism. Application of P - T - fO2 relations in the system C-CO-CO2 indicates that the ordinary chondrites were metamorphosed at pressures of 3-20 bars, as it appears that they lay on the graphite surface. A steep positive thermal gradient in a meteorite parent body lying at the graphite surface will produce thin reduced exterior, an oxidized near-surface layer, and an interior that is increasingly reduced with depth; a shallow thermal gradient will produce the reverse. A body heated by accretion on the outside will have a reduced exterior and oxidized interior. Meteorites from the same parent body clearly are not required to have similar redox states. ?? 1984.

  11. Solid-state thermolysis of a fac-rhenium(I) carbonyl complex with a redox non-innocent pincer ligand.

    PubMed

    Jurca, Titel; Chen, Wen-Ching; Michel, Sheila; Korobkov, Ilia; Ong, Tiow-Gan; Richeson, Darrin S

    2013-03-25

    The development of rhenium(I) chemistry has been restricted by the limited structural and electronic variability of the common pseudo-octahedral products fac-[ReX(CO)3L2] (L2 = α-diimine). We address this constraint by first preparing the bidentate bis(imino)pyridine complexes [(2,6-{2,6-Me2C6H3N=CPh}2C5H3N)Re(CO)3X] (X = Cl 2, Br 3), which were characterized by spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic means, and then converting these species into tridentate pincer ligand compounds, [(2,6-{2,6-Me2C6H3N=CPh}2C5H3N)Re(CO)2X] (X = Cl 4, Br 5). This transformation was performed in the solid-state by controlled heating of 2 or 3 above 200 °C in a tube furnace under a flow of nitrogen gas, giving excellent yields (≥95 %). Compounds 4 and 5 define a new coordination environment for rhenium(I) carbonyl chemistry where the metal center is supported by a planar, tridentate pincer-coordinated bis(imino)pyridine ligand. The basic photophysical features of these compounds show significant elaboration in both number and intensity of the d-π* transitions observed in the UV/Vis spec tra relative to the bidentate starting materials, and these spectra were analyzed using time-dependent DFT computations. The redox nature of the bis(imino)pyridine ligand in compounds 2 and 4 was examined by electrochemical analysis, which showed two ligand reduction events and demonstrated that the ligand reduction shifts to a more positive potential when going from bidentate 2 to tridentate 4 (+160 mV for the first reduction step and +90 mV for the second). These observations indicate an increase in electrostatic stabilization of the reduced ligand in the tridentate conformation. Elaboration on this synthetic methodology documented its generality through the preparation of the pseudo-octahedral rhenium(I) triflate complex [(2,6-{2,6-Me2C6H3N=CPh}2C5H3N)Re(CO)2OTf] (7, 93 % yield).

  12. Redox signaling in cardiovascular health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Madamanchi, Nageswara R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    2013-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of the activity of a vast array of intracellular proteins and signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species (ROS) governs normal cardiovascular function. However, data from experimental and animal studies strongly support that dysregulated redox signaling, resulting from hyper-activation of various cellular oxidases or mitochondrial dysfunction, is integral to the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this review, we address how redox signaling modulates the protein function, the various sources of increased oxidative stress in CVD, and the labyrinth of redox-sensitive molecular mechanisms involved in the development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, and ischemia–reperfusion injury. Advances in redox biology and pharmacology for inhibiting ROS production in specific cell types and subcellular organelles combined with the development of nanotechnology-based new in vivo imaging systems and targeted drug delivery mechanisms may enable fine-tuning of redox signaling for the treatment and prevention of CVD. PMID:23583330

  13. Green fluorescent protein-based monitoring of endoplasmic reticulum redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Julia; Ramming, Thomas; Odermatt, Alex; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pathological endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is tightly linked to the accumulation of reactive oxidants, which can be both upstream and downstream of ER stress. Accordingly, detrimental intracellular stress signals are amplified through establishment of a vicious cycle. An increasing number of human diseases are characterized by tissue atrophy in response to ER stress and oxidative injury. Experimental monitoring of stress-induced, time-resolved changes in ER reduction-oxidation (redox) states is therefore important. Organelle-specific examination of redox changes has been facilitated by the advent of genetically encoded, fluorescent probes, which can be targeted to different subcellular locations by means of specific amino acid extensions. These probes include redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs) and the yellow fluorescent protein-based redox biosensor HyPer. In the case of roGFPs, variants with known specificity toward defined redox couples are now available. Here, we review the experimental framework to measure ER redox changes using ER-targeted fluorescent biosensors. Advantages and drawbacks of plate-reader and microscopy-based measurements are discussed, and the power of these techniques demonstrated in the context of selected cell culture models for ER stress. PMID:23781233

  14. Redox compartmentalization in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse functions of eukaryotic cells are optimized by organization of compatible chemistries into distinct compartments defined by the structures of lipid-containing membranes, multiprotein complexes and oligomeric structures of saccharides and nucleic acids. This structural and chemical organization is coordinated, in part, through cysteine residues of proteins which undergo reversible oxidation-reduction and serve as chemical/structural transducing elements. The central thiol/disulfide redox couples, thioredoxin-1, thioredoxin-2, GSH/GSSG and cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS), are not in equilibrium with each other and are maintained at distinct, non-equilibrium potentials in mitochondria, nuclei, the secretory pathway and the extracellular space. Mitochondria contain the most reducing compartment, have the highest rates of electron transfer and are highly sensitive to oxidation. Nuclei also have more reduced redox potentials but are relatively resistant to oxidation. The secretory pathway contains oxidative systems which introduce disulfides into proteins for export. The cytoplasm contains few metabolic oxidases and this maintains an environment for redox signaling dependent upon NADPH oxidases and NO synthases. Extracellular compartments are maintained at stable oxidizing potentials. Controlled changes in cytoplasmic GSH/GSSG redox potential are associated with functional state, varying with proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Variation in extracellular Cys/CySS redox potential is also associated with proliferation, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, cellular redox biology is inseparable from redox compartmentalization. Further elucidation of the redox control networks within compartments will improve the mechanistic understanding of cell functions and their disruption in disease. PMID:18267127

  15. Simultaneous quantitation of oxidized and reduced glutathione via LC-MS/MS: An insight into the redox state of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Dustin; Howard, Diana; Zhu, Haining; Paumi, Christian M; Vore, Mary; Bondada, Subbarao; Liang, Ying; Wang, Chi; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-08-01

    Cellular redox balance plays a significant role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cell (HSC/MPP) self-renewal and differentiation. Unregulated changes in cellular redox homeostasis are associated with the onset of most hematological disorders. However, accurate measurement of the redox state in stem cells is difficult because of the scarcity of HSC/MPPs. Glutathione (GSH) constitutes the most abundant pool of cellular antioxidants. Thus, GSH metabolism may play a critical role in hematological disease onset and progression. A major limitation to studying GSH metabolism in HSC/MPPs has been the inability to measure quantitatively GSH concentrations in small numbers of HSC/MPPs. Current methods used to measure GSH levels not only rely on large numbers of cells, but also rely on the chemical/structural modification or enzymatic recycling of GSH and therefore are likely to measure only total glutathione content accurately. Here, we describe the validation of a sensitive method used for the direct and simultaneous quantitation of both oxidized and reduced GSH via liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in HSC/MPPs isolated from bone marrow. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 5.0ng/mL for GSH and 1.0ng/mL for GSSG with lower limits of detection at 0.5ng/mL for both glutathione species. Standard addition analysis utilizing mouse bone marrow shows that this method is both sensitive and accurate with reproducible analyte recovery. This method combines a simple extraction with a platform for the high-throughput analysis, allows for efficient determination of GSH/GSSG concentrations within the HSC/MPP populations in mouse, chemotherapeutic treatment conditions within cell culture, and human normal/leukemia patient samples. The data implicate the importance of the modulation of GSH/GSSG redox couple in stem cells related diseases. PMID:27212018

  16. Diet supplementation for 5 weeks with polyphenol-rich cereals improves several functions and the redox state of mouse leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Pedro; Alvarado, Carmen; Mathieu, Florence; Jiménez, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    Background Cereals naturally contain a great variety of polyphenols, which exert a wide range of physiological effects both in vitro and in vivo. Many of their protective effects, including an improvement of the function and redox state of immune cells in unhealthy or aged subjects come from their properties as powerful antioxidant compounds. However, whether cereal-based dietary supplementation positively affects the immune function and cellular redox state of healthy subjects remains unclear. Aim of the study To investigate the effects of supplementation (20% wt/wt) for 5 weeks with four different cereal fractions on healthy mice. Methods Several parameters of function and redox state of peritoneal leukocytes were measured. The cereals, named B (wheat germ), C (buckwheat flour), D (fine rice bran) and E (wheat middlings) contained different amounts of gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, quercetin, catechin, rutin and oryzanol as major polyphenols. Results In general, all cereal fractions caused an improvement of the leukocyte parameters studied such as chemotaxis capacity, microbicidal activity, lymphoproliferative response to mitogens, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) release, as well as oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSSG/GSH ratio, catalase (CAT) activity and lipid oxidative damage. We observed similar effects among the cereal fractions. Conclusions The results suggest that some of these effects may due, at least partially, to the antioxidant activity of the polyphenols naturally present in cereals. Since an appropriate function of the leukocytes has been proposed as marker of the health state, a short-term intake of cereals seems to be sufficient to exert a benefit in the health of the general population. However, further studies are needed to assess the optimal doses and to find out which active polyphenols are able to mediate the observed physiological effects before

  17. Closed-state inactivation involving an internal gate in Kv4.1 channels modulates pore blockade by intracellular quaternary ammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Szanto, Tibor G; Panyi, Gyorgy; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel activation depends on interactions between voltage sensors and an intracellular activation gate that controls access to a central pore cavity. Here, we hypothesize that this gate is additionally responsible for closed-state inactivation (CSI) in Kv4.x channels. These Kv channels undergo CSI by a mechanism that is still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis, we deduced the state of the Kv4.1 channel intracellular gate by exploiting the trap-door paradigm of pore blockade by internally applied quaternary ammonium (QA) ions exhibiting slow blocking kinetics and high-affinity for a blocking site. We found that inactivation gating seemingly traps benzyl-tributylammonium (bTBuA) when it enters the central pore cavity in the open state. However, bTBuA fails to block inactivated Kv4.1 channels, suggesting gated access involving an internal gate. In contrast, bTBuA blockade of a Shaker Kv channel that undergoes open-state P/C-type inactivation exhibits fast onset and recovery inconsistent with bTBuA trapping. Furthermore, the inactivated Shaker Kv channel is readily blocked by bTBuA. We conclude that Kv4.1 closed-state inactivation modulates pore blockade by QA ions in a manner that depends on the state of the internal activation gate. PMID:27502553

  18. Closed-state inactivation involving an internal gate in Kv4.1 channels modulates pore blockade by intracellular quaternary ammonium ions

    PubMed Central

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Szanto, Tibor G.; Panyi, Gyorgy; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel activation depends on interactions between voltage sensors and an intracellular activation gate that controls access to a central pore cavity. Here, we hypothesize that this gate is additionally responsible for closed-state inactivation (CSI) in Kv4.x channels. These Kv channels undergo CSI by a mechanism that is still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis, we deduced the state of the Kv4.1 channel intracellular gate by exploiting the trap-door paradigm of pore blockade by internally applied quaternary ammonium (QA) ions exhibiting slow blocking kinetics and high-affinity for a blocking site. We found that inactivation gating seemingly traps benzyl-tributylammonium (bTBuA) when it enters the central pore cavity in the open state. However, bTBuA fails to block inactivated Kv4.1 channels, suggesting gated access involving an internal gate. In contrast, bTBuA blockade of a Shaker Kv channel that undergoes open-state P/C-type inactivation exhibits fast onset and recovery inconsistent with bTBuA trapping. Furthermore, the inactivated Shaker Kv channel is readily blocked by bTBuA. We conclude that Kv4.1 closed-state inactivation modulates pore blockade by QA ions in a manner that depends on the state of the internal activation gate. PMID:27502553

  19. Differential reconstitution of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and plasma redox state by cysteine and ornithine in a model of cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Ushmorov, A; Hack, V; Dröge, W

    1999-07-15

    The mechanism of wasting, as it occurs in malignant diseases and various etiologically unrelated conditions, is still poorly understood. We have, therefore, studied putative cause/effect relationships in a murine model of cancer cachexia, C57BL/6 mice bearing the fibrosarcoma MCA-105. The plasma of these mice showed decreased albumin and increased glutamate levels, which are typically found in practically all catabolic conditions. Skeletal muscles from tumor-bearing mice were found to have an abnormally low mitochondrial respiratory chain activity (mito.RCA) and significantly decreased glutathione (GSH) levels. The decrease in mito.RCA was correlated with an increase in the i.m. GSH disulfide/GSH ratio, the plasma cystine/thiol ratio, and the GSH disulfide/GSH ratio in the bile. This is indicative of a generalized shift in the redox state extending through different body fluids. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with ornithine, a precursor of the radical scavenger spermine, reversed both the decrease in mito.RCA and the change in the redox state, whereas treatment with cysteine, a GSH precursor, normalized only the redox state. Treatment of normal mice with difluoromethyl-ornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and spermine biosynthesis, inhibited the mito.RCA in the skeletal muscle tissue, thus illustrating the importance of the putrescine/spermine pathway in the maintenance of mito.RCA. Ornithine, cysteine, and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) also reconstituted the abnormally low concentrations of the GSH precursor glutamate in the skeletal muscle tissue of tumor-bearing mice. Higher doses, however, enhanced tumor growth and increased the plasma glucose level in normal mice. In the latter, cysteine and NAC also decreased i.m. catalase and GSH peroxidase activities. Taken together, our studies on the effects of ornithine, cysteine, and NAC illuminate some of the mechanistic pathways involved in cachexia and suggest targets for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Portal Hyperperfusion after Extended Hepatectomy Does Not Induce a Hepatic Arterial Buffer Response (HABR) but Impairs Mitochondrial Redox State and Hepatocellular Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Dold, Stefan; Richter, Sven; Kollmar, Otto; von Heesen, Maximilian; Scheuer, Claudia; Laschke, Matthias W.; Vollmar, Brigitte; Schilling, Martin K.; Menger, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Portal hyperperfusion after extended hepatectomy or small-for-size liver transplantation may induce organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms, however, are still not completely understood. Herein, we analysed whether hepatectomy-associated portal hyperperfusion induces a hepatic arterial buffer response, i.e., an adaptive hepatic arterial constriction, which may cause hepatocellular hypoxia and organ dysfunction. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 30%, 70% and 90% hepatectomy. Baseline measurements before hepatectomy served as controls. Hepatic arterial and portal venous flows were analysed by ultrasonic flow measurement. Microvascular blood flow and mitochondrial redox state were determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Hepatic tissue pO2 was analysed by polarographic techniques. Hepatic function and integrity were studied by bromosulfophthalein bile excretion and liver histology. Results Portal blood flow was 2- to 4-fold increased after 70% and 90% hepatectomy. This, however, did not provoke a hepatic arterial buffer response. Nonetheless, portal hyperperfusion and constant hepatic arterial blood flow were associated with a reduced mitochondrial redox state and a decreased hepatic tissue pO2 after 70% and 90% hepatectomy. Microvascular blood flow increased significantly after hepatectomy and functional sinusoidal density was found only slightly reduced. Major hepatectomy further induced a 2- to 3-fold increase of bile flow. This was associated with a 2-fold increase of bromosulfophthalein excretion. Conclusions Portal hyperperfusion after extended hepatectomy does not induce a hepatic arterial buffer response but reduces mitochondrial redox state and hepatocellular oxygenation. This is not due to a deterioration of microvascular perfusion, but rather due to a relative hypermetabolism of the remnant liver after major resection. PMID:26523932

  1. Solid-State Redox Switching of Magnetic Exchange and Electronic Conductivity in a Benzoquinoid-Bridged Mn(II) Chain Compound.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ie-Rang; Sun, Lei; Negru, Bogdan; Van Duyne, Richard P; Dincă, Mircea; Harris, T David

    2016-05-25

    We demonstrate that incorporation of a redox-active benzoquinoid ligand into a one-dimensional chain compound can give rise to a material that exhibits simultaneous solid-state redox switching of optical, magnetic, and electronic properties. Metalation of the ligand 4,5-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)-1,2-catechol ((N,O)LH4) with Mn(III) affords the chain compound Mn((N,O)L)(DMSO). Structural and spectroscopic analysis of this compound show the presence of Mn(II) centers bridged by (N,O)L(2-) ligands, resulting partially from a spontaneous ligand-to-metal electron transfer. Upon soaking in a solution of the reductant Cp2Co, Mn((N,O)L)(DMSO) undergoes a ligand-centered solid-state reduction to [Mn((N,O)L)](-), as revealed by a suite of techniques, including Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The ligand-based reduction engenders a dramatic modulation of the physical properties of the chain compound. An electrochromic response, evidenced by a color change from dark green to dark purple is accompanied by a nearly 40-fold increase in magnetic coupling strength, from J = -0.38(1) to -15.6(2) cm(-1), and a 10,000-fold increase in electronic conductivity, from σ = 2.33(1) × 10(-12) S/cm (Ea = 0.64(1) eV) to 8.61(1) × 10(-8) S/cm (Ea = 0.39(1) eV). Importantly, the chemical reduction is reversible: treatment of the reduced compound with [Cp2Fe](+) regenerates the oxidized chain. Taken together, these results highlight the ability of benzoquinoid ligands to facilitate solid-state ligand-based redox reactions in nonporous coordination solids, giving rise to reversible switching of optical properties, magnetic exchange interactions, and electronic conductivity.

  2. Redox Dysregulation in Vascular Pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions comprise a subset of fundamental biochemical reactions found throughout biological systems. While redox reactions are involved in many normal cellular functions, excess oxidative potential, or oxidative stress, can lead to cellular dysfunction and injury. Multiple protective antioxidant systems have evolved to guard against the adverse consequences of oxidant stress and injury. These systems include low-molecular-weight antioxidants, such as the glutathione-glutathione disulfide redox couple; the thiol proteome, whose various oxidation states can serve as a global redox buffer; and antioxidant enzymes, such as the superoxide dismutases, catalase, peroxidredoxins, and the glutathione peroxidases. One example of an essential antioxidant enzyme whose deficiency contributes to pathobiology in the vasculature is glutathione peroxidase-3 (GPx-3), the principal antioxidant enzyme in the extracellular compartment. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen and lipid peroxides to water and lipid alcohols, respectively, and does so using reducing equivalents provided by glutathione. As a selenoprotein, it requires unique translational machinery for its expression, as well as adequate selenium stores; its primary site of synthesis is the renal tubule, although all nucleated cells can express low levels of the enzyme. We have previously demonstrated that a deficiency of GPx-3 leads to enhanced platelet activation, and is an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke in the young. We recently developed a GPx-3-deficient mouse model, and demonstrated endothelial dysfunction as well as increased platelet-dependent thrombosis in an acute ischemic stroke model. Importantly, platelet inhibitors or small-molecule superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavengers greatly attenuated the size of the ischemic stroke and its functional consequences in this model. These data support the importance of GPx-3as a key antioxidant enzyme that

  3. Timing and characterization of the change in the redox state of uranium in Precambrian surface environments: A proxy for the oxidation state of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Gerald D.

    The redox-sensitive geochemical behavior of uranium permits the use of Th/U ratios as a geochemical proxy for the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans during sedimentary processes. Due to the effects of post-depositional uranium mobility on Th/U ratios during events involving oxygenated fluids, direct measurements of Th/U ratios are often misleading, but the whole rock Pb isotope composition may be used to determine a sample's apparent time-integrated Th/U ratio (kappaa) and the timing associated with the onset of the U-Th-Pb geochemistry. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations were determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry to evaluate the influence of multiple provenance components and potential mobility of Th, U, and Pb during post-depositional processes on the Th/U ratio. The Pb isotope compositions and REE concentrations were determined for six Paleoproterozoic sedimentary sequences, which were the focus of previous studies involving the timing of the rise of atmospheric oxygen. The Mount McRae Shale, Huronian Supergroup, and Zaonezhskaya Formation have been interpreted as experiencing post-depositional alteration (perhaps associated with orogenic events) due to Pb-Pb ages that are younger than the likely depositional age and observed fractionation of REE in chondrite normalized REE patterns and interelement REE ratios (e.g. La/Nd, La/Yb, Eu/Eu*). Similar geochemical proxies have been interpreted as sedimentary geochemical features of the Timeball Hill Formation, Hotazel Formation, and Sengoma Argillite Formation. This study of Paleoproterozoic sedimentary units constrains the onset of U-Th decoupling, most likely due to the onset of oxidative weathering conditions, began by 2.32 Ga, the latest. Index words. Pb isotopes, Rare earth elements, Th/U ratios, Time-integrated, Atmospheric evolution, Oxygen content of the atmosphere, U-Th decoupling

  4. Oxygen Evolution Reaction Dynamics, Faradaic Charge Efficiency, and the Active Metal Redox States of Ni-Fe Oxide Water Splitting Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Görlin, Mikaela; Chernev, Petko; Ferreira de Araújo, Jorge; Reier, Tobias; Dresp, Sören; Paul, Benjamin; Krähnert, Ralph; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mixed Ni-Fe oxides are attractive anode catalysts for efficient water splitting in solar fuels reactors. Because of conflicting past reports, the catalytically active metal redox state of the catalyst has remained under debate. Here, we report an in operando quantitative deconvolution of the charge injected into the nanostructured Ni-Fe oxyhydroxide OER catalysts or into reaction product molecules. To achieve this, we explore the oxygen evolution reaction dynamics and the individual faradaic charge efficiencies using operando differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). We further use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) under OER conditions at the Ni and Fe K-edges of the electrocatalysts to evaluate oxidation states and local atomic structure motifs. DEMS and XAS data consistently reveal that up to 75% of the Ni centers increase their oxidation state from +2 to +3, while up to 25% arrive in the +4 state for the NiOOH catalyst under OER catalysis. The Fe centers consistently remain in the +3 state, regardless of potential and composition. For mixed Ni100-xFex catalysts, where x exceeds 9 atomic %, the faradaic efficiency of O2 sharply increases from ∼30% to 90%, suggesting that Ni atoms largely remain in the oxidation state +2 under catalytic conditions. To reconcile the apparent low level of oxidized Ni in mixed Ni-Fe catalysts, we hypothesize that a kinetic competition between the (i) metal oxidation process and the (ii) metal reduction step during O2 release may account for an insignificant accumulation of detectable high-valent metal states if the reaction rate of process (ii) outweighs that of (i). We conclude that a discussion of the superior catalytic OER activity of Ni-FeOOH electrocatalysts in terms of surface catalysis and redox-inactive metal sites likely represents an oversimplification that fails to capture essential aspects of the synergisms at highly active Ni-Fe sites.

  5. Determination of the in vivo redox potential using roGFP and fluorescence spectra obtained from one-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierer, S.; Elgass, K.; Bieker, S.; Zentgraf, U.; Meixner, A. J.; Schleifenbaum, F.

    2011-02-01

    The analysis of molecular processes in living (plant) cells such as signal transduction, DNA replication, carbon metabolism and senescence has been revolutionized by the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants as specific cellular markers. Many cell biological processes are accompanied by changes in the intracellular redox potential. To monitor the redox potential, a redox-sensitive mutant of GFP (roGFP) was created, which shows changes in its optical properties in response to changes in the redox state of its surrounding medium. For a quantitative analysis in living systems, it is essential to know the optical properties of roGFP in vitro. Therefore, we applied spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on purified roGFP exposed to different redox potentials to determine shifts in both the absorption and the emission spectra of roGFP. Based on these in vitro findings, we introduce a new approach using one-wavelength excitation to use roGFP for the in vivo analysis of cell biological processes. We demonstrate the ability this technique by investigating chloroplast-located Grx1-roGFP2 expressing Arabidopsis thaliana cells as example for dynamically moving intracellular compartments. This is not possible with the two-wavelength excitation technique established so far, which hampers a quantitative analysis of highly mobile samples due to the time delay between the two measurements and the consequential displacement of the investigated area.

  6. Redox biomarkers in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Antoniades, Charalambos; Nicholls, Stephen J; Channon, Keith M; Figtree, Gemma A

    2015-07-01

    The central role of oxidative signalling in cardiovascular pathophysiology positions biometric measures of redox state as excellent markers for research and clinical application. However, despite this tantalizing biological plausibility, no redox biomarker is currently in widespread clinical use. Major recent insights into the mechanistic complexities of redox signalling may yet provide the opportunity to identify markers that most closely reflect the underlying pathobiology. Such redox biomarkers may, in principle, quantify the integrated effects of various known and unknown pathophysiological drivers of cardiovascular disease processes. Recent advances with the greatest potential include assays measuring post-translational oxidative modifications that have significant cellular effects. However, analytical issues, including the relative instability of redox-modified products, remain a major technical obstacle. Appreciation of these challenges may facilitate future development of user-friendly markers with prognostic value in addition to traditional risk factors, and which could be used to guide personalized cardiovascular therapies. We review both established and recently identified biomarkers of redox signalling, and provide a realistic discussion of the many challenges that remain if they are to be incorporated into clinical practice. Despite the current lack of redox biomarkers in clinical application, the integral role of reactive oxygen species in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease provides a strong incentive for continued efforts.

  7. Monitoring Changes in the Redox State of Myoglobin in Cardiomyocytes by Raman Spectroscopy Enables the Protective Effect of NO Donors to Be Evaluated.

    PubMed

    Almohammedi, Abdullah; Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Hudson, Andrew J; Storey, Nina M

    2015-10-20

    Raman microspectroscopy has been used to monitor changes in the redox and ligand-coordination states of the heme complex in myoglobin during the preconditioning of ex vivo cardiomyocytes with pharmacological drugs that release nitric oxide (NO). These chemical agents are known to confer protection on heart tissue against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Subsequent changes in the redox and ligand-coordination states during experimental simulations of ischemia and reperfusion have also been monitored. We found that these measurements, in real time, could be used to evaluate the preconditioning treatment of cardiomyocytes and to predict the likelihood of cell survival following a potentially lethal period of ischemia. Evaluation of the preconditioning treatment was done at the single-cell level. The binding of NO to myoglobin, giving a 6-coordinate ferrous-heme complex, was inferred from the measured Raman bands of a cardiomyocyte by comparison to pure solution of the protein in the presence of NO. A key change in the Raman spectrum was observed after perfusion of the NO-donor was completed, where, if the preconditioning treatment was successful, the bands corresponding to the nitrosyl complex were replaced by bands corresponding to metmyoglobin, Mb(III). An observation of Mb(III) bands in the Raman spectrum was made for all of the cardiomyocytes that recovered contractile function, whereas the absence of Mb(III) bands always indicated that the cardiomyocyte would be unable to recover contractile function following the simulated conditions of ischemia and reperfusion in these experiments.

  8. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme: role of catalytic cysteine residues in regulation of enzymatic activity through changes in oligomeric state.

    PubMed

    Dotson, P Patrick; Karakashian, Alexander A; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N

    2015-02-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2) is the major sphingomyelinase activated in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and during oxidative stress. It is a membrane-bound 655 amino acid protein containing 22 cysteine residues. In this study, we expressed recombinant mouse nSMase-2 protein in Escherichia coli, and investigated whether nSMase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme. Our results demonstrate that nSMase-2 exists as both monomers and multimers that are associated with high and low enzymatic activity respectively. Mutational analysis of nSMase-2 identified within its C-terminal catalytic domain several oxidant-sensitive cysteine residues that were shown to be involved in enzyme oligomerization. Changing Cys(617) to Ser for example is a gain-of-function mutation associated with a decreased propensity for oligomerization. Alternatively, nSMase-2 expression in a bacterial strain that lacks endogenous thioredoxin, Rosetta-gami2, results in increased oligomer formation and lower enzyme activity. Phenotypic rescue was accomplished by treating nSMase-2 lysates with recombinant human thioredoxin. This indicates that nSMase-2 may be a novel substrate for thioredoxin. FRET analysis confirmed the presence of nSMase-2 multimers in mammalian HEK cells and their localization to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results identify nSMase-2 as a redox-sensitive enzyme, whose basal activity is influenced by thioredoxin-mediated changes in its oligomeric state. PMID:25287744

  9. Probing the Protonation State and the Redox-Active Sites of Pendant Base Iron(II) and Zinc(II) Pyridinediimine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Mayra; Sommer, Samantha K; Swanson, Seth P; Berger, Robert F; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2015-08-01

    Utilizing the pyridinediimine ligand [(2,6-(i)PrC6H3)N═CMe)(N((i)Pr)2C2H4)N═CMe)C5H3N] (didpa), the zinc(II) and iron(II) complexes Zn(didpa)Cl2 (1), Fe(didpa)Cl2 (2), [Zn(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (3), [Fe(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (4), Zn(didpa)Br2 (5), and [Zn(Hdidpa)Br2][PF6] (6), Fe(didpa)(CO)2 (7), and [Fe(Hdidpa)(CO)2][PF6] (8) were synthesized and characterized. These complexes allowed for the study of the secondary coordination sphere pendant base and the redox-activity of the didpa ligand scaffold. The protonated didpa ligand is capable of forming metal halogen hydrogen bonds (MHHBs) in complexes 3, 4, and 6. The solution behavior of the MHHBs was probed via pKa measurements and (1)H NMR titrations of 3 and 6 with solvents of varying H-bond accepting strength. The H-bond strength in 3 and 6 was calculated in silico to be 5.9 and 4.9 kcal/mol, respectively. The relationship between the protonation state and the ligand-based redox activity was probed utilizing 7 and 8, where the reduction potential of the didpa scaffold was found to shift by 105 mV upon protonation of the reduced ligand in Fe(didpa)(CO)2.

  10. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Frameworks: Highly Stable Charge-Separated States through Strut/Guest-to-Strut Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Nivedita; Jayaramulu, Kolleboyina; Kiran, Venkayala; Rao, K Venkata; Sampath, Srinivasan; George, Subi J; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2015-08-10

    Molecular organization of donor and acceptor chromophores in self-assembled materials is of paramount interest in the field of photovoltaics or mimicry of natural light-harvesting systems. With this in mind, a redox-active porous interpenetrated metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Cd(bpdc)(bpNDI)]⋅4.5 H2 O⋅DMF}n (1) has been constructed from a mixed chromophoric system. The μ-oxo-bridged secondary building unit, {Cd2 (μ-OCO)2 }, guides the parallel alignment of bpNDI (N,N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide) acceptor linkers, which are tethered with bpdc (bpdcH2 =4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid) linkers of another entangled net in the framework, resulting in photochromic behaviour through inter-net electron transfer. Encapsulation of electron-donating aromatic molecules in the electron-deficient channels of 1 leads to a perfect donor-acceptor co-facial organization, resulting in long-lived charge-separated states of bpNDI. Furthermore, 1 and guest encapsulated species are characterised through electrochemical studies for understanding of their redox properties. PMID:26206156

  11. Intraperoxisomal redox balance in mammalian cells: oxidative stress and interorganellar cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Oksana; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Ho, Ye-Shih; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are at once unsought by-products of metabolism and critical regulators of multiple intracellular signaling cascades. In nonphotosynthetic eukaryotic cells, mitochondria are well-investigated major sites of ROS generation and related signal initiation. Peroxisomes are also capable of ROS generation, but their contribution to cellular oxidation-reduction (redox) balance and signaling events are far less well understood. In this study, we use a redox-sensitive variant of enhanced green fluorescent protein (roGFP2-PTS1) to monitor the state of the peroxisomal matrix in mammalian cells. We show that intraperoxisomal redox status is strongly influenced by environmental growth conditions. Furthermore, disturbances in peroxisomal redox balance, although not necessarily correlated with the age of the organelle, may trigger its degradation. We also demonstrate that the mitochondrial redox balance is perturbed in catalase-deficient cells and upon generation of excess ROS inside peroxisomes. Peroxisomes are found to resist oxidative stress generated elsewhere in the cell but are affected when the burden originates within the organelle. These results suggest a potential broader role for the peroxisome in cellular aging and the initiation of age-related degenerative disease. PMID:21372177

  12. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  13. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed. PMID:25628332

  14. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  15. Rho GTPases, oxidation, and cell redox control

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Zhou, Bingying; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies support regulation of Ras GTPases by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, the Rho subfamily has received considerably less attention. Over the last few years, increasing evidence is emerging that supports the redox sensitivity of Rho GTPases. Moreover, as Rho GTPases regulate the cellular redox state by controlling enzymes that generate and convert reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, redox feedback loops likely exist. Here, we provide an overview of cellular oxidants, Rho GTPases, and their inter-dependence. PMID:24809833

  16. The Association of Arsenic With Redox Conditions, Depth, and Ground-Water Age in the Glacial Aquifer System of the Northern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    More than 800 wells in the glacial aquifer system of the Northern United States were sampled for arsenic as part of U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) studies during 1991-2003. Elevated arsenic concentrations (greater than or equal to 10 micrograms per liter) were detected in 9 percent of samples. Elevated arsenic concentrations were associated with strongly reducing conditions. Of the samples classified as iron reducing or sulfate reducing, arsenic concentrations were elevated in 19 percent. Of the methanogenic samples, arsenic concentrations were elevated in 45 percent. In contrast, concentrations of arsenic were elevated in only 1 percent of oxic samples. Arsenic concentrations were also related to ground-water age. Elevated arsenic concentrations were detected in 34 percent of old waters (recharged before 1953) as compared to 4 percent of young waters (recharged since 1953). For samples classified as both old and methanogenic, elevated arsenic concentrations were detected in 62 percent of samples, as compared to 1 percent for samples classified as young and oxic. Arsenic concentrations were also correlated with well depth and concentrations of several chemical constituents, including (1) constituents linked to redox processes and (2) anions or oxyanions that sorb to iron oxides. Observations from the glacial aquifer system are consistent with the idea that the predominant source of arsenic is iron oxides and the predominant mechanism for releasing arsenic to the ground water is reductive desorption or reductive dissolution. Arsenic is also released from iron oxides under oxic conditions, but on a more limited basis and at lower concentrations. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relative significance of redox, ground-water age, depth, and other water-quality constituents as indicators of elevated arsenic concentrations in the glacial aquifer system. The single variable that explained the greatest amount of variation in

  17. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  18. Function and redox state of peritoneal leukocytes as preclinical and prodromic markers in a longitudinal study of triple-transgenic mice for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maté, Ianire; Cruces, Julia; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    The aging process involves the impairment of the immune system (immunosenescence), based on the imbalance of the redox status, as occurs in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since in AD there is a systemic disorder, we aimed to assess longitudinally, from before the onset until the complete establishment of AD, cell populations, several functions, and oxidative stress parameters in peritoneal leukocytes of triple transgenic mice for AD (3xTgAD). These animals mimic the human AD pathophysiology. The results indicate a premature immunosenescence in 3xTgAD at 4 months of age, when the immunoreactivity against intracellular amyloid-β fibrils appears. Thus, decreases in functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and lymphoproliferation, as well as a lower reduced glutathione content and higher xanthine oxidase activity, appear in leukocytes. Moreover, NK percentage and cytotoxic activity, CD25+ B and naïve CD8 T cells percentage, GSSG/GSH ratio, and GSH content were already changed before the onset of AD, at the age of 2 months. Furthermore, the changes in some parameters such as CD5+ B1 cells, phagocytosis, lymphoproliferation, and xanthine oxidase activity continue at 15 months of age, when AD pathophysiology is completely established. Because the immune system parameters studied are markers of health and longevity, the premature immunosenescence could explain the shorter life span shown by 3xTgAD observed in the present work. These results suggest that peripheral immune cell functions and their oxidative stress status could be good early peripheral markers of the preclinical and prodromal stages and progression of AD.

  19. Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells Impinges on the Cysteines Redox State of Human XRCC3 Protein and on Its Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Pierre-Marie; Graindorge, Dany; Smirnova, Violetta; Rigolet, Pascal; Francesconi, Stefania; Scanlon, Susan; Sage, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, XRCC3 is one of the five Rad51 paralogs that plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR), a key pathway for maintaining genomic stability. While investigating the potential role of human XRCC3 (hXRCC3) in the inhibition of DNA replication induced by UVA radiation, we discovered that hXRCC3 cysteine residues are oxidized following photosensitization by UVA. Our in silico prediction of the hXRCC3 structure suggests that 6 out of 8 cysteines are potentially accessible to the solvent and therefore potentially exposed to ROS attack. By non-reducing SDS-PAGE we show that many different oxidants induce hXRCC3 oxidation that is monitored in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells by increased electrophoretic mobility of the protein and in human cells by a slight decrease of its immunodetection. In both cell types, hXRCC3 oxidation was reversed in few minutes by cellular reducing systems. Depletion of intracellular glutathione prevents hXRCC3 oxidation only after UVA exposure though depending on the type of photosensitizer. In addition, we show that hXRCC3 expressed in CHO cells localizes both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Mutating all hXRCC3 cysteines to serines (XR3/S protein) does not affect the subcellular localization of the protein even after exposure to camptothecin (CPT), which typically induces DNA damages that require HR to be repaired. However, cells expressing mutated XR3/S protein are sensitive to CPT, thus highlighting a defect of the mutant protein in HR. In marked contrast to CPT treatment, oxidative stress induces relocalization at the chromatin fraction of both wild-type and mutated protein, even though survival is not affected. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the DNA repair protein hXRCC3 is a target of ROS induced by environmental factors and raise the possibility that the redox environment might participate in regulating the HR pathway. PMID:24116071

  20. A cell cycle-controlled redox switch regulates the topoisomerase IV activity

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sharath; Janakiraman, Balaganesh; Kumar, Lokesh

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase IV (topo IV), an essential factor during chromosome segregation, resolves the catenated chromosomes at the end of each replication cycle. How the decatenating activity of the topo IV is regulated during the early stages of the chromosome cycle despite being in continuous association with the chromosome remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel cell cycle-regulated protein in Caulobacter crescentus, NstA (negative switch for topo IV decatenation activity), that inhibits the decatenation activity of the topo IV during early stages of the cell cycle. We demonstrate that in C. crescentus, NstA acts by binding to the ParC DNA-binding subunit of topo IV. Most importantly, we uncover a dynamic oscillation of the intracellular redox state during the cell cycle, which correlates with and controls NstA activity. Thus, we propose that predetermined dynamic intracellular redox fluctuations may act as a global regulatory switch to control cellular development and cell cycle progression and may help retain pathogens in a suitable cell cycle state when encountering redox stress from the host immune response. PMID:26063575

  1. In Situ Tuning of Magnetization and Magnetoresistance in Fe3O4 Thin Film Achieved with All-Solid-State Redox Device.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Terabe, Kazuya; Ochi, Masanori; Higuchi, Tohru; Osada, Minoru; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-01-26

    An all-solid-state redox device composed of Fe3O4 thin film and Li(+) ion conducting solid electrolyte was fabricated for use in tuning magnetization and magnetoresistance (MR), which are key factors in the creation of high-density magnetic storage devices. Electrical conductivity, magnetization, and MR were reversibly tuned by Li(+) insertion and removal. Tuning of the various Fe3O4 thin film properties was achieved by donation of an electron to the Fe(3+) ions. This technique should lead to the development of spintronics devices based on the reversible switching of magnetization and spin polarization (P). It should also improve the performance of conventional magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices in which the ON/OFF ratio has been limited to a small value due to a decrease in P near the tunnel barrier.

  2. Temporal distribution of mantle-derived potassic rocks and carbonatites linked to stabilization of mantle lithosphere and redox states during subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle-derived potassic igneous rocks and carbonatites first appear in the geological record in the late Archean, coinciding with major crust-forming events on most continents. The compositions of potassic rocks require sources including discrete ultramafic rocks with phlogopite and pyroxenes, whereas carbonatites and ultramafic lamprophyres (carbonate-rich potassic rocks) require oxidizing conditions in which carbonate is stable. The presence of these source rocks from this time is probably related to the stabilization of mantle lithosphere. If mantle lithosphere had not been stable for considerable periods of time, then melting would be restricted to peridotite, which is not a viable option for strongly potassic rocks. The phlogopite-rich source-rock assemblages that are necessary precursors for potassic melts could be introduced into the lithosphere by either subduction processes or by multiple stages of low-degree melting. Many modern examples involve subducted sedimentary material, which concentrates potassium by the stabilization of micas in subduction metamorphism. Subduction involves a great variety of redox states, but the bulk effect is the return of oxidized material from the surface into the mantle. However, we cannot apply uniformitarianism unthinkingly, because subduction processes at and before 2.7 Ga may have had different redox states. Before the Great Oxidation Event the distribution and abundances of geological formations such as banded iron formations, red beds, and uraninites indicate that geological reservoirs became gradually oxidized, preventing an earlier increase in atmospheric oxygen. This means that the function of the subduction process to oxidize the upper mantle by the return of oxidized rocks from the surface was much weaker in the early Earth. Early continental mantle lithosphere was, therefore, likely to accumulate carbon in reduced form, which would be more easily remobilized in melts through low-temperature redox melting much

  3. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, III, George F.

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  4. Effects of morin-5'-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NaMSA) on cyclophosphamide-induced changes in oxido-redox state in rat liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Merwid-Ląd, A; Trocha, M; Chlebda, E; Sozański, T; Magdalan, J; Ksiądzyna, D; Kopacz, M; Kuźniar, A; Nowak, D; Pieśniewska, M; Fereniec-Gołębiewska, L; Kwiatkowska, J; Szeląg, A

    2012-08-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CPX) is an anticancer drug with immunosuppressive properties. Its adverse effects are partly connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Some studies indicate that water-soluble derivative of morin-morin-5'-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NaMSA) exhibits strong antioxidant activity. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of NaMSA on CPX-induced changes in oxido-redox state in rat. Experiment was carried out on Wistar rats divided in three experimental groups (N = 12) receiving: 0.9% saline, CPX (15 mg/kg) or CPX (15 mg/kg) + NaMSA (100 mg/kg), respectively, and were given intragastrically for 10 days. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were determined in liver and kidneys. Catalase (CAT) activity was assessed only in liver. Treatment with CPX resulted in significant decrease in MDA level in both tissues, which was completely reversed by NaMSA treatment only in liver. In comparison to the control group significant decrease in SOD activity were observed in both tissues of CPX receiving group. In kidneys this parameter was fully restored by NaMSA administration. CPX evoked significant decrease in GSH concentration in kidneys, which was completely reversed by NaMSA treatment. No significant changes were seen in GSH levels and CAT activity between all groups in liver. Results of our study suggest that CPX may exert significant impact on oxido-redox state in both organs. NaMSA fully reversed the CPX-induced changes, especially MDA level in liver, SOD activity and GSH concentration in kidneys and it may be done by enhancement of activity/concentration of endogenous antioxidants.

  5. Time dependent changes in the intestinal Ca²⁺ absorption in rats with type I diabetes mellitus are associated with alterations in the intestinal redox state.

    PubMed

    Rivoira, María; Rodríguez, Valeria; López, María Peralta; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to determine the intestinal Ca²⁺ absorption in type I diabetic rats after different times of STZ induction, as well as the gene and protein expression of molecules involved in both the transcellular and paracellular Ca²⁺ pathways. The redox state and the antioxidant enzymes of the enterocytes were also evaluated in duodenum from either diabetic or insulin-treated diabetic rats as compared to control rats. Male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were divided into two groups: 1) controls and 2) STZ-induced diabetic rats (60 mg/kg b.w.). A group of diabetic rats received insulin for five days. The insulin was adjusted daily to maintain a normal blood glucose level. Five 5 d after STZ injection, there was a reduction in the intestinal Ca²⁺ absorption, which was maintained for 30 d and disappeared at 60 d. Similar changes occurred in the GSH and (˙)O(2)(-) levels. The protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular pathway increased at 5 and 30 d returning to control values at 60 d. Their mRNA levels declined considerably at 60 d. The gene and protein expression of claudin 2 was upregulated at 30 d. Catalase activity increased at 5 and 30 d normalizing at 60 d. To conclude, type I D.m. inhibits the intestinal Ca²⁺ absorption, which is transient leading to a time dependent adaptation and returning the absorptive process to normal values. The inhibition is accompanied by oxidative stress. When insulin is administered, the duodenal redox state returns to control values and the intestinal Ca²⁺ absorption normalizes.

  6. Tendency for oxidation of annelid hemoglobin at alkaline pH and dissociated states probed by redox titration.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceicao; Landini, Gustavo Fraga; Santos, Jose Luis Rocha; Norberto, Douglas Ricardo; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio

    2005-08-01

    The redox titration of extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) was investigated in different pH conditions and after dissociation induced by pressure. Oxidation increased with increasing pH, as shown by the reduced amount of ferricyanide necessary for the oxidation of hemoglobin. This behavior was the opposite of that of vertebrate hemoglobins. The potential of half oxidation (E1/2) changed from -65.3 to +146.8 mV when the pH increased from 4.50 to 8.75. The functional properties indicated a reduction in the log P50 from 1.28 to 0.28 in this pH range. The dissociation at alkaline pH or induced by high pressure, confirmed by HPLC gel filtration, suggested that disassembly of the hemoglobin could be involved in the increased potential for oxidation. These results suggest that the high stability and prolonged lifetime common to invertebrate hemoglobins is related to their low tendency to oxidize at acidic pH, in contrast to vertebrate hemoglobins. PMID:15982915

  7. Tendency for oxidation of annelid hemoglobin at alkaline pH and dissociated states probed by redox titration.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceicao; Landini, Gustavo Fraga; Santos, Jose Luis Rocha; Norberto, Douglas Ricardo; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio

    2005-08-01

    The redox titration of extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) was investigated in different pH conditions and after dissociation induced by pressure. Oxidation increased with increasing pH, as shown by the reduced amount of ferricyanide necessary for the oxidation of hemoglobin. This behavior was the opposite of that of vertebrate hemoglobins. The potential of half oxidation (E1/2) changed from -65.3 to +146.8 mV when the pH increased from 4.50 to 8.75. The functional properties indicated a reduction in the log P50 from 1.28 to 0.28 in this pH range. The dissociation at alkaline pH or induced by high pressure, confirmed by HPLC gel filtration, suggested that disassembly of the hemoglobin could be involved in the increased potential for oxidation. These results suggest that the high stability and prolonged lifetime common to invertebrate hemoglobins is related to their low tendency to oxidize at acidic pH, in contrast to vertebrate hemoglobins.

  8. Vitex agnus-castus L. (Verbenaceae) Improves the Liver Lipid Metabolism and Redox State of Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Franciele Neves; Campos-Shimada, Lilian Brites; da Costa, Silvio Claudio; Garcia, Rosângela Fernandes; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal; Vitoriano, Adriana de Souza; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Salgueiro-Pagadigorria, Clairce Luzia

    2015-01-01

    Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) is a plant that has recently been used to treat the symptoms of menopause, by its actions on the central nervous system. However, little is known about its actions on disturbances in lipid metabolism and nonalcoholic fat liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with menopause. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats exhibit increased adiposity and NAFLD 13 weeks after ovary removal and were used as animal models of estrogen deficiency. The rats were treated with crude extract (CE) and a butanolic fraction of VAC (ButF) and displayed the beneficial effects of a reduction in the adiposity index and a complete reversion of NAFLD. NAFLD reversion was accompanied by a general improvement in the liver redox status. The activities of some antioxidant enzymes were restored and the mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production was significantly reduced in animals treated with CE and the ButF. It can be concluded that the CE and ButF from Vitex agnus-castus were effective in preventing NAFLD and oxidative stress, which are frequent causes of abnormal liver functions in the postmenopausal period. PMID:25954315

  9. Interplay between redox and protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Feleciano, Diogo R; Arnsburg, Kristin; Kirstein, Janine

    2016-01-01

    The subcellular compartments of eukaryotic cells are characterized by different redox environments. Whereas the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondria are more reducing, the endoplasmic reticulum represents a more oxidizing environment. As the redox level controls the formation of intra- and inter-molecular disulfide bonds, the folding of proteins is tightly linked to its environment. The proteostasis network of each compartment needs to be adapted to the compartmental redox properties. In addition to chaperones, also members of the thioredoxin superfamily can influence the folding of proteins by regulation of cysteine reduction/oxidation. This review will focus on thioredoxin superfamily members and chaperones of C. elegans, which play an important role at the interface between redox and protein homeostasis. Additionally, this review will highlight recent methodological developments on in vivo and in vitro assessment of the redox state and their application to provide insights into the high complexity of redox and proteostasis networks of C. elegans. PMID:27386166

  10. Cysteine Mutational Studies Provide Insight into a Thiol-Based Redox Switch Mechanism of Metal and DNA Binding in FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Botello-Morte, Laura; Pellicer, Silvia; Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C.; Contreras, Lellys M.; Neira, José Luis; Abián, Olga; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is the main transcriptional regulator of genes involved in iron homeostasis in most prokaryotes. FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 contains five cysteine residues, four of them arranged in two redox-active CXXC motifs. The protein needs not only metal but also reducing conditions to remain fully active in vitro. Through a mutational study of the cysteine residues present in FurA, we have investigated their involvement in metal and DNA binding. Results: Residue C101 that belongs to a conserved CXXC motif plays an essential role in both metal and DNA binding activities in vitro. Substitution of C101 by serine impairs DNA and metal binding abilities of FurA. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that the redox state of C101 is responsible for the protein ability to coordinate the metal corepressor. Moreover, the redox state of C101 varies with the presence or absence of C104 or C133, suggesting that the environments of these cysteines are mutually interdependent. Innovation: We propose that C101 is part of a thiol/disulfide redox switch that determines FurA ability to bind the metal corepressor. Conclusion: This mechanism supports a novel feature of a Fur protein that emerges as a regulator, which connects the response to changes in the intracellular redox state and iron management in cyanobacteria. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 173–185. PMID:26414804

  11. Cell–cell and intracellular lactate shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, George A

    2009-01-01

    Once thought to be the consequence of oxygen lack in contracting skeletal muscle, the glycolytic product lactate is formed and utilized continuously in diverse cells under fully aerobic conditions. ‘Cell–cell’ and ‘intracellular lactate shuttle’ concepts describe the roles of lactate in delivery of oxidative and gluconeogenic substrates as well as in cell signalling. Examples of the cell–cell shuttles include lactate exchanges between between white-glycolytic and red-oxidative fibres within a working muscle bed, and between working skeletal muscle and heart, brain, liver and kidneys. Examples of intracellular lactate shuttles include lactate uptake by mitochondria and pyruvate for lactate exchange in peroxisomes. Lactate for pyruvate exchanges affect cell redox state, and by itself lactate is a ROS generator. In vivo, lactate is a preferred substrate and high blood lactate levels down-regulate the use of glucose and free fatty acids (FFA). As well, lactate binding may affect metabolic regulation, for instance binding to G-protein receptors in adipocytes inhibiting lipolysis, and thus decreasing plasma FFA availability. In vitro lactate accumulation upregulates expression of MCT1 and genes coding for other components of the mitochondrial reticulum in skeletal muscle. The mitochondrial reticulum in muscle and mitochondrial networks in other aerobic tissues function to establish concentration and proton gradients necessary for cells with high mitochondrial densities to oxidize lactate. The presence of lactate shuttles gives rise to the realization that glycolytic and oxidative pathways should be viewed as linked, as opposed to alternative, processes, because lactate, the product of one pathway, is the substrate for the other. PMID:19805739

  12. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-12-25

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys(19)-Pro(20)-Trp(21)-Cys(22) motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a "closed" compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an "open" conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily.

  13. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2015-12-25

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys(19)-Pro(20)-Trp(21)-Cys(22) motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a "closed" compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an "open" conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily. PMID:26546681

  14. Capturing a reactive state of amyloid aggregates: NMR-based characterization of copper-bound Alzheimer disease amyloid β-fibrils in a redox cycle.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Yoo, Brian; McElheny, Dan; Tay, William; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of redox-active copper ions with misfolded amyloid β (Aβ) is linked to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which has been associated with oxidative stress and neuronal damages in Alzheimer disease. Despite intensive studies, it is still not conclusive how the interaction of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) with Aβ aggregates leads to ROS production even at the in vitro level. In this study, we examined the interaction between Cu(+)/Cu(2+) and Aβ fibrils by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and other spectroscopic methods. Our photometric studies confirmed the production of ~60 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from a solution of 20 μM Cu(2+) ions in complex with Aβ(1-40) in fibrils ([Cu(2+)]/[Aβ] = 0.4) within 2 h of incubation after addition of biological reducing agent ascorbate at the physiological concentration (~1 mM). Furthermore, SSNMR (1)H T1 measurements demonstrated that during ROS production the conversion of paramagnetic Cu(2+) into diamagnetic Cu(+) occurs while the reactive Cu(+) ions remain bound to the amyloid fibrils. The results also suggest that O2 is required for rapid recycling of Cu(+) bound to Aβ back to Cu(2+), which allows for continuous production of H2O2. Both (13)C and (15)N SSNMR results show that Cu(+) coordinates to Aβ(1-40) fibrils primarily through the side chain Nδ of both His-13 and His-14, suggesting major rearrangements from the Cu(2+) coordination via Nε in the redox cycle. (13)C SSNMR chemical shift analysis suggests that the overall Aβ conformations are largely unaffected by Cu(+) binding. These results present crucial site-specific evidence of how the full-length Aβ in amyloid fibrils offers catalytic Cu(+) centers.

  15. Glutathione redox state, tocochromanols, fatty acids, antioxidant enzymes and protein carbonylation in sunflower seed embryos associated with after-ripening and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Morscher, F.; Kranner, I.; Arc, E.; Bailly, C.; Roach, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Loss of seed viability has been associated with deteriorative processes that are partly caused by oxidative damage. The breaking of dormancy, a seed trait that prevents germination in unfavourable seasons, has also been associated with oxidative processes. It is neither clear how much overlap exists between these mechanisms nor is the specific roles played by oxygen and reactive oxygen species. Methods Antioxidant profiles were studied in fresh (dormant) or after-ripened (non-dormant) sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos subjected to controlled deterioration at 40 °C and 75 % relative humidity under ambient (21 %) or high O2 (75 %). Changes in seed vigour and viability, dormancy, protein carbonylation and fatty acid composition were also studied. Key Results After-ripening of embryonic axes was accompanied by a shift in the thiol-based cellular redox environment towards more oxidizing conditions. Controlled deterioration under high O2 led to a faster loss of seed dormancy and significant decreases in glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities, but viability was lost at the same rate as under ambient O2. Irrespective of O2 concentration, the overall thiol-based cellular redox state increased significantly over 21 d of controlled deterioration to strongly oxidizing conditions and then plateaued, while viability continued to decrease. Viability loss was accompanied by a rapid decrease in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, which provides NADPH for reductive processes such as required by glutathione reductase. Protein carbonylation, a marker of protein oxidation, increased strongly in deteriorating seeds. The lipid-soluble tocochromanols, dominated by α-tocopherol, and fatty acid profiles remained stable. Conclusions After-ripening, dormancy-breaking during ageing and viability loss appeared to be associated with oxidative changes of the cytosolic environment and proteins in the embryonic axis rather than the lipid

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  17. The Redox Code

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O2 and H2O2 contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Recent Advances: Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Critical Issues: Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Future Directions: Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 734–746. PMID:25891126

  18. Oxidative stress and redox regulation of phospholipase D in myocardial disease.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Dent, Melissa R; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2006-08-01

    Oxidative stress may be viewed as an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidant production and the state of glutathione redox buffer and antioxidant defense system. Recently, a new paradigm of redox signaling has emerged whereby ROS and oxidants can function as intracellular signaling molecules, where ROS- and oxidant-induced death signal is converted into a survival signal. It is now known that oxidative stress is involved in cardiac hypertrophy and in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies, ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. Phospholipase D (PLD) is an important signaling enzyme in mammalian cells, including cardiomyocytes. PLD catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). Two mammalian PLD isozymes, PLD1 and PLD2 have been identified, characterized and cloned. The importance of PA in heart function is evident from its ability to stimulate cardiac sarcolemmal membrane and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+-related transport systems and to increase the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ in adult cardiomyocytes and augment cardiac contractile activity of the normal heart. In addition, PA is also considered an important signal transducer in cardiac hypertrophy. Accordingly, this review discusses a role for redox signaling mediated via PLD in ischemic preconditioning and examines how oxidative stress affects PLD in normal hearts and during different myocardial diseases. In addition, the review provides a comparative account on the regulation of PLD activities in vascular smooth muscle cells under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:16843818

  19. In situ X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy investigation of the state of charge of all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuankun; Liu, Qi; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Fan; Ren, Yang; Heald, Steve M; Liu, Yadong; Li, Zhe-Fei; Lu, Wenquan; Xie, Jian

    2014-10-22

    Synchrotron-based in situ X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy (XANES) has been used to study the valence state evolution of the vanadium ion for both the catholyte and anolyte in all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRB) under realistic cycling conditions. The results indicate that, when using the widely used charge-discharge profile during the first charge process (charging the VRB cell to 1.65 V under a constant current mode), the vanadium ion valence did not reach V(V) in the catholyte and did not reach V(II) in the anolyte. Consequently, the state of charge (SOC) for the VRB cell was only 82%, far below the desired 100% SOC. Thus, such incompletely charged mix electrolytes results in not only wasting the electrolytes but also decreasing the cell performance in the following cycles. On the basis of our study, we proposed a new charge-discharge profile (first charged at a constant current mode up to 1.65 V and then continuously charged at a constant voltage mode until the capacity was close to the theoretical value) for the first charge process that achieved 100% SOC after the initial charge process. Utilizing this new charge-discharge profile, the theoretical charge capacity and the full utilization of electrolytes has been achieved, thus having a significant impact on the cost reduction of the electrolytes in VRB. PMID:25191695

  20. In situ X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy investigation of the state of charge of all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuankun; Liu, Qi; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Fan; Ren, Yang; Heald, Steve M; Liu, Yadong; Li, Zhe-Fei; Lu, Wenquan; Xie, Jian

    2014-10-22

    Synchrotron-based in situ X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy (XANES) has been used to study the valence state evolution of the vanadium ion for both the catholyte and anolyte in all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRB) under realistic cycling conditions. The results indicate that, when using the widely used charge-discharge profile during the first charge process (charging the VRB cell to 1.65 V under a constant current mode), the vanadium ion valence did not reach V(V) in the catholyte and did not reach V(II) in the anolyte. Consequently, the state of charge (SOC) for the VRB cell was only 82%, far below the desired 100% SOC. Thus, such incompletely charged mix electrolytes results in not only wasting the electrolytes but also decreasing the cell performance in the following cycles. On the basis of our study, we proposed a new charge-discharge profile (first charged at a constant current mode up to 1.65 V and then continuously charged at a constant voltage mode until the capacity was close to the theoretical value) for the first charge process that achieved 100% SOC after the initial charge process. Utilizing this new charge-discharge profile, the theoretical charge capacity and the full utilization of electrolytes has been achieved, thus having a significant impact on the cost reduction of the electrolytes in VRB.

  1. Flavin Redox Switching of Protein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Moxley, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Flavin cofactors impart remarkable catalytic diversity to enzymes, enabling them to participate in a broad array of biological processes. The properties of flavins also provide proteins with a versatile redox sensor that can be utilized for converting physiological signals such as cellular metabolism, light, and redox status into a unique functional output. The control of protein functions by the flavin redox state is important for transcriptional regulation, cell signaling pathways, and environmental adaptation. A significant number of proteins that have flavin redox switches are found in the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain family and include flavoproteins that act as photosensors and respond to changes in cellular redox conditions. Biochemical and structural studies of PAS domain flavoproteins have revealed key insights into how flavin redox changes are propagated to the surface of the protein and translated into a new functional output such as the binding of a target protein in a signaling pathway. Mechanistic details of proteins unrelated to the PAS domain are also emerging and provide novel examples of how the flavin redox state governs protein–membrane interactions in response to appropriate stimuli. Analysis of different flavin switch proteins reveals shared mechanistic themes for the regulation of protein structure and function by flavins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1079–1091. PMID:21028987

  2. A model of redox kinetics implicates the thiol proteome in cellular hydrogen peroxide responses.

    PubMed

    Adimora, Nnenna J; Jones, Dean P; Kemp, Melissa L

    2010-09-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is appreciated as a cellular signaling molecule with second-messenger properties, yet the mechanisms by which the cell protects against intracellular H(2)O(2) accumulation are not fully understood. We introduce a network model of H(2)O(2) clearance that includes the pseudo-enzymatic oxidative turnover of protein thiols, the enzymatic actions of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxin, and glutaredoxin, and the redox reactions of thioredoxin and glutathione. Simulations reproduced experimental observations of the rapid and transient oxidation of glutathione and the rapid, sustained oxidation of thioredoxin on exposure to extracellular H(2)O(2). The model correctly predicted early oxidation profiles for the glutathione and thioredoxin redox couples across a range of initial extracellular [H(2)O(2)] and highlights the importance of cytoplasmic membrane permeability to the cellular defense against exogenous sources of H(2)O(2). The protein oxidation profile predicted by the model suggests that approximately 10% of intracellular protein thiols react with hydrogen peroxide at substantial rates, with a majority of these proteins forming protein disulfides as opposed to protein S-glutathionylated adducts. A steady-state flux analysis predicted an unequal distribution of the intracellular anti-oxidative burden between thioredoxin-dependent and glutathione-dependent antioxidant pathways, with the former contributing the majority of the cellular antioxidant defense due to peroxiredoxins and protein disulfides.

  3. Pirin is an iron-dependent redox regulator of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Rehmani, Imran; Esaki, Shingo; Fu, Rong; Chen, Lirong; de Serrano, Vesna; Liu, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Pirin is a nuclear nonheme Fe protein of unknown function present in all human tissues. Here we describe that pirin may act as a redox sensor for the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcription factor, a critical mediator of intracellular signaling that has been linked to cellular responses to proinflammatory signals and controls the expression of a vast array of genes involved in immune and stress responses. Pirin’s regulatory effect was tested with several metals and at different oxidations states, and our spectroscopic results show that only the ferric form of pirin substantially facilitates binding of NF-κB proteins to target κB genes, a finding that suggests that pirin performs a redox-sensing role in NF-κB regulation. The molecular mechanism of such a metal identity- and redox state-dependent regulation is revealed by our structural studies of pirin. The ferrous and ferric pirin proteins differ only by one electron, yet they have distinct conformations. The Fe center is shown to play an allosteric role on an R-shaped surface area that has two distinct conformations based on the identity and the formal redox state of the metal. We show that the R-shaped area composes the interface for pirin-NF-κB binding that is responsible for modulation of NF-κB’s DNA-binding properties. The nonheme Fe protein pirin is proposed to serve as a reversible functional switch that enables NF-κB to respond to changes in the redox levels of the cell nucleus. PMID:23716661

  4. Redox Processes in Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicconi, M. R.; de Ligny, D.

    2015-12-01

    Studies into the redox state of magmas provide important constrains on the formation and evolution of planetary bodies Indeed, oxygen fugacity is a key parameter in controlling the physical and chemical properties of melts and therefore it determine the possible interactions between reservoirs within the mantle and between the mantle and surface. It follows that redox mechanisms play a key role in determining the dynamics of the (inner and outer) terrestrial planets. The redox conditions that have accompanied basalt evolution on planetary bodies are known to be different, albeit with some similarities. The strongly reducing environments of the moon and meteorites have led to significant reduced mineralogical assemblages, whereas analogous terrestrial materials predominantly contain the corresponding oxidized compounds. Important geochemical elements such as Fe, Cr, V, Ce and Eu, exist in magmatic systems with different valences and coordination geometries, and the key subjects which need to be understood are: factors influencing redox mechanisms, and the effect on mineral assemblage, element partitioning, mass transfers processes and rheology of the melts. Examples on the study of Ce, Eu and Fe in silicate glasses/melts and on the parameters influencing their oxidation states will be provided.

  5. Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I in C3 Plants. In Vivo Control by the Redox State of Chloroplasts and Involvement of the NADH-Dehydrogenase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Joët, Thierry; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles; Havaux, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow around photosystem (PS) I has been widely described in vitro in chloroplasts or thylakoids isolated from C3 plant leaves, but its occurrence in vivo is still a matter of debate. Photoacoustic spectroscopy and kinetic spectrophotometry were used to analyze cyclic PS I activity in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Petit Havana) leaf discs illuminated with far-red light. Only a very weak activity was measured in air with both techniques. When leaf discs were placed in anaerobiosis, a high and rapid cyclic PS I activity was measured. The maximal energy storage in far-red light increased to 30% to 50%, and the half-time of the P700 re-reduction in the dark decreased to around 400 ms; these values are comparable with those measured in cyanobacteria and C4 plant leaves in aerobiosis. The stimulatory effect of anaerobiosis was mimicked by infiltrating leaves with inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration or of the chlororespiratory oxidase, therefore, showing that changes in the redox state of intersystem electron carriers tightly control the rate of PS I-driven cyclic electron flow in vivo. Measurements of energy storage at different modulation frequencies of far-red light showed that anaerobiosis-induced cyclic PS I activity in leaves of a tobacco mutant deficient in the plastid Ndh complex was kinetically different from that of the wild type, the cycle being slower in the former leaves. We conclude that the Ndh complex is required for rapid electron cycling around PS I. PMID:11842179

  6. The enhancement of tolerance to salt and cold stresses by modifying the redox state and salicylic acid content via the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene in transgenic apple plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Sun, Hong; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Tian-Yu; Jin, Zhong-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin; Yao, Yu-Xin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we characterized the role of an apple cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene (MdcyMDH) in the tolerance to salt and cold stresses and investigated its regulation mechanism in stress tolerance. The MdcyMDH transcript was induced by mild cold and salt treatments, and MdcyMDH-overexpressing apple plants possessed improved cold and salt tolerance compared to wild-type (WT) plants. A digital gene expression tag profiling analysis revealed that MdcyMDH overexpression largely altered some biological processes, including hormone signal transduction, photosynthesis, citrate cycle and oxidation-reduction. Further experiments verified that MdcyMDH overexpression modified the mitochondrial and chloroplast metabolisms and elevated the level of reducing power, primarily caused by increased ascorbate and glutathione, as well as the increased ratios of ascorbate/dehydroascorbate and glutathione/glutathione disulphide, under normal and especially stress conditions. Concurrently, the transgenic plants produced a high H2 O2 content, but a low O2·- production rate was observed compared to the WT plants. On the other hand, the transgenic plants accumulated more free and total salicylic acid (SA) than the WT plants under normal and stress conditions. Taken together, MdcyMDH conferred the transgenic apple plants a higher stress tolerance by producing more reductive redox states and increasing the SA level; MdcyMDH could serve as a target gene to genetically engineer salt- and cold-tolerant trees. PMID:26923485

  7. The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ghneim, Hazem K.; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1–F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50–60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60–70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3–F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD+ and NADP+ levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60–70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD+ and NADP+ biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  8. The effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia venom proteins on TCA cycle activity and mitochondrial NAD(+)-redox state in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ghneim, Hazem K; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1-F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50-60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60-70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3-F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD(+) and NADP(+) levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60-70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD(+) and NADP(+) biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  9. The effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia venom proteins on TCA cycle activity and mitochondrial NAD(+)-redox state in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ghneim, Hazem K; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1-F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50-60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60-70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3-F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD(+) and NADP(+) levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60-70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD(+) and NADP(+) biosynthesis.

  10. Measuring the state of charge of the electrolyte solution in a vanadium redox flow battery using a four-pole cell device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-12-01

    The decrease in the efficiency and capacity of a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) caused by an electrolyte imbalance is an important impediment to its long-term operation. Knowing the state of charge (SOC) of an electrolyte solution can quantify the level of the electrolyte imbalance in the VRB. In this study, a four-pole cell device is devised and employed to predict the SOC. The proposed method directly measures the ionic resistance of the electrolyte solution and is sufficiently precise to be applied in real-time mode. Experimental studies on the effects of the operating current on the four-pole cell and the concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in the electrolyte solution are carried out. The results show that the four-pole cell method can be utilized to measure the electrolyte SOC. The concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in the electrolyte solution affect the ionic resistance of the solution. Regarding the capacity and efficiency of the VRB system, the results indicate that the electrical charge is determined from the concentration of vanadium and that the cell voltage depends on the concentration of sulfuric acid in the electrolyte solution. The decreased vanadium concentration and increased sulfuric acid concentration improves the cell voltage efficiency.

  11. Redox-active phosphines: synthesis and crystal structures of palladium(II) complexes of a metallaphosphine in two different oxidation states.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Ayham; Labouille, Stéphanie; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Carmichael, Duncan; Paul, Frédéric

    2014-05-21

    The redox-active metallaphosphine [Fe(dppe)(η(5)-C5Me5)(C≡C-PPh2)] reacts with [Pd(1,5-cod)Cl2] to give mono- and bis-phosphine coordinated palladium centres as a function of stoichiometry, and these complexes provide a stable redox-active platform which allows reversible one-electron {Fe(II)→Fe(III)(+)} oxidations within the palladium coordination sphere. PMID:24710466

  12. High-pressure and high-temperature equation of state of cobalt oxide: Implications for redox relations in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, Matthew M.; Rainey, Emma S.G.; Kavner, Abby

    2013-07-30

    The high-pressure and high-temperature equation of state of rock salt-structured cobalt oxide was measured up to 65 GPa and 2600 K using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in conjunction with the laser heated diamond-anvil cell. Fitting a Mie-Grüneisen-Debye model to the data we find best-fit parameters V0 = 77.4 (fixed) Å3, K0 = 190 (1) GPa, K' = 3.49 (4), γ0 = 1.54 (4), q = 2.87 (15), and θ0 = 517.8 K (fixed). We use this newly determined equation of state in conjunction with existing measurements of the thermoelastic parameters of cobalt metal to calculate the Gibbs free-energy difference between the cobalt oxide and cobalt metal phases as a function of pressure and temperature. A comparison of the energetics of the Co/CoO system with the Ni/NiO system predicts that below 58 GPa CoO+Ni is stable relative to NiO+Co, while above 58 GPa the reverse is true. This tipping point in energy can be mapped as a crossing point in the electrochemical potential of the two metal ions, suggesting that cobalt becomes more siderophile than nickel with increasing pressure. This result is in qualitative agreement with existing measurements of nickel and cobalt partition coefficients between mantle and core materials.

  13. Extended Kalman filter method for state of charge estimation of vanadium redox flow battery using thermal-dependent electrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Binyu; Zhao, Jiyun; Wei, Zhongbao; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-09-01

    State of charge (SOC) estimation is a key issue for battery management since an accurate estimation method can ensure safe operation and prevent the over-charge/discharge of a battery. Traditionally, open circuit voltage (OCV) method is utilized to estimate the stack SOC and one open flow cell is needed in each battery stack [1,2]. In this paper, an alternative method, extended Kalman filter (EKF) method, is proposed for SOC estimation for VRBs. By measuring the stack terminal voltages and applied currents, SOC can be predicted with a state estimator instead of an additional open circuit flow cell. To implement EKF estimator, an electrical model is required for battery analysis. A thermal-dependent electrical circuit model is proposed to describe the charge/discharge characteristics of the VRB. Two scenarios are tested for the robustness of the EKF. For the lab testing scenarios, the filtered stack voltage tracks the experimental data despite the model errors. For the online operation, the simulated temperature rise is observed and the maximum SOC error is within 5.5%. It is concluded that EKF method is capable of accurately predicting SOC using stack terminal voltages and applied currents in the absence of an open flow cell for OCV measurement.

  14. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  15. Strain Field in Ultrasmall Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Cerium-Based Mixed Oxides. Key Influence of the Support Redox State.

    PubMed

    López-Haro, Miguel; Yoshida, Kenta; Del Río, Eloy; Pérez-Omil, José A; Boyes, Edward D; Trasobares, Susana; Zuo, Jian-Min; Gai, Pratibha L; Calvino, José J

    2016-05-01

    Using a method that combines experimental and simulated Aberration-Corrected High Resolution Electron Microscopy images with digital image processing and structure modeling, strain distribution maps within gold nanoparticles relevant to real powder type catalysts, i.e., smaller than 3 nm, and supported on a ceria-based mixed oxide have been determined. The influence of the reduction state of the support and particle size has been examined. In this respect, it has been proven that reduction even at low temperatures induces a much larger compressive strain on the first {111} planes at the interface. This increase in compression fully explains, in accordance with previous DFT calculations, the loss of CO adsorption capacity of the interface area previously reported for Au supported on ceria-based oxides.

  16. Arabidopsis heat shock factor HsfA1a directly senses heat stress, pH changes, and hydrogen peroxide via the engagement of redox state.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Cuixian; Chen, Juan; Guo, Lihong; Li, Xiaolu; Li, Wenpeng; Yu, Zefen; Deng, Jingshi; Zhang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Keqin; Zhang, Lemin

    2013-03-01

    Arabidopsis heat shock factor HsfA1a is present in a latent, monomeric state under normal conditions; its activation involves heat stress-induced trimerization, binding to heat shock element in target promoters, and the acquisition of transcriptional competence. HsfA1a is an important regulator for heat stress-induced gene expression and thermotolerance. However, it is not clear whether HsfA1a is directly activated by stress and the mechanisms of the stress signaling are poorly understood. We analyzed HsfA1a activation by trimerization and DNA-binding assays in vitro and in vivo in response to heat stress, low/high pH, and hydrogen peroxide treatments. Our results show that purified recombinant HsfA1a was activated by these stress treatments in vitro. The same treatments also induced the binding to HSP18.2 and HSP70 promoters as examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and the HsfA1a DNA binding paralleled the mRNA expression of its target genes induced by different stresses. Stress-induced DNA-binding could be reversed, both in vitro and in vivo, by subsequent incubation with reducing agents (DTT, NADPH). These data suggest that HsfA1a can directly sense stress and become activated, and this process is dependent on the redox state. An N-terminal deletion of the amino acid residues from 48 to 74 negatively affected pH- and hydrogen peroxide-, but not heat-stress sensing.

  17. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Regulates a Redox Cycle Within the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kalen, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a nuclear-encoded and mitochondria-matrix-localized oxidation-reduction (redox) enzyme that regulates cellular redox homeostasis. Cellular redox processes are known to regulate proliferative and quiescent growth states. Therefore, MnSOD and mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be critical regulators of quiescent cells' entry into the cell cycle and exit from the proliferative cycle back to the quiescent state. Recent Advances/Critical Issues: Recent evidence suggests that the intracellular redox environment fluctuates during the cell cycle, shifting toward a more oxidized status during mitosis. MnSOD activity is higher in G0/G1 cells compared with S, G2 and M phases. After cell division, MnSOD activity increases in the G1 phase of the daughter generation. The periodic fluctuation in MnSOD activity during the cell cycle inversely correlates with cellular superoxide levels as well as glucose and oxygen consumption. Based on an inverse correlation between MnSOD activity and glucose consumption during the cell cycle, it is proposed that MnSOD is a central molecular player for the “Warburg effect.” Future Directions: In general, loss of MnSOD activity results in aberrant proliferation. A better understanding of the MnSOD and mitochondrial ROS-dependent cell cycle processes may lead to novel approaches to overcome aberrant proliferation. Since ROS have both deleterious (pathological) and beneficial (physiological) effects, it is proposed that “eustress” should be used when discussing ROS processes that regulate normal physiological functions, while “oxidative stress” should be used to discuss the deleterious effects of ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1618–1627. PMID:23590434

  18. Iron, oxidative stress, and redox signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Guenancia, Charles; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine; Rochette, Luc

    2014-08-01

    The redox state of the cell is predominantly dependent on an iron redox couple and is maintained within strict physiological limits. Iron is an essential metal for hemoglobin synthesis in erythrocytes, for oxidation-reduction reactions, and for cellular proliferation. The maintenance of stable iron concentrations requires the coordinated regulation of iron transport into plasma from dietary sources in the duodenum, from recycled senescent red cells in macrophages, and from storage in hepatocytes. The absorption of dietary iron, which is present in heme or nonheme form, is carried out by mature villus enterocytes of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. Multiple physiological processes are involved in maintaining iron homeostasis. These include its storage at the intracellular and extracellular level. Control of iron balance in the whole organism requires communication between sites of uptake, utilization, and storage. Key protein transporters and the molecules that regulate their activities have been identified. In this field, ferritins and hepcidin are the major regulator proteins. A variety of transcription factors may be activated depending on the level of oxidative stress, leading to the expression of different genes. Major preclinical and clinical trials have shown advances in iron-chelation therapy for the treatment of iron-overload disease as well as cardiovascular and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  19. Iron, oxidative stress, and redox signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Guenancia, Charles; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine; Rochette, Luc

    2014-08-01

    The redox state of the cell is predominantly dependent on an iron redox couple and is maintained within strict physiological limits. Iron is an essential metal for hemoglobin synthesis in erythrocytes, for oxidation-reduction reactions, and for cellular proliferation. The maintenance of stable iron concentrations requires the coordinated regulation of iron transport into plasma from dietary sources in the duodenum, from recycled senescent red cells in macrophages, and from storage in hepatocytes. The absorption of dietary iron, which is present in heme or nonheme form, is carried out by mature villus enterocytes of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. Multiple physiological processes are involved in maintaining iron homeostasis. These include its storage at the intracellular and extracellular level. Control of iron balance in the whole organism requires communication between sites of uptake, utilization, and storage. Key protein transporters and the molecules that regulate their activities have been identified. In this field, ferritins and hepcidin are the major regulator proteins. A variety of transcription factors may be activated depending on the level of oxidative stress, leading to the expression of different genes. Major preclinical and clinical trials have shown advances in iron-chelation therapy for the treatment of iron-overload disease as well as cardiovascular and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24888568

  20. Redox Pioneer: Professor Joseph Loscalzo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Professor Joseph Loscalzo Dr. Joseph Loscalzo (M.D., 1978; Ph.D., 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because he has published two articles in the field of antioxidant/redox biology that have been cited more than 1,000 times and 22 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Dr. Loscalzo is known for his seminal contributions to our understanding of the vascular biology of nitric oxide. His initial discovery that the antiplatelet effects of organic nitrates are potentiated by thiols through a mechanism that involved metabolism to S-nitrosothiols was followed by the demonstration that S-nitrosothiols are formed endogenously through S-transnitrosation, stabilize nitric oxide, and facilitate the transport and transfer of nitric oxide between and within cells of the vessel wall. These properties led to the development of S-nitrosothiol–containing pharmacotherapies to treat disease states characterized by nitric oxide deficiency. Dr. Loscalzo's other scientific contributions include identifying the vascular functional consequences of genetic deficiencies of antioxidant enzymes that decrease nitric oxide bioavailability, collectively termed the “oxidative enzymopathies,” and demonstrating the role of mitochondria in modulating the disulfide subproteome, and in redox signaling in hypoxia. He has received numerous awards and honors for his scientific contributions, including election to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1125–1132. PMID:20443733

  1. Dual responsive nanogels for intracellular doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Hamed; Khoee, Sepideh

    2016-09-10

    Nanosized polymeric delivery systems that encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific intracellular stimulus are of promising interest for cancer therapy. Here, we demonstrated a simple and fast synthetic protocol of redox-responsive nanogels with high drug encapsulation efficiency and stability. The prepared nanogels displayed narrow size distributions and versatility of surface modification. The polymer precursor of these nanogels is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. The nanogels were prepared through a lock-in strategy in aqueous media via self cross-linking of PDS groups. By changing polymer concentration, we could control the size of nanogels in range of 80-115nm. The formed nanogels presented high doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulation efficiency (70% (w/w)) and displayed pH and redox-controlled drug release triggered by conditions mimicking the reducible intracellular environment. The nanogels displayed an excellent cytocompatibility and were effectively endocytosed by A2780CP ovarian cancer cells, which make them promising nanomaterials for the efficient intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27444549

  2. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  3. Adenine Nucleotide Levels, the Redox State of the NADP System, and Assimilatory Force in Nonaqueously Purified Mesophyll Chloroplasts from Maize Leaves under Different Light Intensities 1

    PubMed Central

    Usuda, Hideaki

    1988-01-01

    Recently, a nonaqueous fractionation method of obtaining highly purified mesophyll chloroplasts from maize leaves was established. This method is now used to determine adenine nucleotide levels, the redox states of the NADP system, Pi levels and dihydroxyacetone phosphate/3-phosphoglycerate ratios in mesophyll chloroplasts of Zea mays L. leaves under different light intensities. The sum of the ATP, ADP, and AMP levels was estimated to be 1.4 millimolar and the ATP/ADP ratio was 1 in the dark and 2.5 to 4 in the light. The adenine nucleotides were equilibrated by adenylate kinase. The total concentration of NADP(H) in the chloroplasts was 0.3 millimolar in the dark and 0.48 millimolar in the light. The ratio of NADPH/NADP was 0.1 to 0.18 in the dark and 0.23 to 0.48 in the light. The Pi level was estimated to be 20 millimolar in the dark and 10 to 17 millimolar in the light. The 3-phosphoglycerate reducing system was under thermodynamic equilibrium in the light. The calculated assimilatory forces were 8 per molar and 40 to 170 per molar in the dark and the light, respectively. There was no relationship between the degree of activation of pyruvate, Pi dikinase, and adenylate energy charge, or ATP/ADP ratio or ADP level under various light intensities. Only a weak relationship was found between the degree of activation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase and the NADPH/NADP ratio or NADP(H) level with increasing light intensity. A possible regulatory mechanism which is responsible for the regulation of activation of pyruvate,Pi dikinase and NADP-malate dehydrogenase is discussed. PMID:16666481

  4. Cysteine/cystine redox signaling in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular thiol/disulfide redox environments are highly regulated in healthy individuals. The major thiol/disulfide redox couple in human plasma is cysteine (Cys) and its disulfide form, cystine (CySS). Oxidation of this redox couple measured as a more positive steady-state redox potential (Eh) is associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including aging, smoking, obesity, and alcohol abuse. Rodent and vascular cell studies show that extracellular redox state of Cys/CySS (EhCySS) can play a vital role in controlling CVD through proinflammatory signaling. This inflammatory signaling is regulated by cell surface protein redox state and involves mitochondrial oxidation, nuclear factor-κB activation, and elevated expression of genes for monocyte recruitment to endothelial cells. Gene array and proteomics studies reveal the global nature of redox effects, and different cell types, e.g., endothelial cells, monocytes, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells, show cell-specific redox responses with different phenotypic traits, e.g., proliferation and apoptosis, which can contribute to CVD. The critical nature of the proinflammatory redox signaling and cell biology associated with EhCySS supports the use of plasma levels of Cys, CySS, and EhCySS as key indicators of vascular health. Plasma redox state-based pharmacologic interventions to control or improve EhCySS may be effective in preventing CVD onset or progression. PMID:21130865

  5. Oxygen-sensing mechanisms and the regulation of redox-responsive transcription factors in development and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, John J

    2002-01-01

    How do organisms sense the amount of oxygen in the environment and respond appropriately when the level of oxygen decreases? Oxygen sensing and the molecular stratagems underlying the process have been the focus of an endless number of investigations trying to find an answer to the question: "What is the identity of the oxygen sensor?" Dynamic changes in pO2 constitute a potential signaling mechanism for the regulation of the expression and activation of reduction-oxidation (redox)-sensitive and oxygen-responsive transcription factors, apoptosis-signaling molecules and inflammatory cytokines. The transition from placental to lung-based respiration causes a relatively hyperoxic shift or oxidative stress, which the perinatal, developing lung experiences during birth. This variation in ΔpO2, in particular, differentially regulates the compartmentalization and functioning of the transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, oxygen-evoked regulation of HIF-1α and NF-κB is closely coupled with the intracellular redox state, such that modulating redox equilibrium affects their responsiveness at the molecular level (expression/transactivation). The differential regulation of HIF-1α and NF-κB in vitro is paralleled by oxygen-sensitive and redox-dependent pathways governing the regulation of these factors during the transition from placental to lung-based respiration ex utero. The birth transition period in vivo and ex utero also regulates apoptosis signaling pathways in a redox-dependent manner, consistent with NF-κB being transcriptionally regulated in order to play an anti-apoptotic function. An association is established between oxidative stress conditions and the augmentation of an inflammatory state in pathophysiology, regulated by the oxygen- and redox-sensitive pleiotropic cytokines. PMID:12537605

  6. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Bayse, Craig A.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used 77Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of 77Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs’ reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20–25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs’ flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  7. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  8. Structural Basis for NADH/NAD+ Redox Sensing by a Rex Family Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, K.J.; Soares, A.; Strain-Damerell, C. M.; Xie, K.; Brekasis, D.; Pagent, M. S. B.; Kielkopf, C. L.

    2010-05-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides have emerged as key signals of the cellular redox state. Yet the structural basis for allosteric gene regulation by the ratio of reduced NADH to oxidized NAD{sup +} is poorly understood. A key sensor among Gram-positive bacteria, Rex represses alternative respiratory gene expression until a limited oxygen supply elevates the intracellular NADH:NAD{sup +} ratio. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism for NADH/NAD{sup +} sensing among Rex family members by determining structures of Thermus aquaticus Rex bound to (1) NAD{sup +}, (2) DNA operator, and (3) without ligand. Comparison with the Rex/NADH complex reveals that NADH releases Rex from the DNA site following a 40{sup o} closure between the dimeric subunits. Complementary site-directed mutagenesis experiments implicate highly conserved residues in NAD-responsive DNA-binding activity. These rare views of a redox sensor in action establish a means for slight differences in the nicotinamide charge, pucker, and orientation to signal the redox state of the cell.

  9. Study the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahong, Chen; Ruxiu, Cai; Ke, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    The intracellular NAD level plays a pivotal role in numerous biological processes such as rhythm, senescence, cancer and death. The study of the intracellular NAD level has been one of the "hotspots" in biomedical research. We investigated the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum in this paper. Plasma membrane redox system of yeast was found to be greatly promoted by the addition of Vitamin K 3 or Vitamin K 1. Ferricyanide reduction catalyzed by Vitamin K was accompanied by the decrease in intracellular NADH concentration and the increase in intracellular NAD level of yeast cells.

  10. Conformational changes in redox pairs of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Samuel W; George, Richard A; Haworth, Naomi L; Feng, Lina L; Liu, Jason Y; Wouters, Merridee A

    2009-01-01

    Disulfides are conventionally viewed as structurally stabilizing elements in proteins but emerging evidence suggests two disulfide subproteomes exist. One group mediates the well known role of structural stabilization. A second redox-active group are best known for their catalytic functions but are increasingly being recognized for their roles in regulation of protein function. Redox-active disulfides are, by their very nature, more susceptible to reduction than structural disulfides; and conversely, the Cys pairs that form them are more susceptible to oxidation. In this study, we searched for potentially redox-active Cys Pairs by scanning the Protein Data Bank for structures of proteins in alternate redox states. The PDB contains over 1134 unique redox pairs of proteins, many of which exhibit conformational differences between alternate redox states. Several classes of structural changes were observed, proteins that exhibit: disulfide oxidation following expulsion of metals such as zinc; major reorganisation of the polypeptide backbone in association with disulfide redox-activity; order/disorder transitions; and changes in quaternary structure. Based on evidence gathered supporting disulfide redox activity, we propose disulfides present in alternate redox states are likely to have physiologically relevant redox activity. PMID:19598234

  11. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri Race 1 Induced Redox State Alterations Are Coupled to Downstream Defense Signaling in Root Tissues of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Moniya; Das, Sampa

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to play pivotal roles in pathogen perception, recognition and downstream defense signaling. But, how these redox alarms coordinate in planta into a defensive network is still intangible. Present study illustrates the role of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceri Race1 (Foc1) induced redox responsive transcripts in regulating downstream defense signaling in chickpea. Confocal microscopic studies highlighted pathogen invasion and colonization accompanied by tissue damage and deposition of callose degraded products at the xylem vessels of infected roots of chickpea plants. Such depositions led to the clogging of xylem vessels in compatible hosts while the resistant plants were devoid of such obstructions. Lipid peroxidation assays also indicated fungal induced membrane injury. Cell shrinkage and gradual nuclear adpression appeared as interesting features marking fungal ingress. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction exhibited differential expression patterns of redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors during Foc1 progression. Network analysis showed redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors to coordinate into a well orchestrated defensive network with sugars acting as internal signal modulators. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue, cationic peroxidase, vacuolar sorting receptor, polyol transporter, sucrose synthase, and zinc finger domain containing transcription factor appeared as key molecular candidates controlling important hubs of the defense network. Functional characterization of these hub controllers may prove to be promising in understanding chickpea–Foc1 interaction and developing the case study as a model for looking into the complexities of wilt diseases of other important crop legumes. PMID:24058463

  12. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri race 1 induced redox state alterations are coupled to downstream defense signaling in root tissues of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumanti; Bhar, Anirban; Chatterjee, Moniya; Das, Sampa

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to play pivotal roles in pathogen perception, recognition and downstream defense signaling. But, how these redox alarms coordinate in planta into a defensive network is still intangible. Present study illustrates the role of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceri Race1 (Foc1) induced redox responsive transcripts in regulating downstream defense signaling in chickpea. Confocal microscopic studies highlighted pathogen invasion and colonization accompanied by tissue damage and deposition of callose degraded products at the xylem vessels of infected roots of chickpea plants. Such depositions led to the clogging of xylem vessels in compatible hosts while the resistant plants were devoid of such obstructions. Lipid peroxidation assays also indicated fungal induced membrane injury. Cell shrinkage and gradual nuclear adpression appeared as interesting features marking fungal ingress. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction exhibited differential expression patterns of redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors during Foc1 progression. Network analysis showed redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors to coordinate into a well orchestrated defensive network with sugars acting as internal signal modulators. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue, cationic peroxidase, vacuolar sorting receptor, polyol transporter, sucrose synthase, and zinc finger domain containing transcription factor appeared as key molecular candidates controlling important hubs of the defense network. Functional characterization of these hub controllers may prove to be promising in understanding chickpea-Foc1 interaction and developing the case study as a model for looking into the complexities of wilt diseases of other important crop legumes.

  13. Mitochondria and Redox Signaling in Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E. Matthew; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are potentially pathological conditions that can progress to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. These conditions affect millions of people throughout the world in part through poor lifestyle choices of excess alcohol consumption, overnutrition, and lack of regular physical activity. Abnormal mitochondrial and cellular redox homeostasis has been documented in steatohepatitis and results in alterations of multiple redox-sensitive signaling cascades. Ultimately, these changes in signaling lead to altered enzyme function and transcriptional activities of proteins critical to mitochondrial and cellular function. In this article, we review the current hypotheses linking mitochondrial redox state to the overall pathophysiology of alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and briefly discuss the current therapeutic options under investigation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 485–504. PMID:21128703

  14. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid interconversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a possible metabolic pathway under the control of the glutathione redox cycle.

    PubMed

    Elskens, M T; Penninckx, M J

    1997-07-01

    A rapid decrease of intracellular glutathione (GSH) was observed when exponentially growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with sublethal concentrations of either dimethyldithiocarbamic acid or thiram [bis(dimethylthiocarbamoyl) disulfide]. The underlying mechanism of this effect possibly involves the intracellular oxidation of dimethyldithiocarbamate anions to thiram, which in turn oxidizes GSH. Overall, a linear relationship was found between thiram concentrations up to 21 microM and production of oxidized GSH (GSSG). Cytochrome c can serve as the final electron acceptor for dimethyldithiocarbamate reoxidation, and it was demonstrated in vitro that NADPH handles the final electron transfer from GSSG to the fungicide by glutathione reductase. These cycling reactions induce transient alterations in the intracellular redox state of several electron carriers and interfere with the respiration of the yeast. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid also inactivate yeast glutathione reductase when the fungicide is present within the cells as the disulfide. Hence, whenever the GSH regeneration rate falls below its oxidation rate, the GSH:GSSG molar ratio drops from 45 to 1. Inhibition of glutathione reductase may be responsible for the saturation kinetics observed in rates of thiram elimination and uptake by the yeast. The data suggest also a leading role for the GSH redox cycle in the control of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid fungitoxicity. Possible pathways for the handling of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid by yeast are considered with respect to the physiological status, the GSH content, and the activity of glutathione reductase of the cells.

  15. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid interconversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a possible metabolic pathway under the control of the glutathione redox cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Elskens, M T; Penninckx, M J

    1997-01-01

    A rapid decrease of intracellular glutathione (GSH) was observed when exponentially growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with sublethal concentrations of either dimethyldithiocarbamic acid or thiram [bis(dimethylthiocarbamoyl) disulfide]. The underlying mechanism of this effect possibly involves the intracellular oxidation of dimethyldithiocarbamate anions to thiram, which in turn oxidizes GSH. Overall, a linear relationship was found between thiram concentrations up to 21 microM and production of oxidized GSH (GSSG). Cytochrome c can serve as the final electron acceptor for dimethyldithiocarbamate reoxidation, and it was demonstrated in vitro that NADPH handles the final electron transfer from GSSG to the fungicide by glutathione reductase. These cycling reactions induce transient alterations in the intracellular redox state of several electron carriers and interfere with the respiration of the yeast. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid also inactivate yeast glutathione reductase when the fungicide is present within the cells as the disulfide. Hence, whenever the GSH regeneration rate falls below its oxidation rate, the GSH:GSSG molar ratio drops from 45 to 1. Inhibition of glutathione reductase may be responsible for the saturation kinetics observed in rates of thiram elimination and uptake by the yeast. The data suggest also a leading role for the GSH redox cycle in the control of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid fungitoxicity. Possible pathways for the handling of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid by yeast are considered with respect to the physiological status, the GSH content, and the activity of glutathione reductase of the cells. PMID:9212433

  16. Hydroxyl radical scavenger ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by preventing oxidative stress, redox state unbalance, impairment of energetic metabolism and apoptosis in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Santos, N A G; Bezerra, C S Catão; Martins, N M; Curti, C; Bianchi, M L P; Santos, A C

    2008-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is the major dose-limiting factor of cisplatin chemotherapy. Reactive oxygen species generated in mitochondria are thought to be the main cause of cellular damage in such injury. The present study examined, in vivo, the protective potential of the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) against cisplatin-induced effects on renal mitochondrial bioenergetics, redox state and oxidative stress. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into four groups of eight animals each. The control group was treated only with an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline solution (1 ml/100 g body weight). The second group was given only DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p, followed by 125 mg/Kg, i.p., twice a day until they were killed). The third group was given a single injection of cisplatin (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). The fourth group was given DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), just before the cisplatin injection (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), followed by injections of DMTU (125 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) twice a day until they were killed. Animals were killed 72 h after the treatment. Besides not presenting any direct effect on mitochondria, DMTU substantially inhibited cisplatin-induced mitochondrial injury and cellular death by apoptosis, suppressing the occurrence of acute renal failure. All the following cisplatin-induced effects were prevented by DMTU: (1) increased plasmatic levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN); (2) decreased ATP content, calcium uptake and electrochemical potential; (3) oxidation of lipids, including cardiolipin; and oxidation of proteins, including sulfhydryl, and aconitase enzyme, as well as accumulation of carbonyl proteins; (4) depletion of the antioxidant defense (NADPH and GSH) and (5) increased activity of the apoptosis executioner caspase-3. Our findings show the important role played by mitochondria and hydroxyl radicals in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as well as the effectiveness of DMTU in

  17. Hydroxyl radical scavenger ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by preventing oxidative stress, redox state unbalance, impairment of energetic metabolism and apoptosis in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Santos, N A G; Bezerra, C S Catão; Martins, N M; Curti, C; Bianchi, M L P; Santos, A C

    2008-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is the major dose-limiting factor of cisplatin chemotherapy. Reactive oxygen species generated in mitochondria are thought to be the main cause of cellular damage in such injury. The present study examined, in vivo, the protective potential of the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) against cisplatin-induced effects on renal mitochondrial bioenergetics, redox state and oxidative stress. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into four groups of eight animals each. The control group was treated only with an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline solution (1 ml/100 g body weight). The second group was given only DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p, followed by 125 mg/Kg, i.p., twice a day until they were killed). The third group was given a single injection of cisplatin (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). The fourth group was given DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), just before the cisplatin injection (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), followed by injections of DMTU (125 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) twice a day until they were killed. Animals were killed 72 h after the treatment. Besides not presenting any direct effect on mitochondria, DMTU substantially inhibited cisplatin-induced mitochondrial injury and cellular death by apoptosis, suppressing the occurrence of acute renal failure. All the following cisplatin-induced effects were prevented by DMTU: (1) increased plasmatic levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN); (2) decreased ATP content, calcium uptake and electrochemical potential; (3) oxidation of lipids, including cardiolipin; and oxidation of proteins, including sulfhydryl, and aconitase enzyme, as well as accumulation of carbonyl proteins; (4) depletion of the antioxidant defense (NADPH and GSH) and (5) increased activity of the apoptosis executioner caspase-3. Our findings show the important role played by mitochondria and hydroxyl radicals in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as well as the effectiveness of DMTU in

  18. Auto-protective redox buffering systems in stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferret, Pierre-Jacques; Soum, Emmanuelle; Negre, Olivier; Fradelizi, Didier

    2002-01-01

    Background Macrophages, upon encounter with micro-organisms or stimulated by cytokines, produce various effector molecules aimed at destroying the foreign agents and protecting the organism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are front line molecules exerting strong cytotoxic activities against micro-organisms and many cells, including macrophages themselves. Using cells of the murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or interferon (IFN-γ), which induce strong endogenous NO production, we examined by which mechanisms a fraction of activated macrophages protect themselves from nitrosative stress and manage to escape destruction? Results We observed that survivors (10–50% depending on the experiments) had acquired a resistant phenotype being capable to survive when further exposed in vitro to an apoptosis inducing dose of the NO donor compound DETA-NO. These cells expressed an increased steady-state levels of Mn SOD, CuZn SOD and catalase mRNA (130–200%), together with an increased activity of the corresponding enzymes. Intracellular concentration of glutathione was also increased (× 3.5 fold at 6 hours, still maintained × 5.2 fold at 48 hours). Neither mRNA for glutathione peroxydase, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase and glutathione reductase, nor thioredoxine and thioredoxine reductase, were significantly modified. Additional experiments in which RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with LPS and/or IFN-γ in the presence of relatively specific inhibitors of both Mn and Cu/Zn SOD, aminotriazol (ATZ) catalase inhibitor and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) glutathione inhibitor, showed that inhibiting LPS-induced up-regulation of intracellular redox buffering systems also prevented acquisition of the resistant phenotype. Conclusions Our data suggest a direct causal relationship between survival of a fraction of macrophages and a up-regulation of key sets of auto-protective intracellular

  19. PEX5, the shuttling import receptor for peroxisomal matrix proteins, is a redox-sensitive protein.

    PubMed

    Apanasets, Oksana; Grou, Cláudia P; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Wang, Bo; Nordgren, Marcus; Dodt, Gabriele; Azevedo, Jorge E; Fransen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome maintenance depends on the import of nuclear-encoded proteins from the cytosol. The vast majority of these proteins is destined for the peroxisomal lumen and contains a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal, called PTS1. This targeting signal is recognized in the cytosol by the receptor PEX5. After docking at the peroxisomal membrane and release of the cargo into the organelle matrix, PEX5 is recycled to the cytosol through a process requiring monoubiquitination of an N-terminal, cytosolically exposed cysteine residue (Cys11 in the human protein). At present, the reason why a cysteine, and not a lysine residue, is the target of ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that PTS1 protein import into human fibroblasts is a redox-sensitive process. We also demonstrate that Cys11 in human PEX5 functions as a redox switch that regulates PEX5 activity in response to intracellular oxidative stress. Finally, we show that exposure of human PEX5 to oxidized glutathione results in a ubiquitination-deficient PEX5 molecule, and that substitution of Cys11 by a lysine can counteract this effect. In summary, these findings reveal that the activity of PEX5, and hence PTS1 import, is controlled by the redox state of the cytosol. The potential physiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24118911

  20. Role of metabolic H2O2 generation: redox signaling and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sies, Helmut

    2014-03-28

    Hydrogen peroxide, the nonradical 2-electron reduction product of oxygen, is a normal aerobic metabolite occurring at about 10 nm intracellular concentration. In liver, it is produced at 50 nmol/min/g of tissue, which is about 2% of total oxygen uptake at steady state. Metabolically generated H2O2 emerged from recent research as a central hub in redox signaling and oxidative stress. Upon generation by major sources, the NADPH oxidases or Complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, H2O2 is under sophisticated fine control of peroxiredoxins and glutathione peroxidases with their backup systems as well as by catalase. Of note, H2O2 is a second messenger in insulin signaling and in several growth factor-induced signaling cascades. H2O2 transport across membranes is facilitated by aquaporins, denoted as peroxiporins. Specialized protein cysteines operate as redox switches using H2O2 as thiol oxidant, making this reactive oxygen species essential for poising the set point of the redox proteome. Major processes including proliferation, differentiation, tissue repair, inflammation, circadian rhythm, and aging use this low molecular weight oxygen metabolite as signaling compound.

  1. Redox control of iron regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, are cytoplasmic proteins of the iron-sulfur cluster isomerase family and serve as major post-transcriptional regulators of cellular iron metabolism. They bind to 'iron responsive elements' (IREs) of several mRNAs and thereby control their translation or stability. IRP1 and IRP2 respond to alterations in intracellular iron levels, but also to other signals such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The redox regulation of IRP1 and IRP2 provides direct links between the control of iron homeostasis and oxidative stress.

  2. Redox Regulation of Human Estrogen Sulfotransferase (hSULT1E1)†

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Smarajit; Zhang, Jimei; Chen, Guangping

    2007-01-01

    Sulfotransferases (SULTs) are enzymes that catalyze the sulfation of hydroxyl-containing compounds. Sulfation regulates hormone activities and detoxifies xenobiotics. Human estrogen sulfotransferase (hSULT1E1) catalyzes the sulfation of estrogens and regulates estrogen bioactivities. Oxidative regulation provides a biological mechanism for regulating enzyme activities in vivo. The oxidative regulation of human SULTs has not been reported. In this study, we used amino acid modification, manipulation of intracellular redox state, and site-directed mutagenesis to study the redox regulation of human SULTs and specifically the mechanism of hSULT1E1 inhibitory regulation by oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Of the four major human SULTs, hSULT1A1, hSULT1A3, and hSULT2A1 do not undergo redox regulation; hSULT1E1, on the other hand, can be redox regulated. GSSG inactivated hSULT1E1 activity in an efficient, time- and concentration-dependant manner. The co-enzyme adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-phosphosulfate protected hSULT1E1 from GSSG-associated inactivation. A reduced glutathione (GSH) inducer (N-acetyl cysteine) significantly increased while a GSH depletor (buthionine sulfoxamine) significantly decreased hSULT1E1 activity, but both failed to affect the amount of hSULT1E1 protein in human hepatocyte carcinoma Hep G2 cells. Crystal structure suggested that no Cys residues exist near the active sites of hSULT1A1, hSULT1A3, and hSULT2A1, but Cys residues do exist within the active site of hSULT1E1. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that Cys83 is critical for the redox regulation of hSULT1E1. This first report on the redox regulation of human SULTs suggests that the redox regulation of hSULT1E1 may interrupt the regulation and function of estrogens under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:17266938

  3. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  4. The Torsin-family AAA+ Protein OOC-5 Contains a Critical Disulfide Adjacent to Sensor-II That Couples Redox State to Nucleotide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wrabl, James O.; Hayashi, Adam P.; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2008-01-01

    A subgroup of the AAA+ proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope including human torsinA, a protein mutated in hereditary dystonia, is called the torsin family of AAA+ proteins. A multiple-sequence alignment of this family with Hsp100 proteins of known structure reveals a conserved cysteine in the C-terminus of torsin proteins within the Sensor-II motif. A structural model predicts this cysteine to be a part of an intramolecular disulfide bond, suggesting that it may function as a redox sensor to regulate ATPase activity. In vitro experiments with OOC-5, a torsinA homolog from Caenorhabditis elegans, demonstrate that redox changes that reduce this disulfide bond affect the binding of ATP and ADP and cause an attendant local conformational change detected by limited proteolysis. Transgenic worms expressing an ooc-5 gene with cysteine-to-serine mutations that disrupt the disulfide bond have a very low embryo hatch rate compared with wild-type controls, indicating these two cysteines are essential for OOC-5 function. We propose that the Sensor-II in torsin family proteins is a redox-regulated sensor. This regulatory mechanism may be central to the function of OOC-5 and human torsinA. PMID:18550799

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase: pre-steady-state absorbance changes show that redox changes occur in the MoFe protein that depend on substrate and component protein ratio; a role for P-centres in reducing dinitrogen?

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D J; Fisher, K; Thorneley, R N

    1993-01-01

    The pre-steady-state absorbance changes that occur during the first 0.6 s of reaction of the nitrogenase of Klebsiella pneumoniae can be simulated by associating redox changes with the different states of the MoFe protein described by our published kinetic model for nitrogenase [Lowe and Thorneley (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 877-886]. When the substrate is changed, from H+ to C2H2 (acetylene) or N2, or the nitrogenase component protein ratio is altered, these pre-steady-state absorbance changes are affected in a manner that is quantitatively predicted by our model. The results, together with parallel e.p.r. studies, are interpreted as showing that the P-clusters become oxidized when the MoFe protein is in the state where bound N2 is irreversibly committed to being reduced and is protonated to the hydrazido(2-) level. PMID:8389132

  6. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-01-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  7. Organoselenocyanates and symmetrical diselenides redox modulators: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Saad; Negm, Amr; Sobh, Mohamed A; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and disturbed intracellular redox balance have been predominantly observed in different types of cancer, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Agents which can stop OS multi-stressor events and modulate the intracellular redox state are becoming a major focus in HCC prevention. Among them, compounds with glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like activity are of particularly concern. We herein report the synthesis of novel series of organoselenocyanates and symmetrical diselenide antioxidants, inspired by the natural redox enzyme, GPx and the synthetic organoselenium ebselen antioxidants. Their cytotoxic activity was evaluated against Hep G2 cells and their antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Candida albicans (C. albicans) fungus as well as against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These compounds were also tested for their antioxidant activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), GPx-like activity and bleomycin dependent DNA damage assays and a basic structure-activity relationship was subsequently established. The physicochemical parameters and drug-likeness were computed employing the Molinspiration online property calculation toolkit and MolSoft software. Interestingly, some compounds proved to be more cytotoxic than ebselen and the known anticancer drug 5-Fu and in the same time they showed similar, sometime even more, antifungal activity than the reference antifungal drugs. Among these compounds, compound 16 was considered to be the most interesting with free radical-scavenging activity comparable to ascorbic acid and a GPx-like activity similar to ebselen. As most of these compounds comply with Lipinski's Rule of Five, they promise good bioavailability, which needs to be studied as part of future investigations.

  8. Scanning electrochemical microscopy at the surface of bone-resorbing osteoclasts: evidence for steady-state disposal and intracellular functional compartmentalization of calcium.

    PubMed

    Berger, C E; Rathod, H; Gillespie, J I; Horrocks, B R; Datta, H K

    2001-11-01

    Osteoclast resorptive activity occurs despite the presence of extremely high levels of ionized calcium ([Ca2+]) within the osteoclast hemivacuole, which is generated as a by-product of its resorptive activity. Previous in vitro observations have shown that increases in extracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]e) in the surrounding medium can inhibit the osteoclast resorptive activity. Therefore, it has been suggested that the osteoclast acts as a "sensor" for [Ca2+]e, and that high [Ca2+]e leads to an increase in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i), thereby inhibiting osteoclasts in a negative feedback manner. In this report we have carried out an experimental and theoretical analysis of calcium disposal during osteoclast activity to evaluate how in vitro models relate to in vivo osteoclast activity, where it is possible that high [Ca2+]e may be present in the hemivacuole but not over the nonresorbing surface of the cell. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) studies of [Ca2+] and superoxide anion (O2.-) generation by bone-resorbing osteoclasts on the surface of a bovine cortical bone slice were compared with microspectofluorometric measurements of the levels of [Ca2+]i in single osteoclasts and the effect of [Ca2+]i on various aspects of osteoclast function. The generation of O2.- by the osteoclasts has been shown to be positively correlated with osteoclast resorptive function and can therefore serve as an index of acute changes in osteoclast activity. The SECM of bone-resorbing osteoclasts at the surface of a bone slice revealed a continuous steady-state release of Ca2+. Even after prolonged incubation lasting 3 h the near-surface [Ca2+]e in the solution above the cell remained <2 mM. The SECM real-time measurement data were consistent with the osteoclast acting as a conduit for continuous Ca2+ disposal from the osteoclast-bone interface. We conclude that the osteoclast distinguishes [Ca2+]e in the hemivacuole and in the extracellular fluid above the cell which we denote [Ca2

  9. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested. PMID:26593894

  10. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  11. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso–redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jillian N.; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso–redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. PMID:26786158

  12. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso-redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jillian N; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso-redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF.

  13. Relationship between intracellular ice formation in oocytes of the mouse and Xenopus and the physical state of the external medium--a revisit.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Peter; Kleinhans, F W

    2008-02-01

    We have previously reported that intracellular ice formation (IIF) in mouse oocytes suspended in glycerol/PBS solutions or ethylene glycol (EG)/PBS solutions and rapidly cooled to -50 degrees C or below occurs at temperatures where a critical fraction of the external water remains unfrozen [P. Mazur, S. Seki, I.L. Pinn, F.W. Kleinhans, K. Edashige, Extra- and intracellular ice formation in mouse oocytes, Cryobiology 51 (2005) 29-53; P. Mazur, I.L. Pinn, F.W. Kleinhans, The temperature of intracellular ice formation in mouse oocytes vs. the unfrozen fraction at that temperature, Cryobiology 54 (2007) 223-233]. For mouse oocytes in PBS or glycerol/PBS that fraction is 0.06; for oocytes in EG that fraction was calculated to be 0.13, more than double. The fractions unfrozen are computed from ternary phase diagrams. In the previous publication, we used the EG data of Woods et al. [E.J. Woods, M.A.J. Zieger, D.Y. Gao, J.K. Critser, Equations for obtaining melting points for the ternary system ethylene glycol/sodium chloride/Water and their application to cryopreservation., Cryobiology 38 (1999) 403-407]. Since then, we have determined that ternary phase diagrams for EG/NaCl/water synthesized by summing binary phase data for EG/water NaCl/water gives substantially different curves, which seem more realistic [F.W. Kleinhans, P. Mazur, Comparison of actual vs. synthesized ternary phase diagrams for solutes of cryobiological interest, Cryobiology 54 (2007) 212-222]. Unfrozen fractions at the temperatures of IIF computed from these synthesized phase diagrams are about half of those calculated from the Woods et al. data, and are in close agreement with the computations for glycerol; i.e., IIF occurs when about 92-94% of the external water is frozen. A parallel paper was published by Guenther et al. [J.F. Guenther, S. Seki, F.W. Kleinhans, K. Edashige, D.M. Roberts, P. Mazur, Extra-and intra-cellular ice formation in Stage I and II Xenopus laevis oocytes, Cryobiology 52 (2006

  14. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  15. New light on a dark subject: On the use of fluorescence data to deduce redox states of natural organic matter (NOM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the use of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMS), parallel factor statistical analysis (PARAFAC), and oxidation-reduction experiments to examine the effect of redox conditions on PARAFAC model results for aqueous samples rich in natural organic matter. Fifty-four aqueous samples from 11 different geographic locations and two plant extracts were analyzed untreated and after chemical treatments or irradiation were used in attempts to change the redox status of the natural organic matter. The EEMS spectra were generated and modeled using a PARAFAC package developed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The PARAFAC model output was examined for consistency with previously reported relations and with changes expected to occur upon experimental oxidation and reduction of aqueous samples. Results indicate the implied fraction of total sample fluorescence attributed to quinone-like moieties was consistent (0.64 to 0.78) and greater than that observed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The fraction of the quinone-like moieties that was reduced (the reducing index, RI) showed relatively little variation (0.46 to 0.71) despite attempts to alter the redox status of the natural organic matter. The RI changed little after reducing samples using zinc metal, oxidizing at high pH with air, or irradiating with a Xenon lamp. Our results, however, are consistent with the correlations between the fluorescence indices (FI) of samples and the ratio of PARAFAC fitting parameters suggested by Cory and McKnight (2005), though we used samples with a much narrower range of FI values.

  16. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  17. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure. PMID:23089153

  18. Requirement of ArcA for redox regulation in Escherichia coli under microaerobic but not anaerobic or aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Teixeira de Mattos, M Joost

    2003-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the two-component regulatory ArcAB system functions as a major control system for the regulation of expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways. Previously, we have described the physiological response of wild-type E. coli to changes in oxygen availability through the complete range from anaerobiosis to full aerobiosis (S. Alexeeva, B. de Kort, G. Sawers, K. J. Hellingwerf, and M. J. Teixeira de Mattos, J. Bacteriol. 182:4934-4940, 2000, and S. Alexeeva, K. J. Hellingwerf, and M. J. Teixeira de Mattos, J. Bacteriol. 184:1402-1406, 2002). Here, we address the question of the contribution of the ArcAB-dependent transcriptional regulation to this response. Wild-type E. coli and a mutant lacking the ArcA regulator were grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at controlled levels of oxygen availability ranging from full aerobiosis to complete anaerobiosis. A flux analysis of the distribution of catabolic fluxes over parallel pathways was carried out, and the intracellular redox state (as reflected by the NADH/NAD ratio) was monitored for all steady states. Deletion of ArcA neither significantly altered the in vivo activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate formate lyase nor significantly affected catabolism under fully aerobic and fully anaerobic conditions. In contrast, profound effects of the absence of ArcA were seen under conditions of oxygen-restricted growth: increased respiration, an altered electron flux distribution over the cytochrome o- and d-terminal oxidases, and a significant change in the intracellular redox state were observed. Thus, the ArcA regulator was found to exert major control on flux distribution, and it is concluded that the ArcAB system should be considered a microaerobic redox regulator.

  19. Relationship Between Photochemical Quenching and Non-Photochemical Quenching in Six Species of Cyanobacteria Reveals Species Difference in Redox State and Species Commonality in Energy Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Misumi, Masahiro; Katoh, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-01-01

    Although the photosynthetic reaction center is well conserved among different cyanobacterial species, the modes of metabolism, e.g. respiratory, nitrogen and carbon metabolism and their mutual interaction, are quite diverse. To explore such uniformity and diversity among cyanobacteria, here we compare the influence of the light environment on the condition of photosynthetic electron transport through Chl fluorescence measurement of six cyanobacterial species grown under the same photon flux densities and at the same temperature. In the dark or under weak light, up to growth light, a large difference in the plastoquinone (PQ) redox condition was observed among different cyanobacterial species. The observed difference indicates that the degree of interaction between respiratory electron transfer and photosynthetic electron transfer differs among different cyanobacterial species. The variation could not be ascribed to the phylogenetic differences but possibly to the light environment of the original habitat. On the other hand, changes in the redox condition of PQ were essentially identical among different species at photon flux densities higher than the growth light. We further analyzed the response to high light by using a typical energy allocation model and found that ‘non-regulated’ thermal dissipation was increased under high-light conditions in all cyanobacterial species tested. We assume that such ‘non-regulated’ thermal dissipation may be an important ‘regulatory’ mechanism in the acclimation of cyanobacterial cells to high-light conditions. PMID:26712847

  20. The redox switch that regulates molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Conway, Myra E; Lee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Modification of reactive cysteine residues plays an integral role in redox-regulated reactions. Oxidation of thiolate anions to sulphenic acid can result in disulphide bond formation, or overoxidation to sulphonic acid, representing reversible and irreversible endpoints of cysteine oxidation, respectively. The antioxidant systems of the cell, including the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems, aim to prevent these higher and irreversible oxidation states. This is important as these redox transitions have numerous roles in regulating the structure/function relationship of proteins. Proteins with redox-active switches as described for peroxiredoxin (Prx) and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) can undergo dynamic structural rearrangement resulting in a gain of function. For Prx, transition from cysteine sulphenic acid to sulphinic acid is described as an adaptive response during increased cellular stress causing Prx to form higher molecular weight aggregates, switching its role from antioxidant to molecular chaperone. Evidence in support of PDI as a redox-regulated chaperone is also gaining impetus, where oxidation of the redox-active CXXC regions causes a structural change, exposing its hydrophobic region, facilitating polypeptide folding. In this review, we will focus on these two chaperones that are directly regulated through thiol-disulphide exchange and detail how these redox-induced switches allow for dual activity. Moreover, we will introduce a new role for a metabolic protein, the branched-chain aminotransferase, and discuss how it shares common mechanistic features with these well-documented chaperones. Together, the physiological importance of the redox regulation of these proteins under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be discussed to illustrate the impact and importance of correct folding and chaperone-mediated activity.

  1. Physical and functional sensitivity of zinc finger transcription factors to redox change.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X; Bishopric, N H; Discher, D J; Murphy, B J; Webster, K A

    1996-01-01

    Redox regulation of DNA-binding proteins through the reversible oxidation of key cysteine sulfhydryl groups has been demonstrated to occur in vitro for a range of transcription factors. The direct redox regulation of DNA binding has not been described in vivo, possibly because most protein thiol groups are strongly buffered against oxidation by the highly reduced intracellular environment mediated by glutathione, thioredoxin, and associated pathways. For this reason, only accessible protein thiol groups with high thiol-disulfide oxidation potentials are likely to be responsive to intracellular redox changes. In this article, we demonstrate that zinc finger DNA-binding proteins, in particular members of the Sp-1 family, appear to contain such redox-sensitive -SH groups. These proteins displayed a higher sensitivity to redox regulation than other redox-responsive factors both in vitro and in vivo. This effect was reflected in the hyperoxidative repression of transcription from promoters with essential Sp-1 binding sites, including the simian virus 40 early region, glycolytic enzyme, and dihydrofolate reductase genes. Promoter analyses implicated the Sp-1 sites in this repression. Non-Sp-1-dependent redox-regulated genes including metallothionein and heme oxygenase were induced by the same hyperoxic stress. The studies demonstrate that cellular redox changes can directly regulate gene expression in vivo by determining the level of occupancy of strategically positioned GC-binding sites. PMID:8622648

  2. Intracellular chromium reduction.

    PubMed

    Arslan, P; Beltrame, M; Tomasi, A

    1987-10-22

    Two steps are involved in the uptake of Cr(VI): (1) the diffusion of the anion CrO4(2-) through a facilitated transport system, presumably the non-specific anion carrier and (2) the intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI), keeping the cytoplasmic concentration of Cr(VI) low, facilitates accumulation of chromate from extracellular medium into the cell. In the present paper, a direct demonstration of intracellular chromium reduction is provided by means of electron paramagnetic (spin) resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Incubation of metabolically active rat thymocytes with chromate originates a signal which can be attributed to a paramagnetic species of chromium, Cr(V) or Cr(III). The EPR signal is originated by intracellular reduction of chromium since: (1) it is observed only when cells are incubated with chromate, (2) it is present even after extensive washings of the cells in a chromium-free medium; (3) it is abolished when cells are incubated with drugs able to reduce the glutathione pool, i.e., diethylmaleate or phorone; and (4) it is abolished when cells are incubated in the presence of a specific inhibitor of the anion carrier, 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid. PMID:2820507

  3. Carbonic anhydrase II plays a major role in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by effecting the steady state intracellular pH and Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Lehenkari, P; Hentunen, T A; Laitala-Leinonen, T; Tuukkanen, J; Väänänen, H K

    1998-07-10

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) expression in characteristic for the early stage of osteoclast differentiation. To study how CA II, which is crucial in proton generation in mature osteoclasts, influences the osteoclast differentiation process we performed rat bone marrow cultures. In this model, acetazolamide, a specific CA inhibitor, decreased the 1,25 (OH)2D3-induced formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells, in a dose-dependent manner. We then performed intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ (Cai2+) measurements for cultured osteoclasts and noticed that addition of acetazolamide caused a rapid, transient increase of both parameters. The increase in pHi was dependent neither on the culture substrate nor on the extracellular pH (pHe) but the increase could be diminished by DIDS or by bicarbonate removal. Membrane-impermeable CA inhibitors (benzolamide and pd5000) did not have this effect. Addition of CA II antisense oligonucleotides into the cultures reduced the pHi increase significantly. CA II inhibition was also found to neutralize the intracellular vesicles at extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.4, but at less extent at pHe 7.0. In mouse calvaria cultures, bone resorption was inhibited dose dependently by acetazolamide at pHe 7.4 while inhibition was smaller at pHe 7.0. We conclude that CA II is essential not only in bone resorption but also in osteoclast differentiation. In both processes, however, the crucial role of CA II is at least partially due to the effect on the osteoclast pHi regulation.

  4. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  5. Redox regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ila; Chandhok, Des

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress, implicated in the etiology of cancer, results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell’s own antioxidant defenses. ROS deregulate the redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating an aberrant induction of signaling networks that cause tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet (UV) exposures, γ-radiation and other environmental carcinogens generate ROS in the cells, which can exert apoptosis in the tumors, thereby killing the malignant cells or induce the progression of the cancer growth by blocking cellular defense system. Cancer stem cells take the advantage of the aberrant redox system and spontaneously proliferate. Oxidative stress and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in the development of breast, prostate, pancreatic and colon cancer. Prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with several kinds of DNA damage. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. BRCA1, a tumor suppressor against hormone responsive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, plays a significant role in inhibiting ROS and estrogen mediated DNA damage; thereby regulate the redox homeostasis of the cells. Several transcription factors and tumor suppressors are involved during stress response such as Nrf2, NFκB and BRCA1. A promising strategy for targeting redox status of the cells is to use readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices. Many of the phytochemicals have already been identified to have chemopreventive potential, capable of intervening in carcinogenesis. PMID:20716925

  6. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  7. Biological definition of multiple chemical sensitivity from redox state and cytokine profiling and not from polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, Chiara; Scordo, Maria G.; Cesareo, Eleonora; Pastore, Saveria; Mariani, Serena; Maiani, Gianluca; Stancato, Andrea; Loreti, Beatrice; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Lubrano, Carla; Raskovic, Desanka; De Padova, Luigia; Genovesi, Giuseppe; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a poorly clinically and biologically defined environment-associated syndrome. Although dysfunctions of phase I/phase II metabolizing enzymes and redox imbalance have been hypothesized, corresponding genetic and metabolic parameters in MCS have not been systematically examined. Objectives: We sought for genetic, immunological, and metabolic markers in MCS. Methods: We genotyped patients with diagnosis of MCS, suspected MCS and Italian healthy controls for allelic variants of cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A5), UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1), and glutathione S-transferases (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1). Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids, antioxidant (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and glutathione metabolizing (GST, glutathione peroxidase (Gpx)) enzymes, whole blood chemiluminescence, total antioxidant capacity, levels of nitrites/nitrates, glutathione, HNE-protein adducts, and a wide spectrum of cytokines in the plasma were determined. Results: Allele and genotype frequencies of CYPs, UGT, GSTM, GSTT, and GSTP were similar in the Italian MCS patients and in the control populations. The activities of erythrocyte catalase and GST were lower, whereas Gpx was higher than normal. Both reduced and oxidised glutathione were decreased, whereas nitrites/nitrates were increased in the MCS groups. The MCS fatty acid profile was shifted to saturated compartment and IFNgamma, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, PDGFbb, and VEGF were increased. Conclusions: Altered redox and cytokine patterns suggest inhibition of expression/activity of metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes in MCS. Metabolic parameters indicating accelerated lipid oxidation, increased nitric oxide production and glutathione depletion in combination with increased plasma inflammatory cytokines should be considered in biological definition and diagnosis of MCS.

  8. Redox and anti-oxidant state within cattle oocytes following in vitro maturation with bone morphogenetic protein 15 and follicle stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Purdey, Malcolm; Brown, Hannah M; Abell, Andrew D; Mottershead, David G; Cetica, Pablo D; Dalvit, Gabriel C; Goldys, Ewa M; Gilchrist, Robert B; Gardner, David K; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-04-01

    The developmental competence of cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) can be increased during in vitro oocyte maturation with the addition of exogenous oocyte-secreted factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), in combination with hormones. FSH and BMP15, for example, induce different metabolic profiles within COCs-namely, FSH increases glycolysis while BMP15 stimulates FAD and NAD(P)H accumulation within oocytes, without changing the redox ratio. The aim of this study was to investigate if this BMP15-induced NAD(P)H increase was due to de novo NADPH production. Cattle COCs were cultured with FSH and/or recombinant human BMP15, resulting in a significant decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (P < 0.05). Inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) during this process decreased NAD(P)H intensity threefold in BMP15-treated oocytes, suggesting that BMP15 stimulates IDH and NADPH production via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. As NADPH is a reducing agent, reduced glutathione (GSH), H2O2, and mitochondrial activity were also measured to assess the general redox status of the oocyte. FSH alone decreased GSH levels whereas the combination of BMP15 and FSH sustained higher levels. Expression of genes encoding glutathione-reducing enzymes were also lower in oocytes cultured in the presence of FSH alone. BMP15 supplementation further promoted mitochondrial localization patterns that are consistent with enhanced developmental competence. Metabolomics revealed significant consumption of glutamine and production of alanine by COCs matured with both FSH and BMP15 compared to the control (P < 0.05). Hence, BMP15 supplementation differentially modulates reductive metabolism and mitochondrial localization within the oocyte. In comparison, FSH-stimulation alone decreases the oocytes' ability to regulate cellular stress, and therefore utilizes other mechanisms to improve developmental competence.

  9. Measuring glutathione redox potential of HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Ashima; Munshi, MohamedHusen; Khan, Sohrab Zafar; Fatima, Sadaf; Arya, Rahul; Jameel, Shahid; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Redox signaling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The majority of HIV redox research relies on measuring redox stress using invasive technologies, which are unreliable and do not provide information about the contributions of subcellular compartments. A major technological leap emerges from the development of genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs), which provide sensitive and compartment-specific insights into redox homeostasis. Here, we exploited a roGFP-based specific bioprobe of glutathione redox potential (E(GSH); Grx1-roGFP2) and measured subcellular changes in E(GSH) during various phases of HIV-1 infection using U1 monocytic cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1). We show that although U937 and U1 cells demonstrate significantly reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial E(GSH) (approximately -310 mV), active viral replication induces substantial oxidative stress (E(GSH) more than -240 mV). Furthermore, exposure to a physiologically relevant oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induces significant deviations in subcellular E(GSH) between U937 and U1, which distinctly modulates susceptibility to apoptosis. Using Grx1-roGFP2, we demonstrate that a marginal increase of about ∼25 mV in E(GSH) is sufficient to switch HIV-1 from latency to reactivation, raising the possibility of purging HIV-1 by redox modulators without triggering detrimental changes in cellular physiology. Importantly, we show that bioactive lipids synthesized by clinical drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivate HIV-1 through modulation of intracellular E(GSH). Finally, the expression analysis of U1 and patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells demonstrated a major recalibration of cellular redox homeostatic pathways during persistence and active replication of HIV.

  10. Spatially-resolved intracellular sensing of hydrogen peroxide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Warren, Emilie A K; Netterfield, Tatiana S; Sarkar, Saheli; Kemp, Melissa L; Payne, Christine K

    2015-11-20

    Understanding intracellular redox chemistry requires new tools for the site-specific visualization of intracellular oxidation. We have developed a spatially-resolved intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide, HyPer-Tau, for time-resolved imaging in live cells. This sensor consists of a hydrogen peroxide-sensing protein tethered to microtubules. We demonstrate the use of the HyPer-Tau sensor for three applications; dose-dependent response of human cells to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, a model immune response of mouse macrophages to stimulation by bacterial toxin, and a spatially-resolved response to localized delivery of hydrogen peroxide. These results demonstrate that HyPer-Tau can be used as an effective tool for tracking changes in spatially localized intracellular hydrogen peroxide and for future applications in redox signaling.

  11. Redox Regulation of Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ signaling mechanism triggered by Ca2+ depletion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and by a variety of cellular stresses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often concomitantly produced in response to these stresses, however, the relationship between redox signaling and SOCE is not completely understood. Various cardiovascular, neurological, and immune diseases are associated with alterations in both Ca2+ signaling and ROS production, and thus understanding this relationship has therapeutic implications. Recent Advances: Several reactive cysteine modifications in stromal interaction molecule (STIM) and Orai proteins comprising the core SOCE machinery were recently shown to modulate SOCE in a redox-dependent manner. Moreover, STIM1 and Orai1 expression levels may reciprocally regulate and be affected by responses to oxidative stress. ER proteins involved in oxidative protein folding have gained increased recognition as important sources of ROS, and the recent discovery of their accumulation in contact sites between the ER and mitochondria provides a further link between ROS production and intracellular Ca2+ handling. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Future research should aim to establish the complete set of SOCE controlling molecules, to determine their redox-sensitive residues, and to understand how intracellular Ca2+ stores dynamically respond to different types of stress. Mapping the precise nature and functional consequence of key redox-sensitive components of the pre- and post-translational control of SOCE machinery and of proteins regulating ER calcium content will be pivotal in advancing our understanding of the complex cross-talk between redox and Ca2+ signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 915–932. PMID:24053140

  12. Redox Proteomics of the Inflammatory Secretome Identifies a Common Set of Redoxins and Other Glutathionylated Proteins Released in Inflammation, Influenza Virus Infection and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Checconi, Paola; Salzano, Sonia; Bowler, Lucas; Mullen, Lisa; Mengozzi, Manuela; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Sgarbanti, Rossella; Panella, Simona; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Protein cysteines can form transient disulfides with glutathione (GSH), resulting in the production of glutathionylated proteins, and this process is regarded as a mechanism by which the redox state of the cell can regulate protein function. Most studies on redox regulation of immunity have focused on intracellular proteins. In this study we have used redox proteomics to identify those proteins released in glutathionylated form by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after pre-loading the cells with biotinylated GSH. Of the several proteins identified in the redox secretome, we have selected a number for validation. Proteomic analysis indicated that LPS stimulated the release of peroxiredoxin (PRDX) 1, PRDX2, vimentin (VIM), profilin1 (PFN1) and thioredoxin 1 (TXN1). For PRDX1 and TXN1, we were able to confirm that the released protein is glutathionylated. PRDX1, PRDX2 and TXN1 were also released by the human pulmonary epithelial cell line, A549, infected with influenza virus. The release of the proteins identified was inhibited by the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX), which also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release, and by thiol antioxidants (N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which did not affect TNF-α production. The proteins identified could be useful as biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with inflammation, and further studies will be required to investigate if the extracellular forms of these proteins has immunoregulatory functions. PMID:25985305

  13. Characterization of Redox States of Ru(OH2)(Q)(tpy)2+ (Q = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone, tpy = 2,2#:6#,2#-terpyridine)and Related Species through Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Muckerman, J.T.; Tsai, M.-K.; , Rochford, J.; Polyansky, D.E.; Wada, T.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, E.

    2009-04-27

    The redox states of Ru(OH{sub 2})(Q)(tpy){sup 2+} (Q = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone, tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) are investigated through experimental and theoretical UV-vis spectra and Pourbaix diagrams. The electrochemical properties are reported for the species resulting from deprotonation and redox processes in aqueous solution. The formal oxidation states of the redox couples in the various intermediate complexes are systematically assigned using electronic structure theory. The controversy over the electronic assignment of ferromagnetic vs. antiferromagnetic coupling is investigated through comparison of ab initio methods and the broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) approach. The various pK{sub a} values and reduction potentials, including the consideration of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) processes, are calculated, and the theoretical version of the Pourbaix diagram is constructed in order to elucidate and assign several previously ambiguous regions in the experimental diagram.

  14. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  15. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Craig J.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Mary K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Orr, Galya

    2015-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of cells. PMID:26056725

  16. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, Craig J.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Marry K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Orr, Galya

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of cells.

  17. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Craig J; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Mary K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R; Orr, Galya

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of the cells.

  18. Actin cytoskeleton redox proteome oxidation by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Orr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies associate environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure with the risk of lung diseases. Although mechanisms are not fully elucidated, several studies demonstrate Cd effects on actin and actin-associated proteins. In a recent study of Cd at concentrations similar to environmental exposures, we found that redox-dependent inflammatory signaling by NF-κB was sensitive to the actin-disrupting agent, cytochalasin D. The goal of the present study was to use mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics to investigate Cd effects on the actin cytoskeleton proteome and related functional pathways in lung cells at low environmental concentrations. The results showed that Cd under conditions that did not alter total protein thiols or glutathione redox state caused significant oxidation of peptidyl Cys of proteins regulating actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence microscopy of lung fibroblasts and pulmonary artery endothelial cells showed that low-dose Cd exposure stimulated filamentous actin formation and nuclear localization of destrin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Taken together, the results show that redox states of peptidyl Cys in proteins associated with actin cytoskeleton pathways are selectively oxidized in lung by Cd at levels thought to occur from environmental exposure. PMID:24077948

  19. Redox theory of aging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. PMID:25863726

  20. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications. PMID:23712370

  1. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  2. Pressure effects reveal that changes in the redox states of the heme iron complexes in the sensor domains of two heme-based oxygen sensor proteins, EcDOS and YddV, have profound effects on their flexibility.

    PubMed

    Anzenbacher, Pavel; Marchal, Stéphane; Palacký, Jan; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Domaschke, Thomas; Lange, Reinhard; Shimizu, Toru; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Stranava, Martin; Stiborová, Marie; Martinkova, Marketa

    2014-12-01

    The catalytic activity of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (EcDOS) towards cyclic diGMP is regulated by the redox state of the heme iron complex in the enzyme's sensing domain and the association of external ligands with the iron center. Specifically, the Fe(II) complex is more active towards cyclic diGMP than the Fe(III) complex, and its activity is further enhanced by O2 or CO binding. In order to determine how the redox state and coordination of the heme iron atom regulate the catalytic activity of EcDOS, we investigated the flexibility of its isolated N-terminal heme-binding domain (EcDOS-heme) by monitoring its spectral properties at various hydrostatic pressures. The most active form of the heme-containing domain, i.e. the Fe(II)-CO complex, was found to be the least flexible. Conversely, the oxidized Fe(III) forms of EcDOS-heme and its mutants had relatively high flexibilities, which appeared to be linked to the low catalytic activity of the corresponding intact enzymes. These findings corroborate the suggestion, made on the basis of crystallographic data, that there is an inverse relationship between the flexibility of the heme-containing domain of EcDOS and its catalytic activity. The Fe(II)-CO form of the heme domain of a second heme-based oxygen sensor, diguanylate cyclase (YddV), was also found to be quite rigid. Interestingly, the incorporation of a water molecule into the heme complex of YddV caused by mutation of the Leu65 residue reduced the flexibility of this heme domain. Conversely, mutation of the Tyr43 residue increased its flexibility.

  3. A new level of regulation in gluconeogenesis: metabolic state modulates the intracellular localization of aldolase B and its interaction with liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Droppelmann, Cristian A; Sáez, Doris E; Asenjo, Joel L; Yáñez, Alejandro J; García-Rocha, Mar; Concha, Ilona I; Grez, Manuel; Guinovart, Joan J; Slebe, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how glucose metabolism is finely regulated at molecular and cellular levels in the liver is critical for knowing its relationship to related pathologies, such as diabetes. In order to gain insight into the regulation of glucose metabolism, we studied the liver-expressed isoforms aldolase B and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1 (FBPase-1), key enzymes in gluconeogenesis, analysing their cellular localization in hepatocytes under different metabolic conditions and their protein-protein interaction in vitro and in vivo. We observed that glucose, insulin, glucagon and adrenaline differentially modulate the intracellular distribution of aldolase B and FBPase-1. Interestingly, the in vitro protein-protein interaction analysis between aldolase B and FBPase-1 showed a specific and regulable interaction between them, whereas aldolase A (muscle isozyme) and FBPase-1 showed no interaction. The affinity of the aldolase B and FBPase-1 complex was modulated by intermediate metabolites, but only in the presence of K(+). We observed a decreased association constant in the presence of adenosine monophosphate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and inhibitory concentrations of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Conversely, the association constant of the complex increased in the presence of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and non-inhibitory concentrations of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Notably, in vivo FRET studies confirmed the interaction between aldolase B and FBPase-1. Also, the co-expression of aldolase B and FBPase-1 in cultured cells suggested that FBPase-1 guides the cellular localization of aldolase B. Our results provide further evidence that metabolic conditions modulate aldolase B and FBPase-1 activity at the cellular level through the regulation of their interaction, suggesting that their association confers a catalytic advantage for both enzymes. PMID:26417114

  4. The transmembrane Bax inhibitor motif (TMBIM) containing protein family: Tissue expression, intracellular localization and effects on the ER CA²⁺-filling state.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Dmitrij A; Schacht, Teresa; Enders, Vitalij; Habicht, Jörn; Kiviluoto, Santeri; Schneider, Julia; Henke, Nadine; Bultynck, Geert; Methner, Axel

    2015-09-01

    Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is an evolutionarily conserved pH-dependent Ca²⁺ leak channel in the endoplasmic reticulum and the founding member of a family of six highly hydrophobic mammalian proteins named transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing (TMBIM) 1-6 with BI-1 being TMBIM6. Here we compared the structure, subcellular localization, tissue expression and the effect on the cellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis of all family members side by side. We found that all TMBIM proteins possess the di-aspartyl pH sensor responsible for pH sensing identified in TMBIM6 and its bacterial homologue BsYetJ. TMBIM1-3 and TMBIM4-6 represent two phylogenetically distinct groups that are localized in the Golgi apparatus (TMBIM1-3), endoplasmic reticulum (TMBIM4-6) or mitochondria (TMBIM5) but share a common structure of at least seven transmembrane domains with the last domain being semi-hydrophobic. TMBIM1 is mainly expressed in muscle, TMBIM2 and 3 in the nervous system, TMBIM4 and 5 are ubiquitously expressed and TMBIM6 in skeletal muscle, kidney, liver and spleen. All TMBIM proteins reduce the Ca²⁺ content of the endoplasmic reticulum, and all but TMBIM5 also reduce the cytosolic resting Ca²⁺ concentration. These results suggest that the TMBIM family has comparable functions in the maintenance of intracellular Ca²⁺ homeostasis in a wide variety of tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  5. A new level of regulation in gluconeogenesis: metabolic state modulates the intracellular localization of aldolase B and its interaction with liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Droppelmann, Cristian A; Sáez, Doris E; Asenjo, Joel L; Yáñez, Alejandro J; García-Rocha, Mar; Concha, Ilona I; Grez, Manuel; Guinovart, Joan J; Slebe, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how glucose metabolism is finely regulated at molecular and cellular levels in the liver is critical for knowing its relationship to related pathologies, such as diabetes. In order to gain insight into the regulation of glucose metabolism, we studied the liver-expressed isoforms aldolase B and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1 (FBPase-1), key enzymes in gluconeogenesis, analysing their cellular localization in hepatocytes under different metabolic conditions and their protein-protein interaction in vitro and in vivo. We observed that glucose, insulin, glucagon and adrenaline differentially modulate the intracellular distribution of aldolase B and FBPase-1. Interestingly, the in vitro protein-protein interaction analysis between aldolase B and FBPase-1 showed a specific and regulable interaction between them, whereas aldolase A (muscle isozyme) and FBPase-1 showed no interaction. The affinity of the aldolase B and FBPase-1 complex was modulated by intermediate metabolites, but only in the presence of K(+). We observed a decreased association constant in the presence of adenosine monophosphate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, fructose-6-phosphate and inhibitory concentrations of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Conversely, the association constant of the complex increased in the presence of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and non-inhibitory concentrations of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Notably, in vivo FRET studies confirmed the interaction between aldolase B and FBPase-1. Also, the co-expression of aldolase B and FBPase-1 in cultured cells suggested that FBPase-1 guides the cellular localization of aldolase B. Our results provide further evidence that metabolic conditions modulate aldolase B and FBPase-1 activity at the cellular level through the regulation of their interaction, suggesting that their association confers a catalytic advantage for both enzymes.

  6. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants.

  7. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  8. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  9. Redox modulation of adjacent thiols in VLA-4 by AS101 converts myeloid leukemia cells from a drug-resistant to drug-sensitive state.

    PubMed

    Layani-Bazar, Adi; Skornick, Itai; Berrebi, Alain; Pauker, Maor H; Noy, Elad; Silberman, Alon; Albeck, Michael; Longo, Dan L; Kalechman, Yona; Sredni, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Interaction between the integrin VLA-4 on acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells with stromal fibronectin is a decisive factor in chemotherapeutic resistance. In this study, we provide a rationale for a drug repositioning strategy to blunt integrin activation in AML cells and restore their sensitivity to chemotherapy. Specifically, we demonstrate that the nontoxic tellurium compound AS101, currently being evaluated in clinical trials, can abrogate the acquired resistance of AML. Mechanistic investigations revealed that AS101 caused redox inactivation of adjacent thiols in the exofacial domain of VLA-4 after its ligation to stromal fibronectin. This effect triggered cytoskeletal conformational changes that decreased PI3K/Akt/Bcl2 signaling, an obligatory step in chemosensitization by AS101. In a mouse xenograft of AML derived from patient leukemic cells with high VLA-4 expression and activity, we demonstrated that AS101 abrogated drug resistance and prolonged survival in mice receiving chemotherapy. Decreased integrin activity was confirmed on AML cells in vivo. The chemosensitizing activity of AS101 persisted in hosts with defective adaptive and innate immunity, consistent with evidence that integrin deactivation was not mediated by heightening immune attack. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to reposition the experimental clinical agent, AS101, to degrade VLA-4-mediated chemoresistance and improve clinical responses in patients with AML.

  10. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  11. Non-redox modulated fluorescence strategy for sensitive and selective ascorbic acid detection with highly photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticles via solid-state synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-08-18

    Highly photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticles (N-CNPs) were prepared by a simple and green route employing sodium alginate as a carbon source and tryptophan as both a nitrogen source and a functional monomer. The as-synthesized N-CNPs exhibited excellent water solubility and biocompatibility with a fluorescence quantum yield of 47.9%. The fluorescence of the N-CNPs was intensively suppressed by the addition of ascorbic acid (AA). The mechanism of the fluorescence suppression of the N-CNPs was investigated, and the synergistic action of the inner filter effect (IFE) and the static quenching effect (SQE) contributed to the intensive fluorescence suppression, which was different from those reported for the traditional redox-based fluorescent probes. Owing to the spatial effect and hydrogen bond between the AA and the groups on the N-CNP surface, excellent sensitivity and selectivity for AA detecting was obtained in a wide linear relationship from 0.2 μM to 150 μM. The detection limit was as low as 50 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The proposed sensing systems also represented excellent sensitivity and selectivity for AA analysis in human biological fluids, providing a valuable platform for AA sensing in clinic diagnostic and drug screening. PMID:26202861

  12. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  13. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  14. Authigenic pyrite formation and re-oxidation as an indicator of an unsteady-state redox sedimentary environment: Evidence from the intertidal mangrove sediments of Hainan Island, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hai; Yao, Suping; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    .6 μm and 6.1±4.1 μm at Tanmen and Qinglan, respectively) are compatible with previous observations in oxic and dysoxic environments. At the TM site, we observed a notable double-hump phenomenon in the framboid size distribution and a greater number of secondary framboids between the 50 and 100 cm layers, suggesting different pyrite growth events than are present at QL site. There are remarkable increases in the sulfur isotopic fractionations between the CRS and the acid-dissolvable sulfate in several layers of the QL site (e.g.,>10‰ at 10, 20, 80 and 110-120 cm depths), demonstrating that the reoxidized sulfate could then be re-reduced to create greater 34S depletions in sulfides relative to the acid-dissolvable sulfate. In addition, the small mean diameters and standard deviations of framboid size in these layers are much closer to those of dysoxic sediments (e.g., the Peru margin) where the redox conditions may be suitable for the re-reduction of partial sulfate derived from the reoxidation of reduced sulfur. Generally, these data provide evidence that the sudden redox turnover caused by the oxygen input during ebb tides or bioturbation occurs in both mangrove swamps, leading to a significant reoxidation of reduced sulfurs.

  15. Glutathione reductase from Brassica rapa affects tolerance and the redox state but not fermentation ability in response to oxidative stress in genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ho-Sung; Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Young-Saeng; Kim, Il-Sup

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether the exogenous expression of glutathione reductase (GR) from Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (BrGR) can reduce the deleterious effects of unfavorable conditions, we constructed a transgenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain bearing the GR gene cloned into the yeast expression vector, pVTU260. BrGR expression was confirmed by semi reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, immunoblotting analysis and an enzyme assay. Ectopic BrGR-expression improved cellular glutathione (GSH) homeostasis after higher GSH accumulation in the transgenic yeast than in the wild-type yeast under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. The BrGR-expressing yeast strain induced the activation of metabolic enzymes (Hxt, G6PDH, GAPDH and Ald), antioxidant systems (Gpx, Trx2, Trx3, Trr1, Tsa1 and porin) and molecular chaperones (Hsp104, Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp42, Hsp26, Grp, Sti1 and Zpr1), which led to lower oxidative protein damage after a reduction in the level of cellular ROS in the BrGR-expressing yeast strain exposed to H(2)O(2) than in the wild-type yeast strain. BrGR-expression increased the ability to adapt and recover from H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress and various stressors, including heat shock, menadione, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, heavy metals, sodium dodecyl sulfate, ethanol and NaCl, but did not affect fermentation capacity. These results suggest that ectopic BrGR expression confers acquired tolerance by improving proteostasis and redox homeostasis through co-activation of various cell rescue proteins against ROS-induced oxidative stress in yeast cells.

  16. Breast Cancer Redox Heterogeneity Detectable with Chemical Exchange Satruation Transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kejia; Xu, He N.; Singh, Anup; Moon, Lily; Haris, Mohammad; Reddy, Ravinder; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tissue redox state is an important mediator of various biological processes in health and diseases such as cancer. Previously, we discovered that the mitochondrial redox state of ex vivo tissues detected by redox scanning (an optical imaging method) revealed interesting tumor redox state heterogeneity that could differentiate tumor aggressiveness. Because the noninvasive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI can probe the proton transfer and generate contrasts from endogenous metabolites, we aim to investigate if the in vivo CEST contrast is sensitive to proton transfer of the redox reactions so as to reveal the tissue redox states in breast cancer animal models. Procedures CEST MRI has been employed to characterize tumor metabolic heterogeneity and correlated with the redox states measured by the redox scanning in two human breast cancer mouse xenograft models, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The possible biological mechanism on the correlation between the two imaging modalities was further investigated by phantom studies where the reductants and the oxidants of the representative redox reactions were measured. Results The CEST contrast is found linearly correlated with NADH concentration and the NADH redox ratio with high statistical significance, where NADH is the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The phantom studies showed that the reductants of the redox reactions have more CEST contrast than the corresponding oxidants, indicating that higher CEST effect corresponds to the more reduced redox state. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that CEST MRI, once calibrated, might provide a novel noninvasive imaging surrogate for the tissue redox state and a possible diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer in the clinic. PMID:24811957

  17. Antioxidant enzymes as redox-based biomarkers: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Young; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2015-04-01

    The field of redox proteomics focuses to a large extent on analyzing cysteine oxidation in proteins under different experimental conditions and states of diseases. The identification and localization of oxidized cysteines within the cellular milieu is critical for understanding the redox regulation of proteins under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and it will in turn provide important information that are potentially useful for the development of novel strategies in the treatment and prevention of diseases associated with oxidative stress. Antioxidant enzymes that catalyze oxidation/reduction processes are able to serve as redox biomarkers in various human diseases, and they are key regulators controlling the redox state of functional proteins. Redox regulators with antioxidant properties related to active mediators, cellular organelles, and the surrounding environments are all connected within a network and are involved in diseases related to redox imbalance including cancer, ischemia/reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative diseases, as well as normal aging. In this review, we will briefly look at the selected aspects of oxidative thiol modification in antioxidant enzymes and thiol oxidation in proteins affected by redox control of antioxidant enzymes and their relation to disease.

  18. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  19. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes, AIM45, YGR207c/CIR1 and YOR356w/CIR2, Are Involved in Cellular Redox State Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, João; Pinto, Maria Joana; Rodrigues, Aurora; Vasconcelos, Filipe; Oliveira, Rui

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian electron transfer flavoproteins comprise a mitochondrial matrix heterodimer, and an electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Electrons from primary acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, of mitochondrial metabolism of fatty acids and amino acids, are transferred to the matricial heterodimer and, subsequently, to the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase, which transfers electrons to ubiquinone of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Several evidences suggest that these proteins may convey electrons directly to molecular oxygen, yielding reactive oxygen species. In this work, we investigated phenotypes of the yeast mutants affected in the orthologous genes of the matrix heterodimer (AIM45 and YGR207c/CIR1) and of the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (YOR356w/CIR2). The mutant strains aim45 and yor356w/cir2 displayed better growth on several non-fermentable carbon sources, which depended on the component of the electron transport chain that accepts the electrons resulting from its mitochondrial oxidation. Furthermore, upon heat shock, the mutant strains presented decreased intracellular oxidation, suggesting that these flavoproteins are a source of reactive oxygen species. Other phenotypes identified suggest that AIM45, YGR207c/CIR1 and YOR356w/CIR2 can protect cells from oxidative and heat stress, which encompass increased heat stress sensitivity, superoxide sensitivity, both only on non-fermentable carbon sources. PMID:21253464

  20. Intracellular structure and nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular movement of any solute or particle accords with one of two general schemes: either it takes place predominantly in the solution phase or it occurs by dynamic interactions with solid-state structures. If nucleocytoplasmic exchanges of macromolecules and complexes are predominantly solution-phase processes, i.e., if the former ("diffusionist") perspective applies, then the only significant structures in nucleocytoplasmic transport are the pore complexes. However, if such exchanges accord with the latter ("solid-state") perspective, then the roles of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton in nucleocytoplasmic transport are potentially, at least, as important as that of the pore complexes. The role of the nucleoskeleton in mRNA transport is more difficult to evaluate than that of the cytoskeleton because it is less well characterized, and current evidence does not exclude either perspective. However, the balance of evidence favors a solid-state scheme. It is argued that ribosomal subunits are also more likely to migrate by a solid-state rather than a diffusionist mechanism, though the opposite is true of proteins and tRNAs. Moreover, recent data on the effects of viral proteins on intranuclear RNA processing and migration accord with the solid-state perspective. In view of this balance of evidence, three possible solid-state mechanisms for nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport are described and evaluated. The explanatory advantage of solid-state models is contrasted with the heuristic advantage of diffusion theory, but it is argued that diffusion theory itself, even aided by modern computational techniques and numerical and graphical approaches, cannot account for data describing the movements of materials within the cell. Therefore, the mechanisms envisaged in a diffusionist perspective cannot be confined to diffusion alone, but must include other processes such as bulk fluid flow.

  1. Tuning of Redox Regulatory Mechanisms, Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Homeostasis under Salinity Stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Sazzad; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g., the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH), alternative oxidase (AOX), the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants. PMID:27242807

  2. Tuning of Redox Regulatory Mechanisms, Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Homeostasis under Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Sazzad; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g., the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH), alternative oxidase (AOX), the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants. PMID:27242807

  3. A designed redox-controlled caspase

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Witold A; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2011-01-01

    Caspases are a powerful class of cysteine proteases. Introduction of activated caspases in healthy or cancerous cells results in induction of apoptotic cell death. In this study, we have designed and characterized a version of caspase-7 that can be inactivated under oxidizing extracellular conditions and then reactivated under reducing intracellular conditions. This version of caspase-7 is allosterically inactivated when two of the substrate-binding loops are locked together via an engineered disulfide. When this disulfide is reduced, the protein regains its full function. The inactive loop-locked version of caspase-7 can be readily observed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The reduced and reactivated form of the enzyme observed crystallographically is the first caspase-7 structure in which the substrate-binding groove is properly ordered even in the absence of an active-site ligand. In the reactivated structure, the catalytic-dyad cysteine–histidine are positioned 3.5 Å apart in an orientation that is capable of supporting catalysis. This redox-controlled version of caspase-7 is particularly well suited for targeted cell death in concert with redox-triggered delivery vehicles. PMID:21674661

  4. A designed redox-controlled caspase

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, Witold A.; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2011-09-15

    Caspases are a powerful class of cysteine proteases. Introduction of activated caspases in healthy or cancerous cells results in induction of apoptotic cell death. In this study, we have designed and characterized a version of caspase-7 that can be inactivated under oxidizing extracellular conditions and then reactivated under reducing intracellular conditions. This version of caspase-7 is allosterically inactivated when two of the substrate-binding loops are locked together via an engineered disulfide. When this disulfide is reduced, the protein regains its full function. The inactive loop-locked version of caspase-7 can be readily observed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The reduced and reactivated form of the enzyme observed crystallographically is the first caspase-7 structure in which the substrate-binding groove is properly ordered even in the absence of an active-site ligand. In the reactivated structure, the catalytic-dyad cysteine-histidine are positioned 3.5 {angstrom} apart in an orientation that is capable of supporting catalysis. This redox-controlled version of caspase-7 is particularly well suited for targeted cell death in concert with redox-triggered delivery vehicles.

  5. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. PMID:27151506

  6. A mitochondrial redox oxygen sensor in the pulmonary vasculature and ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J; Hong, Zhigang G; Xiong, Ping Y; Del Paggio, Joseph C; Herr, Julia E; Johri, Amer M; Archer, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian homeostatic oxygen sensing system (HOSS) initiates changes in vascular tone, respiration, and neurosecretion that optimize oxygen uptake and tissue oxygen delivery within seconds of detecting altered environmental or arterial PO2. The HOSS includes carotid body type 1 cells, adrenomedullary cells, neuroepithelial bodies, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in pulmonary arteries (PAs), ductus arteriosus (DA), and fetoplacental arteries. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes ventilation-perfusion matching. In utero, HPV diverts placentally oxygenated blood from the non-ventilated lung through the DA. At birth, increased alveolar and arterial oxygen tension dilates the pulmonary vasculature and constricts the DA, respectively, thereby transitioning the newborn to an air-breathing organism. Though modulated by endothelial-derived relaxing and constricting factors, O2 sensing is intrinsic to PASMCs and DASMCs. Within the SMC's dynamic mitochondrial network, changes in PO2 alter the reduction-oxidation state of redox couples (NAD(+)/NADH, NADP(+)/NADPH) and the production of reactive oxygen species, ROS (e.g., H2O2), by complexes I and III of the electron transport chain (ETC). ROS and redox couples regulate ion channels, transporters, and enzymes, changing intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i and calcium sensitivity and eliciting homeostatic responses to hypoxia. In PASMCs, hypoxia inhibits ROS production and reduces redox couples, thereby inhibiting O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, depolarizing the plasma membrane, activating voltage-gated calcium channels (CaL), increasing [Ca(2+)]i, and causing vasoconstriction. In DASMCs, elevated PO2 causes mitochondrial fission, increasing ETC complex I activity and ROS production. The DASMC's downstream response to elevated PO2 (Kv channel inhibition, CaL activation, increased [Ca(2+)]i, and rho kinase activation) is similar to the PASMC's hypoxic response. Impaired O2 sensing contributes to

  7. Determination of intracellular nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J M; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of intracellular nitrate. The method includes: (i) preparation of cell lysates in 2 M-H3PO4 after separation of cells from the outer medium by rapid centrifugation through a layer of silicone oil, and (ii) subsequent nitrate analysis by ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, as mobile phase, a solution containing 50 mM-H3PO4 and 2% (v/v) tetrahydrofuran, adjusted to pH 1.9 with NaOH. The determination of nitrate is subjected to interference by chloride and sulphate when present in the samples at high concentrations. Nitrite also interferes, but it is easily eliminated by treatment of the samples with sulphamic acid. The method has been successfully applied to the study of nitrate transport in the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. PMID:2497740

  8. Preparation of redox polymer cathodes for thin film rechargeable batteries

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.; Lee, Hung S.; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki

    1994-11-08

    The present invention relates to the manufacture of thin film solid state electrochemical devices using composite cathodes comprising a redox polymer capable of undergoing oxidation and reduction, a polymer solid electrolyte and conducting carbon. The polymeric cathode material is formed as a composite of radiation crosslinked polymer electrolytes and radiation crosslinked redox polymers based on polysiloxane backbones with attached organosulfur side groups capable of forming sulfur-sulfur bonds during electrochemical oxidation.

  9. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (p<0.05) and the redox ratio Fp/(NADH+Fp) was about 27% higher in the cancerous tissues than in the normal ones (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that the redox state could differentiate between cancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  10. New Pt(II)(dithiolate) Compounds Possessing an Energetically Accessible Diphosphine-Based LUMO: Syntheses, Redox Properties, and Solid-State Structures of PtCl2(pbpcd), Pt(tdt)(pbpcd), and Pt(tdt)(bpcd)

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Sean W; Yang, Li; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Richmond, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The new ligand 2-(pyren-1-ylidene)-4,5-bis- (diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (pbpcd) has been synthesized from the Knoevenagel condensation using 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde with 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)- 4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd). Displacement of the cod ligand in PtCl2(cod) by pbpcd furnishes PtCl2 (pbpcd) (2) in near quantitative yield. Treatment of 2 with the dipotassium salt of toluene-3,4-dithiol (K2tdt) affords the dithiolate compound Pt(tdt)(pbpcd) (3) as a 1:1 mixture of diastereomers. An alternative synthesis of 3 from Pt(tdt)(bpcd) (5) and 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde also affords 3 in 23% yield. The pbpcd ligand and all new diphosphinesubstituted compounds have been isolated and fully characterized in solution by IR and NMR spectroscopies, and the solid-state structures of 2_CH2Cl2, 3_toluene, and 5_CH2Cl2 established by X-ray diffraction analyses. The solid-state structure of each product exhibits a square-planar architecture at the metal center. The redox properties of the pbpcd ligand and the tdt-substituted compound 3 have been explored by cyclic and differential-pulse voltammetry, and these data are discussed with respect to extended Huckel MO calculations and the nature of the HOMO and LUMO levels in each compound.

  11. Redox flow batteries: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M; Meyers, Jeremy; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of RFBs with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  12. [Radiation therapy and redox imaging].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy kills cancer cells in part by flood of free radicals. Radiation ionizes and/or excites water molecules to create highly reactive species, i.e. free radicals and/or reactive oxygen species. Free radical chain reactions oxidize biologically important molecules and thereby disrupt their function. Tissue oxygen and/or redox status, which can influence the course of the free radical chain reaction, can affect the efficacy of radiation therapy. Prior observation of tissue oxygen and/or redox status is helpful for planning a safe and efficient course of radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance-based redox imaging techniques, which can estimate tissue redox status non-invasively, have been developed not only for diagnostic information but also for estimating the efficacy of treatment. Redox imaging is now spotlighted to achieve radiation theranostics. PMID:25948308

  13. [Radiation therapy and redox imaging].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy kills cancer cells in part by flood of free radicals. Radiation ionizes and/or excites water molecules to create highly reactive species, i.e. free radicals and/or reactive oxygen species. Free radical chain reactions oxidize biologically important molecules and thereby disrupt their function. Tissue oxygen and/or redox status, which can influence the course of the free radical chain reaction, can affect the efficacy of radiation therapy. Prior observation of tissue oxygen and/or redox status is helpful for planning a safe and efficient course of radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance-based redox imaging techniques, which can estimate tissue redox status non-invasively, have been developed not only for diagnostic information but also for estimating the efficacy of treatment. Redox imaging is now spotlighted to achieve radiation theranostics.

  14. An Excel Workbook for Identifying Redox Processes in Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) condition of ground water affects the concentration, transport, and fate of many anthropogenic and natural contaminants. The redox state of a ground-water sample is defined by the dominant type of reduction/oxidation reaction, or redox process, occurring in the sample, as inferred from water-quality data. However, because of the difficulty in defining and applying a systematic redox framework to samples from diverse hydrogeologic settings, many regional water-quality investigations do not attempt to determine the predominant redox process in ground water. Recently, McMahon and Chapelle (2008) devised a redox framework that was applied to a large number of samples from 15 principal aquifer systems in the United States to examine the effect of redox processes on water quality. This framework was expanded by Chapelle and others (in press) to use measured sulfide data to differentiate between iron(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions. These investigations showed that a systematic approach to characterize redox conditions in ground water could be applied to datasets from diverse hydrogeologic settings using water-quality data routinely collected in regional water-quality investigations. This report describes the Microsoft Excel workbook, RedoxAssignment_McMahon&Chapelle.xls, that assigns the predominant redox process to samples using the framework created by McMahon and Chapelle (2008) and expanded by Chapelle and others (in press). Assignment of redox conditions is based on concentrations of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-), manganese (Mn2+), iron (Fe2+), sulfate (SO42-), and sulfide (sum of dihydrogen sulfide [aqueous H2S], hydrogen sulfide [HS-], and sulfide [S2-]). The logical arguments for assigning the predominant redox process to each sample are performed by a program written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The program is called from buttons on the main worksheet. The number of samples that can be analyzed

  15. Redox-Responsive Fluorescent Probes with Different Design Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhangrong; Li, Peng; Han, Keli

    2015-05-19

    In an aerobic organism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an inevitable metabolic byproduct. Endogenously produced ROS have a significant role in physiological processes, but excess ROS can cause oxidative stress and can damage tissue. Cells possess elaborate mechanisms to regulate their internal redox status. The intracellular redox homeostasis plays an essential role in maintaining cellular function. However, moderate alterations in redox balance can accompany major transitions in a cell's life cycle. Because of the role of ROS in physiology and in pathology, researchers need new tools to study redox chemistry in biological systems.In recent years, researchers have made remarkable progress in developing new, highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probes that respond to redox changes, and in this Account we highlight related research, primarily from our own group. We present an overview of the design, photophysical properties, and fluorescence transduction mechanisms of reported molecules that probe redox changes. We have designed and synthesized a series of fluorescent probes for redox cycles in biological systems relying on the active center of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). We have also constructed probes based on the oxidation and reduction of hydroquinone and of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy (TEMPO). Most of these probes exhibit high sensitivity and good selectivity, absorb in the near-infrared, and respond rapidly. Such probes are useful for confocal fluorescence microscopy, a dynamic imaging technique that could allow researchers to observe biologically important ROS and antioxidants in real time. This technique and these probes provide potentially useful tools for exploring the generation, transport, physiological function, and pathogenic mechanisms of ROS and antioxidants.We also describe features that could improve the properties of redox-responsive fluorescent probes: greater photostability; rapid, dynamic, cyclic and ratiometric responses; and

  16. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  17. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  18. Zinc Chelation Mediates the Lysosomal Disruption without Intracellular ROS Generation

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Andreza Cândido; Manieri, Tânia Maria; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2016-01-01

    We report the molecular mechanism for zinc depletion caused by TPEN (N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine) in neuroblastoma cells. The activation of p38 MAP kinase and subsequently caspase 3 is not due to or followed by redox imbalance or ROS generation, though these are commonly observed in literature. We found that TPEN is not responsible for ROS generation and the mechanism involves essentially lysosomal disruption caused by intracellular zinc depletion. We also observed a modest activation of Bax and no changes in the Bcl-2 proteins. As a result, we suggest that TPEN causes intracellular zinc depletion which can influence the breakdown of lysosomes and cell death without ROS generation. PMID:27123155

  19. Redox modification of cell signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dan; Oka, Shin-ichi; Brady, Christopher D; Haendeler, Judith; Eaton, Philip; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress is presumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. However, oxidants are also generated in healthy cells, and increasing evidence suggests that they can act as signaling molecules. The intracellular reduction-oxidation (redox) status is tightly regulated by oxidant and antioxidant systems. Imbalance between them causes oxidative or reductive stress which triggers cellular damage or aberrant signaling, leading to dysregulation. In this review, we will briefly summarize the aspects of ROS generation and neutralization mechanisms in the cardiovascular system. ROS can regulate cell signaling through oxidation and reduction of specific amino acids within proteins. Structural changes during post-translational modification allow modification of protein activity which can result in altered cellular function. We will focus on the molecular basis of redox protein modification and how this regulatory mechanism affects signal transduction in the cardiovascular system. Finally, we will discuss some techniques applied to monitoring redox status and identifying redox-sensitive proteins in the heart. This article is part of a Special Section entitled "Post-translational Modification."

  20. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics – Lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. PMID:26282677

  1. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. PMID:26282677

  2. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms.

  3. Dynamic Regulation of the GABAA Receptor Function by Redox Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Daniel J; González, Andrea N Beltrán

    2016-09-01

    Oxidizing and reducing agents, which are currently involved in cell metabolism and signaling pathways, can regulate fast inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA receptors in the nervous system. A number of in vitro studies have shown that diverse redox compounds, including redox metabolites and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, modulate phasic and tonic responses mediated by neuronal GABAA receptors through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We review experimental data showing that many redox agents, which are normally present in neurons and glia or are endogenously generated in these cells under physiologic states or during oxidative stress (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, ascorbic acid, and glutathione), induce potentiating or inhibiting actions on different native and recombinant GABAA receptor subtypes. Based on these results, it is thought that redox signaling might represent a homeostatic mechanism that regulates the function of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in physiologic and pathologic conditions.

  4. Redox-Switchable Surface Wrinkling on Polyaniline Film.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jixun; Zong, Chuanyong; Han, Xue; Ji, Haipeng; Wang, Juanjuan; Yang, Xiu; Lu, Conghua

    2016-04-01

    Here the redox-driven switch between the wrinkled and dewrinkled states on poly-aniline (PANI) film is reported. This switch is derived from the reversible transition in different intrinsic redox states of polyaniline (e.g., between emeraldine salt (ES) and leucoemeraldine base (LEB) or between ES and pernigraniline base (PB)) that are involved in the redox reaction, coupled with the corresponding volume expansion/shrinkage. Interestingly, the as-wrinkled ES film becomes deswollen and dewrinkled when reduced to the LEB state or oxidized to the PB state. Conversely, oxidation of the LEB film or reduction of the PB film into the swollen ES film leads to the reoccurrence of surface wrinkling. Furthermore, the reducibility of the dewrinkled LEB film and the oxidizability of the dewrinkled PB film are well utilized respectively to yield various wrinkled PANI-based composite films.

  5. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-01

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  6. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  7. Mechanisms of intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrew, K; McGann, L E

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of intracellular freezing in cells was investigated by designing experiments with cultured mouse fibroblasts on a cryomicroscope to critically assess the current hypotheses describing the genesis of intracellular ice: (a) intracellular freezing is a result of critical undercooling; (b) the cytoplasm is nucleated through aqueous pores in the plasma membrane; and (c) intracellular freezing is a result of membrane damage caused by electrical transients at the ice interface. The experimental data did not support any of these theories, but was consistent with the hypothesis that the plasma membrane is damaged at a critical gradient in osmotic pressure across the membrane, and intracellular freezing occurs as a result of this damage. An implication of this hypothesis is that mathematical models can be used to design protocols to avoid damaging gradients in osmotic pressure, allowing new approaches to the preservation of cells, tissues, and organs by rapid cooling. PMID:2306499

  8. Insights into redox sensing metalloproteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chim, Nicholas; Johnson, Parker M; Goulding, Celia W

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for evading assault by the human host. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis regulatory metalloproteins that are sensitive to exogenous stresses attributed to changes in the levels of gaseous molecules (i.e., molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) to elicit an intracellular response. In particular, we highlight recent developments on the subfamily of Whi proteins, redox sensing WhiB-like proteins that contain iron-sulfur clusters, sigma factors and their cognate anti-sigma factors of which some are zinc-regulated, and the dormancy survival regulon DosS/DosT-DosR heme sensory system. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that these systems contribute to a highly complex and interrelated regulatory network that controls M. tuberculosis biology. This review concludes with a discussion of strategies that M. tuberculosis has developed to maintain redox homeostasis, including mechanisms to regulate endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide levels.

  9. Redox imaging using genetically encoded redox indicators in zebrafish and mice.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Wittmann, Christine; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Grabher, Clemens

    2015-05-01

    Redox signals have emerged as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology. The advent of redox imaging in vertebrate systems now provides the opportunity to dynamically visualize redox signaling during development and disease. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the generation of genetically encoded redox indicators (GERIs), introduce new redox imaging strategies, and highlight key publications in the field of vertebrate redox imaging. We also discuss the limitations and future potential of in vivo redox imaging in zebrafish and mice.

  10. Preparation of LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} for Lithium Batteries Via Solid-State Redox Method using Nitrate and Acetate Based Reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Mat, A.; Sulaiman, K. S.; Sulaiman, M. A.; Hasim, M. F.

    2010-03-11

    LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} is a potential cathode material for 5 V batteries. This material was prepared by the solid-state redox method using nitrate and acetate based reactants. The precursor material was obtained when the mixture reactants was heated at 500 deg. C for 10 hours and calcined at different temperatures in the range between 650 and 950 deg. C for 12 hours. The structures of the synthesized materials were verified with X- ray diffraction (XRD) measurement and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The charge-discharge technique was determined using Solartron 1470. As calcination temperature increases, the well-ordered crystal growth oriented to [1 1 1] direction shows a clear octahedral morphology, which is the characteristic of the typical cubic spinel. The Li/LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} prepared from acetate based reactants calcined at 750 deg. C for 12 h delivered the discharge capacity of 140 mAh/g.

  11. The active (ADHa) and inactive (ADHi) forms of the PQQ-alcohol dehydrogenase from Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus differ in their respective oligomeric structures and redox state of their corresponding prosthetic groups.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; González-Valdez, Alejandra Abigail; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena; Escamilla, Jose E

    2012-03-01

    The membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus contains one pyrroloquinoline quinone moiety (PQQ), one [2Fe-2S] cluster, and four c-type cytochromes. Here, we describe a novel and inactive enzyme. ADHi, similarly to ADHa, is a heterodimer of 72- and 44-kDa subunits and contains the expected prosthetic groups. However, ADHa showed a threefold molecular mass as compared to ADHi. Noteworthy, the PQQ, the [2Fe-2S] and most of the cytochromes in purified ADHi is in the oxidized form, contrasting with ADHa where the PQQ-semiquinone is detected and the [2Fe-2S] cluster as well as the cytochromes c remained fully reduced after purification. Reduction kinetics of the ferricyanide-oxidized enzymes showed that while ADHa was brought back by ethanol to its full reduction state, in ADHi, only one-quarter of the total heme c was reduced. The dithionite-reduced ADHi was largely oxidized by ubiquinone-2, thus indicating that intramolecular electron transfer is not impaired in ADHi. The acidic pH of the medium might be deleterious for the membrane-bound ADH by causing conformational changes leading to changes in the relative orientation of heme groups and shift of corresponding redox potential to higher values. This would hamper electron transfer resulting in the low activity observed in ADHi.

  12. A new hybrid redox flow battery with multiple redox couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-10-01

    A redox flow battery using V4+/V5+ vs. V2+/V3+ and Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples in chloric/sulfuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions and operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency ˜80% and negligible capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previously reported Fe/V cell using only Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples.

  13. A New Hybrid Redox Flow Battery with Multiple Redox Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-05-19

    A redox flow battery using V{sup 4+}/V{sup 5+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples in chloric/sulphuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency {approx}80% and no capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previous reported Fe/V cell using only Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples.

  14. Mechanisms of Hop Inhibition Include the Transmembrane Redox Reaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under “highly reducing” conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and “antioxidative” hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of

  15. Mechanisms of hop inhibition include the transmembrane redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under "highly reducing" conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and "antioxidative" hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of hop

  16. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness and Architecture Govern Intracellular Rheology in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin L.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the complex interplay between the extracellular mechanical environment and the mechanical properties that characterize the dynamic intracellular environment. To elucidate this relationship in cancer, we probe the intracellular environment using particle-tracking microrheology. In three-dimensional (3D) matrices, intracellular effective creep compliance of prostate cancer cells is shown to increase with increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, whereas modulating ECM stiffness does not significantly affect the intracellular mechanical state when cells are attached to two-dimensional (2D) matrices. Switching from 2D to 3D matrices induces an order-of-magnitude shift in intracellular effective creep compliance and apparent elastic modulus. However, for a given matrix stiffness, partial blocking of β1 integrins mitigates the shift in intracellular mechanical state that is invoked by switching from a 2D to 3D matrix architecture. This finding suggests that the increased cell-matrix engagement inherent to a 3D matrix architecture may contribute to differences observed in viscoelastic properties between cells attached to 2D matrices and cells embedded within 3D matrices. In total, our observations show that ECM stiffness and architecture can strongly influence the intracellular mechanical state of cancer cells. PMID:19686648

  17. The solution structure of the FATC domain of the protein kinase target of rapamycin suggests a role for redox-dependent structural and cellular stability.

    PubMed

    Dames, Sonja A; Mulet, José M; Rathgeb-Szabo, Klara; Hall, Michael N; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2005-05-27

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a highly conserved Ser/Thr kinase that plays a central role in the control of cellular growth. TOR has a characteristic multidomain structure. Only the kinase domain has catalytic function; the other domains are assumed to mediate interactions with TOR substrates and regulators. Except for the rapamycin-binding domain, there are no high-resolution structural data available for TOR. Here, we present a structural, biophysical, and mutagenesis study of the extremely conserved COOH-terminal FATC domain. The importance of this domain for TOR function has been highlighted in several publications. We show that the FATC domain, in its oxidized form, exhibits a novel structural motif consisting of an alpha-helix and a COOH-terminal disulfide-bonded loop between two completely conserved cysteine residues. Upon reduction, the flexibility of the loop region increases dramatically. The structural data, the redox potential of the disulfide bridge, and the biochemical data of a cysteine to serine mutant indicate that the intracellular redox potential can affect the cellular amount of the TOR protein via the FATC domain. Because the amount of TOR mRNA is not changed, the redox state of the FATC disulfide bond is probably influencing the degradation of TOR. PMID:15772072

  18. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Eman A.; Chang, Tsuhen M.; Astashkin, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  19. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2](n) Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron-Sulfur Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna K; Hahn, Anselm W; Albers, Antonia; Schiewer, Christine E; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Lima, Frederico A; Meyer, Franc; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2](n) model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron-sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron-sulfur clusters.

  20. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  1. Redox Modulation of HMGB1-Related Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Christina; Filipović, Milos; Munoz, Luis E.; Schorn, Christine; Schett, Georg; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In the cells' nuclei, high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone chromatin-binding protein involved in the regulation of transcription. Extracellularly, HMGB1 acts as a danger molecule with properties of a proinflammatory cytokine. It can be actively secreted from myeloid cells or passively leak from any type of injured, necrotic cell. Increased serum levels of active HMGB1 are often found in pathogenic inflammatory conditions and correlate with worse prognoses in cancer, sepsis, and autoimmunity. By damaging cells, superoxide and peroxynitrite promote leakage of HMGB1. Recent Advances: The activity of HMGB1 strongly depends on its redox state: Inflammatory-active HMGB1 requires an intramolecular disulfide bond (Cys23 and Cys45) and a reduced Cys106. Oxidation of the latter blocks its stimulatory activity and promotes immune tolerance. Critical Issues: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species create an oxidative environment and can be detoxified by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and peroxidases. Modifications of the oxidative environment influence HMGB1 activity. Future Directions: In this review, we hypothesize that manipulations of an oxidative environment by SOD mimics or by hydrogen sulfide are prone to decrease tissue damage. Both the concomitant decreased HMGB1 release and its redox chemical modifications ameliorate inflammation and tissue damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1075–1085. PMID:23373897

  2. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  3. The primary fO2 of basalts examined by the Spirit rover in Gusev Crater, Mars: Evidence for multiple redox states in the martian interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Schrader, Christian M.; McCoy, Timothy J.

    2013-12-01

    The primary oxygen fugacity (fO2) of basaltic melts reflects the mantle source oxidation state, dictates the crystallizing assemblage, and determines how the magma will evolve. Basalts examined by the Spirit Mars Exploration Rover in Gusev Crater range from the K-poor Adirondack class (0.02 wt% K2O) to K-rich Backstay class (up to 1.2 wt% K2O) and exhibit substantially more variation than observed in martian basaltic meteorites. The ratios of ferric to total iron (Fe3+/FeT) measured by the Mössbauer spectrometer are high (equivalent to -0.76 to +2.98ΔQFM; quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer as defined by Wones and Gilbert, 1969), reflecting secondary Fe3+ phases. By combining the Fe3+/FeT of the igneous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, and magnetite) determined by Mössbauer spectrometer, we estimate primary fO2 for the Gusev basalts to be -3.6 to 0.5ΔQFM. Estimating the fO2 as a function of the dependence of the CIPW normative fayalite/magnetite ratios on Fe3+/FeT yields a slightly smaller range of -2.58 to +0.57ΔQFM. General similarity between the fO2 estimated for the Gusev basalts and ranges in fO2 for the shergottitic meteorites (-3.8 to 0.2ΔQFM; Herd, 2003; Goodrich et al., 2003) suggests that the overall range of fO2 for the martian igneous rocks and mantle is relatively restricted. Like the shergottites (Herd, 2003), estimated fO2 of three Gusev classes (Adirondack, Barnhill and Irvine) correlates with a proxy for LREE enrichment (K2O/TiO2). This suggests mixing between melts or fluids derived from reservoirs with contrasting fO2 and REE characteristics. Oxygen fugacity estimates for the martian interior suggest that tectonic processes have not led to sufficient recycling of oxidized surface material into the martian interior to entirely affect the overall oxidation state of the mantle.

  4. Neptunium redox speciation at the illite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu lal; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Dardenne, Kathy; Schild, Dieter; Rothe, Joerg; Diascorn, Alexandre; Kupcik, Tomas; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-03-01

    Neptunium (Np(V)) sorption onto a purified illite is investigated as a function of pH (3-10) and [NpVO2+]tot(3 × 10-8-3 × 10-4 M) in 0.1 M NaCl under Ar atmosphere. After about one week reaction time, only insignificant variation of Np sorption is observed and the establishment of reaction equilibrium can be assumed. Surprisingly, solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd) are clearly higher than those measured for Np(V) sorption onto illite under aerobic conditions. The observation that Rd increases with decreasing pe (pe = -log ae-) suggests partial reduction to Np(IV), although measured redox potentials (pe values) at a first glance suggest the predominance of Np(V). Reduction to Np(IV) at the illite surface could indeed be confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). Np speciation in presence of the purified Na-illite under given conditions is consistently described by applying the 2 sites protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model. Measured pe data are taken to calculate Np redox state and surface complexation constants for Np(IV) are derived by applying a data fitting procedure. Constants are very consistent with results obtained by applying an existing linear free energy relationship (LFER). Taking Np(IV) surface complexation constants into account shifts the calculated Np(V)/Np(IV) redox borderline in presence of illite surfaces by 3-5 pe units (0.2-0.3 V) towards redox neutral conditions. Our study suggests that Np(V) reduction in presence of a sorbing mineral phase is thermodynamically favored.

  5. 5,5'-Dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification of cysteine improves the crystal quality of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mi Wei; Li Lanfen; Su Xiaodong

    2008-04-18

    Structural studies of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2 (CLIC2) had been hampered by the problem of generating suitable crystals primarily due to the protein containing exposed cysteines. Several chemical reagents were used to react with the cysteines on CLIC2 in order to modify the redox state of the protein. We have obtained high quality crystals that diffracted to better than 2.5 A at a home X-ray source by treating the protein with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). After solving the crystal structure of CLIC2, we found that the DTNB had reacted with the Cys{sup 114}, and made CLIC2 in a homogenous oxidized state. This study demonstrated that the DTNB modification drastically improved the crystallization of CLIC2, and it implied that this method may be useful for other proteins containing exposed cysteines in general.

  6. [Redox-sensors of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes available literature data on the existence and operation of redox sensors of microorganisms. It is partially focused on the activation by hyrdrogen peroxide OxyR protein and by superoxide anion SoxR protein in bacteria Escherichia coli and the activation by hyrdrogen peroxide and superoxide anion of Orp1-Yap1 protein system in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The similarities and peculiarities of redox signal sensing in pro- and eukaryotes have been discussed. PMID:19140447

  7. Pt-functionalized Fe2O3 photoanodes for solar water splitting: the role of hematite nano-organization and the platinum redox state.

    PubMed

    Warwick, M E A; Barreca, D; Bontempi, E; Carraro, G; Gasparotto, A; Maccato, C; Kaunisto, K; Ruoko, T-P; Lemmetyinen, H; Sada, C; Gönüllü, Y; Mathur, S

    2015-05-21

    Pt/α-Fe2O3 nanocomposites were synthesized on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a sequential plasma enhanced-chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD)/radio frequency (RF) sputtering approach, tailoring the overall Pt content as a function of sputtering time. The chemico-physical properties of the as-prepared systems were extensively investigated by means of complementary techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and optical absorption spectroscopy, and compared to those of the homologous Pt/α-Fe2O3 systems annealed in air prior and/or after sputtering. The obtained results evidenced that the material compositional, structural and morphological features, with particular regard to the Pt oxidation state and hematite nano-organization, could be finely tailored as a function of the adopted processing conditions. Pt/α-Fe2O3 systems were finally tested as photoanodes in photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting experiments, evidencing a remarkable interplay between functional performances and the above-mentioned material properties, as also testified by transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) results. PMID:25909639

  8. Signaling of Escherichia coli enterotoxin on supramolecular redox bilayer vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Q.; Peng, T.; Stevens, R.C.

    1999-07-21

    Electron transport in supramolecular assemblies containing redox centers has been a subject of great interest. Depending on spatial arrangement of redox moieties in macromolecular structures, transport of electrons may occur via a diffusion mechanism or electron hopping between the neighboring redox sites. While research has largely dealt with 3-D redox polymers, some 2-D systems such as self-assembled and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers have been exploited as well. The authors describe here a new interfacial architecture that combines the high redox concentration in 3-D polymers and controllable structure and functionality of the 2-D monolayer systems. The new interface utilizes structurally defined redox liposomes engineered with biomolecular recognition capability by incorporating cell surface receptor G{sub M1} into the bilayer membrane. The design allows for direct inspection of the dependency of electron transport on the state and extent of biomolecular recognition that has taken place on the vesicles and, thus, provides a method for direct measurement of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin binding by electrochemistry.

  9. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  10. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  11. Automated and continuous redox potential measurements in soil.

    PubMed

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G; van Marum, Daan; Wattel, Kees; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2004-01-01

    Redox potential (Eh) describes the electrical state of a matrix. In soils, Eh is an important parameter controlling the persistence of many organic and inorganic compounds. A popular, but also criticized, manual measuring method makes use of a small tip of Pt placed on a copper wire that is placed in the soil; a reference electrode is placed in the same soil at a fixed distance. Fluctuations in redox potential values measured in the soil can be very large and depth-dependent. This will be overlooked when making single-point measurements. We developed the datalogger Hypnos 2.0 for continuous redox potential and temperature measurements at various depths in the soil and without disturbance of the site. Hypnos is field-deployable, relatively cheap, and runs on batteries. The datalogger can use a "sleep mode" between sampling events. In sleep mode, there is no constant voltage on the Pt wire or the reference electrode, but there is only a short pulse during sampling. We did not measure an effect of this short pulse on the measured redox potential. In sandy soils in mesocosms and in a salt marsh soil we measured changes in the Eh as large as from -400 to +100 mV within 4 d, and daily cycles of 200 mV. Both absolute redox potential values and their diurnal variations were depth-dependent. Because single redox measurements are insufficient in describing redox conditions in some soil systems, Hypnos can be a powerful tool when studying the effects of fluctuating redox conditions on metal availability and pollutant degradation.

  12. Redox processes and water quality of selected principal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions in 15 principal aquifer (PA) systems of the United States, and their impact on several water quality issues, were assessed from a large data base collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the USGS. The logic of these assessments was based on the observed ecological succession of electron acceptors such as dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate and threshold concentrations of these substrates needed to support active microbial metabolism. Similarly, the utilization of solid-phase electron acceptors such as Mn(IV) and Fe(III) is indicated by the production of dissolved manganese and iron. An internally consistent set of threshold concentration criteria was developed and applied to a large data set of 1692 water samples from the PAs to assess ambient redox conditions. The indicated redox conditions then were related to the occurrence of selected natural (arsenic) and anthropogenic (nitrate and volatile organic compounds) contaminants in ground water. For the natural and anthropogenic contaminants assessed in this study, considering redox conditions as defined by this framework of redox indicator species and threshold concentrations explained many water quality trends observed at a regional scale. An important finding of this study was that samples indicating mixed redox processes provide information on redox heterogeneity that is useful for assessing common water quality issues. Given the interpretive power of the redox framework and given that it is relatively inexpensive and easy to measure the chemical parameters included in the framework, those parameters should be included in routine water quality monitoring programs whenever possible.

  13. Redox mechanisms of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial protection

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress are primary contributors to the loss of myocardial tissue in insults ranging from ischemia/reperfusion injury from coronary artery disease and heart transplantation to sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction and drug-induced myocardial damage. This cell damage caused by oxidative and nitrosative stress leads to mitochondrial protein, DNA, and lipid modifications, which inhibits energy production and contractile function, potentially leading to cell necrosis and/or apoptosis. However, cardiomyocytes have evolved an elegant set of redox-sensitive mechanisms that respond to and contain oxidative and nitrosative damage. These responses include the rapid induction of antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial DNA repair mechanisms, selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), and mitochondrial biogenesis. Coordinated cytoplasmic to nuclear cell-signaling and mitochondrial transcriptional responses to the presence of elevated cytoplasmic oxidant production, e.g., H2O2, allows nuclear translocation of the Nfe2l2 transcription factor and up-regulation of downstream cytoprotective genes such as heme oxygenase-1 which generates physiologic signals, such as CO that up-regulates Nfe212 gene transcription. Simultaneously, a number of other DNA binding transcription factors are expressed and/or activated under redox control, such as Nuclear Respiratory Factor-1 (NRF-1), and lead to the induction of genes involved in both intracellular and mitochondria-specific repair mechanisms. The same insults, particularly those related to vascular stress and inflammation also produce elevated levels of nitric oxide, which also has mitochondrial protein thiol-protective functions and induces mitochondrial biogenesis through cyclic GMP-dependent and perhaps other pathways. This brief review provides an overview of these pathways and interconnected cardiac repair mechanisms. PMID:26578967

  14. Solid-state voltammetry and self-diffusion dynamics of a linear monotagged redox polymer:. omega. -ferrocenecarboxamido-. alpha. -methoxypoly(ethylene oxide)

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, M.J.; Le Mest, Y.; Zhang, H.; Watanabe, M.; Murray, R.W. )

    1990-05-09

    The synthesized title labeled polymer, Fc-MePEG, MW = 2,590, analytically characterized as free of unlabeled PEO and of ferrocene monomer, dissolves LiClO{sub 4} electrolyte and in dry undiluted form is both a polymer electrolyte and an electroactive phase. The microelectrode solid-state voltammetrically measured, center-of-mass self-diffusion coefficient for Fc-MePEG in its polymer let, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s at 62{degree}C, is 3.4 times smaller than that for ferrocene monomer dissolved in unlabeled (MW = 2,380) Me{sub 2}PEG. Electron hopping is estimated to contribute less than 10% to the diffusion rates of Fc-MePEG and of monomer dissolved at 40-50 mM concentrations in unlabeled Me{sub 2}PEG. At room temperature, where Fc-MePEG and Me{sub 2}PEG are waxy solids, D{sub Fc-MePEG} is 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/s, 12 times smaller than that of monomer ferrocene, in Me{sub 2}PEG, and which corresponds to a diffusion pathlength of ca. 110-200 nm during the electrochemical experiment. Dissolved in CH{sub 3}CN or CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, Fe-MePEG diffuses 8-10 times more slowly than ferrocene monomer which is consistent with transport as a random coiled sphere.

  15. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  16. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  17. Redox-activated MRI contrast agents based on lanthanide and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Tsitovich, Pavel B; Burns, Patrick J; McKay, Adam M; Morrow, Janet R

    2014-04-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) potential of tissue is tightly regulated in order to maintain normal physiological processes, but is disrupted in disease states. Thus, the development of new tools to map tissue redox potential may be clinically important for the diagnosis of diseases that lead to redox imbalances. One promising area of chemical research is the development of redox-activated probes for mapping tissue through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we summarize several strategies for the design of redox-responsive MRI contrast agents. Our emphasis is on both lanthanide(III) and transition metal(II/III) ion complexes that provide contrast either as T1 relaxivity MRI contrast agents or as paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents. These agents are redox-triggered by a variety of chemical reactions or switches including redox-activated thiol groups, and heterocyclic groups that interact with the metal ion or influence properties of other ancillary ligands. Metal ion centered redox is an approach which is ripe for development by coordination chemists. Redox-triggered metal ion approaches have great potential for creating large differences in magnetic properties that lead to changes in contrast. An attractive feature of these agents is the ease of fine-tuning the metal ion redox potential over a biologically relevant range.

  18. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies of redox reactions catalysed by Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase with NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Soeta, Takahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Sétif, Pierre; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase ([EC1.18.1.2], FNR) from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is a homodimeric flavoprotein sharing structural homology with bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the reactions of BsFNR with NADP(+), NADPH, NADPD (deuterated form) and B. subtilis ferredoxin (BsFd) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry were studied. Mixing BsFNR with NADP(+) and NADPH yielded two types of charge-transfer (CT) complexes, oxidized FNR (FNR(ox))-NADPH and reduced FNR (FNR(red))-NADP(+), both having CT absorption bands centered at approximately 600n m. After mixing BsFNR(ox) with about a 10-fold molar excess of NADPH (forward reaction), BsFNR was almost completely reduced at equilibrium. When BsFNR(red) was mixed with NADP(+), the amount of BsFNR(ox) increased with increasing NADP(+) concentration, but BsFNR(red) remained as the major species at equilibrium even with about 50-fold molar excess NADP(+). In both directions, the hydride-transfer was the rate-determining step, where the forward direction rate constant (~500 s(-1)) was much higher than the reverse one (<10 s(-1)). Mixing BsFd(red) with BsFNR(ox) induced rapid formation of a neutral semiquinone form. This process was almost completed within 1 ms. Subsequently the neutral semiquinone form was reduced to the hydroquinone form with an apparent rate constant of 50 to 70 s(-1) at 10°C, which increased as BsFd(red) increased from 40 to 120 μM. The reduction rate of BsFNR(ox) by BsFd(red) was markedly decreased by premixing BsFNR(ox) with BsFd(ox), indicating that the dissociation of BsFd(ox) from BsFNR(sq) is rate-limiting in the reaction. The characteristics of the BsFNR reactions with NADP(+)/NADPH were compared with those of other types of FNRs.

  19. How a redox-innocent metal promotes the formal reductive elimination of biphenyl using redox-active ligands.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Daniel Charles; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    One of the most compelling strategies for utilizing redox-active ligands is to perform redox events at the ligands to avoid accessing prohibitively high energy oxidation states at the metal center. This has been demonstrated experimentally in many systems, yet there is little understanding of the fundamental electronic structures involved with these transformations or how to control them. Here, the reductive elimination of biphenyl from [M(isq)2Ph2] (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf and isq = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-tert-butyliminosemiquinone) was studied computationally. It was found that the metal remains in the +IV oxidation state and all redox chemistry was mediated by the redox-active ligands. Two types of electron-transfer mechanisms were identified, an asymmetric unpaired electron transfer (UET) and a symmetric pairwise electron transfer (PET), the former always being lower in energy. The energetic differences between these two mechanisms were explained through simple molecular orbital theory arguments. Despite the metal's redox-inactivity, it still has a marked influence on the calculated energetics of the reaction, with the Ti systems being much more reactive than the Zr/Hf systems. This primarily originates from the shorter Ti-Ph bond, which leads to a stronger filled-filled interaction between these ligands at the reactant state. This greater reactant destabilization leads to the lower activation energies.

  20. Role of redox reactions in the vascular phenotype of hyperhomocysteinemic animals.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Sanjana; Lentz, Steven R

    2007-11-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and thrombosis. Several animal models of hyperhomocysteinemia have been developed by using both dietary and genetic approaches. These animal models have provided considerable insight into the mechanisms underlying the adverse vascular effects of hyperhomocysteinemia. Accumulating evidence suggests a significant role of altered cellular redox reactions in the vascular phenotype of hyperhomocysteinemia. Redox effects of hyperhomocysteinemia are particularly important in mediating the adverse effects of hyperhomocysteinemia on the endothelium, leading to loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide and vasomotor dysfunction. Redox reactions also may be key factors in the development of vascular hypertrophy, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis in hyperhomocysteinemic animals. In this review, we summarize the metabolic relations between homocysteine and the cellular redox state, the vascular phenotypes that have been observed in hyperhomocysteinemic animals, the evidence for altered redox reactions in vascular tissue, and the specific redox reactions that may mediate the vascular effects of hyperhomocysteinemia.

  1. Effects of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles on ECG, myocardial inflammatory cytokines, redox state, and connexin 43 and lipid profile in rats: possible cardioprotective effect of gallic acid.

    PubMed

    El-Hussainy, El-Hussainy M A; Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Mehasseb, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of present study were to examine the effects of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles on myocardial functions, electrical activities, morphology, inflammation, redox state, and myocardial expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and the effect of gallic acid (GA) on these effects in a rat animal model. Forty male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups: the control (normal) group; the Al2O3 group, rats received Al2O3 (30 mg·kg(-1), i.p.) daily for 14 days; the nano-alumina group, rats received nano-alumina (30 mg·kg(-1), i.p.) daily for 14 days; and the nano-alumina + GA group, rats received GA (100 mg·kg(-1) orally once daily) for 14 days before nano-alumina administration. The results showed disturbed ECG variables and significant increases in serum levels of LDH, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), CK-MB, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol and LDL, nitric oxide (NO), and TNF-α and myocardial concentrations of NO, TNF-α, and malondialdehyde (MDA), with significant decreases in serum HDL and myocardial GSH, SOD, catalase (CAT), and Cx43 expression in the nano-alumina group. Pretreatment with GA improved significantly all parameters except serum and myocardial NO. We concluded that chronic administration of Al2O3 NPs caused myocardial dysfunctions, and pretreatment with GA ameliorates myocardial injury induced by nano-alumina, probably through its hypolipidaemic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects and upregulation of Cx43 in heart.

  2. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling and depleting intracellular glutathione in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yun; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces oxidative damage to cellular constituents, ultimately leading to induction of apoptotic cell death and the pathogenesis of various diseases. The molecular mechanisms for the action of ROS in intestinal diseases remain poorly defined. Here, we reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) treatment led to capses-3-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular ROS level and reduced glutathione concentration in intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of 4-HNE were markedly abolished by the antioxidant L-cysteine derivative N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Further studies demonstrated that the protective effect of NAC was associated with restoration of intracellular redox state by Nrf2-related regulation of expression of genes involved in intracellular glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and inactivation of 4-HNE-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2). The 4-HNE-induced ERK1/2 activation was mediated by repressing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of ERK1/2, through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Importantly, either overexpression of MKP-1 or NAC treatment blocked 4-HNE-induced MKP-1 degradation, thereby protecting cell from apoptosis. These novel findings provide new insights into a functional role of MKP-1 in oxidative stress-induced cell death by regulating ERK1/2 MAP kinase in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27620528

  3. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling and depleting intracellular glutathione in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces oxidative damage to cellular constituents, ultimately leading to induction of apoptotic cell death and the pathogenesis of various diseases. The molecular mechanisms for the action of ROS in intestinal diseases remain poorly defined. Here, we reported that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) treatment led to capses-3-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular ROS level and reduced glutathione concentration in intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of 4-HNE were markedly abolished by the antioxidant L-cysteine derivative N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Further studies demonstrated that the protective effect of NAC was associated with restoration of intracellular redox state by Nrf2-related regulation of expression of genes involved in intracellular glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis and inactivation of 4-HNE-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2). The 4-HNE-induced ERK1/2 activation was mediated by repressing mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), a negative regulator of ERK1/2, through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Importantly, either overexpression of MKP-1 or NAC treatment blocked 4-HNE-induced MKP-1 degradation, thereby protecting cell from apoptosis. These novel findings provide new insights into a functional role of MKP-1 in oxidative stress-induced cell death by regulating ERK1/2 MAP kinase in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:27620528

  4. Redox Pioneer: Professor Helmut Sies

    PubMed Central

    Radi, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Professor Helmut Sies Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2459–2468. The joy of exploring the unknown and finding something novel and noteworthy: what a privilege! —Prof. Helmut Sies PMID:25178739

  5. Tuning the Mn valence state in new Ca(0.66)Mn(2-x)Al(x)O4 (x≤ 0.4) oxides: impact on magnetic and redox properties.

    PubMed

    Lesturgez, Stéphanie; Goglio, Graziella; Weill, François; N'Guyen, Olivier; Toulemonde, Olivier; Durand, Etienne; Hernandez, Julien; Demourgues, Alain

    2016-03-21

    New Ca(0.66)Mn(2-x)Al(x)O4 (x≤ 0.4) solid solutions crystallizing with the CaFe2O4-type structure (SG: Pnma) were synthesized for the first time by the glycine-nitrate process. The structures were determined on the basis of XRD Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction investigation. While the CaMn3O6 ('Ca(0.66)Mn2O4') oxide adopts a monoclinic unit cell, the Al substitution for Mn (x = 0.2, 0.4) leads to an orthorhombic cell with only two Mn atomic positions, with different valence states, and 33% of Ca sites empty. The Ca molar concentration decreases down to 0.6 in order to increase the Mn valence leading to a phase mixture, whereas a slight Ca content increase up to 0.7 leads to a decrease of Mn valence in the pure phase. The Al(3+) ions are located at a specific Mn site because their ionic radii are close to that of Mn(4+) and a more isotropic environment. The unit cell parameters and volume strongly decrease for a low Al content and tend to an asymptotic value of x = 0.33-0.4, around the limit of solubility. As the Al content increases, the Mn valence state in the same slightly distorted octahedral site increases up to 4+ whereas the other octahedral site is highly elongated and corresponds mainly to Jahn-Teller Mn(3+). At x = 0.33, these two Mn sites correspond to Mn(4+) and Mn(3+) respectively. Moreover, the aluminium content increase induces a weakening of the global antiferromagnetic long range interactions between the ferromagnetic chains. The Al substitution leads to the change of the Mn valence distribution as well as the unit cell symmetry of the CaMn3O6 phase. These 1D tunnel networks stabilizing the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) valence states can be reduced under Ar/5%H2 between T = 300 °C and T = 600 °C (heating rate = 2 °C min(-1)) into pure Mn(2+) rocksalt solid solution despite the large difference in ionic radii. The re-oxidation leads to the same CaFe2O4-type structure and several redox cycles can be operated. The relationship between the two double

  6. Tuning the Mn valence state in new Ca(0.66)Mn(2-x)Al(x)O4 (x≤ 0.4) oxides: impact on magnetic and redox properties.

    PubMed

    Lesturgez, Stéphanie; Goglio, Graziella; Weill, François; N'Guyen, Olivier; Toulemonde, Olivier; Durand, Etienne; Hernandez, Julien; Demourgues, Alain

    2016-03-21

    New Ca(0.66)Mn(2-x)Al(x)O4 (x≤ 0.4) solid solutions crystallizing with the CaFe2O4-type structure (SG: Pnma) were synthesized for the first time by the glycine-nitrate process. The structures were determined on the basis of XRD Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction investigation. While the CaMn3O6 ('Ca(0.66)Mn2O4') oxide adopts a monoclinic unit cell, the Al substitution for Mn (x = 0.2, 0.4) leads to an orthorhombic cell with only two Mn atomic positions, with different valence states, and 33% of Ca sites empty. The Ca molar concentration decreases down to 0.6 in order to increase the Mn valence leading to a phase mixture, whereas a slight Ca content increase up to 0.7 leads to a decrease of Mn valence in the pure phase. The Al(3+) ions are located at a specific Mn site because their ionic radii are close to that of Mn(4+) and a more isotropic environment. The unit cell parameters and volume strongly decrease for a low Al content and tend to an asymptotic value of x = 0.33-0.4, around the limit of solubility. As the Al content increases, the Mn valence state in the same slightly distorted octahedral site increases up to 4+ whereas the other octahedral site is highly elongated and corresponds mainly to Jahn-Teller Mn(3+). At x = 0.33, these two Mn sites correspond to Mn(4+) and Mn(3+) respectively. Moreover, the aluminium content increase induces a weakening of the global antiferromagnetic long range interactions between the ferromagnetic chains. The Al substitution leads to the change of the Mn valence distribution as well as the unit cell symmetry of the CaMn3O6 phase. These 1D tunnel networks stabilizing the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) valence states can be reduced under Ar/5%H2 between T = 300 °C and T = 600 °C (heating rate = 2 °C min(-1)) into pure Mn(2+) rocksalt solid solution despite the large difference in ionic radii. The re-oxidation leads to the same CaFe2O4-type structure and several redox cycles can be operated. The relationship between the two double

  7. Monitoring the solid-state electrochemistry of Cu(2,7-AQDC) (AQDC = anthraquinone dicarboxylate) in a lithium battery: coexistence of metal and ligand redox activities in a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongyue; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Awaga, Kunio

    2014-11-19

    By adopting a facile synthetic strategy, we obtained a microporous redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF), namely, Cu(2,7-AQDC) (2,7-H2AQDC = 2,7-anthraquinonedicarboxylic acid) (1), and utilized it as a cathode active material in lithium batteries. With a voltage window of 4.0-1.7 V, both metal clusters and anthraquinone groups in the ligands exhibited reversible redox activity. The valence change of copper cations was clearly evidenced by in situ XANES analysis. By controlling the voltage window of operation, extremely high recyclability of batteries was achieved, suggesting the framework was robust. This MOF is the first example of a porous material showing independent redox activity on both metal cluster nodes and ligand sites. PMID:25365211

  8. Dietary calcium intake is associated with adiposity, metabolic profile, inflammatory state and blood pressure, but not with erythrocyte intracellular calcium and endothelial function in healthy pre-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    da Silva Ferreira, Thaís; Torres, Márcia Regina Simas Gonçalves; Sanjuliani, Antonio Felipe

    2013-09-28

    Recent studies have suggested that dietary Ca may have beneficial effects on adiposity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and blood pressure (BP). One potential mechanism underlying these benefits involves modifications in intracellular Ca concentration ([Ca2+]i). The present study aimed to evaluate the associations of dietary Ca with adiposity, erythrocyte [Ca2+]i, metabolic profile, BP, inflammatory state and endothelial function in healthy pre-menopausal women. In the present cross-sectional study, seventy-six women aged 18–50 years were submitted to the evaluation of dietary intake, anthropometric parameters, body composition, erythrocyte [Ca2+]i, biochemical variables, endothelial function and BP. A FFQ was used to assess usual dietary intake. Endothelial function was evaluated by serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and by the peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) method, using Endo-PAT 2000®. Participants were allocated into two groups according to Ca intake: low-Ca group (LCG; n 32; < 600 mg/d) and high-Ca group (HCG; n 44; ≥ 600 mg/d). Women in the LCG compared with those in the HCG exhibited, after adjustments for potential confounders, higher values of BMI, waist circumference, waist:height ratio, percentage of body fat, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, diastolic and mean BP; and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol, adiponectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Endothelial function assessed by PAT and [Ca2+]i was similar in both groups. Subjects in the HCG had lower OR for prevalent overweight, obesity, abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, HDL-cholesterol < 600 mg/l and systolic BP >120 mmHg. The findings of the present study suggest that high Ca intake is inversely associated with some cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:23411109

  9. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  10. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed.

  11. Redox- and Hypoxia-Responsive MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Quyen N.; Ratnakar, James S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The development of responsive or “smart” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd3+-based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  12. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  13. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  15. NASA Redox Project status summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Redox Project effort during Cy 1982. It was presented at the Fifth U.S. Department of Energy Batt