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Sample records for intracellular survival mechanisms

  1. The effects of macrophage source on the mechanism of phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chia-Hung Christine; Ueno, Norikiyo; Shao, Jian Q.; Schroeder, Kristin R.; Moore, Kenneth C.; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania spp. protozoa are obligate intracellular parasites that replicate in macrophages during mammalian infection. Efficient phagocytosis and survival in macrophages are important determinants of parasite virulence. Macrophage lines differ dramatically in their ability to sustain intracellular Leishmania infantum chagasi (Lic). We report that the U937 monocytic cell line supported the intracellular replication and cell-to-cell spread of Lic during 72 hours after parasite addition, whereas primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) did not. Electron microscopy and live cell imaging illustrated that Lic promastigotes anchored to MDMs via their anterior ends and were engulfed through symmetrical pseudopods. In contrast, U937 cells bound Lic in diverse orientations, and extended membrane lamellae to reorient and internalize parasites through coiling phagocytosis. Lic associated tightly with the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) membrane in both cell types. PVs fused with LAMP-1-expressing compartments 24 hours after phagocytosis by MDMs, whereas U937 cell PVs remained LAMP-1 negative. The expression of one phagocytic receptor (CR3) was higher in MDMs than U937 cells, leading us to speculate that parasite uptake proceeds through dissimilar pathways between these cells. We hypothesize that the mechanism of phagocytosis differs between primary versus immortalized human macrophage cells, with corresponding differences in the subsequent intracellular fate of the parasite. PMID:21723411

  2. Chlamydial Intracellular Survival Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bastidas, Robert J.; Elwell, Cherilyn A.; Engel, Joanne N.

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of blinding trachoma. Although Chlamydia is protected from humoral immune responses by residing within remodeled intracellular vacuoles, it still must contend with multilayered intracellular innate immune defenses deployed by its host while scavenging for nutrients. Here we provide an overview of Chlamydia biology and highlight recent findings detailing how this vacuole-bound pathogen manipulates host–cellular functions to invade host cells and maintain a replicative niche. PMID:23637308

  3. Invasion and Intracellular Survival by Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracellular parasitism has arisen only a few times during the long ancestry of protozoan parasites including in diverse groups such as microsporidians, kinetoplastids, and apicomplexans. Strategies used to gain entry differ widely from injection (e.g. microsporidians), active penetration of the host cell (e.g. Toxoplasma), recruitment of lysosomes to a plasma membrane wound (e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi), to host cell-mediated phagocytosis (e.g. Leishmania). The resulting range of intracellular niches is equally diverse ranging from cytosolic (e.g. T. cruzi) to residing within a nonfusigenic vacuole (e.g. Toxoplasma, Encephalitizoon) or a modified phagolysosome (e.g. Leishmania). These lifestyle choices influence access to nutrients, interaction with host cell signaling pathways, and detection by pathogen recognition systems. As such, intracellular life requires a repertoire of adaptations to assure entry-exit from the cell, as well as to thwart innate immune mechanisms and prevent clearance. Elucidating these pathways at the cellular and molecular level may identify key steps that can be targeted to reduce parasite survival or augment immunological responses and thereby prevent disease. PMID:21349087

  4. Strategies for Intracellular Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, Elizabeth M.; Devenish, Rodney J.; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with high mortality that is prevalent in tropical regions of the world. A key component of the pathogenesis of melioidosis is the ability of B. pseudomallei to enter, survive, and replicate within mammalian host cells. For non-phagocytic cells, bacterial adhesins have been identified both on the bacterial surface and associated with Type 4 pili. Cell invasion involves components of one or more of the three Type 3 Secretion System clusters, which also mediate, at least in part, the escape of bacteria from the endosome into the cytoplasm, where bacteria move by actin-based motility. The mechanism of actin-based motility is not clearly understood, but appears to differ from characterized mechanisms in other bacterial species. A small proportion of intracellular bacteria is targeted by host cell autophagy, involving direct recruitment of LC3 to endosomes rather than through uptake by canonical autophagosomes. However, the majority of bacterial cells are able to circumvent autophagy and other intracellular defense mechanisms such as the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and then replicate in the cytoplasm and spread to adjacent cells via membrane fusion, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated giant cells. A potential role for host cell ubiquitin in the autophagic response to bacterial infection has recently been proposed. PMID:22007185

  5. Transcriptomic Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Biovar 1B Infecting Murine Macrophages Reveals New Mechanisms of Extracellular and Intracellular Survival.

    PubMed

    Bent, Zachary W; Poorey, Kunal; Brazel, David M; LaBauve, Annette E; Sinha, Anupama; Curtis, Deanna J; House, Samantha E; Tew, Karen E; Hamblin, Rachelle Y; Williams, Kelly P; Branda, Steven S; Young, Glenn M; Meagher, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is typically considered an extracellular pathogen; however, during the course of an infection, a significant number of bacteria are stably maintained within host cell vacuoles. Little is known about this population and the role it plays during an infection. To address this question and to elucidate the spatially and temporally dynamic gene expression patterns of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1B through the course of an in vitro infection, transcriptome sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of bacteria infecting murine macrophage cells were performed under four distinct conditions. Bacteria were first grown in a nutrient-rich medium at 26 °C to establish a baseline of gene expression that is unrelated to infection. The transcriptomes of these bacteria were then compared to bacteria grown in a conditioned cell culture medium at 37 °C to identify genes that were differentially expressed in response to the increased temperature and medium but not in response to host cells. Infections were then performed, and the transcriptomes of bacteria found on the extracellular surface and intracellular compartments were analyzed individually. The upregulated genes revealed potential roles for a variety of systems in promoting intracellular virulence, including the Ysa type III secretion system, the Yts2 type II secretion system, and the Tad pilus. It was further determined that mutants of each of these systems had decreased virulence while infecting macrophages. Overall, these results reveal the complete set of genes expressed by Y. enterocolitica in response to infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies.

  6. A transcriptomic analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1B infecting murine macrophages reveals new mechanisms of intracellular survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Zachary W.; Poorey, Kunal; Brazel, David M.; LaBauve, Annette E.; Sinha, Anupama; Curtis, Deanna Joy; House, Samantha E.; Tew, Karen E.; Hamblin, Rachelle Y.; Williams, Kelly Porter; Branda, Steven S.; Young, Glenn M.; Meagher, Robert J.

    2015-04-20

    Yersinia enterocolitica is typically considered an extracellular pathogen; however, during the course of an infection, a significant number of bacteria are stably maintained within host cell vacuoles. Little is known about this population and the role it plays during an infection. To address this question and to elucidate the spatially and temporally dynamic gene expression patterns of Y. enterocoliticabiovar 1B through the course of an in vitro infection, transcriptome sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of bacteria infecting murine macrophage cells were performed under four distinct conditions. Bacteria were first grown in a nutrient-rich medium at 26°C to establish a baseline of gene expression that is unrelated to infection. The transcriptomes of these bacteria were then compared to bacteria grown in a conditioned cell culture medium at 37°C to identify genes that were differentially expressed in response to the increased temperature and medium but not in response to host cells. Infections were then performed, and the transcriptomes of bacteria found on the extracellular surface and intracellular compartments were analyzed individually. The upregulated genes revealed potential roles for a variety of systems in promoting intracellular virulence, including the Ysa type III secretion system, the Yts2 type II secretion system, and the Tad pilus. It was further determined that mutants of each of these systems had decreased virulence while infecting macrophages. Overall, these results reveal the complete set of genes expressed by Y. enterocolitica in response to infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies.

  7. Mechanism of Asp24 Upregulation in Brucella abortus Rough Mutant with a Disrupted O-Antigen Export System and Effect of Asp24 in Bacterial Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. PMID:24752516

  8. Mechanism of Asp24 upregulation in Brucella abortus rough mutant with a disrupted O-antigen export system and effect of Asp24 in bacterial intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-07-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Biovar 1B Infecting Murine Macrophages Reveals New Mechanisms of Extracellular and Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Poorey, Kunal; Brazel, David M.; LaBauve, Annette E.; Sinha, Anupama; Curtis, Deanna J.; House, Samantha E.; Tew, Karen E.; Hamblin, Rachelle Y.; Williams, Kelly P.; Branda, Steven S.; Young, Glenn M.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is typically considered an extracellular pathogen; however, during the course of an infection, a significant number of bacteria are stably maintained within host cell vacuoles. Little is known about this population and the role it plays during an infection. To address this question and to elucidate the spatially and temporally dynamic gene expression patterns of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1B through the course of an in vitro infection, transcriptome sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of bacteria infecting murine macrophage cells were performed under four distinct conditions. Bacteria were first grown in a nutrient-rich medium at 26°C to establish a baseline of gene expression that is unrelated to infection. The transcriptomes of these bacteria were then compared to bacteria grown in a conditioned cell culture medium at 37°C to identify genes that were differentially expressed in response to the increased temperature and medium but not in response to host cells. Infections were then performed, and the transcriptomes of bacteria found on the extracellular surface and intracellular compartments were analyzed individually. The upregulated genes revealed potential roles for a variety of systems in promoting intracellular virulence, including the Ysa type III secretion system, the Yts2 type II secretion system, and the Tad pilus. It was further determined that mutants of each of these systems had decreased virulence while infecting macrophages. Overall, these results reveal the complete set of genes expressed by Y. enterocolitica in response to infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies. PMID:25895974

  10. A transcriptomic analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica biovar 1B infecting murine macrophages reveals new mechanisms of intracellular survival

    DOE PAGES

    Bent, Zachary W.; Poorey, Kunal; Brazel, David M.; ...

    2015-04-20

    Yersinia enterocolitica is typically considered an extracellular pathogen; however, during the course of an infection, a significant number of bacteria are stably maintained within host cell vacuoles. Little is known about this population and the role it plays during an infection. To address this question and to elucidate the spatially and temporally dynamic gene expression patterns of Y. enterocoliticabiovar 1B through the course of an in vitro infection, transcriptome sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of bacteria infecting murine macrophage cells were performed under four distinct conditions. Bacteria were first grown in a nutrient-rich medium at 26°C to establish amore » baseline of gene expression that is unrelated to infection. The transcriptomes of these bacteria were then compared to bacteria grown in a conditioned cell culture medium at 37°C to identify genes that were differentially expressed in response to the increased temperature and medium but not in response to host cells. Infections were then performed, and the transcriptomes of bacteria found on the extracellular surface and intracellular compartments were analyzed individually. The upregulated genes revealed potential roles for a variety of systems in promoting intracellular virulence, including the Ysa type III secretion system, the Yts2 type II secretion system, and the Tad pilus. It was further determined that mutants of each of these systems had decreased virulence while infecting macrophages. Overall, these results reveal the complete set of genes expressed by Y. enterocolitica in response to infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies.« less

  11. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics.

  12. Intracellular survival of Burkholderia cepacia complex in phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Valvano, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species are a group of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that infect the airways of cystic fibrosis patients, and occasionally they infect other immunocompromised patients. Bcc bacteria display high-level multidrug resistance and chronically persist in the infected host while eliciting robust inflammatory responses. Studies using macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic cells, combined with advances in the genetic manipulation of these bacteria, have increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virulence in these pathogens and the molecular details of cell-host responses triggering inflammation. This article discusses our current view of the intracellular survival of Burkholderia cenocepacia within macrophages.

  13. Mechanisms of intracellular ice formation.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrew, K; McGann, L E

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of intracellular freezing in cells was investigated by designing experiments with cultured mouse fibroblasts on a cryomicroscope to critically assess the current hypotheses describing the genesis of intracellular ice: (a) intracellular freezing is a result of critical undercooling; (b) the cytoplasm is nucleated through aqueous pores in the plasma membrane; and (c) intracellular freezing is a result of membrane damage caused by electrical transients at the ice interface. The experimental data did not support any of these theories, but was consistent with the hypothesis that the plasma membrane is damaged at a critical gradient in osmotic pressure across the membrane, and intracellular freezing occurs as a result of this damage. An implication of this hypothesis is that mathematical models can be used to design protocols to avoid damaging gradients in osmotic pressure, allowing new approaches to the preservation of cells, tissues, and organs by rapid cooling. PMID:2306499

  14. Intracellular glasses and seed survival in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Buitink, Julia; Leprince, Olivier

    2008-10-01

    So-called orthodox seeds can resist complete desiccation and survive the dry state for extended periods of time. During drying, the cellular viscosity increases dramatically and in the dry state, the cytoplasm transforms into a glassy state. The formation of intracellular glasses is indispensable to survive the dry state. Indeed, the storage stability of seeds is related to the packing density and molecular mobility of the intracellular glass, suggesting that the physico-chemical properties of intracellular glasses provide stability for long-term survival. Whereas seeds contain large amounts of soluble non-reducing sugars, which are known to be good glass formers, detailed in vivo measurements using techniques such as FTIR and EPR spectroscopy reveal that these intracellular glasses have properties that are quite different from those of simple sugar glasses. Intracellular glasses exhibit slow molecular mobility and a high molecular packing, resembling glasses made of mixtures of sugars with proteins, which potentially interact with additional cytoplasmic components such as salts, organic acids and amino acids. Above the glass transition temperature, the cytoplasm of biological systems still exhibits a low molecular mobility and a high stability, which serves as an ecological advantage, keeping the seeds stable under adverse conditions of temperature or water content that bring the tissues out of the glassy state.

  15. Inter- and intra-cellular mechanism of NF-kB-dependent survival advantage and clonal expansion of radio-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Aravindan, Natarajan; Xu, Ji; Natarajan, Mohan

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanism by which cancer cells acquire resistance to radiation and favorably selected for its clonal expansion will provide molecular insight into tumor recurrence at the treatment site. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms prompted in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to clinical radiation and the associated coordination of intra- and inter-cellular signaling that orchestrate radio-resistance and tumor relapse/recurrence. Our findings showed that 2 or 10Gy of (137)Cs γ-rays at a dose rate of 1.03Gy/min trigger the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), its DNA-binding activity and recycles its own transcription. NF-κB DNA-binding kinetic analysis demonstrated both sustained and dual phase NF-κB activation with radiation. Gene manipulation approach revealed that radiation triggered NF-κB-mediated TNF-α transcriptional activity. TNF-α blocking approach confirmed that the de novo synthesis and secretion of TNF-α serves as a pre-requisite for the second phase of NF-κB activation and sustained maintenance. Radiation-associated NF-κB-dependent secretion of TNF-α from irradiated cells, in parallel, activates NF-κB in the non-targeted un-irradiated bystander cells. Together, these findings demonstrated that radiation-triggered NF-κB-dependent TNFα secretion is critical for self-sustenance of NF-κB (through autocrine positive feedback signaling) and for coordinating bystander response (through inter-cellular paracrine mechanism) after radiation exposure. Further, the data suggest that this self-sustained NF-κB in the irradiated cells determines radio-resistance, survival advantage and clonal expansion of the tumor cells at the treatment site. Parallel maintenance of NF-ΚB-TNF-α-NF-κB feedback-cycle in the un-irradiated non-targeted bystander cells initiates supportive mechanism for the promotion and progression of surviving tumor cells. Intervening this molecular pathway would help us to

  16. Mapping intracellular mechanics on micropatterned substrates

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Kalpana; Asnacios, Atef; Goud, Bruno; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells impact on their architecture, their migration, intracellular trafficking, and many other cellular functions and have been shown to be modified during cancer progression. We have developed an approach to map the intracellular mechanical properties of living cells by combining micropatterning and optical tweezers-based active microrheology. We optically trap micrometer-sized beads internalized in cells plated on crossbow-shaped adhesive micropatterns and track their displacement following a step displacement of the cell. The local intracellular complex shear modulus is measured from the relaxation of the bead position assuming that the intracellular microenvironment of the bead obeys power-law rheology. We also analyze the data with a standard viscoelastic model and compare with the power-law approach. We show that the shear modulus decreases from the cell center to the periphery and from the cell rear to the front along the polarity axis of the micropattern. We use a variety of inhibitors to quantify the spatial contribution of the cytoskeleton, intracellular membranes, and ATP-dependent active forces to intracellular mechanics and apply our technique to differentiate normal and cancer cells. PMID:27799529

  17. Membranes, mechanics, and intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Cellular membranes are remarkable materials -- self-assembled, flexible, two-dimensional fluids. Understanding how proteins manipulate membrane curvature is crucial to understanding the transport of cargo in cells, yet the mechanical activities of trafficking proteins remain poorly understood. Using an optical-trap based assay involving dynamic deformation of biomimetic membranes, we have examined the behavior of Sar1, a key component of the COPII family of transport proteins. We find that Sar1 from yeast (S. cerevisiae) lowers membrane rigidity by up to 100% as a function of its concentration, thereby lowering the energetic cost of membrane deformation. Human Sar1 proteins can also lower the mechanical rigidity of the membranes to which they bind. However, unlike the yeast proteins, the rigidity is not a monotonically decreasing function of concentration but rather shows increased rigidity and decreased mobility at high concentrations that implies interactions between proteins. In addition to describing this study of membrane mechanics, I'll also discuss some topics relevant to a range of biophysical investigations, such as the insights provided by imaging methods and open questions in the dynamics of multicellular systems.

  18. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Onkar; O’Seaghdha, Maghnus; Velarde, Jorge J.; Wessels, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS) has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase). When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO), and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase) that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells. PMID:26938870

  19. Intracellular proliferation of S. aureus in osteoblasts and effects of rifampicin and gentamicin on S. aureus intracellular proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, W; Sommer, U; Sethi, S; Domann, E; Thormann, U; Schütz, I; Lips, K S; Chakraborty, T; Schnettler, R; Alt, V

    2014-10-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most clinically relevant pathogen regarding implant-associated bone infection and its capability to invade osteoblasts is well known. The aim of this study was to investigate firstly whether S. aureus is not only able to invade but also to proliferate within osteoblasts, secondly to delineate the mechanism of invasion and thirdly to clarify whether rifampicin or gentamicin can inhibit intracellular proliferation and survival of S. aureus. The SAOS-2 osteoblast-like cell line and human primary osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus EDCC5055 and S. aureus Rosenbach 1884. Both S. aureus strains were able to invade efficiently and to proliferate within human osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intracellular invasion of S. aureus and transmission electron microscopy images could demonstrate bacterial division as a sign of intracellular proliferation as well as cytosolic bacterial persistence. Cytochalasin D, the major actin depolymerisation agent, was able to significantly reduce S. aureus invasion, suggesting that invasion was enabled by promoting actin rearrangement at the cell surface. 7.5 μg/mL of rifampicin was able to inhibit bacterial survival in SAOS-2 cells with almost complete elimination of bacteria after 4 h. Gentamicin could also kill intracellular S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was significantly lower than that observed using rifampicin. In conclusion, S. aureus is not only able to invade but also to proliferate in osteoblasts. Invasion seems to be associated with actin rearrangement at the cell surface. Rifampicin is effective in intracellular eradication of S. aureus whereas gentamicin only poorly eliminates intracellularly replicating bacteria.

  20. Modulating cancer cell survival by targeting intracellular cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Omer F; Gowda, Raghavendra; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2017-08-08

    Demand for cholesterol is high in certain cancers making them potentially sensitive to therapeutic strategies targeting cellular cholesterol homoeostasis. A potential approach involves disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport, which occurs in Niemann-Pick disease as a result of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency. Hence, a class of lysosomotropic compounds that were identified as functional ASM inhibitors (FIASMAs) might exhibit chemotherapeutic activity by disrupting cancer cell cholesterol homoeostasis. Here, the chemotherapeutic utility of ASM inhibition was investigated. The effect of FIASMAs on intracellular cholesterol levels, cholesterol homoeostasis, cellular endocytosis and signalling cascades were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of ASM inhibition was demonstrated using melanoma xenografts and a nanoparticle formulation was developed to overcome dose-limiting CNS-associated side effects of certain FIASMAs. Functional ASM inhibitors inhibited intracellular cholesterol transport leading to disruption of autophagic flux, cellular endocytosis and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Consequently, major oncogenic signalling cascades on which cancer cells were reliant for survival were inhibited. Two tested ASM inhibitors, perphenazine and fluphenazine that are also clinically used as antipsychotics, were effective in inhibiting xenografted tumour growth. Nanoliposomal encapsulation of the perphenazine enhanced its chemotherapeutic efficacy while decreasing CNS-associated side effects. This study suggests that disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting ASM could be utilised as a potential chemotherapeutic approach for treating cancer.

  1. The role of TREM-2 in internalization and intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pan; Lu, Qiang; Cui, Guimei; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Changjiang; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-02-15

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) is a cell surface receptor primarily expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. TREM-2 functions as a phagocytic receptor for bacteria as well as an inhibitor of Toll like receptors (TLR) induced inflammatory cytokines. However, the role of TREM-2 in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. To investigate whether TREM-2 is involved in Brucella intracellular survival, we chose bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs), in which TREM-2 is stably expressed, as cell model. Colony formation Units (CFUs) assay suggests that TREM-2 is involved in the internalization of Brucella abortus (B. abortus) by macrophages, while silencing of TREM-2 decreases intracellular survival of B. abortus. To further study the underlying mechanisms of TREM-2-mediated bacterial intracellular survival, we examined the activation of B. abortus-infected macrophages through determining the kinetics of activation of the three MAPKs, including ERK, JNK and p38, and measuring TNFα production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Brucella (BrLPS) or B. abortus stimulation. Our data show that TREM-2 deficiency promotes activation of Brucella-infected macrophages. Moreover, our data also demonstrate that macrophage activation promotes killing of Brucella by enhancing nitric oxygen (NO), but not reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, macrophage apoptosis or cellular death. Taken together, these findings provide a novel interpretation of Brucella intracellular growth through inhibition of NO production produced by TREM-2-mediated activated macrophages.

  2. Intracellular survival of Candida glabrata in macrophages: immune evasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Seider, Katja; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a successful human opportunistic pathogen which causes superficial but also life-threatening systemic infections. During infection, C. glabrata has to cope with cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages, which belong to the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Candida glabrata is able to survive and even replicate inside macrophages while causing surprisingly low damage and cytokine release. Here, we present an overview of recent studies dealing with the interaction of C. glabrata with macrophages, from phagocytosis to intracellular growth and escape. We review the strategies of C. glabrata that permit intracellular survival and replication, including poor host cell activation, modification of phagosome maturation and phagosome pH, adaptation to antimicrobial activities, and mechanisms to overcome the nutrient limitations within the phagosome. In summary, these studies suggest that survival within macrophages may be an immune evasion and persistence strategy of C. glabrata during infection.

  3. Type Six Secretion System of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Adaptive Immune Components Limit Intracellular Survival During Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bendor, Liron; Weyrich, Laura S.; Linz, Bodo; Rolin, Olivier Y.; Taylor, Dawn L.; Goodfield, Laura L.; Smallridge, William E.; Kennett, Mary J.; Harvill, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    The Type Six Secretion System (T6SS) is required for Bordetella bronchiseptica cytotoxicity, cytokine modulation, infection, and persistence. However, one-third of recently sequenced Bordetella bronchiseptica strains of the predominantly human-associated Complex IV have lost their T6SS through gene deletion or degradation. Since most human B. bronchiseptica infections occur in immunocompromised patients, we determine here whether loss of Type Six Secretion is beneficial to B. bronchiseptica during infection of immunocompromised mice. Infection of mice lacking adaptive immunity (Rag1-/- mice) with a T6SS-deficient mutant results in a hypervirulent phenotype that is characterized by high numbers of intracellular bacteria in systemic organs. In contrast, wild-type B. bronchiseptica kill their eukaryotic cellular hosts via a T6SS-dependent mechanism that prevents survival in systemic organs. High numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered from immunodeficient mice but only low numbers from wild-type mice demonstrates that B. bronchiseptica survival in an intracellular niche is limited by B and T cell responses. Understanding the nature of intracellular survival during infection, and its effects on the generation and function of the host immune response, are important to contain and control the spread of Bordetella-caused disease. PMID:26485303

  4. Type Six Secretion System of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Adaptive Immune Components Limit Intracellular Survival During Infection.

    PubMed

    Bendor, Liron; Weyrich, Laura S; Linz, Bodo; Rolin, Olivier Y; Taylor, Dawn L; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Kennett, Mary J; Harvill, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    The Type Six Secretion System (T6SS) is required for Bordetella bronchiseptica cytotoxicity, cytokine modulation, infection, and persistence. However, one-third of recently sequenced Bordetella bronchiseptica strains of the predominantly human-associated Complex IV have lost their T6SS through gene deletion or degradation. Since most human B. bronchiseptica infections occur in immunocompromised patients, we determine here whether loss of Type Six Secretion is beneficial to B. bronchiseptica during infection of immunocompromised mice. Infection of mice lacking adaptive immunity (Rag1-/- mice) with a T6SS-deficient mutant results in a hypervirulent phenotype that is characterized by high numbers of intracellular bacteria in systemic organs. In contrast, wild-type B. bronchiseptica kill their eukaryotic cellular hosts via a T6SS-dependent mechanism that prevents survival in systemic organs. High numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered from immunodeficient mice but only low numbers from wild-type mice demonstrates that B. bronchiseptica survival in an intracellular niche is limited by B and T cell responses. Understanding the nature of intracellular survival during infection, and its effects on the generation and function of the host immune response, are important to contain and control the spread of Bordetella-caused disease.

  5. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    PubMed

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  6. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Survival of Brevibacterium linens during nutrient starvation and intracellular changes.

    PubMed

    Boyaval, P; Boyaval, E; Desmazeaud, M J

    1985-03-01

    The present work reports the survival capacity of a strain of Brevibacterium linens isolated from a French camembert cheese and the ensuing changes in cell composition. Exponentially growing cells were harvested, washed and resuspended with shaking in pH 8.0 buffer at 21 degrees C in the absence of a carbon source. The viability of this strain, assessed with slide cultures, is much less than that of coryneform bacteria isolated from soil samples, even though no cell lysis was detected. Intracellular RNA was rapidly consumed during the first few days although magnesium levels remained high. The quantity of DNA initially increased by 17% within 24 h and then remained stable during the 30 days of the experiment. During the same period, absorbance of the medium at 260 nm reached 2 absorbance units. Reserve polysaccharides in this strain are less abundant than in Arthrobacter and were rapidly consumed. Proteolysis was regular and thus maintained a pool of free amino acids which was greater than 60% of the initial value. There was a parallel accumulation of ammonia in the medium. Catalase activity decreased regularly during the first 80 h whereas the quantity of Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) dropped by 47% in 10 h, stabilizing at less than 10% of its initial value. Cell respiration declined very rapidly and was very low after 24 h.

  8. Yersinia pestis Resists Predation by Acanthamoeba castellanii and Exhibits Prolonged Intracellular Survival.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Montaño, Javier A; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2017-07-01

    Plague is a flea-borne rodent-associated zoonotic disease caused by Yersinia pestis The disease is characterized by epizootics with high rodent mortalities, punctuated by interepizootic periods when the bacterium persists in an unknown reservoir. This study investigates the interaction between Y. pestis and the ubiquitous soil free-living amoeba (FLA) Acanthamoeba castellanii to assess if the bacterium can survive within soil amoebae and whether intracellular mechanisms are conserved between infection of mammalian macrophages and soil amoebae. The results demonstrate that during coculture with amoebae, representative Y. pestis strains of epidemic biovars Medievalis, Orientalis, and Antiqua are phagocytized and able to survive within amoebae for at least 5 days. Key Y. pestis determinants of the intracellular interaction of Y. pestis and phagocytic macrophages, PhoP and the type three secretion system (T3SS), were then tested for their roles in the Y. pestis-amoeba interaction. Consistent with a requirement for the PhoP transcriptional activator in the intracellular survival of Y. pestis in macrophages, a PhoP mutant is unable to survive when cocultured with amoebae. Additionally, induction of the T3SS blocks phagocytic uptake of Y. pestis by amoebae, similar to that which occurs during macrophage infection. Electron microscopy revealed that in A. castellanii, Y. pestis resides intact within spacious vacuoles which were characterized using lysosomal trackers as being separated from the lysosomal compartment. This evidence for prolonged survival and subversion of intracellular digestion of Y. pestis within FLA suggests that protozoa may serve as a protective soil reservoir for Y. pestisIMPORTANCEYersinia pestis is a reemerging flea-borne zoonotic disease. Sylvatic plague cycles are characterized by an epizootic period during which the disease spreads rapidly, causing high rodent mortality, and an interepizootic period when the bacterium quiescently persists in an

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei Differentially Regulates Host Innate Immune Response Genes for Intracellular Survival in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Shankar, Esaki M.; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis poses a serious threat to humankind. B. pseudomallei secretes numerous virulence proteins that alter host cell functions to escape from intracellular immune sensors. However, the events underlying disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. Methods We determined the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and also investigated the early transcriptional responses using an Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 microarray platform, after three hours of exposure to live B. pseudomallei (BCMS) and its secreted proteins (CCMS). Results We found that the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly correlated with increase of multiplicity of infection and duration of contact. Activation of host carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis as well as suppression of amino acid metabolism and innate immune responses both by live bacteria and its secreted proteins were evident. These early events might be linked to initial activation of host genes directed towards bacterial dissemination from lungs to target organs (via proposed in vivo mechanisms) or to escape potential sensing by macrophages. Conclusion Understanding the early responses of A549 cells toward B. pseudomallei infection provide preliminary insights into the likely pathogenesis mechanisms underlying melioidosis, and could contribute to development of novel intervention strategies to combat B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27367858

  10. [Seed aging and survival mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Grappin, Philippe; Bourdais, Gildas; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Job, Dominique; Ogé, Laurent; Jullien, Marc; Rajjou, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    Aging and death are universal to living systems. In temperate climate latitudes the mature seeds of higher plants are exposed to aging and have developed resistance mechanisms allowing survival and plant propagation. In addition to the physicochemical properties of the seed that confer stress resistance, the protein metabolism contributes importantly to longevity mechanisms. Recently, genetic studies have demonstrated the occurrence of the Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase repair enzyme in controlling age-related protein damages and seed survival. These protective mechanisms by protein repair are widespread in all kingdoms, so that the use of seeds as models to study these controlling processes offers the prospect of understanding longevity mechanisms better.

  11. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  12. Mechanisms of Obligatory Intracellular Infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Anaplasma phagocytophilum persists in nature by cycling between mammals and ticks. Human infection by the bite of an infected tick leads to a potentially fatal emerging disease called human granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. phagocytophilum is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that replicates inside mammalian granulocytes and the salivary gland and midgut cells of ticks. A. phagocytophilum evolved the remarkable ability to hijack the regulatory system of host cells. A. phagocytophilum alters vesicular traffic to create an intracellular membrane-bound compartment that allows replication in seclusion from lysosomes. The bacterium downregulates or actively inhibits a number of innate immune responses of mammalian host cells, and it upregulates cellular cholesterol uptake to acquire cholesterol for survival. It also upregulates several genes critical for the infection of ticks, and it prolongs tick survival at freezing temperatures. Several host factors that exacerbate infection have been identified, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cholesterol. Host factors that overcome infection include IL-12 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Two bacterial type IV secretion effectors and several bacterial proteins that associate with inclusion membranes have been identified. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying A. phagocytophilum infection will foster the development of creative ideas to prevent or treat this emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:21734244

  13. Intracellular Uropathogenic E. coli Exploits Host Rab35 for Iron Acquisition and Survival within Urinary Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dikshit, Neha; Bist, Pradeep; Fenlon, Shannon N.; Pulloor, Niyas Kudukkil; Chua, Christelle En Lin; Scidmore, Marci A.; Carlyon, Jason A.; Tang, Bor Luen; Chen, Swaine L.; Sukumaran, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are common and morbid infections with limited therapeutic options. Previous studies have demonstrated that persistent intracellular infection of bladder epithelial cells (BEC) by UPEC contributes to recurrent UTI in mouse models of infection. However, the mechanisms employed by UPEC to survive within BEC are incompletely understood. In this study we aimed to understand the role of host vesicular trafficking proteins in the intracellular survival of UPEC. Using a cell culture model of intracellular UPEC infection, we found that the small GTPase Rab35 facilitates UPEC survival in UPEC-containing vacuoles (UCV) within BEC. Rab35 plays a role in endosomal recycling of transferrin receptor (TfR), the key protein responsible for transferrin–mediated cellular iron uptake. UPEC enhance the expression of both Rab35 and TfR and recruit these proteins to the UCV, thereby supplying UPEC with the essential nutrient iron. Accordingly, Rab35 or TfR depleted cells showed significantly lower intracellular iron levels and reduced ability to support UPEC survival. In the absence of Rab35, UPEC are preferentially trafficked to degradative lysosomes and killed. Furthermore, in an in vivo murine model of persistent intracellular infection, Rab35 also colocalizes with intracellular UPEC. We propose a model in which UPEC subverts two different vesicular trafficking pathways (endosomal recycling and degradative lysosomal fusion) by modulating Rab35, thereby simultaneously enhancing iron acquisition and avoiding lysosomal degradation of the UCV within bladder epithelial cells. Our findings reveal a novel survival mechanism of intracellular UPEC and suggest a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention against recurrent UTI. PMID:26248231

  14. Salmonella Engages Host MicroRNAs To Modulate SUMOylation: a New Arsenal for Intracellular Survival.

    PubMed

    Verma, Smriti; Mohapatra, Gayatree; Ahmad, Salman Mustfa; Rana, Sarika; Jain, Swati; Khalsa, Jasneet Kaur; Srikanth, C V

    2015-09-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) can alter many fundamental properties of a protein. One or combinations of them have been known to regulate the dynamics of many cellular pathways and consequently regulate all vital processes. Understandably, pathogens have evolved sophisticated strategies to subvert these mechanisms to achieve instantaneous control over host functions. Here, we present the first report of modulation by intestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) of host SUMOylation, a PTM pathway central to all fundamental cellular processes. Both in cell culture and in a mouse model, we observed that S. Typhimurium infection led to a dynamic SUMO-conjugated proteome alteration. The intracellular survival of S. Typhimurium was dependent on SUMO status as revealed by reduced infection and Salmonella-induced filaments (SIFs) in SUMO-upregulated cells. S. Typhimurium-dependent SUMO modulation was seen as a result of depletion of crucial SUMO pathway enzymes Ubc-9 and PIAS1, at both the protein and the transcript levels. Mechanistically, depletion of Ubc-9 relied on upregulation of small noncoding RNAs miR30c and miR30e during S. Typhimurium infection. This was necessary and sufficient for both down-modulation of Ubc-9 and a successful infection. Thus, we demonstrate a novel strategy of pathogen-mediated perturbation of host SUMOylation, an integral mechanism underlying S. Typhimurium infection and intracellular survival.

  15. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection. PMID:27909341

  16. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-02

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  17. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  18. The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis resists phagosome acidification and autophagy to promote intracellular survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Shankar, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    While many strains of Enterococcus faecalis have been reported to be capable of surviving within macrophages for extended periods, the exact mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In this study, we found that after phagocytosis by macrophages, enterococci-containing vacuoles resist acidification, and E. faecalis is resistant to low pH. Ultrastructural examination of the enterococci-containing vacuole by transmission electron microscopy revealed a single membrane envelope, with no evidence of the classical double-membraned autophagosomes. Western blot analysis further confirmed that E. faecalis could trigger inhibition of the production of LC3-II during infection. By employing cells transfected with RFP-LC3 plasmid and infected with GFP-labelled E. faecalis, we also observed that E. faecalis was not delivered into autophagosomes during macrophage infection. While these observations indicated no role for autophagy in elimination of intracellular E. faecalis, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were keys to this process. Stimulation of autophagy suppressed the intracellular survival of E. faecalis in macrophages in vitro and decreased the burden of E. faecalis in vivo. In summary, the results from this study offer new insights into the interaction of E. faecalis with host cells and may provide a new approach to treatment of enterococcal infections.

  19. Transposon-Derived Brucella abortus Rough Mutants Are Attenuated and Exhibit Reduced Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Chris A.; Adams, L. Garry; Ficht, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The O antigen of Brucella abortus has been described as a major virulence determinant based on the attenuated survival of fortuitously isolated rough variants. However, the lack of genetic definition of these mutants and the virulence of naturally occurring rough species, Brucella ovis and Brucella canis, has confused interpretation. To better characterize the role of O antigen in virulence and survival, transposon mutagenesis was used to generate B. abortus rough mutants defective in O-antigen presentation. Sequence analysis of DNA flanking the site of Tn5 insertion was used to verify insertion in genes encoding lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic functions. Not surprisingly, each of the rough mutants was attenuated for survival in mice, but unexpected differences among the mutants were observed. In an effort to define the basis for the observed differences, the structure of the rough LPS and the sensitivity of these mutants to individual killing mechanisms were examined in vitro. All of the B. abortus rough mutants exhibited a 4- to 5-log-unit increase, compared to the smooth parental strain, in sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. Little change was evident in the sensitivity of these organisms to hydrogen peroxide, consistent with an inability of O antigen to exclude relatively small molecules. Sensitivity to polymyxin B, which was employed as a model cationic, amphipathic peptide similar to defensins found in phagocytic cells, revealed survival differences among the rough mutants similar to those observed in the mouse. One mutant in particular exhibited hypersensitivity to polymyxin B and reduced survival in mice. This mutant was characterized by a truncated rough LPS. DNA sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a transposon interruption in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase (pmm), suggesting that this activity may be required for the synthesis of a full-length core polysaccharide in addition to O antigen. B. abortus O antigen appears to be essential

  20. Intracellular mechanisms of lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is associated with the appearance of an intracellular factor (ADR) that can induce DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR plays a role in the sequence of intracellular events leading to activation for IL-2-mediated proliferation. Because of the nature of the defining assay, the locus of ADR action appears to be near the terminal end of the transduction pathway. Interestingly, although lymphocytes from aged individuals respond poorly to proliferative stimuli, they appear to produce normal to above-normal levels of ADR. In contrast, their nuclei are only poorly responsive to stimulation by ADR. Preparations rich in ADR activity have proteolytic activity as well. In addition, aprotinin, as well as a variety of other protease inhibitors, suppresses ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by absorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads, and can be removed from the beads by elution at pH 5.0. This latter suggests that ADR itself is a protease. However, its endogenous substrate is not yet known. We have also detected an inhibitor of ADR activity in the cytoplasm of resting lymphocytes. This is a heat-stable protein of approximately 60,000 Da. In addition to suppressing the interaction of ADR with quiescent nuclei, the inhibitor can suppress DNA synthetic activity of replicative nuclei isolated from mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Interestingly, these preparations had little or no activity on replicative nuclei derived from several neoplastic cell lines. The resistance of tumor cell nuclei to spontaneously occurring cytoplasmic inhibitory factors such as the one described here may provide one explanation for the loss of growth control in neoplastic cells.

  1. Proline mechanisms of stress survival.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Becker, Donald F

    2013-09-20

    The imino acid proline is utilized by different organisms to offset cellular imbalances caused by environmental stress. The wide use in nature of proline as a stress adaptor molecule indicates that proline has a fundamental biological role in stress response. Understanding the mechanisms by which proline enhances abiotic/biotic stress response will facilitate agricultural crop research and improve human health. It is now recognized that proline metabolism propels cellular signaling processes that promote cellular apoptosis or survival. Studies have shown that proline metabolism influences signaling pathways by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the mitochondria via the electron transport chain. Enhanced ROS production due to proline metabolism has been implicated in the hypersensitive response in plants, lifespan extension in worms, and apoptosis, tumor suppression, and cell survival in animals. The ability of proline to influence disparate cellular outcomes may be governed by ROS levels generated in the mitochondria. Defining the threshold at which proline metabolic enzyme expression switches from inducing survival pathways to cellular apoptosis would provide molecular insights into cellular redox regulation by proline. Are ROS the only mediators of proline metabolic signaling or are other factors involved? New evidence suggests that proline biosynthesis enzymes interact with redox proteins such as thioredoxin. An important future pursuit will be to identify other interacting partners of proline metabolic enzymes to uncover novel regulatory and signaling networks of cellular stress response.

  2. Proline Mechanisms of Stress Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The imino acid proline is utilized by different organisms to offset cellular imbalances caused by environmental stress. The wide use in nature of proline as a stress adaptor molecule indicates that proline has a fundamental biological role in stress response. Understanding the mechanisms by which proline enhances abiotic/biotic stress response will facilitate agricultural crop research and improve human health. Recent Advances: It is now recognized that proline metabolism propels cellular signaling processes that promote cellular apoptosis or survival. Studies have shown that proline metabolism influences signaling pathways by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the mitochondria via the electron transport chain. Enhanced ROS production due to proline metabolism has been implicated in the hypersensitive response in plants, lifespan extension in worms, and apoptosis, tumor suppression, and cell survival in animals. Critical Issues: The ability of proline to influence disparate cellular outcomes may be governed by ROS levels generated in the mitochondria. Defining the threshold at which proline metabolic enzyme expression switches from inducing survival pathways to cellular apoptosis would provide molecular insights into cellular redox regulation by proline. Are ROS the only mediators of proline metabolic signaling or are other factors involved? Future Directions: New evidence suggests that proline biosynthesis enzymes interact with redox proteins such as thioredoxin. An important future pursuit will be to identify other interacting partners of proline metabolic enzymes to uncover novel regulatory and signaling networks of cellular stress response. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 998–1011. PMID:23581681

  3. In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni with phagocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehlbauch, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni was studied using three types of mononuclear phagocytes: a J774G8 peritoneal macrophage line, resident BABL/c peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes. In phagocytosis assays using CFU determinations, phagocytosis increased steadily over an 8 hr time period. Results obtained using a /sup 51/Cr assay indicated no consistent significant difference between phagocytosis of C. jejuni between the three mononuclear phagocytes or PMN's and that maximum infection occurred prior to 0.5 hr and maintained throughout the 4 hr assay. Further investigation of the mechanism of attachment and entry of C. jejuni revealed this process required the expenditure of energy by the phagocyte, but was not inhibited by inhibitors of microfilament functions. In addition, phagocytosis was enhanced by the presence of 20% FCS,

  4. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Exploits Host SUMOylation Pathways To Mediate Effector-Host Interactions and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Paige Selvy; Luo, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that selectively infects mononuclear phagocytes. We recently reported that E. chaffeensis utilizes a type 1 secretion (T1S) system to export tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors and demonstrated that these effectors interact with a functionally diverse array of host proteins. By way of these interactions, TRP effectors modulate host cell functions; however, the molecular basis of these interactions and their roles in ehrlichial pathobiology are not well defined. In this study, we describe the first bacterial protein posttranslational modification (PTM) by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). The E. chaffeensis T1S effector TRP120 is conjugated to SUMO at a carboxy-terminal canonical consensus SUMO conjugation motif in vitro and in human cells. In human cells, TRP120 was selectively conjugated with SUMO2/3 isoforms. Disruption of TRP120 SUMOylation perturbed interactions with known host proteins, through predicted SUMO interaction motif-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E. chaffeensis infection did not result in dramatic changes in the global host SUMOylated protein profile, but a robust colocalization of predominately SUMO1 with ehrlichial inclusions was observed. Inhibiting the SUMO pathway with a small-molecule inhibitor had a significant impact on E. chaffeensis replication and recruitment of the TRP120-interacting protein polycomb group ring finger protein 5 (PCGF5) to the inclusion, indicating that the SUMO pathway is critical for intracellular survival. This study reveals the novel exploitation of the SUMO pathway by Ehrlichia, which facilitates effector-eukaryote interactions necessary to usurp the host and create a permissive intracellular niche. PMID:25047847

  5. Identification of a Novel Small Non-Coding RNA Modulating the Intracellular Survival of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufei; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ligui; Wang, Tongkun; Liang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Chunli; Yuan, Jiuyun; Zhuang, Yubin; An, Chang; Lei, Shuangshuang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Li, Wenna; Yuan, Xitong; Huang, Liuyu; Yang, Xiaoli; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are gene expression modulators respond to environmental changes, stressful conditions, and pathogenesis. In this study, by using a combined bioinformatic and experimental approach, eight novel sRNA genes were identified in intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis. BSR0602, one sRNA that was highly induced in stationary phase, was further examined and found to modulate the intracellular survival of B. melitensis. BSR0602 was present at very high levels in vitro under stresses similar to those encountered during infection in host macrophages. Furthermore, BSR0602 was found to be highly expressed in the spleens of infected mice, suggesting its potential role in the control of pathogenesis. BSR0602 targets the mRNAs coding for gntR, a global transcriptional regulator, which is required for B. melitensis virulence. Overexpression of BSR0602 results in distinct reduction in the gntR mRNA level. B. melitensis with high level of BSR0602 is defective in bacteria intracellular survival in macrophages and defective in growth in the spleens of infected mice. Therefore, BSR0602 may directly inhibit the expression of gntR, which then impairs Brucellae intracellular survival and contributes to Brucella infection. Our findings suggest that BSR0602 is responsible for bacterial adaptation to stress conditions and thus modulate B. melitensis intracellular survival. PMID:25852653

  6. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  7. [Neurotensin: reception and intracellular mechanisms of signaling].

    PubMed

    Osadchiĭ, O E

    2006-01-01

    The review coveres the features of neurotensin receptor, functional role ot its structural elements, nature of conjugation with effectoral cell systems, and mechanisms of receptor decensitization developing as results of prolonged effect of agonist. The author provides pharmacological description of neurotensin antagonists and special features of three subtypes of its receptors. The author reviews the research results establishing a correlation between structural modification of various section of neurotensin molecula and manifestations of its physiological activity. Special focus is mage on discussion of neurotensin's physiological effects developing as results of its modulating impact on discharge of other biologically active substances.

  8. The Role of the Francisella Tularensis Pathogenicity Island in Type VI Secretion, Intracellular Survival, and Modulation of Host Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bröms, Jeanette E.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Lavander, Moa

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Essential for its virulence is the ability to multiply within host cells, in particular monocytic cells. The bacterium has developed intricate means to subvert host immune mechanisms and thereby facilitate its intracellular survival by preventing phagolysosomal fusion followed by escape into the cytosol, where it multiplies. Moreover, it targets and manipulates numerous host cell signaling pathways, thereby ameliorating the otherwise bactericidal capacity. Many of the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unknown but key elements, directly or indirectly responsible for many of the aforementioned mechanisms, rely on the expression of proteins encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI), suggested to constitute a type VI secretion system. We here describe the current knowledge regarding the components of the FPI and the roles that have been ascribed to them. PMID:21687753

  9. PKC-η-MARCKS Signaling Promotes Intracellular Survival of Unopsonized Burkholderia thailandensis

    DOE PAGES

    Micheva-Viteva, Sofiya N.; Shou, Yulin; Ganguly, Kumkum; ...

    2017-06-07

    Pathogenic Burkholderia rely on host factors for efficient intracellular replication and are highly refractory to antibiotic treatment. To identify host genes that are required by Burkholderia spp. during infection, we performed a RNA interference (RNAi) screen of the human kinome and identified 35 host kinases that facilitated Burkholderia thailandensis intracellular survival in human monocytic THP-1 cells. We validated a selection of host kinases using imaging flow cytometry to assess efficiency of B. thailandensis survival in the host upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. We focused on the role of the novel protein kinase C isoform, PKC-η, in Burkholderia infection and characterized PKC-η/MARCKS signalingmore » as a key event that promotes the survival of unopsonized B. thailandensis CDC2721121 within host cells. While infection of lung epithelial cells with unopsonized Gram-negative bacteria stimulated phosphorylation of Ser175/160 in the MARCKS effector domain, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC-η expression reduced the levels of phosphorylated MARCKS by >3-fold in response to infection with Bt CDC2721121. We compared the effect of the conventional PKC-α and novel PKC-η isoforms on the growth of B. thailandensis CDC2721121 within monocytic THP-1 cells and found that ≥75% knock-down of PRKCH transcript levels reduced intracellular bacterial load 100% more efficiently when compared to growth in cells siRNA-depleted of the classical PKC-α, suggesting that the PKC-η isoform can specifically mediate Burkholderia intracellular survival. Based on imaging studies of intracellular B. thailandensis, we found that PKC-η function stimulates phagocytic pathways that promote B. thailandensis escape into the cytoplasm leading to activation of autophagosome flux. As a result, identification of host kinases that are targeted by Burkholderia during infection provides valuable molecular insights in understanding Burkholderia pathogenesis, and ultimately, in designing effective

  10. Impact of Hfq on Global Gene Expression and Intracellular Survival in Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xinying; Yuan, Xitong; Wang, Zhoujia; Gong, Chunli; Zhuang, Yubin; Lei, Shuangshuang; Su, Xiao; Wang, Xuesong; Huang, Liuyu; Zhong, Zhijun; Peng, Guangneng; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Yufei

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that replicates within macrophages. The ability of brucellae to survive and multiply in the hostile environment of host macrophages is essential to its virulence. The RNA-binding protein Hfq is a global regulator that is involved in stress resistance and pathogenicity. Here we demonstrate that Hfq is essential for stress adaptation and intracellular survival in B. melitensis. A B. melitensis hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced survival under environmental stresses and is attenuated in cultured macrophages and mice. Microarray-based transcriptome analyses revealed that 359 genes involved in numerous cellular processes were dysregulated in the hfq mutant. From these same samples the proteins were also prepared for proteomic analysis to directly identify Hfq-regulated proteins. Fifty-five proteins with significantly affected expression were identified in the hfq mutant. Our results demonstrate that Hfq regulates many genes and/or proteins involved in metabolism, virulence, and stress responses, including those potentially involved in the adaptation of Brucella to the oxidative, acid, heat stress, and antibacterial peptides encountered within the host. The dysregulation of such genes and/or proteins could contribute to the attenuated hfq mutant phenotype. These findings highlight the involvement of Hfq as a key regulator of Brucella gene expression and facilitate our understanding of the role of Hfq in environmental stress adaptation and intracellular survival of B. melitensis. PMID:23977181

  11. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  12. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Activates Canonical Notch Signaling To Downregulate TLR2/4 Expression and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Dunphy, Paige S.; Luo, Tian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ehrlichia chaffeensis preferentially targets mononuclear phagocytes and survives through a strategy of subverting innate immune defenses, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown E. chaffeensis type 1 secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors are involved in diverse molecular pathogen-host interactions, such as the TRP120 interaction with the Notch receptor-cleaving metalloprotease ADAM17. In the present study, we demonstrate E. chaffeensis, via the TRP120 effector, activates the canonical Notch signaling pathway to promote intracellular survival. We found that nuclear translocation of the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain (NICD) occurs in response to E. chaffeensis or recombinant TRP120, resulting in upregulation of Notch signaling pathway components and target genes notch1, adam17, hes, and hey. Significant differences in canonical Notch signaling gene expression levels (>40%) were observed during early and late stages of infection, indicating activation of the Notch pathway. We linked Notch pathway activation specifically to the TRP120 effector, which directly interacts with the Notch metalloprotease ADAM17. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against γ-secretase enzyme, Notch transcription factor complex, Notch1, and ADAM17, we demonstrated that Notch signaling is required for ehrlichial survival. We studied the downstream effects and found that E. chaffeensis TRP120-mediated activation of the Notch pathway causes inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways required for PU.1 and subsequent Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) expression. This investigation reveals a novel mechanism whereby E. chaffeensis exploits the Notch pathway to evade the host innate immune response for intracellular survival. PMID:27381289

  13. The ability of the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi to survive intracellular freezing is dependent upon nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Mélianie R; Wharton, David A

    2013-02-01

    The Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi is the best documented example of an animal surviving intracellular freezing and the only animal so far shown to survive such freezing throughout its tissues. However, a recent study found that after exposure to a freezing stress that produced intracellular freezing in a proportion of nematodes, the resulting survival levels could be explained if those nematodes that froze intracellularly had died. We have thus re-examined the survival of intracellular freezing in this nematode. The ability to survive a freezing exposure that is likely to produce intracellular freezing (freezing at -10 °C) declines with culture age. In cultures that are fed regularly, the ability to survive freezing at -10 °C increases, but in starved cultures freezing survival declines. Survival of intracellular freezing in fed cultures was confirmed using cryomicroscopy, staining of cells with vital dyes and by freeze substitution and transmission electron microscopy. We have thus confirmed that P. davidi can survive intracellular freezing and shown that this ability is dependent upon them being well fed. The effect of culture conditions on the nutrient status of the nematodes should thus be an important factor in the design of experiments.

  14. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development. PMID:28252642

  15. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  16. Host Lipid Bodies as Platforms for Intracellular Survival of Protozoan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Daniel A M; D'Avila, Heloísa; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens induce several changes in the host cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms in order to evade and manipulate the immune response. One prominent pathogen-mediated change is the formation of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets, in the host cell cytoplasm. Protozoan parasites, which contribute expressively to the burden of infectious diseases worldwide, are able to induce LB genesis in non-immune and immune cells, mainly macrophages, key players in the initial resistance to the infection. Under host-parasite interaction, LBs not only accumulate in the host cytoplasm but also relocate around and move into parasitophorous vacuoles. There is increasing evidence that protozoan parasites may target host-derived LBs either for gaining nutrients or for escaping the host immune response. Newly formed, parasite-induced LBs may serve as lipid sources for parasite growth and also produce inflammatory mediators that potentially act in the host immune response deactivation. In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the formation and role of host LBs as sites exploited by intracellular protozoan parasites as a strategy to maintain their own survival.

  17. Host Lipid Bodies as Platforms for Intracellular Survival of Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; D’Avila, Heloísa; Melo, Rossana C. N.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens induce several changes in the host cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms in order to evade and manipulate the immune response. One prominent pathogen-mediated change is the formation of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets, in the host cell cytoplasm. Protozoan parasites, which contribute expressively to the burden of infectious diseases worldwide, are able to induce LB genesis in non-immune and immune cells, mainly macrophages, key players in the initial resistance to the infection. Under host–parasite interaction, LBs not only accumulate in the host cytoplasm but also relocate around and move into parasitophorous vacuoles. There is increasing evidence that protozoan parasites may target host-derived LBs either for gaining nutrients or for escaping the host immune response. Newly formed, parasite-induced LBs may serve as lipid sources for parasite growth and also produce inflammatory mediators that potentially act in the host immune response deactivation. In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the formation and role of host LBs as sites exploited by intracellular protozoan parasites as a strategy to maintain their own survival. PMID:27199996

  18. Transposon Mutagenesis of Mycobacterium marinum Identifies a Locus Linking Pigmentation and Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lian-Yong; Groger, Richard; Cox, Jeffery S.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Lawson, Elise H.; Brown, Eric J.

    2003-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria survive and replicate within host macrophages, but the molecular mechanisms involved in this necessary step in the pathogenesis of infection are not completely understood. Mycobacterium marinum has recently been used as a model for aspects of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis because of its close genetic relationship to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and because of similarities in the pathology and course of infection caused by this organism in its natural hosts, fish and frogs, with tuberculosis in humans. In order to advance the utility of the M. marinum model, we have developed efficient transposon mutagenesis of the organism by using a Drosophila melanogaster mariner-based transposon. To determine the efficiency of transposition, we have analyzed pigmentation mutants from the transposon mutant library. In addition to insertions in four known genes in the pathway of pigment biosynthesis, two insertions in novel genes were identified in our mutant library. One of these is in a putative inhibitor of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. The second unexpected insertion is in an intergenic region between two genes homologous to Rv2603c and Rv2604c of M. tuberculosis. In addition to a pigmentation defect, this mutant showed increased susceptibility to singlet oxygen and grew poorly in murine macrophages. Complementation with M. tuberculosis genomic DNA encompassing Rv2603c to Rv2606c corrected the pigmentation and growth defects of the mutant. These data demonstrate the utility of mariner-based transposon mutagenesis of M. marinum and that M. marinum can be used to study the function of M. tuberculosis genes involved in intracellular survival and replication. PMID:12540574

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans Thermotolerance to Avian Body Temperature Is Sufficient For Extracellular Growth But Not Intracellular Survival In Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Simon A.; Voelz, Kerstin; May, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fatal fungal pathogen of humans that efficiently parasitises macrophages. Birds can be colonised by cryptococci and can transmit cryptococcosis to humans via inhalation of inoculated bird excreta. However, colonisation of birds appears to occur in the absence of symptomatic infection. Here, using a pure population of primary bird macrophages, we demonstrate a mechanism for this relationship. We find that bird macrophages are able to suppress the growth of cryptococci seen in mammalian cells despite C. neoformans being able to grow at bird body temperature, and are able to escape from bird macrophages by vomocytosis. A small subset of cryptococci are able to adapt to the inhibitory intracellular environment of bird macrophages, exhibiting a large cell phenotype that rescues growth suppression. Thus, restriction of intracellular growth combined with survival at bird body temperature explains the ability of birds to efficiently spread C. neoformans in the environment whilst avoiding systemic disease. PMID:26883088

  20. Mir-30d increases intracellular survival of Helicobacter pylori through inhibition of autophagy pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Si, Ruo-Huang; Liang, Yu-He; Ma, Bing-Qiang; Jiang, Ze-Bin; Wang, Bin; Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine if mir-30d inhibits the autophagy response to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) invasion and increases H. pylori intracellular survival. METHODS: The expression of mir-30d was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and autophagy level was examined by transmission electron microscopy, western blot, and GFP-LC3 puncta assay in human AGS cells and GES-1 cells. Luciferase reporter assay was applied to confirm the specificity of mir-30d regulation on the expression of several core molecules involved in autophagy pathway. The expression of multiple core proteins were analyzed at both the mRNA and protein level, and the intracellular survival of H. pylori after different treatments was detected by gentamicin protection assay. RESULTS: Autophagy level was increased in AGS and GES-1 cells in response to H. pylori infection, which was accompanied by upregulation of mir-30d expression (P < 0.05, vs no H. pylori infection). In the two gastric epithelial cell lines, mimic mir-30d was found to repress the autophagy process, whereas mir-30d inhibitor increased autophagy response to H. pylori invasion. mir-30d mimic decreased the luciferase activity of wild type reporter plasmids carrying the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of all five tested genes (ATG2B, ATG5, ATG12, BECN1, and BNIP3L), whereas it had no effect on the mutant reporter plasmids. These five genes are core genes of autophagy pathway, and their expression was reduced significantly after mir-30d mimic transfection (P < 0.05, vs control cells without mir-30d mimic treatment). Mir-30d mimic transfection and direct inhibition of autophagy increased the intracellular survival of H. pylori in AGS cells. CONCLUSION: Mir-30d increases intracellular survival of H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells through inhibition of multiple core proteins in the autophagy pathway. PMID:27099441

  1. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A; Chávez, Francisco P; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host-pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  2. Relevant Genes Linked to Virulence Are Required for Salmonella Typhimurium to Survive Intracellularly in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Sebastián; Varas, Macarena; Valenzuela, Camila; Velozo, Paula; Chahin, Nicolás; Aguilera, Paulina; Sabag, Andrea; Labra, Bayron; Álvarez, Sergio A.; Chávez, Francisco P.; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful model for studying relevant aspects of the host-pathogen interaction. In this work, D. discoideum was used as a model to study the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive in amoebae and to evaluate the contribution of selected genes in this process. To do this, we performed infection assays using axenic cultures of D. discoideum co-cultured with wild-type S. Typhimurium and/or defined mutant strains. Our results confirmed that wild-type S. Typhimurium is able to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. In contrast, mutants ΔaroA and ΔwaaL are defective in intracellular survival in this amoeba. Next, we included in our study a group of mutants in genes directly linked to Salmonella virulence. Of note, mutants ΔinvA, ΔssaD, ΔclpV, and ΔphoPQ also showed an impaired ability to survive intracellularly in D. discoideum. This indicates that S. Typhimurium requires a functional biosynthetic pathway of aromatic compounds, a lipopolysaccharide containing a complete O-antigen, the type III secretion systems (T3SS) encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in SPI-6 and PhoP/PhoQ two-component system to survive in D. discoideum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the requirement of O-antigen and T6SS in the survival of Salmonella within amoebae. In addition, mutants ΔinvA and ΔssaD were internalized in higher numbers than the wild-type strain during competitive infections, suggesting that S. Typhimurium requires the T3SS encoded in SPI-1 and SPI-2 to evade phagocytosis by D. discoideum. Altogether, these results indicate that S. Typhimurium exploits a common set of genes and molecular mechanisms to survive within amoeba and animal host cells. The use of D. discoideum as a model for host–pathogen interactions will allow us to discover the gene repertoire used by Salmonella to survive inside the amoeba and to study the cellular processes that are affected

  3. Influence of site specifically altered Mip proteins on intracellular survival of Legionella pneumophila in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wintermeyer, E; Ludwig, B; Steinert, M; Schmidt, B; Fischer, G; Hacker, J

    1995-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is able to survive intracellularly in eukaryotic cells such as monocytes, macrophages, and protozoan organisms. The Mip (macrophage infectivity potentiator) protein represents a factor of L. pneumophila necessary for optimal intracellular survival. Interestingly, Mip belongs to the substance class of FK 506-binding proteins and exhibits peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity that can be inhibited by the immunosuppressant FK506. In order to identify amino acids most likely to be involved in the enzymatic activity of Mip, site-directed mutagenized Mip proteins were constructed and characterized. It was shown that an Asp-142 to Leu-142 mutation and a Tyr-185 to Ala-185 substitution resulted in strongly reduced PPIase activity of the recombinant Mip proteins (5.3 and 0.6% of the activity of the wild-type Mip, respectively). Genes coding for the wild-type and for site-directed-mutagenized Mip proteins were used to complement three different Mip-negative mutants of the L. pneumophila Corby, Philadelphia I, and Wadsworth. While Mip protein expression could be restored in the corresponding complementants, significant Mip-specific PPIase activity could be detected only in Mip mutants complemented with wild-type mip genes. To investigate the influence of the PPIase activity of Mip on intracellular survival of L. pneumophila, invasion assays were performed using the macrophage-like cell line U937, human blood monocytes, and Acanthamoeba castellanii. The Mip-negative mutants were approximately 50- to 100-fold less infective for A. castellanii and for human mononuclear phagocytes in vitro compared with their isogenic Mip-positive parental strains. The wild-type invasion rate could be restored by introducing an intact copy of the mip gene into Mip-negative strains. In addition, no differences in intracellular survival were observed between the wild-type isolates and the Legionella strains

  4. Survival mechanisms in Antarctic lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Laybourn-Parry, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    In Antarctic lakes, organisms are confronted by continuous low temperatures as well as a poor light climate and nutrient limitation. Such extreme environments support truncated food webs with no fish, few metazoans and a dominance of microbial plankton. The key to success lies in entering the short Antarctic summer with actively growing populations. In many cases, the most successful organisms continue to function throughout the year. The few crustacean zooplankton remain active in the winter months, surviving on endogenous energy reserves and, in some cases, continuing development. Among the Protozoa, mixotrophy is an important nutritional strategy. In the extreme lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, planktonic cryptophytes are forced to sustain a mixotrophic strategy and cannot survive by photosynthesis alone. The dependence on ingesting bacteria varies seasonally and with depth in the water column. In the Vestfold Hills, Pyramimonas, which dominates the plankton of some of the saline lakes, also resorts to mixotrophy, but does become entirely photosynthetic at mid-summer. Mixotrophic ciliates are also common and the entirely photosynthetic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum has a widespread distribution in the saline lakes of the Vestfold Hills, where it attains high concentrations. Bacteria continue to grow all year, showing cycles that appear to be related to the availability of dissolved organic carbon. In saline lakes, bacteria experience sub-zero temperatures for long periods of the year and have developed biochemical adaptations that include anti-freeze proteins, changes in the concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids in their membranes and suites of low-temperature enzymes. PMID:12171649

  5. Intracellular Survival of Brucella spp. in Human Monocytes Involves Conventional Uptake but Special Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, Michael G.; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria-Teresa; Porte, Françoise; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Rouot, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular parasites of various mammals, including humans, typically infecting lymphoid as well as reproductive organs. We have investigated how B. suis and B. melitensis enter human monocytes and in which compartment they survive. Peripheral blood monocytes readily internalized nonopsonized brucellae and killed most of them within 12 to 18 h. The presence of Brucella-specific antibodies (but not complement) increased the uptake of bacteria without increasing their intracellular survival, whereas adherence of the monocytes or incubation in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free medium reduced the uptake. Engulfment of all Brucella organisms (regardless of bacterial viability or virulence) initially resulted in phagosomes with tightly apposed walls (TP). Most TP were fully fusiogenic and matured to spacious phagolysosomes containing degraded bacteria, whereas some TP (more in monocyte-derived macrophages, HeLa cells, and CHO cells than in monocytes) remained tightly apposed to intact bacteria. Immediate treatment of infected host cells with the lysosomotropic base ammonium chloride caused a swelling of all phagosomes and a rise in the intraphagosomal pH, abolishing the intracellular survival of Brucella. These results indicate that (i) human monocytes readily internalize Brucella in a conventional way using various phagocytosis-promoting receptors, (ii) the maturation of some Brucella phagosomes is passively arrested between the steps of acidification and phagosome-lysosome fusion, (iii) brucellae are killed in maturing but not in arrested phagosomes, and (iv) survival of internalized Brucella depends on an acidic intraphagosomal pH and/or close contact with the phagosomal wall. PMID:11349069

  6. Adherence and intracellular survival within human macrophages of Enterococcus faecalis isolates from coastal marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Raffaella; Di Cesare, Andrea; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Vignaroli, Carla; Citterio, Barbara; Amiri, Mehdi; Rossi, Luigia; Magnani, Mauro; Mauro, Alessandro; Biavasco, Francesca

    2015-09-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the human intestinal microbiota and an important nosocomial pathogen. It can be found in the marine environment, where it is also employed as a fecal indicator. To assess the pathogenic potential of marine E. faecalis, four strains isolated from marine sediment were analyzed for their ability to survive in human macrophages. Escherichia coli DH5α was used as a negative control. The number of adherent and intracellular bacteria was determined 2.5 h after the infection (T0) and after further 24h (T24) by CFU and qPCR counts. At T24 adherent and intracellular enterococcal CFU counts were increased for all strains, the increment in intracellular bacteria being particularly marked. No CFU of E. coli DH5α were detected. In contrast, qPCR counts of intracellular enterococcal and E. coli bacteria were similar at both time points. These findings suggest that whereas E. coli was killed within macrophages (no CFU, positive qPCR), the E. faecalis isolates not only escaped killing, but actually multiplied, as demonstrated by the increase in the viable cell population. These findings support earlier data by our group, further documenting that marine sediment can be a reservoir of pathogenic enterococci.

  7. The ability to survive intracellular freezing in nematodes is related to the pattern and distribution of ice formed.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Méliane R; Wharton, David A

    2016-07-01

    A few species of nematodes can survive extensive intracellular freezing throughout all their tissues, an event that is usually thought to be fatal to cells. How are they able to survive in this remarkable way? The pattern and distribution of ice formed, after freezing at -10°C, can be observed using freeze substitution and transmission electron microscopy, which preserves the former position of ice as white spaces. We compared the pattern and distribution of ice formed in a nematode that survives intracellular freezing well (Panagrolaimus sp. DAW1), one that survives poorly (Panagrellus redivivus) and one with intermediate levels of survival (Plectus murrayi). We also examined Panagrolaimus sp. in which the survival of freezing had been compromised by starvation. Levels of survival were as expected and the use of vital dyes indicated cellular damage in those that survived poorly (starved Panagrolaimus sp. and P. murrayi). In fed Panagrolaimus sp. the intracellular ice spaces were small and uniform, whereas in P. redivivus and starved Panagrolaimus sp. there were some large spaces that may be causing cellular damage. The pattern and distribution of ice formed was different in P. murrayi, with a greater number of individuals having no ice or only small intracellular ice spaces. Control of the size of the ice formed is thus important for the survival of intracellular freezing in nematodes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Intracellular Survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Male Urethral Epithelial Cells: Importance of a Hexaacyl Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Phillips, Nancy J.; Shao, Jian Q.; Entz, David D.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Apicella, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strict human pathogen that invades and colonizes the urogenital tracts of males and females. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS) has been shown to play a role in gonococcal pathogenesis. The acyl transferase MsbB is involved in the biosynthesis of the lipid A portion of the LOS. In order to determine the role of an intact lipid A structure on the pathogenesis of N. gonorrhoeae, the msbB gene was cloned and sequenced, a deletion and insertion mutation was introduced into N. gonorrhoeae, and the mutant strain was designated 1291A11K3. Mass spectrometric analyses of 1291A11K3 LOS determined that this mutation resulted in a pentaacyl rather than a hexaacyl lipid A structure. These analyses also demonstrated an increase in the phosphorylation of lipid A and an increase in length of the oligosaccharide of a minor species of the msbB LOS. The interactions of this mutant with male urethral epithelial cells (uec) were examined. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the msbB mutants formed close associations with and were internalized by the uec at levels similar to those of the parent strain. Gentamicin survival assays performed with 1291A11K3 and 1291 bacteria demonstrated that there was no difference in the abilities of the two strains to adhere to uec; however, significantly fewer 1291A11K3 bacteria than parent strain bacteria were recovered from gentamicin-treated uec. These studies suggest that the lipid A modification in the N. gonorrhoeae msbB mutant may render it more susceptible to innate intracellular killing mechanisms when internalized by uec. PMID:11796626

  9. Intracellular survival of Staphylococcus aureus during persistent infection in the insect Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, John E; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Survival of bacteria within host cells and tissues presents a challenge to the immune systems of higher organisms. Escape from phagocytic immune cells compounds this issue, as immune cells become potential vehicles for pathogen dissemination. However, the duration of persistence within phagocytes and its contribution to pathogen load has yet to be determined. We investigate the immunological significance of intracellular persistence within the insect model Tenebrio molitor, assessing the extent, duration and location of bacterial recovery during a persistent infection. Relative abundance of Staphylococcus aureus in both intracellular and extracellular fractions was determined over 21 days, and live S. aureus were successfully recovered from both the hemolymph and within phagocytic immune cells across the entire time course. The proportion of bacteria recovered from within phagocytes also increased over time. Our results show that to accurately estimate pathogen load it is vital to account for bacteria persisting within immune cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of a mechanical shear stress on intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Aubertin, Kelly; Tailleur, Julien; Wilhelm, Claire; Gallet, François

    2017-08-09

    Intracellular trafficking mainly takes place along the microtubules, and its efficiency depends on the local architecture and organization of the cytoskeletal network. In this work, the cytoplasm of stem cells is subjected to mechanical vortexing at a frequency of up to 1 Hz, by using magnetic chains of endosomes embedded in the cell body, in order to locally perturb the network structure. The consequences are evaluated on the directionality and processivity of the spontaneous motion of endosomes. When the same chains are used both to shear the cell medium and to probe the intracellular traffic, a substantial decrease in transport efficiency is detected after applying the mechanical shear. Interestingly, when using different objects to apply the shear and to probe the spontaneous motion, no alteration of the transport efficiency can be detected. We conclude that shaking the vesicles mainly causes their unbinding from the cytoskeletal tracks, but has little influence on the integrity of the network itself. This is corroborated by active microrheology measurements, performed with chains actuated by a magnetic field, and showing that the mechanical compliance of the cytoplasm is similar before and after slow vortexing.

  11. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria. PMID:27118300

  12. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria.

  13. Stallion spermatozoa surviving freezing and thawing experience membrane depolarization and increased intracellular Na().

    PubMed

    Ortega Ferrusola, C; Anel-López, L; Ortiz-Rodriguez, J M; Martin Muñoz, P; Alvarez, M; de Paz, P; Masot, J; Redondo, E; Balao da Silva, C; Morrell, J M; Rodriguez Martinez, H; Tapia, J A; Gil, M C; Anel, L; Peña, F J

    2017-10-03

    In order to gain insight of the modifications that freezing and thawing cause to the surviving population of spermatozoa, changes in the potential of the plasma membrane (Em) and intracellular Na(+) content of stallion spermatozoa were investigated using flow cytometry. Moreover, caspase 3 activity was also investigated and the functionality of the Na(+) -K(+) ATPase pump was investigated before and after freezing and thawing. Cryopreservation caused a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the subpopulation of spermatozoa with depolarized sperm membranes, concomitantly with an increase (p < 0.05) in intracellular Na(+) . These changes occurred in relation to activation of caspase 3 (p < 0.001). Cryopreservation reduced the activity of the Na-K(+) pump and inhibition of the Na(+) -K(+) ATPase pump with ouabain-induced caspase 3 activation. It is concluded that inactivation of Na(+) -K(+) ATPase occurs during cryopreservation, an inhibition that could play a role explaining the accelerated senescence of the surviving population of spermatozoa. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. The Mechanical Environment Modulates Intracellular Calcium Oscillation Activities of Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Charles; Follonier Castella, Lysianne; Smith, Eric A.; Talele, Nilesh; Chow, Melissa L.; Garonna, Adriano; Hinz, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair. PMID:23691248

  15. Intracellular disulfide reduction by phosphine-borane complexes: Mechanism of action for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Niemuth, Nicholas J; Thompson, Alex F; Crowe, Megan E; Lieven, Christopher J; Levin, Leonard A

    2016-10-01

    Phosphine-borane complexes are novel cell-permeable drugs that protect neurons from axonal injury in vitro and in vivo. These drugs activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) cell survival pathway and are therefore neuroprotective, but do not scavenge superoxide. In order to understand the interaction between superoxide signaling of neuronal death and the action of phosphine-borane complexes, their biochemical activity in cell-free and in vitro assays was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry and using an intracellular dithiol reporter that becomes fluorescent when its disulfide bond is cleaved. These studies demonstrated that bis(3-propionic acid methyl ester) phenylphosphine-borane complex (PB1) and (3-propionic acid methyl ester) diphenylphosphine-borane complex (PB2) are potent intracellular disulfide reducing agents which are cell permeable. EPR and pharmacological studies demonstrated reducing activity but not scavenging of superoxide. Given that phosphine-borane complexes reduce cell injury from mitochondrial superoxide generation but do not scavenge superoxide, this implies a mechanism where an intracellular superoxide burst induces downstream formation of protein disulfides. The redox-dependent cleavage of the disulfides is therefore a novel mechanism of neuroprotection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of caveolae in Leishmania chagasi phagocytosis and intracellular survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Nilda E; Gaur, Upasna; Wilson, Mary E

    2006-07-01

    Caveolae are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol, ganglioside M1 (GM1) and caveolin-1. We explored whether caveolae facilitate the entry of Leishmania chagasi into murine macrophages. Transient depletion of macrophage membrane cholesterol by 1 h exposure to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD) impaired the phagocytosis of non-opsonized and serum-opsonized virulent L. chagasi. In contrast, MbetaCD did not affect the phagocytosis of opsonized attenuated L. chagasi. As early as 5 min after phagocytosis, virulent L. chagasi colocalized with the caveolae markers GM1 and caveolin-1, and colocalization continued for over 48 h. We explored the kinetics of lysosome fusion. Whereas fluorescent-labelled dextran entered macrophage lysosomes by 30 min after addition, localization of L. chagasi in lysosomes was delayed for 24-48 h after phagocytosis. However, after transient depletion of cholesterol from macrophage membrane with MbetaCD, the proportion of L. chagasi-containing phagosomes that fused with lysosomes increased significantly. Furthermore, intracellular replication was impaired in parasites entering after transient cholesterol depletion, even though lipid microdomains were restored by 4 h after treatment. These observations suggest that virulent L. chagasi localize in caveolae during phagocytosis by host macrophages, and that cholesterol-containing macrophage membrane domains, such as caveolae, target parasites to a pathway that promotes delay of lysosome fusion and intracellular survival.

  17. Gene set analysis of survival following ovarian cancer implicates macrolide binding and intracellular signaling genes.

    PubMed

    Fridley, Brooke L; Jenkins, Gregory D; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Song, Honglin; Bolton, Kelly L; Fenstermacher, David; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Iversen, Ed; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sutphen, Rebecca; Gayther, Simon A; Hartmann, Lynn C; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Goode, Ellen L

    2012-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, have identified novel susceptibility loci. GWAS for survival after EOC have had more limited success. The association of each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) individually may not be well suited to detect small effects of multiple SNPs, such as those operating within the same biologic pathway. Gene set analysis (GSA) overcomes this limitation by assessing overall evidence for association of a phenotype with all measured variation in a set of genes. To determine gene sets associated with EOC overall survival, we conducted GSA using data from two large GWAS (N cases = 2,813, N deaths = 1,116), with a novel Principal Component-Gamma GSA method. Analysis was completed for all cases and then separately for high-grade serous histologic subtype. Analysis of the high-grade serous subjects resulted in 43 gene sets with P < 0.005 (1.7%); of these, 21 gene sets had P < 0.10 in both GWAS, including intracellular signaling pathway (P = 7.3 × 10(-5)) and macrolide binding (P = 6.2 × 10(-4)) gene sets. The top gene sets in analysis of all cases were meiotic mismatch repair (P = 6.3 × 10(-4)) and macrolide binding (P = 1.0 × 10(-3)). Of 18 gene sets with P < 0.005 (0.7%), eight had P < 0.10 in both GWAS. This research detected novel gene sets associated with EOC survival. Novel gene sets associated with EOC survival might lead to new insights and avenues for development of novel therapies for EOC and pharmacogenomic studies. ©2012 AACR.

  18. Thermal and non-thermal intracellular mechanical fluctuations of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Intracellular stresses generated by molecular motors can actively modify cytoskeletal network, which causes changes in intracellular mechanical properties. We study the out-of-equilibrium microrheology in living cells. This paper reports measurements of the intracellular mechanical properties using passive and optical tweezers-based active microrheology approaches and endogenous organelle particles as probes. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we compared the two approaches measurements and distinguished thermal and non-thermal fluctuations of mechanical properties in living cells.

  19. The Essential Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium leprae Is Not Coupled to Central Carbon Metabolism and Energy Production

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Maria Angela M.; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Rosa, Thabatta L. S. A.; Pujari, Venugopal; Lemes, Robertha M. R.; Lery, Leticia M. S.; Silva, Carlos Adriano M.; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R.; Atella, Georgia C.; Wheat, William H.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Crick, Dean C.; Belisle, John T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium leprae induces the formation of lipid droplets, which are recruited to pathogen-containing phagosomes in infected macrophages and Schwann cells. Cholesterol is among the lipids with increased abundance in M. leprae-infected cells, and intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation. The present study investigated the capacity of M. leprae to acquire and metabolize cholesterol. In silico analyses showed that oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one (cholestenone), the first step of cholesterol degradation catalyzed by the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is apparently the only portion of the cholesterol catabolic pathway seen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis preserved by M. leprae. Incubation of bacteria with radiolabeled cholesterol confirmed the in silico predictions. Radiorespirometry and lipid analyses performed after incubating M. leprae with [4-14C]cholesterol or [26-14C]cholesterol showed the inability of this pathogen to metabolize the sterol rings or the side chain of cholesterol as a source of energy and carbon. However, the bacteria avidly incorporated cholesterol and, as expected, converted it to cholestenone both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that M. leprae has lost the capacity to degrade and utilize cholesterol as a nutritional source but retains the enzyme responsible for its oxidation to cholestenone. Thus, the essential role of cholesterol metabolism in the intracellular survival of M. leprae is uncoupled from central carbon metabolism and energy production. Further elucidation of cholesterol metabolism in the host cell during M. leprae infection will establish the mechanism by which this lipid supports M. leprae intracellular survival and will open new avenues for novel leprosy therapies. IMPORTANCE Our study focused on the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and its capacity to metabolize cholesterol. The data make an important contribution for those interested in

  20. The Essential Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium leprae Is Not Coupled to Central Carbon Metabolism and Energy Production.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Angela M; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Rosa, Thabatta L S A; Pujari, Venugopal; Lemes, Robertha M R; Lery, Leticia M S; Silva, Carlos Adriano M; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R; Atella, Georgia C; Wheat, William H; Brennan, Patrick J; Crick, Dean C; Belisle, John T; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae induces the formation of lipid droplets, which are recruited to pathogen-containing phagosomes in infected macrophages and Schwann cells. Cholesterol is among the lipids with increased abundance in M. leprae-infected cells, and intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation. The present study investigated the capacity of M. leprae to acquire and metabolize cholesterol. In silico analyses showed that oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one (cholestenone), the first step of cholesterol degradation catalyzed by the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is apparently the only portion of the cholesterol catabolic pathway seen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis preserved by M. leprae. Incubation of bacteria with radiolabeled cholesterol confirmed the in silico predictions. Radiorespirometry and lipid analyses performed after incubating M. leprae with [4-(14)C]cholesterol or [26-(14)C]cholesterol showed the inability of this pathogen to metabolize the sterol rings or the side chain of cholesterol as a source of energy and carbon. However, the bacteria avidly incorporated cholesterol and, as expected, converted it to cholestenone both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that M. leprae has lost the capacity to degrade and utilize cholesterol as a nutritional source but retains the enzyme responsible for its oxidation to cholestenone. Thus, the essential role of cholesterol metabolism in the intracellular survival of M. leprae is uncoupled from central carbon metabolism and energy production. Further elucidation of cholesterol metabolism in the host cell during M. leprae infection will establish the mechanism by which this lipid supports M. leprae intracellular survival and will open new avenues for novel leprosy therapies. Our study focused on the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and its capacity to metabolize cholesterol. The data make an important contribution for those interested in understanding the

  1. Bacterial proteases in disease - role in intracellular survival, evasion of coagulation/ fibrinolysis innate defenses, toxicoses and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Grzegorz; Koziel, Joanna; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Wladyka, Benedykt; Potempa, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms aimed to evade host defenses. This review summarizes selected examples of how bacteria utilize proteolytic enzymes to efficiently establish and spread infection systemically. First, the role of proteases in intracellular survival and persistence - the primary means used by bacteria to endure phagocytosis and/or avoid the vigilance of the immune system - is discussed. Second, it is demonstrated how some bacteria escape entanglement in fibrin(ogen) meshes, by inducing their proteolytic dissolution while other species modify the proteolytic cascade of mesh formation to divert this important innate immune defense for their own benefit. Third, bacterial proteolytic toxins are introduced, which allow microorganisms to exert and take advantage of systemic effects already during primary, localized infection. Finally, it is discussed how viruses utilize bacterial proteases by taking advantage of concurrent infection, and how pathogens may even mutually benefit from the joint presence of other pathogens. The reviewed adaptations are often essential for pathogen survival in the hostile environment of a host organism. As such, the potential benefits of pharmacological interference in relevant pathways for the struggle against bacterial pathogens are also discussed.

  2. Intracellular Trafficking Modulation by Ginsenoside Rg3 Inhibits Brucella abortus Uptake and Intracellular Survival within RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-03-28

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, has various pharmacological and biological activities; however, its effects against Brucella infection are still unclear. Herein, the inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against intracellular parasitic Brucella infection were evaluated through bacterial infection, adherence assays, and LAMP-1 colocalization, as well as immunoblotting and FACS for detecting MAPK signaling proteins and F-actin polymerization, respectively. The internalization, intracellular growth, and adherence of Brucella abortus in Rg3-treated RAW 264.7 cells were significantly decreased compared with the Rg3-untreated control. Furthermore, an apparent reduction of F-actin content and intensity of F-actin fluorescence in Rg3-treated cells was observed compared with B. abortus-infected cells without treatment by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. In addition, treating cells with Rg3 decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling proteins such as ERK 1/2 and p38 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, the colocalization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was markedly increased in Rg3-treated cells. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits B. abortus infection in mammalian cells and can be used as an alternative approach in the treatment of brucellosis.

  3. Subcellular Localization of the Intracellular Survival-Enhancing Eis Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, John L.; Wei, Jun; Moulder, James W.; Laal, Suman; Friedman, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that has evolved the ability to survive and multiply within human macrophages. It is not clear how M. tuberculosis avoids the destructive action of macrophages, but this ability is fundamental in the pathogenicity of tuberculosis. A gene previously identified in M. tuberculosis, designated eis, was found to enhance intracellular survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis in the human macrophage-like cell line U-937 (J. Wei et al., J. Bacteriol. 182:377–384, 2000). When eis was introduced into M. smegmatis on a multicopy vector, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the appearance of a unique 42-kDa protein band corresponding to the predicted molecular weight of the eis gene product. This band was electroeluted from the gel with a purity of >90% and subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, which demonstrated that the 42-kDa band was indeed the protein product of eis. The Eis protein produced by M. tuberculosis H37Ra had an identical N-terminal amino acid sequence. A synthetic polypeptide corresponding to a carboxyl-terminal region of the deduced eis protein sequence was used to generate affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies that reacted with the 42-kDa protein in Western blot analysis. Hydropathy profile analysis showed the Eis protein to be predominantly hydrophilic with a potential hydrophobic amino terminus. Phase separation of M. tuberculosis H37Ra lysates by the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 revealed the Eis protein in both the aqueous and detergent phases. After fractionation of M. tuberculosis by differential centrifugation, Eis protein appeared mainly in the cytoplasmic fraction but also in the membrane, cell wall, and culture supernatant fractions as well. Forty percent of the sera from pulmonary tuberculosis patients tested for anti-Eis antibody gave positive reactions in Western blot analysis. Although the function of Eis remains unknown, evidence

  4. Pathogenic intracellular and autoimmune mechanisms in urticaria and angioedema.

    PubMed

    Altman, Katherine; Chang, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Urticaria and angioedema are common disorders. Chronic urticaria is defined as lasting longer than 6 weeks. Causes of chronic urticaria fall into the following categories: physical, allergic, hereditary, autoimmune, and idiopathic. Basophils and mast cells are the primary effector cells responsible for clinical symptoms and signs. These cells produce and secrete a variety of mediators including histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines, and other pro-inflammatory mediators. This leads to vasodilation, fluid exudation, increased vascular permeability, and accumulation of additional secondary inflammatory cells. Two mechanisms have been investigated as possibly contributing to the pathogenesis of chronic urticaria. One is the development of autoantibodies to FcεRI or IgE on mast cells and basophils. This appears to be responsible for 30-50 % of cases. The other is dysregulation of intracellular signaling pathways involving Syk, SHIP-1, or SHIP-2 in basophils and mast cells. The primary treatment for chronic urticaria is to treat the underlying pathology, if any can be identified. Otherwise, in idiopathic cases, H1 antihistamines, H2 antihistamines, antileukotrienes, and corticosteroids constitute the main pharmacologic treatment modalities. In severe and recalcitrant cases of chronic and autoimmune urticaria, immunosuppressive drugs have been used, most commonly cyclosporin. More recent experimental studies have also suggested that omalizumab, an anti-IgE therapy, may be of benefit. Currently, inhibitors of Syk are also being developed and tested in the laboratory and in animal models. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of idiopathic urticaria increases, development of additional drugs targeting these pathways may provide relief for the significant physical and psychological morbidity experienced by patients with this disorder.

  5. Involvement of intracellular calcium in anaerobic gene expression and survival of maize seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Subbaiah, C C; Zhang, J; Sachs, M M

    1994-01-01

    Ca-mediated processes are known to be involved in transducing many developmental, hormonal, and environmental cues in plant cells. In this study, the role of Ca in the perception of anoxic stress signals by maize (Zea mays L. cv B73) roots was assessed by studying the effect of various Ca antagonists on the induction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and sucrose synthase mRNA as well as ADH activity under anoxia. The effect of these compounds on the poststress recovery of the seedlings was also monitored. Ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor of organellar Ca fluxes, repressed the anoxic activation of the alcohol dehydrogenase1 and shrunken1 genes as measured by their transcript levels as well as ADH activity. Furthermore, RR-treated seedlings could not recover even after only 2 h of flooding, in contrast to untreated B73 seedlings that survived 72 h of submergence. Ca, when supplied along with RR, allowed normal anoxic gene expression and also prevented the RR-imposed death of the seedlings from short-term anoxia. Ca (45Ca) fluxes were measured in maize roots to elucidate the mode of action of RR. RR abolished anoxia-stimulated 45Ca influx into maize roots but did not affect aerobic Ca2+ uptake, unlike a few other antagonists that blocked both the aerobic and anoxic fluxes. However, Ca uptake across the plasma membrane was not necessary for the adaptive response to anoxia, since chelation of extracellular Ca by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid did not affect the induction of ADH activity or poststress survival of flooded seedlings. The data suggest that RR may act on one of the intracellular stores of Ca and the Ca mobilized from this source is a physiological transducer of anoxic stress signals in maize roots. PMID:7518090

  6. Intracellular survival and replication of Vibrio cholerae O139 in aquatic free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Abd, Hadi; Weintraub, Andrej; Sandström, Gunnar

    2005-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a highly infectious bacterium responsible for large outbreaks of cholera among humans at regular intervals. A seasonal distribution of epidemics is known but the role of naturally occurring habitats are virtually unknown. Plankton has been suggested to play a role, because bacteria can attach to such organisms forming a biofilm. Acanthamoebea castellanii is an environmental amoeba that has been shown to be able to ingest and promote growth of several bacteria of different origin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not an intra-amoebic behaviour of V. cholerae O139 exists. Interaction between these microorganisms in co-culture was studied by culturable counts, gentamicin assay, electron microscopy, and polymerase chain reaction. The interaction resulted in intra-amoebic growth and survival of V. cholerae in the cytoplasm of trophozoites as well as in the cysts of A. castellanii. These data show symbiosis between these microorganisms, a facultative intracellular behaviour of V. cholerae contradicting the generally held view, and a role of free-living amoebae as hosts for V. cholerae O139. Taken together, this opens new doors to study the ecology, immunity, epidemiology, and treatment of cholera.

  7. Intracellular Survival of Leishmania major Depends on Uptake and Degradation of Extracellular Matrix Glycosaminoglycans by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Eleanor C.; Kloehn, Joachim; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Brown, Tracey J.; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Leishmania parasites replicate within the phagolysosome compartment of mammalian macrophages. Although Leishmania depend on sugars as a major carbon source during infections, the nutrient composition of the phagolysosome remains poorly described. To determine the origin of the sugar carbon source in macrophage phagolysosomes, we have generated a N-acetylglucosamine acetyltransferase (GNAT) deficient Leishmania major mutant (∆gnat) that is auxotrophic for the amino sugar, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). This mutant was unable to grow or survive in ex vivo infected macrophages even when macrophages were cultivated in presence of exogenous GlcNAc. In contrast, the L. major ∆gnat mutant induced normal skin lesions in mice, suggesting that these parasites have access to GlcNAc in tissue macrophages. Intracellular growth of the mutant in ex vivo infected macrophages was restored by supplementation of the macrophage medium with hyaluronan, a GlcNAc-rich extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan. Hyaluronan is present and constitutively turned-over in Leishmania-induced skin lesions and is efficiently internalized into Leishmania containing phagolysosomes. These findings suggest that the constitutive internalization and degradation of host glycosaminoglycans by macrophages provides Leishmania with essential carbon sources, creating a uniquely favorable niche for these parasites. PMID:26334531

  8. Transcription of innate immunity genes and cytokine secretion by canine macrophages resistant or susceptible to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; da Costa, Luciana Fachini; Romão, Everton de Lima; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2015-01-15

    In this study we assessed the basal transcription of genes associated with innate immunity (i.e. Nramp1, NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9) in canine monocyte-derived macrophages from Leishmania-free dogs. Additionally, secretion of cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ) and nitric oxide in culture supernatants of macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum was also measured. Constitutive transcription of TLR9 and NOD2 were negligible; NOD1, TLR1, and TLR7 had low levels of transcription, whereas Nramp1 and TLR2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 had higher levels of constitutive transcription in canine monocyte-derived macrophages. There were no significant differences in transcription between macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of L. infantum. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in more resistant macrophages (designated as resistant) at 24h after infection when compared to less resistant macrophages (designated as susceptible), as well as the secretion of IFN-γ at 72 h post infection. Secretion of IL-10 was lower in resistant macrophages at 24h after infection. No detectable production of nitric oxide was observed. Interestingly, there was a negative correlation between NOD2 transcript levels and intracellular survival of L. infantum in resistant macrophages. This study demonstrated that decreased intracellular survival of L. infantum in canine macrophages was associated with increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and decreased production of IL-10; and that constitutive transcription of Nramp1, TLR and NLR does not interfere in intracellular survival of L. infantum.

  9. Mechanisms of cell survival in myocardial hibernation.

    PubMed

    Depre, Christophe; Vatner, Stephen F

    2005-04-01

    Myocardial hibernation represents a condition of regional ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic coronary artery disease, which reverses gradually after revascularization. The precise mechanism mediating the regional dysfunction is still debated. One hypothesis suggests that chronic hypoperfusion results in a self-protecting downregulation in myocardial function and metabolism to match the decreased oxygen supply. An alternative hypothesis suggests that the myocardium is subject to repetitive episodes of ischemic dysfunction resulting from an imbalance between myocardial metabolic demand and supply that eventually creates a sustained depression of contractility. It is generally agreed that hibernating myocardium is submitted repeatedly to ischemic stress, and therefore one question persists: how do myocytes survive in the setting of chronic ischemia? The hallmark of hibernating myocardium is a maintained viability of the dysfunctional myocardium which relies on an increased uptake of glucose. We propose that, in addition to this metabolic adjustment, there must be molecular switches that confer resistance to ischemia in hibernating myocardium. Such mechanisms include the activation of a genomic program of cell survival as well as autophagy. These protective mechanisms are induced by ischemia and remain activated chronically as long as either sustained or intermittent ischemia persists.

  10. The role of PIP2 and the IP3/DAG pathway in intracellular calcium release and cell survival during nanosecond electric pulse exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phospholipid of particular importance in cell-signaling pathways. Hydrolysis of PIP2 releases inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) from the membrane, activating IP3 receptors on the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and facilitating a release of intracellular calcium stores and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recent studies suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause depletion of PIP2 in the cellular membrane, activating the IP3 signaling pathway. However, the exact mechanism(s) causing this observed depletion of PIP2 are unknown. Complicating the matter, nsPEF create nanopores in the plasma membrane, allowing calcium to enter the cell and thus causing an increase in intracellular calcium. While elevated intracellular calcium can cause activation of phospholipase C (PLC) (a known catalyst of PIP2 hydrolysis), PIP2 depletion has been shown to occur in the absence of both extracellular and intracellular calcium. These observations have led to the hypothesis that the high electric field itself may be playing a direct role in the hydrolysis of PIP2 from the plasma membrane. To support this hypothesis, we used edelfosine to block PLC and prevent activation of the IP3/DAG pathway in Chinese Hamster Ovarian (CHO) cells prior to applying nsPEF. Fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor intracellular calcium bursts during nsPEF, while MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) survivability assays were utilized to determine whether edelfosine improved cell survival during nsPEF exposure. This work is critical to refine the role of PIP2 in the cellular response to nsPEF, and also to determine the fundamental biological effects of high electric field exposures.

  11. Role of Metal-Dependent Regulation of ESX-3 Secretion in Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tinaztepe, Emir; Wei, Jun-Rong; Raynowska, Jenelle; Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Thompson, Victor; Philips, Jennifer A

    2016-08-01

    More people die every year from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than from infection by any other bacterial pathogen. Type VII secretion systems (T7SS) are used by both environmental and pathogenic mycobacteria to secrete proteins across their complex cell envelope. In the nonpathogen Mycobacterium smegmatis, the ESX-1 T7SS plays a role in conjugation, and the ESX-3 T7SS is involved in metal homeostasis. In M. tuberculosis, these secretion systems have taken on roles in virulence, and they also are targets of the host immune response. ESX-3 secretes a heterodimer composed of EsxG (TB9.8) and EsxH (TB10.4), which impairs phagosome maturation in macrophages and is essential for virulence in mice. Given the importance of EsxG and EsxH during infection, we examined their regulation. With M. tuberculosis, the secretion of EsxG and EsxH was regulated in response to iron and zinc, in accordance with the previously described transcriptional response of the esx-3 locus to these metals. While iron regulated the esx-3 expression in both M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis, there is a significant difference in the dynamics of this regulation. In M. smegmatis, the esx-3 locus behaved like other iron-regulated genes such as mbtB In M. tuberculosis, both iron and zinc modestly repressed esx-3 expression. Diminished secretion of EsxG and EsxH in response to these metals altered the interaction of M. tuberculosis with macrophages, leading to impaired intracellular M. tuberculosis survival. Our findings detail the regulatory differences of esx-3 in M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis and demonstrate the importance of metal-dependent regulation of ESX-3 for virulence in M. tuberculosis.

  12. Hearts of surviving MLP-KO mice show transient changes of intracellular calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Kemecsei, Péter; Miklós, Zsuzsanna; Bíró, Tamás; Marincsák, Rita; Tóth, Balázs I; Komlódi-Pásztor, Edina; Barnucz, Eniko; Mirk, Eva; Van der Vusse, Ger J; Ligeti, László; Ivanics, Tamás

    2010-09-01

    The muscle Lim protein knock-out (MLP-KO) mouse model is extensively used for studying the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, explanation is lacking for the observed long survival of the diseased mice which develop until adulthood despite the gene defect, which theoretically predestines them to early death due to heart failure. We hypothesized that adaptive changes of cardiac intracellular calcium (Ca(i)(2+)) handling might explain the phenomenon. In order to study the progression of changes in cardiac function and Ca(i)(2+) cycling, myocardial Ca(i)(2+)-transients recorded by Indo-1 surface fluorometry were assessed with concomitant measurement of hemodynamic performance in isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts of 3- and 9-month old MLP-KO animals. Hearts were challenged with beta-agonist isoproterenol and the sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). Cardiac mRNA content and levels of key Ca(2+) handling proteins were also measured. A decline in lusitropic function was observed in 3-month old, but not in 9-month old MLP-KO mice under unchallenged conditions. beta-adrenergic responses to isoproterenol were similar in all the studied groups. The CPA induced an increase in end-diastolic Ca(i)(2+)-level and a decrease in Ca(2+)-sequestration capacity in 3-month old MLP-KO mice compared to age-matched controls. This unfavorable condition was absent at 9 months of age. SERCA2a expression was lower in 3-month old MLP-KO than in the corresponding controls and in 9-month old MLP-KO hearts. Our results show time-related recovery of hemodynamic function and an age-dependent compensatory upregulation of Ca(i)(2+) handling in hearts of MLP-KO mice, which most likely involve the normalization of the expression of SERCA2a in the affected hearts.

  13. Intracellular Survival and Persistence of Chlamydia muridarum Is Determined by Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gracey, Eric; Lin, Aifeng; Akram, Ali; Chiu, Basil; Inman, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages can display a number of distinct phenotypes, known collectively as polarized macrophages. The best defined of these phenotypes are the classically-activated, interferon gamma (IFNγ)/LPS induced (M1) and alternatively-activated, IL-4 induced (M2) macrophages. The goal of this study is to characterize macrophage-Chlamydia interactions in the context of macrophage polarization. Here we use Chlamydia muridarum and murine bone-marrow derived macrophages to show Chlamydia does not induce M2 polarization in macrophages as a survival strategy. Unexpectedly, the infection of macrophages was silent with no upregulation of M1 macrophage-associated genes. We further demonstrate that macrophages polarized prior to infection have a differential capacity to control Chlamydia. M1 macrophages harbor up to 40-fold lower inclusion forming units (IFU) than non-polarized or M2 polarized macrophages. Gene expression analysis showed an increase in 16sRNA in M2 macrophages with no change in M1 macrophages. Suppressed Chlamydia growth in M1 macrophages correlated with the induction of a bacterial gene expression profile typical of persistence as evident by increased Euo expression and decreased Omp1 and Tal expression. Observations of permissive Chlamydia growth in non-polarized and M2 macrophages and persistence in M1 macrophages were supported through electron microscopy. This work supports the importance of IFNγ in the innate immune response to Chlamydia. However, demonstration that the M1 macrophages, despite an antimicrobial signature, fail to eliminate intracellular Chlamydia supports the notion that host–pathogen co-evolution has yielded a pathogen that can evade cellular defenses against this pathogen, and persist for prolonged periods of time in the host. PMID:23967058

  14. Role of Metal-Dependent Regulation of ESX-3 Secretion in Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tinaztepe, Emir; Wei, Jun-Rong; Raynowska, Jenelle; Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Thompson, Victor

    2016-01-01

    More people die every year from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than from infection by any other bacterial pathogen. Type VII secretion systems (T7SS) are used by both environmental and pathogenic mycobacteria to secrete proteins across their complex cell envelope. In the nonpathogen Mycobacterium smegmatis, the ESX-1 T7SS plays a role in conjugation, and the ESX-3 T7SS is involved in metal homeostasis. In M. tuberculosis, these secretion systems have taken on roles in virulence, and they also are targets of the host immune response. ESX-3 secretes a heterodimer composed of EsxG (TB9.8) and EsxH (TB10.4), which impairs phagosome maturation in macrophages and is essential for virulence in mice. Given the importance of EsxG and EsxH during infection, we examined their regulation. With M. tuberculosis, the secretion of EsxG and EsxH was regulated in response to iron and zinc, in accordance with the previously described transcriptional response of the esx-3 locus to these metals. While iron regulated the esx-3 expression in both M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis, there is a significant difference in the dynamics of this regulation. In M. smegmatis, the esx-3 locus behaved like other iron-regulated genes such as mbtB. In M. tuberculosis, both iron and zinc modestly repressed esx-3 expression. Diminished secretion of EsxG and EsxH in response to these metals altered the interaction of M. tuberculosis with macrophages, leading to impaired intracellular M. tuberculosis survival. Our findings detail the regulatory differences of esx-3 in M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis and demonstrate the importance of metal-dependent regulation of ESX-3 for virulence in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27245412

  15. Mechanisms of Borrelia burgdorferi internalization and intracellular innate immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Kern, Aurelie

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease is a long-term infection whose most severe pathology is characterized by inflammatory arthritis of the lower bearing joints, carditis, and neuropathy. The inflammatory cascades are initiated through the early recognition of invading Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes by cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophage. B. burgdorferi does not have an intracellular niche and thus much research has focused on immune pathways activated by pathogen recognition molecules at the cell surface, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, in recent years, studies have shown that internalization of the bacterium by host cells is an important component of the defense machinery in response to B. burgdorferi. Upon internalization, B. burgdorferi is trafficked through an endo/lysosomal pathway resulting in the activation of a number of intracellular pathogen recognition receptors including TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs). Here we will review the innate immune molecules that participate in both cell surface and intracellular immune activation by B. burgdorferi.

  16. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Ebbinghaus, M.; Santen, L.

    2015-09-01

    Cells are the elementary units of living organisms, which are able to carry out many vital functions. These functions rely on active processes on a microscopic scale. Therefore, they are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems, which are driven by continuous energy supply. The tasks that have to be performed in order to maintain the cell alive require transportation of various ingredients, some being small, others being large. Intracellular transport processes are able to induce concentration gradients and to carry objects to specific targets. These processes cannot be carried out only by diffusion, as cells may be crowded, and quite elongated on molecular scales. Therefore active transport has to be organized. The cytoskeleton, which is composed of three types of filaments (microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments), determines the shape of the cell, and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for a special kind of vehicles, namely the cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated. The interest for this type of question was enhanced when it was discovered that intracellular transport breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. Our review includes on the one hand an overview of biological facts, obtained from experiments, and on the other hand a presentation of some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We present some background knowledge on the original and variants of the TASEP (Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process), before turning to more application oriented models. After addressing microtubule based transport in general, with a focus on in vitro experiments, and on cooperative effects in the

  17. Dextran sulfate sodium upregulates MAPK signaling for the uptake and subsequent intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Hop, Huynh Tan; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Kim, Dong Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-02-01

    Brucellosis is one of the major zoonoses worldwide that inflicts important health problems in animal and human. Here, we demonstrated that dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) significantly increased adhesion of Brucella (B.) abortus in murine macrophages compared to untreated cells. Even without infection, Brucella uptake into macrophages increased and F-actin reorganization was induced compared with untreated cells. Furthermore, DSS increased the phosphorylation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and p38α) in Brucella-infected, DSS-treated cells compared with the control cells. Lastly, DSS markedly increased the intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in macrophages by up to 48 h. These results suggest that DSS enhanced the adhesion and phagocytosis of B. abortus into murine macrophages by stimulating the MAPK signaling proteins phospho-ERK1/2 and p38α and that DSS increased the intracellular survival of B. abortus by inhibiting colocalization of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) with the late endosome marker LAMP-1. This study emphasizes the enhancement of the phagocytic and intracellular modulatory effects of DSS, which may suppress the innate immune system and contribute to prolonged Brucella survival and chronic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. TceSR two-component regulatory system of Brucella melitensis 16M is involved in invasion, intracellular survival and regulated cytotoxicity for macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Fu, Q; Wang, Z; Li, T; Zhang, H; Guo, F; Wang, Y; Zhang, J; Chen, C

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms of invasion and intracellular survival of Brucella are still poorly understood. Previous studies showed that the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) play an important role in the intracellular survival of Brucella. To investigate if TCSs involve in the virulence and cytotoxicity of Brucella melitensis, we introduced a mutation into one of the TCSs in chromosome II in Br. melitensis 16M strain, and generated 16MΔTceSR, a mutant of Br. melitensis 16M strain. In vitro infection experiments using murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) showed that the survival of 16MΔTceSR mutant in macrophages decreased 0·91-log compared with that of wild type Br. melitensis 16M strain at 2 h postinfection, replication of 16MΔTceSR mutant in macrophages was 5·65-log, which was much lower than that wild type strain. Results of lactate dehydrogenase cytotoxicity assays in macrophages demonstrated high dose infection with wide type strain produced high level cytotoxicity to macrophages, but 16MΔTceSR mutant had very low level cytotoxicity, indicating mutation of TCSs impaired the cytotoxicity of Br. melitensis to macrophages. Animal experiments showed that the spleen colonization of 16MΔTceSR was significantly reduced compared with its wild type strains. The lower levels of survival of 16MΔTceSR in various stress conditions suggested that the mutation of the TCSs of Br. melitensis was the causative factor of its reduced resistance to stress conditions. Taken together, our results demonstrated TCS TceSR involves in the intracellular survival, virulence and cytotoxicity of Br. melitensis during its infection. Significance and impact of the study: Two-component systems (TCSs) are predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. The pathogenicity of Brucella is due to its ability to adapt to the intracellular environment including low levels of acidic pH, high-salt and heat shock. TCSs are designed to sense diverse stimuli, transfer signals and enact an

  19. Effects of age and macrophage lineage on intracellular survival and cytokine induction after infection with Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Sturgill, Tracy L

    2014-07-15

    Rhodococcus equi, a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, causes life-threatening pneumonia in foals and in people with underlying immune deficiencies. As a basis for this study, we hypothesized that macrophage lineage and age would affect intracellular survival of R. equi and cytokine induction after infection. Monocyte-derived and bronchoalveolar macrophages from 10 adult horses and from 10 foals (sampled at 1-3 days, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 5 months of age) were infected ex vivo with virulent R. equi. Intracellular R. equi were quantified and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IL-18, IFN-γ, and TNF-α was measured. Intracellular replication of R. equi was significantly (P<0.001) greater in bronchoalveolar than in monocyte-derived macrophages, regardless of age. Regardless of the macrophage lineage, replication of R. equi was significantly (P=0.002) higher in 3-month-old foals than in 3-day old foals, 2-week-old foals, 1-month-old foals, and adult horses. Expression of IL-4 mRNA was significantly higher in monocyte-derived macrophages whereas expression of IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-α was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar macrophages. Induction of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and IL-8 mRNA in bronchoalveolar macrophages of 1-3-day old foals was significantly higher than in older foals or adult horses. Preferential intracellular survival of R. equi in bronchoalveolar macrophages of juvenile horses may play a role in the pulmonary tropism of the pathogen and in the window of age susceptibility to infection.

  20. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  1. Functional Validation of ABCA3 as a Miltefosine Transporter in Human Macrophages: IMPACT ON INTRACELLULAR SURVIVAL OF LEISHMANIA (VIANNIA) PANAMENSIS.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Luuk C T; Navas, Adriana; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Gregory, David J; Kip, Anke; Dorlo, Thomas P C; Gomez, Maria Adelaida

    2016-04-29

    Within its mammalian host, Leishmania resides and replicates as an intracellular parasite. The direct activity of antileishmanials must therefore depend on intracellular drug transport, metabolism, and accumulation within the host cell. In this study, we explored the role of human macrophage transporters in the intracellular accumulation and antileishmanial activity of miltefosine (MLF), the only oral drug available for the treatment of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Membrane transporter gene expression in primary human macrophages infected in vitro with Leishmania Viannia panamensis and exposed to MLF showed modulation of ABC and solute liquid carrier transporters gene transcripts. Among these, ABCA3, a lipid transporter, was significantly induced after exposure to MLF, and this induction was confirmed in primary macrophages from CL patients. Functional validation of MLF as a substrate for ABCA3 was performed by shRNA gene knockdown (KD) in THP-1 monocytes. Intracellular accumulation of radiolabeled MLF was significantly higher in ABCA3(KD) macrophages. ABCA3(KD) resulted in increased cytotoxicity induced by MLF exposure. ABCA3 gene expression inversely correlated with intracellular MLF content in primary macrophages from CL patients. ABCA3(KD) reduced parasite survival during macrophage infection with an L. V. panamensis strain exhibiting low in vitro susceptibility to MLF. Confocal microscopy showed ABCA3 to be located in the cell membrane of resting macrophages and in intracellular compartments in L. V. panamensis-infected cells. These results provide evidence of ABCA3 as an MLF efflux transporter in human macrophages and support its role in the direct antileishmanial effect of this alkylphosphocholine drug. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Differential Legionella spp. survival between intracellular and extracellular forms in thermal spring environments.

    PubMed

    Kao, Po-Min; Tung, Min-Che; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Hsu, Shih-Yung; Huang, Jen-Te; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Huang, Yu-Li

    2013-05-01

    Legionella are commonly found in natural and man-made aquatic environments and are able to inhabit various species of protozoa. The relationship between the occurrence of Legionella spp. within protozoa and human legionellosis has been demonstrated; however, the proportions of intracellular and extracellular Legionella spp. in the aquatic environment were rarely reported. In this study, we developed a new method to differentiate intracellular and extracellular Legionella spp. in the aquatic environment. Water samples from three thermal spring recreational areas in southeastern Taiwan were collected and analyzed. For each water sample, concurrent measurements were performed for Legionella spp. and their free-living amoebae hosts. The overall detection rate was 32 % (16/50) for intracellular Legionella spp. and 12 % (6/50) for extracellular Legionella spp. The most prevalent host of Legionella spp. was Hartmannella vermiformis. The identified Legionella spp. differed substantially between intracellular and extracellular forms. The results showed that it may be necessary to differentiate intracellular and extracellular forms of Legionella spp.

  3. Intracellular trafficking mechanism of cationic phospholipids including cationic liposomes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Un, K; Sakai-Kato, K; Goda, Y

    2014-07-01

    The development of gene delivery methods is essential for the achievement of effective gene therapy. Elucidation of the intracellular transfer mechanism for cationic carriers is in progress, but there are few reports regarding the intracellular trafficking processes of the cationic phospholipids taken up into cells. In the present work, the trafficking processes of a cationic phospholipid (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, DOTAP) were investigated from intracellular uptake to extracellular efflux using cationic liposomes in vitro. Following intracellular transport of liposomes via endocytosis, DOTAP was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Moreover, the proteins involved in DOTAP intracellular trafficking and extracellular efflux were identified. In addition, helper lipids of cationic liposomes were found to partially affect this intracellulartrafficking. These findings might provide valuable information for designing cationic carriers and avoiding unexpected toxic side effects derived from cationic liposomal components.

  4. Cognitive functions of intracellular mechanisms for contextual amplification.

    PubMed

    Phillips, William A

    2017-03-01

    Evidence for the hypothesis that input to the apical tufts of neocortical pyramidal cells plays a central role in cognition by amplifying their responses to feedforward input is reviewed. Apical tufts are electrically remote from the soma, and their inputs come from diverse sources including direct feedback from higher cortical regions, indirect feedback via the thalamus, and long-range lateral connections both within and between cortical regions. This suggests that input to tuft dendrites may amplify the cell's response to basal inputs that they receive via layer 4 and which have synapses closer to the soma. ERP data supporting this inference is noted. Intracellular studies of apical amplification (AA) and of disamplification by inhibitory interneurons targeted only at tufts are reviewed. Cognitive processes that have been related to them by computational, electrophysiological, and psychopathological studies are then outlined. These processes include: figure-ground segregation and Gestalt grouping; contextual disambiguation in perception and sentence comprehension; priming; winner-take-all competition; attention and working memory; setting the level of consciousness; cognitive control; and learning. It is argued that theories in cognitive neuroscience should not assume that all neurons function as integrate-and-fire point processors, but should use the capabilities of cells with distinct sites of integration for driving and modulatory inputs. Potentially 'unifying' theories that depend upon these capabilities are reviewed. It is concluded that evolution of the primitives of AA and disamplification in neocortex may have extended cognitive capabilities beyond those built from the long-established primitives of excitation, inhibition, and disinhibition.

  5. Intracellular Survival of Staphylococcus aureus in Endothelial Cells: A Matter of Growth or Persistence.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Guillaume; Tan, Xin; Tros, Fabiola; Dupuis, Marion; Nassif, Xavier; Charbit, Alain; Coureuil, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    The Gram-positive human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of severe bacterial infections. Recent studies have shown that various cell types could readily internalize S. aureus and infected cells have been proposed to serve as vehicle for the systemic dissemination of the pathogen. Here we focused on the intracellular behavior of the Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus strain USA300. Supporting earlier observations, we found that wild-type S. aureus strain USA300 persisted for longer period within endothelial cells than within macrophages and that a mutant displaying the small colony variant phenotype (ΔhemDBL) had increased intracellular persistence. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that initial persistence of wild-type bacteria in endothelial cells corresponded to distinct single cell events, ranging from active intracellular bacterial proliferation, leading to cell lysis, to non-replicating bacterial persistence even 1 week after infection. In sharp contrast, ΔhemDBL mutant bacteria were essentially non-replicating up to 10 days after infection. These findings suggest that internalization of S. aureus in endothelial cells triggers its persistence and support the notion that endothelial cells might constitute an intracellular persistence niche responsible for reported relapse of infection after antibiotic therapy.

  6. Intracellular ice and cell survival in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum: an ultrastructural study of factors affecting cell and ice structures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryogenic technologies are required to preserve embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds. Formation of potentially lethal intracellular ice limits successful cryopreservation; thus, it is important to understand the relationships among cryo-exposure techniques, water content and survival. In this pap...

  7. Effects of ApoE on intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis of neurons after mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Zhong, J; Dou, X; Cheng, C; Huang, Z; Sun, X

    2015-08-20

    The current study aimed to explore the effects of apolipoprotein e (ApoE) on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and apoptosis of neurons after mechanical injury in vitro. A neuron mechanical injury model was established after primary neurons obtained from APOE knockout and wild-type (WT) mice, and four experimental groups were generated: Group-ApoE4, Group-ApoE3, Group-ApoE(-) and Group-WT. Recombinant ApoE4 and ApoE3 were added to Group-ApoE4 and Group-ApoE3 respectively, and Group-ApoE(-) and Group-WT were control groups. Intracellular calcium was labeled by fluo-3/AM and examined using laser scanning confocal microscope and flow cytometry, and the apoptosis of neurons was also evaluated. The intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis rates of mice neurons were significantly higher in Group-ApoE4 than in Group-ApoE3 and Group-WT after mechanical injury. However, without mechanical injury on neurons, no significant differences in intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis rates were found among all four experimental groups. The effects of ApoE4 on intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis rates of injured neurons were partly decreased by EGTA treatment. Compared with ApoE3-treatment and WT neurons, ApoE4 caused higher intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis rates of neurons after mechanical injury. This suggested APOE polymorphisms may affect neuron apoptosis after mechanical injury through different influences on intracellular calcium levels. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Severe anemia is an important negative predictor for survival with disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sathe, S S; Gascon, P; Lo, W; Pinto, R; Reichman, L B; Gascone, P

    1990-12-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually unresponsive to antimycobacterial therapy. We examined clinical and laboratory characteristics of MAI organisms and their relationship to the length of survival. We studied factors influencing survival and compared these in 76 patients with AIDS with and without MAI. Serum levels of p24 antigen and erythropoietin, and CD4-positive helper T-lymphocytes in blood were assessed in 36 additional patients with various clinical stages of HIV infection. In patients with MAI infection, survival was significantly related only to total lymphocyte count, hematocrit, platelet count, and sex. Of these, hematocrit and total lymphocyte count were the only linear predictors of survival. Anemia was significantly more profound in patients with AIDS and MAI than in the other patients. This anemia in patients with MAI could not be ascribed to increased peripheral destruction of red cells, deficient nutritional factors, or erythropoietin production, HIV viral or bacterial load, or a general effect on other blood elements such as neutrophils or platelets. The influence of MAI on survival in patients with AIDS did depend upon whether the MAI occurred as an index infection or was preceded by other opportunistic infections. Patients with other preceding opportunistic infection lived for a much shorter duration from the time of diagnosis of MAI.

  9. Effects of ice-seeding temperature and intracellular trehalose contents on survival of frozen Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihide; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Freezing tolerance is an important characteristic for baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as it is used to make frozen dough. The ability of yeast cells to survive freezing is thought to depend on various factors. The purpose of this work was to study the viability of yeast cells during the freezing process. We examined factors potentially affecting their survival, including the growth phase, ice-seeding temperature, intracellular trehalose content, freezing period, and duration of supercooling. The results showed that the ice-seeding temperature significantly affected cell viability. In the stationary phase, trehalose accumulation did not affect the viability of yeast cells after brief freezing, although it did significantly affect the viability after prolonged freezing. In the log phase, the ice-seeding temperature was more important for cell survival than the presence of trehalose during prolonged freezing. The importance of increasing the extracellular ice-seeding temperature was verified by comparing frozen yeast survival rates in a freezing test with ice-seeding temperatures of -5 degrees C and -15 degrees C. We also found that the cell survival rates began to increase at 3h of supercooling. The yeast cells may adapt to subzero temperatures and/or acquire tolerance to freezing stress during the supercooling.

  10. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Listeria monocytogenes contributes to intracellular survival and growth of Listeria innocua.

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, W R; Demuth, A; Kuhn, M; Goebel, W

    1994-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular organism that is capable of replicating within macrophage and macrophage-like cells. The species secretes a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) encoded by the plcA gene. A plcA gene from L. monocytogenes was cloned downstream of a gram-positive promoter in the plasmid pWS2-2. To determine what effect plcA would have on intracellular survival when introduced into Listeria innocua, a species that does not growth intracellularly or contain plcA, transformation with the recombinant pWS2-2 plasmid was performed. Phospholipase C activity in Listeria innocua/pWS2-2 was confirmed on a brain heart infusion-phosphatidylinositol agar plate, whereas wild-type L. innocua did not produce PI-PLC activity. Intracellular growth of L. innocua/pWS2-2 was subsequently measured in the macrophage-like cell line J774 by Giemsa staining and viable count determinations at specific time points following infection. The J774 cells infected with wild-type L. innocua showed a falling viable count through 8 h postinfection. Although J774 cells infected with L. innocua/pWS2-2 also initially displayed reduced viable counts, the viable count rose after 6 h postinfection and increased further at 8 h postinfection before a subsequent decline again at 16 h postinfection. Giemsa staining revealed fewer than 6 bacteria in individual macrophage cells at 2 h postinfection, and yet approximately 15% of the J774 cells had 6 to 12 bacteria localized to one area of the macrophage cell after 6 h; moreover, electron micrographs showed that the L. innocua/pWS2-2 cells were replicating inside the phagosome of the host cell. Furthermore, Thoria Sol labeling demonstrated that lysosomes had fused with these phagosomes, and acridine orange staining revealed that the compartments were acidified. These results demonstrate that L. innocua cells transformed with the plasmid-borne plcA gene, and expressing functional PI-PLC, are able to grow

  11. Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+) microdomains in the control of cell survival, apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    La Rovere, Rita M L; Roest, Gemma; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B

    2016-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria and lysosomes are physically and/or functionally linked, establishing close contact sites between these organelles. As a consequence, Ca(2+) release events from the ER, the major intracellular Ca(2+)-storage organelle, have an immediate effect on the physiological function of mitochondria and lysosomes. Also, the lysosomes can act as a Ca(2+) source for Ca(2+) release into the cytosol, thereby influencing ER-based Ca(2+) signaling. Given the important role for mitochondria and lysosomes in cell survival, cell death and cell adaptation processes, it has become increasingly clear that Ca(2+) signals from or towards these organelles impact these processes. In this review, we discuss the most recent insights in the emerging role of Ca(2+) signaling in cellular survival by controlling basal mitochondrial bioenergetics and by regulating apoptosis, a mitochondrial process, and autophagy, a lysosomal process, in response to cell damage and cell stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurodegeneration in Glaucoma: Progression and Calcium-Dependent Intracellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Crish, Samuel D.; Calkins, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is an age-related optic neuropathy involving sensitivity to ocular pressure. The disease is now seen increasingly as one of the central nervous system, as powerful new approaches highlight an increasing number of similarities with other age-related neurodegenerations such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. While the etiologies of these diseases are diverse, they involve many important common elements including compartmentalized programs of degeneration targeting axons, dendrites and finally cell bodies. Most age-related degenerations display early functional deficits that precede actual loss of neuronal substrate. These are linked to several specific neurochemical cascades that can be linked back to dysregulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. We are now in the midst of identifying similar cascades in glaucoma. Here we review recent evidence on the pathological progression of neurodegeneration in glaucoma and some of the Ca2+-dependent mechanisms that could underlie these changes. These mechanisms present clear implications for efforts to develop interventions targeting neuronal loss directly and make glaucoma an attractive model for both interrogating and informing other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21187126

  13. Mechanism-oriented controllability of intracellular quantum dots formation: the role of glutathione metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Bei-Bei; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Li, Li; Hu, Bin; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2013-03-26

    Microbial cells have shown a great potential to biosynthesize inorganic nanoparticles within their orderly regulated intracellular environment. However, very little is known about the mechanism of nanoparticle biosynthesis. Therefore, it is difficult to control intracellular synthesis through the manipulation of biological processes. Here, we present a mechanism-oriented strategy for controlling the biosynthesis of fluorescent CdSe quantum dots (QDs) by means of metabolic engineering in yeast cells. Using genetic techniques, we demonstrated that the glutathione metabolic pathway controls the intracellular CdSe QD formation. Inspired from this mechanism, the controllability of CdSe QD yield was realized through engineering the glutathione metabolism in genetically modified yeast cells. The yeast cells were homogeneously transformed into more efficient cell-factories at the single-cell level, providing a specific way to direct the cellular metabolism toward CdSe QD formation. This work could provide the foundation for the future development of nanomaterial biosynthesis.

  14. Testosterone induces an intracellular calcium increase by a nongenomic mechanism in cultured rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel; Chiong, Mario; Soto, Dagoberto; Parra, Valentina; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    Androgens are associated with important effects on the heart, such as hypertrophy or apoptosis. These responses involve the intracellular androgen receptor. However, the mechanisms of how androgens activate several membrane signaling pathways are not fully elucidated. We have investigated the effect of testosterone on intracellular calcium in cultured rat cardiac myocytes. Using fluo3-AM and epifluorescence microscopy, we found that exposure to testosterone rapidly (1-7 min) led to an increase of intracellular Ca2+, an effect that persisted in the absence of external Ca2+. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that these effects occurred before translocation of the intracellular androgen receptor to the perinuclear zone. Pretreatment of the cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester and thapsigargin blocked this response, suggesting the involvement of internal Ca2+ stores. U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, and xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, abolished the Ca2+ signal. The rise in intracellular Ca2+ was not inhibited by cyproterone, an antagonist of intracellular androgen receptor. Moreover, the cell impermeant testosterone-BSA complex also produced the Ca2+ signal, indicating its origin in the plasma membrane. This effect was observed in cultured neonatal and adult rat cardiac myocytes. Pertussis toxin and the adenoviral transduction of beta- adrenergic receptor kinase carboxy terminal peptide, a peptide inhibitor of betagamma-subunits of G protein, abolished the testosterone-induced Ca2+ release. In summary, this is the first study of rapid, nongenomic intracellular Ca2+ signaling of testosterone in cardiac myocytes. Using various inhibitors and testosterone-BSA complex, the mechanism for the rapid, testosterone-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ is through activation of a plasma membrane receptor associated with a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein-phospholipase C

  15. STING-Dependent 2'-5' Oligoadenylate Synthetase-Like Production Is Required for Intracellular Mycobacterium leprae Survival.

    PubMed

    de Toledo-Pinto, Thiago Gomes; Ferreira, Anna Beatriz Robottom; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Batista-Silva, Leonardo Ribeiro; Silva, Bruno Jorge de Andrade; Lemes, Robertha Mariana Rodrigues; Martinez, Alejandra Nóbrega; Sandoval, Felipe Galvan; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Shannon, Edward Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Antunes, Sérgio Luís Gomes; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lara, Flávio Alves; Williams, Diana Lynn; Ozório Moraes, Milton

    2016-07-15

    Cytosolic detection of nucleic acids elicits a type I interferon (IFN) response and plays a critical role in host defense against intracellular pathogens. Herein, a global gene expression profile of Mycobacterium leprae-infected primary human Schwann cells identified the genes differentially expressed in the type I IFN pathway. Among them, the gene encoding 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like (OASL) underwent the greatest upregulation and was also shown to be upregulated in M. leprae-infected human macrophage cell lineages, primary monocytes, and skin lesion specimens from patients with a disseminated form of leprosy. OASL knock down was associated with decreased viability of M. leprae that was concomitant with upregulation of either antimicrobial peptide expression or autophagy levels. Downregulation of MCP-1/CCL2 release was also observed during OASL knock down. M. leprae-mediated OASL expression was dependent on cytosolic DNA sensing mediated by stimulator of IFN genes signaling. The addition of M. leprae DNA enhanced nonpathogenic Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin intracellular survival, downregulated antimicrobial peptide expression, and increased MCP-1/CCL2 secretion. Thus, our data uncover a promycobacterial role for OASL during M. leprae infection that directs the host immune response toward a niche that permits survival of the pathogen.

  16. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Nef Function and Intracellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Foster, John L.; Denial, Sarah J.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the last several years have enhanced mechanistic understanding of Nef induced CD4 and MHCI downregulation and have suggested a new paradigm for analyzing Nef function. In both of these cases, Nef acts by forming ternary complexes with significant contributions to stability imparted by non-canonical interactions. The mutational analyses and binding assays that have led to these conclusions are discussed. The recent progress has been dependent on conservative mutations and multi-protein binding assays. The poorly understood Nef functions of p21 activated protein kinase (PAK2) activation, enhancement of virion infectivity, and inhibition of immunoglobulin class switching are also likely to involve ternary complexes and non-canonical interactions. Hence, investigation of these latter Nef functions should benefit from a similar approach. Six historically used alanine substitutions for determining structure-function relationships of Nef are discussed. These are M20A, E62A/E63A/E64A/E65A (AAAA), P72A/P75A (AXXA), R106A, L164A/L165A, and D174A/D175A. Investigations of less disruptive mutations in place of AAAA and AXXA have led to different interpretations of mechanism. Two recent examples of this alternate approach applied to PAK2 activation F191 and critical residue D123 are presented. The implications of the new findings and the resulting new paradigm for Nef structure-function are discussed with respect to creating a map of Nef functions on the protein surface. We report the results of a PPI-Pred analysis for protein-protein interfaces. There are three predicted patches produced by the analysis which describe regions consistent with the currently known mutational analyses of Nef function. PMID:21336563

  17. SURVIVABILITY THROUGH OPTIMIZING RESILIENT MECHANISMS (STORM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    specifications, or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation ; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response ...survivability, hardware Trojans, critical infrastructure protection, Online Social Network (OSN), and cyber security monitoring. When appropriate, we

  18. Arginase Is Essential for Survival of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes but Not Intracellular Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Gilroy, Caslin A.; Olenyik, Tamara D.; Paradis, Dustin; Perdeh, Jasmine; Dearman, Kristie; Davis, Madison J.; Yates, Phillip A.; Li, Yuexin; Riscoe, Michael K.; Ullman, Buddy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of Leishmania donovani have shown that both ornithine decarboxylase and spermidine synthase, two enzymes of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, are critical for promastigote proliferation and required for maximum infection in mice. However, the importance of arginase (ARG), the first enzyme of the polyamine pathway in Leishmania, has not been analyzed in L. donovani. To test ARG function in intact parasites, we generated Δarg null mutants in L. donovani and evaluated their ability to proliferate in vitro and trigger infections in mice. The Δarg knockout was incapable of growth in the absence of polyamine supplementation, but the auxotrophic phenotype could be bypassed by addition of either millimolar concentrations of ornithine or micromolar concentrations of putrescine or by complementation with either glycosomal or cytosolic versions of ARG. Spermidine supplementation of the medium did not circumvent the polyamine auxotrophy of the Δarg line. Although ARG was found to be essential for ornithine and polyamine synthesis, ornithine decarboxylase appeared to be the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine production. Mouse infectivity studies revealed that the Δarg lesion reduced parasite burdens in livers by an order of magnitude but had little impact on the numbers of parasites recovered from spleens. Thus, ARG is essential for proliferation of promastigotes but not intracellular amastigotes. Coupled with previous studies, these data support a model in which L. donovani amastigotes readily salvage ornithine and have some access to host spermidine pools, while host putrescine appears to be unavailable for salvage by the parasite. PMID:27795357

  19. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 15. RETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, OF SURVIVING HEADGATES LIFTING MECHANISMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. RETAIL VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, OF SURVIVING HEADGATES LIFTING MECHANISMS - Dundee Canal, Headgates, Guardlock & Uppermost Section, 250 feet northeast of Randolph Avenue, opposite & in line with East Clifton Avenue, Clifton, Passaic County, NJ

  1. Mechanisms for the Intracellular Manipulation of Organelles by Conventional Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Axel T.; Smith, Kyle C.; Gowrishankar, T.R.; Vasilkoski, Zlatko; Weaver, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Conventional electroporation (EP) changes both the conductance and molecular permeability of the plasma membrane (PM) of cells and is a standard method for delivering both biologically active and probe molecules of a wide range of sizes into cells. However, the underlying mechanisms at the molecular and cellular levels remain controversial. Here we introduce a mathematical cell model that contains representative organelles (nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria) and includes a dynamic EP model, which describes formation, expansion, contraction, and destruction for the plasma and all organelle membranes. We show that conventional EP provides transient electrical pathways into the cell, sufficient to create significant intracellular fields. This emerging intracellular electrical field is a secondary effect due to EP and can cause transmembrane voltages at the organelles, which are large enough and long enough to gate organelle channels, and even sufficient, at some field strengths, for the poration of organelle membranes. This suggests an alternative to nanosecond pulsed electric fields for intracellular manipulations. PMID:20513394

  2. Effect of Warming Rate on the Survival of Vitrified Mouse Oocytes and on the Recrystallization of Intracellular Ice1

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Shinsuke; Mazur, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation demands there be little or no intracellular ice. One procedure is classical slow equilibrium freezing, and it has been successful in many cases. However, for some important cell types, including some mammalian oocytes, it has not. For the latter, there are increasing attempts to cryopreserve them by vitrification. However, even if intracellular ice formation (IIF) is prevented during cooling, it can still occur during the warming of a vitrified sample. Here, we examine two aspects of this occurrence in mouse oocytes. One took place in oocytes that were partly dehydrated by an initial hold for 12 min at −25°C. They were then cooled rapidly to −70°C and warmed slowly, or they were warmed rapidly to intermediate temperatures and held. These oocytes underwent no IIF during cooling but blackened from IIF during warming. The blackening rate increased about 5-fold for each five-degree rise in temperature. Upon thawing, they were dead. The second aspect involved oocytes that had been vitrified by cooling to −196°C while suspended in a concentrated solution of cryoprotectants and warmed at rates ranging from 140°C/min to 3300°C/min. Survivals after warming at 140°C/min and 250°C/min were low (<30%). Survivals after warming at ≥2200°C/min were high (80%). When warmed slowly, they were killed, apparently by the recrystallization of previously formed small internal ice crystals. The similarities and differences in the consequences of the two types of freezing are discussed. PMID:18562703

  3. Intracellular Production of Brucella L Forms II. Induction and Survival of Brucella abortus L Forms in Tissue Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Hatten, Betty A.; Sulkin, S. Edward

    1966-01-01

    Hatten, Betty A. (The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas), and S. Edward Sulkin. Intracellular production of Brucella L forms. II. Induction and survival of Brucella abortus L forms in tissue culture. J. Bacteriol. 91:14–20. 1966.—Intracellular survival of altered brucellae, possibly L forms, was not greatly affected by penicillin or streptomycin in concentrations ranging from 5.0 to 40 μg/ml, but a combination of these two antibiotics (2.5 to 20 μg/ml each) reduced the number of positive L-form cultures. Tetracycline (2.0 μg/ml) decreased the number of positive L-form cultures at about the same rate as combinations of the higher concentrations of penicillin and streptomycin. Various concentrations of tetracycline (0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml) with 5.0 μg/ml of penicillin or streptomycin significantly reduced the number of positive L-form cultures. L forms were recovered for several days after elimination of bacteria from the cultures by all of the antibiotics tested. L-form production was not dependent upon the presence of antibiotics in the culture medium, but they were recovered in greater numbers when bacteria were still present in the hamster kidney cells. Addition of thallium acetate to infected cells (at varying intervals of time after infection) to control bacterial growth and conversion to the L phase during cellular disintegration decreased the number of positive L-form cultures obtained over a 10-day period. Comparison of the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria recovered from infected tissue culture cells with the stock strain of Brucella abortus indicated that some resistance to penicillin and tetracycline had developed. A marked resistance to streptomycin was observed in those bacteria recovered from cells maintained in the presence of this antibiotic. PMID:4955246

  4. The administration of olanzapine and fluoxetine has synergistic effects on intracellular survival pathways in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Agostinho, Fabiano R; Ribeiro, Karine F; Vitto, Marcelo F; Luciano, Thais F; Souza, Claúdio T de; Quevedo, João

    2012-08-01

    Recently, several studies have emerged suggesting a role of the intracellular survival pathways in the treatment of mood disorders. In addition, the beneficial effects of using a combination of antipsychotics and antidepressants have been shown. With this in mind, we evaluated the effects of the acute administration of fluoxetine (FLX), olanzapine (OLZ) and the combination of fluoxetine/olanzapine on the brain-derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), Protein Kinase B (PKB, Akt), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) in the rat brain. Adult Wistar rats received an acute injection of OLZ (3 or 6 mg/kg) and/or FLX (12.5 or 25 mg/kg), and were evaluated for Akt, BDNF, CREB, Bcl-2 and BAD protein levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our results showed that treatment with FLX and OLZ alone or in combination increased the Akt, CREB, BDNF, Bcl-2 and BAD levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. However, the combination of FLX and OLZ at high doses was associated with a greater increase in the levels of Akt in the prefrontal cortex, and did not have an effect on the levels of BAD in any of the brain areas that we evaluated. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that treatment with FLX and OLZ alone or in combination exert neuroprotective effects, and that intracellular survival pathways could be involved in the therapeutic effects of combining antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs in mood disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Swine TRIM21 restricts FMDV infection via an intracellular neutralization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenchun; Zhang, Dong; Qian, Ping; Qian, Suhong; Wu, Mengge; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-03-01

    The tripartite motif protein 21 (TRIM21) is a ubiquitously expressed E3 ubiquitin ligase and an intracellular antibody receptor. TRIM21 mediates antibody-dependent intracellular neutralization (ADIN) in cytosol and provides an intracellular immune response to protect host defense against pathogen infection. In this study, swine TRIM21 (sTRIM21) was cloned and its role in ADIN was investigated. The expression of sTRIM21 is induced by type I interferon in PK-15 cells. sTRIM21 restricts FMDV infection in the presence of FMDV specific antibodies. Furthermore, sTRIM21 interacts with Fc fragment of swine immunoglobulin G (sFc) fused VP1 of FMDV and thereby causing its degradation. Both the RING and SPRY domains are essential for sTRIM21 to degrade sFc-fused VP1. These results suggest that the intracellular neutralization features of FMDV contribute to the antiviral activity of sTRIM21. sTRIM21 provide another intracellular mechanism to inhibit FMDV infection in infected cells.

  6. The formation of lipid droplets favors intracellular Mycobacterium leprae survival in SW-10, non-myelinating Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song-Hyo; An, Sung-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae), which is the leading cause of all non-traumatic peripheral neuropathies worldwide. Although both myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are infected by M.leprae in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M.leprae preferentially invades the non-myelinating Schwann cells. However, the effect of M.leprae infection on non-myelinating Schwann cells has not been elucidated. Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in M.leprae-infected Schwann cells in the nerve biopsies of lepromatous leprosy patients. M.leprae-induced LD formation favors intracellular M.leprae survival in primary Schwann cells and in a myelinating Schwann cell line referred to as ST88-14. In the current study, we initially characterized SW-10 cells and investigated the effects of LDs on M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells, which are non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells express S100, a marker for cells from the neural crest, and NGFR p75, a marker for immature or non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells, however, do not express myelin basic protein (MBP), a marker for myelinating Schwann cells, and myelin protein zero (MPZ), a marker for precursor, immature, or myelinating Schwann cells, all of which suggests that SW-10 cells are non-myelinating Schwann cells. In addition, SW-10 cells have phagocytic activity and can be infected with M. leprae. Infection with M. leprae induces the formation of LDs. Furthermore, inhibiting the formation of M. leprae-induced LD enhances the maturation of phagosomes containing live M.leprae and decreases the ATP content in the M. leprae found in SW-10 cells. These facts suggest that LD formation by M. leprae favors intracellular M. leprae survival in SW-10 cells, which leads to the logical conclusion that M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells can be a new model for investigating the interaction of M.leprae with non-myelinating Schwann cells. PMID:28636650

  7. Effects of Equex from different sources on post-thaw survival, longevity and intracellular Ca2+ concentration of dog spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Peña, Ana I; Lugilde, Luz L; Barrio, Mónica; Herradón, Pedro G; Quintela, Luis A

    2003-04-15

    The aims of the present study were to compare the effects of two commercial preparations (Equex STM Paste or Equex Pasta), whose active ingredient is sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), added to a Tris-egg yolk-based extender, on post-thaw sperm survival and longevity, as well as on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of dog spermatozoa during incubation at 38 degrees C. One ejaculate was collected from each of eight dogs. Each ejaculate was centrifuged, the semen plasma discarded, and the sperm pellet rediluted with a Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender containing 3% glycerol (Ext-1) at a sperm concentration of 200 x 10(6) spermatozoa (spz)/ml. The diluted semen was divided in three aliquots of equal volume and allowed to equilibrate for 1h at 4 degrees C. After equilibration, the same volume of three different second extenders was added, respectively, to each of the three aliquots: (A) Ext-2A (same composition as Ext-1 except that it contained 7% glycerol and 1% Equex STM Paste), (B) Ext-2B (same composition as that of Ext-1 except that it contained 7% glycerol and 1% Equex Pasta), and (C) Ext-2 (CONTROL: same composition as that of Ext-1 except that it contained 7% glycerol). Semen samples were packed in 0.5 ml straws and frozen on a rack 4 cm above liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) in a styrofoam box. Thawing was at 70 degrees C for 8s. Sperm motility was evaluated after thawing and at 1 h intervals for 5h at 38 degrees C by subjective examination and by using a CASA system. Plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal status were evaluated at 1, 4 and 7h post-thaw using a triple staining procedure and flow cytometry. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of live spermatozoa was evaluated by flow cytometry at 1, 4 and 7h post-thaw after co-loading the sperm cells with the Ca(2+) indicators Fluo 3 AM and Fura Red AM, and with PI. Post-thaw sperm survival and longevity, as well as the quality of the sperm movement, were significantly better (P<0.005) when Ext-2A (containing Equex STM

  8. Nanomechanical mechanism for lipid bilayer damage induced by carbon nanotubes confined in intracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    von dem Bussche, Annette; Yi, Xin; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhongying; Weston, Paula; Hurt, Robert H.; Kane, Agnes B.; Gao, Huajian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of low-dimensional nanomaterials confined in intracellular vesicles has been limited by the resolution of bioimaging techniques and the complex nature of the problem. Recent studies report that long, stiff carbon nanotubes are more cytotoxic than flexible varieties, but the mechanistic link between stiffness and cytotoxicity is not understood. Here we combine analytical modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and in vitro intracellular imaging methods to reveal 1D carbon nanotube behavior within intracellular vesicles. We show that stiff nanotubes beyond a critical length are compressed by lysosomal membranes causing persistent tip contact with the inner membrane leaflet, leading to lipid extraction, lysosomal permeabilization, release of cathepsin B (a lysosomal protease) into the cytoplasm, and cell death. The precise material parameters needed to activate this unique mechanical pathway of nanomaterials interaction with intracellular vesicles were identified through coupled modeling, simulation, and experimental studies on carbon nanomaterials with wide variation in size, shape, and stiffness, leading to a generalized classification diagram for 1D nanocarbons that distinguishes pathogenic from biocompatible varieties based on a nanomechanical buckling criterion. For a wide variety of other 1D material classes (metal, oxide, polymer), this generalized classification diagram shows a critical threshold in length/width space that represents a transition from biologically soft to stiff, and thus identifies the important subset of all 1D materials with the potential to induce lysosomal permeability by the nanomechanical mechanism under investigation. PMID:27791073

  9. Nanomechanical mechanism for lipid bilayer damage induced by carbon nanotubes confined in intracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenpeng; von dem Bussche, Annette; Yi, Xin; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhongying; Weston, Paula; Hurt, Robert H; Kane, Agnes B; Gao, Huajian

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of low-dimensional nanomaterials confined in intracellular vesicles has been limited by the resolution of bioimaging techniques and the complex nature of the problem. Recent studies report that long, stiff carbon nanotubes are more cytotoxic than flexible varieties, but the mechanistic link between stiffness and cytotoxicity is not understood. Here we combine analytical modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and in vitro intracellular imaging methods to reveal 1D carbon nanotube behavior within intracellular vesicles. We show that stiff nanotubes beyond a critical length are compressed by lysosomal membranes causing persistent tip contact with the inner membrane leaflet, leading to lipid extraction, lysosomal permeabilization, release of cathepsin B (a lysosomal protease) into the cytoplasm, and cell death. The precise material parameters needed to activate this unique mechanical pathway of nanomaterials interaction with intracellular vesicles were identified through coupled modeling, simulation, and experimental studies on carbon nanomaterials with wide variation in size, shape, and stiffness, leading to a generalized classification diagram for 1D nanocarbons that distinguishes pathogenic from biocompatible varieties based on a nanomechanical buckling criterion. For a wide variety of other 1D material classes (metal, oxide, polymer), this generalized classification diagram shows a critical threshold in length/width space that represents a transition from biologically soft to stiff, and thus identifies the important subset of all 1D materials with the potential to induce lysosomal permeability by the nanomechanical mechanism under investigation.

  10. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  11. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  12. Augmenter of liver regeneration: An important intracellular survival factor for hepatocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Wang, Lian Fu; Harvey, Stephen A.K.; Watkins, Simon C.; Chaillet, J. Richard; Prelich, John; Starzl, Thomas E.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR), a protein synthesized and stored in hepatocytes, is associated with mitochondria, and possesses sulfhydryl oxidase and cytochrome c reductase activities. We sought to determine the effects of ALR depletion in hepatocytes by antisense oligonucleotide transfection. Methods Rat hepatocytes in primary culture were transfected with antisense oligonucleotide for ALR mRNA (ALR-AS) or scrambled oligonucleotide. Various analyses were performed at times up to 24 h after transfection. Results Treatment with ALR-AS caused a decrease in ALR mRNA, cellular depletion of ALR protein primarily from mitochondria, and decreased viability. Flow cytometric analysis of ALR-AS-transfected hepatocytes stained with annexin-Vcy3 and 7-aminoactinomycin D revealed apoptosis as the predominant cause of death up to 6 h; incubation beyond this time resulted in necrosis in addition to apoptosis. ALR-AS-transfection caused release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3, profound reduction in the ATP content, and cellular release of LDH. Inhibition of caspase-3 inhibited the early phase of ALR-AS-induced death but not the late phase that included ALR and LDH release. Conclusions These results suggest that ALR is critically important for the survival of hepatocytes by its association with mitochondria and regulation of ATP synthesis. PMID:18272248

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases Are Immunogenic, Alter Cytokine Profile and Aid in Intracellular Survival.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Tripathi, Deeksha; Khubaib, Mohd; Kumar, Ashutosh; Sheikh, Javaid A; Sumanlatha, Gaddam; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z; Hasnain, Seyed E

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) has two peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (Ppiases) PpiA and PpiB, popularly known as cyclophilin A and cyclophilin B. The role of cyclophilins in processes such as signaling, cell surface recognition, chaperoning, and heat shock response has been well-documented. We present evidence that M. tb Ppiases modulate the host immune response. ELISA results revealed significant presence of antibodies to M. tb Ppiases in patient sera as compared to sera from healthy individuals. Treatment of THP-1 cells with increasing concentrations of rPpiA, induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Alternatively, treatment with rPpiB inhibited secretion of TNF-α and induced secretion of IL-10. Furthermore, heterologous expression of M. tb PpiA and PpiB in Mycobacterium smegmatis increased bacterial survival in THP-1 cells as compared to those transformed with the vector control. Our results demonstrate that M. tb Ppiases are immunogenic proteins that can possibly modulate host immune response and enhance persistence of the pathogen within the host by subverting host cell generated stresses.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases Are Immunogenic, Alter Cytokine Profile and Aid in Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Saurabh; Tripathi, Deeksha; Khubaib, Mohd; Kumar, Ashutosh; Sheikh, Javaid A.; Sumanlatha, Gaddam; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z.; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) has two peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (Ppiases) PpiA and PpiB, popularly known as cyclophilin A and cyclophilin B. The role of cyclophilins in processes such as signaling, cell surface recognition, chaperoning, and heat shock response has been well-documented. We present evidence that M. tb Ppiases modulate the host immune response. ELISA results revealed significant presence of antibodies to M. tb Ppiases in patient sera as compared to sera from healthy individuals. Treatment of THP-1 cells with increasing concentrations of rPpiA, induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Alternatively, treatment with rPpiB inhibited secretion of TNF-α and induced secretion of IL-10. Furthermore, heterologous expression of M. tb PpiA and PpiB in Mycobacterium smegmatis increased bacterial survival in THP-1 cells as compared to those transformed with the vector control. Our results demonstrate that M. tb Ppiases are immunogenic proteins that can possibly modulate host immune response and enhance persistence of the pathogen within the host by subverting host cell generated stresses. PMID:28261567

  15. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  16. Mechanism of amyloid plaque formation suggests an intracellular basis of Aβ pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Ralf P.; Tepper, Katharina; Rönicke, Raik; Soom, Malle; Westermann, Martin; Reymann, Klaus; Kaether, Christoph; Fändrich, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    The formation of extracellular amyloid plaques is a common patho-biochemical event underlying several debilitating human conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Considerable evidence implies that AD damage arises primarily from small oligomeric amyloid forms of Aβ peptide, but the precise mechanism of pathogenicity remains to be established. Using a cell culture system that reproducibly leads to the formation of Alzheimer’s Aβ amyloid plaques, we show here that the formation of a single amyloid plaque represents a template-dependent process that critically involves the presence of endocytosis- or phagocytosis-competent cells. Internalized Aβ peptide becomes sorted to multivesicular bodies where fibrils grow out, thus penetrating the vesicular membrane. Upon plaque formation, cells undergo cell death and intracellular amyloid structures become released into the extracellular space. These data imply a mechanism where the pathogenic activity of Aβ is attributed, at least in part, to intracellular aggregates. PMID:20133839

  17. Modeling the effects of sodium chloride, acetic acid, and intracellular pH on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Althea M; Breidt, Frederick; Smith, Charles E

    2011-02-01

    Microbiological safety has been a critical issue for acid and acidified foods since it became clear that acid-tolerant pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 can survive (even though they are unable to grow) in a pH range of 3 to 4, which is typical for these classes of food products. The primary antimicrobial compounds in these products are acetic acid and NaCl, which can alter the intracellular physiology of E. coli O157:H7, leading to cell death. For combinations of acetic acid and NaCl at pH 3.2 (a pH value typical for non-heat-processed acidified vegetables), survival curves were described by using a Weibull model. The data revealed a protective effect of NaCl concentration on cell survival for selected acetic acid concentrations. The intracellular pH of an E. coli O157:H7 strain exposed to acetic acid concentrations of up to 40 mM and NaCl concentrations between 2 and 4% was determined. A reduction in the intracellular pH was observed for increasing acetic acid concentrations with an external pH of 3.2. Comparing intracellular pH with Weibull model predictions showed that decreases in intracellular pH were significantly correlated with the corresponding times required to achieve a 5-log reduction in the number of bacteria.

  18. The intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine-based transfection reagents and its implication for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Francesco; Digiacomo, Luca; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Salomone, Fabrizio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Rossetta, Alessandro; Gratton, Enrico; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2016-05-11

    Lipofectamine reagents are widely accepted as "gold-standard" for the safe delivery of exogenous DNA or RNA into cells. Despite this, a satisfactory mechanism-based explanation of their superior efficacy has remained mostly elusive thus far. Here we apply a straightforward combination of live cell imaging, single-particle tracking microscopy, and quantitative transfection-efficiency assays on live cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine/DNA complexes. We find that Lipofectamine, contrary to alternative formulations, is able to efficiently avoid active intracellular transport along microtubules, and the subsequent entrapment and degradation of the payload within acidic/digestive lysosomal compartments. This result is achieved by random Brownian motion of Lipofectamine-containing vesicles within the cytoplasm. We demonstrate here that Brownian diffusion is an efficient route for Lipofectamine/DNA complexes to avoid metabolic degradation, thus leading to optimal transfection. By contrast, active transport along microtubules results in DNA degradation and subsequent poor transfection. Intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and lysosomal degradation appear therefore as highly interdependent phenomena, in such a way that they should be viewed as a single barrier on the route for efficient transfection. As a matter of fact, they should be evaluated in their entirety for the development of optimized non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  19. The intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine-based transfection reagents and its implication for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Francesco; Digiacomo, Luca; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Salomone, Fabrizio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Rossetta, Alessandro; Gratton, Enrico; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Lipofectamine reagents are widely accepted as “gold-standard” for the safe delivery of exogenous DNA or RNA into cells. Despite this, a satisfactory mechanism-based explanation of their superior efficacy has remained mostly elusive thus far. Here we apply a straightforward combination of live cell imaging, single-particle tracking microscopy, and quantitative transfection-efficiency assays on live cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine/DNA complexes. We find that Lipofectamine, contrary to alternative formulations, is able to efficiently avoid active intracellular transport along microtubules, and the subsequent entrapment and degradation of the payload within acidic/digestive lysosomal compartments. This result is achieved by random Brownian motion of Lipofectamine-containing vesicles within the cytoplasm. We demonstrate here that Brownian diffusion is an efficient route for Lipofectamine/DNA complexes to avoid metabolic degradation, thus leading to optimal transfection. By contrast, active transport along microtubules results in DNA degradation and subsequent poor transfection. Intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and lysosomal degradation appear therefore as highly interdependent phenomena, in such a way that they should be viewed as a single barrier on the route for efficient transfection. As a matter of fact, they should be evaluated in their entirety for the development of optimized non-viral gene delivery vectors. PMID:27165510

  20. Spark-induced Sparks as a Mechanism of Intracellular Calcium Alternans in Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rovetti, Robert; Cui, Xiaohua; Garfinkel, Alan; Weiss, James N.; Qu, Zhilin

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Intracellular calcium (Ca) alternans has been widely studied in cardiac myocytes and tissue, yet the underlying mechanism remains controversial. Objective: In this study, we used computational modeling and simulation to study how randomly occurring Ca sparks interact collectively to result in whole-cell Ca alternans. Methods and Results: We developed a spatially-distributed intracellular Ca cycling model in which Ca release units (CRUs) are locally coupled by Ca diffusion throughout the myoplasm and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) network. Ca sparks occur randomly in the CRU network when periodically paced with a clamped voltage waveform, but Ca alternans develops as the pacing speeds up. Combining computational simulation with theoretical analysis, we show that Ca alternans emerges as a collective behavior of Ca sparks, determined by three critical properties of the CRU network from which Ca sparks arise: randomness (of Ca spark activation), refractoriness (of a CRU after a Ca spark), and recruitment (Ca sparks inducing Ca sparks in adjacent CRUs). We also show that the steep nonlinear relationship between fractional SR Ca release and SR Ca load arises naturally as a collective behavior of Ca sparks, and Ca alternans can occur even when SR Ca is held constant. Conclusions: We present a general theory for the mechanisms of intracellular Ca alternans, which mechanistically links Ca sparks to whole-cell Ca alternans, and is applicable to Ca alternans in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:20378857

  1. Freezing survival and cryoprotective dehydration as cold tolerance mechanisms in the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi.

    PubMed

    Wharton, David A; Goodall, Gordon; Marshall, Craig J

    2003-01-01

    The relative importance of freezing tolerance and cryoprotective dehydration in the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi has been investigated. If nucleation of the medium is initiated at a high subzero temperature (-1 degree C), the nematodes do not freeze but dehydrate. This effect occurs in deionised water, indicating that the loss of water is driven by the difference in vapour pressure of ice and supercooled water at the same temperature. If the nematodes are held above their nucleation temperature for a sufficient time, or are cooled slowly, enough water is lost to prevent freezing (cryoprotective dehydration). However, if the medium is nucleated at lower temperatures or if the sample is cooled at a faster cooling rate, the nematodes freeze and can survive intracellular ice formation. P. davidi thus has a variety of mechanisms that ensure its survival in its harsh terrestrial Antarctic habitat.

  2. Surface transport properties of reticulopodia: do intracellular and extracellular motility share a common mechanism?

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; Israel, H A; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-12-01

    The reticulopodial networks of the foraminiferan protozoans Allogromia sp., strain NF, and A. laticollaris display rapid (up to 11 microns/second) and bidirectional saltatory transport of membrane surface markers (polystyrene microspheres). Electron microscopy shows that microspheres adhere directly to the reticulopodial surface glycocalyx. A videomicroscopic analysis of this phenomenon reveals that microsphere movement is typically independent of pseudopod extension/withdrawal and that particles of different sizes and surface properties display similar motile characteristics. The motile properties of surface-associated microspheres appear identical to those of saltating intracellular organelles. Indeed, in some instances the surface-attached microspheres appear transiently linked in motion to these underlying organelles. Our observations suggest that, in reticulopodia, surface transport of microspheres and intracellular transport of organelles are driven by a common mechanism.

  3. Campylobacter protein oxidation influences epithelial cell invasion or intracellular survival as well as intestinal tract colonization in chickens.

    PubMed

    Lasica, A M; Wyszynska, A; Szymanek, K; Majewski, P; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, E K

    2010-01-01

    The Dsb family of redox proteins catalyzes disulfide bond formation and isomerization. Since mutations in dsb genes change the conformation and stability of many extracytoplasmic proteins, and since many virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria are extracytoplasmic, inactivation of dsb genes often results in pathogen attenuation. This study investigated the role of 2 membrane-bound oxidoreductases, DsbB and DsbI, in the Campylobacter jejuni oxidative Dsb pathway. Campylobacter mutants, lacking DsbB or DsbI or both, were constructed by allelic replacement and used in the human intestinal epithelial T84 cell line for the gentamicin protection assay (invasion assay) and chicken colonization experiments. In C. coli strain 23/1, the inactivation of the dsbB or dsbI gene separately did not significantly affect the colonization process. However, simultaneous disruption of both membrane-bound oxidoreductase genes significantly decreased the strain’s ability to colonize chicken intestines. Moreover, C. jejuni strain 81-176 with mutated dsbB or dsbI genes showed reduced invasion/intracellular survival abilities. No cells of the double mutants (dsbB⁻ dsbI⁻) of C. jejuni 81-176 were recovered from human cells after 3 h of invasion.

  4. Mycobacterium leprae intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation in infected macrophages: a potential target for new drugs for leprosy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Katherine A; Oliveira, Viviane C G; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Amaral, Julio J; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Melo, Rossana C N; Acosta, Chyntia C D; Moura, Danielle F; Olmo, Roberta; Han, Jun; Rosa, Patricia S; Almeida, Patrícia E; Finlay, B Brett; Borchers, Christoph H; Sarno, Euzenir N; Bozza, Patricia T; Atella, Georgia C; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that Mycobacterium leprae (ML) is able to induce lipid droplet formation in infected macrophages. We herein confirm that cholesterol (Cho) is one of the host lipid molecules that accumulate in ML-infected macrophages and investigate the effects of ML on cellular Cho metabolism responsible for its accumulation. The expression levels of LDL receptors (LDL-R, CD36, SRA-1, SR-B1, and LRP-1) and enzymes involved in Cho biosynthesis were investigated by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot and shown to be higher in lepromatous leprosy (LL) tissues when compared to borderline tuberculoid (BT) lesions. Moreover, higher levels of the active form of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptional factors, key regulators of the biosynthesis and uptake of cellular Cho, were found in LL skin biopsies. Functional in vitro assays confirmed the higher capacity of ML-infected macrophages to synthesize Cho and sequester exogenous LDL-Cho. Notably, Cho colocalized to ML-containing phagosomes, and Cho metabolism impairment, through either de novo synthesis inhibition by statins or depletion of exogenous Cho, decreased intracellular bacterial survival. These findings highlight the importance of metabolic integration between the host and bacteria to leprosy pathophysiology, opening new avenues for novel therapeutic strategies to leprosy. PMID:24552180

  5. [Mechanisms of pathogenicity and host defense in infections by intracellular parasitic microbes].

    PubMed

    Mitsuyama, M; Suzuki, K

    2000-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the intracellular parasitic bacteria escaping the intracellular killing inside macrophages. The aim of this symposium was to get some insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity and host defense in M. tuberculosis infection, which has not yet been elucidated well, by the presentation of up-to-date knowledge on these aspect in infection with different intracellular parasitic microbes. Dr. Yoshikai (Nagoya Univ.) indicated that TLR is involved in the initial response of host against S. choleraesuis. Among the cytokines contributing to the induction of specific immunity, the importance of IL-15 was emphasized, based on their own experimental data using IL-15 transgenic mice and the application of anti-IL-15 antibody in vivo. Dr. Yoshida (Kyushu Univ.) reviewed the mechanisms of intracellular growth of Legionellae. Several genes so far identified as essential genes in intra-macrophage growth appeared to be similar to those encoding type 3 secretion system observed in Shigellae. There is a significant strain difference in the growth of L. pneumophila inside macrophages and such difference seemed to be under the control of a gene at chromosome 13, Lgn 1. The investigation of difference in the mode of escape among various Legionella. spp. may provide a novel mechansim in bacterial invasion and escape. Dr. Kawamura (Kyoto Univ.) summarized some new reports on the molecular mechanism of the inhibition of P-L fusion by M. tuberculosis. He emphasized the importance of the alteration in phagosomal maturation as indicated by the accumulation of TACO protein. The possible involvement of TLR in the recognition of Mycobacterial cells and its LAM was discussed. Dr. Kawakami (Ryukyu Univ.) first discussed the possibility that Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen, could be regarded as one of the intracellular parasitic microbes. His presentation mainly focused on the TH1-Th2 balance in the expression of host defense against C. neoformans in

  6. Vibrio cholerae O1 strains are facultative intracellular bacteria, able to survive and multiply symbiotically inside the aquatic free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Abd, Hadi; Saeed, Amir; Weintraub, Andrej; Nair, G Balakrish; Sandström, Gunnar

    2007-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae species are extracellular, waterborne, gram-negative bacteria that are overwhelmed by predators in aquatic environments. The unencapsulated serogroup V. cholerae O1 and encapsulated V. cholerae O139 cause epidemic and pandemic outbreaks of cholera. It has recently been shown that the aquatic and free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii is not a predator to V. cholerae O139; rather, V. cholerae O139 has shown an intracellular compatibility with this host. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor strains to grow and survive in A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae O1 strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts and viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae. The viable count of intracellularly growing bacteria was estimated by utilizing gentamicin assay. Confocal microscopy and electron microscopy were used to determine the intracellular localization of V. cholerae in A. castellanii. The results showed that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor strains grew and survived intracellularly in the cytoplasm of trophozoites, and that the bacteria were also found in the cysts of A. castellanii. The interaction showed a facultative intracellular behaviour of V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor strains and a possible role of A. castellanii as an environmental host of V. cholerae species.

  7. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P.; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M.; Bakr, Osman M.; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where particles are abundantly internalized - is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a ``lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect'' since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments.The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where

  8. A two dimensional electromechanical model of a cardiomyocyte to assess intra-cellular regional mechanical heterogeneities

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jose F.; Palazzi, Maria J.; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Schönleitner, Patrick; Balicevic, Vedrana; Loncaric, Sven; Luiken, Joost J. F. P.; Ceresa, Mario; Camara, Oscar; Antoons, Gudrun; Crispi, Fatima; Gratacos, Eduard; Bijnens, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Experimental studies on isolated cardiomyocytes from different animal species and human hearts have demonstrated that there are regional differences in the Ca2+ release, Ca2+ decay and sarcomere deformation. Local deformation heterogeneities can occur due to a combination of factors: regional/local differences in Ca2+ release and/or re-uptake, intra-cellular material properties, sarcomere proteins and distribution of the intracellular organelles. To investigate the possible causes of these heterogeneities, we developed a two-dimensional finite-element electromechanical model of a cardiomyocyte that takes into account the experimentally measured local deformation and cytosolic [Ca2+] to locally define the different variables of the constitutive equations describing the electro/mechanical behaviour of the cell. Then, the model was individualised to three different rat cardiac cells. The local [Ca2+] transients were used to define the [Ca2+]-dependent activation functions. The cell-specific local Young’s moduli were estimated by solving an inverse problem, minimizing the error between the measured and simulated local deformations along the longitudinal axis of the cell. We found that heterogeneities in the deformation during contraction were determined mainly by the local elasticity rather than the local amount of Ca2+, while in the relaxation phase deformation was mainly influenced by Ca2+ re-uptake. Our electromechanical model was able to successfully estimate the local elasticity along the longitudinal direction in three different cells. In conclusion, our proposed model seems to be a good approximation to assess the heterogeneous intracellular mechanical properties to help in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of cardiomyocyte dysfunction. PMID:28837585

  9. Intracellular ice and cell survival in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum: an ultrastructural study of factors affecting cell and ice structures

    PubMed Central

    Wesley-Smith, James; Berjak, Patricia; Pammenter, N. W.; Walters, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Cryopreservation is the only long-term conservation strategy available for germplasm of recalcitrant-seeded species. Efforts to cryopreserve this form of germplasm are hampered by potentially lethal intracellular freezing events; thus, it is important to understand the relationships among cryo-exposure techniques, water content, structure and survival. Methods Undried embryonic axes of Acer saccharinum and those rapidly dried to two different water contents were cooled at three rates and re-warmed at two rates. Ultrastructural observations were carried out on radicle and shoot tips prepared by freeze-fracture and freeze-substitution to assess immediate (i.e. pre-thaw) responses to cooling treatments. Survival of axes was assessed in vitro. Key Results Intracellular ice formation was not necessarily lethal. Embryo cells survived when crystal diameter was between 0·2 and 0·4 µm and fewer than 20 crystals were distributed per μm2 in the cytoplasm. Ice was not uniformly distributed within the cells. In fully hydrated axes cooled at an intermediate rate, the interiors of many organelles were apparently ice-free; this may have prevented the disruption of vital intracellular machinery. Intracytoplasmic ice formation did not apparently impact the integrity of the plasmalemma. The maximum number of ice crystals was far greater in shoot apices, which were more sensitive than radicles to cryo-exposure. Conclusions The findings challenge the accepted paradigm that intracellular ice formation is always lethal, as the results show that cells can survive intracellular ice if crystals are small and localized in the cytoplasm. Further understanding of the interactions among water content, cooling rate, cell structure and ice structure is required to optimize cryopreservation treatments without undue reliance on empirical approaches. PMID:24368198

  10. Intracellular ice and cell survival in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum: an ultrastructural study of factors affecting cell and ice structures.

    PubMed

    Wesley-Smith, James; Berjak, Patricia; Pammenter, N W; Walters, Christina

    2014-03-01

    Cryopreservation is the only long-term conservation strategy available for germplasm of recalcitrant-seeded species. Efforts to cryopreserve this form of germplasm are hampered by potentially lethal intracellular freezing events; thus, it is important to understand the relationships among cryo-exposure techniques, water content, structure and survival. Undried embryonic axes of Acer saccharinum and those rapidly dried to two different water contents were cooled at three rates and re-warmed at two rates. Ultrastructural observations were carried out on radicle and shoot tips prepared by freeze-fracture and freeze-substitution to assess immediate (i.e. pre-thaw) responses to cooling treatments. Survival of axes was assessed in vitro. Intracellular ice formation was not necessarily lethal. Embryo cells survived when crystal diameter was between 0·2 and 0·4 µm and fewer than 20 crystals were distributed per μm(2) in the cytoplasm. Ice was not uniformly distributed within the cells. In fully hydrated axes cooled at an intermediate rate, the interiors of many organelles were apparently ice-free; this may have prevented the disruption of vital intracellular machinery. Intracytoplasmic ice formation did not apparently impact the integrity of the plasmalemma. The maximum number of ice crystals was far greater in shoot apices, which were more sensitive than radicles to cryo-exposure. The findings challenge the accepted paradigm that intracellular ice formation is always lethal, as the results show that cells can survive intracellular ice if crystals are small and localized in the cytoplasm. Further understanding of the interactions among water content, cooling rate, cell structure and ice structure is required to optimize cryopreservation treatments without undue reliance on empirical approaches.

  11. Coupling mechanical forces to electrical signaling: molecular motors and the intracellular transport of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Major role for FeoB in Campylobacter jejuni ferrous iron acquisition, gut colonization, and intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Naikare, Hemant; Palyada, Kiran; Panciera, Roger; Marlow, Denver; Stintzi, Alain

    2006-10-01

    To assess the importance of ferrous iron acquisition in Campylobacter physiology and pathogenesis, we disrupted and characterized the Fe2+ iron transporter, FeoB, in Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168, 81-176, and ATCC 43431. The feoB mutant was significantly affected in its ability to transport 55Fe2+. It accumulated half the amount of iron than the wild-type strain during growth in an iron-containing medium. The intracellular iron of the feoB mutant was localized in the periplasmic space versus the cytoplasm for the wild-type strain. These results indicate that the feoB gene of C. jejuni encodes a functional ferrous iron transport system. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis revealed the cotranscription of feoB and Cj1397, which encodes a homolog of Escherichia coli feoA. C. jejuni 81-176 feoB mutants exhibited reduced ability to persist in human INT-407 embryonic intestinal cells and porcine IPEC-1 small intestinal epithelial cells compared to the wild type. C. jejuni NCTC 11168 feoB mutant was outcompeted by the wild type for colonization and/or survival in the rabbit ileal loop. The feoB mutants of the three C. jejuni strains were significantly affected in their ability to colonize the chick cecum. And finally, the three feoB mutants were outcompeted by their respective wild-type strains for infection of the intestinal tracts of colostrum-deprived piglets. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FeoB-mediated ferrous iron acquisition contributes significantly to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract during both commensal and infectious relationship, and thus it plays an important role in Campylobacter pathogenesis.

  13. Capacitation inducers act through diverse intracellular mechanisms in cryopreserved bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Breininger, E; Cetica, P D; Beconi, M T

    2010-10-01

    The effect of various capacitation inducers, i.e. heparin, superoxide anion, bicarbonate, adenosine, and caffeine, and their role in intracellular mechanisms involved in capacitation, were studied in cryopreserved bovine sperm. Capacitation was determined by epifluorescence chlortetracycline, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and the ability of capacitated sperm to undergo an acrosome reaction and fertilize in vitro matured oocytes. Participation of membrane adenylate cyclase and protein kinases (protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and protein tyrosine kinase) was evaluated indirectly (with specific inhibitors). Involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined with scavengers of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, or nitric oxide. Percentages of capacitated (27-29%) and acrosome-reacted sperm (23-26%) did not differ (P > 0.05) among various capacitation inducers. Significantly higher rates of IVF were obtained with heparin (43%) or bicarbonate plus caffeine (45%), when compared with control samples (17%). Adding the membrane adenylate cyclase inhibitor diminished capacitation rates with heparin (8%) or adenosine (10%). There was differential protein kinase participation in response to inducers; protein kinase inhibitors diminished cleavage rates in heparin-capacitated sperm relative to controls. There were differences between and within the studied inducers in protein tyrosine phosphorylation patterns. We inferred that capacitation in cryopreserved bovine sperm was promoted through diverse pathways. Mechanisms triggered by heparin, or caffeine plus bicarbonate-induced capacitation, involved activation of intracellular pathways to optimize fertilizing capability of cryopreserved bovine sperm.

  14. Effect of glycerol on intracellular virus survival: implications for the clinical use of glycerol-preserved cadaver skin.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L; Ghosh, M M; Boyce, S G; MacNeil, S; Freedlander, E; Kudesia, G

    1995-08-01

    Glycerol has long been used for the preservation of skin allografts. The antimicrobial activity of glycerol has not been fully documented. This paper reports the results of an investigation of a model studying the effect of glycerol on the inactivation of intracellular viruses. Two viruses--herpes simplex type I (HSV-1) and poliovirus--were cultured within human dermal fibroblasts. These intracellular viruses were incubated with 50 per cent, 85 per cent and 98 per cent glycerol at 4 degrees C and 20 degrees C for 4 weeks. Each week, the cultures in glycerol and controls in fibroblast maintenance medium were assayed for virus infectivity by examining the ability of harvested viruses to infect further fibroblasts. At 4 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol could not fully inactivate intracellular HSV-I or poliovirus even after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (after 3 weeks) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks. At 20 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) and inactivated intracellular poliovirus (after 2 weeks). It is suggested that, on the basis of this study, glycerol can reduce intracellular virus infectivity but that its effects are very dependent on concentration, time and temperature such that we would recommend that allograft skin be exposed to 98 per cent glycerol for a minimum of at least 4 weeks at a minimum temperature of 20 degrees C before clinical use.

  15. Bio imaging of intracellular NO production in single bone cells after mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Aviral; Mizuno, Daisuke; Smit, Theo H; Schmidt, Christoph F; MacKintosh, Fred C; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2006-11-01

    We show the intracellular upregulation of NO production after mechanical stimulation, an essential chemical signal in bone remodeling. This is done in real time using the fluorescent chromophore DAR-4M AM. Differences in cellular response to mechanical stimulation of different regions of a single cell were observed. Osteocytes are the most abundant bone cells that are believed to be the mechanosensors of bone, responding to mechanical stresses in interstitial fluid flow through the canaliculi. Under mechanical load, chemical signals such as NO play a key role in the activity of osteoblasts/osteoclasts that regulate bone remodeling. Despite the importance of NO in signaling, its real-time detection has proved challenging. This is largely because of the short NO half-life (typically approximately 0.1-5 s). Here, we show the upregulation of intracellular NO production in single osteocytes under localized mechanical stimulation. We used the chromophore DAR-4M AM for NO detection. This is loaded into surface-attached MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells that are subjected to a localized mechanical stimulation using optical tweezers or a microneedle tip. DAR-4M AM is membrane-permeable and chelates NO, forming a stable, fluorescent compound, which is visible with a rhodamine filter. Nonstimulated MLO-Y4 and MC3T3-E1 cells showed basal NO production levels, as indicated by a gradual increase in their fluorescence intensity. Localized mechanical stimulation of single MC3T3-E1 cells and MLO-Y4 cells by optical tweezers (150-550 pN, 0.5-3 Hz, 1 minute) showed a nearly 15-30% increase, whereas MLO-Y4 cells stimulated by a microneedle (10-20 nN, 1 minute) showed nearly 15-16% increase relative to their nonstimulated state. Furthermore, stimulation of a single cell process by a microneedle resulted in a 2-10% increase in the fluorescence intensity. NO is essential for mechanically induced bone remodeling and is a meaningful parameter for measuring bone cell

  16. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  17. Caspase-1-induced pyroptosis is an innate immune effector mechanism against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Edward A.; Leaf, Irina A.; Treuting, Piper M.; Mao, Dat P.; Dors, Monica; Sarkar, Anasuya; Warren, Sarah E.; Wewers, Mark D.; Aderem, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Macrophages mediate crucial innate immune responses via caspase-1-dependent processing and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. While wild type Salmonella typhimurium infection is lethal to mice, a strain that persistently expresses flagellin was cleared by the cytosolic flagellin detection pathway via NLRC4 activation of caspase-1; however, this clearance was independent of IL-1β and IL-18. Instead, caspase-1 induced pyroptotic cell death, released bacteria from macrophages and exposed them to uptake and killing by reactive oxygen species in neutrophils. Similarly, caspase-1 cleared unmanipulated Legionella and Burkholderia by cytokine-independent mechanisms. This demonstrates for the first time that caspase-1 clears intracellular bacteria in vivo independent of IL-1β and IL-18, and establishes pyroptosis as an efficient mechanism of bacterial clearance by the innate immune system. PMID:21057511

  18. High-speed tracking of intracellular structures: understanding the transport mechanisms in living plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Quesada, C.; Joseph, M.; Selva, J.; Farré, A.; Egea, G.; Ludevid, M. D.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2011-10-01

    Zera® technology offers the possibility to artificially induce the formation of spherical organelles in different kinds of cells. Their large size and high density, compared to the native organelles of the cell, make them good candidates to be used as a handles for the realization of biophysical experiments inside living cells. Furthermore, they present a high signal-to-noise ratio in fluorescence microscopy and small photobleaching. This work focuses mainly on the nature of protein body motion in Nicotiana Benthamiana (tobacco) cells. The high-speed tracking of these structures reveals that they move in a stepwise mode, suggesting that myosin XI motors directly pull these organelles through the cytosol. Our results indicate that these artificially-induced structures are well integrated into the natural processes of the cell so that the technique may be advantageous for the study of the intracellular transport mechanisms. Large forces can be exerted with optical tweezers to mechanically interact with the moving organelles.

  19. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  20. Comparative intracellular uptake of adriamycin and 4'-deoxydoxorubicin by non-small cell lung tumor cells in culture and its relationship to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D J; Kerr, A M; Freshney, R I; Kaye, S B

    1986-08-15

    4'-Deoxydoxorubicin (4'-deoxy) is a new adriamycin analogue with a similar spectrum of antitumour activity but is significantly more lipophilic than the parent compound. We report the kinetics and uptake of the two drugs by human non-small cell lung tumour cells in monolayer culture and the relationship between intracellular drug levels and cytotoxicity. The rate and degree of cell uptake of 4'-deoxy (Vmax = 30 ng/10(5) cells/min) was greater than that of adriamycin (Vmax = 0.15 ng/10(5) cells/min). Although for a given intracellular drug concentration adriamycin was more lethal, on the basis of extracellular drug concentration, cell kill was virtually identical. The log cell survival vs intracellular drug concentration plot was linear for adriamycin but biphasic for 4'-deoxy. Intracellular distribution of the two drugs was followed by fluorescent microscopy and it was apparent that adriamycin was localized mainly within the nucleus whereas 4'-deoxy accumulated within the cytoplasm. Our results suggest that the relationship between intracellular distribution of the two drugs could reflect different modes of action for the drugs with respect to binding sites or could be a non-specific phenomenon, unrelated to lethal effects.

  1. An integrative approach to understanding microbial diversity: from intracellular mechanisms to community structure.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ivana; Weitz, Joshua S; Ferenci, Tom; Claire Horner-Devine, M; Marx, Christopher J; Meyer, Justin R; Forde, Samantha E

    2010-09-01

    Trade-offs have been put forward as essential to the generation and maintenance of diversity. However, variation in trade-offs is often determined at the molecular level, outside the scope of conventional ecological inquiry. In this study, we propose that understanding the intracellular basis for trade-offs in microbial systems can aid in predicting and interpreting patterns of diversity. First, we show how laboratory experiments and mathematical models have unveiled the hidden intracellular mechanisms underlying trade-offs key to microbial diversity: (i) metabolic and regulatory trade-offs in bacteria and yeast; (ii) life-history trade-offs in bacterial viruses. Next, we examine recent studies of marine microbes that have taken steps toward reconciling the molecular and the ecological views of trade-offs, despite the challenges in doing so in natural settings. Finally, we suggest avenues for research where mathematical modelling, experiments and studies of natural microbial communities provide a unique opportunity to integrate studies of diversity across multiple scales.

  2. Active site structure and catalytic mechanism of phosphodiesterase for degradation of intracellular second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2002-03-01

    Phosphodiesterases are clinical targets for a variety of biological disorders, because this superfamily of enzymes regulate intracellular concentration of cyclic nucleotides that serve as the second messengers playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes. Understanding structure and mechanism of a phosphodiesterase will provide a solid basis for rational design of the more efficient therapeutics. Although a three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human phosphodiesterase 4B2B was recently reported, it was uncertain whether a critical bridging ligand in the active site is a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. The identity of this bridging ligand has been determined by performing first-principles quantum chemical calculations on models of the active site. All the results obtained indicate that this critical bridging ligand in the active site of the reported X-ray crystal structure is a hydroxide ion, rather than a water molecule, expected to serve as the nucleophile to initialize the catalytic degradation of the intracellular second messengers.

  3. An integrative approach to understanding microbial diversity: from intracellular mechanisms to community structure

    PubMed Central

    Gudelj, Ivana; Weitz, Joshua S; Ferenci, Tom; Claire Horner-Devine, M; Marx, Christopher J; Meyer, Justin R; Forde, Samantha E

    2010-01-01

    Trade-offs have been put forward as essential to the generation and maintenance of diversity. However, variation in trade-offs is often determined at the molecular level, outside the scope of conventional ecological inquiry. In this study, we propose that understanding the intracellular basis for trade-offs in microbial systems can aid in predicting and interpreting patterns of diversity. First, we show how laboratory experiments and mathematical models have unveiled the hidden intracellular mechanisms underlying trade-offs key to microbial diversity: (i) metabolic and regulatory trade-offs in bacteria and yeast; (ii) life-history trade-offs in bacterial viruses. Next, we examine recent studies of marine microbes that have taken steps toward reconciling the molecular and the ecological views of trade-offs, despite the challenges in doing so in natural settings. Finally, we suggest avenues for research where mathematical modelling, experiments and studies of natural microbial communities provide a unique opportunity to integrate studies of diversity across multiple scales. PMID:20576029

  4. Intracellular calcium signalling in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus: understanding the autoregulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dayanithi, G; Sabatier, N; Widmer, H

    2000-03-01

    Oxytocin and vasopressin, released at the soma and dendrites of neurones, bind to specific autoreceptors and induce an increase in [Ca2+]i. In oxytocin cells, the increase results from a mobilisation of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, whereas in vasopressin cells, it results mainly from an influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent channels. The response to vasopressin is coupled to phospholipase C and adenylyl-cyclase pathways which are activated by V1 (V1a and V1b)- and V2-type receptors respectively. Measurements of [Ca2+]i in response to V1a and V2 agonists and antagonists suggest the functional expression of these two types of receptors in vasopressin neurones. The intracellular mechanisms involved are similar to those observed for the action of the pituitary adenylyl-cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Isolated vasopressin neurones exhibit spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations and these are synchronised with phasic bursts of electrical activity. Vasopressin modulates these spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations in a manner that depends on the initial state of the neurone, and such varied effects of vasopressin may be related to those observed on the electrical activity of vasopressin neurones in vivo.

  5. Intracellular trafficking and cellular uptake mechanism of PHBV nanoparticles for targeted delivery in epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza, Juan P; Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Cabaña-Brunod, Mauricio; Reyes-Ramírez, Rodrigo; Llancalahuen, Felipe M; Vilos, Cristian; Maldonado-Biermann, Fernanda; Velásquez, Luis A; Fuentes, Juan A; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Rodríguez-Díaz, Maité; Otero, Carolina

    2017-01-03

    Nanotechnology is a science that involves imaging, measurement, modeling and a manipulation of matter at the nanometric scale. One application of this technology is drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles obtained from natural or synthetic sources. An example of these systems is synthetized from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate), which is a biodegradable, biocompatible and a low production cost polymer. The aim of this work was to investigate the uptake mechanism of PHBV nanoparticles in two different epithelial cell lines (HeLa and SKOV-3). As a first step, we characterized size, shape and surface charge of nanoparticles using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Intracellular incorporation was evaluated through flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy using intracellular markers. We concluded that cellular uptake mechanism is carried out in a time, concentration and energy dependent way. Our results showed that nanoparticle uptake displays a cell-specific pattern, since we have observed different colocalization in two different cell lines. In HeLa (Cervical cancer cells) this process may occur via classical endocytosis pathway and some internalization via caveolin-dependent was also observed, whereas in SKOV-3 (Ovarian cancer cells) these patterns were not observed. Rearrangement of actin filaments showed differential nanoparticle internalization patterns for HeLa and SKOV-3. Additionally, final fate of nanoparticles was also determined, showing that in both cell lines, nanoparticles ended up in lysosomes but at different times, where they are finally degraded, thereby releasing their contents. Our results, provide novel insight about PHBV nanoparticles internalization suggesting that for develop a proper drug delivery system is critical understand the uptake mechanism.

  6. Intracellular mechanisms of verapamil and diltiazem action on striated muscle of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Su, J Y

    1988-09-01

    Skinned fibers from striated muscle were used to study the intracellular mechanisms (contractile proteins and sarcoplasmic reticulum [SR]) of action of diltiazem (DT) and verapamil (VP) on muscle contraction. Rabbit papillary muscle (PM), and the skeletal muscles adductor magnus (AM, fast-twitch) and soleus (SL, slow-twitch) were used. The muscles were skinned by homogenization and fibre bundles for PM and single fibres for AM and SL were dissected from the homogenate and mounted on photodiode force transducers. VP (0.1-3.0 mmol/l) (and to a lesser degree DT) increased Ca2+-activated tension development of the contractile protains in PM and SL and decreased it in AM (+[4-20]%, +4%, -[14-28]%, respectively). Both drugs increased the submaximal Ca2+-activated tension development at the order of PM = SL greater than AM in a dose-dependent manner. The changes of half-maximal pCa50 at 1 mmol/l VP were 0.25, 0.25, and 0.15, respectively. For Ca2+ uptake and release from the SR, VP as well as DT (0.1-3.0 mmol/l) in the uptake phase decreased caffeine-induced tension transients in a dose-dependent fashion. At 0.01-3.0 mmol/l, the drugs directly induced Ca2+ release from the SR or enhanced caffeine-induced tension transients with the exception that in PM, DT attenuated caffeine-induced tension transients. Thus, VP and DT have similar intracellular mechanisms of action in striated muscle. Both drugs induced calcium release from the SR and increase Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile proteins, and thus could be the underlying mechanisms for potentiating twitch tension, and inducing contracture in skeletal muscle.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of the Impact of the Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 on Campylobacter jejuni’s Invasion and Intracellular Survival in Human Colonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Yosra A.; Kassem, Issmat I.; Kumar, Anand; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial food poisoning in humans. Due to the rise in antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, there exists a need to develop antibiotic-independent interventions to control infections in humans. Here, we evaluated the impact of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), a probiotic strain, on C. jejuni’s invasion and intracellular survival in polarized human colonic cells (HT-29). To further understand how EcN mediates its impact, the expression of 84 genes associated with tight junctions and cell adhesion was profiled in HT-29 cells after treatment with EcN and challenge with C. jejuni. The pre-treatment of polarized HT-29 cells with EcN for 4 h showed a significant effect on C. jejuni’s invasion (∼2 log reduction) of the colonic cells. Furthermore, no intracellular C. jejuni were recovered from EcN pre-treated HT-29 cells at 24 h post-infection. Other probiotic strains tested had no significant impact on C. jejuni invasion and intracellular survival. C. jejuni decreased the expression of genes associated with epithelial cells permeability and barrier function in untreated HT-29 cells. However, EcN positively affected the expression of genes that are involved in enhanced intestinal barrier function, decreased cell permeability, and increased tight junction integrity. The results suggest that EcN impedes C. jejuni invasion and subsequent intracellular survival by affecting HT-29 cells barrier function and tight junction integrity. We conclude that EcN might be a viable alternative for controlling C. jejuni infections. PMID:28878749

  8. Spatio-temporal PLC activation in parallel with intracellular Ca2+ wave propagation in mechanically stimulated single MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Yasunori; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Ushida, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ transients are evoked either by the opening of Ca2+ channels on the plasma membrane or by phospholipase C (PLC) activation resulting in IP3 production. Ca2+ wave propagation is known to occur in mechanically stimulated cells; however, it remains uncertain whether and how PLC activation is involved in intracellular Ca2+ wave propagation in mechanically stimulated cells. To answer these questions, it is indispensable to clarify the spatio-temporal relations between intracellular Ca2+ wave propagation and PLC activation. Thus, we visualized both cytosolic Ca2+ and PLC activation using a real-time dual-imaging system in individual Mardin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. This system allowed us to simultaneously observe intracellular Ca2+ wave propagation and PLC activation in a spatio-temporal manner in a single mechanically stimulated MDCK cell. The results showed that PLC was activated not only in the mechanically stimulated region but also in other subcellular regions in parallel with intracellular Ca2+ wave propagation. These results support a model in which PLC is involved in Ca2+ signaling amplification in mechanically stimulated cells.

  9. Omp31 plays an important role on outer membrane properties and intracellular survival of Brucella melitensis in murine macrophages and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Verdiguel-Fernández, L; Oropeza-Navarro, R; Basurto-Alcántara, Francisco J; Castañeda-Ramírez, A; Verdugo-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2017-04-05

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease that affects practically all species of mammals, including human, and is a major zoonosis worldwide. Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that have the ability to survive and multiply in phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells such as trophoblast and epithelial cells. Among the six recognized species of the genus Brucella, Brucella melitensis is the main etiological agent involved in goat brucellosis and is also the most pathogenic for human. It causes significant losses in livestock production as a result of abortions, metritis, infertility, and birth of weak animals. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are exposed on the bacterial surface and are in contact with cells and effectors of the host immune response, whereby they could be important virulence factors of Brucella species. To evaluate this hypothesis, the gene encoding for the major outer membrane protein Omp31 was amplified, cloned into pUC18 plasmid, and inactivated by inserting a kanamycin cassette, rendering pLVM31 plasmid which was transformed into B. melitensis wild-type strain to obtain LVM31 mutant strain. The Outer membrane (OM) properties of the mutant strain were compared with B. melitensis Bm133 wild-type and B. melitensis Rev1 vaccine strains, in assessing its susceptibility to polymyxin B, sodium deoxycholate, and nonimmune serum. The mutant strain was assessed in vitro with survival assays in murine macrophages J774.A1 and HeLa cells. Our results demonstrate that LVM31 mutant is more susceptible to polymyxin B, sodium deoxycholate, and nonimmune serum than control strains; moreover, Omp31 mutation caused a decrease in the internalization and a significant decrease in the intracellular survival compared with the reference strains in both cell lines. These results allow us to conclude that Omp31 is important for maintaining OM integrity, but also it is necessary for bacterial internalization, establishment and development of an optimal replication

  10. Survival Predictions of Ceramic Crowns Using Statistical Fracture Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, S; Katsube, N; Seghi, R R; Rokhlin, S I

    2017-01-01

    This work establishes a survival probability methodology for interface-initiated fatigue failures of monolithic ceramic crowns under simulated masticatory loading. A complete 3-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis model of a minimally reduced molar crown was developed using commercially available hardware and software. Estimates of material surface flaw distributions and fatigue parameters for 3 reinforced glass-ceramics (fluormica [FM], leucite [LR], and lithium disilicate [LD]) and a dense sintered yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YZ) were obtained from the literature and incorporated into the model. Utilizing the proposed fracture mechanics-based model, crown survival probability as a function of loading cycles was obtained from simulations performed on the 4 ceramic materials utilizing identical crown geometries and loading conditions. The weaker ceramic materials (FM and LR) resulted in lower survival rates than the more recently developed higher-strength ceramic materials (LD and YZ). The simulated 10-y survival rate of crowns fabricated from YZ was only slightly better than those fabricated from LD. In addition, 2 of the model crown systems (FM and LD) were expanded to determine regional-dependent failure probabilities. This analysis predicted that the LD-based crowns were more likely to fail from fractures initiating from margin areas, whereas the FM-based crowns showed a slightly higher probability of failure from fractures initiating from the occlusal table below the contact areas. These 2 predicted fracture initiation locations have some agreement with reported fractographic analyses of failed crowns. In this model, we considered the maximum tensile stress tangential to the interfacial surface, as opposed to the more universally reported maximum principal stress, because it more directly impacts crack propagation. While the accuracy of these predictions needs to be experimentally verified, the model can provide a fundamental understanding of the

  11. Regulation of outer hair cell cytoskeletal stiffness by intracellular Ca2+: underlying mechanism and implications for cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Frolenkov, Gregory I; Mammano, Fabio; Kachar, Bechara

    2003-03-01

    Two Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms have been proposed to regulate the mechanical properties of outer hair cells (OHCs), the sensory-motor receptors of the mammalian cochlea. One involves the efferent neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, decreasing OHC axial stiffness. The other depends on elevation of intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) resulting in OHC elongation, a process known as Ca(2+)-dependent slow motility. Here we provide evidence that both these phenomena share a common mechanism. In whole-cell patch-clamp conditions, a fast increase of [Ca(2+)](i) by UV-photolysis of caged Ca(2+) or by extracellular application of Ca(2+)-ionophore, ionomycin, produced relatively slow (time constant approximately 20s) cell elongation. When OHCs were partially collapsed by applying minimal negative pressure through the patch pipette, elevation of the [Ca(2+)](i) up to millimole levels (estimated by Fura-2) was unable to restore the cylindrical shape of the OHC. Stiffness measurements with vibrating elastic probes showed that the increase of [Ca(2+)](i) causes a decrease of OHC axial stiffness, with time course similar to that of the Ca(2+)-dependent elongation, without developing any measurable force. We concluded that, contrary to a previous proposal, Ca(2+)-induced OHC elongation is unlikely to be driven by circumferential contraction of the lateral wall, but is more likely a passive mechanical reaction of the turgid OHC to Ca(2+)-induced decrease of axial stiffness. This may be the key phenomenon for controlling gain and operating point of the cochlear amplifier.

  12. Differential expression of survival proteins during decreased intracellular oxygen tension in brain endothelial cells of grey mullets.

    PubMed

    Ekambaram, Padmini; Narayanan, Meenakshi; Parasuraman, Parimala

    2017-02-15

    The brain requires constant oxygen supply to perform its biological functions essential for survival. Because of low oxygen capacity and poor oxygen diffusibility of water, many fish species have evolved various adaptive mechanisms to cope with depleted oxygen. Endothelial cells (EC) are the primary components responsible for controlled environment of brain. Brain homeostasis largely depends on integrity of the EC. To elucidate their adaptive strategy, EC were isolated from the fish brain of Kovalam-control site and Ennore estuary-test/field hypoxic site and were subjected to low oxygen tension in laboratory. Cell viability, 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed to ascertain stress. Hypoxic insult, cytoprotective role of HSPs and apoptotic effect were analyzed by assessing hypoxia-inducible-factor-α (HIF1α), heat-shock-protein-70 (HSP70), heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and apoptosis signal regulating kinase-1 (ASK1). This study evidenced that HSP70 and HO-1 are the key stress proteins, confer high tolerance to decreased oxygen tension mediated stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-adrenergic non-cholinergic inhibition of gastrointestinal smooth muscle and its intracellular mechanism(s).

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M

    2010-06-01

    Relaxation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle caused by release of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) transmitters from enteric nerves occurs in several physiologic digestive reflexes. Likely candidate NANC inhibitory agents include nitric oxide (NO), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), carbon monoxide (CO), protease-activated receptors (PARs), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), neurotensin (NT) and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD). Multiple NANC transmitters work in concert, are pharmacologically coupled and are closely coordinated. Individual contribution varies regionally in the gastrointestinal tract and between species. NANC inhibition of gastrointestinal smooth muscle involves several intracellular mechanisms, including increase of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), increase of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and hyperpolarization of the cell membrane via direct or indirect activation of potassium ion (K+) channels.

  14. Political Mechanisms for Long-Range Survival and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, W.

    As the first species aware of extinction and capable of proactively ensuring our long-term survival and development, it is striking that we do not do so with the rigor, formality, and foresight it requires. Only from a reactive posture have we responded to the challenges of global warfare, human rights, environmental concerns, and sustainable development. Despite our awareness of the possibility for extinction and apocalyptic set-backs to our evolution, and despite the existence of long-range studies-which must still be dramatically increased-proactive global policy implementation regarding our long-term survival and development is arguably non-existent. This lack of long-term policy making can be attributed in part to the lack of formal political mechanisms to facilitate longer-range policy making that extends 30 years or more into the future. Political mechanisms for infusing long-range thinking, research, and strategic planning into the policy-making process can help correct this shortcoming and provide the motivation needed to adequately address long-term challenges with the political rigor required to effectively establish and implement long-term policies. There are some efforts that attempt to address longer-range issues, but those efforts often do not connect to the political process, do not extend 30 or more years into the future, are not well-funded, and are not sufficiently systemic. Political mechanisms for long-range survival and prosperity could correct these inadequacies by raising awareness, providing funding, and most importantly, leveraging political rigor to establish and enforce long-range strategic planning and policies. The feasibility of such mechanisms should first be rigorously studied and assessed in a feasibility study, which could then inform implementation. This paper will present the case for such a study and suggest some possible political mechanisms that should be investigated further in the proposed study. This work is being further

  15. Identification of a type IV secretion substrate of Brucella abortus that participates in the early stages of intracellular survival

    PubMed Central

    Döhmer, Peter H.; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Czibener, Cecilia; Ugalde, Juan E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Brucella abortus, the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, is an intracellular pathogen whose virulence is completely dependent on a type IV secretion system. This secretion system translocates effector proteins into the host cell to modulate the intracellular fate of the bacterium in order to establish a secure niche were it actively replicates. Although much has been done in understanding how this secretion system participates in the virulence process, few effector proteins have been identified to date. We describe here the identification of a type IV secretion substrate (SepA) that is only present in Brucella spp. and has no detectable homology to known proteins. This protein is secreted in a virB dependent manner in a two-step process involving a periplasmic intermediate and secretion is necessary for its function. The deletion mutant showed a defect in the early stages of intracellular replication in professional and non-professional phagocytes although it invades the cells more efficiently than the wild type parental strain. Our results indicate that, even though the mutant was more invasive, it had a defect in excluding the lysosomal marker Lamp-1 and was inactivated more efficiently during the early phases of the intracellular life cycle. PMID:24119283

  16. Mechanisms of intracellular calcium homeostasis in developing and mature bovine corpora lutea.

    PubMed

    Wright, Marietta F; Bowdridge, Elizabeth; McDermott, Erica L; Richardson, Samuel; Scheidler, James; Syed, Qaisar; Bush, Taylor; Inskeep, E Keith; Flores, Jorge A

    2014-03-01

    Although calcium (Ca(2+)) is accepted as an intracellular mediator of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2alpha) actions on luteal cells, studies defining mechanisms of Ca(2+) homeostasis in bovine corpora lutea (CL) are lacking. The increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) induced by PGF2alpha in steroidogenic cells from mature CL is greater than in those isolated from developing CL. Our hypothesis is that differences in signal transduction associated with developing and mature CL contribute to the increased efficacy of PGF2alpha to induce a Ca(2+) signal capable of inducing regression in mature CL. To test this hypothesis, major genes participating in Ca(2+) homeostasis in the bovine CL were identified, and expression of mRNA, protein, or activity, in the case of phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta), in developing and mature bovine CL was compared. In addition, we examined the contribution of external and internal Ca(2+) to the PGF2alpha stimulated rise in [Ca(2+)]i in LLCs isolated from developing and mature bovine CL. Three differences were identified in mechanisms of calcium homeostasis between developing and mature CL, which could account for the lesser increase in [Ca(2+)]i in response to PGF2alpha in developing than in mature CL. First, there were lower concentrations of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) after similar PGF2alpha challenge, indicating reduced phospholipase C beta (PLCbeta) activity, in developing than mature CL. Second, there was an increased expression of sorcin (SRI) in developing than in mature CL. This cytoplasmic Ca(2+) binding protein modulates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) release channel, ryanodine receptor (RyR), to be in the closed configuration. Third, there was greater expression of ATP2A2 or SERCA, which causes calcium reuptake into the ER, in developing than in mature CL. Developmental differences in expression detected in whole CL were confirmed by Western blots using protein samples from steroidogenic cells

  17. How insects survive the cold: molecular mechanisms-a review.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melody S; Worland, M Roger

    2008-11-01

    Insects vary considerably in their ability to survive low temperatures. The tractability of these organisms to experimentation has lead to considerable physiology-based work investigating both the variability between species and the actual mechanisms themselves. This has highlighted a range of strategies including freeze tolerance, freeze avoidance, protective dehydration and rapid cold hardening, which are often associated with the production of specific chemicals such as antifreezes and polyol cryoprotectants. But we are still far from identifying the critical elements behind over-wintering success and how some species can regularly survive temperatures below -20 degrees C. Molecular biology is the most recent tool to be added to the insect physiologist's armoury. With the public availability of the genome sequence of model insects such as Drosophila and the production of custom-made molecular resources, such as EST libraries and microarrays, we are now in a position to start dissecting the molecular mechanisms behind some of these well-characterised physiological responses. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art snapshot of the molecular work currently being conducted into insect cold tolerance and the very interesting preliminary results from such studies, which provide great promise for the future.

  18. A Mechanism for Intracellular Release of Na+ by Neurotransmitter: Sodium Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Malinauskaite, Lina; Reinhard, Linda; Lyons, Joseph A.; Yano, Hideaki; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate synaptic signal transmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters, with key conformational states reported for a bacterial homolog LeuT and an inhibitor-bound Drosophila dopamine transporter. However, a coherent mechanism of Na+-driven transport has not been described. Here, we present two crystal structures of MhsT, a NSS member from Bacillus halodurans, in occluded inward-facing states with bound Na+ ions and L-Trp that provide insight into the cytoplasmic release of Na+. The switch from outward- to inward-oriented states is centered on the partial unwinding of transmembrane helix 5, which is facilitated by a conserved GlyX9Pro motif that opens an intracellular pathway for water to access the Na2 site. Based on our structural and functional findings we propose a mechanism according to which solvation through the TM5 pathway facilitates Na+ release from Na2 and the transition to an inward-open state. PMID:25282149

  19. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Zhou, Bin; Lai, Xiaohan; Wang, Liyun; Luo, Erping; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes have been hypothesized to be the major mechanosensors in bone. How in situ osteocytes respond to mechanical stimuli is still unclear because of technical difficulties. In vitro studies have shown that osteocytes exhibited unique calcium (Ca2+) oscillations to fluid shear. However, whether this mechanotransduction phenomenon holds for in situ osteocytes embedded within a mineralized bone matrix under dynamic loading remains unknown. Using a novel synchronized loading/imaging technique, we successfully visualized in real time and quantified Ca2+ responses in osteocytes and bone surface cells in situ under controlled dynamic loading on intact mouse tibia. The resultant fluid-induced shear stress on the osteocyte in the lacunocanalicular system (LCS) was also quantified. Osteocytes, but not surface cells, displayed repetitive Ca2+ spikes in response to dynamic loading, with spike frequency and magnitude dependent on load magnitude, tissue strain, and shear stress in the LCS. The Ca2+ oscillations were significantly reduced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depletion and P2 purinergic receptor (P2R)/phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. This study provides direct evidence that osteocytes respond to in situ mechanical loading by Ca2+ oscillations, which are dependent on the P2R/PLC/inositol trisphosphate/ER pathway. This study develops a novel approach in skeletal mechanobiology and also advances our fundamental knowledge of bone mechanotransduction.—Jing, D., Baik, A. D., Lu, X. L., Zhou, B., Lai, X., Wang, L., Luo, E., Guo, X. E. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading. PMID:24347610

  20. Intracellular mechanisms for alpha 1-adrenergic regulation of the transient outward current in rabbit atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A P; Fedida, D; Clark, R B; Giles, W R

    1990-01-01

    1. The intracellular mechanism(s) underlying the decrease of a transient outward K+ current (It) induced by alpha 1-adrenergic agonists was studied in isolated adult rabbit atrial myocytes using whole-cell voltage clamp and cell-attached patch clamp techniques. Experiments were carried out at 22-23 degrees C. 2. Application of the specific alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, methoxamine, produced a decrease in It which was irreversible after the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, GTP gamma S and Gpp(NH)p, had been introduced into cells via the recording micropipette. 3. Pre-treatment of cells with 0.1-0.15 microgram/ml pertussis toxin (PT) for 8-9 h at 30-34 degrees C did not prevent the alpha 1-induced decrease in It. Yet, this protocol, as measured by the PT-catalysed incorporation of [32P]ADP-ribose in membrane-associated 40 and 41 kDa proteins, effectively caused the ADP-ribosylation of approximately 70% of the PT-sensitive GTP-binding proteins (i.e. Gi) in these treated cells. After taking into account the proportion of non-viable cells (20-30%), the effectiveness of this treatment probably approaches 100% in the viable myocytes from which electrophysiological recordings were made. 4. Cell-attached patch recordings showed that bath application of methoxamine altered the single-channel events underlying It by decreasing their opening probability. Averaged currents from ensemble single-channel openings recorded in the presence of 0.2 mM-methoxamine outside the patch reproduced the features of alpha 1-adrenergic modulation of the macroscopic It observed during whole-cell voltage clamp measurements. This observation provides evidence for the involvement of a diffusible intracellular second messenger in the alpha 1-adrenergic modulation of It. 5. The protein kinase C (PKC) activators, 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) increased It, when included in the bath perfusate, whereas the inactive analogues, 4 alpha-phorbol and 4 alpha

  1. Intracellular mechanisms mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Paul W; Shah, Sumit

    2005-01-01

    Tocotrienols and tocopherols represent the two subgroups that make up the vitamin E family of compounds. However, tocotrienols display significantly more potent apoptotic activity in neoplastic mammary epithelial cells than tocopherols. Studies were conducted to determine the intracellular mechanism(s) mediating tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in neoplastic +SA mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. An initial step in apoptosis is the activation of 'initiator' caspases (caspase-8 or -9) that subsequently activate 'effector' caspases (caspase-3, -6 and -7) and induce apoptosis. Treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol (20 microM) resulted in a time-dependent increase in caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity. Combined treatment with specific caspase-8 or caspase-3 inhibitors completely blocked alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis and caspase-8 or caspase-3 activity, respectively. In contrast, alpha-tocotrienol treatment had no effect on caspase-9 activation, and combined treatment with a specific caspase-9 inhibitor did not block alpha-tocotrienol-induced apoptosis in (+)SA cells. Since caspase-8 activation is associated with the activation of death receptors, such as Fas, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, studies were conducted to determine the exact death receptor(s) and ligand(s) involved in mediating tocotrienol-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Treatment with Fas-ligand (FasL), Fas-activating antibody, or TRAIL failed to induce cell death in (+)SA neoplastic mammary epithelial cells, suggesting that these cells are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with cytotoxic doses of alpha-tocotrienol did not alter the intracellular levels of Fas, FasL, or Fas-associated death domain (FADD) in these cells. Western blot analysis also showed that alpha-tocotrienol did not induce FasL or FADD translocation from the cytosolic to membrane fraction in these cells. Finally

  2. Use of agent-based modeling to explore the mechanisms of intracellular phosphorus heterogeneity in cultured phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, Neil D; Berges, John A; Twining, Benjamin S; Nuñez-Milland, Daliangelis; Hellweger, Ferdi L

    2013-07-01

    There can be significant intraspecific individual-level heterogeneity in the intracellular P of phytoplankton, which can affect the population-level growth rate. Several mechanisms can create this heterogeneity, including phenotypic variability in various physiological functions (e.g., nutrient uptake rate). Here, we use modeling to explore the contribution of various mechanisms to the heterogeneity in phytoplankton grown in a laboratory culture. An agent-based model simulates individual cells and their intracellular P. Heterogeneity is introduced by randomizing parameters (e.g., maximum uptake rate) of daughter cells at division. The model was calibrated to observations of the P quota of individual cells of the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, which were obtained using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF). A number of simulations, with individual mechanisms of heterogeneity turned off, then were performed. Comparison of the coefficient of variation (CV) of these and the baseline simulation (i.e., all mechanisms turned on) provides an estimate of the relative contribution of these mechanisms. The results show that the mechanism with the largest contribution to variability is the parameter characterizing the maximum intracellular P, which, when removed, results in a CV of 0.21 compared to a CV of 0.37 with all mechanisms turned on. This suggests that nutrient/element storage capabilities/mechanisms are important determinants of intrapopulation heterogeneity.

  3. Phytoestrogens modulate prostaglandin production in bovine endometrium: cell type specificity and intracellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Woclawek-Potocka, Izabela; Acosta, Tomas J; Korzekwa, Anna; Bah, Mamadou M; Shibaya, Masami; Okuda, Kiyoshi; Skarzynski, Dariusz J

    2005-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are known to modulate the proper cyclicity of bovine reproductive organs. The main luteolytic agent in ruminants is PGF2alpha, whereas PGE2 has luteotropic actions. Estradiol 17beta (E2) regulates uterus function by influencing PG synthesis. Phytoestrogens structurally resemble E2 and possess estrogenic activity; therefore, they may mimic the effects of E2 on PG synthesis and influence the reproductive system. Using a cell-culture system of bovine epithelial and stromal cells, we determined cell-specific effects of phytoestrogens (i.e., daidzein, genistein), their metabolites (i.e., equol and para-ethyl-phenol, respectively), and E2 on PGF2alpha and PGE2 synthesis and examined the intracellular mechanisms of their actions. Both PGs produced by stromal and epithelial cells were significantly stimulated by phytoestrogens and their metabolites. However, PGF2alpha synthesis by both kinds of cells was greater stimulated than PGE2 synthesis. Moreover, epithelial cells treated with phytoestrogens synthesized more PGF2alpha than stromal cells, increasing the PGF2alpha to PGE2 ratio. The epithelial and stromal cells were preincubated with an estrogen-receptor (ER) antagonist (i.e., ICI), a translation inhibitor (i.e., actinomycin D), a protein kinase A inhibitor (i.e., staurosporin), and a phospholipase C inhibitor (i.e., U73122) for 0.5 hrs and then stimulated with equol, para-ethyl-phenol, or E2. Although the action of E2 on PGF2alpha synthesis was blocked by all reagents, the stimulatory effect of phytoestrogens was blocked only by ICI and actinomycin D in both cell types. Moreover, in contrast to E2 action, phytoestrogens did not cause intracellular calcium mobilization in either epithelial or stromal cells. Phytoestrogens stimulate both PGF2alpha and PGE2 in both cell types of bovine endometrium via an ER-dependent genomic pathway. However, because phytoestrogens preferentially stimulated PGF2alpha synthesis in epithelial cells of bovine

  4. Intracellular electrophysiological study of suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons in rodents: excitatory synaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y I; Dudek, F E

    1991-01-01

    1. To study the synaptic mechanisms of excitatory transmission in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), we assessed the effects of excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists on excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) recorded from SCN neurons in horizontal and parasagittal hypothalamic slice preparations from rats and guinea-pigs. The EPSPs were evoked by electrical stimulation of either optic nerve or a site near the SCN. 2. When evoked at membrane potentials between -60 and -100 mV, the EPSPs from optic nerve stimulation were conventional in shape; they rose to the peak quickly (6.2 +/- 0.5 ms, mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 45) and decayed gradually over 50-250 ms. When evoked at membrane potentials between -20 and -55 mV after blockade of outward K+ currents and fast Na+ spikes by intracellular injection of Cs+ and QX-314 (n = 5 neurons), a slow depolarizing potential emerged near the fast peak of the EPSP. This slow potential, unlike the fast peak, was not linearly related to membrane potential. 3. An antagonist for kainate- and quisqualate-type excitatory amino acid receptors, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX 1-10 microM), depressed in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner the EPSPs evoked by optic nerve stimulation at membrane potentials between -60 and -100 mV (n = 9). The effects of DNQX were not associated with any significant changes in the baseline input resistance or membrane potential of the postsynaptic neurons. The selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5, 50-100 microM), did not affect significantly and consistently the EPSPs evoked at these membrane potentials (n = 7). On the other hand, AP5 (50 microM) blocked or depressed the slow depolarizing component of the EPSPs evoked at membrane potentials between -20 and -55 mV (n = 4). No significant changes in baseline input resistance or membrane potential accompanied the effects of AP5. 4. Stimulation of a site lateral or dorsocaudal to

  5. Intracellular infections in Drosophila melanogaster: host defense and mechanisms of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Péan, Claire B; Dionne, Marc S

    2014-01-01

    The fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a powerful model to study innate immunity against intracellular pathogens. To combat infection, the fly relies on multiple lines of defense, many of which are shared with mammals and arthropod vectors of human diseases. In addition to conserved immune pathways, the ease of performing sophisticated genetic screens has allowed the identification of novel host immune factors and novel pathogen virulence factors. Recently, some groups have exploited this to simultaneously analyze the host and pathogen genetics of intracellular infection. This review aims to unravel the Drosophila immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting recent discoveries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracellular patterns of Her-2/neu, ras, and ploidy abnormalities in primary human breast cancers predict postoperative clinical disease-free survival.

    PubMed

    Shackney, Stanley E; Smith, Charles A; Pollice, Agnese; Brown, Kathryn; Day, Roger; Julian, Thomas; Silverman, Jan F

    2004-05-01

    In an earlier study, the presence of aneuploidy, Her-2/neu overexpression, and ras overexpression in the same cells (triple-positive cells) was of prognostic significance (P < 0.015) in 91 patients with localized breast cancer (median follow up, 32 months). Here, we present results involving a larger group of patients with longer follow-up. Fixed cell suspensions prepared from primary tumors of 189 patients with early breast cancer were studied prospectively by multiparameter flow cytometry. Correlated intracellular fluorescence-based measurements of cell DNA content and Her-2/neu and ras protein were obtained on each of >2000 cells in each tumor. Intracellular combinations of abnormalities in these measurements were correlated with subsequent patient disease-free survival (DFS). Median time on study was 54 months (range, 7-128 months). DFS of patients with > or = 5% triple-positive tumor cells was shorter than those who did not meet this criterion (P = 0.004). The difference remained statistically significant after accounting for nodal status, tumor size, and each of the component abnormalities (P = 0.006). Node-negative patients whose tumors had fewer than 2 abnormalities/cell had an especially favorable clinical course, with a 5-year DFS of 96% (lower confidence bound, 86%). Patterns of accumulated intracellular molecular abnormalities in cells of primary human breast cancers are predictive for subsequent DFS independently of the abnormalities themselves taken individually.

  7. A reappraisal of humoral immunity based on mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2006-01-01

    Sometime in the mid to late twentieth century the study of antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) entered the doldrums, as many immunologists believed that the function of AMI was well understood, and was no longer deserving of intensive investigation. However, beginning in the 1990s studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) revealed new functions for antibodies, including direct antimicrobial effects and their ability to modify host inflammatory and cellular responses. Furthermore, the demonstration that mAbs to several intracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens were protective issued a serious challenge to the paradigm that host defense against such microbes was strictly governed by cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Hence, a new view of AMI is emerging. This view is based on the concept that a major function of antibody (Ab) is to amplify or subdue the inflammatory response to a microbe. In this regard, the "damage-response framework" of microbial pathogenesis provides a new conceptual viewpoint for understanding mechanisms of AMI. According to this view, the ability of an Ab to affect the outcome of a host-microbe interaction is a function of its capacity to modify the damage ensuing from such an interaction. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the efficacy of an Ab cannot be defined either by immunoglobulin or epitope characteristics alone, but rather by a complex function of Ab variables, such as specificity, isotype, and amount, host variables, such as genetic background and immune status, and microbial variables, such as inoculum, mechanisms of avoiding host immune surveillance and pathogenic strategy. Consequently, far from being understood, recent findings in AMI imply a system with unfathomable complexity and the field is poised for a long overdue renaissance.

  8. Polycystin-1 Mediates Mechanical Strain-Induced Osteoblastic Mechanoresponses via Potentiation of Intracellular Calcium and Akt/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Wen; Ma, Junqing; Pan, Yongchu; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Weibing

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical regulation of bone formation involves a complex biophysical process, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Polycystin-1 (PC1) is postulated to function as a mechanosensory molecule mediating mechanical signal transduction in renal epithelial cells. To investigate the involvement of PC1 in mechanical strain-induced signaling cascades controlling osteogenesis, PKD1 gene was stably silenced in osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 by using lentivirus-mediated shRNA technology. Here, our findings showed that mechanical tensile strain sufficiently enhanced osteogenic gene expressions and osteoblastic proliferation. However, PC1 deficiency resulted in the loss of the ability to sense external mechanical stimuli thereby promoting osteoblastic osteogenesis and proliferation. The signal pathways implicated in this process were intracellular calcium and Akt/β-catenin pathway. The basal levels of intracellular calcium, phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β and nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin were significantly attenuated in PC1 deficient osteoblasts. In addition, PC1 deficiency impaired mechanical strain-induced potentiation of intracellular calcium, and activation of Akt-dependent and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, which was able to be partially reversed by calcium ionophore A23187 treatment. Furthermore, applications of LiCl or A23187 in PC1 deficient osteoblasts could promote osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation under mechanical strain conditions. Therefore, our results demonstrated that osteoblasts require mechanosensory molecule PC1 to adapt to external mechanical tensile strain thereby inducing osteoblastic mechanoresponse, partially through the potentiation of intracellular calcium and downstream Akt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:24618832

  9. Metallothionein is crucial for safe intracellular copper storage and cell survival at normal and supra-physiological exposure levels.

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Lucía; González-Agüero, Mauricio; Cisternas, Mónica F; Suazo, Miriam; Cambiazo, Verónica; Uauy, Ricardo; González, Mauricio

    2004-01-01

    MTs (metallothioneins) increase the resistance of cells to exposure to high Cu (copper) levels. Characterization of the MT-Cu complex suggests that MT has an important role in the cellular storage and/or delivery of Cu ions to cuproenzymes. In this work we investigate how these properties contribute to Cu homoeostasis by evaluating the uptake, accumulation and efflux of Cu in wild-type and MT I/II null rat fibroblast cell lines. We also assessed changes in the expression of Cu metabolism-related genes in response to Cu exposure. At sub-physiological Cu levels (0.4 microM), the metal content was not dependent on MT; however, when extracellular Cu was increased to physiological levels (10 microM), MTs were required for the cell's ability to accumulate the metal. The subcellular localization of the accumulated metal in the cytoplasm was MT-dependent. Following supra-physiological Cu exposure (>50 microM), MT null cells had a decreased capacity for Cu storage and an elevated sensitivity to a minor increment in intracellular metal levels, suggesting that intracellular Cu toxicity is due not to the metal content but to the interactions of the metal with cellular components. Moreover, MT null cells failed to show increased levels of mRNAs encoding MT I, SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1) and Ccs1 (Cu chaperone for SOD) in response to Cu exposure. These results support a role for MT in the storage of Cu in a safe compartment and in sequestering an intracellular excess of Cu in response to supra-physiological Cu exposure. Gene expression analysis suggests the necessity of having MT as part of the signalling pathway that induces gene expression in response to Cu. PMID:14627437

  10. Existence of two groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis based on biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular profile and agr-typing.

    PubMed

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Caplin, Jonathan; Detilleux, Johann; Graber, Hans; Moroni, Paolo; Taminiau, Bernard; Mainil, Jacques G

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is recognised worldwide as an important pathogen causing contagious acute and chronic bovine mastitis. Chronic mastitis account for a significant part of all bovine cases and represent an important economic problem for dairy producers. Several properties (biofilm formation, intracellular survival, capsular expression and group agr) are thought to be associated with this chronic status. In a previous study, we found the existence of two groups of strains based on the association of these features. The aim of the present work was to confirm on a large international and non-related collection of strains the existence of these clusters and to associate them with case history records. In addition, the genomes of eight strains were sequenced to study the genomic differences between strains of each cluster. The results confirmed the existence of both groups based on capsular typing, intracellular survival and agr-typing: strains cap8-positive, belonging to agr group II, showing a low invasion rate and strains cap5-positive, belonging to agr group I, showing a high invasion rate. None of the two clusters were associated with the chronic status of the cow. When comparing the genomes of strains belonging to both clusters, the genes specific to the group "cap5-agrI" would suggest that these strains are better adapted to live in hostile environment. The existence of these two groups is highly important as they may represent two clusters that are adapted differently to the host and/or the surrounding environment.

  11. The Lly protein protects Legionella pneumophila from light but does not directly influence its intracellular survival in Hartmannella vermiformis.

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, M; Engelhard, H; Flügel, M; Wintermeyer, E; Hacker, J

    1995-01-01

    The lly locus (legiolysin) mediates the browning of the culture medium of Legionella pneumophila in the late stationary growth phase, presumably as a result of synthesis of homogentisic acid. Mutagenesis of the lly gene of the L. pneumophila Philadelphia I derivative JR32 did not affect intracellular replication in the natural host Hartmannella vermiformis. The Lly-negative mutant, however, showed a markedly decreased resistance to ordinary light. The cloned lly gene conferred an increased resistance to light in recombinant L. pneumophila and Escherichia coli K-12, indicating a contribution of the Lly protein to ecological adaptation of Legionella species. PMID:7793965

  12. On the intracellular release mechanism of hydrophobic cargo and its relation to the biodegradation behavior of mesoporous silica nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    von Haartman, Eva; Lindberg, Desiré; Prabhakar, Neeraj; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2016-12-01

    The intracellular release mechanism of hydrophobic molecules from surface-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles was studied in relation to the biodegradation behavior of the nanocarrier, with the purpose of determining the dominant release mechanism for the studied drug delivery system. To be able to follow the real-time intracellular release, a hydrophobic fluorescent dye was used as model drug molecule. The in vitro release of the dye was investigated under varying conditions in terms of pH, polarity, protein and lipid content, presence of hydrophobic structures and ultimately, in live cancer cells. Results of investigating the drug delivery system show that the degradation and drug release mechanisms display a clear interdependency in simple aqueous solvents. In pure aqueous media, the cargo release was primarily dependent on the degradation of the nanocarrier, while in complex media, mimicking intracellular conditions, the physicochemical properties of the cargo molecule itself and its interaction with the carrier and/or surrounding media were found to be the main release-governing factors. Since the material degradation was retarded upon loading with hydrophobic guest molecules, the cargo could be efficiently delivered into live cancer cells and released intracellularly without pronounced premature release under extracellular conditions. From a rational design point of view, pinpointing the interdependency between these two processes can be of paramount importance considering future applications and fundamental understanding of the drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Permethrin potentiates adipogenesis via intracellular calcium and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated mechanisms in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Qi, Weipeng; Clark, John M; Park, Yeonhwa

    2017-09-06

    Permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, was previously reported to promote adipogenesis in vitro and weight gain in vivo. The mechanism by which permethrin promotes adipogenesis/obesity, however, has not been fully explored. Intracellular calcium and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been reported to be linked with adipogenesis and obesity. Because pyrethroid insecticides have been determined to influence intracellular calcium and ER stress in vitro, the purpose of this current study was to investigate whether permethrin potentiates adipogenesis via a change in intracellular calcium, leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were exposed to four different concentrations of permethrin (0.01, 0.1, 1 & 10 μM) for 6 days during differentiation. Treatment of permethrin increased intracellular calcium level in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, permethrin treatment increased protein levels of ER stress markers in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that intracellular calcium and ER stress may be involved in permethrin-induced adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracellular Trafficking in Drosophila Visual System Development: A Basis for Pattern Formation Through Simple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chih-Chiang; Epstein, Daniel; Hiesinger, P. Robin

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking underlies cellular functions ranging from membrane remodeling to receptor activation. During multicellular organ development, these basic cell biological functions are required as both passive machinery and active signaling regulators. Exocytosis, endocytosis, and recycling of several key signaling receptors have long been known to actively regulate morphogenesis and pattern formation during Drosophila eye development. Hence, intracellular membrane trafficking not only sets the cell biological stage for receptor-mediated signaling but also actively controls signaling through spatiotemporally regulated receptor localization. In contrast to eye development, the role of intracellular trafficking for the establishment of the eye-to-brain connectivity map has only recently received more attention. It is still poorly understood how guidance receptors are spatiotemporally regulated to serve as meaningful synapse formation signals. Yet, the Drosophila visual system provides some of the most striking examples for the regulatory role of intracellular trafficking during multicellular organ development. In this review we will first highlight the experimental and conceptual advances that motivate the study of intracellular trafficking during Drosophila visual system development. We will then illuminate the development of the eye, the eye-to-brain connectivity map and the optic lobe from the perspective of cell biological dynamics. Finally, we provide a conceptual framework that seeks to explain how the interplay of simple genetically encoded intracellular trafficking events governs the seemingly complex cellular behaviors, which in turn determine the developmental product. PMID:21714102

  15. Mechanisms Associated with Activation of Intracellular Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor, mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    The group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5, is found on the cell surface as well as on intracellular membranes where it can mediate both overlapping and unique signaling effects. Previously we have shown that glutamate activates intracellular mGluR5 by entry through sodium-dependent transporters and/or cystine glutamate exchangers. Calibrated antibody labelling suggests that the glutamate concentration within neurons is quite high (~10 mM) raising the question as to whether intracellular mGluR5 is maximally activated at all times or whether a different ligand might be responsible for receptor activation. To address this issue, we used cellular, optical and molecular techniques to show that intracellular glutamate is largely sequestered in mitochondria; that the glutamate concentration necessary to activate intracellular mGluR5 is about ten-fold higher than what is necessary to activate cell surface mGluR5; and uncaging caged glutamate within neurons can directly activate the receptor. Thus these studies further the concept that glutamate itself serves as the ligand for intracellular mGluR5.

  16. Evolution of intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of intracellular pathogens is considered in the context of ambiguities in basic definitions and the diversity of host-microbe interactions. Intracellular pathogenesis is a subset of a larger world of host-microbe interactions that includes amoeboid predation and endosymbiotic existence. Intracellular pathogens often reveal genome reduction. Despite the uniqueness of each host-microbe interaction, there are only a few general solutions to the problem of intracellular survival, especially in phagocytic cells. Similarities in intracellular pathogenic strategies between phylogenetically distant microbes suggest convergent evolution. For discerning such patterns, it is useful to consider whether the microbe is acquired from another host or directly from the environment. For environmentally acquired microbes, biotic pressures, such as amoeboid predators, may select for the capacity for virulence. Although often viewed as a specialized adaptation, the capacity for intracellular survival may be widespread among microbes, thus questioning whether the intracellular lifestyle warrants a category of special distinctiveness.

  17. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  18. Enhancement of intracellular signaling associated with hematopoietic progenitor cell survival in response to SDF-1/CXCL12 in synergy with other cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghee; Gotoh, Akihiko; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; You, Minute; Kohli, Lisa; Mantel, Charlie; Cooper, Scott; Hangoc, Giao; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2002-06-15

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) is a multifunctional cytokine. We previously reported that myelopoiesis was enhanced in SDF-1 alpha transgenic mice, probably due in part to SDF-1 alpha enhancement of myeloid progenitor cell (MPC) survival. To understand signaling pathways involved in this activity, we studied the effects on factor-dependent cell line MO7e cells incubated with SDF-1 alpha alone or in combination with other cytokines. SDF-1 alpha induced transient activation of extracellular stress-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) and Akt, molecules implicated in cell survival. Moreover, ERK1/2, p90RSK, and Akt were synergistically activated by SDF-1 alpha in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), Steel factor (SLF), or thrombopoietin (TPO). Similar effects were seen after pretreatment of MO7e cells with SDF-1 alpha followed by stimulation with the other cytokines, suggesting a priming effect of SDF-1 alpha. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) did not appear to be involved in SDF-1 alpha actions, alone or in combination with other cytokines. These intracellular effects were consistent with enhanced myeloid progenitor cell survival by SDF-1 alpha after delayed addition of growth factors. SDF-1 alpha alone supported survival of highly purified human cord blood CD34(+++) cells, less purified human cord blood, and MO7e cells; this effect was synergistically enhanced when SDF-1 alpha was combined with low amounts of other survival-promoting cytokines (GM-CSF, SLF, TPO, and FL). SDF-1 may contribute to maintenance of MPCs in bone marrow by enhancing cell survival alone and in combination with other cytokines.

  19. Diverse mechanisms of metaeffector activity in an intracellular bacterial pathogen, Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanus, Malene L.; Quaile, Andrew T.; Stogios, Peter J.; Morar, Mariya; Rao, Chitong; Di Leo, Rosa; Evdokimova, Elena; Lam, Mandy; Oatway, Christina; Cuff, Marianne E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Michalska, Karolina; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Taipale, Mikko; Savchenko, Alexei; Ensminger, Alexander W.

    2016-12-16

    Pathogens deliver complex arsenals of translocated effector proteins to host cells during infection, but the extent to which these proteins are regulated once inside the eukaryotic cell remains poorly defined. Among all bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila maintains the largest known set of translocated substrates, delivering over 300 proteins to the host cell via its Type IVB, Icm/Dot translocation system. Backed by a few notable examples of effector–effector regulation in L. pneumophila, we sought to define the extent of this phenomenon through a systematic analysis of effector–effector functional interaction. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an established proxy for the eukaryotic host, to query > 108,000 pairwise genetic interactions between two compatible expression libraries of ~330 L. pneumophila–translocated substrates. While capturing all known examples of effector–effector suppression, we identify fourteen novel translocated substrates that suppress the activity of other bacterial effectors and one pair with synergistic activities. In at least nine instances, this regulation is direct—a hallmark of an emerging class of proteins called metaeffectors, or “effectors of effectors”. Through detailed structural and functional analysis, we show that metaeffector activity derives from a diverse range of mechanisms, shapes evolution, and can be used to reveal important aspects of each cognate effector's function. Here, metaeffectors, along with other, indirect, forms of effector–effector modulation, may be a common feature of many intracellular pathogens—with unrealized potential to inform our understanding of how pathogens regulate their interactions with the host cell.

  20. Hypoxia Affects Neprilysin Expression Through Caspase Activation and an APP Intracellular Domain-dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Caroline; Kozlova, Daria I; Nalivaeva, Natalia N; Turner, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    While gene mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the presenilins lead to an accumulation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain causing neurodegeneration and familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), over 95% of all AD cases are sporadic. Despite the pathologies being indistinguishable, relatively little is known about the mechanisms affecting generation of Aβ in the sporadic cases. Vascular disorders such as ischaemia and stroke are well established risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases and systemic hypoxic episodes have been shown to increase Aβ production and accumulation. We have previously shown that hypoxia causes a significant decrease in the expression of the major Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) which might deregulate Aβ clearance. Aβ itself is derived from the transmembrane APP along with several other biologically active metabolites including the C-terminal fragment (CTF) termed the APP intracellular domain (AICD), which regulates the expression of NEP and some other genes in neuronal cells. Here we show that in hypoxia there is a significantly increased expression of caspase-3, 8, and 9 in human neuroblastoma NB7 cells, which can degrade AICD. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we have revealed that there was also a reduction of AICD bound to the NEP promoter region which underlies the decreased expression and activity of the enzyme under hypoxic conditions. Incubation of the cells with a caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK could rescue the effect of hypoxia on NEP activity protecting the levels of AICD capable of binding the NEP promoter. These data suggest that activation of caspases might play an important role in regulation of NEP levels in the brain under pathological conditions such as hypoxia and ischaemia leading to a deficit of Aβ clearance and increasing the risk of development of AD.

  1. Hypoxia Affects Neprilysin Expression Through Caspase Activation and an APP Intracellular Domain-dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kerridge, Caroline; Kozlova, Daria I.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    While gene mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the presenilins lead to an accumulation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain causing neurodegeneration and familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), over 95% of all AD cases are sporadic. Despite the pathologies being indistinguishable, relatively little is known about the mechanisms affecting generation of Aβ in the sporadic cases. Vascular disorders such as ischaemia and stroke are well established risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases and systemic hypoxic episodes have been shown to increase Aβ production and accumulation. We have previously shown that hypoxia causes a significant decrease in the expression of the major Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) which might deregulate Aβ clearance. Aβ itself is derived from the transmembrane APP along with several other biologically active metabolites including the C-terminal fragment (CTF) termed the APP intracellular domain (AICD), which regulates the expression of NEP and some other genes in neuronal cells. Here we show that in hypoxia there is a significantly increased expression of caspase-3, 8, and 9 in human neuroblastoma NB7 cells, which can degrade AICD. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we have revealed that there was also a reduction of AICD bound to the NEP promoter region which underlies the decreased expression and activity of the enzyme under hypoxic conditions. Incubation of the cells with a caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK could rescue the effect of hypoxia on NEP activity protecting the levels of AICD capable of binding the NEP promoter. These data suggest that activation of caspases might play an important role in regulation of NEP levels in the brain under pathological conditions such as hypoxia and ischaemia leading to a deficit of Aβ clearance and increasing the risk of development of AD. PMID:26617481

  2. Diverse mechanisms of metaeffector activity in an intracellular bacterial pathogen, Legionella pneumophila

    DOE PAGES

    Urbanus, Malene L.; Quaile, Andrew T.; Stogios, Peter J.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Pathogens deliver complex arsenals of translocated effector proteins to host cells during infection, but the extent to which these proteins are regulated once inside the eukaryotic cell remains poorly defined. Among all bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila maintains the largest known set of translocated substrates, delivering over 300 proteins to the host cell via its Type IVB, Icm/Dot translocation system. Backed by a few notable examples of effector–effector regulation in L. pneumophila, we sought to define the extent of this phenomenon through a systematic analysis of effector–effector functional interaction. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an established proxy for the eukaryotic host, tomore » query > 108,000 pairwise genetic interactions between two compatible expression libraries of ~330 L. pneumophila–translocated substrates. While capturing all known examples of effector–effector suppression, we identify fourteen novel translocated substrates that suppress the activity of other bacterial effectors and one pair with synergistic activities. In at least nine instances, this regulation is direct—a hallmark of an emerging class of proteins called metaeffectors, or “effectors of effectors”. Through detailed structural and functional analysis, we show that metaeffector activity derives from a diverse range of mechanisms, shapes evolution, and can be used to reveal important aspects of each cognate effector's function. Here, metaeffectors, along with other, indirect, forms of effector–effector modulation, may be a common feature of many intracellular pathogens—with unrealized potential to inform our understanding of how pathogens regulate their interactions with the host cell.« less

  3. Possible role of Toll-like receptor-2 in the intracellular survival of Staphylococcus aureus in murine peritoneal macrophages: involvement of cytokines and anti-oxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bishayi, B; Bandyopadhyay, D; Majhi, A; Adhikary, R

    2014-08-01

    Effects of blocking toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) on the survival of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and cytokine production in peritoneal macrophages of Swiss albino mice were analysed. Macrophages were infected with S. aureus in the presence and absence of anti-TLR-2 antibody. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) concentrations were measured. Expressions of TLR-2, NF-κB, MyD 88 were analysed by Western Blot. Expression of TLR-2 was increased in S. aureus-infected macrophages with respect to control and was MyD 88 independent. TLR2 blocking significantly reduced TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-10 and increased IFN-γ and IL-12 production. Decreased catalase activity and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) by S. aureus with concomitant increase in H2 O2 and nitric oxide (NO) were observed in the case of prior TLR-2 blocking. To understand whether catalase contributing in the intracellular survival, was of bacterial origin or not, 3-amino, 1, 2, 4-triazole (ATZ) was used to inhibit specifically macrophage-derived catalase. Catalase enzyme activity from the whole staphylococcal cells in the presence of ATZ suggested that the released catalase were of extracellular origin. From the intracellular survival assay, it was evident that pretreatment of macrophages with ATZ reduces the bacterial burden in macrophages when infected with the recovered bacteria only from the anti-TLR-2 antibody-treated macrophages after phagocytosis. Catalase protein expression from the whole staphylococcal cells recovered after phagocytosis also indicated the catalase release from S. aureus. Capturing of S. aureus via TLR-2 induces inflammatory reactions through activation of NF-κB-signalling pathways which was MyD88-independent. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Is Increased Intracellular Calcium in Red Blood Cells a Common Component in the Molecular Mechanism Causing Anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Laura; Huisjes, Rick; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Makhro, Asya; Danielczok, Jens G.; Egee, Stephane; del Mar Mañú-Pereira, Maria; van Wijk, Richard; Vives Corrons, Joan-Lluis; Bogdanova, Anna; Kaestner, Lars

    2017-01-01

    For many hereditary disorders, although the underlying genetic mutation may be known, the molecular mechanism leading to hemolytic anemia is still unclear and needs further investigation. Previous studies revealed an increased intracellular Ca2+ in red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with sickle cell disease, thalassemia, or Gardos channelopathy. Therefore we analyzed RBCs' Ca2+ content from 35 patients with different types of anemia (16 patients with hereditary spherocytosis, 11 patients with hereditary xerocytosis, 5 patients with enzymopathies, and 3 patients with hemolytic anemia of unknown cause). Intracellular Ca2+ in RBCs was measured by fluorescence microscopy using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4 and subsequent single cell analysis. We found that in RBCs from patients with hereditary spherocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis the intracellular Ca2+ levels were significantly increased compared to healthy control samples. For enzymopathies and hemolytic anemia of unknown cause the intracellular Ca2+ levels in RBCs were not significantly different. These results lead us to the hypothesis that increased Ca2+ levels in RBCs are a shared component in the mechanism causing an accelerated clearance of RBCs from the blood stream in channelopathies such as hereditary xerocytosis and in diseases involving defects of cytoskeletal components like hereditary spherocytosis. Future drug developments should benefit from targeting Ca2+ entry mediating molecular players leading to better therapies for patients. PMID:28932200

  5. Is Increased Intracellular Calcium in Red Blood Cells a Common Component in the Molecular Mechanism Causing Anemia?

    PubMed

    Hertz, Laura; Huisjes, Rick; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Makhro, Asya; Danielczok, Jens G; Egee, Stephane; Del Mar Mañú-Pereira, Maria; van Wijk, Richard; Vives Corrons, Joan-Lluis; Bogdanova, Anna; Kaestner, Lars

    2017-01-01

    For many hereditary disorders, although the underlying genetic mutation may be known, the molecular mechanism leading to hemolytic anemia is still unclear and needs further investigation. Previous studies revealed an increased intracellular Ca(2+) in red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with sickle cell disease, thalassemia, or Gardos channelopathy. Therefore we analyzed RBCs' Ca(2+) content from 35 patients with different types of anemia (16 patients with hereditary spherocytosis, 11 patients with hereditary xerocytosis, 5 patients with enzymopathies, and 3 patients with hemolytic anemia of unknown cause). Intracellular Ca(2+) in RBCs was measured by fluorescence microscopy using the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 and subsequent single cell analysis. We found that in RBCs from patients with hereditary spherocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis the intracellular Ca(2+) levels were significantly increased compared to healthy control samples. For enzymopathies and hemolytic anemia of unknown cause the intracellular Ca(2+) levels in RBCs were not significantly different. These results lead us to the hypothesis that increased Ca(2+) levels in RBCs are a shared component in the mechanism causing an accelerated clearance of RBCs from the blood stream in channelopathies such as hereditary xerocytosis and in diseases involving defects of cytoskeletal components like hereditary spherocytosis. Future drug developments should benefit from targeting Ca(2+) entry mediating molecular players leading to better therapies for patients.

  6. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G.; MacArthur, Iain

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted “bovine-type” allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. PMID:25895973

  7. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G; MacArthur, Iain; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2015-07-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted "bovine-type" allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  9. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (mean survival: 34.2% +/- 9.0% of albumin, P less than 0.0001) despite similar efficient ingestion of extracellular bacteria. Enhancement of killing was observed when surfaces were coated with purified constituents of extracellular matrix, i.e., fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, vitronectin, or type IV collagen. In addition to matrix proteins, the tetrapeptide RGDS (the sequence recognized by integrins) crosslinked to surface bound albumin was also active (survival: 74.5% +/- 5.5% of albumin, P less than 0.02), and fibronectin-increased killing was inhibited by soluble RGDS. Chemiluminescence measurements and experiments with CGD neutrophils revealed that both oxygen-dependent and -independent bactericidal mechanisms are involved. In conclusion, matrix proteins enhance intracellular bactericidal activity of adherent neutrophils, presumably by integrin recognition of RGDS-containing ligands. These results indicate a role for extracellular matrix proteins in the enhancement of the host defense against pyogenic infections. Images PMID:2394841

  10. Combating Enhanced Intracellular Survival (Eis)-Mediated Kanamycin Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Novel Pyrrolo[1,5-a]pyrazine-Based Eis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garzan, Atefeh; Willby, Melisa J; Ngo, Huy X; Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Green, Keith D; Holbrook, Selina Y L; Hou, Caixia; Posey, James E; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2017-02-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Hence, the identification of highly effective antitubercular drugs with novel modes of action is crucial. In this paper, we report the discovery and development of pyrrolo[1,5-a]pyrazine-based analogues as highly potent inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) acetyltransferase enhanced intracellular survival (Eis), whose up-regulation causes clinically observed resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotic kanamycin A (KAN). We performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study to optimize these compounds as potent Eis inhibitors both against purified enzyme and in mycobacterial cells. A crystal structure of Eis in complex with one of the most potent inhibitors reveals that the compound is bound to Eis in the AG binding pocket, serving as the structural basis for the SAR. These Eis inhibitors have no observed cytotoxicity to mammalian cells and are promising leads for the development of innovative AG adjuvant therapies against drug-resistant TB.

  11. A Campylobacter jejuni Dps Homolog Has a Role in Intracellular Survival and in the Development of Campylobacterosis in Neonate Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Theoret, James R.; Cooper, Kerry K.; Glock, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Iron acquisition is an absolute requirement by most microorganisms for host survival. In this work, we investigated the Campylobacter jejuni iron binding Dps protein for a potential role in virulence. In vitro assays using J774A.1 macrophage-like cells demonstrated a 2.5 log reduction in C. jejuni survival of the Dps mutant and a reduction of four logs in invasion of HEp-2 epithelial cells compared to the wild-type strain. To examine the role of the dps gene in host pathogenesis, the piglet model was used in C. jejuni challenge studies. In vivo inoculation studies of newborn piglets with wild-type C. jejuni demonstrated an 11-fold upregulation of the dps gene and intestinal lesion production typical of campylobacteriosis in humans. In contrast, piglets inoculated with the dps mutant were not colonized and remained normal throughout the study period. Mucosal lesion production was restored in piglets inoculated with the complemented Dps mutant strain. Based on these results, we conclude that the C. jejuni Dps homolog is a virulence factor in the production of campylobacteriosis, and warrants further investigation. PMID:21854265

  12. A Campylobacter jejuni Dps homolog has a role in intracellular survival and in the development of campylobacterosis in neonate piglets.

    PubMed

    Theoret, James R; Cooper, Kerry K; Glock, Robert D; Joens, Lynn A

    2011-12-01

    Iron acquisition is an absolute requirement by most microorganisms for host survival. In this work, we investigated the Campylobacter jejuni iron binding Dps protein for a potential role in virulence. In vitro assays using J774A.1 macrophage-like cells demonstrated a 2.5 log reduction in C. jejuni survival of the Dps mutant and a reduction of four logs in invasion of HEp-2 epithelial cells compared to the wild-type strain. To examine the role of the dps gene in host pathogenesis, the piglet model was used in C. jejuni challenge studies. In vivo inoculation studies of newborn piglets with wild-type C. jejuni demonstrated an 11-fold upregulation of the dps gene and intestinal lesion production typical of campylobacteriosis in humans. In contrast, piglets inoculated with the dps mutant were not colonized and remained normal throughout the study period. Mucosal lesion production was restored in piglets inoculated with the complemented Dps mutant strain. Based on these results, we conclude that the C. jejuni Dps homolog is a virulence factor in the production of campylobacteriosis, and warrants further investigation.

  13. Intracellular Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Mechanism for Inducing Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Viral nanoparticles as tools for intravital vascular imaging . Nature Medicine, 2006. 12(3): p. 354-360. 16. Speelmans, G., et al., Transport Studies of...hydrodynamic diameter of 25.4 ± 0.4 nm and TEM images showing distinct nanoparticles. Task 2: Coupling of chemotherapeutic molecules to protein...examined. The images indicate cellular uptake and an accumulation of D381C-AF532M within intracellular compartments, but minimal uptake of free AF532M

  14. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the measurement of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration changes in cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Hosokawa, S.; Hakomori, S.; Miyoshi, S.; Soejima, K.; Arai, T.

    2008-02-01

    We propose the application of early state photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treatment of atrial fibrillation, which is a kind of arrhythmia characterized by irregular rapid beating of heart. We had demonstrated that our PDT can block the propagation of electrical excitation in cardiac myocytes. However, the mechanism of the PDT-induced electrical blockade was not clear. In order to clarify this mechanism, changes in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration during the PDT with Talaporfin sodium (water soluble photosensitizer) were measured by fluorescence Ca 2+ indicator, fluo-4 AM. The PDT led to the rapid increase of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration and the changes in cell shapes. These results indicated that extracellular Ca 2+ flowed into the cells mediated by cell membrane. Moreover, we found bubble generation in the cells after the PDT. In conclusion, the PDT-induced electrical blockade in myocytes can be caused by cell death following the bubble generation, which is accompanied by the increase in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration due to the cell membrane malfunction with the PDT.

  15. Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: Why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

    Treesearch

    Nate McDowell; William T. Pockman; Craig D. Allen; David D. Breshears; Neil Cobb; Thomas Kolb; Jennifer Plaut; John Sperry; Adam West; David G. Williams; Enrico A. Yepez

    2008-01-01

    Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and...

  16. Depletion of autophagy-related genes ATG3 and ATG5 in Tenebrio molitor leads to decreased survivability against an intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Tindwa, Hamisi; Jo, Yong Hun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Noh, Mi Young; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Iksoo; Han, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Bok Luel; Kim, Nam Jung

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in physiological and developmental processes including cell survival, death, and innate immunity. Homologues of most of 36 originally discovered autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast have been characterized in higher eukaryotes including insects. In this study, the homologues of ATG3 (TmATG3) and ATG5 (TmATG5) were isolated from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor by expressed sequence tag and RNAseq approaches. The cDNA of TmATG3 and TmATG5 comprise open-reading frame sizes of 963 and 792 bp encoding polypeptides of 320 and 263 amino acid residues, respectively. TmATG3 and TmATG5 mRNA are expressed in all developmental stages, and mainly in fat body and hemocytes of larvae. TmATG3 and TmATG5 showed an overall sequence identity of 58-95% to other insect Atg proteins. There exist clear one-to-one orthologs of TmATG3 and TmATG5 in Tribolium and that they clustered together in the gene tree. Depletion of TmATG3 and TmATG5 by RNA interference led to a significant reduction in survival ability of T. molitor larvae against an intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. Six days post-Listeria challenge, the survival rate in the dsEGFP-injected (where EGFP is enhanced green fluorescent protein) control larvae was significantly higher (55%) compared to 4 and 3% for TmATG3 and TmATG5 double-stranded RNA injected larvae, respectively. These data suggested that TmATG3 and TmATG5 may play putative role in mediating autophagy-based clearance of Listeria in T. molitor model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Homeostatic Systems--Mechanisms for Survival. Science IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Carl H.

    The two student notebooks in this set provide the basic outline and assignments for the fourth and last year of a senior high school unified science program which builds on the technical third year course, Science IIIA (see SE 012 149). An introductory section considers the problems of survival inherent in living systems, matter-energy…

  18. Anaerobic phosphate release from activated sludge with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. A possible mechanism of intracellular pH control

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, P.L.; Keller, J.; Blackall, L.L.

    1999-06-05

    The biochemical mechanisms of the wastewater treatment process known as enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) are presently described in a metabolic model. The authors investigated details of the EBPR model to determine the nature of the anaerobic phosphate release and how this may be metabolically associated with polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) formation. Iodoacetate, an inhibitor of glycolysis, was found to inhibit the anaerobic formation of PHA and phosphate release, supporting the pathways proposed in the EBPR metabolic model. In the metabolic model, it is proposed that polyphosphate degradation provides energy for the microorganisms in anaerobic regions of these treatment systems. Other investigations have shown that anaerobic phosphate release depends on the extracellular pH. The authors observed that when the intracellular pH of EBPR sludge was raised, substantial anaerobic phosphate release was caused without volatile fatty acid (VFA) uptake. Acidification of the sludge inhibited anaerobic phosphate release even in the presence of VFA. from these observations, the authors postulate that an additional possible role of anaerobic polyphosphate degradation in EBPR is for intracellular pH control. Intracellular pH control may be a metabolic feature of EBPR, not previously considered, that could have some use in the control and optimization of EBPR.

  19. ACAT1-associated Late Endosomes/Lysosomes Significantly Improve Impaired Intracellular Cholesterol Metabolism and the Survival of Niemann-Pick Type C Mice.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Masashi; Lei, XiaoFeng; Fujiwara, Yukio; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro; Sakashita, Naomi

    2014-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that macrophages exhibit endoplasmic reticulum fragmentation under cholesterol-rich conditions, which results in the generation of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1)-associated late endosomes/lysosomes (ACAT1-LE). ACAT1-LE efficiently esterify free cholesterol in loco, even with abnormal egress of free cholesterol from late endosomes. Because impaired free cholesterol transport from late endosomes results in Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC), the induction of ACAT1-LE is a potential therapeutic intervention for NPC. To examine the effects of ACAT1-LE induction on intracellular cholesterol metabolism, we incubated bone marrow-derived macrophages possessing NPC phenotype (npc1 (-/-)) with methyl-β-cyclodextrin-cholesterol complex (mβCD-cho), a cholesterol donor. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed that mβCD-cho treatment of npc1 (-/-) macrophages resulted in significant colocalization of signals from ACAT1 and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2, a late endosome/lysosome marker. npc1 (-/-) macrophages contained significant amounts of free cholesterol with negligible amounts of cholesteryl ester, while wild-type macrophages possessed the same amounts of both cholesterols. mβCD-cho treatment also induced marked restoration of cholesterol esterification activity. mβCD-cho administration in neonate npc1 (-/-) mice improved survival. These results indicate that ACAT1-LE induction in npc1 (-/-) mice corrects impaired intracellular cholesterol metabolism and that restoring cholesterol esterification improves prognosis of npc1 (-/-). These data suggest that ACAT1-LE induction is a potential alternative therapeutic strategy for NPC.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: mechanism of entry and intracellular fate in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The mode of entry and intracellular fate of epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi in cultured cells was studied. Electron microscopic observations indicated the uptake by phagocytosis of both forms into mouse peritoneal macrophages and of trypomastigotes and transition forms into other cultured cell types. In each instance the organisms were initially surrounded by a plasma membrane-derived phagosome. Trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment of the macrophages completely abolished attachment and ingestion of both forms, indicating that protease-sensitive structures on the macrophage plasma membrane mediate ingestion. The macrophage Fc or C3b receptors were not essential for uptake of T. cruzi in the conditions used. Cytochalasin B inhibited ingestion but not the attachment of both forms by macrophages. Epimastigotes were not taken up by HeLa, L cells, and calf embryo fibroblasts. In macrophages, epimastigotes were killed and digested within phagolysosomes. In contrast, trypomastigotes and transition forms escaped from the phagocytic vacuole and then multiplied in the cytoplasmic matrix. Amastigotes released from infected cells exhibited properties similar to those of trypomastigotes and were able to enter all cell types studied and multiply intracellularly. PMID:775012

  1. Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nate G.; Pockman, William T.; Allen, Craig D.; Breshears, David D.; Cobb, Neil; Kolb, Thomas; Plaut, Jennifer; Sperry, John; West, Adam; Williams, David G.; Yepez, Enrico A.

    2008-01-01

    Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced hydraulic failure via stomatal closure, resulting in carbon starvation and a cascade of downstream effects such as reduced resistance to biotic agents. Mortality by hydraulic failure per se may occur for isohydric seedlings or trees near their maximum height. Although anisohydric plants are relatively drought-tolerant, they are predisposed to hydraulic failure because they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins during drought. Elevated temperatures should exacerbate carbon starvation and hydraulic failure. Biotic agents may amplify and be amplified by drought-induced plant stress. Wet multidecadal climate oscillations may increase plant susceptibility to drought-induced mortality by stimulating shifts in hydraulic architecture, effectively predisposing plants to water stress. Climate warming and increased frequency of extreme events will probably cause increased regional mortality episodes. Isohydric and anisohydric water potential regulation may partition species between survival and mortality, and, as such, incorporating this hydraulic framework may be effective for modeling plant survival and mortality under future climate conditions.

  2. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Louisse, Jochem; Bai, Yanqing; Verwei, Miriam; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2010-06-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH(i)) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH(i)in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH(i) of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na(+)/H(+)-antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH(i) in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH(i) may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  3. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Louisse, Jochem; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-06-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH{sub i}in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH{sub i} of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +}-antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH{sub i} in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH{sub i} may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  4. Intracellular recordings of subnucleus reticularis dorsalis neurones revealed novel electrophysiological properties and windup mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Cristina; Canedo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aδ- and/or C-fibre nociceptive inputs drive subnucleus reticularis dorsalis (SRD) neurones projecting to a variety of regions including the spinal cord and the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc), but their electrophysiological properties are largely unknown. Here we intracellularly recorded the SRD neuronal responses to injection of polarising current pulses as well as to electrical stimulation of the cervical spinal posterior quadrant (PQ) and the NRGc. Three different classes of neurones with distinct electrophysiological properties were found: type I were characterised by the absence of a fast postspike hyperpolarisation, type II by the presence of a postspike hyperpolarisation followed by a depolarisation resembling low threshold calcium spikes (LTSs), and type III (lacking LTSs) had a fast postspike hyperpolarisation deinactivating A-like potassium channels leading to enlarged interspike intervals. All three classes generated depolarising sags to hyperpolarising current pulses and showed 3–4.5 Hz subthreshold oscillatory activity leading to windup when intracellularly injecting low-frequency repetitive depolarising pulses as well as in response to 0.5–2 Hz NRGc and PQ electrical stimulation. About half of the 132 sampled neurones responded antidromically to NRGc stimulation with more than 65% of the NRGc-antidromic cells, pertaining to all three types, also responding antidromically to PQ stimulation. NRGc stimulation induced exclusively excitatory first-synaptic-responses whilst PQ stimulation induced first-response excitation in most cases, but inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in a few type II and type III neurones not projecting to the spinal cord that also displayed cumulative inhibitory effects (inverse windup). The results show that SRD cells (i) can actively regulate different temporal firing patterns due to their intrinsic electrophysiological properties, (ii) generate windup upon gradual membrane depolarisation produced by

  5. Mechanism of the association between Na+ binding and conformations at the intracellular gate in neurotransmitter:sodium symporters

    DOE PAGES

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; ...

    2015-04-13

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. Here we describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two differentmore » perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na+ dependence. Furthermore, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na+ binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. Lastly, that the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.« less

  6. The mechanism of improved intracellular organic selenium and glutathione contents in selenium-enriched Candida utilis by acid stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gao-Chuan; Wang, Da-Hui; Wang, Dong-Hua; Wei, Gong-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Batch culture of Candida utilis CCTCC M 209298 for the preparation of selenium (Se)-enriched yeast was carried out under different pH conditions, and maximal intracellular organic Se and glutathione (GSH) contents were obtained in a moderate acid stress environment (pH 3.5). In order to elucidate the physiological mechanism of improved performance of Se-enriched yeast by acid stress, assays of the key enzymes involved in GSH biosynthesis and determinations of energy supply and regeneration were performed. The results indicated that moderate acid stress increased the activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and the ratios of NADH/NAD(+) and ATP/ADP, although no significant changes in intracellular pH were observed. In addition, the molecular mechanism of moderate acid stress favoring the improvement of Se-yeast performance was revealed by comparing whole transcriptomes of yeast cells cultured at pH 3.5 and 5.5. Comparative analysis of RNA-Seq data indicated that 882 genes were significantly up-regulated by moderate acid stress. Functional annotation of the up-regulated genes based on gene ontology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) pathway showed that these genes are involved in ATP synthesis and sulfur metabolism, including the biosynthesis of methionine, cysteine, and GSH in yeast cells. Increased intracellular ATP supply and more amounts of sulfur-containing substances in turn contributed to Na2SeO3 assimilation and biotransformation, which ultimately improved the performance of the Se-enriched C. utilis.

  7. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  8. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca2+]i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca2+]i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P < 0.01) when the external calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca2+]i. We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. PMID:27980039

  9. Intracellular membrane association of the Aplysia cAMP phosphodiesterase long and short forms via different targeting mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Hyung; Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Yongsoo; Lee, Jin-A; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2014-09-12

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play key roles in cAMP compartmentalization, which is required for intracellular signaling processes, through specific subcellular targeting. Previously, we showed that the long and short forms of Aplysia PDE4 (ApPDE4), which are localized to the membranes of distinct subcellular organelles, play key roles in 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced synaptic facilitation in Aplysia sensory and motor synapses. However, the molecular mechanism of the isoform-specific distinct membrane targeting was not clear. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of the membrane targeting of the ApPDE4 long and short forms. We found that the membrane targeting of the long form was mediated by hydrophobic interactions, mainly via 16 amino acids at the N-terminal region, whereas the short form was targeted solely to the plasma membrane, mainly by nonspecific electrostatic interactions between their N termini and the negatively charged lipids such as the phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates PI4P and PI(4,5)P2, which are embedded in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Moreover, oligomerization of the long or short form by interaction of their respective upstream conserved region domains, UCR1 and UCR2, enhanced their plasma membrane targeting. These results suggest that the long and short forms of ApPDE4 are distinctly targeted to intracellular membranes through their direct association with the membranes via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, respectively.

  10. Intracellular Membrane Association of the Aplysia cAMP Phosphodiesterase Long and Short Forms via Different Targeting Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun-Hyung; Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Yongsoo; Lee, Jin-A; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play key roles in cAMP compartmentalization, which is required for intracellular signaling processes, through specific subcellular targeting. Previously, we showed that the long and short forms of Aplysia PDE4 (ApPDE4), which are localized to the membranes of distinct subcellular organelles, play key roles in 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced synaptic facilitation in Aplysia sensory and motor synapses. However, the molecular mechanism of the isoform-specific distinct membrane targeting was not clear. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of the membrane targeting of the ApPDE4 long and short forms. We found that the membrane targeting of the long form was mediated by hydrophobic interactions, mainly via 16 amino acids at the N-terminal region, whereas the short form was targeted solely to the plasma membrane, mainly by nonspecific electrostatic interactions between their N termini and the negatively charged lipids such as the phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates PI4P and PI(4,5)P2, which are embedded in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Moreover, oligomerization of the long or short form by interaction of their respective upstream conserved region domains, UCR1 and UCR2, enhanced their plasma membrane targeting. These results suggest that the long and short forms of ApPDE4 are distinctly targeted to intracellular membranes through their direct association with the membranes via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, respectively. PMID:25077971

  11. A selective Gβγ-linked intracellular mechanism for modulation of a ligand-gated ion channel by ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Yevenes, Gonzalo E.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Peoples, Robert W.; Schmalzing, Günther; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2008-01-01

    The current understanding about ethanol effects on the ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) superfamily has been restricted to identify potential binding sites within transmembrane (TM) domains in the Cys-loop family. Here, we demonstrate a key role of the TM3–4 intracellular loop and Gβγ signaling for potentiation of glycine receptors (GlyRs) by ethanol. We discovered 2 motifs within the large intracellular loop of the GlyR α1 subunit that are critical for the actions of pharmacological concentrations of ethanol. Significantly, the sites were ethanol-specific because they did not alter the sensitivity to general anesthetics, neurosteroids, or longer n-alcohols. Furthermore, Gβγ scavengers selectively attenuated the ethanol effects on recombinant and native neuronal GlyRs. These results show a selective mechanism for low-ethanol concentration effects on the GlyR and provide a mechanism on ethanol pharmacology, which may be applicable to other LGIC members. Moreover, these data provide an opportunity to develop new genetically modified animal models and novel drugs to treat alcohol-related medical concerns. PMID:19074265

  12. Growth and Survival Mechanisms Associated with Perineural Invasion in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    CANCER RESEARCH 64, 6082–6090, September 1, 2004] Growth and Survival Mechanisms Associated with Perineural Invasion in Prostate Cancer Gustavo E...Departments of 1Pathology, 2Urology, and 3Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Perineural invasion (PNI) is...PNI. Cancer cells in a perineural location acquire a survival and growth advantage using a NFB survival pathway. Targeting PNI might help detain local

  13. Intracellular Calcium and the Mechanism of Anodal Supernormal Excitability in Langendorff Perfused Rabbit Ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Boyoung; Park, Hyung-Wook; Maruyama, Mitsunori; Tang, Liang; Song, Juan; Han, Seongwook; Piccirillo, Gianfranco; Weiss, James N.; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Anodal stimulation hyperpolarizes cell membrane and increases intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) transient. This study tested the hypothesis that The maximum slope of Cai decline (–(dCai/dt)max) corresponds to the timing of anodal dip on the strength-interval curve and the initiation of repetitive responses and ventricular fibrillation (VF) after a premature stimulus (S2). Methods and Results We simultaneously mapped membrane potential (Vm) and Cai in 23 rabbit ventricles. A dip was observed on the anodal strength-interval curve. During the anodal dip, ventricles were captured by anodal break excitation directly under the S2 electrode. The Cai following anodal stimuli is larger than that following cathodal stimuli. The S1-S2 intervals of the anodal dip (203 ± 10 ms) coincided with the -(dCai/dt)max (199 ± 10 ms, p=NS). BAPTA-AM (n=3), INCX inhibition by low extracellular Na+ (n=3), and combined ryanodine and thapsigargin infusion (n=2) eliminated the anodal supernormality. Strong S2 during the relative refractory period (n=5) induced 29 repetitive responses and 10 VF episodes. The interval between S2 and the first non-driven beat was coincidental with the time of -(dCai/dt)max. Conclusions Larger Cai transient and INCX activation induced by anodal stimulation produces anodal supernormality. Time of maximum INCX activation is coincidental to the induction of non- driven beats from the Cai sinkhole after a strong premature stimulation. PMID:21301131

  14. Anabolic androgenic steroids and intracellular calcium signaling: a mini review on mechanisms and physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, J M; Estrada, M; Galvis, D; Bravo, R; Contreras, A E; Rotter, D; Szabadkai, G; Hill, J A; Rothermel, B A; Jaimovich, E; Lavandero, S

    2011-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nongenomic effects of testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) operate concertedly with genomic effects. Classically, these responses have been viewed as separate and independent processes, primarily because nongenomic responses are faster and appear to be mediated by membrane androgen receptors, whereas long-term genomic effects are mediated through cytosolic androgen receptors regulating transcriptional activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ in response to AAS. These Ca2+ mediated responses have been seen in a diversity of cell types, including osteoblasts, platelets, skeletal muscle cells, cardiac myocytes and neurons. The versatility of Ca2+ as a second messenger provides these responses with a vast number of pathophysiological implications. In cardiac cells, testosterone elicits voltage-dependent Ca2+ oscillations and IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, leading to activation of MAPK and mTOR signaling that promotes cardiac hypertrophy. In neurons, depending upon concentration, testosterone can provoke either physiological Ca2+ oscillations, essential for synaptic plasticity, or sustained, pathological Ca2+ transients that lead to neuronal apoptosis. We propose therefore, that Ca2+ acts as an important point of crosstalk between nongenomic and genomic AAS signaling, representing a central regulator that bridges these previously thought to be divergent responses.

  15. Anabolic Androgenic Steroids and Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A Mini Review on Mechanisms and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Vicencio, J.M.; Estrada, M.; Galvis, D.; Bravo, R.; Contreras, A.E.; Rotter, D.; Szabadkai, G.; Hill, J.A.; Rothermel, B.A.; Jaimovich, E.; Lavandero, S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nongenomic effects of testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) operate concertedly with genomic effects. Classically, these responses have been viewed as separate and independent processes, primarily because nongenomic responses are faster and appear to be mediated by membrane androgen receptors, whereas long-term genomic effects are mediated through cytosolic androgen receptors regulating transcriptional activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ in response to AAS. These Ca2+ mediated responses have been seen in a diversity of cell types, including osteoblasts, platelets, skeletal muscle cells, cardiac myocytes and neurons. The versatility of Ca2+ as a second messenger provides these responses with a vast number of pathophysiological implications. In cardiac cells, testosterone elicits voltage-dependent Ca2+ oscillations and IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, leading to activation of MAPK and mTOR signaling that promotes cardiac hypertrophy. In neurons, depending upon concentration, testosterone can provoke either physiological Ca2+ oscillations, essential for synaptic plasticity, or sustained, pathological Ca2+ transients that lead to neuronal apoptosis. We propose therefore, that Ca2+ acts as an important point of crosstalk between nongenomic and genomic AAS signaling, representing a central regulator that bridges these previously thought to be divergent responses. PMID:21443511

  16. Impact of mechanical shear on Listeria monocytogenes survival on surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial inactivation using high temperatures is well known process and has contributed significantly toward food safety and shelf life extension for the food industry. Mechanical high pressure (hydrostatic) treatment is also gaining interest in food processing applications for achieving microbial...

  17. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular calcium: A mechanism of mustard toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Majerus, B.J.; Munavalli, G.S.; Petrali, J.P.

    1993-05-13

    The effect of sulfur mustard SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+)i was studied in vitro using the clonal mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 and primary normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cell culture models. SM depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) and thus may inhibit GSH-dependent Ca2+-ATPase (Ca2+ pump), leading to a high (Ca2+) and consequent cellular toxicity. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, GSH levels decreased 20-34% between 1-6 hr in NG108-15 cells. SM increased (Ca2+)i, measured using the Ca2+-specific fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM, in both NG108-15 cells (1030% between 2-6 hr) and NHEK (23-30% between 0.5-3 hr) . Depletion of cellular GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (1 mM), a specific GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, also increased Ca2+, (88% at 1 hr) in NHEK, suggesting that GSH depletion may lead to increased (Ca2+)i. Calcium, localized cytochemically with antimony, accumulated in increased amounts around mitochondria and endoplasmic reticula, in the cytosol, and in particular in the euchromatin regions of the nucleus beginning at 6 hr after 0.3 mM SM exposure of NG108-15 cells. Cell membrane integrity examined with the fluorescent membrane probe calcein AM was unaffected through 6 hr following 1 mM SM exposure; and cell viability (NG108-15 cells) measured by trypan blue exclusion was >80% of control through 9 hr following 0.3 mM SM exposure.

  18. Reduction of intracellular pH is not the mechanism for the synergistic interaction between photodynamic therapy and nigericin.

    PubMed

    Varnes, M E; Bayne, M T; Bright, G R

    1996-11-01

    Previous studies showed that photodynamic therapy (PDT) sensitized by aluminum phthalocyanine can be dramatically potentiated by the K+/H+ ionophore nigericin. Nigericin equilibrates intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHe) and is most effective in potentiating PDT damage when cells are in an acidic environment (pH 6.5-6.7). We therefore hypothesized that the ability of nigericin to lower pHi is causally related to its ability to potentiate PDT. To test this, the pHi of A549 cells was reduced using pHe-adjusted growth medium, with or without addition of amiloride and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, inhibitors of the membrane-based exchangers responsible for regulating pHi. Using fluorescence ratio imaging, we found that pHi can be equilibrated to within +/- 0.05 pH unit, in the pH range of 6.0-6.8, for up to 1 h after pHe adjustment. Cells equilibrated to various pHi were subjected to PDT at various light fluences, then plated for clonogenic survival immediately after PDT treatment. There is no significant effect of lowering pHi, to values as low as 6.23, on the toxicity of PDT, regardless of whether pHi is lowered by adjustment of the medium alone or by addition of exchange inhibitors. However, cells equilibrated to pHi 6.0 are more sensitive to PDT, with survival reduced by 1 log at 20 kJ/m2 and 1.5 log at 30 kJ/m2, relative to cells treated at a pHi of 6.8 (controls). In contrast, 20 microM nigericin in medium at pHe 6.7 reduces pHi to 6.55, but reduces the surviving fraction at 20 kJ/m2 by nearly 3 logs relative to controls. These data conclusively demonstrate that the ability of nigericin to potentiate PDT is not directly related to its ability to lower pHi. Furthermore, they show that the expression of PDT damage is independent of pHi, except at the very low value of 6.0. Photodynamic therapy does not induce apoptosis in A549 cells, at surviving fractions of 0.1 to 0.01, under any of the treatment conditions used in this study.

  19. Rapid Pathogen-Induced Apoptosis: A Mechanism Used by Dendritic Cells to Limit Intracellular Replication of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Catarina V.; Lindsten, Tullia; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Case, Christopher L.; Shin, Sunny; Thompson, Craig B.; Roy, Craig R.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized phagocytes that internalize exogenous antigens and microbes at peripheral sites, and then migrate to lymphatic organs to display foreign peptides to naïve T cells. There are several examples where DCs have been shown to be more efficient at restricting the intracellular replication of pathogens compared to macrophages, a property that could prevent DCs from enhancing pathogen dissemination. To understand DC responses to pathogens, we investigated the mechanisms by which mouse DCs are able to restrict replication of the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila. We show that both DCs and macrophages have the ability to interfere with L. pneumophila replication through a cell death pathway mediated by caspase-1 and Naip5. L. pneumophila that avoided Naip5-dependent responses, however, showed robust replication in macrophages but remained unable to replicate in DCs. Apoptotic cell death mediated by caspase-3 was found to occur much earlier in DCs following infection by L. pneumophila compared to macrophages infected similarly. Eliminating the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak or overproducing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were both found to restore L. pneumophila replication in DCs. Thus, DCs have a microbial response pathway that rapidly activates apoptosis to limit pathogen replication. PMID:19521510

  20. The mechanism of honokiol-induced intracellular Ca(2+) rises and apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-Zhe; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Chang, Hong-Tai; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Ko, Kuang-Chung; Chiang, Ni-Na; Wu, Ru-Fang; Shieh, Pochuen; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2014-09-25

    Honokiol, an active constituent of oriental medicinal herb Magnolia officinalis, caused Ca(2+) mobilization and apoptosis in different cancer cells. In vivo, honokiol crossed the blood-brain or -cerebrospinal fluid barrier, suggesting that it may be an effective drug for the treatment of brain tumors, including glioblastoma. This study examined the effect of honokiol on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells. Honokiol concentration-dependently induced a [Ca(2+)]i rise. The signal was decreased partially by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). Honokiol-triggered [Ca(2+)]i rise was not suppressed by store-operated Ca(2+) channel blockers (nifedipine, econazole, SK&F96365) and the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA), but was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. GF109203X-induced inhibition was not altered by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). In Ca(2+)-free medium, pretreatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished honokiol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rise. Conversely, incubation with honokiol abolished TG or BHQ-induced [Ca(2+)]i rise. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 abolished honokiol-induced [Ca(2+)]i rise. Honokiol (20-80μM) reduced the cell viability, which was not reversed by prechelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester). Honokiol (20-60μM) enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, released cytochrome c, and activated caspase-9/caspase-3. Together, honokiol induced a [Ca(2+)]i rise by inducing PLC-dependent Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca(2+) entry via PKC-dependent, non store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, honokiol activated the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in DBTRG-05MG human glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2014

  1. Dietary antiaging phytochemicals and mechanisms associated with prolonged survival

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongwei; Liu, Dongmin

    2014-01-01

    Aging is well-known an inevitable process that is influenced by genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the aging process are not well understood. Increasing evidence shows that aging is highly associated with chronic increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), accumulation of a low-grade proinflammatory phenotype and reduction in age-related autophagy, suggesting that these factors may play important roles in promoting aging. Indeed, reduction of ROS and low-grade inflammation and promotion of autophagy by calorie restriction or other dietary manipulation can extend lifespan in a wide spectrum of model organisms. Interestingly, recent studies show that some food-derived small molecules, also called phytochemicals, can extend lifespan in various animal species. In this paper, we review several recently identified potential antiaging phytochemicals that have been studied in cells, animals and humans and further highlight the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the antiaging actions by these molecules. PMID:24742470

  2. SLC25A22 Promotes Proliferation and Survival of Colorectal Cancer Cells With KRAS Mutations and Xenograft Tumor Progression in Mice via Intracellular Synthesis of Aspartate.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Chun; Qian, Yun; Li, Xiaona; Xu, Jiaying; Kang, Wei; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka-Fai; Jin, Ye; Li, Weilin; Chen, Huarong; Go, Minnie Y Y; Wu, Jian-Lin; Cheng, Ka Wing; Ng, Simon S M; Sung, Joseph J Y; Cai, Zongwei; Yu, Jun

    2016-11-01

    regeneration of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Reduced oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide inhibited glycolysis and decreased levels of adenosine triphosphate, which inactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase. An increased ratio of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate induced oxidative stress and glutathione oxidation, which suppressed cell proliferation. Asparagine synthetase mediated synthesis of asparagine from aspartate to promote cell migration. SLC25A22 promotes proliferation and migration of CRC cells with mutations KRAS, and formation and metastasis of CRC xenograft tumors in mice. Patients with colorectal tumors that express increased levels of SLC25A22 have shorter survival times than patients whose tumors have lower levels. SLC25A22 induces intracellular synthesis of aspartate, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and reduces oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TcI Isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi Exploit the Antioxidant Network for Enhanced Intracellular Survival in Macrophages and Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zago, María Paola; Hosakote, Yashoda M; Koo, Sue-Jie; Dhiman, Monisha; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Basombrio, Miguel A; Robello, Carlos; Garg, Nisha J

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi species is categorized into six discrete typing units (TcI to TcVI) of which TcI is most abundantly noted in the sylvatic transmission cycle and considered the major cause of human disease. In our study, the TcI strains Colombiana (COL), SylvioX10/4 (SYL), and a cultured clone (TCC) exhibited different biological behavior in a murine model, ranging from high parasitemia and symptomatic cardiomyopathy (SYL), mild parasitemia and high tissue tropism (COL), to no pathogenicity (TCC). Proteomic profiling of the insect (epimastigote) and infective (trypomastigote) forms by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, followed by functional annotation of the differential proteome data sets (≥2-fold change, P < 0.05), showed that several proteins involved in (i) cytoskeletal assembly and remodeling, essential for flagellar wave frequency and amplitude and forward motility of the parasite, and (ii) the parasite-specific antioxidant network were enhanced in COL and SYL (versus TCC) trypomastigotes. Western blotting confirmed the enhanced protein levels of cytosolic and mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidases and their substrate (tryparedoxin) and iron superoxide dismutase in COL and SYL (versus TCC) trypomastigotes. Further, COL and SYL (but not TCC) were resistant to exogenous treatment with stable oxidants (H2O2 and peroxynitrite [ONOO(-)]) and dampened the intracellular superoxide and nitric oxide response in macrophages, and thus these isolates escaped from macrophages. Our findings suggest that protein expression conducive to increase in motility and control of macrophage-derived free radicals provides survival and persistence benefits to TcI isolates of T. cruzi. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. TcI Isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi Exploit the Antioxidant Network for Enhanced Intracellular Survival in Macrophages and Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosakote, Yashoda M.; Koo, Sue-jie; Dhiman, Monisha; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Basombrio, Miguel A.; Robello, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi species is categorized into six discrete typing units (TcI to TcVI) of which TcI is most abundantly noted in the sylvatic transmission cycle and considered the major cause of human disease. In our study, the TcI strains Colombiana (COL), SylvioX10/4 (SYL), and a cultured clone (TCC) exhibited different biological behavior in a murine model, ranging from high parasitemia and symptomatic cardiomyopathy (SYL), mild parasitemia and high tissue tropism (COL), to no pathogenicity (TCC). Proteomic profiling of the insect (epimastigote) and infective (trypomastigote) forms by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, followed by functional annotation of the differential proteome data sets (≥2-fold change, P < 0.05), showed that several proteins involved in (i) cytoskeletal assembly and remodeling, essential for flagellar wave frequency and amplitude and forward motility of the parasite, and (ii) the parasite-specific antioxidant network were enhanced in COL and SYL (versus TCC) trypomastigotes. Western blotting confirmed the enhanced protein levels of cytosolic and mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidases and their substrate (tryparedoxin) and iron superoxide dismutase in COL and SYL (versus TCC) trypomastigotes. Further, COL and SYL (but not TCC) were resistant to exogenous treatment with stable oxidants (H2O2 and peroxynitrite [ONOO−]) and dampened the intracellular superoxide and nitric oxide response in macrophages, and thus these isolates escaped from macrophages. Our findings suggest that protein expression conducive to increase in motility and control of macrophage-derived free radicals provides survival and persistence benefits to TcI isolates of T. cruzi. PMID:27068090

  5. Protection of Cells against Oxidative Stress by Nanomolar Levels of Hydroxyflavones Indicates a New Type of Intracellular Antioxidant Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hájek, Jan; Staňková, Veronika; Filipský, Tomáš; Balducci, Valentina; De Vito, Paolo; Leone, Stefano; Bavavea, Eugenia I.; Silvestri, Ilaria Proietti; Righi, Giuliana; Luly, Paolo; Saso, Luciano; Bovicelli, Paolo; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Incerpi, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Natural polyphenol compounds are often good antioxidants, but they also cause damage to cells through more or less specific interactions with proteins. To distinguish antioxidant activity from cytotoxic effects we have tested four structurally related hydroxyflavones (baicalein, mosloflavone, negletein, and 5,6-dihydroxyflavone) at very low and physiologically relevant levels, using two different cell lines, L-6 myoblasts and THP-1 monocytes. Measurements using intracellular fluorescent probes and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with cytotoxicity assays showed strong antioxidant activities for baicalein and 5,6-dihydroxyflavone at picomolar concentrations, while 10 nM partially protected monocytes against the strong oxidative stress induced by 200 µM cumene hydroperoxide. Wide range dose-dependence curves were introduced to characterize and distinguish the mechanism and targets of different flavone antioxidants, and identify cytotoxic effects which only became detectable at micromolar concentrations. Analysis of these dose-dependence curves made it possible to exclude a protein-mediated antioxidant response, as well as a mechanism based on the simple stoichiometric scavenging of radicals. The results demonstrate that these flavones do not act on the same radicals as the flavonol quercetin. Considering the normal concentrations of all the endogenous antioxidants in cells, the addition of picomolar or nanomolar levels of these flavones should not be expected to produce any detectable increase in the total cellular antioxidant capacity. The significant intracellular antioxidant activity observed with 1 pM baicalein means that it must be scavenging radicals that for some reason are not eliminated by the endogenous antioxidants. The strong antioxidant effects found suggest these flavones, as well as quercetin and similar polyphenolic antioxidants, at physiologically relevant concentrations act as redox mediators to enable endogenous

  6. Mechanisms of cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and degradation of CIGB-300, a Tat-conjugated peptide, in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Benavent Acero, Fernando R; Perera Negrin, Yasser; Alonso, Daniel F; Perea, Silvio E; Gomez, Daniel E; Farina, Hernán G

    2014-06-02

    CIGB-300 is a cyclic synthetic peptide that induces apoptosis in malignant cells, elicits antitumor activity in cancer animal models, and shows tumor reduction signs when assayed in first-in-human phase I trial in patients with cervical tumors. CIGB-300 impairs phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 through targeting the substrate's phosphoacceptor domain. CIGB-300 was linked to the cell penetrating peptide Tat to facilitate the delivery into cells. Previously, we showed that CIGB-300 had a differential antiproliferative behavior in different tumor cell lines. In this work, we studied differential antiproliferative behavior in terms of cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and degradation in tumor cell lines with dissimilar sensitivity to CIGB-300. The internalization of CIGB-300 was studied in different malignant cell lines. We found that the cell membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans act as main receptors for extracellular CIGB-300 uptake. The most sensitive tumor cell lines showed higher intracellular incorporation of CIGB-300 in comparison to less sensitive cell lines. Furthermore, CIGB-300 uptake is time- and concentration-dependent in all studied cell lines. It was shown that CIGB-300 has the ability to penetrate cells mainly by direct membrane translocation. However, a minor proportion of the peptide uses an energy-dependent endocytic pathway mechanism to gain access into cells. CIGB-300 is internalized and transported into cells preferentially by caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Lysosomes are involved in CIGB-300 degradation; highly sensitive cell lines showed degradation at earlier times compared to low sensitive cells. Altogether, our data suggests a mechanism of internalization, vesicular transportation, and degradation for CIGB-300 in tumor cells.

  7. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  8. Microfluidics study of intracellular calcium response to mechanical stimulation on single suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Yue, Wanqing; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yao, Xinsheng; Yang, Mengsu

    2013-03-21

    A microfluidic microdevice was developed to exert mechanical stimulation on an individual suspension cell for mechanosensation research. In this microfluidic chip, an individual cell was isolated from a population of cells, and trapped in a microchannel with a compressive component made of a deflectable membrane. The mechanosensation of HL60 cells (leukemic cells) was studied using this chip, and the results showed that mechanical stimulations could trigger extracellular calcium to flow into HL60 cells through ion channels on cell membranes. The tension on individual HL60 cells exerted by the microdevice was showed large variations in the threshold of mechanosensation activation. In contrast to previous reports using patch clamp technique, there was little influence of cytoskeleton interruption on HL60 cell mechanosensation triggered by whole-cell compression. Additionally, two functional units were integrated in one chip for carrying out mechanosensation study in parallel, where HL60 cells (leukemic cells) and Jurkat cells (lymphocytes) were shown to respond to mechanical stimulation with different kinetics. The results demonstrated that the microfluidic device provides a novel approach to investigating the mechanosensation of single suspension cells in high-throughput.

  9. AMPK: energy sensor and survival mechanism in the ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dake; Young, Lawrence H

    2015-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism and plays an important role in diabetes, cancer, and vascular disease. In the heart, AMPK activation is an essential component of the adaptive response to cardiomyocyte stress that occurs during myocardial ischemia. During ischemia-reperfusion, AMPK activation modulates glucose and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial function, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy, and apoptosis. Pharmacological activation of AMPK prevents myocardial necrosis and contractile dysfunction during ischemia-reperfusion and potentially represents a cardioprotective strategy for the treatment of myocardial infarction. This review discusses novel mechanisms of AMPK activation in the ischemic heart, the role of endogenous AMPK activation during ischemia, and the potential therapeutic applications for AMPK-directed therapy.

  10. Cellular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the cognitive impairment of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Puighermanal, Emma; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous cannabinoids, such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as the modulation of endogenous cannabinoids, affect cognitive function through the activation of cannabinoid receptors. Indeed, these compounds modulate a number of signalling pathways critically implicated in the deleterious effect of cannabinoids on learning and memory. Thus, the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and extracellular signal-regulated kinases, together with their consequent regulation of cellular processes such as protein translation, play a critical role in the amnesic-like effects of cannabinoids. In this study, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms reported in the modulation of cognitive function by the endocannabinoid system. PMID:23108544

  11. Arf6 controls retromer traffic and intracellular cholesterol distribution via a phosphoinositide-based mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Marquer, Catherine; Tian, Huasong; Yi, Julie; Bastien, Jayson; Dall'Armi, Claudia; Yang-Klingler, YoungJoo; Zhou, Bowen; Chan, Robin Barry; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases play a critical role in membrane traffic. Among them, Arf6 mediates transport to and from the plasma membrane, as well as phosphoinositide signalling and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we delineate the molecular basis for the link between Arf6 and cholesterol homeostasis using an inducible knockout (KO) model of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We find that accumulation of free cholesterol in the late endosomes/lysosomes of Arf6 KO MEFs results from mistrafficking of Niemann–Pick type C protein NPC2, a cargo of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-M6PR). This is caused by a selective increase in an endosomal pool of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) and a perturbation of retromer, which controls the retrograde transport of CI-M6PR via sorting nexins, including the PI4P effector SNX6. Finally, reducing PI4P levels in KO MEFs through independent mechanisms rescues aberrant retromer tubulation and cholesterol mistrafficking. Our study highlights a phosphoinositide-based mechanism for control of cholesterol distribution via retromer. PMID:27336679

  12. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of long-term research of the morpho-functional characteristics of the cells of the stomach, small intestine and gallbladder the mechanism and function of membrane vesicles in the implementation of the main functions of these organs sets out in this article: the secretion of hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and the fluid at a concentration of bile epitheliocytes of gallbladder. Proofs of the intracellular formation of hydrochloric acid in tubulovesicles of the parietal cells and turnover of its secretory membranes in the process of secretory cycle, that has ensured the re-use and explained the extraordinary life of these unique cells are presented. The credible mechanism of HCl output oppression by H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity blockers has set out on this basis. The article provides detailed endocytosis mechanism of the ions and nutrients absorption by enterocytes. The mechanism of participation of the apical contractile complex of brush border of epithelial cells in the initiation of endocytosis and cytoplasmic microtubules in transport of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm was analyzed. Based on our research and numerous of the world scientific proceedings the conclusion was done about the existence of two energy dependent types of transport in the absorptive epithelium of the digestive--transmembrane (ionic and nutritive) homeostatic type which is realized by the ATP-system of the basal plasmalemma, and vesicular (endocytosis) type which is impltmented by apical contractile complex of brush border and cytoplasmic microtubules. Both types of transport are interrelated and are under constant cellular control. This observation is relevant to the majority of cells, including those involved in the secretion of various substances: hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, enzymes by main cells of the gastric glands and exocrinocytes of the pancreas, hormone by endocrine cells of the APUD system and, finally

  13. Mechanical models of the cellular cytoskeletal network for the analysis of intracellular mechanical properties and force distributions: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-12-01

    The cytoskeleton, which is the major mechanical component of cells, supports the cell body and regulates the cellular motility to assist the cell in performing its biological functions. Several cytoskeletal network models have been proposed to investigate the mechanical properties of cells. This review paper summarizes these models with a focus on the prestressed cable network, the semi-flexible chain network, the open-cell foam, the tensegrity, and the granular models. The components, material parameters, types of connection joints, tension conditions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated from a structural and biological point of view. The underlying mechanisms that are associated with the morphological changes of spreading cells are expected to be simulated using a cytoskeletal model; however, it is still paid less attention most likely due to the lack of a suitable cytoskeletal model that can accurately model the spreading process. In this review article, the established cytoskeletal models are hoped to provide useful information for the development of future cytoskeletal models with different degrees of cell attachment for the study of the mechanical mechanisms underlying the cellular behaviors in response to external stimulations.

  14. Actin-based mechanisms for light-dependent intracellular positioning of nuclei and chloroplasts in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Takagi, Shingo

    2010-08-01

    The plant organelles, chloroplast and nucleus, change their position in response to light. In Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells, chloroplasts and nuclei are distributed along the inner periclinal wall in darkness. In strong blue light, they become positioned along the anticlinal wall, while in weak blue light, only chloroplasts are accumulated along the inner and outer periclinal walls. Blue-light dependent positioning of both organelles is mediated by the blue-light receptor phototropin and controlled by the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, however, it seems that chloroplast movement requires short, fine actin filaments organized at the chloroplast edge, whereas nuclear movement does cytoplasmic, thick actin bundles intimately associated with the nucleus. Although there are many similarities between photo-relocation movements of chloroplasts and nuclei, plant cells appear to have evolved distinct mechanisms to regulate actin organization required for driving the movements of these organelles.

  15. Comparative transduction mechanisms of hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus. 1: Responses to intracellular current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus are specifically adapted to sense small-amplitude, high-frequency linear accelerations. These hair cells display many properties that are undesirable or inappropriate for hair cells that must provide static gravity sensitivity. This study resulted in part due to an interest in seeing how the transduction mechanisms of hair cells in a gravity-sensing otolith endorgan would differ from those in the bullfrog sacculus. The bullfrog utriculus is an appropriate model for these studies, because its structure is representative of higher vertebrates in general and its function as a sensor of static gravity and dynamic linear acceleration is well known. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus, classifiable as Type 2 by cell body and synapse morphology, differ markedly in hair bundle morphology from those in the bullfrog sacculus. Moreover, the hair bundle morphologies of utricular hair cells, unlike those in the sacculus, differ in different membrane regions.

  16. Increased extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} lead to adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow stromal cells by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Seigo; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2015-02-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common progenitors for both adipocyte and osteoblast. An increase in marrow adipogenesis is associated with age-related osteopenia and anemia. Both extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) are versatile signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of cell functions, including proliferation and differentiation. We have recently reported that upon treatment of BMSCs with insulin and dexamethasone, both high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} enhanced adipocyte accumulation, which suggested that increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} caused by bone resorption may accelerate adipocyte accumulation in aging and diabetic patients. In this study, we used primary mouse BMSCs to investigate the mechanisms by which high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} may enhance adipocyte accumulation. In the process of adipocyte accumulation, two important keys are adipocyte differentiation and the proliferation of BMSCs, which have the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Use of MTT assay and real-time RT-PCR revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (ionomycin)-dependent adipocyte accumulation is caused by enhanced proliferation of BMSCs but not enhanced differentiation into adipocytes. Using fura-2 fluorescence-based approaches, we showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} (addition of CaCl{sub 2}) leads to increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Flow cytometric methods revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK independently of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The inhibition of ERK by U0126 and PD0325901 enhanced the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes. These data suggest that increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} provides the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes by the suppression of ERK activity independently of increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, which results in BMSC proliferation. - Highlights:

  17. Cancer survival probability as a function of ego defense (adaptive) mechanisms versus depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Beresford, Thomas P; Alfers, Julie; Mangum, Laura; Clapp, Lori; Martin, Brandon

    2006-01-01

    Psychological treatment studies, uncontrolled for ego defense (adaptive) styles, report conflicting survival results. The authors hypothesized that "immature" adaptive styles and frequent depression symptoms would independently predict lower survival rates. This study followed 86 consecutive, mostly late-stage, cancer outpatients for up to 5 years; their survival data were analyzed in relation to the Beck Depression Inventory and the Defense Style Questionnaire scores at study entry. Cumulative survival probability curves contrasted the extreme cases: the most (N=15) to the least (N=21) depressed, and the "immature" (N=14) to the "mature" (N=16) adaptors. Depression did not separate the groups until 30 months after diagnosis. Ego defense style separated them at 8 months; by 18 months, the "immature" survival probability had dropped to 50%, versus 87% for the "mature." At 36 months, survival probabilities were 19% and 57%, respectively. These data direct clinical attention toward ego defense mechanisms as indicators of distress and lowered survival in cancer patients. They further suggest that the maturity of adaptive mechanisms must be controlled for in behavioral-treatment trials of cancer patients.

  18. Spatiotemporal characteristics and mechanisms of intracellular Ca(2+) increases at fertilization in eggs of jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria, Class Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Kondoh, Eri; Itoh, Junko

    2005-03-15

    We have clarified, for the first time, the spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) increases at fertilization and the Ca(2+)-mobilizing mechanisms in eggs of hydrozoan jellyfish, which belong to the evolutionarily old diploblastic phylum, Cnidaria. An initial Ca(2+) increase just after fertilization took the form of a Ca(2+) wave starting from one cortical region of the egg and propagating to its antipode in all of four hydrozoan species tested: Cytaeis uchidae, Cladonema pacificum, Clytia sp., and Gonionema vertens. The initiation site of the Ca(2+) wave was restricted to the animal pole, which is known to be the only area of sperm-egg fusion in hydrozoan eggs, and the wave propagating velocity was estimated to be 4.2-5.9 mum/s. After a Ca(2+) peak had been attained by the initial Ca(2+) wave, the elevated Ca(2+) gradually declined and returned nearly to the resting value at 7-10 min following fertilization. Injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), an agonist of IP(3) receptors (IP(3)R), was highly effective in inducing a Ca(2+) increase in unfertilized eggs; IP(3) at a final intracellular concentration of 12-60 nM produced a fully propagating Ca(2+) wave equivalent to that observed at fertilization. In contrast, a higher concentration of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), an agonist of ryanodine receptors (RyR), only generated a localized Ca(2+) increase that did not propagate in the egg. In addition, caffeine, another stimulator of RyR, was completely without effect. Sperm-induced Ca(2+) increases in Gonionema eggs were severely affected by preinjection of heparin, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release from IP(3)R. These results strongly suggest that there is a well-developed IP(3)R-, but not RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release mechanism in hydrozoan eggs and that the former system primarily functions at fertilization. Our present data also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics and mechanisms of Ca(2+) increases at fertilization in hydrozoan eggs resemble

  19. Targets and Intracellular Signaling Mechanisms for Deoxynivalenol-Induced Ribosomal RNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a known translational inhibitor, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage. Here, we characterized this process relative to (1) specific 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage sites and (2) identity of specific upstream signaling elements in this pathway. Capillary electrophoresis indicated that DON at concentrations as low as 200 ng/ml evoked selective rRNA cleavage after 6 h and that 1000 ng/ml caused cleavage within 2 h. Northern blot analysis revealed that DON exposure induced six rRNA cleavage fragments from 28S rRNA and five fragments from 18S rRNA. When selective kinase inhibitors were used to identify potential upstream signals, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and p38 were found to be required for rRNA cleavage, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase were not. Furthermore, rRNA fragmentation was suppressed by the p53 inhibitors pifithrin-α and pifithrin-μ as well as the pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Concurrent apoptosis was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry. DON activated caspases 3, 8, and 9, thus suggesting the possible coinvolvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in rRNA cleavage. Satratoxin G (SG), anisomycin, and ricin also induced specific rRNA cleavage profiles identical to those of DON, suggesting that ribotoxins might share a conserved rRNA cleavage mechanism. Taken together, DON-induced rRNA cleavage is likely to be closely linked to apoptosis activation and appears to involve the sequential activation of PKR/Hck →p38→p53→caspase 8/9→caspase 3. PMID:22491426

  20. Targets and intracellular signaling mechanisms for deoxynivalenol-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2012-06-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a known translational inhibitor, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage. Here, we characterized this process relative to (1) specific 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage sites and (2) identity of specific upstream signaling elements in this pathway. Capillary electrophoresis indicated that DON at concentrations as low as 200 ng/ml evoked selective rRNA cleavage after 6 h and that 1000 ng/ml caused cleavage within 2 h. Northern blot analysis revealed that DON exposure induced six rRNA cleavage fragments from 28S rRNA and five fragments from 18S rRNA. When selective kinase inhibitors were used to identify potential upstream signals, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and p38 were found to be required for rRNA cleavage, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase were not. Furthermore, rRNA fragmentation was suppressed by the p53 inhibitors pifithrin-α and pifithrin-μ as well as the pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Concurrent apoptosis was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry. DON activated caspases 3, 8, and 9, thus suggesting the possible coinvolvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in rRNA cleavage. Satratoxin G (SG), anisomycin, and ricin also induced specific rRNA cleavage profiles identical to those of DON, suggesting that ribotoxins might share a conserved rRNA cleavage mechanism. Taken together, DON-induced rRNA cleavage is likely to be closely linked to apoptosis activation and appears to involve the sequential activation of PKR/Hck →p38→p53→caspase 8/9→caspase 3.

  1. Intracellular mechanisms of cocaine-memory reconsolidation in the basolateral amygdala and dorsal hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Audrey Marie

    The ability of cocaine-associated environmental contexts to promote relapse in abstinent humans and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in laboratory animals depends on the formation and maintenance of maladaptive context-response-cocaine associative memories, the latter of which can be disrupted by manipulations that interfere with memory reconsolidation. Memory reconsolidation refers to a protein synthesis-dependent phenomenon whereby memory traces are reincorporated back into long-term memory storage following their retrieval and subsequent destabilization. To elucidate the distinctive roles of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the reconsolidation of context-response-cocaine memories, Experiments 1-3 evaluated novel molecular mechanisms within each structure that control this phenomenon. Experiment 1 tested the hypothesis that activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the BLA and nucleus accumbens core (NACc - a substrate for Pavlovian cocaine-memory reconsolidation) would critically control instrumental cocaine-memory reconsolidation. To determine this, rats were re-exposed to a context that had previously been used for cocaine self-administration (i.e., cocaine memory-reactivation) and immediately thereafter received bilateral intra-BLA or intra-NACc microinfusions of the ERK inhibitor U0126 or vehicle (VEH) and were subsequently tested for drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced lever responding) ~72 h later. Re-exposure to the cocaine-paired context at test fully reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, relative to responding in an alternate, extinction context, and post-reactivation U0126 treatment in the BLA, but not the NACc, impaired cocaine-seeking behavior, relative to VEH. This effect was associated with a temporary increase in ERK2, but not ERK1, phosphorylation in the BLA and required explicit reactivation of the target memory trace (i.e., did not similarly manifest when U

  2. [The effect and mechanism of endothelin-1-induced intracellular free calcium in human lung adenocarcinoma cells SPC-A1.].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Weimin; Ye, Qianjun; Jia, Gang

    2008-08-20

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent mitogen involved in cell growth in human lung adenocarcinoma cells SPC-A1. The increase in intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) plays a great role in this process. The aim of this study is to investigate the ET-1-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses in SPC-A1 cells and to explore its cellular mechanism. [Ca(2+)]i was measured by Fura-2/AM fluorescent assay. Endothelin receptors antagonists, calcium channel blockers and intracellular signal transduction blockers were used to study the underlying mechanism of ET-1-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses in SPC-A1 cells. At the concentration of 1*10(-15) mol/L-1*10(-8) mol/L, ET-1 caused a dose-dependent increase of [Ca(2+)]i in SPC-A1 cells (P <0.05) in vitro . The ET-1-induced (1*10(-10) mol/L) increase of [Ca(2+)]i was blocked by BQ123 at 1*10(-7) mol/L (P <0.05), a highly selective endothelin receptor A (ETAR) antagonist, not by BQ788 at 10(-7) mol/L (P >0.05), a highly selective endothelin receptor B (ETBR) antagonist. Depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) with free Ca(2+) solution and 0.1mmol/L ethyleneglycol bis (2-aminoethyl ether) tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or blockade of voltage dependent calcium channel with nifedipine at 1*10(-6) mol/L significantly reduced the ET-1-induced increase of [Ca(2+)]i. The ET-1-induced (1*10(-10) mol/L) increase of [Ca(2+)]i was also significantly attenuated by U73122 at 1*10(-5) mol/L (P <0.05), a phospholipase C inhibitor, and by Ryanodine at 50*10(-6) mol/L. However, Staurosporine (2*10(-9) mol/L), a protein kinas C inhibitor, exerted no significant effect on the ET-1-induced (1*10(-10) mol/L) increase of [Ca(2+)]i. ET-1 elevates [Ca(2+)]i via activation of ETA receptor. Both phospholipase C/Ca(2+) pathway and Ca(2+) influx through voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel activate by ETAR contribute to this process.

  3. Thioredoxin-1 promotes survival in cells exposed to S-nitrosoglutathione: Correlation with reduction of intracellular levels of nitrosothiols and up-regulation of the ERK1/2 MAP Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Roberto J.; Debbas, Victor; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P.

    2008-12-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that post-translational protein modifications by nitric oxide and its derived species are critical effectors of redox signaling in cells. These protein modifications are most likely controlled by intracellular reductants. Among them, the importance of the 12 kDa dithiol protein thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) has been increasingly recognized. However, the effects of TRX-1 in cells exposed to exogenous nitrosothiols remain little understood. We investigated the levels of intracellular nitrosothiols and survival signaling in HeLa cells over-expressing TRX-1 and exposed to S-nitrosoglutahione (GSNO). A role for TRX-1 expression on GSNO catabolism and cell viability was demonstrated by the concentration-dependent effects of GSNO on decreasing TRX-1 expression, activation of caspase-3, and increasing cell death. The over-expression of TRX-1 in HeLa cells partially attenuated caspase-3 activation and enhanced cell viability upon GSNO treatment. This was correlated with reduction of intracellular levels of nitrosothiols and increasing levels of nitrite and nitrotyrosine. The involvement of ERK, p38 and JNK pathways were investigated in parental cells treated with GSNO. Activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases was shown to be critical for survival signaling. In cells over-expressing TRX-1, basal phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 MAP kinases were higher and further increased after GSNO treatment. These results indicate that the enhanced cell viability promoted by TRX-1 correlates with its capacity to regulate the levels of intracellular nitrosothiols and to up-regulate the survival signaling pathway mediated by the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  4. Identification of the clpB and bipA genes and an evaluation of their expression as related to intracellular survival for the bacterial pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Isla, A; Haussmann, D; Vera, T; Kausel, G; Figueroa, J

    2014-10-10

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the pathogen responsible for salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS), a disease that affects a wide variety of marine cultivated fish species and causes economic losses for the aquaculture industry worldwide. Many in vitro studies have reported on the capacity of this microorganism to replicate in the interior of cytoplasmic vesicles from varied fish cell lines. However, the mechanisms used by this bacteria to survive, replicate, and propagate in cell lines, especially in macrophages and monocytes, are unknown. A number of studies have described the diverse proteins in pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnetii, and Francisella tularensis which allow these to evade the cellular immune response and replicate in the interior of macrophages in different hosts. Some of these proteins are the virulence factor BipA/TypA and the heat shock protein ClpB, both of which have been widely characterized. The results of the current study present the complete coding sequence of the genes clpB and bipA from the P. salmonis genome. Moreover, the experimental results suggest that during the infectious process of the SHK-1 cellular line in P. salmonis, the pathogen significantly increases the expression of proteins ClpB and BipA. This would permit the pathogen to adapt to the hostile conditions produced by the macrophage and thus evade mechanisms of cellular degradation while facilitating replication in the interior of this salmon cell line.

  5. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1.

  6. Risk-adjusted survival after tissue versus mechanical aortic valve replacement: a 23-year assessment.

    PubMed

    Gaca, Jeffrey G; Clare, Robert M; Rankin, J Scott; Daneshmand, Mani A; Milano, Carmelo A; Hughes, G Chad; Wolfe, Walter G; Glower, Donald D; Smith, Peter K

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analyses of risk-adjusted outcomes after mitral valve surgery have documented significant survival decrements with tissue valves at any age. Several recent studies of prosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) also have suggested a poorer performance of tissue valves, although analyses have been limited to small matched series. The study aim was to test the hypothesis that AVR with tissue valves is associated with a lower risk-adjusted survival, as compared to mechanical valves. Between 1986 and 2009, primary isolated AVR, with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), was performed with currently available valve types in 2148 patients (1108 tissue valves, 1040 mechanical). Patients were selected for tissue valves to be used primarily in the elderly. Baseline and operative characteristics were documented prospectively with a consistent variable set over the entire 23-year period. Follow up was obtained with mailed questionnaires, supplemented by National Death Index searches. The average time to death or follow up was seven years, and follow up for survival was 96.2% complete. Risk-adjusted survival characteristics for the two groups were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model with stepwise selection of candidate variables. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were (tissue versus mechanical): median age 73 versus 61 years; non-elective surgery 32% versus 28%; CABG 45% versus 35%; median ejection fraction 55% versus 55%; renal failure 6% versus 1%; diabetes 18% versus 7% (p<0.01). Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier survival was significantly lower with tissue than mechanical valves; however, after risk adjustment for the adverse profiles of tissue valve patients, no significant difference was observed in survival after tissue or mechanical AVR. Thus, the hypothesis did not hold, and risk-adjusted survival was equivalent, of course qualified by the fact that selection bias was evident. With selection criteria that employed tissue AVR

  7. Long-term survival for patients with metabolic syndrome after bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Polomsky, Marek; Kilgo, Patrick D; Puskas, John D; Halkos, Michael E; Thourani, Vinod H; Kelli, Heval M; Guyton, Robert A; Lattouf, Omar M

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are thought to negatively impact the long-term survival of cardiac patients and have been shown to be associated with reduced durability of bioprosthetic heart valves. The purpose of this study is to determine whether long-term survival of post-valve replacement patients is affected by the presence of metabolic disease, and whether choice of tissue versus mechanical prosthesis impacts survival. A retrospective review was conducted of all isolated valve replacements performed between 2002 and 2011 from the STS adult cardiac database of Emory Healthcare Hospitals. A total of 1,222 cases were reviewed, of which 909 patients had AVR (661 tissue, 248 mechanical), and 313 MVR (190 tissue, 123 mechanical). Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS), in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) definition, was present in 242 of 1,222 (19.8%) cases in entire cohort, 203 of 909 (22.3%) in AVR, and 39 of 313 (12.5%) in MVR. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to calculate long-term survival after adjusting for propensity score (PS), Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality (STS PROM), and direct covariates for valve and implant type and stratifying by CMS. In PS adjusted AVR, patients with CMS risk factors had worse survival compared to metabolic risk-free patients (AHR = 3.47), as was the case for MVR (AHR = 4.06). Tissue MVR patients with CMS had higher hazard of death compared to patients with no diabetes and no metabolic risk factors after adjusting for PROM (AHR = 3.33) and direct covariates (AHR = 3.91). Metabolic diseases negatively impact long-term survival of aortic and mitral valve replacement (MVR) patients. Tissue prostheses are associated with worse long-term survival following MVR. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Intracellular pH-regulating mechanism of the squid axon. Interaction between DNDS and extracellular Na+ and HCO3-

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) of the squid axon is regulated by a stilbenesensitive transporter that couples the influx of Na+ and HCO3- (or the equivalent) to the efflux of Cl-. According to one model, the extracellular ion pair NaCO3- exchanges for intracellular Cl-. In the present study, the ion-pair model was tested by examining the interaction of the reversible stilbene derivative 4,4'-dinitrostilbene- 2,2'-disulfonate (DNDS) with extracellular Na+ and HCO3-. Axons (initial pHi approximately 7.4) were internally dialyzed with a pH 6.5 solution containing 400 mM Cl- but no Na+. After pHi, as measured with a glass microelectrode, had fallen to approximately 6.6, dialysis was halted. In the presence of both external Na+ and HCO3- (pHo = 8.0, 22 degrees C), pHi increased due to the pHi-regulating mechanism. At a fixed [Na+]o of 425 mM and [HCO3-]o of 12 mM, DNDS reversibly reduced the equivalent acid-extrusion rate (JH) calculated from the rate of pHi recovery. The best-fit value for maximal inhibition was 104%, and for the [DNDS]o at half-maximal inhibition, 0.3 mM. At a [Na+]o of 425 mM, the [HCO3-]o dependence of JH was examined at 0, 0.1, and 0.25 mM DNDS. Although Jmax was always approximately 20 pmol cm-2 s-1, Km(HCO3-) was 2.6, 5.7, and 12.7 mM, respectively. Thus, DNDS is competitive with HCO3-. At a [HCO3-]o of 12 mM, the [Na+]o dependence of JH was examined at 0 and 0.1 mM DNDS. Although Jmax was approximately 20 pmol cm-2 s-1 in both cases, Km(Na+) was 71 and 179 mM, respectively. At a [HCO3-]o of 48 mM, Jmax was approximately 20 pmol cm-2 s-1 at [DNDS]o levels of 0, 0.1, and 0.25 mM. However, Km(Na+) was 22, 45, and 90 mM, respectively. Thus, DNDS (an anion) is also competitive with Na+. The results are consistent with simple competition between DNDS and NaCO3-, and place severe restrictions on other kinetic models. PMID:2915212

  9. The mechanism of injury-induced intracellular calcium concentration oscillations in the endothelium of excised rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Berra-Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Torres-Jácome, Julián; Guzman-Silva, Alejandro; Guerra, Germano; Tanzi, Franco; Moccia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial injury is the primary event that leads to a variety of severe vascular disorders. Mechanical injury elicits a Ca(2+) response in the endothelium of excised rat aorta, which comprises an initial Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3))-sensitive stores followed by a long-lasting decay phase due to Ca(2+) entry through uncoupled connexons. The Ca(2+) signal may also adopt an oscillatory pattern, the molecular underpinnings of which are unclear. In the light of the role played by Ca(2+) spiking in tissue regeneration, this study aimed to unveil the mechanisms underlying injury-induced Ca(2+) oscillations. The latter reversibly ceased upon removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or addition of the gap junction blockers heptanol, 18 α,β-glycyrrhetinic acid, La(3+) and Ni(2+), but were insensitive to BTP-2 and SKF 96365. The spiking response was abolished by inhibiting the Ca(2+) entry mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). The InsP(3)-producing agonist ATP resumed Ca(2+) oscillations in silent cells, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 suppressed them. Injury-induced Ca(2+) transients were prevented by the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) blockers thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, while they were unaffected by suramin and genistein. These data show for the first time that the coordinated interplay between NCX-mediated Ca(2+) entry and InsP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release contributes to injury-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration oscillations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Metal intracellular partitioning as a detoxification mechanism for mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus) living in metal-polluted salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Goto, Daisuke; Wallace, William G

    2010-04-01

    Intracellular partitioning of trace metals is critical to metal detoxification in aquatic organisms. In the present study, we assessed metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) handling capacities of mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus) in metal-polluted salt marshes in New York, USA by examining metal intracellular partitioning. Despite the lack of differences in the whole body burdens, partitioning patterns of metals in intracellular components (heat-stable proteins, heat-denaturable proteins, organelles, and metal-rich granules) revealed clear differential metal handling capacities among the populations of mummichogs. In general, mummichogs living in metal-polluted sites stored a large amount of metals in detoxifying cellular components, particularly metal-rich granules (MRG). Moreover, only metals associated with MRG were consistently correlated with variations in the whole body burdens. These findings suggest that metal detoxification through intracellular partitioning, particularly the sequestration to MRG, may have important implications for metal tolerance of mummichogs living in chronically metal-polluted habitats.

  11. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  12. Hospital closures and survivals: an analysis of operating characteristics and regulatory mechanisms in three states.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, L; Dumas, M B

    1983-01-01

    This article examines factors related to hospital closures, using a longitudinal sample of surviving and closed hospitals. The hospitals are drawn from three states with different regulatory programs. Size of hospital and occupancy rate are shown to be related to likelihood of closure, while ownership, length of stay, and expenditures are not. These findings are observed both in the aggregate and within the individual states between 1960 and 1980. The three states--Arizona, Pennsylvania, and Maryland--represent different population trends and regulatory mechanisms and goals. The findings indicate that some programs appear to guarantee survival, whereas others are more neutral. PMID:6668180

  13. Mechanisms underlying the transport and intracellular metabolism of acetic acid in the presence of glucose in the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M J; Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1998-03-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 displays biphasic growth in a medium containing a mixture of glucose (0.5%, w/v) and acetic acid (0.5%, w/v), pH 5.0 and 3.0. In cells harvested during the first growth phase, no activity of a mediated acetic acid transport system was found. Incubation of these cells in phosphate buffer with cycloheximide for 1 h restored activity of an acetic acid carrier which behaved as the one present in glucose-grown cells. These results indicated that the acetic acid carrier is probably present in cells from the first growth phase of the mixed medium but its activity was affected by the presence of acetic acid in the culture medium. In glucose-grown cells, after incubation in phosphate buffer with glucose and acetic acid, the activity of the acetic acid carrier decreased significantly with increased acid concentration in the incubation buffer. At acid concentrations above 16.7 mM, no significant carrier activity was detectable. Furthermore, the intracellular acid concentration increased with the extracellular one and was inversely correlated with the activity of the acetic acid carrier, suggesting the involvement of a feedback inhibition mechanism in the regulation of the carrier. During biphasic growth, the first phase corresponded to a simultaneous consumption of glucose and acetic acid, and the second to the utilization of the remaining acid. The enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase was active in both growth phases, even in the presence of glucose. Activity of isocitrate lyase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was found only in acetic-acid-grown cells. Thus it appears that both membrane transport and acetyl-CoA synthetase and their regulation are important for Z. bailii to metabolize acetic acid in the presence of glucose. This fact correlates with the high resistance of this yeast to environments with mixtures of sugars and acetic acid such as those often present during wine fermentation.

  14. A functional selectivity mechanism at the serotonin-2A GPCR involves ligand-dependent conformations of intracellular loop 2.

    PubMed

    Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Shan, Jufang; LeVine, Michael V; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-11-12

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT(2A)R is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT(2A)R agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT(2A)R interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. The findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT(2A)R activation.

  15. A functional selectivity mechanism at the serotonin-2A GPCR involves ligand-dependent conformations of intracellular loop 2

    DOE PAGES

    Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Shan, Jufang; LeVine, Michael V.; ...

    2014-10-14

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2ARmore » is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. Lastly, the findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation.« less

  16. A functional selectivity mechanism at the serotonin-2A GPCR involves ligand-dependent conformations of intracellular loop 2

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Shan, Jufang; LeVine, Michael V.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-10-14

    With recent progress in determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure with crystallography, a variety of other experimental approaches (e.g., NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent-based assays, mass spectrometry techniques) are also being used to characterize state-specific and ligand-specific conformational states. MD simulations offer a powerful complementary approach to elucidate the dynamic features associated with ligand-specific GPCR conformations. To shed light on the conformational elements and dynamics of the important aspect of GPCR functional selectivity, we carried out unbiased microsecond-length MD simulations of the human serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) in the absence of ligand and bound to four distinct serotonergic agonists. The 5-HT2AR is a suitable system to study the structural features involved in the ligand-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GPCRs because it is well-characterized experimentally and exhibits a strong agonist-specific phenotype in that some 5-HT2AR agonists induce LSD-like hallucinations, while others lack this psychoactive property entirely. Here we report evidence for structural and dynamic differences in 5-HT2AR interacting with such pharmacologically distinct ligands, hallucinogens, and nonhallucinogens obtained from all-atom MD simulations. Differential ligand binding contacts were identified for structurally similar hallucinogens and nonhallucinogens and found to correspond to different conformations in the intracellular loop 2 (ICL2). From the different ICL2 conformations, functional selective phenotypes are suggested through effects on dimerization and/or distinct direct interaction with effector proteins. Lastly, the findings are presented in the context of currently proposed hallucinogenesis mechanisms, and ICL2 is proposed as a fine-tuning selective switch that can differentiates modes of 5-HT2AR activation.

  17. Excretion of lead as a mechanism for survival in Chrissia halyi (Ferguson, 1969)

    SciTech Connect

    Prasuna, G.; Zeba, M.; Khan, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In general organisms develop or use a number of mechanisms to overcome the adverse influence of such toxicants as heavy metals. These mechanisms may be avoidance, immobilization, excretion and mechanisms involving enzymatic changes. Tolerant organisms may possess certain storage organs which are particularly involved in heavy metal immobilization as suggested by Hopkin and Martin (1985). Chrissia halyi (Crustacea, Ostracoda) were observed to be surviving in waters which are highly polluted with lead. Besides they were found feeding voraciously on contaminated blue green algae, and excreting large pellets. Therefore the present work has been taken up to see the lead in the excreted pellets. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Improving survival of disassociated human embryonic stem cells by mechanical stimulation using acoustic tweezing cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Sun, Yubing; Deng, Cheri X; Fu, Jianping

    2015-03-24

    Dissociation-induced apoptosis of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hampers their large-scale culture. Herein we leveraged the mechanosensitivity of hESCs and employed, to our knowledge, a novel technique, acoustic tweezing cytometry (ATC), for subcellular mechanical stimulation of disassociated single hESCs to improve their survival. By acoustically actuating integrin-bound microbubbles (MBs) to live cells, ATC increased the survival rate and cloning efficiency of hESCs by threefold. A positive correlation was observed between the increased hESC survival rate and total accumulative displacement of integrin-anchored MBs during ATC stimulation. ATC may serve as a promising biocompatible tool to improve hESC culture. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Monocyte-derived macrophages from Zebu (Bos taurus indicus) are more efficient to control Brucella abortus intracellular survival than macrophages from European cattle (Bos taurus taurus).

    PubMed

    Macedo, A A; Costa, E A; Silva, A P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2013-02-15

    Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases in the world. Considering its strict zoonotic nature, understanding of the pathogenesis and immunity of Brucella spp. in natural animal hosts is essential to prevent human infections. Natural resistance against brucellosis has been demonstrated in cattle, and it is associated with the ability of macrophages to prevent intracellular replication of Brucella abortus. Identification of breeds that are resistant to B. abortus may contribute for controlling and eradicating brucellosis in cattle. This study aimed to compare macrophages from Nelore (Bos taurus indicus) or Holstein (Bos taurus taurus) regarding their resistance to B. abortus infection. Macrophages from Nelore were significantly more efficient in controlling intracellular growth of B. abortus when compared to Holstein macrophages even under intralysosomal iron restricting conditions. Furthermore, Nelore macrophages had higher transcription levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α at 12h post-infection (hpi) and higher levels of IL-12 at 24 hpi when compared to Holstein macrophages. Conversely, Holstein macrophages had higher levels of IL-10 transcripts at 24 hpi. Macrohages from Nelore also generated more nitric oxide (NO) in response to B. abortus infection when compared to Holstein macrophages. In conclusion, cultured Nelore macrophages are more effective in controlling intracellular replication of B. abortus, suggesting that Nelore cattle is likely to have a higher degree of natural resistance to brucellosis than Holstein.

  20. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design. PMID:26928089

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Therapy-induced Cancer Drug Resistance: Connecting Cancer Mechanisms to Population Survival Rates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; Shao, Yongzhao

    2016-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly limits the long-term effectiveness of targeted therapeutics for cancer patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that cancer cell heterogeneity and microenvironment adaptations to targeted therapy play important roles in promoting the rapid acquisition of drug resistance and in increasing cancer metastasis. The systematic development of effective therapeutics to overcome drug resistance mechanisms poses a major challenge. In this study, we used a modeling approach to connect cellular mechanisms underlying cancer drug resistance to population-level patient survival. To predict progression-free survival in cancer patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a set of stochastic differential equations to describe the dynamics of heterogeneous cell populations while taking into account micro-environment adaptations. Clinical data on survival and circulating tumor cell DNA (ctDNA) concentrations were used to confirm the effectiveness of our model. Moreover, our model predicted distinct patterns of dose-dependent synergy when evaluating a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors versus a combination of BRAF and PI3K inhibitors. These predictions were consistent with the findings in previously reported studies. The impact of the drug metabolism rate on patient survival was also discussed. The proposed model might facilitate the quantitative evaluation and optimization of combination therapeutics and cancer clinical trial design.

  4. Notch1 promotes survival of E2A-deficient T cell lymphomas through pre-T cell receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reschly, Erica J; Spaulding, Christina; Vilimas, Tomas; Graham, W Vallen; Brumbaugh, Rachel L; Aifantis, Iannis; Pear, Warren S; Kee, Barbara L

    2006-05-15

    Loss of E2A transcription factor activity or activation of the intracellular form of Notch1 (ICN) leads to the development of leukemia or lymphoma in humans or mice, respectively. Current models propose that ICN functions by suppressing E2A through a pre-T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent mechanism. Here we show that lymphomas arising in E2A(-/-) mice require the activation of Notch1 for their survival and have accumulated mutations in, or near, the Notch1 PEST domain, resulting in increased stability and signaling. In contrast, lymphomas arising in p53(-/-) mice show the activation of Notch1, but no mutations were identified in ICN. The requirement for Notch1 signaling in E2A(-/-) lymphomas cannot be overcome by ectopic expression of pTalpha; however, pTalpha is required for optimal survival and expansion of these cells. Our findings indicate that the activation of Notch1 is an important "second hit" for the transformation of E2A(-/-) T cell lymphomas and that Notch1 promotes survival through pre-TCR-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

  5. [Effects of isocitrate lyase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis in macrophage and mechanism thereof].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Ming; Wan, La-Gen; Zhu, Dao-Yin; Li, Na; He, Yong-Lin; Yang, Chun

    2008-02-26

    .67 +/- 2.45) x 10(3) and (2.28 +/- 0.25) x 10(3) respectively, both P < 0.01]. There were not significant differences in the concentrations of IFN-gamma and NO in the culture supernatants between the 2 groups (both P >0.05). 48 h after the infection the apoptotic rate of the rMS-pUV15-icl group was significantly lower than that of the rMS-pUV15 group (P <0.01). Conclusion MTB-ICL promotes the intracellular survival of MS. Suppressing the apoptosis of the host macrophage may be one of the important mechanisms involved in this increased intracellular survival.

  6. Sodium-iodide symporter positive cells after intracellular uptake of (99m)Tc versus α-emitter 211At. Reduction of clonogenic survival and characterization of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kotzerke, J; Wendisch, M; Freudenberg, R; Runge, R; Oehme, L; Meyer, G J; Kunz-Schughart, L A; Wunderlich, G

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the DNA damaging potential of Auger electrons emitted in the decay of (99m)Tc compared to α-particles of 211At. The impact of (99m)Tc and 211At was monitored in a NIS-expressing rat thyroid cell model PCCl3 with varying, yet defined intra- and extracellular radionuclide distribution (using ± perchlorate). The radiotoxicity of (99m)Tc and 211At was studied by the comet assay under neutral and alkaline conditions and colony formation. In the presence of perchlorate, the radioactivity yielding 37% cellular survival, A37, was estimated to be (0.27 ± 0.02) MBq/ml and (450 ± 30) MBq/ml for 211At and (99m)Tc, respectively. In absence of perchlorate, cellular radiotracer uptake was similar for both radionuclides (2.2%, 2.7%), yet the A37 was reduced by 82% for the α-emitter and by 95% for (99m)Tc. Cellular dose increased by a factor of 5 (211At) and 38 (99mTc). Comet assays revealed an increased DNA damage after intracellular uptake of both radiotracers. The data indicate damage to the cell to occur from absorbed dose without recognizable contribution from intracellular heterogeneity of radionuclide distribution. Comet assay under alkaline and neutral conditions did not reveal any shift to more complex DNA damage after radionuclide uptake. Cellular uptake of (99m)Tc and 211At increased cellular dose and reduced clonogenic survival.

  7. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Auricelio A.; Silva, Ana P. C.; Mol, Juliana P. S.; Costa, Luciana F.; Garcia, Luize N. N.; Araújo, Marcio S.; Martins Filho, Olindo A.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS) during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi). In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment. PMID:26366863

  8. Heteromerization of dopamine D2 receptors with dopamine D1 or D5 receptors generates intracellular calcium signaling by different mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hasbi, Ahmed; O’Dowd, Brian F.; George, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The repertoire of signal transduction pathways activated by dopamine in brain includes the increase of intracellular calcium. However the mechanism(s) by which dopamine activated this important second messenger system was unknown. Although we showed that activation of the D5 dopamine receptor increased calcium concentrations, the restricted anatomic distribution of this receptor made this unlikely to be the major mechanism in brain. We have identified novel heteromeric dopamine receptor complexes that are linked to calcium signaling. The calcium pathway activated through the D1–D2 receptor heteromer involved coupling to Gq, through phospholipase C and IP3 receptors to result in a rise in intracellular calcium. The calcium rise activated through the D2–D5 receptor heteromer involved a small rise in intracellular calcium through the Gq pathway that triggered a store operated channel mediated influx of extracellular calcium. These novel receptor heteromeric complexes, for the first time, establish the link between dopamine action and rapid calcium signaling. PMID:19897420

  9. Mechanical strain stimulates vasculogenesis and expression of angiogenesis guidance molecules of embryonic stem cells through elevation of intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation.

    PubMed

    Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Behr, Sascha; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may be regulated by mechanical strain. Herein, signaling molecules underlying mechanical stimulation of vasculogenesis and expression of angiogenesis guidance cues were investigated in ES cell-derived embryoid bodies. Treatment of embryoid bodies with 10% static mechanical strain using a Flexercell strain system significantly increased CD31-positive vascular structures and the angiogenesis guidance molecules plexinB1, ephrin B2, neuropilin1 (NRP1), semaphorin 4D (sem4D) and robo4 as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) as evaluated by Western blot and real time RT-PCR. In contrast ephrin type 4 receptor B (EphB4) expression was down-regulated upon mechanical strain, indicating an arterial-type differentiation. Robo1 protein expression was modestly increased with no change in mRNA expression. Mechanical strain increased intracellular calcium as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Mechanical strain-induced vasculogenesis was abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS2870, upon chelation of intracellular calcium by BAPTA as well as upon siRNA inactivation of ephrin B2, NRP1 and robo4. BAPTA blunted the strain-induced expression of angiogenic growth factors, the increase in NO and ROS as well as the expression of NRP1, sem4D and plexinB1, whereas ephrin B2, EphB4 as well as robo1 and robo4 expression were not impaired. Mechanical strain stimulates vasculogenesis of ES cells by the intracellular messengers ROS, NO and calcium as well as by upregulation of angiogenesis guidance molecules and the angiogenic growth factors VEGF, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. IglE Is an Outer Membrane-Associated Lipoprotein Essential for Intracellular Survival and Murine Virulence of Type A Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Gregory T.; Child, Robert; Ingle, Christine; Celli, Jean

    2013-01-01

    IglE is a small, hypothetical protein encoded by the duplicated Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI). Inactivation of both copies of iglE rendered Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 avirulent and incapable of intracellular replication, owing to an inability to escape the phagosome. This defect was fully reversed following single-copy expression of iglE in trans from attTn7 under the control of the Francisella rpsL promoter, thereby establishing that the loss of iglE, and not polar effects on downstream vgrG gene expression, was responsible for the defect. IglE is exported to the Francisella outer membrane as an ∼13.9-kDa lipoprotein, determined on the basis of a combination of selective Triton X-114 solubilization, radiolabeling with [3H]palmitic acid, and sucrose density gradient membrane partitioning studies. Lastly, a genetic screen using the iglE-null live vaccine strain resulted in the identification of key regions in the carboxyl terminus of IglE that are required for intracellular replication of Francisella tularensis in J774A.1 macrophages. Thus, IglE is essential for Francisella tularensis virulence. Our data support a model that likely includes protein-protein interactions at or near the bacterial cell surface that are unknown at present. PMID:23959721

  11. Explorative multifactor approach for investigating global survival mechanisms of Campylobacter jejuni under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Oust, Astrid; Langsrud, Øyvind; Dorrell, Nick; Marsden, Gemma L; Hinds, Jason; Kohler, Achim; Wren, Brendan W; Rudi, Knut

    2005-04-01

    Explorative approaches such as DNA microarray experiments are becoming increasingly important in microbial research. Despite these major technical advancements, approaches to study multifactor experiments are still lacking. We have addressed this problem by using rotation testing and a novel multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) approach (50-50 MANOVA) to investigate interacting experimental factors in a complex experimental design. Furthermore, a new rotation testing based method was introduced to calculate false-discovery rates for each response. This novel analytical concept was used to investigate global survival mechanisms in the environment of the major food-borne pathogen C. jejuni. We simulated nongrowth environmental conditions by investigating combinations of the factors temperature (5 and 25 degrees C) and oxygen tension (anaerobic, microaerobic, and aerobic). Data were generated with DNA microarrays for information about gene expression patterns and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to study global macromolecular changes in the cell. Microarray analyses showed that most genes were either unchanged or down regulated compared to the reference (day 0) for the conditions tested and that the 25 degrees C anaerobic condition gave the most distinct expression pattern with the fewest genes expressed. The few up-regulated genes were generally stress related and/or related to the cell envelope. We found, using FT-IR spectroscopy, that the amount of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides increased under the nongrowth survival conditions. Potential mechanisms for survival could be to down regulate most functions to save energy and to produce polysaccharides and oligosaccharides for protection against harsh environments. Basic knowledge about the survival mechanisms is of fundamental importance in preventing transmission of this bacterium through the food chain.

  12. Biofilm formation by algae as a mechanism for surviving on mine tailings.

    PubMed

    García-Meza, J Viridiana; Barrangue, Christiane; Admiraal, Wim

    2005-03-01

    Photosynthetic biofilms successfully colonize the sediments of a mine tailings reservoir (Guanajuato, Mexico) despite the high metal concentrations that are present. To elucidate the mechanisms of biofilm survival despite metal ores, experiments were performed to evaluate the response of seminatural biofilms to Cu, Zn, and a combination of both metals at concentrations observed in the field. The biofilms were composed mostly of the chlorophyte Chlorococcum sp. and the cyanobacterium Phormidium sp., and their response to the two added metals was described by measurements of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and in vivo fluorescence. The photosynthetic efficiency and the minimal chlorophyll fluorescence of dark-adapted cells were measured by multiwavelength pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry. The photosynthetic efficiency of light-adapted cells (phi(PSII)) also was measured. Metal exposure increased the EPS production of biofilms, as visualized with confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Extracellular polymeric substances enhanced the extracellular metal accumulation from the first day of metal exposure. Metals provoked changes in the relative abundance of the dominant taxa because of a species-specific response to the metals when added individually. Metals affected the phi(PSII) less than the total biomass, suggesting ongoing activity of the surviving biofilms. Survival of individual biofilm photosynthetic cells was found to resume from the embedding in the mucilaginous structure, which immobilizes the metals extracellularly. The survival of biofilms under mixed-metal exposure has practical applications in the remediation of mine tailings.

  13. Nutritional status in patients with chronic respiratory failure receiving home mechanical ventilation: impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Hitzl, Andre P; Jörres, Rudolf A; Heinemann, Frank; Pfeifer, Michael; Budweiser, Stephan

    2010-02-01

    In patients with chronic respiratory diseases body mass index (BMI) is a predictor of long-term survival, whereas the prognostic value of body composition, especially fat-free mass index (FFMI), is unknown. In a prospectively collected cohort of 131 patients (50 females, 81 males; 71% chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 29% severe restrictive disorders) undergoing home mechanical ventilation (HMV) due to chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF), the prognostic value of nutritional composition assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis was evaluated during a 4-year follow-up and compared to that of BMI, anthropometrics, and functional parameters. After follow-up, 53 patients (40.5%) had died. Regarding all-cause mortality cumulative survival percentages after 1, 2 and 3 years were 89.3, 76.3 and 67.9%, respectively. In univariate analyses, FFMI, BMI, sex, age, leukocyte number, FEV1 and 6-min walking distance were associated with survival (p<0.05). Multivariate analyses using the most significant percentiles identified by univariate analysis revealed FFMI (25th percentile; hazard ratio 0.338 [95% confidence interval: 0.189-0.605]), sex, leukocyte number (50th percentile) and FEV1 (50th percentile) as independent predictors of mortality. In patients with CHRF and HMV, body composition in terms of FFMI was an independent predictor of long-term survival. FFMI was superior to BMI and seems informative in the multidimensional assessment of these patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Histoplasma capsulatum surmounts obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Garfoot, Andrew L.; Rappleye, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and disseminated disease, even in immunocompetent hosts. In contrast to opportunistic pathogens, which are readily controlled by phagocytic cells, H. capsulatum yeasts are able to infect macrophages, survive antimicrobial defenses, and proliferate as an intracellular pathogen. In this review, we discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that enable H. capsulatum yeasts to overcome obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis. H. capsulatum yeasts gain refuge from extracellular obstacles such as antimicrobial lung surfactant proteins by engaging the β-integrin family of phagocytic receptors to promote entry into macrophages. In addition, H. capsulatum yeasts conceal immunostimulatory β-glucans to avoid triggering signaling receptors such as the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1. H. capsulatum yeasts counteract phagocyte-produced reactive oxygen species by expression of oxidative stress defense enzymes including an extracellular superoxide dismutase and an extracellular catalase. Within the phagosome, H. capsulatum yeasts block phagosome acidification, acquire essential metals such as iron and zinc, and utilize de novo biosynthesis pathways to overcome nutritional limitations. These mechanisms explain how H. capsulatum yeasts avoid and negate macrophage defense strategies and establish a hospitable intracellular niche, making H. capsulatum a successful intracellular pathogen of macrophages. PMID:26235362

  15. Modeling the effects of sodium chloride, acetic acid and intracellular pH on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbiological safety has been a critical issue for acid and acidified foods since it became clear that acid-tolerant pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 can survive (even though they are unable to grow) in a pH range of 3 to 4, which is typical for these classes of food products. The primar...

  16. Melatonin elevates intracellular free calcium in human platelets by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sharda; Dash, Debabrata

    2011-07-21

    Several studies have indicated the existence of direct effects of melatonin on platelets. Here we show that, melatonin at high concentration is capable of significantly raising platelet intracellular calcium even in the absence of an agonist. The effect of melatonin on platelets was abolished by luzindole, a melatonin receptor blocker, and rotenone, while it was unaffected by cell-permeable antagonists of either inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor, phospholipase C (PLC), or bafilomycin A1, which discharges acidic calcium stores. Melatonin-induced manganese entry provided evidence for activation of bivalent cation entry. Thus, our data suggest that melatonin evoked the elevation of platelet intracellular calcium through depletion of mitochondrial Ca(2+) stores and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), while the action was independent of the PLC-IP(3) axis. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Age-dependent changes in the regulation mechanisms for intracellular calcium ions in ganglion cells of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Mann, Miriam; Haq, Wadood; Zabel, Thomas; Guenther, Elke; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ladewig, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of intracellular calcium buffering in retinal ganglion cells. We performed a quantitative analysis of calcium homeostasis in ganglion cells of early postnatal and adult mice by simultaneous patch-clamp recordings in sliced tissue and microfluorometric calcium measurements with Fura-2. Endogenous calcium homeostasis was quantified by using the 'added buffer' approach which uses amplitudes and decay time constants of calcium transients to give a standard for intracellular calcium buffering. The recovery phase of depolarization-induced calcium transients was well approximated by a mono-exponential function with a decay time constant that showed a linear dependence on dye concentration. Endogenous calcium binding ratios were found to be 575 (n = 18 cells) in early postnatal and 121 (n = 18 cells) in adult retinal ganglion cells. With respect to ganglion cell degeneration at early postnatal stages, our measurements suggest that neuroprotection of a majority of developing ganglion cells partially results from a specialized calcium homeostasis based on high buffering capacities. Furthermore, the dramatic decrease of the intracellular calcium buffering capacity during ganglion cell development may enhance their vulnerability to neurodegeneration.

  18. Mobilization of Intracellular Copper by Gossypol and Apogossypolone Leads to Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cell Death: Putative Anticancer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Haseeb; Azim, Shafquat; Khan, Husain Yar; Ullah, Mohammad Fahad; Wu, Daocheng; Singh, Ajay Pratap; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-06-20

    There is compelling evidence that serum, tissue and intracellular levels of copper are elevated in all types of cancer. Copper has been suggested as an important co-factor for angiogenesis. It is also a major metal ion present inside the nucleus, bound to DNA bases, particularly guanine. We have earlier proposed that the interaction of phenolic-antioxidants with intracellular copper leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately serve as DNA cleaving agents. To further validate our hypothesis we show here that the antioxidant gossypol and its semi-synthetic derivative apogossypolone induce copper-mediated apoptosis in breast MDA-MB-231, prostate PC3 and pancreatic BxPC-3 cancer cells, through the generation of ROS. MCF10A breast epithelial cells refractory to the cytotoxic property of these compounds become sensitized to treatment against gossypol, as well as apogossypolone, when pre-incubated with copper. Our present results confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that plant-derived antioxidants mobilize intracellular copper instigating ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. As cancer cells exist under significant oxidative stress, this increase in ROS-stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  19. Disruption of the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in the cardiac excitation-contraction coupling is a crucial mechanism of arrhythmic toxicity in aconitine-induced cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Min; Wu Meng; Wang Jifeng; Qiao Yanjiang; Wang Zhao . E-mail: zwang@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2007-03-23

    Aconitine is an effective ingredient in Aconite tuber, an important traditional Chinese medicine. Aconitine is also known to be a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid with arrhythmogenic effects. In the present study, we have characterized the properties of arrhythmic cytotoxicity and explored the possible mechanisms of aconitine-induced cardiomyocytes. Results show that aconitine induces significant abnormity in the spontaneous beating rate, amplitude of spontaneous oscillations and the relative intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. Also, mRNA transcription levels and protein expressions of SR Ca{sup 2+} release channel RyR{sub 2} and sarcolemmal NCX were elevated in aconitine-induced cardiomyocytes. However, co-treatment with ruthenium red (RR), a RyR channel inhibitor, could reverse the aconitine-induced abnormity in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signals. These results demonstrate that disruption of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in the cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (EC coupling) is a crucial mechanism of arrhythmic cytotoxicity in aconitine-induced cardiomyocytes. Moreover, certain inhibitors appear to play an important role in the detoxification of aconitine-induced Ca{sup 2+}-dependent arrhythmias.

  20. Intracellular ROS

    PubMed Central

    Leshem, Yehoram

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular localization of stress induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) has emerged as an important aspect towards understanding of cellular responses to environmental stimuli. Our recent study published in the PNAS (103:18008–13)1 shows that NaCl-induced ROS appear within endosomes on the way to tonoplast as part of the vacuolar vesicle trafficking. In addition to showing ROS damage to the tonoplast, this finding may shed light upon recently reported aspects of root water relations during salt stress, suggesting a new signaling role for intracellular ROS in Arabidopsis root cells, during salt stress: ROS that are compartmentalized in endosomes are delivered by the vacuolar vesicle trafficking pathway to the tonoplast, resulting in oxidative gating of TIPs water channels. The closure of the tonoplast aquaporins contributes to the observed reduction in root hydraulic conductivity during salt stress. PMID:19704741

  1. Single-cell mass cytometry reveals intracellular survival/proliferative signaling in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Qiu, Peng; Zeng, Zhihong; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Mak, Duncan H; Burks, Jared K; Schober, Wendy; McQueen, Teresa J; Cortes, Jorge; Tanner, Scott D; Roboz, Gail J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Guzman, Monica L; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the unique phenotypes and complex signaling pathways of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) will provide insights and druggable targets that can be used to eradicate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current work on AML LSCs is limited by the number of parameters that conventional flow cytometry (FCM) can analyze because of cell autofluorescence and fluorescent dye spectral overlap. Single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) substitutes rare earth elements for fluorophores to label antibodies, which allows measurements of up to 120 parameters in single cells without correction for spectral overlap. The aim of this study was the evaluation of intracellular signaling in antigen-defined stem/progenitor cell subsets in primary AML. CyTOF and conventional FCM yielded comparable results on LSC phenotypes defined by CD45, CD34, CD38, CD123, and CD99. Intracellular phosphoprotein responses to ex vivo cell signaling inhibitors and cytokine stimulation were assessed in myeloid leukemia cell lines and one primary AML sample. CyTOF and conventional FCM results were confirmed by western blotting. In the primary AML sample, we investigated the cell responses to ex vivo stimulation with stem cell factor and BEZ235-induced inhibition of PI3K and identified activation patterns in multiple PI3K downstream signaling pathways including p-4EBP1, p-AKT, and p-S6, particularly in CD34(+) subsets. We evaluated multiple signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD mutations. The data demonstrated the heterogeneity of cell phenotype distribution and distinct patterns of signaling activation across AML samples and between AML and normal samples. The mTOR targets p-4EBP1 and p-S6 were exclusively found in FLT3-ITD stem/progenitor cells, but not in their normal counterparts, suggesting both as novel targets in FLT3 mutated AML. Our data suggest that CyTOF can identify functional signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML, which may

  2. Innate Immunity to Intracellular Pathogens: Lessons Learned from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunny

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to manipulate host cell processes in order to establish a replicative niche within the host cell. In response, the host can initiate immune defenses that lead to the eventual restriction and clearance of intracellular infection. The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila has evolved elaborate virulence mechanisms that allow for its survival inside protozoa within a specialized membrane-bound organelle. These strategies also enable L. pneumophila to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages, and can result in the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease. Essential to L. pneumophila's intracellular lifestyle is a specialized type IV secretion system, termed Dot/Icm, that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells. The ease with which L. pneumophila can be genetically manipulated has facilitated the comparison of host responses to virulent and isogenic avirulent mutants lacking a functional Dot/Icm system. This has made L. pneumophila an excellent model for understanding how the host discriminates between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and for systematically dissecting host defense mechanisms against intracellular pathogens. In this chapter, I discuss a few examples demonstrating how the study of immune responses triggered specifically by the L. pneumophila type IV secretion system has provided unique insight into our understanding of host immunity against intracellular bacterial pathogens.

  3. Mechanisms of survival, responses and sources of Salmonella in low-moisture environments

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Sarah; Condell, Orla; McClure, Peter; Amézquita, Alejandro; Fanning, Séamus

    2013-01-01

    Some Enterobacteriaceae possess the ability to survive in low-moisture environments for extended periods of time. Many of the reported food-borne outbreaks associated with low-moisture foods involve Salmonella contamination. The control of Salmonella in low-moisture foods and their production environments represents a significant challenge for all food manufacturers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to Salmonella survival in intermediate- and low-moisture food matrices and their production environments. The mechanisms utilized by this bacterium to ensure their survival in these dry conditions remain to be fully elucidated, however, in depth transcriptomic data is now beginning to emerge regarding this observation. Earlier research work described the effect(s) that low-moisture can exert on the long-term persistence and heat tolerance of Salmonella, however, data are also now available highlighting the potential cross-tolerance to other stressors including commonly used microbicidal agents. Sources and potential control measures to reduce the risk of contamination will be explored. By extending our understanding of these geno- and phenotypes, we may be able to exploit them to improve food safety and protect public health. PMID:24294212

  4. In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-06-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are model subsurface organisms for studying genes involving in situ radionuclide transformation and sediment survival. Our research objective for this project has been to develop a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) procedure and use it to identify mutants in genes of these subsurface bacteria involved in sediment survival and radionuclide reduction. The mutant genes identified in these studies allow us for the first time to describe at the genetic level microbial processes that are actually being used by environmental bacteria while growing in their natural ecosystems. Identification of these genes revealed facets of microbial physiology and ecology that are not accessible through laboratory studies. Ultimately, this information may be used to optimize bioremediation or other engineered microbial processes. Furthermore, the identification of a mutant in a gene conferring multidrug resistance in strain MR-1 shows that this widespread mechanism of antibiotic resistance, likely has its origins as a mechanism of bacterial defense against naturally occurring toxins. Studies with D. desulfuricans G20: The STM procedure first involved generating a library of 5760 G20 mutants and screening for potential non-survivors in subsurface sediment microcosms. After two rounds of screening, a total of 117 mutants were confirmed to be true non-survivors. 97 transposon insertion regions have been sequenced to date. Upon further analysis of these mutants, we classified the sediment survival genes into COG functional categories. STM mutant insertions were located in genes encoding proteins related to metabolism (33%), cellular processes (42%), and information storage and processing (17%). We also noted 8% of STM mutants identified had insertions in genes for hypothetical proteins or unknown functions. Interestingly, at least 64 of these genes encode cytoplasmic proteins, 46 encode inner membrane proteins, and only 7 encode

  5. Landmark discoveries in intracellular transport and secretion

    PubMed Central

    Paknikar, Kishore M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Cellular protein transport and secretion is fundamental to the very existence of an organism, regulating important physiological functions such as reproduction, digestion, energy production, growth, neurotransmission, hormone release, water and ion transport, etc., all required for the survival and maintenance of homeostasis within an organism. Molecular understanding of transport and secretion of intracellular product has therefore been of paramount importance and aggressively investigated for over six decades. Only in the last 20 years, the general molecular mechanism of the process has come to light, following discovery of key proteins involved in ER-Golgi transport, and discovery of the ‘porosome’– the universal secretion machinery in cells. PMID:17635635

  6. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  7. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla Pareja, Maria Eugenia; Colombo, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance. PMID:24137567

  8. Pathway Analysis Reveals Common Pro-Survival Mechanisms of Metyrapone and Carbenoxolone after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Helen L.; Rojo, Daniel R.; Micci, Maria-Adelaide; Sell, Stacy L.; Boone, Deborah R.; Crookshanks, Jeanna M.; DeWitt, Douglas S.; Masel, Brent E.; Prough, Donald S.

    2013-01-01

    Developing new pharmacotherapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI) requires elucidation of the neuroprotective mechanisms of many structurally and functionally diverse compounds. To test our hypothesis that diverse neuroprotective drugs similarly affect common gene targets after TBI, we compared the effects of two drugs, metyrapone (MT) and carbenoxolone (CB), which, though used clinically for noncognitive conditions, improved learning and memory in rats and humans. Although structurally different, both MT and CB inhibit a common molecular target, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby effectively reducing glucocorticoid levels. We examined injury-induced signaling pathways to determine how the effects of these two compounds correlate with pro-survival effects in surviving neurons of the injured rat hippocampus. We found that treatment of TBI rats with MT or CB acutely induced in hippocampal neurons transcriptional profiles that were remarkably similar (i.e., a coordinated attenuation of gene expression across multiple injury-induced cell signaling networks). We also found, to a lesser extent, a coordinated increase in cell survival signals. Analysis of injury-induced gene expression altered by MT and CB provided additional insight into the protective effects of each. Both drugs attenuated expression of genes in the apoptosis, death receptor and stress signaling pathways, as well as multiple genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway such as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase (Complex1), cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV) and ATP synthase (Complex V). This suggests an overall inhibition of mitochondrial function. Complex 1 is the primary source of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway, thus linking the protective effects of these drugs to a reduction in oxidative stress. The net effect of the drug-induced transcriptional changes observed here indicates that suppressing

  9. Early down-regulation of PKCδ as a pro-survival mechanism in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rué, Laura; Alcalá-Vida, Rafael; López-Soop, Graciela; Creus-Muncunill, Jordi; Alberch, Jordi; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2014-03-01

    A balance between cell survival and apoptosis is crucial to avoid neurodegeneration. Here, we analyzed whether the pro-apoptotic protein PKCδ, and the pro-survival PKCα and βII, were dysregulated in the brain of R6/1 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). Protein levels of the three PKCs examined were reduced in all the brain regions analyzed being PKCδ the most affected isoform. Interestingly, PKCδ protein levels were also decreased in the striatum and cortex of R6/2 and Hdh(Q111/Q111) mice, and in the putamen of HD patients. Nuclear PKCδ induces apoptosis, but we detected reduced PKCδ in both cytoplasmic and nuclear enriched fractions from R6/1 mouse striatum, cortex and hippocampus. In addition, we show that phosphorylation and ubiquitination of PKCδ are increased in 30-week-old R6/1 mouse brain. All together these results suggest a pro-survival role of reduced PKCδ levels in response to mutant huntingtin-induced toxicity. In fact, we show that over-expression of PKCδ increases mutant huntingtin-induced cell death in vitro, whereas over-expression of a PKCδ dominant negative form or silencing of endogenous PKCδ partially blocks mutant huntingtin-induced cell death. Finally, we show that the analysis of lamin B protein levels could be a good marker of PKCδ activity, but it is not involved in PKCδ-mediated cell death in mutant huntingtin-expressing cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that neurons increase the degradation of PKCδ as a compensatory pro-survival mechanism in response to mutant huntingtin-induced toxicity that can help to understand why cell death appears late in the disease.

  10. Functional characterization delineates that a Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific protein kinase (Rv3080c) is responsible for the growth, phagocytosis and intracellular survival of avirulent mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Ruma; Singh, Susmita K; Singh, Diwakar K; Singh, Pramod K; Chaurasiya, Shivendra K; Srivastava, Kishore K

    2012-10-01

    Serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs) are predominantly involved in growth, development, division, differentiation, and in regulating immune responses in mycobacteria. A wide variety of functions of mycobacterial STPKs persuade mycobacterial growth and further its survival in the hosts. The polymorphic studies have shown that a full length gene of Rv3080c (pknK) is present in the slow growing mycobacteria. The wild type Mycobacterium smegmatis containing only vector (M. smegmatis) and M. smegmatis containing Rv3080c (pknK) cloned in pMV261 vector (M. smegmatis::K) were cultured in different growth media. The studies have shown that M. smegmatis did not differ in the growth and in survival while a substantial reduction in the growth (four-ten-folds) and a significant delay in the colony formation were observed in M. smegmatis::K. In order to look for the stage specific and modulated expression of PknK, the study was comprehended to quantitate pknK transcripts at different phases of cultures. The mycobacterium, containing high copy number of pknK specific RNA was unable to multiply. The study thus highlights that Rv3080c is largely accountable for changing the fate of avirulent mycobacteria and hence the protein can be utilized as an important molecule to target pathogenesis.

  11. Effects of the Enterococcus faecalis hypR gene encoding a new transcriptional regulator on oxidative stress response and intracellular survival within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Verneuil, Nicolas; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Le Breton, Yoann; Posteraro, Brunella; Fadda, Giovanni; Auffray, Yanick; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2004-08-01

    In order to identify regulators of the oxidative stress response in Enterococcus faecalis, an important human pathogen, several genes annotated as coding for transcriptional regulators were inactivated by insertional mutagenesis. One mutant, affected in the ef2958 locus (designated hypR [hydrogen peroxide regulator]), appeared to be highly sensitive to oxidative challenge caused by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, testing of the hypR mutant by using an in vivo-in vitro macrophage infection model resulted in a highly significant reduction in survival compared to the survival of parent strain JH2-2. Northern blot analyses were carried out with probes specific for genes encoding known antioxidant enzymes, and they showed that the ahpCF (alkyl hydroperoxide reductase) transcript was expressed less in mutant cells. Mobility shift protein-DNA binding assays revealed that HypR regulated directly the expression of hypR itself and the ahpCF operon. Our combined results showed that HypR appeared to be directly involved in the expression of ahpCF genes under oxidative stress conditions and suggested that this regulator could contribute to the virulence of E. faecalis.

  12. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells.

  13. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  14. Fc-receptor-mediated intracellular delivery of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) protects against redox-induced apoptosis through a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Vouldoukis, I.; Sivan, V.; Vozenin, M. C.; Kamaté, C.; Calenda, A.; Mazier, D.; Dugas, B.

    2000-01-01

    apoptosis and promoted the intracellular antioxidant armature. CONCLUSIONS: To define the pharmacologic mechanism of action of bovine SOD1, we attempted to identify the second messengers that are induced by SOD1 IC. In this work, we propose that Fc-mediated intracellular delivery of the SOD1 that reduced the production of superoxide anion and of peroxynitrite, promoted a NO-induced protective effect in inducing the antioxidant armature of the cells. Taken together, these data suggested that specific immune responses against antigenic SOD1 could promote the pharmacological properties of the antioxidant enzyme likely via a NO-dependent mechanism. PMID:11474120

  15. Desiccation as a Long-Term Survival Mechanism for the Archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kimberly L.; Apolinario, Ethel E.

    2012-01-01

    Viable methanogens have been detected in dry, aerobic environments such as dry reservoir sediment, dry rice paddies and aerobic desert soils, which suggests that methanogens have mechanisms for long-term survival in a desiccated state. In this study, we quantified the survival rates of the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri after desiccation under conditions equivalent to the driest environments on Earth and subsequent exposure to different stress factors. There was no significant loss of viability after desiccation for 28 days for cells grown with either hydrogen or the methylotrophic substrates, but recovery was affected by growth phase, with cells desiccated during the stationary phase of growth having a higher rate of recovery after desiccation. Synthesis of methanosarcinal extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) significantly increased the viability of desiccated cells under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions compared with that of non-EPS-synthesizing cells. Desiccated M. barkeri exposed to air at room temperature did not lose significant viability after 28 days, and exposure of M. barkeri to air after desiccation appeared to improve the recovery of viable cells compared with that of desiccated cells that were never exposed to air. Desiccated M. barkeri was more resistant to higher temperatures, and although resistance to oxidative conditions such as ozone and ionizing radiation was not as robust as in other desiccation-resistant microorganisms, the protection mechanisms are likely adequate to maintain cell viability during periodic exposure events. The results of this study demonstrate that after desiccation M. barkeri has the innate capability to survive extended periods of exposure to air and lethal temperatures. PMID:22194299

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS18 enhances the intracellular survival of M. smegmatis via altering host macrophage cytokine profiling and attenuating the cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenmin; Deng, Wanyan; Zeng, Jie; Ren, Sai; Ali, Md Kaisar; Gu, Yinzhong; Li, Yangyuling; Xie, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE/PPE family proteins, named after the presence of conserved PE (Pro-Glu) and PPE (Pro-Pro-Glu) domains at N-terminal, are prevalent in M. tuberculosis genome. The function of most PE/PPE family proteins remains elusive. To characterize the function of PE_PGRS18, the encoding gene was heterologously expressed in M. smegmatis, a nonpathogenic mycobacterium. The recombinant PE_PGRS18 is cell wall associated. M. smegmatis PE_PGRS18 recombinant showed differential response to stresses and altered the production of host cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12p40 and IL-10, as well as enhanced survival within macrophages largely via attenuating the apoptosis of macrophages. In summary, the study firstly unveiled the role of PE_PGRS18 in physiology and pathogenesis of mycobacterium.

  17. Compartmentation of malic acid in mesophyll cells of Kalanchoee daigremontiana: indications of a intracellular cytosolic vesicle transport mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Balsamo, R.A.; Uribe, E.G.

    1987-04-01

    Leaf tissue was harvested over a 24hr period at one to three hour intervals. The malic acid levels in the tissue were assayed spectrophotometrically and the percent cell volume occupied by cytosolic vesicles in replicate samples was determined. The total volume of the cytosolic vesicles fluctuated throughout the photoperiod concommitantly with malic acid concentrations present in the tissue. An intact leaf tissue section (10.2cm/sup 2/) was radiolabeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ seven hours into the dark period for thirty minutes. Two dimensional thin layer chromatography and electrophoresis of the tissue determined that 96% of the label was incorporated into malic acid. A freeze substitution procedure was initiated followed by microautoradiography (Fisher 1971) which allowed for the tracing of intracellular malic acid migration and compartmentation within the mesophyll cells. The results and interpretation of this experiment will be presented.

  18. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Galli, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the deubiquitination enzyme gene OTU1, the nuclear pore protein POM152 and the SNT1 that encodes for the Set3C subunit of the histone deacetylase complex. In these strains the PARP-1 level was roughly the same as in the wild type. PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in the snt1Δ than in the wild type strain; after UV radiation, PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in hho1 and pom152 deletion strains than in the wild type indicating that these functions may have a role on regulating PARP-1 level and activity in the nucleus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism of the association between Na+ binding and conformations at the intracellular gate in neurotransmitter:sodium symporters

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-04-13

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. Here we describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na+ dependence. Furthermore, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na+ binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. Lastly, that the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  20. Corynebacterium diphtheriae putative tellurite-resistance protein (CDCE8392_0813) contributes to the intracellular survival in human epithelial cells and lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; Antunes, Camila Azevedo; dos Santos, Cintia Silva; Pereira, José Augusto Adler; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; de Luna, Maria das Graças; Azevedo, Vasco; Hirata, Raphael; Burkovski, Andreas; Asad, Lídia Maria Buarque de Oliveira; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the aetiologic agent of diphtheria, also represents a global medical challenge because of the existence of invasive strains as causative agents of systemic infections. Although tellurite (TeO32-) is toxic to most microorganisms, TeO32--resistant bacteria, including C. diphtheriae, exist in nature. The presence of TeO32--resistance (TeR) determinants in pathogenic bacteria might provide selective advantages in the natural environment. In the present study, we investigated the role of the putative TeR determinant (CDCE8392_813gene) in the virulence attributes of diphtheria bacilli. The disruption of CDCE8392_0813 gene expression in the LDCIC-L1 mutant increased susceptibility to TeO32- and reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), but not to other antimicrobial agents. The LDCIC-L1 mutant also showed a decrease in both the lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans and the survival inside of human epithelial cells compared to wild-type strain. Conversely, the haemagglutinating activity and adherence to and formation of biofilms on different abiotic surfaces were not regulated through the CDCE8392_0813 gene. In conclusion, the CDCE8392_813 gene contributes to the TeR and pathogenic potential of C. diphtheriae. PMID:26107188

  1. Corynebacterium diphtheriae putative tellurite-resistance protein (CDCE8392_0813) contributes to the intracellular survival in human epithelial cells and lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Santos, Louisy Sanches Dos; Antunes, Camila Azevedo; Santos, Cintia Silva Dos; Pereira, José Augusto Adler; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; Luna, Maria das Graças de; Azevedo, Vasco; Hirata Júnior, Raphael; Burkovski, Andreas; Asad, Lídia Maria Buarque de Oliveira; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-08-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the aetiologic agent of diphtheria, also represents a global medical challenge because of the existence of invasive strains as causative agents of systemic infections. Although tellurite (TeO32-) is toxic to most microorganisms, TeO32--resistant bacteria, including C. diphtheriae, exist in nature. The presence of TeO32--resistance (TeR) determinants in pathogenic bacteria might provide selective advantages in the natural environment. In the present study, we investigated the role of the putative TeR determinant (CDCE8392_813gene) in the virulence attributes of diphtheria bacilli. The disruption of CDCE8392_0813 gene expression in the LDCIC-L1 mutant increased susceptibility to TeO32- and reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), but not to other antimicrobial agents. The LDCIC-L1 mutant also showed a decrease in both the lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans and the survival inside of human epithelial cells compared to wild-type strain. Conversely, the haemagglutinating activity and adherence to and formation of biofilms on different abiotic surfaces were not regulated through the CDCE8392_0813 gene. In conclusion, the CDCE8392_813 gene contributes to the TeR and pathogenic potential of C. diphtheriae.

  2. Intracellular microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Matjaž; Hyun Yun, Seok

    2015-09-01

    Optical microresonators, which confine light within a small cavity, are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers and nonlinear devices to biochemical and optomechanical sensing. Here we use microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explore two distinct types of microresonator—soft and hard—that support whispering-gallery modes. Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (˜500 pN μm-2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN μm-2 (20 Pa). In a second form, whispering-gallery modes within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes.

  3. Survival and SOS response induction in ultraviolet B irradiated Escherichia coli cells with defective repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Prada Medina, Cesar Augusto; Aristizabal Tessmer, Elke Tatjana; Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose In this paper, the contribution of different genes involved in DNA repair for both survival and SOS induction in Escherichia coli mutants exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, [wavelength range 280-315 nm]) was evaluated. Materials and methods E. coli strains defective in uvrA, oxyR, recO, recN, recJ, exoX, recB, recD or xonA genes were used to determine cell survival. All strains also had the genetic sulA::lacZ fusion, which allowed for the quantification of SOS induction through the SOS Chromotest. Results Five gene products were particularly important for survival, as follows: UvrA > RecB > RecO > RecJ > XonA. Strains defective in uvrA and recJ genes showed elevated SOS induction compared with the wild type, which remained stable for up to 240 min after UVB-irradiation. In addition, E. coli strains carrying the recO or recN mutation showed no SOS induction. Conclusions The nucleotide excision and DNA recombination pathways were equally used to repair UVB-induced DNA damage in E. coli cells. The sulA gene was not turned off in strains defective in UvrA and RecJ. RecO protein was essential for processing DNA damage prior to SOS induction. In this study, the roles of DNA repair proteins and their contributions to the mechanisms that induce SOS genes in E. coli are proposed.

  4. Delayed apoptosis allows islet β-cells to implement an autophagic mechanism to promote cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Heather L.; Peterson, Brett S.; Haldeman, Jonathan M.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Hohmeier, Hans E.

    2017-01-01

    Increased β-cell death coupled with the inability to replicate existing β-cells drives the decline in β-cell mass observed in the progression of both major forms of diabetes. Understanding endogenous mechanisms of islet cell survival could have considerable value for the development of novel strategies to limit β-cell loss and thereby promote β-cell recovery. Insulinoma cells have provided useful insight into β-cell death pathways but observations made in cell lines sometimes fail to translate to primary islets. Here, we report dramatic differences in the temporal regulation and engagement of the apoptotic program in primary rodent islets relative to the INS-1 derived 832/13 cell line. As expected, 832/13 cells rapidly induced cell stress markers in response to ER stress or DNA damage and were fully committed to apoptosis, resulting in >80% cell death within 24 h. In contrast, primary rat islets were largely refractory to cell death in response to ER stress and DNA damage, despite rapid induction of stress markers, such as XBP-1(s), CHOP, and PUMA. Gene expression profiling revealed a general suppression of pro-apoptotic machinery, such as Apaf-1 and caspase 3, and sustained levels of pro-survival factors, such as cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and XIAP, in rat islets. Furthermore, we observed sustained induction of autophagy following chronic ER stress and found that inhibition of autophagy rendered islet β-cells highly vulnerable to ER stress-induced cell death. We propose that islet β-cells dampen the apoptotic response to delay the onset of cell death, providing a temporal window in which autophagy can be activated to limit cellular damage and promote survival. PMID:28212395

  5. Delayed apoptosis allows islet β-cells to implement an autophagic mechanism to promote cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Heather L; Peterson, Brett S; Haldeman, Jonathan M; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E; Stephens, Samuel B

    2017-01-01

    Increased β-cell death coupled with the inability to replicate existing β-cells drives the decline in β-cell mass observed in the progression of both major forms of diabetes. Understanding endogenous mechanisms of islet cell survival could have considerable value for the development of novel strategies to limit β-cell loss and thereby promote β-cell recovery. Insulinoma cells have provided useful insight into β-cell death pathways but observations made in cell lines sometimes fail to translate to primary islets. Here, we report dramatic differences in the temporal regulation and engagement of the apoptotic program in primary rodent islets relative to the INS-1 derived 832/13 cell line. As expected, 832/13 cells rapidly induced cell stress markers in response to ER stress or DNA damage and were fully committed to apoptosis, resulting in >80% cell death within 24 h. In contrast, primary rat islets were largely refractory to cell death in response to ER stress and DNA damage, despite rapid induction of stress markers, such as XBP-1(s), CHOP, and PUMA. Gene expression profiling revealed a general suppression of pro-apoptotic machinery, such as Apaf-1 and caspase 3, and sustained levels of pro-survival factors, such as cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and XIAP, in rat islets. Furthermore, we observed sustained induction of autophagy following chronic ER stress and found that inhibition of autophagy rendered islet β-cells highly vulnerable to ER stress-induced cell death. We propose that islet β-cells dampen the apoptotic response to delay the onset of cell death, providing a temporal window in which autophagy can be activated to limit cellular damage and promote survival.

  6. Survival mechanisms of vertebrate ectotherms at subfreezing temperatures: applications in cryomedicine.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E; DeVries, A L; Wang, T; Layne, J R

    1995-03-01

    Various marine fishes, amphibians, and reptiles survive at temperatures several degrees below the freezing point of their body fluids by virtue of adaptive mechanisms that promote freeze avoidance or freeze tolerance. Freezing is avoided by a colligative depression of the blood freezing point, supercooling of the body fluids, or the biosynthesis of unique antifreeze proteins that inhibit the propagation of ice within body fluids. Conversely, freeze tolerance is an adaptation for the survival of tissue freezing under ecologically relevant thermal and temporal conditions that is conferred by the biosynthesis of permeating carbohydrate cryoprotectants and an extensive dehydration of tissues and organs. Such cryoprotective responses, invoked by the onset of freezing, mitigate the osmotic stress associated with freeze-concentration of cytoplasm, attendant metabolic perturbations, and physical damage. Cryomedical research has historically relied on mammalian models for experimentation even though endotherms do not naturally experience subfreezing temperatures. Some vertebrate ectotherms have "solved" not only the problem of freezing individual tissues and organs, but also that of simultaneously freezing all organ systems. An emerging paradigm in cryomedicine is the application of principles governing natural cold hardiness to the development of protocols for the cryopreservation of mammalian tissues and organs.

  7. An inducible and secreted eukaryote-like serine/threonine kinase of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi promotes intracellular survival and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theeya, Nagaraja; Ta, Atri; Das, Sayan; Mandal, Rahul S; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ghosh, Amar N; Das, Santasabuj

    2015-02-01

    Eukaryote-like serine/threonine kinases (eSTKs) constitute an important family of bacterial virulence factors. Genome analysis had predicted putative eSTKs in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, although their functional characterization and the elucidation of their role in pathogenesis are still awaited. We show here that the primary sequence and secondary structure of the t4519 locus of Salmonella Typhi Ty2 have all the signatures of eukaryotic superfamily kinases. t4519 encodes a ∼39-kDa protein (T4519), which shows serine/threonine kinase activities in vitro. Recombinant T4519 (rT4519) is autophosphorylated and phosphorylates the universal substrate myelin basic protein. Infection of macrophages results in decreased viability of the mutant (Ty2Δt4519) strain, which is reversed by gene complementation. Moreover, reactive oxygen species produced by the macrophages signal to the bacteria to induce T4519, which is translocated to the host cell cytoplasm. That T4519 may target a host substrate(s) is further supported by the activation of host cellular signaling pathways and the induction of cytokines/chemokines. Finally, the role of T4519 in the pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhi is underscored by the significantly decreased mortality of mice infected with the Ty2Δt4519 strain and the fact that the competitive index of this strain for causing systemic infection is 0.25% that of the wild-type strain. This study characterizes the first eSTK of Salmonella Typhi and demonstrates its role in promoting phagosomal survival of the bacteria within macrophages, which is a key determinant of pathogenesis. This, to the best of our knowledge, is the first study to describe the essential role of eSTKs in the in vivo pathogenesis of Salmonella spp.

  8. The Interaction between Candida krusei and Murine Macrophages Results in Multiple Outcomes, Including Intracellular Survival and Escape from Killing ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodas, Rocío; González-Camacho, Fernando; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Candida krusei is a fungal pathogen of interest for the scientific community for its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole. Little is known about the interaction of this yeast with host immune cells. In this work, we have characterized the outcome of the interaction between C. krusei and murine macrophages. Once C. krusei was internalized, we observed different phenomena. In a macrophage-like cell line, C. krusei survived in a significant number of macrophages and induced filamentation and macrophage explosion. Phagocytosis of C. krusei led to actin polymerization around the yeast cells at the site of entry. Fluorescent specific staining with anti-Lamp1 and LysoTracker indicated that after fungal internalization, there was a phagolysosome maturation defect, a phenomenon that was more efficient when the macrophages phagocytosed killed yeast cells. Using cell line macrophages, we also observed macrophage fusion after cell division. When we used primary resident peritoneal macrophages in addition to macrophage explosion, we also observed a strong chemotaxis of uninfected macrophages to regions where C. krusei-infected macrophages were present. We also noticed yeast transfer phenomena between infected macrophages. Primary macrophages inhibited pseudohypha elongation more efficiently than the macrophage-like cell line, suggesting that C. krusei infection was better controlled by the former macrophages. Primary macrophages induced more tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than the macrophage-like cell line. Our results demonstrate that C. krusei can exploit the macrophages for replication, although other different outcomes are also possible, indicating that the interaction of this pathogen with phagocytic cells is very complex and regulated by multiple factors. PMID:21422181

  9. Simultaneous monitoring of superoxides and intracellular calcium ions in neutrophils by chemiluminescence and fluorescence: evaluation of action mechanisms of bioactive compounds in foods.

    PubMed

    Kazumura, Kimiko; Sato, Yukiko; Satozono, Hiroshi; Koike, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi; Hiramatsu, Mitsuo; Katsumata, Masakazu; Okazaki, Shigetoshi

    2013-10-01

    We have developed a measuring system for simultaneous monitoring of chemiluminescence and fluorescence, which indicate respectively, (i) generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2(-•)) and (ii) change in the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of neutrophils triggered by the mechanism of innate immune response. We applied this measuring system for establishing a method to distinguish between anti-inflammatory actions and antioxidant actions caused by bioactive compounds. We evaluated anti-inflammatory agents (zinc ion [Zn(2+)] and ibuprofen) and antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD] and ascorbic acid). It was shown that ibuprofen and Zn(2+) were anti-inflammatory while SOD and ascorbic acid were anti-oxidative. We conclude that it is possible to determine the mechanism of action of bioactive compounds using this method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracellular distribution and mechanisms of actions of photosensitizer Zinc(II)-phthalocyanine solubilized in Cremophor EL against human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingwei; Dai, Yongchao; Zhao, Wenna; Xie, Jingjing; Xue, Jinping; Ye, Jianhui; Jia, Lee

    2013-03-01

    Zinc(II)-phthalocyanine (ZnPc) is a metal photosensitizer. In the present study, we formulated the poorly-soluble ZnPc in Cremophor EL solution to enhance its solubility and determined its intracellular distribution and mechanisms of action on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. ZnPc uptake by the cells reached a plateau by 8h. ZnPc primarily located in mitochondria, lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum. The concentration-growth inhibition curves of ZnPc on the cell lines were pharmacodynamically enhanced by 10-50 folds by irradiation. Once irradiated, ZnPc produced significant amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activated caspase-3 and caspase-9, arrested cell cycle mainly at G2/M stage, and decreased membrane potential (ΔΨm) of HepG2 cells. In conclusion, the present study first elucidated cellular and molecular mechanisms of ZnPc on HepG2 cells.

  11. Effect of mechanical site preparation treatments on oak survival in a retired field afforestation effort -- first-year results

    Treesearch

    Andrew B. Self; Andrew W. Ezell; Damon B. Hollis; Derek. Alkire

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical site preparation is frequently proposed to alleviate poor soil conditions when afforesting retired agricultural fields. Without management of soil problems, oak seedlings planted in these areas may exhibit poor survival. While mechanical site preparation methods currently employed in hardwood afforestation are proven, there is a substantial void in research...

  12. Intracellular trafficking and cellular uptake mechanism of mPEG-PLGA-PLL and mPEG-PLGA-PLL-Gal nanoparticles for targeted delivery to hepatomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peifeng; Sun, Yanming; Wang, Qi; Sun, Ying; Li, He; Duan, Yourong

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal escape of nanoparticles is crucial to enhancing their delivery and therapeutic efficiency. Here, we report the cellular uptake mechanism, lysosomal escape, and organelle morphology effect of monomethoxy (polyethylene glycol)-poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly (L-lysine) (mPEG-PLGA-PLL, PEAL) and 4-O-beta-D-Galactopyranosyl-D-gluconic acid (Gal)-modified PEAL (PEAL-Gal) for intracellular delivery to HepG2, Huh7, and PLC hepatoma cells. These results indicate that PEAL is taken up by clathrin-mediated endocytosis of HepG2, Huh7 and PLC cells. For PEAL-Gal, sialic acid receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis are the primary uptake pathways in HepG2 cells, respectively, whereas PEAL-Gal is internalized by sag vesicle- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in Huh7 cells. In the case of PLC cells, clathrin-mediated endocytosis and sialic acid receptor play a primary role in the uptake of PEAL-Gal. TEM results verify that PEAL and PEAL-Gal lead to a different influence on organelle morphology of HepG2, Huh7 and PLC cells. In addition, the results of intracellular distribution reveal that PEAL and PEAL-Gal are less entrapped in the lysosomes of HepG2 and Huh7 cells, demonstrating that they effectively escape from lysosomes and contribute to enhance the efficiency of intracellular delivery and tumor therapy. In vivo tumor targeting image results demonstrate that PEAL-Gal specifically delivers Rhodamine B (Rb) to the tumor tissue of mice with HepG2, Huh7, and PLC hepatomas and remains at a high concentration in tumor tissue until 48 h, properties that will greatly contribute to enhanced antitumor efficiency. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis in MC3T3-E1 Cells and Bone Tissues of Sprague-Dawley Rats Exposed to Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-qin; Li, Yan-hui; Zhang, Xiu-yun; Zhao, Zhi-tao; Wang, Ying; Wang, Huan; Li, Guang-sheng; Jing, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Calcium homeostasis of osteoblasts (OBs) has an important role in the physiology and pathology of bone tissue. In order to study the mechanisms of intracellular calcium homeostasis, MC3T3-E1 cells and Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with different concentrations of fluoride. Then, we examined intracellular-free calcium ion ([Ca(2+)]i) in MC3T3-E1 cells as well as mRNA and protein levels of Cav1.2, the main subunit of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange carriers (NCS), and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channels, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2b (SERCA2b)/ATP2A2 in vitro, and rat bone tissues in vivo. Our results showed that [Ca(2+)]i of fluoride-treated OBs increased in a concentration-dependent manner with an increase in the concentration of fluoride. We also found that the low dose of fluoride led to high expression levels of Cav1.2, NCS-1, and PMCA and low expression levels of IP3R and SERCA2b/ATP2A2, while the high dose of fluoride induced an increase in SERCA2b/ATP2A2 levels and decrease in Cav1.2, PMCA, NCS-1, and IP3R levels. These results demonstrate that calcium channels and calcium pumps of plasma and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes keep intracellular calcium homeostasis by regulating Cav1.2, NCS-1, PMCA, IP3R, and SERCA2b/ATP2A2 expression.

  14. Intra-cellular Staphylococcus aureus alone causes infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hamza, T; Dietz, M; Pham, D; Clovis, N; Danley, S; Li, B

    2013-07-08

    Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can "hide" in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years.

  15. INTRA-CELLULAR STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ALONE CAUSES INFECTION IN VIVO#

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Therwa; Dietz, Matthew; Pham, Danh; Clovis, Nina; Danley, Suzanne; Li, Bingyun

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can “hide” in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years. PMID:23832687

  16. Molecular Mechanism of Flocculation Self-Recognition in Yeast and Its Role in Mating and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Katty V. Y.; Ielasi, Francesco S.; Nookaew, Intawat; Stals, Ingeborg; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Daenen, Luk; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E.; Stassen, Catherine; van Eijsden, Rudy G. E.; Siewers, Verena; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Kasas, Sandor; Nielsen, Jens; Devreese, Bart

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied the flocculation mechanism at the molecular level by determining the atomic structures of N-Flo1p and N-Lg-Flo1p in complex with their ligands. We show that they have similar ligand binding mechanisms but distinct carbohydrate specificities and affinities, which are determined by the compactness of the binding site. We characterized the glycans of Flo1p and their role in this binding process and demonstrate that glycan-glycan interactions significantly contribute to the cell-cell adhesion mechanism. Therefore, the extended flocculation mechanism is based on the self-interaction of Flo proteins and this interaction is established in two stages, involving both glycan-glycan and protein-glycan interactions. The crucial role of calcium in both types of interaction was demonstrated: Ca2+ takes part in the binding of the carbohydrate to the protein, and the glycans aggregate only in the presence of Ca2+. These results unify the generally accepted lectin hypothesis with the historically first-proposed “Ca2+-bridge” hypothesis. Additionally, a new role of cell flocculation is demonstrated; i.e., flocculation is linked to cell conjugation and mating, and survival chances consequently increase significantly by spore formation and by introduction of genetic variability. The role of Flo1p in mating was demonstrated by showing that mating efficiency is increased when cells flocculate and by differential transcriptome analysis of flocculating versus nonflocculating cells in a low-shear environment (microgravity). The results show that a multicellular clump (floc) provides a uniquely organized multicellular ultrastructure that provides a suitable microenvironment to induce and perform cell conjugation and mating. PMID:25873380

  17. Size-Dependent Mechanism of Intracellular Localization and Cytotoxicity of Mono-Disperse Spherical Mesoporous Nano- and Micron-Bioactive Glass Particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuli; Hu, Qing; Miao, Guohou; Zhang, Qing; Yuan, Bo; Zhu, Ye; Fu, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiaofeng; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Mono-disperse spherical mesoporous nano- and micro- bioactive glass particles (NMBGs) can find potential use in bone tissue engineering. However, their size-dependent interaction with osteoblasts has never been studied. Herein, the proliferation, morphology, cytoskeleton organization and apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts are studied in response to the NMBGs with varying sizes (from 61 to 1085 nm) at different concentrations. Generally, smaller NMBGs at a lower dose show weaker cytotoxicity compared to the larger particles and higher doses, arising from a novel size-dependent mechanism of intracellular localization of NMBGs observed by electron and confocal microscopy. Specifically, NMBGs pass through perinuclear membrane of the cells to initiate endocytosis. Once internalized, the sizes of NMBGs are found to play a significant role in determining their intracellular localization. When the NMBGs are smaller than 174 nm, they are transported via the lysosomal pathway and phagocytized in lysosomes, resulting in little cytotoxicity at later time points. On the contrary, larger NMBGs (over 174 nm) escape from the lysosomes after endocytosis, and are localized inside the intra-cytoplasmic vacuoles or randomly in the cytoplasm of cells. Their lysosomal escape may damage the lysosomes, inducing cell apoptosis and thus the greater cytotoxicity. PMID:27305811

  18. Mechanisms underlying the long-term survival of the monocot Dracaena marginata under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Jupa, Radek; Plichta, Roman; Paschová, Zuzana; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Gebauer, Roman

    2017-09-01

    Efficient water management is essential for the survival of vascular plants under drought stress. While interrelations among drought stress, plant anatomy and physiological functions have been described in woody dicots, similar research is very limited for non-palm arborescent and shrubby monocots despite their generally high drought tolerance. In this study, potted transplants of Dracaena marginata Lam. in primary growth stage were exposed to several short- and long-term drought periods. Continuous measurements of sap flow and stem diameter, the evaluation of capacitance and leaf conductance, the quantification of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), and organ-specific anatomical analyses were performed to reveal the mechanisms promoting plant resistance to limited soil moisture. The plants showed sensitive stomata regulation in the face of drying soil, but only intermediate resistance to water loss through cuticular transpiration. The water losses were compensated by water release from stem characterized by densely interconnected, parenchyma-rich ground tissue and considerable hydraulic capacitance. Our results suggest that the high concentration of osmotically active NSC in aboveground organs combined with the production of root pressures supported water uptake and the restoration of depleted reserves after watering. The described anatomical features and physiological mechanisms impart D. marginata with high resistance to irregular watering and long-term water scarcity. These findings should help to improve predictions with respect to the impacts of droughts on this plant group. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Desensitization of ETA endothelin receptor-mediated negative chronotropic response in right atria–species difference and intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kageyoshi; Sakamoto, Aiji; Masaki, Tomoh; Satake, Motoyoshi

    1998-01-01

    Desensitization of ETA endothelin receptor (ETAR) was compared between the rat and guinea-pig with regard to negative chronotropic response (NC) in the right atria (RA).ET-1 (100 nM) produced distinct NC in the presence of BQ788 (300 nM), and positive chronotropic response (PC) in the presence of BQ123 (1 μM) in both species, showing that ETAR and ETB endothelin receptor (ETBR) mediate NC and PC, respectively.Repetitive applications of ET-1 (50 nM) desensitized PC, and the second application only induced a strong NC in both species. Later applications of ET-1 produced virtually no response in the rat RA, whereas they produced BQ123-sensitive NCs repetitively in guinea-pig RA, exhibiting marked species difference in desensitization of ETAR-mediated NC.Pretreatment with staurosporine (100 nM) prevented desensitization of ETAR in the rat RA altogether. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 300 nM) failed to induce, but rather hampered, desensitization of ETAR.Partial amino acid sequencing of ETARs, spanning from the 2nd through the 4th intracellular loops, revealed that all the potential Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites, including a protein kinase C (PKC) site, are conserved among guinea-pigs, rats, rabbits, bovines and humans.In guinea pig RA, pretreatment with okadaic acid (1 μg ml−1) and PMA did not facilitate desensitization of ETAR whereas these agents successfully desensitized ETAR during combined stimulation of β-adrenoceptor and ETAR by isoproterenol (300 nM) and ET-1 (100 nM).These results suggest that species differences in desensitization of ETAR are not caused by differences in the site(s) of, but caused by differences in the environment for phosphorylation of the receptor. Desensitization of ETAR appears to require phosphorylation of the receptor by PKC as well as a kinase stimulated by β-adrenoceptor activation. PMID:9831916

  20. A Robust In Vivo-Like Persistent Firing Supported by a Hybrid of Intracellular and Synaptic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Arthur; Yoshida, Motoharu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent firing is believed to support short-term information retention in the brain. Established hypotheses make use of the recurrent synaptic connectivity to support persistent firing. However, this mechanism is known to suffer from a lack of robustness. On the other hand, persistent firing can be supported by an intrinsic cellular mechanism in multiple brain areas. However, the consequences of having both the intrinsic and the synaptic mechanisms (a hybrid model) on persistent firing remain largely unknown. The goal of this study is to investigate whether a hybrid neural network model with these two mechanisms has advantages over a conventional recurrent network based model. Our computer simulations were based on in vitro recordings obtained from hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells under cholinergic receptor activation. Calcium activated non-specific cationic (CAN) current supported persistent firing in the Hodgkin-Huxley style cellular models. Our results suggest that the hybrid model supports persistent firing within a physiological frequency range over a wide range of different parameters, eliminating parameter sensitivity issues generally recognized in network based persistent firing. In addition, persistent firing in the hybrid model is substantially more robust against distracting inputs, can coexist with theta frequency oscillations, and supports pattern completion. PMID:25901969

  1. Handheld mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp silicon nano-blade arrays for rapid intracellular protein extraction.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung-Sik; Yoon, Sang Youl; Song, Min-Kyung; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Sung

    2010-06-07

    This paper presents a handheld mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nano-blade arrays fabricated by simple and cost effective crystalline wet etching of (110) silicon. The ultra-sharp nano-blade array is simply formed by the undercutting of (110) silicon during the crystalline wet etching process. Cells can be easily disrupted by the silicon nano-blade array without the help of additional reagents or electrical sources. Based on the bench-top test of the proposed device, a handheld mechanical cell lysis chip with the nano-blade arrays is designed and fabricated for direct connection to a commercial syringe. The direct connection to a syringe provides rapid cell lysis, easy handling, and minimization of the lysate dead volume. The protein concentration in the cell lysate obtained by the proposed lysis chip is quantitatively comparable to the one prepared by a conventional chemical lysis method.

  2. Thrombolytic Therapy for Right-Sided Mechanical Pulmonic and Tricuspid Valves: The Largest Survival Analysis to Date

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Hekmat, Manouchehr; Safi, Morteza; Taherkhani, Adineh

    2015-01-01

    Data regarding thrombolytic treatment of right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis are almost nonexistent, and all current guidelines arise from very small case series. We retrospectively studied the in-hospital and long-term outcome data of a larger series of patients who had received, from September 2005 through June 2012, thrombolytic therapy for right-sided mechanical pulmonary valve or tricuspid valve thrombosis. We identified 16 patients aged 8–67 years who had undergone thrombolytic therapy for definite thrombotic mechanical valve obstruction in the tricuspid or pulmonary valve position (8 in each position). All study patients except one had subtherapeutic international normalized ratios. The 8 patients with pulmonary mechanical valve thrombosis had a 100% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, and their in-hospital survival rate was also 100%. The 8 patients with tricuspid mechanical valve thrombosis had a 75% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, with an in-hospital survival rate of 87.5%. The one-year survival rate for mechanical valve thrombosis treated with thrombolytic therapy (whether pulmonary or tricuspid) was 87.5%. On the basis of our data, we recommend that thrombolytic therapy remain the first-line therapy for right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis in adults or children—including children with complex congenital heart disease and patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Surgery should be reserved for patients in whom this treatment fails. PMID:26664307

  3. Thrombolytic Therapy for Right-Sided Mechanical Pulmonic and Tricuspid Valves: The Largest Survival Analysis to Date.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Hekmat, Manouchehr; Safi, Morteza; Taherkhani, Adineh; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    Data regarding thrombolytic treatment of right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis are almost nonexistent, and all current guidelines arise from very small case series. We retrospectively studied the in-hospital and long-term outcome data of a larger series of patients who had received, from September 2005 through June 2012, thrombolytic therapy for right-sided mechanical pulmonary valve or tricuspid valve thrombosis. We identified 16 patients aged 8-67 years who had undergone thrombolytic therapy for definite thrombotic mechanical valve obstruction in the tricuspid or pulmonary valve position (8 in each position). All study patients except one had subtherapeutic international normalized ratios. The 8 patients with pulmonary mechanical valve thrombosis had a 100% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, and their in-hospital survival rate was also 100%. The 8 patients with tricuspid mechanical valve thrombosis had a 75% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, with an in-hospital survival rate of 87.5%. The one-year survival rate for mechanical valve thrombosis treated with thrombolytic therapy (whether pulmonary or tricuspid) was 87.5%. On the basis of our data, we recommend that thrombolytic therapy remain the first-line therapy for right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis in adults or children-including children with complex congenital heart disease and patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Surgery should be reserved for patients in whom this treatment fails.

  4. Modelling the role of intrinsic electric fields in microtubules as an additional control mechanism of bi-directional intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Sataric, M V; Budinski-Petkovic, L; Loncarevic, I; Tuszynski, J A

    2008-01-01

    Active transport is essential for cellular function, while impaired transport has been linked to diseases such as neuronal degeneration. Much long distance transport in cells uses opposite polarity molecular motors of the kinesin and dynein families to move cargos along microtubules. It is clear that many types of cargo are moved by both sets of motors, and frequently in a reverse direction. The general question of how the direction of transport is regulated is still open. The mechanism of the cell's differential control of diverse cargos within the same cytoplasmic background is still unclear as is the answer to the question how endosomes and mitochondria move to different locations within the same cell. To answer these questions we postulate the existence of a local signaling mechanism used by the cell to specifically control different cargos. In particular, we propose an additional physical mechanism that works through the use of constant and alternating intrinsic (endogenous) electric fields as a means of controlling the speed and direction of microtubule-based transport. A specific model is proposed and analyzed in this paper. The model involves the rotational degrees of freedom of the C-termini of tubulin, their interactions and the coupling between elastic and dielectric degrees of freedom. Viscosity of the solution is also included and the resultant equation of motion is found as a nonlinear elliptic equation with dissipation. A particular analytical solution of this equation is obtained in the form of a kink whose properties are analyzed. It is concluded that this solution can be modulated by the presence of electric fields and hence may correspond to the observed behavior of motor protein transport along microtubules.

  5. Histamine reverses IL-5-afforded human eosinophil survival by inducing apoptosis: pharmacological evidence for a novel mechanism of action of histamine.

    PubMed

    Hasala, Hannele; Giembycz, Mark A; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Moilanen, Eeva; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    Eosinophils are essential inflammatory cells in the pathogenesis of asthma and atopic conditions. Histamine, released from mast cells and basophils in response to allergen exposure, is a critical mediator in the allergic response. Histamine exerts its effects via four unequivocally characterized histamine receptors, H(1-4). Several functions of eosinophils have previously been shown to be stimulated by histamine. However, its effects on eosinophil apoptosis are unknown. The aim of the present study was to resolve the effects of histamine on constitutive apoptosis of human eosinophils and on the survival-enhancing action of interleukin (IL)-5. Additional experiments were conducted to elucidate the histamine receptor(s) involved in any response seen and the associated signal transduction cascade. Human isolated peripheral blood eosinophils were cultured in the absence or presence of histamine, IL-5 and receptor antagonists/agonists or mediator inhibitors/analogues. Apoptosis was assessed by measuring the relative DNA content of propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells and the effects were confirmed by morphological analysis with bright field microscopy. Caspase activities were assessed by using commercial Caspase-Glo 3/7, 8 and 9 luminescence assays. Histamine (10-100 microM) partially reversed IL-5-induced human eosinophil survival by enhancing apoptosis as assessed by measuring the relative DNA content of PI-stained cells. This effect was not mediated through any of the known histamine receptors or through non-specific activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors or alpha-adrenoceptors. Moreover, the reversal of IL-5-inhibited eosinophil apoptosis by histamine seemed not to utilize the conventional intracellular second-messenger pathways including cyclic AMP, protein kinase A or phospholipase C. Inhibition of caspase 6 and caspases 1, 10 or 12 reversed the effects of histamine but also inhibited apoptosis in general. In conclusion, the data presented herein indicate that

  6. Selection by differential molecular survival: a possible mechanism of early chemical evolution.

    PubMed Central

    de Duve, C

    1987-01-01

    A model is proposed to account for selective chemical evolution, progressing from a relatively simple initial set of abiotic synthetic phenomena up to the elaborately sophisticated processes that are almost certainly required to produce the complex molecules, such as replicatable RNA-like oligonucleotides, needed for a Darwinian form of selection to start operating. The model makes the following assumptions: (i) that a small number of micromolecular substances were present at high concentration; (ii) that a random assembly mechanism combined these molecules into a variety of multimeric compounds comprising a wide repertoire of rudimentary catalytic activities; and (iii) that a lytic system capable of breaking down the assembled products existed. The model assumes further that catalysts supplied with substrates were significantly protected against breakdown. It is shown that, by granting these assumptions, an increasingly complex network of metabolic pathways would progressively be established. At the same time, the catalysts concerned would accumulate selectively to become choice substrates for elongation and other modifications that could enhance their efficiency, as well as their survival. Chemical evolution would thus proceed by a dual process of metabolic extension and catalytic innovation. Such a process should be largely deterministic and predictable from initial conditions. PMID:3479788

  7. Sulfide toxicity: Mechanical ventilation and hypotension determine survival rate and brain necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldelli, R.J.; Green, F.H.Y.; Auer, R.N. )

    1993-09-01

    Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide is one of the leading causes of sudden death in the workplace, especially in the oil and gas industry. High-dose exposure causes immediate neurogenic apnea and death; lower doses cause [open quotes]knockdown[close quotes] (transient loss of consciousness, with apnea). Because permanent neurological sequelae have been reported, the authors sought to determine whether sulfide can directly kill central nervous system neurons. Ventilated and unventilated rats were studied to allow administration of higher doses of sulfide and to facilitate physiological monitoring. It was extremely difficult to produce cerebral necrosis with sulfide. Only one of eight surviving unventilated rats given high-dose sulfide (a dose that was lethal in [ge]50% of animals) showed cerebral necrosis. Mechanical ventilation shifted the dose that was lethal in 50% of the animals to 190 mg/kg from 94 mg/kg in the unventilated rats. Sulfide was found to potently depress blood pressure. Cerebral necrosis was absent in the ventilated rats (n = 11), except in one rat that showed profound and sustained hypotension to [le]35 Torr. Electroencephalogram activity ceased during exposure but recovered when the animals regained consciousness. The authors conclude that very-high-dose sulfide is incapable of producing cerebral necrosis by a direct histotoxic effect. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Metabolic mechanisms for anoxia tolerance and freezing survival in the intertidal gastropod, Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Lant, Benjamin; Anozie, Obiajulu O; Storey, Janet M

    2013-08-01

    The gastropod mollusk, Littorina littorea L., is a common inhabitant of the intertidal zone along rocky coastlines of the north Atlantic. This species has well-developed anoxia tolerance and freeze tolerance and is extensively used as a model for exploring the biochemical adaptations that support these tolerances as well as for toxicological studies aimed at identifying effective biomarkers of aquatic pollution. This article highlights our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in anaerobiosis and freezing survival of periwinkles, particularly with respect to anoxia-induced metabolic rate depression. Analysis of foot muscle and hepatopancreas metabolism includes anoxia-responsive changes in enzyme regulation, signal transduction, gene expression, post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA, control of translation, and cytoprotective strategies including chaperones and antioxidant defenses. New studies describe the regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by reversible protein phosphorylation, the role of microRNAs in suppressing mRNA translation in the hypometabolic state, modulation of glutathione S-transferase isozyme patterns, and the regulation of the unfolded protein response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vitamin-induced intracellular electrons are the mechanism for their well-known beneficial effects: a review.

    PubMed

    Getoff, Nikola

    2013-04-01

    A new conception of the action mechanisms of vitamins and some other compounds without a vitamin status is briefly presented. It is based on results obtained through pulse radiolysis, molecular radiation biological investigations, and in vitro studies. The data clearly show that antioxidant vitamins (C, E, β-carotene) and B vitamins and related compounds possess the capability to emit "solvated electrons" in aqueous solutions or polar media. In consequence, the well-known vitamin effects are attributed to the action of the emitted solvated electrons and the resulting vitamin free radicals rather than the vitamin molecules per se, as generally accepted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: impact of pulmonary follow-up and mechanical ventilation on survival. A study of 114 cases.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán-López, Pilar; Valiño-López, Paz; Ricoy-Gabaldón, Jorge; Verea-Hernando, Héctor

    2014-12-01

    To study the impact of ventilatory management and treatment on the survival of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Retrospective analysis of 114 consecutive patients admitted to a general hospital, evaluating demographic data, type of presentation, clinical management, treatment with mechanical ventilation and survival. descriptive and Kaplan-Meier estimator. Sixty four patients presented initial bulbar involvement. Overall mean survival after diagnosis was 28.0 months (95%CI, 21.1-34.8). Seventy patients were referred to the pulmonary specialist (61.4%) and 43 received non-invasive ventilation (NIV) at 12.7 months (median) after diagnosis. Thirty seven patients continued to receive NIV with no subsequent invasive ventilation. The mean survival of these patients was 23.3 months (95%CI, 16.7-28.8), higher in those without bulbar involvement, although below the range of significance. Survival in the 26 patients receiving programmed NIV was higher than in the 11 patients in whom this was indicated without prior pulmonary assessment (considered following diagnosis, P<.012, and in accordance with the start of ventilation, P<.004). A total of 7 patients were treated invasively; mean survival in this group was 72 months (95%CI, 14.36-129.6), median 49.6±17.5 (95%CI, 15.3-83.8), and despite the difficulties involved in home care, acceptance and tolerance was acceptable. Long-term mechanical ventilation prolongs survival in ALS. Programmed pulmonary assessment has a positive impact on survival of ALS patients and is key to the multidisciplinary management of this disease. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanisms of spinal motoneurons survival in rats under simulated hypogravity on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, R. R.; Mishagina, E. A.; Tyapkina, O. V.; Shajmardanova, G. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Nikolskij, E. E.; Grigorjev, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    It was previously shown that different cell types in vivo and in vitro may die via apoptosis under weightlessness conditions in space as well as in simulated hypogravity on the Earth. We assessed survivability of spinal motoneurons of rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Following weight bearing, unloading the total protein content in lumbar spinal cord is dropped by 21%. The electrophysiological studies of m. gastrocnemius revealed an elevated motoneurons' reflex excitability and conduction disturbances in the sciatic nerve axons. The number of myelinated fibers in the ventral root of experimental animals was insignificantly increased by 35-day of antiorthostatic hind limb suspension, although the retrograde axonal transport was significantly decreased during the first week of simulated hypogravity. The results of the immunohistochemical assay with antibodies against proapoptotic protein caspase 9 and cytotoxicity marker neuron specific nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the TUNEL staining did not reveal any signs of apoptosis in motoneurons of suspended and control animals. To examine the possible adaptation mechanisms activated in motoneurons in response to simulated hypogravity we investigated immunoexpression of Hsp25 and Hsp70 in lumbar spinal cord of the rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical reaction with anti-Hsp25 antibodies revealed differential staining of motoneurons in intact and experimental animals. The density of immunoprecipitate with anti-Hsp25 antibodies was substantially higher in motoneurons of the 35-day suspended than control rats and the more intensive precipitate in this reaction was observed in motoneuron neuritis. Quantitative analysis of Hsp25 expression demonstrated an increase in the Hsp25 level by 95% in experimental rats compared to the control. The immunoexpression of Hsp70 found no qualitative and quantitative differences in control and experimental

  12. Inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFKFB3) induces autophagy as a survival mechanism.

    PubMed

    Klarer, Alden C; O'Neal, Julie; Imbert-Fernandez, Yoannis; Clem, Amy; Ellis, Steve R; Clark, Jennifer; Clem, Brian; Chesney, Jason; Telang, Sucheta

    2014-01-23

    Unlike glycolytic enzymes that directly catabolize glucose to pyruvate, the family of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatases (PFKFBs) control the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to and from fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, a key regulator of the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1). One family member, PFKFB3, has been shown to be highly expressed and activated in human cancer cells, and derivatives of a PFKFB3 inhibitor, 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3PO), are currently being developed in clinical trials. However, the effectiveness of drugs such as 3PO that target energetic pathways is limited by survival pathways that can be activated by reduced ATP and nutrient uptake. One such pathway is the process of cellular self-catabolism termed autophagy. We hypothesized that the functional glucose starvation induced by inhibition of PFKFB3 in tumor cells would induce autophagy as a pro-survival mechanism and that inhibitors of autophagy could increase the anti-tumor effects of PFKFB3 inhibitors. We found that selective inhibition of PFKFB3 with either siRNA transfection or 3PO in HCT-116 colon adenocarcinoma cells caused a marked decrease in glucose uptake simultaneously with an increase in autophagy based on LC3-II and p62 protein expression, acridine orange fluorescence of acidic vacuoles and electron microscopic detection of autophagosomes. The induction of autophagy caused by PFKFB3 inhibition required an increase in reactive oxygen species since N-acetyl-cysteine blocked both the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and the increase in acridine orange fluorescence in acidic vesicles after exposure of HCT-116 cells to 3PO. We speculated that the induction of autophagy might protect cells from the pro-apoptotic effects of 3PO and found that agents that disrupt autophagy, including chloroquine, increased 3PO-induced apoptosis as measured by double staining with Annexin V and propidium iodide in both HCT-116 cells and Lewis lung

  13. Nitric oxide regulates cardiac intracellular Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ by modulating Na/K ATPase via PKCε and phospholemman-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Davor; Hall, Andrew R; Kennington, Erika J; Aughton, Karen; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Fuller, William; Despa, Sanda; Bers, Donald M; Shattock, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    In the heart, Na/K-ATPase regulates intracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+) (via NCX), thereby preventing Na(+) and Ca(2+) overload and arrhythmias. Here, we test the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) regulates cardiac intracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+) and investigate mechanisms and physiological consequences involved. Effects of both exogenous NO (via NO-donors) and endogenously synthesized NO (via field-stimulation of ventricular myocytes) were assessed in this study. Field stimulation of rat ventricular myocytes significantly increased endogenous NO (18 ± 2 μM), PKCε activation (82 ± 12%), phospholemman phosphorylation (at Ser-63 and Ser-68) and Na/K-ATPase activity (measured by DAF-FM dye, western-blotting and biochemical assay, respectively; p<0.05, n=6) and all were abolished by Ca(2+)-chelation (EGTA 10mM) or NOS inhibition l-NAME (1mM). Exogenously added NO (spermine-NONO-ate) stimulated Na/K-ATPase (EC50=3.8 μM; n=6/grp), via decrease in Km, in PLM(WT) but not PLM(KO) or PLM(3SA) myocytes (where phospholemman cannot be phosphorylated) as measured by whole-cell perforated-patch clamp. Field-stimulation with l-NAME or PKC-inhibitor (2 μM Bis) resulted in elevated intracellular Na(+) (22 ± 1.5 and 24 ± 2 respectively, vs. 14 ± 0.6mM in controls) in SBFI-AM-loaded rat myocytes. Arrhythmia incidence was significantly increased in rat hearts paced in the presence of l-NAME (and this was reversed by l-arginine), as well as in PLM(3SA) mouse hearts but not PLM(WT) and PLM(KO). We provide physiological and biochemical evidence for a novel regulatory pathway whereby NO activates Na/K-ATPase via phospholemman phosphorylation and thereby limits Na(+) and Ca(2+) overload and arrhythmias. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes".

  14. Soluble uric acid increases intracellular calcium through an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism in immortalized human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Albertoni, Guilherme; Maquigussa, Edgar; Pessoa, Edson; Barreto, Jose Augusto; Borges, Fernanda; Schor, Nestor

    2010-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is associated with increases in cardiovascular risk and renal disease. Mesangial cells regulate glomerular filtration rates through the release of hormones and vasoactive substances. This study evaluates the signaling pathway of uric acid (UA) in immortalized human mesangial cells (ihMCs). To evaluate cell proliferation, ihMCs were exposed to UA (6-10 mg/dL) for 24-144 h. In further experiments, ihMCs were treated with UA (6-10 mg/dL) for 12 and 24 h simultaneously with losartan (10(-7) mmol/L). Angiotensin II (AII) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were assessed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Pre-pro-ET mRNA was evaluated by the real-time PCR technique. It was observed that soluble UA (8 and 10 mg/dL) stimulated cellular proliferation. UA (10 mg/dL) for 12 h significantly increased AII protein synthesis and ET-1 expression and protein production was increased after 24 h. Furthermore, UA increased [Ca(2+)](i), and this effect was significantly blocked when ihMCs were preincubated with losartan. Our results suggested that UA triggers reactions including AII and ET-1 production in mesangial cells. In addition, UA can potentially affect glomerular function due to UA-induced proliferation and contraction of mesangial cells. The latter mechanism could be related to the long-term effects of UA on renal function and chronic kidney disease.

  15. Insight concerning the mechanism of therapeutic ultrasound facilitating gene delivery: increasing cell membrane permeability or interfering with intracellular pathways?

    PubMed

    Duvshani-Eshet, Maayan; Haber, Tom; Machluf, Marcelle

    2014-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery methods encounter major barriers in plasmid DNA (pDNA) trafficking toward the nucleus. The present study aims to understand the role and contribution of therapeutic ultrasound (TUS), if any, in pDNA trafficking in primary cells such as fibroblasts and cell lines (e.g., baby hamster kidney [BHK]) during the transfection process. Using compounds that alter the endocytic pathways and the cytoskeletal network, we show that after TUS application, pDNA trafficking in the cytoplasm is not mediated by endocytosis or by the cytoskeletal network. Transfection studies and confocal analyses showed that the actin fibers impeded TUS-mediated transfection in BHK cells, but not in fibroblasts. Flow cytometric analyses indicated that pDNA uptake by cells occurs primarily when the pDNA is added before and not after TUS application. Taken together, these results suggest that TUS by itself operates as a mechanical force driving the pDNA through the cell membrane, traversing the cytoplasmic network and into the nucleus.

  16. Intracellular Organisms as Placental Invaders

    PubMed Central

    Vigliani, Marguerite B.; Bakardjiev, Anna I.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present a novel model for how the human placenta might get infected via the hematogenous route. We present a list of diverse placental pathogens, like Listeria monocytogenes or Cytomegalovirus, which are familiar to most obstetricians, but others, like Salmonella typhi, have only been reported in case studies or small case series. Remarkably, all of these organisms on this list are either obligate or facultative intracellular organisms. These pathogens are able to enter and survive inside host immune cells for at least a portion of their life cycle. We suggest that many blood-borne pathogens might arrive at the placenta via transportation inside of maternal leukocytes that enter the decidua in early pregnancy. We discuss mechanisms by which extravillous trophoblasts could get infected in the decidua and spread infection to other layers in the placenta. We hope to raise awareness among OB/GYN clinicians that organisms not typically associated with the TORCH list might cause placental infections and pregnancy complications. PMID:27695204

  17. Gateways for the intracellular access of nanocarriers: a review of receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanisms and of strategies in receptor targeting.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Noha M; Tirelli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    The last 10 years have seen a dramatic growth in understanding and controlling how complex, drug-loaded (nano)structures, as well as pathogens, or biopharmaceuticals can gather access to the cytoplasm, which is a key step to increasing the effectiveness of their action. The review offers an updated overview of the current knowledge of endocytic processes; furthermore, the cell surface receptors most commonly used in drug delivery are here discussed on the basis of their reported internalization mechanisms, with examples of their use as nanocarrier targets taken from the most recent scientific literature. Knowledge of molecular biology details is increasingly necessary for a rational design of drug delivery systems. Here, the aim is to provide the reader with an attempt to link a mechanistic knowledge of endocytic mechanisms with the identification of appropriate targets (internalization receptors) for nanocarriers. Much advance is still needed to create a complete and coherent biological picture of endocytosis, but current knowledge already allows individuation of a good number of targetable groups for a predetermined intracellular fate of nanocarriers.

  18. Exploring Anti-Bacterial Compounds against Intracellular Legionella

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Christopher F.; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Berschl, Kathrin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Hedberg, Christian; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an ‘accidental’ human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target. PMID:24058631

  19. Review: Intracardiac intracellular angiotensin system in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Yong, Qian Chen; Thomas, Candice M.

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has mainly been categorized as a circulating and a local tissue RAS. A new component of the local system, known as the intracellular RAS, has recently been described. The intracellular RAS is defined as synthesis and action of ANG II intracellularly. This RAS appears to differ from the circulating and the local RAS, in terms of components and the mechanism of action. These differences may alter treatment strategies that target the RAS in several pathological conditions. Recent work from our laboratory has demonstrated significant upregulation of the cardiac, intracellular RAS in diabetes, which is associated with cardiac dysfunction. Here, we have reviewed evidence supporting an intracellular RAS in different cell types, ANG II's actions in cardiac cells, and its mechanism of action, focusing on the intracellular cardiac RAS in diabetes. We have discussed the significance of an intracellular RAS in cardiac pathophysiology and implications for potential therapies. PMID:22170614

  20. Mechanism of nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation: refilling of intracellular stores by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase and inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R A; Weisbrod, R M; Gericke, M; Yaghoubi, M; Bierl, C; Bolotina, V M

    1999-02-05

    The precise mechanisms by which nitric oxide (NO) decreases free [Ca2+]i, inhibits Ca2+ influx, and relaxes vascular smooth muscle are poorly understood. In rabbit and mouse aorta, agonist-induced contractions and increases in [Ca2+]i were resistant to nifedipine, suggesting Ca2+ entry through non-L-type Ca2+ channels. Relaxations to NO were inhibited by thapsigargin (TG) or cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) indicating the involvement of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA). Studies of the effect of NO on [Ca2+]i and the rate of Mn2+ influx with fura-2 fluorometry in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture were designed to test how SERCA is involved in mediating the response to NO. When cells were stimulated with angiotensin II (AII), NO accelerated the removal of Ca2+ from the cytoplasm, decreased [Ca2+]i, and inhibited Ca2+ and Mn2+ influx. Inhibition of SERCA abolished all the effects of NO. In contrast, inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+exchanger or the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase had no influence on the ability of NO to decrease [Ca2+]i. NO maximally decreased [Ca2+]i within 5 s, whereas significant inhibition of AII-induced Ca2+ and Mn2+ influx required more than 15 s. The inhibition of cation influx strictly depended on [Ca2+]o and functional SERCA, suggesting that during the delay before NO inhibits Ca2+ influx, the influx of Ca2+ and the uptake into intracellular stores are required. In the absence of [Ca2+]o, NO diminished the AII-induced [Ca2+]i transient by a SERCA-dependent mechanism and increased the amount of Ca2+ in the stores subsequently released by ionomycin. The present study indicates that the initial rapid decrease in [Ca2+]i caused by NO in vascular smooth muscle is accounted for by the uptake of Ca2+ by SERCA into intracellular stores. It is proposed that the refilling of the stores inhibits store-operated Ca2+ influx through non-L-type Ca2+ conducting ion channels and that this maintains the decrease in [Ca2+]i and NO-induced relaxation.

  1. Mechanism of riboflavin uptake by cultured human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells: possible regulation by an intracellular Ca2+-calmodulin-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Said, Hamid M; Wang, Shuling; Ma, Thomas Y

    2005-07-15

    In mammalian cells (including those of the ocular system), the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) assumes an essential role in a variety of metabolic reactions and is critical for normal cellular functions, growth and development. Cells of the human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) play an important role in providing a sufficient supply of RF to the retina, but nothing is known about the mechanism of the vitamin uptake by these cells and its regulation. Our aim in the present study was to address this issue using the hRPE ARPE-19 cells as the retinal epithelial model. Our results show RF uptake in the hRPE to be: (1) energy and temperature dependent and occurring without metabolic alteration in the transported substrate, (2) pH but not Na+ dependent, (3) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 80 +/- 14 nM, (4) trans-stimulated by unlabelled RF and its structural analogue lumiflavine, (5) cis-inhibited by the RF structural analogues lumiflavine and lumichrome but not by unrelated compounds, and (6) inhibited by the anion transport inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS) as well as by the Na+ -H+ exchange inhibitor amiloride and the sulfhydryl group inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (p-CMPS). Maintaining the hRPE cells in a RF-deficient medium led to a specific and significant up-regulation in RF uptake which was mediated via changes in the number and affinity of the RF uptake carriers. While modulating the activities of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)-, protein kinase C (PKC)-, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK)-, and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pathways were found to have no role in regulating RF uptake, a role for the Ca2+ -calmodulin-mediated pathway was observed. These studies demonstrate for the first time the involvement of a specialized carrier-mediated mechanism for RF uptake by hRPE cells and show that the process is

  2. Immune oppression array elucidating immune escape and survival mechanisms in uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Fang; Huang, Qi-Ming; Hu, Dan-Ning; Jonas, Jost B.; Wei, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the genetic profile of primary uveal melanoma (UM) as compared to UM in immune escape. METHODS Dendritic cells (DC) loaded with lysates of UM cells of high metastatic potential were used to stimulate CTLs(CTLs). When CTLs co-cultured with the UM cells, most UM cells could be eliminated. Survival UM cells grew slowly and were considered to be survival variants and examined by a microarray analysis. These differential genes were analyzed further with Venn Diagrams and functions related to immune escape. We additionally examined transcriptional changes of manually selected survival variants of UM cells and of clinical UM samples by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and analyzed the correlation of these expressions and patients' survival. RESULTS Gene expression analyses revealed a marked up-regulation of SLAMF7 and CCL22 and a significant down-regulation of KRT10, FXYD3 and ABCC2. The expression of these genes in the relapsed UM was significantly greater than those in primary UM. UM patients with overexpression of these genes had a shorter survival period as compared with those of their underexpression. CONCLUSION Gene expression, in particular of SLAMF7, CCL22, KRT10, FXYD3 and ABCC2, differed between primary UM cells and survival variants of UM cells. PMID:28003967

  3. Intracellular Oscillations and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beta, Carsten; Kruse, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic processes in living cells are highly organized in space and time. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms of spatiotemporal pattern formation remains one of the outstanding challenges at the interface between physics and biology. A fundamental recurrent pattern found in many different cell types is that of self-sustained oscillations. They are involved in a wide range of cellular functions, including second messenger signaling, gene expression, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we review recent developments in the field of cellular oscillations and focus on cases where concepts from physics have been instrumental for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We consider biochemical and genetic oscillators as well as oscillations that arise from chemo-mechanical coupling. Finally, we highlight recent studies of intracellular waves that have increasingly moved into the focus of this research field.

  4. Survival and ecological fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens genetically engineered with dual biocontrol mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bainton, N J; Lynch, J M; Naseby, D; Way, J A

    2004-10-01

    The antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl) is produced by a range of naturally occurring fluorescent pseudomonads. One isolate, Pseudomonas fluorescens F113, protects pea plants from the pathogenic fungus Pythium ultimum by reducing the number of pathogenic lesions on plant roots, but with a concurrent reduction in the emergence of plants such as pea. The genes responsible for Phl production have been shown to be functionally conserved between the wild-type (wt) P. fluorescens strains F113 and Q2-87. In this study the genes from F113 were isolated using an optimized long PCR method and a 6.7-kb gene cluster inserted into the chromosome of the non-Phl-producing P. fluorescens strain SBW25 EeZY6KX. This strain is a lacZY, km(R) marked derivative of the wt SBW25 which effects biological control against the plant pathogen Pythium ultimum by competitive exclusion as a result of its strong rhizosphere-colonizing ability. We describe here the integration of the Phl antifungal and competitive exclusion mechanisms into a single strain, and the impact this has on survival and plant emergence in microcosms. The insertion of the Phl biosynthetic genes from the F113 into the SBW25 chromosome gave a Phl-producing transformant (strain Pa21) able to suppress P. ultimum through antibiotic production. The growth of Pa21 was not reduced in flask culture at 20 degrees C compared with its parent strain. When inoculated on pea seedlings, the strain containing the Phl operon behaved similarly to the SBW25 EeZY6KX parent but did not show the tendency of the wt Phl producer F113 to cause lower pea seed emergence. Pea roots inoculated with SBW25 EeZY6KX have significantly lower indigenous populations than with F113 and the control. This is indicative of this strain's strong colonising presence. Pa21, the Phl-modified strain, is able to exclude the resident population from roots to the same degree as the SBW25 EeZY6KX from which it is derived. This suggests that it has maintained its

  5. Proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of Mycena dendrobii promoting transplantation survival and growth of tissue culture seedlings of Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Xu, X B; Ma, X Y; Lei, H H; Song, H M; Ying, Q C; Xu, M J; Liu, S B; Wang, H Z

    2015-06-01

    Dendrobium officinale is an important traditional Chinese medicinal herb. Its seedlings generally show low survival and growth when transferred from in vitro tissue culture to a greenhouse or field environment. In this study, the effect of Mycena dendrobii on the survival and growth of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings and the mechanisms involved was explored. Mycena dendrobii were applied underneath the roots of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings. The seedling survival and growth were analysed. The root proteins induced by M. dendrobii were identified using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF-MS). Mycena dendrobii treatment significantly enhanced survival and growth of D. officinale seedlings. Forty-one proteins induced by M. dendrobii were identified. Among them, 10 were involved in defence and stress response, two were involved in the formation of root or mycorrhizae, and three were related to the biosynthesis of bioactive constituents. These results suggest that enhancing stress tolerance and promoting new root formation induced by M. dendrobii may improve the survival and growth of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings. This study provides a foundation for future use of M. dendrobii in the large-scale cultivation of Dendrobiums. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Intracellularly-retained decorin lacking the C-terminal ear repeat causes ER stress: a cell-based etiological mechanism for congenital stromal corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shoujun; Sun, Mei; Iozzo, Renato V; Kao, Winston W-Y; Birk, David E

    2013-07-01

    Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP), is involved in the pathophysiology of human congenital stromal corneal dystrophy (CSCD). This disease is characterized by corneal opacities and vision impairment. In reported cases, the human gene encoding decorin contains point mutations in exon 10, generating a truncated form of decorin lacking the C-terminal 33 amino acid residues. We have previously described a transgenic mouse model carrying a similar mutation in the decorin gene that leads to an ocular phenotype characterized by corneal opacities identical to CSCD in humans. We have also identified abnormal synthesis and secretion of various SLRPs in mutant mouse corneas. In the present study, we found that mutant C-terminal truncated decorin was retained in the cytoplasm of mouse keratocytes in vivo and of transfected human embryonic kidney cells. This resulted in endoplasmic reticulum stress and an unfolded protein response. Thus, we propose a novel cell-based mechanism underlying CSCD in which a truncated SLRP protein core is retained intracellularly, its accumulation triggering endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in abnormal SLRP synthesis and secretion, which ultimately affects stromal structure and corneal transparency.

  7. A novel domain-by-domain survivable mechanism in multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Xingwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Chongshan; Li, Hongming; Wang, Hongpeng; Liu, Xin

    2009-03-01

    In multi-domain wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical networks, the inter-domain routing is a challenge since each single-domain cannot view the full network topology. At the same time, survivability is also an important issue in optical networks since the failures of fiber links or network nodes may lead to a lot of traffic being blocked. In this paper, we study the survivability in multi-domain WDM optical networks, and propose a new survivable mechanism called load balanced domain-by-domain routing (LBDDR). In LBDDR, in order to obtain the efficient inter-domain survivable routes, we present the domain-by-domain routing (DDR) method which can find the intra-domain sub-working path and sub-backup path in each single-domain to form the inter-domain working path and backup path for each demand. In order to reduce the blocking probability, we present the load balanced routing method which can encourage the traffic to be uniformly distributed on the links with more free wavelengths. Simulation results show that, compared with conventional mechanism, LBDDR can obtain better performances.

  8. Host cell interactions of outer membrane vesicle-associated virulence factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: Intracellular delivery, trafficking and mechanisms of cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Greune, Lilo; Jarosch, Kevin-André; Steil, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlan; He, Xiaohua; Lloubes, Roland; Fruth, Angelika; Kim, Kwang Sik; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are important tools in bacterial virulence but their role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157, the leading cause of life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome, is poorly understood. Using proteomics, electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, and bioassays, we investigated OMVs secreted by EHEC O157 clinical isolates for virulence factors cargoes, interactions with pathogenetically relevant human cells, and mechanisms of cell injury. We demonstrate that O157 OMVs carry a cocktail of key virulence factors of EHEC O157 including Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a), cytolethal distending toxin V (CdtV), EHEC hemolysin, and flagellin. The toxins are internalized by cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and differentially separate from vesicles during intracellular trafficking. Stx2a and CdtV-B, the DNase-like CdtV subunit, separate from OMVs in early endosomes. Stx2a is trafficked, in association with its receptor globotriaosylceramide within detergent-resistant membranes, to the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum from where the catalytic Stx2a A1 fragment is translocated to the cytosol. CdtV-B is, after its retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, translocated to the nucleus to reach DNA. CdtV-A and CdtV-C subunits remain OMV-associated and are sorted with OMVs to lysosomes. EHEC hemolysin separates from OMVs in lysosomes and targets mitochondria. The OMV-delivered CdtV-B causes cellular DNA damage, which activates DNA damage responses leading to G2 cell cycle arrest. The arrested cells ultimately die of apoptosis induced by Stx2a and CdtV via caspase-9 activation. By demonstrating that naturally secreted EHEC O157 OMVs carry and deliver into cells a cocktail of biologically active virulence factors, thereby causing cell death, and by performing first comprehensive analysis of intracellular trafficking of OMVs and OMV-delivered virulence factors

  9. Host cell interactions of outer membrane vesicle-associated virulence factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: Intracellular delivery, trafficking and mechanisms of cell injury.

    PubMed

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Rüter, Christian; Bauwens, Andreas; Greune, Lilo; Jarosch, Kevin-André; Steil, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlan; He, Xiaohua; Lloubes, Roland; Fruth, Angelika; Kim, Kwang Sik; Schmidt, M Alexander; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2017-02-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are important tools in bacterial virulence but their role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157, the leading cause of life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome, is poorly understood. Using proteomics, electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, and bioassays, we investigated OMVs secreted by EHEC O157 clinical isolates for virulence factors cargoes, interactions with pathogenetically relevant human cells, and mechanisms of cell injury. We demonstrate that O157 OMVs carry a cocktail of key virulence factors of EHEC O157 including Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a), cytolethal distending toxin V (CdtV), EHEC hemolysin, and flagellin. The toxins are internalized by cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and differentially separate from vesicles during intracellular trafficking. Stx2a and CdtV-B, the DNase-like CdtV subunit, separate from OMVs in early endosomes. Stx2a is trafficked, in association with its receptor globotriaosylceramide within detergent-resistant membranes, to the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum from where the catalytic Stx2a A1 fragment is translocated to the cytosol. CdtV-B is, after its retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, translocated to the nucleus to reach DNA. CdtV-A and CdtV-C subunits remain OMV-associated and are sorted with OMVs to lysosomes. EHEC hemolysin separates from OMVs in lysosomes and targets mitochondria. The OMV-delivered CdtV-B causes cellular DNA damage, which activates DNA damage responses leading to G2 cell cycle arrest. The arrested cells ultimately die of apoptosis induced by Stx2a and CdtV via caspase-9 activation. By demonstrating that naturally secreted EHEC O157 OMVs carry and deliver into cells a cocktail of biologically active virulence factors, thereby causing cell death, and by performing first comprehensive analysis of intracellular trafficking of OMVs and OMV-delivered virulence factors

  10. Nanomolar concentrations of inorganic lead increase Ca2+ efflux and decrease intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentrations in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by a calmodulin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2000-06-01

    Inorganic lead (Pb2+) activates calmodulin, which in turn may stimulate many other cellular processes. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase is a calmodulin-stimulated enzyme that plays the major role in regulating the "resting" intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentration, [Ca2+]i. We hypothesized that exposing neurons to low levels of Pb2+ would cause Pb2+ to enter the cytoplasm, and that intracellular Pb2+, by activating calmodulin, would stimulate plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase activity, thereby increasing Ca2+ extrusion and reducing [Ca2+]i. We used the ratiometric Ca2+ indicator fura-2 to estimate changes in [Ca2+]i. In vitro calibrations of fura-2 with solutions of defined free Ca2+ and free Pb2+ concentrations showed that, at free Ca2+ concentrations from 10 nM to 1000 nM, adding Pb2+ caused either no significant change in the F340/F380 ratio (free Pb2+ concentrations from 100 fM to 1 pM) or increased the F340/F380 ratio (free Pb2+ concentrations from 5 to 50 pM). Therefore, fura-2 should be suitable for estimating Pb2+-induced decreases in [Ca2+]i, but not increases in [Ca2+]i. We exposed cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons to 100 nM Pb2+ for periods from 1 hour to 2 days and measured the F340/F380 ratio; the ratio decreased significantly by 9 to 16% at all time points, indicating that Pb2+ exposure decreased [Ca2+]i. In neurons loaded with 45Ca, Pb2+ exposure increased Ca2+ efflux for at least two hours; by 24 hours, Ca2+ efflux returned to control levels. Influx of 45Ca was not altered by Pb2+ exposure. Low concentrations (250 nM) of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium had no effect on either 45Ca efflux or on the F340/F380 ratio in fura-loaded control neurons, but completely eliminated the increase in 45Ca efflux and decrease in F340/F380 ratio in Pb2+-exposed neurons. Zaldoride, another calmodulin inhibitor, also eliminated the decrease in F340/F380 ratio in Pb2+-exposed neurons. We conclude that Pb2+ exposure decreases [Ca2+]i and increases Ca2+ efflux

  11. Exploring mechanisms of survival in rainbow trout selectively bred for increased resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A challenge for selective breeding programs is to better understand how artificial selection alters host pathophysiologic and immunologic response following pathogen exposure. The National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture is exploring this in rainbow trout bred for increased survival (ARS...

  12. Mechanisms and mediation in survival analysis: towards an integrated analytical framework.

    PubMed

    Pratschke, Jonathan; Haase, Trutz; Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda; de Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Johnson, Howard

    2016-02-29

    A wide-ranging debate has taken place in recent years on mediation analysis and causal modelling, raising profound theoretical, philosophical and methodological questions. The authors build on the results of these discussions to work towards an integrated approach to the analysis of research questions that situate survival outcomes in relation to complex causal pathways with multiple mediators. The background to this contribution is the increasingly urgent need for policy-relevant research on the nature of inequalities in health and healthcare. The authors begin by summarising debates on causal inference, mediated effects and statistical models, showing that these three strands of research have powerful synergies. They review a range of approaches which seek to extend existing survival models to obtain valid estimates of mediation effects. They then argue for an alternative strategy, which involves integrating survival outcomes within Structural Equation Models via the discrete-time survival model. This approach can provide an integrated framework for studying mediation effects in relation to survival outcomes, an issue of great relevance in applied health research. The authors provide an example of how these techniques can be used to explore whether the social class position of patients has a significant indirect effect on the hazard of death from colon cancer. The results suggest that the indirect effects of social class on survival are substantial and negative (-0.23 overall). In addition to the substantial direct effect of this variable (-0.60), its indirect effects account for more than one quarter of the total effect. The two main pathways for this indirect effect, via emergency admission (-0.12), on the one hand, and hospital caseload, on the other, (-0.10) are of similar size. The discrete-time survival model provides an attractive way of integrating time-to-event data within the field of Structural Equation Modelling. The authors demonstrate the efficacy

  13. Bioelectric patterning during oogenesis: stage-specific distribution of membrane potentials, intracellular pH and ion-transport mechanisms in Drosophila ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Julia; Bohrmann, Johannes

    2015-01-16

    Bioelectric phenomena have been found to exert influence on various developmental and regenerative processes. Little is known about their possible functions and the cellular mechanisms by which they might act during Drosophila oogenesis. In developing follicles, characteristic extracellular current patterns and membrane-potential changes in oocyte and nurse cells have been observed that partly depend on the exchange of protons, potassium ions and sodium ions. These bioelectric properties have been supposed to be related to various processes during oogenesis, e. g. pH-regulation, osmoregulation, cell communication, cell migration, cell proliferation, cell death, vitellogenesis and follicle growth. Analysing in detail the spatial distribution and activity of the relevant ion-transport mechanisms is expected to elucidate the roles that bioelectric phenomena play during oogenesis. To obtain an overview of bioelectric patterning along the longitudinal and transversal axes of the developing follicle, the spatial distributions of membrane potentials (Vmem), intracellular pH (pHi) and various membrane-channel proteins were studied systematically using fluorescent indicators, fluorescent inhibitors and antisera. During mid-vitellogenic stages 9 to 10B, characteristic, stage-specific Vmem-patterns in the follicle-cell epithelium as well as anteroposterior pHi-gradients in follicle cells and nurse cells were observed. Corresponding distribution patterns of proton pumps (V-ATPases), voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+)-channels, amiloride-sensitive Na(+)-channels and Na(+),H(+)-exchangers (NHE) and gap-junction proteins (innexin 3) were detected. In particular, six morphologically distinguishable follicle-cell types are characterized on the bioelectric level by differences concerning Vmem and pHi as well as specific compositions of ion channels and carriers. Striking similarities between Vmem-patterns and activity patterns of voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels were found, suggesting

  14. Studies on the mechanism of long term survival of Taenia taeniaeformis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwa, B H; Liew, F Y

    1978-03-01

    An attempt was made to determine if blocking antibody is involved in protecting cysticerci of Taenia taeniaeformis against a host immune response. Immunoflourescence microscopy confirmed that host antibody is presnet on the parasite surface within the capsule. To test if the larvae can still survive after such a coat of blocking antibody is removed, the larvae were trysinised and then implanted into recipients. The results indicate that blocking antibody could be involved in the survival of 1 year old established larvae. Untrypsinised larvae were normal 14 days after implantation into control or immunised rats. Trypsinised larvae implanted in control rats were alive but showed on intense cell adherence on their surface. On the other hand, trypsinised larvae implanted into immunised rats were dead and completely encapsulated. However, experiments with 1 month old larvae were inconclusive.

  15. Metabolic rate suppression as a mechanism for surviving environmental challenge in fish.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jeffrey G

    2010-01-01

    The ability to reduce metabolic rate during exposure to environmental stress, termed metabolic rate suppression, is thought to be an important component to enhance survival in many organisms. Metabolic rate suppression can be achieved through modifications to behavior, physiology, and cellular biochemistry, all of which act to reduce whole organisms energy expenditure. This chapter will critically evaluate the use of metabolic rate suppression as a response to environmental challenge in fish using three metabolic states: aestivation, hypoxia/anoxia exposure, and diapause.

  16. Investigating intracellular persistence of Staphylococcus aureus within a murine alveolar macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Lacoma, A; Cano, V; Moranta, D; Regueiro, V; Domínguez-Villanueva, D; Laabei, M; González-Nicolau, M; Ausina, V; Prat, C; Bengoechea, J A

    2017-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a particularly difficult pathogen to eradicate from the respiratory tract. Previous studies have highlighted the intracellular capacity of S.aureus in several phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. The aim of this study was to define S.aureus interaction within a murine alveolar macrophage cell line. Cell line MH-S was infected with Newman strain. Molecular mechanisms involved in phagocytosis were explored. To assess whether S.aureus survives intracellularly quantitative (gentamicin protection assays and bacterial plating) and qualitative analysis (immunofluorescence microscopy) were performed. Bacterial colocalization with different markers of the endocytic pathway was examined to characterize its intracellular trafficking. We found that S.aureus uptake requires host actin polymerization, microtubule assembly and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling. Time course experiments showed that Newman strain was able to persist within macrophages at least until 28.5 h post infection. We observed that intracellular bacteria are located inside an acidic subcellular compartment, which co-localizes with the late endosome/lysosome markers Lamp-1, Rab7 and RILP. Colocalization counts with TMR-dextran might reflect a balance between bacterial killing and intracellular survival. This study indicates that S.aureus persists and replicates inside murine alveolar macrophages, representing a privileged niche that can potentially offer protection from antimicrobial activity and immunological host defense mechanisms.

  17. Inhibition mechanism of the intracellular transporter Ca2+-pump from sarco-endoplasmic reticulum by the antitumor agent dimethyl-celecoxib.

    PubMed

    Coca, Ramón; Soler, Fernando; Cortés-Castell, Ernesto; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Fernández-Belda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl-celecoxib is a celecoxib analog that lacks the capacity as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor and therefore the life-threatening effects but retains the antineoplastic properties. The action mechanism at the molecular level is unclear. Our in vitro assays using a sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle demonstrate that dimethyl-celecoxib inhibits Ca2+-ATPase activity and ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Celecoxib was a more potent inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase activity than dimethyl-celecoxib, as deduced from the half-maximum effect but dimethyl-celecoxib exhibited higher inhibition potency when Ca2+ transport was evaluated. Since Ca2+ transport was more sensitive to inhibition than Ca2+-ATPase activity the drugs under study caused Ca2+/Pi uncoupling. Dimethyl-celecoxib provoked greater uncoupling and the effect was dependent on drug concentration but independent of Ca2+-pump functioning. Dimethyl-celecoxib prevented Ca2+ binding by stabilizing the inactive Ca2+-free conformation of the pump. The effect on the kinetics of phosphoenzyme accumulation and the dependence of the phosphoenzyme level on dimethyl-celecoxib concentration were independent of whether or not the Ca2+-pump was exposed to the drug in the presence of Ca2+ before phosphorylation. This provided evidence of non-preferential interaction with the Ca2+-free conformation. Likewise, the decreased phosphoenzyme level in the presence of dimethyl-celecoxib that was partially relieved by increasing Ca2+ was consistent with the mentioned effect on Ca2+ binding. The kinetics of phosphoenzyme decomposition under turnover conditions was not altered by dimethyl-celecoxib. The dual effect of the drug involves Ca2+-pump inhibition and membrane permeabilization activity. The reported data can explain the cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects that have been attributed to the celecoxib analog. Ligand docking simulation predicts interaction of celecoxib and

  18. Influence of Transplant Center Procedural Volume on Survival Outcomes of Heart Transplantation for Children Bridged with Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Alex; Tumin, Dmitry; McConnell, Patrick I; Galantowicz, Mark; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2017-02-01

    Transplant center expertise improves survival after heart transplant (HTx) but it is unknown whether center expertise ameliorates risk associated with mechanical circulatory support (MCS) bridge to transplantation. This study investigated whether center HTx volume reduced survival disparities among pediatric HTx patients bridged with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), left ventricular assist device (LVAD), or no MCS. Patients ≤18 years of age receiving first-time HTx between 2005 and 2015 were identified in the United Network of Organ Sharing registry. Center volume was the total number of HTx during the study period, classified into tertiles. The primary outcome was 1 year post-transplant survival, and MCS type was interacted with center volume in Cox proportional hazards regression. The study cohort included 4131 patients, of whom 719 were supported with LVAD and 230 with ECMO. In small centers (≤133 HTx over study period), patients bridged with ECMO had increased post-transplant mortality hazard compared to patients bridged with LVAD (HR 0.29, 95% CI 0.12, 0.71; p = 0.006) and patients with no MCS (HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.19, 0.57; p < 0.001). Interactions of MCS type with medium or large center volume were not statistically significant, and the same differences in survival by MCS type were observed in medium- or large-volume centers (136-208 or ≥214 HTx over the study period). Post-HTx survival disadvantage of pediatric patients bridged with ECMO persisted regardless of transplant program volume. The role of institutional ECMO expertise outside the transplant setting for improving outcomes of ECMO bridge to HTx should be explored.

  19. Evidence that additional mechanisms to cyclic GMP mediate the decrease in intracellular calcium and relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Griswold, Mark C; Yaghoubi, Mohammad; Komalavilas, Padmini; Lincoln, Thomas M; Cohen, Richard A

    1998-01-01

    The role of cyclic GMP in the ability of nitric oxide (NO) to decrease intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i and divalent cation influx was studied in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture. In cells stimulated with angiotensin II (AII, 10−7 M), NO (10−10–10−6 M) increased cyclic GMP levels measured by radioimmunoassay and decreased [Ca2+]i and cation influx as indicated by fura-2 fluorimetry.Zaprinast (10−4 M), increased NO-stimulated levels of cyclic GMP by 3–20 fold. Although the phosphodiesterase inhibitor lowered the level of [Ca2+]i reached after administration of NO, the initial decreases in [Ca2+]i initiated by NO were not significantly different in magnitude or duration from those that occurred in the absence of zaprinast.The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo(4,3-a) quinoxallin-1-one (ODQ, 10−5 M), blocked cyclic GMP accumulation and activation of protein kinase G, as measured by back phosphorylation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor. ODQ and Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS, a protein kinase G inhibitor, decreased the effects of NO, 10−10–10−8 M, but the decrease in [Ca2+]i or cation influx caused by higher concentrations of NO (10−7–10−6 M) were unaffected. Relaxation of intact rabbit aorta rings to NO (10−7–10−5 M) also persisted in the presence of ODQ without a significant increase in cyclic GMP. Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS blocked the decreases in cation influx caused by a cell permeable cyclic GMP analog, but ODQ and/or the protein kinase G inhibitor had no significant effect on the decrease caused by NO.Although inhibitors of cyclic GMP, protein kinase G and phosphodiesterase can be shown to affect the decrease in [Ca2+]i and cation influx via protein kinase G, these studies indicate that when these mechanisms are blocked, cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms also contribute significantly to the decrease in [Ca2+]i and smooth muscle relaxation to NO. PMID:9886761

  20. Motility, Survival and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.; Schaafsma, Dedmer; Sharma, Pawan; Ghavami, Saeid; Halayko, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle has classically been of interest for its contractile response linked to bronchoconstriction. However, terminally differentiated smooth muscle cells are phenotypically plastic and have multifunctional capacity for proliferation, cellular hypertrophy, migration, and the synthesis of extracellular matrix and inflammatory mediators. These latter properties of airway smooth muscle are important in airway remodeling which is a structural alteration that compounds the impact of contractile responses on limiting airway conductance. In this overview we describe the important signaling components and the functional evidence supporting a view of smooth muscle cells at the core of fibroproliferative remodeling of hollow organs. Signal transduction components and events are summarized that control the basic cellular processes of proliferation, cell survival, apoptosis and cellular migration. We delineate known intracellular control mechanisms and suggest future areas of interest to pursue to more fully understand factors that regulate normal myocyte function and airway remodeling in obstructive lung diseases. PMID:23728975

  1. Lung protective mechanical ventilation and two year survival in patients with acute lung injury: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Dinglas, Victor D; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R; Desai, Sanjay V; Shanholtz, Carl; Brower, Roy G; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of volume limited and pressure limited (lung protective) mechanical ventilation with two year survival in patients with acute lung injury. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 13 intensive care units at four hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Participants 485 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury. Main outcome measure Two year survival after onset of acute lung injury. Results 485 patients contributed data for 6240 eligible ventilator settings, as measured twice daily (median of eight eligible ventilator settings per patient; 41% of which adhered to lung protective ventilation). Of these patients, 311 (64%) died within two years. After adjusting for the total duration of ventilation and other relevant covariates, each additional ventilator setting adherent to lung protective ventilation was associated with a 3% decrease in the risk of mortality over two years (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 0.99, P=0.002). Compared with no adherence, the estimated absolute risk reduction in two year mortality for a prototypical patient with 50% adherence to lung protective ventilation was 4.0% (0.8% to 7.2%, P=0.012) and with 100% adherence was 7.8% (1.6% to 14.0%, P=0.011). Conclusions Lung protective mechanical ventilation was associated with a substantial long term survival benefit for patients with acute lung injury. Greater use of lung protective ventilation in routine clinical practice could reduce long term mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00300248. PMID:22491953

  2. Inhibition Mechanism of the Intracellular Transporter Ca2+-Pump from Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum by the Antitumor Agent Dimethyl-Celecoxib

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Castell, Ernesto; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Fernández-Belda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl-celecoxib is a celecoxib analog that lacks the capacity as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor and therefore the life-threatening effects but retains the antineoplastic properties. The action mechanism at the molecular level is unclear. Our in vitro assays using a sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle demonstrate that dimethyl-celecoxib inhibits Ca2+-ATPase activity and ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Celecoxib was a more potent inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase activity than dimethyl-celecoxib, as deduced from the half-maximum effect but dimethyl-celecoxib exhibited higher inhibition potency when Ca2+ transport was evaluated. Since Ca2+ transport was more sensitive to inhibition than Ca2+-ATPase activity the drugs under study caused Ca2+/Pi uncoupling. Dimethyl-celecoxib provoked greater uncoupling and the effect was dependent on drug concentration but independent of Ca2+-pump functioning. Dimethyl-celecoxib prevented Ca2+ binding by stabilizing the inactive Ca2+-free conformation of the pump. The effect on the kinetics of phosphoenzyme accumulation and the dependence of the phosphoenzyme level on dimethyl-celecoxib concentration were independent of whether or not the Ca2+–pump was exposed to the drug in the presence of Ca2+ before phosphorylation. This provided evidence of non-preferential interaction with the Ca2+-free conformation. Likewise, the decreased phosphoenzyme level in the presence of dimethyl-celecoxib that was partially relieved by increasing Ca2+ was consistent with the mentioned effect on Ca2+ binding. The kinetics of phosphoenzyme decomposition under turnover conditions was not altered by dimethyl-celecoxib. The dual effect of the drug involves Ca2+-pump inhibition and membrane permeabilization activity. The reported data can explain the cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects that have been attributed to the celecoxib analog. Ligand docking simulation predicts interaction of celecoxib and

  3. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. 13C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using 3H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  4. Preservation of cell-survival mechanisms by the presenilin-1 K239N mutation may cause its milder clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sarroca, Sara; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Aresté, Cristina; Etzrodt, Martin; García de Frutos, Pablo; Gasa, Rosa; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, José Luís; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Saura, Carlos A; Lladó, Albert; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-10-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of monogenic Alzheimer's disease. We studied the functional effects of the mutation K239N, which shows incomplete penetrance at the age of 65 years and compared it with the more aggressive mutation E120G. We engineered stable cell lines expressing human PSEN1 wild type or with K239N or E120G mutations. Both mutations induced dysfunction of γ-secretase in the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor, leading to an increase in the amyloid β42/amyloid β40 ratio. Analysis of homeostatic mechanisms showed that K239N induced lower basal and hydrogen peroxide induced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species than E120G. Similarly, K239N induced lower vulnerability to apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide injury than E120G. Accordingly, the proapoptotic signaling pathways c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase maintained PSEN1-mediated negative regulation in K239N but not in E120G-bearing cells. Furthermore, the activation of the prosurvival signaling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt was lower in E120G-bearing cells. Therefore, preservation of mechanisms regulating cell responses independent of amyloid-β protein precursor processing may account for the milder phenotype induced by the PSEN1 K239N mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between volume and survival in closed intensive care units is weak and apparent only in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rafael; Altaba, Susana; Cabre, Lluis; Lacueva, Victoria; Santos, Antonio; Solsona, Jose-Felipe; Añon, Jose-Manuel; Catalan, Rosa-Maria; Gutierrez, Maria-Jose; Fernandez-Cid, Ramon; Gomez-Tello, Vicente; Curiel, Emilio; Fernandez-Mondejar, Enrique; Oliva, Joan-Carles; Tizon, Ana Isabel; Gonzalez, Javier; Monedero, Pablo; Sanchez, Manuela Garcia; de la Torre, M Victoria; Ibañez, Pedro; Frutos, Fernando; Del Nogal, Frutos; Gomez, M Jesus; Marcos, Alfredo; Vera, Paula; Serrano, Jose Manuel; Umaran, Isabel; Carrillo, Andres; Lopez-Pueyo, M-Jose; Rascado, Pedro; Balerdi, Begoña; Suberviola, Borja; Hernandez, Gonzalo

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have found an association between increased volume and increased intensive care unit (ICU) survival; however, this association might not hold true in ICUs with permanent intensivist coverage. Our objective was to determine whether ICU volume correlates with survival in the Spanish healthcare system. Post hoc analysis of a prospective study of all patients admitted to 29 ICUs during 3 months. At ICU discharge, the authors recorded demographic variables, severity score, and specific ICU treatments. Follow-up variables included ICU readmission and hospital mortality. Statistics include logistic multivariate analyses for hospital mortality according to quartiles of volume of patients. The authors studied 4,001 patients with a mean predicted risk of death of 23% (range at hospital level: 14-46%). Observed hospital mortality was 19% (range at hospital level: 11-35%), resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 0.81 (range: 0.5-1.3). Among the 1,923 patients needing mechanical ventilation, the predicted risk of death was 32% (14-60%) and observed hospital mortality was 30% (12-61%), resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 0.96 (0.5-1.7). The authors found no correlation between standardized mortality ratio and ICU volume in the entire population or in mechanically ventilated patients. Only mechanically ventilated patients in very low-volume ICUs had slightly worse outcome. In the currently studied healthcare system characterized by 24/7 intensivist coverage, the authors found wide variability in outcome among ICUs even after adjusting for severity of illness but no relationship between ICU volume and outcome. Only mechanically ventilated patients in very low-volume centers had slightly worse outcomes.

  6. An easily reversible structural change underlies mechanisms enabling desert crust cyanobacteria to survive desiccation.

    PubMed

    Bar-Eyal, Leeat; Eisenberg, Ido; Faust, Adam; Raanan, Hagai; Nevo, Reinat; Rappaport, Fabrice; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Sétif, Pierre; Thurotte, Adrien; Reich, Ziv; Kaplan, Aaron; Ohad, Itzhak; Paltiel, Yossi; Keren, Nir

    2015-10-01

    Biological desert sand crusts are the foundation of desert ecosystems, stabilizing the sands and allowing colonization by higher order organisms. The first colonizers of the desert sands are cyanobacteria. Facing the harsh conditions of the desert, these organisms must withstand frequent desiccation-hydration cycles, combined with high light intensities. Here, we characterize structural and functional modifications to the photosynthetic apparatus that enable a cyanobacterium, Leptolyngbya sp., to thrive under these conditions. Using multiple in vivo spectroscopic and imaging techniques, we identified two complementary mechanisms for dissipating absorbed energy in the desiccated state. The first mechanism involves the reorganization of the phycobilisome antenna system, increasing excitonic coupling between antenna components. This provides better energy dissipation in the antenna rather than directed exciton transfer to the reaction center. The second mechanism is driven by constriction of the thylakoid lumen which limits diffusion of plastocyanin to P700. The accumulation of P700(+) not only prevents light-induced charge separation but also efficiently quenches excitation energy. These protection mechanisms employ existing components of the photosynthetic apparatus, forming two distinct functional modes. Small changes in the structure of the thylakoid membranes are sufficient for quenching of all absorbed energy in the desiccated state, protecting the photosynthetic apparatus from photoinhibitory damage. These changes can be easily reversed upon rehydration, returning the system to its high photosynthetic quantum efficiency.

  7. Mechanisms of survival of necrotrophic fungal plant pathogens in hosts expressing the hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Mayer, A M; Staples, R C; Gil-ad, N L

    2001-09-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), elicited when resistant hosts are infected by incompatible races of biotrophic fungi, has been researched extensively. New studies on host responses to necrotrophic fungi are beginning to show that when the HR occurs in hosts colonized by necrotrophs, fungal growth is accelerated rather than retarded. We review current knowledge about how necrotrophs survive in host plants in which the HR is expressed. We discuss how necrotrophs cope with the environmental factors formed as a result of the HR. Necrotrophs contain an array of enzymes, which can help in exploiting the hostile environment in order to colonize the host and to remove or inactivate active oxygen species (AOS). Among this array of enzymes are superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidases, catalase, and perhaps laccases and polyphenol oxidases. Of these, only SOD and catalase have been studied in any detail. The precise significance of SOD and catalase in host invasion and fungal resistance is still not adequately known. The importance of different peroxidases is also still far from clear. We speculate that AOS species may trigger the response of necrotrophs to the host environment.

  8. Mechanisms of response to silver nanoparticles on Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta): survival, reproduction and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Susana I L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2013-06-15

    Silver has antimicrobial properties and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) have been some of the most widely used NPs. Information regarding their effects is still insufficient, in particular for soil dwelling organisms. The standard soil Oligochaete Enchytraeus albidus was used to study the effects of Ag in soils, using differential gene expression (microarray) and population (survival, reproduction) response to Ag-NPs (PVP coated) and AgNO₃. Results showed higher toxicity of AgNO₃ (EC₅₀<50 mg/kg) compared to toxicity of Ag-NPs (EC₅₀=225 mg/kg). Based on the biological and material identity, the difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO₃ could possibly be explained by a release of Ag(+) ions from the particles or by a slower uptake of Ag-NPs. The indications were that the responses to Ag-NPs reflect an effect of Ag ions and Ag-NPs given the extent of similar/dissimilar genes activated. The particles characterization supports this deduction as there were limited free ions measured in soil extracts, maybe related to little oxidation and/or complexation in the soil matrix. The possibility that gene differences were due to different levels of biological impact (i.e. physiological responses) should not be excluded. Testing of Ag-NPs seem to require longer exposure period to be comparable in terms of effect/risk assessment with other chemicals.

  9. Intracellular staphylococcus aureus: Live-in and let die

    PubMed Central

    Fraunholz, Martin; Sinha, Bhanu

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses a plethora of virulence factors to accommodate a diversity of niches in its human host. Aside from the classical manifestations of S. aureus-induced diseases, the pathogen also invades and survives within mammalian host cells.The survival strategies of the pathogen are as diverse as strains or host cell types used. S. aureus is able to replicate in the phagosome or freely in the cytoplasm of its host cells. It escapes the phagosome of professional and non-professional phagocytes, subverts autophagy, induces cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and pyronecrosis, and even can induce anti-apoptotic programs in phagocytes. The focus of this review is to present a guide to recent research outlining the variety of intracellular fates of S. aureus. PMID:22919634

  10. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  11. Activities of Antimicrobial Agents against Intracellular Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Gerald L.; Coleman, Elizabeth J.

    2000-01-01

    Pneumococci can enter and survive inside human lung alveolar carcinoma cells. We examined the activity of azithromycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, penicillin G, rifampin, telithromycin, and trovafloxacin against pneumococci inside and outside cells. We found that moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin, and telithromycin were the most active, but only telithromycin killed all intracellular organisms. PMID:10952618

  12. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  13. Mechanism of the Intracellular Killing and Modulation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in THP-1 Macrophages Activated by Gamma Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Ouadrhiri, Youssef; Scorneaux, Bernard; Sibille, Yves; Tulkens, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen, readily enters cells and multiplies in the cytosol after escaping from phagosomal vacuoles. Macrophages exposed to gamma interferon, one of the main cellular host defenses against Listeria, become nonpermissive for bacterial growth while containing Listeria in the phagosomes. Using the human myelomonocytic cell line THP-1, we show that the combination of l-monomethyl arginine and catalase restores bacterial growth without affecting the phagosomal containment of Listeria. A previous report (B. Scorneaux, Y. Ouadrhiri, G. Anzalone, and P. M. Tulkens, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 40:1225–1230, 1996) showed that intracellular Listeria was almost equally sensitive to ampicillin, azithromycin, and sparfloxacin in control cells but became insensitive to ampicillin and more sensitive to azithromycin and sparfloxacin in gamma interferon-treated cells. We show here that these modulations of antibiotic activity are largely counteracted by l-monomethyl arginine and catalase. In parallel, we show that gamma interferon enhances the cellular accumulation of azithromycin and sparfloxacin, an effect which is not reversed by addition of l-monomethyl arginine and catalase and which therefore cannot account for the increased activity of these antibiotics in gamma interferon-treated cells. We conclude that (i) the control exerted by gamma interferon on intracellular multiplication of Listeria in THP-1 macrophages is dependent on the production of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide; (ii) intracellular Listeria may become insensitive to ampicillin in macrophages exposed to gamma interferon because the increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates already controls bacterial growth; and (iii) azithromycin and still more sparfloxacin cooperate efficiently with gamma interferon, one of the main cellular host defenses in Listeria infection. PMID:10223943

  14. Mechanisms for monovalent cation-dependent depletion of intracellular Mg2+:Na+-independent Mg2+ pathways in guinea-pig smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Nomura, Hideki; Smith, Lorraine M; Clark, Joseph F; Uetani, Tadayuki; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that magnesium deficiency is correlated with many diseases. 31P NMR experiments were carried out in order to investigate the effects of Na+ substitution on Mg2+ depletion in smooth muscle under divalent cation-free conditions. In the taenia of guinea-pig caeci, the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) was estimated from the chemical shifts of (1) the β-ATP peak alone and (2) β- and γ-ATP peaks. Both estimations indicated that [Mg2+]i decreased only very slowly in Mg2+-free, Ca2+-free solutions in which Na+ was substituted with large cations such as NMDG (N-methyl-D-glucamine) and choline. Furthermore, the measurements of tension development supported the suggestion of preservation of intracellular Mg2+ with NMDG substitution. Substituting extracellular Na+ with the small cation, Li+, also shifted the β-ATP peak towards a lower frequency, but the frequency shift was significantly less than that seen upon Na+ substitution with K+. The estimated [Mg2+]i depletion was, however, comparable with that seen after Na+ substitution with K+ using the titration curves of metal-free and Mg2+-bound ATP obtained in Li+-based model solutions. It was concluded that Mg2+ rapidly decreases only when small cations were the major electrolyte of the extracellular medium. Na+ substitutions with NMDG, choline or Li+ had little effect on intracellular ATP concentration after 100 min treatment. PMID:12844514

  15. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrelli, K.; Galy, O.; Latour-Lambert, P.; Kirwan, L.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.; Henry, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms.

  16. Intracellular mechanisms involved in copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Cu-GnRH) complex-induced cAMP/PKA signaling in female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Alina; Zielinska-Gorska, Marlena; Wolinska-Witort, Ewa; Siawrys, Gabriela; Baran, Marta; Kotarba, Grzegorz; Biernacka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone molecule (Cu-GnRH) is a GnRH analog, which preserves its amino acid sequence, but which contains a Cu(2+) ion stably bound to the nitrogen atoms including that of the imidazole ring of Histidine(2). A previous report indicated that Cu-GnRH was able to activate cAMP/PKA signaling in anterior pituitary cells in vitro, but raised the question of which intracellular mechanism(s) mediated the Cu-GnRH-induced cAMP synthesis in gonadotropes. To investigate this mechanism, in the present study, female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro were pretreated with 0.1 μM antide, a GnRH antagonist; 0.1 μM cetrorelix, a GnRH receptor antagonist; 0.1 μM PACAP6-38, a PAC-1 receptor antagonist; 2 μM GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor; 50 mM PMA, a protein kinase C activator; the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 (30 μM) and KT5720 (60 nM); factors affecting intracellular calcium activity: 2.5 mM EGTA; 2 μM thapsigargin; 5 μM A23187, a Ca(2+) ionophore; or 10 μg/ml cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. After one of the above pretreatments, cells were incubated in the presence of 0.1 μM Cu-GnRH for 0.5, 1, and 3 h. Radioimmunoassay analysis of cAMP confirmed the functional link between Cu-GnRH stimulation and cAMP/PKA signal transduction in rat anterior pituitary cells, demonstrating increased intracellular cAMP, which was reduced in the presence of specific PKA inhibitors. The stimulatory effect of Cu-GnRH on cAMP production was partly dependent on GnRH receptor activation. In addition, an indirect and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism might be involved in intracellular adenylate cyclase stimulation. Neither activation of protein kinase C nor new protein synthesis was involved in the Cu-GnRH-induced increase of cAMP in the rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. Presented data indicate that conformational changes of GnRH molecule resulting from cooper ion coordination affect specific pharmacological properties of Cu

  17. Long-term survival in elderly patients with a do-not-intubate order treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Scarpazza, Paolo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Amboni, Paolo; di Franco, Giuseppe; Raschi, Stefania; Usai, Pierfranco; Bernareggi, Monica; Bonacina, Cristiano; Melacini, Chiara; Cattaneo, Roberta; Bencini, Serena; Pravettoni, Chiara; Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Passalacqua, Gianni; Casali, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) is an effective tool in treating patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF), since it reduces both the need for endotracheal intubation and the mortality in comparison with nonventilated patients. A particular issue is represented by the outcome of NIMV in patients referred to the emergency department for ARF and with a do-not-intubate (DNI) status because of advanced age or excessively critical conditions. This study evaluated long-term survival in a group of elderly patients with acute hypercapnic ARF who had a DNI order and who were successfully treated by NIMV. Methods: The population consisted of 54 patients with a favorable outcome after NIMV for ARF. They were followed up for 3 years by regular control visits, with at least one visit every 4 months, or as needed according to the patient’s condition. Of these, 31 continued NIMV at home and 23 were on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) alone. Results: A total of 16 of the 52 patients had not survived at the 1-year follow-up, and another eight patients died during the 3-year observation, with an overall mortality rate of 30.8% after 1 year and 46.2% after 3 years. Comparing patients who continued NIMV at home with those who were on LTOT alone, 9 of the 29 patients on home NIMV died (6 after 1 year and 3 after 3 years) and 15 of the 23 patients on LTOT alone died (10 after 1 year and 5 after 3 years). Conclusion: These results show that elderly patients with ARF successfully treated by NIMV following a DNI order have a satisfactory long-term survival. PMID:21814461

  18. Delivery of host cell-directed therapeutics for intracellular pathogen clearance

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Michael A.; Gallovic, Matthew D.; Peine, Kevin J.; Duong, Anthony D.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Gunn, John S.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Ainslie, Kristy M.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens present a major health risk because of their innate ability to evade clearance. Their location within host cells and ability to react to the host environment by mutation or transcriptional changes often enables survival mechanisms to resist standard therapies. Host-directed drugs do not target the pathogen, minimizing the potential development of drug resistance; however, they can be difficult to deliver efficiently to intracellular sites. Vehicle delivery of host-mediated response drugs not only improves drug distribution and toxicity profiles, but can reduce the total amount of drug necessary to clear infection. In this article, we will review some host-directed drugs and current drug delivery techniques that can be used to efficiently clear intracellular infections. PMID:24134600

  19. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  20. Bacillus and other spore-forming genera: variations in responses and mechanisms for survival.

    PubMed

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Burbank, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of Bacilli endospores in soils facilitates their easy transfer routes to other environments, including cleanrooms and low-biomass sites required by many industries such as food production and processing. A bacterial endospore is a metabolically dormant form of life that is much more resistant to heat, desiccation, lack of nutrients, exposure to UV and gamma radiation, organic chemicals, and oxidizing agents than is a vegetative cell. For example, the heat tolerance of endospores depends on multiple factors such as sporulation temperature, core dehydration, and the presence of minerals and small, acid-soluble proteins (SASPs) in the core. This review describes our current understanding of the persistence mechanisms related to sporeformers' biochemical properties and discusses in detail spores' heat, radiation, and reactive chemical resistance. In addition, it discusses the impact of contamination with spores on many areas of human activity, spore adhesive properties, and biofilm contribution to resistance.

  1. The relationship of freeze tolerance with intracellular compounds in baker's yeasts.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojian; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; Chen, Jun; Li, Wenli; He, Xun; Wang, Jining

    2014-03-01

    Freeze-tolerant baker's yeasts are required for the processing of frozen doughs. The present study was carried out to investigate the cell survival rate after frozen storage and the change of fermentability in dough due to frozen storage, and to discuss quantitatively the relationship of freeze tolerance with intracellular trehalose, amino acids, and glycerol, using six types of baker's yeasts as the test materials. The experimental results showed that the fermentability of yeast cells in frozen dough was strongly correlated with the cell survival rate. The baker's yeast with a higher level of cell survival rate had a larger increase in the total intracellular compound content after frozen storage, and the cell survival rate increased linearly with increasing total intracellular compound content in frozen yeast cells. Trehalose was a primary compound affecting freeze tolerance, followed by glutamic acid, arginine, proline, asparagic acid, and glycerol. The basic information provided by the present study is useful for exploring the freeze-tolerance mechanisms of baker's yeast cells, breeding better freeze-tolerant baker's yeast strains, and developing more effective cryoprotectants.

  2. Activation of NFkB is a novel mechanism of pro-survival activity of glucocorticoids in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shagufta; Lopez-Dee, Zenaida; Kumar, Raj; Ling, Jun

    2013-08-28

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are pro-apoptotic as a co-medication to treat leukemia and lymphoma. However, the effects in breast cancer (BC) are diverse with mechanisms less understood. In this study using BC model cell MCF7, we found that dexamethasone (Dex) promotes cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis identified that c-Myc was enhanced by Dex, providing an important link to the pro-survival effect of GCs in BC. Dex treatment promoted NFkB transcriptional activity leading to the up-regulation of c-Myc. RelA was activated by Dex but with decreased interaction with GR, thus identifying a new pattern of regulation of NFkB by GC/GR in BC cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanism of Human Influenza Virus RNA Persistence and Virion Survival in Feces: Mucus Protects Virions From Acid and Digestive Juices.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Ryohei; Nakaya, Takaaki; Naito, Yuji; Daidoji, Tomo; Watanabe, Yohei; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2017-07-01

    Although viral RNA or infectious virions have been detected in the feces of individuals infected with human influenza A and B viruses (IAV/IBV), the mechanism of viral survival in the gastrointestinal tract remains unclear. We developed a model that attempts to recapitulate the conditions encountered by a swallowed virus. While IAV/IBV are vulnerable to simulated digestive juices (gastric acid and bile/pancreatic juice), highly viscous mucus protects viral RNA and virions, allowing the virus to retain its infectivity. Our results suggest that virions and RNA present in swallowed mucus are not inactivated or degraded by the gastrointestinal environment, allowing their detection in feces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose inhibits intracellular multiplication and promotes intracellular killing of Legionella pneumophila in A/J mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, M; Yoshida, S; Mizuguchi, Y

    1994-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila can grow intracellularly in A/J mouse macrophages. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2dG) (0.1, 1, and 10 mM) inhibited intracellular multiplication and promoted intracellular killing of L. pneumophila dose dependently when it was added to the culture medium of macrophage monolayers, whereas it did not inhibit the bacterial growth in buffered yeast extract broth, which was used for an L. pneumophila culture. The effect of 2dG was reversible because the surviving bacteria resumed intracellular multiplication after the washing away of 2dG from the culture. The effect of 2dG was also competitively inhibited by high concentrations of glucose. The inhibitory effect of 2dG was not attributed to the inhibition of bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Furthermore, sodium fluoride (0.1 and 1 mM), cycloheximide (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml), and tunicamycin (1, 2, and 5 micrograms/ml) did not promote the killing of L. pneumophila in macrophages, implying that the inhibitory effect of 2dG cannot be attributed to the inhibition of glycolysis, protein synthesis, and protein glycosylation in macrophages. We suggest that 2dG promotes intracellular killing of L. pneumophila by activating some novel killing mechanism of macrophages. PMID:8262638

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  6. Characterization of the proapoptotic intracellular mechanisms induced by a toxic conformer of the recombinant human prion protein fragment 90-231.

    PubMed

    Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Thellung, Stefano; Paludi, Domenico; Chiovitti, Katia; Venezia, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Russo, Claudio; Schettini, Gennaro; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio

    2006-12-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that affect both animals and humans. The transition of the prion protein (PrP) from a mainly alpha-structured isoform (PrPC) to a prevalent beta-sheet-containing protein (PrPSc) is believed to represent a major pathogenetic mechanism in prion diseases. To investigate the linkage between PrP neurotoxicity and its conformation, we used a recombinant prion protein fragment corresponding to the amino acidic sequence 90-231 of human prion protein (hPrP90-231). Using thermal denaturation, we set up an experimental model to induce the process of conversion from PrPC to PrPSc. We report that partial thermal denaturation converts hPrP90-231 into a beta-sheet-rich isoform, displaying a temperature- and time-dependent conversion into oligomeric structures that share some physico-chemical characteristics with brain PrPSc. SH-SY5Y cells were chosen to characterize the potential neurotoxic effect of hPrP90-231 in its different structural conformations. We demonstrated that hPrP90-231 in beta-conformation, but not when alpha-structured, powerfully affected the survival of these cells. hPrP90-231 beta-structured caused DNA fragmentation and a significant increase in caspase-3 proteolytic activity (maximal effects+170%), suggesting the occurrence of apoptotic cell death. Finally, we investigated the involvement of MAP kinases in the regulation of beta-hPrP90-231-dependent apoptosis. We observed that the p38 MAP kinase blocker SB203580 prevented the apoptotic cell death evoked by hPrP90-231, and Western blot analysis revealed that the exposure of the cells to the peptide induced p38 phosphorylation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the hPrP90-231 elicits proapoptotic activity when in beta-sheet-rich conformation and that this effect is mediated by p38 and caspase-3 activation.

  7. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. RESULTS The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all P<.05). CONCLUSION The Ankylos® implant is suitable for single-tooth restoration in Koreans. However, relatively frequent abutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture. PMID:26813443

  8. Mechanism allowing an insect to survive complete dehydration and extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kikawada, T; Minagawa, N; Yukuhiro, F; Okuda, T

    2002-09-01

    Cryptobiosis describes the state of an organism whose body water is completely dehydrated and metabolic activity has become undetectable. Our study aimed to elucidate the physiological mechanism of cryptobiosis in the highest cryptobiotic invertebrate, Polypedilum vanderplanki. Larvae of this insect rapidly accumulated a large amount of the carbohydrate, trehalose, (18% of dry body mass) during desiccation for 2 days, suggesting that a high level of trehalose accumulation contributed to the successful induction of cryptobiosis in P. vanderplanki as well as in other lower cryptobiotic organisms. When larvae deprived of the brain, suboesophageal ganglion (SG) and thoracic ganglia (TG) were completely dehydrated and then rehydrated, they were able to recover and move actively. During desiccation, such larvae also accumulated trehalose, although only about half as much as the intact larvae. It is concluded that the brain, SG and TG do not affect the induction and termination of cryptobiosis, and hence in this higher multicellular animal cryptobiosis is independent of brain, SG and TG regulation, just as in plants or in unicellular organisms.

  9. [Effects and related mechanism of bivalirudin on the survival of random skin flap on the back of rat].

    PubMed

    Cai, L Y; Wang, T; Lin, D S; Lu, D

    2017-04-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects and related mechanism of bivalirudin on the survival of random skin flap on the back of rat. Methods: Thirty SD rats were divided into bivalirudin group and normal saline group according to the random number table, with 15 rats in each group. The random flap model with size of 9 cm×3 cm was reproduced on the back of rats in two groups. Immediately post injury, rats in bivalirudin group were intraperitoneally injected with 5 mg/mL bivalirudin (0.8 mL/kg), while rats in normal saline group were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline (0.8 mL/kg) once a day. The continuous injection lasted for 7 days. The flap was divided into distal area, middle area and proximal area averagely based on the flap blood supply. On post injury day (PID) 1, 3, and 7, the overall survival of each area of flap was observed with naked eyes. On PID 7, the survival rate of flap was calculated, and then the morphology of skin tissue at the center of the three areas of flap was observed by HE staining, the microvessel density (MVD) of the middle area of flap was calculated, and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of the middle area of flap was detected with immunohistochemical staining. Data were processed with t test. Results: (1) On PID 1, flaps of rats in two groups had different degrees of swelling, mainly concentrated in distal area, but there was no obvious necrosis. The middle area and proximal area of flaps in two groups were survived. On PID 3, the necrosis of flaps of rats in two groups was concentrated in the middle area, while the proximal area of flap was still in survival state, and most distal area of flap was necrosis with a little scab. On PID 7, the necrosis of middle area of flaps of rats in two groups was gradually fused, and the survival area of flap of rats in bivalirudin group was larger than that in normal saline group. The distal area of flap was almost necrotic, and the proximal area of flap was

  10. Intracellular microbes and haemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2008-11-01

    Haemophagocytosis (hemophagocytosis) is the phenomenon of activated macrophage consumption of red and white blood cells, including professional phagocytes and lymphocytes. It can occur in patients with severe cases of intracellular microbial infection, including avian influenza, leishmaniasis, tuberculosis and typhoid fever. While well-known to physicians since at least the mid-1800s, haemophagocytosis has been little studied due to a paucity of tractable animal and cell culture models. Recently, haemophagocytosis has been described in a mouse model of typhoid fever, and it was noted that the infectious agent, Salmonella enterica, resides within haemophagocytic macrophages in mice. In addition, a cell culture model for haemophagocytosis revealed that S. enterica preferentially replicate in haemophagocytic macrophages. This review describes how, at the molecular and cellular levels, S. enterica may promote and take advantage of haemophagocytosis to establish long-term systemic infections in mammals. The role, relevance and possible molecular mechanisms of haemophagocytosis are discussed within the context of other microbial infections and of genetic deficiencies in which haemophagocytosis occurs and is associated with morbidity.

  11. Intracellular mechanism of the action of inhibin on the secretion of follicular stimulating hormone and of luteinizing hormone induced by LH-RH in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecomte-Yerna, M. J.; Hazee-Hagelstein, M. T.; Charlet-Renard, C.; Franchimont, P.

    1982-01-01

    The FSH secretion-inhibiting action of inhibin in vitro under basal conditions and also in the presence of LH-RH is suppressed by the addition of MIX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In the presence of LH-RH, inhibin reduces significantly the intracellular level of cAMP in isolated pituitary cells. In contrast, the simultaneous addition of MIX and inhibin raises the cAMP level, and this stimulation is comparable to the increase observed when MIX is added alone. These observations suggest that one mode of action of inhibin could be mediated by a reduction in cAMP within the pituitary gonadotropic cell.

  12. Posttranslational regulation of BCL2 levels in cerebellar granule cells: A mechanism of neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Lossi, Laura; Gambino, Graziana; Ferrini, Francesco; Alasia, Silvia; Merighi, Adalberto

    2009-11-01

    Apoptosis can be modulated by K(+) and Ca(2+) inside the cell and/or in the extracellular milieu. In murine organotypic cultures, membrane potential-regulated Ca(2+) signaling through calcineurin phosphatase has a pivotal role in development and maturation of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). P8 cultures were used to analyze the levels of expression of B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) protein, and, after particle-mediated gene transfer in CGCs, to study the posttranslational modifications of BCL2 fused to a fluorescent tag in response to a perturbation of K(+)/Ca(2+) homeostasis. There are no changes in Bcl2 mRNA after real time PCR, whereas the levels of the fusion protein (monitored by calculating the density of transfected CGCs under the fluorescence microscope) and of BCL2 (inWestern blotting) are increased. After using a series of agonists/antagonists for ion channels at the cell membrane or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and drugs affecting protein synthesis/degradation, accumulation of BCL2 was related to a reduction in posttranslational cleavage by macroautophagy. The ER functionally links the [K(+)](e) and [Ca(2+)](i) to the BCL2 content in CGCs along two different pathways. The first, triggered by elevated [K(+)](e) under conditions of immaturity, is independent of extracellular Ca(2+) and operates via IP3 channels. The second leads to influx of extracellular Ca(2+) following activation of ryanodine channels in the presence of physiological [K(+)](e), when CGCs are maintained in mature status. This study identifies novel mechanisms of neuroprotection in immature and mature CGCs involving the posttranslational regulation of BCL2.

  13. Axonal guidance by surface microstructuring for intracellular transport investigations.

    PubMed

    Pelzl, Carina; Arcizet, Delphine; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Jürgen; Heinrich, Doris

    2009-11-09

    Intracellular transport, a complex interplay of diverse processes, is fundamental for the development, function and survival of cells. Passive diffusion and active transport phases alternate in living cells, with active phases arising from molecular motors, such as kinesin or dynein, pulling cargoes along microtubules. A better understanding of stochasic mechanisms involved in motor-microtubule interactions and in diffusion processes, which enable efficient active transport over long distances in motor neurons, requires a better link between theoretical models and live-cell experiments. Herein, we establish one-dimensional (1D) intracellular transport geometries, suitable for comparing experimental findings with recent theoretical 1D model predictions, by guiding axonal outgrowth of pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells along predefined chemical surface structures with a strip width of 2 microm, fabricated by means of microscale plasma-initiated patterning (microPIP method). Quantification of the intracellular transport of quantum dots (QDs) in straight axons, which exhibit almost parallel microtubules, is obtained by our recently developed algorithm based on a time-resolved mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. Such a thorough dissection of experimental data will be useful for validation and clarification of current theoretical transport models.

  14. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  15. Surface properties and intracellular speciation revealed an original adaptive mechanism to arsenic in the acid mine drainage bio-indicator Euglena mutabilis.

    PubMed

    Halter, David; Casiot, Corinne; Heipieper, Hermann J; Plewniak, Frédéric; Marchal, Marie; Simon, Stéphane; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bertin, Philippe N

    2012-02-01

    Euglena mutabilis is a protist ubiquitously found in extreme environments such as acid mine drainages which are often rich in arsenic. The response of E. mutabilis to this metalloid was compared to that of Euglena gracilis, a protist not found in such environments. Membrane fatty acid composition, cell surface properties, arsenic accumulation kinetics, and intracellular arsenic speciation were determined. The results revealed a modification in fatty acid composition leading to an increased membrane fluidity in both Euglena species under sublethal arsenic concentrations exposure. This increased membrane fluidity correlated to an induced gliding motility observed in E. mutabilis in the presence of this metalloid but did not affect the flagellar dependent motility of E. gracilis. Moreover, when compared to E. gracilis, E. mutabilis showed highly hydrophobic cell surface properties and a higher tolerance to water-soluble arsenical compounds but not to hydrophobic ones. Finally, E. mutabilis showed a lower accumulation of total arsenic in the intracellular compartment and an absence of arsenic methylated species in contrast to E. gracilis. Taken together, our results revealed the existence of a specific arsenical response of E. mutabilis that may play a role in its hypertolerance to this toxic metalloid.

  16. Oxytocin Inhibits the Membrane Depolarization-Induced Increase in Intracellular Calcium in Capsaicin Sensitive Sensory Neurons: A Peripheral Mechanism of Analgesic Action

    PubMed Central

    Hobo, Shotaro; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Eisenach, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lumbar intrathecal injection of oxytocin produces antinociception in rats and analgesia in humans. Classically, oxytocin receptors couple to stimulatory G proteins, increase inositol-3-phosphate production, and result in neuronal excitation. Most work to date has focused on a spinal site of oxytocin to excite γ-aminobutyric acid interneurons to produce analgesia. Here we ask whether oxytocin might also affect primary sensory afferents by modulating high voltage-gated calcium channels, such as it does in the brain. Methods Dorsal root ganglion cells from adult rats were acutely dissociated and cultured, and changes in intracellular calcium determined by fluorescent microscopy using an indicator dye. The effects of oxytocin alone and in the presence of transient depolarization from increased extracellular KCl concentration were determined, then the pharmacology of these effects were studied. Cells from injured dorsal root ganglion cells after spinal nerve ligation were also studied. Results Oxytocin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increase in intracellular calcium from membrane depolarization, an effect blocked more efficiently by oxytocin- than vasopressin-receptor selective antagonists. Oxytocin-induced inhibition was present in cells responding to capsaicin, and when internal stores of calcium were depleted with thapsigargin. Oxytocin produced similar inhibition in cells from animals with spinal nerve ligation. Conclusions These data suggest that oxytocin produces antinociception after intrathecal delivery in part by reducing excitatory neurotransmitter release from the central terminals of nociceptors. PMID:22104073

  17. Umami changes intracellular Ca2+ levels using intracellular and extracellular sources in mouse taste receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Mori, Tomohiko; Hayashi, Yukako

    2006-11-01

    Recently, candidates for umami receptors have been identified in taste cells, but the precise transduction mechanisms of the downstream receptor remain unknown. To investigate how intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the umami transduction pathway, we measured changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels in response to umami stimuli monosodium glutamate (MSG), IMP, and MSG + IMP in mouse taste receptor cells (TRCs) by Ca(2+) imaging. Even when extracellular Ca(2+) was absent, 1/3 of umami-responsive TRCs exhibited increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels. When intracellular Ca(2+) was depleted, half of the TRCs retained their response to umami. These results suggest that umami-responsive TRCs increase their intracellular Ca(2+) levels through two pathways: by releasing Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and by an influx of Ca(2+) from extracellular sources. We conclude that the Ca(2+) influx from extracellular source might play an important role in the synergistic effect between MSG and IMP.

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-2 intracellularly stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and specifically induces submucosal arteriole vasodilation via a sheer stress-independent, local neural mechanism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-responsive neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract, including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, mucosal blood flow, luminal nutrient uptake, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. We have shown th...

  19. TRPV6 calcium channel translocates to the plasma membrane via Orai1-mediated mechanism and controls cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Raphaël, Maylis; Lehen’kyi, V’yacheslav; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Beck, Benjamin; Khalimonchyk, Sergiy; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Farsetti, Leonardo; Germain, Emmanuelle; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Mihalache, Adriana; Gosset, Pierre; Romanin, Christoph; Clézardin, Philippe; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 6 (TRPV6) is a highly selective calcium channel that has been considered as a part of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Despite its first discovery in the early 2000s, the role of this channel in prostate cancer (PCa) remained, until now, obscure. Here we show that TRPV6 mediates calcium entry, which is highly increased in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism involving the translocation of the TRPV6 channel to the plasma membrane via the Orai1/TRPC1-mediated Ca2+/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway, partially contributing to SOCE. The TRPV6 calcium channel is expressed de novo by the PCa cell to increase its survival by enhancing proliferation and conferring apoptosis resistance. Xenografts in nude mice and bone metastasis models confirmed the remarkable aggressiveness of TRPV6-overexpressing tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of these demonstrated the increased expression of clinical markers such as Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, synaptophysin, CD31, and CD56, which are strongly associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the TRPV6 channel acquires its oncogenic potential in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism via the Orai1-mediated Ca2+/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway. PMID:25172921

  20. TRPV6 calcium channel translocates to the plasma membrane via Orai1-mediated mechanism and controls cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Raphaël, Maylis; Lehen'kyi, V'yacheslav; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Beck, Benjamin; Khalimonchyk, Sergiy; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Farsetti, Leonardo; Germain, Emmanuelle; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Mihalache, Adriana; Gosset, Pierre; Romanin, Christoph; Clézardin, Philippe; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2014-09-16

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 6 (TRPV6) is a highly selective calcium channel that has been considered as a part of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Despite its first discovery in the early 2000s, the role of this channel in prostate cancer (PCa) remained, until now, obscure. Here we show that TRPV6 mediates calcium entry, which is highly increased in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism involving the translocation of the TRPV6 channel to the plasma membrane via the Orai1/TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway, partially contributing to SOCE. The TRPV6 calcium channel is expressed de novo by the PCa cell to increase its survival by enhancing proliferation and conferring apoptosis resistance. Xenografts in nude mice and bone metastasis models confirmed the remarkable aggressiveness of TRPV6-overexpressing tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of these demonstrated the increased expression of clinical markers such as Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, synaptophysin, CD31, and CD56, which are strongly associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the TRPV6 channel acquires its oncogenic potential in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism via the Orai1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway.

  1. Mechanism of action of benzoic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects on glycolytic metabolite levels, energy production, and intracellular pH.

    PubMed Central

    Warth, A D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of benzoic acid in the preservative-resistant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii were studied. At concentrations of benzoic acid up to 4 mM, fermentation was stimulated and only low levels of benzoate were accumulated. Near the MIC (10 mM), fermentation was inhibited, ATP levels declined, and benzoate was accumulated to relatively higher levels. Intracellular pH was reduced but not greatly. Changes in the levels of metabolites at different external benzoic acid levels showed that glycolysis was limited at pyruvate kinase and glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase-phosphoglycerate kinase steps. Inhibition of phosphofructokinase and several other glycolytic enzymes was not responsible for the inhibition of fermentation. Instead, the results suggest that the primary action of benzoic acid in Z. bailii is to cause a general energy loss, i.e., ATP depletion. PMID:1785916

  2. TRIM21-dependent intracellular antibody neutralization of virus infection.

    PubMed

    McEwan, William A; James, Leo C

    2015-01-01

    The ability of antibodies to prevent viral infection has long been recognized. In vitro neutralization assays, which take place in the absence of professional immune effector mechanisms, have demonstrated that the process of neutralization can occur by a variety of molecular mechanisms. Most known mechanisms involve the blocking of an event essential for infection, for instance, the steric inhibition of attachment to entry receptors. As such, neutralization is often thought of as a passive process that can occur without the need for host effector machinery. In contrast to this view, it has recently been demonstrated that neutralization can depend on the widely expressed cytosolic Fc binding protein TRIM21. This unique and novel Ig receptor directs the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of intracellular antibody-bound viral particles and prevents infection. It has been further demonstrated that detection of cytosolic antibody by TRIM21 activates inflammatory signaling pathways and promotes the production of cytokines and chemokines. Studies in a TRIM21-null mouse demonstrate the importance of these activities: homozygous knockouts suffer fatal viral infection where wild-type mice survive. Though there is much to be learned about the role of TRIM21 in immunity, it is clear that there is a hitherto unappreciated role for antibodies in the intracellular environment.

  3. HIF-1α-mediated upregulation of SERCA2b: The endogenous mechanism for alleviating the ischemia-induced intracellular Ca(2+) store dysfunction in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kopach, Olga; Maistrenko, Anastasiia; Lushnikova, Iryna; Belan, Pavel; Skibo, Galina; Voitenko, Nana

    2016-05-01

    Pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus possess differential susceptibility to the ischemia-induced damage with the highest vulnerability of CA1 and the lower sensitivity of CA3 neurons. This damage is triggered by Ca(2+)-dependent excitotoxicity and can result in a delayed cell death that might be potentially suspended through activation of endogenous neuroprotection with the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF). However, the molecular mechanisms of this neuroprotection remain poorly understood. Here we show that prolonged (30min) oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in situ impairs intracellular Ca(2+) regulation in CA1 rather than in CA3 neurons with the differently altered expression of genes coding Ca(2+)-ATPases: the mRNA level of plasmalemmal Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCA1 and PMCA2 subtypes) was downregulated in CA1 neurons, whereas the mRNA level of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCA2b subtype) was increased in CA3 neurons at 4h of re-oxygenation after prolonged OGD. These demonstrate distinct susceptibility of CA1 and CA3 neurons to the ischemic impairments in intracellular Ca(2+) regulation and Ca(2+)-ATPase expression. Stabilization of HIF-1α by inhibiting HIF-1α hydroxylation prevented the ischemic decrease in both PMCA1 and PMCA2 mRNAs in CA1 neurons, upregulated the SERCA2b mRNA level and eliminated the OGD-induced Ca(2+) store dysfunction in these neurons. Cumulatively, these findings reveal the previously unknown HIF-1α-driven upregulation of Ca(2+)-ATPases as a mechanism opposing the ischemic impairments in intracellular Ca(2+) regulation in hippocampal neurons. The ability of HIF-1α to modulate expression of genes coding Ca(2+)-ATPases suggests SERCA2b as a novel target for HIF-1 and may provide potential implications for HIF-1α-stabilizing strategy in activating endogenous neuroprotection.

  4. Mechanisms of pH-Sensitivity and Cellular Internalization of PEOz-b-PLA Micelles with Varied Hydrophilic/Hydrophobic Ratios and Intracellular Trafficking Routes and Fate of the Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dishi; Zhou, Yanxia; Li, Xinru; Qu, Xiaoyou; Deng, Yunqiang; Wang, Ziqi; He, Chuyu; Zou, Yang; Jin, Yiguang; Liu, Yan

    2017-03-01

    pH-responsive polymeric micelles have shown promise for the targeted and intracellular delivery of antitumor agents. The present study aimed to elucidate the possible mechanisms of pH-sensitivity and cellular internalization of PEOz-b-PLA micelles in detail, further unravel the effect of hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio of the micelles on their cellular internalization, and examine the intracellular trafficking routes and fate of PEOz-b-PLA after internalization of the micelles. The results of variations in the size and Zeta potential of PEOz-b-PLA micelles and cross-sectional area of PEOz-b-PLA molecules with pH values suggested that electrostatic repulsion between PEOz chains resulting from ionization of the tertiary amide groups along PEOz chain at pH lower than its pKa was responsible for pH-sensitivity of PEOz-b-PLA micelles. Furthermore, the studies on internalization of PEOz-b-PLA micelles by MCF-7 cells revealed that the uptake of PEOz-b-PLA micelles was strongly influenced by their structural features, and showed that PEOz-b-PLA micelles with hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio of 1.7-2.0 exhibited optimal cellular uptake. No evident alteration in cellular uptake of PEOz-b-PLA micelles was detected by flow cytometry upon the existence of EIPA and chlorpromazine. However, the intracellular uptake of the micelles in the presence of MβCD and genistein was effectively inhibited. Hence, the internalization of such micelles by MCF-7 cells appeared to proceed mainly through caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis without being influenced by their hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio. Confocal micrographs revealed that late endosomes, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were all involved in the intracellular trafficking of PEOz-b-PLA copolymers following their internalization via endocytosis, and then part of them was excreted from tumor cells to extracellular medium. These findings provided valuable information for developing desired PEOz-b-PLA micelles to improve their

  5. Revisiting intracellular calcium signaling semantics.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Audran, Emilie; Fève, Marie; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-12-01

    Cells use intracellular free calcium concentration changes for signaling. Signal encoding occurs through both spatial and temporal modulation of the free calcium concentration. The encoded message is detected by an ensemble of intracellular sensors forming the family of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) which must faithfully translate the message using a new syntax that is recognized by the cell. The cell is home to a significant although limited number of genes coding for proteins involved in the signal encoding and decoding processes. In a cell, only a subset of this ensemble of genes is expressed, leading to a genetic regulation of the calcium signal pathways. Calmodulin (CaM), the most ubiquitous expressed intracellular calcium-binding protein, plays a major role in calcium signal translation. Similar to a hub, it is central to a large and finely tuned network, receiving information, integrating it and dispatching the cognate response. In this review, we examine the different steps starting with an external stimulus up to a cellular response, with special emphasis on CaM and the mechanism by which it decodes calcium signals and translates it into exquisitely coordinated cellular events. By this means, we will revisit the calcium signaling semantics, hoping that we will ease communication between scientists dealing with calcium signals in different biological systems and different domains.

  6. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  7. A bioinformatic approach to understanding antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria through whole genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Silpak; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria survive within eukaryotic host cells and are difficult to kill with certain antibiotics. As a result, antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria is becoming commonplace in healthcare institutions. Owing to the lack of methods available for transforming these bacteria, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance using molecular methods and in silico genome analysis. The objective of this review was to understand the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance through in silico comparisons of the genomes of obligate and facultative intracellular bacteria. The available data on in vitro mutants reported for intracellular bacteria were also reviewed. These genomic data were analysed to find natural mutations in known target genes involved in antibiotic resistance and to look for the presence or absence of different resistance determinants. Our analysis revealed the presence of tetracycline resistance protein (Tet) in Bartonella quintana, Francisella tularensis and Brucella ovis; moreover, most of the Francisella strains possessed the blaA gene, AmpG protein and metallo-beta-lactamase family protein. The presence or absence of folP (dihydropteroate synthase) and folA (dihydrofolate reductase) genes in the genome could explain natural resistance to co-trimoxazole. Finally, multiple genes encoding different efflux pumps were studied. This in silico approach was an effective method for understanding the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria. The whole genome sequence analysis will help to predict several important phenotypic characteristics, in particular resistance to different antibiotics. In the future, stable mutants should be obtained through transformation methods in order to demonstrate experimentally the determinants of resistance in intracellular bacteria.

  8. Protective approaches and mechanisms of microencapsulation to the survival of probiotic bacteria during processing, storage and gastrointestinal digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Cui, Steve W; Chen, Maoshen; Li, Yue; Liang, Rong; Xu, Feifei; Zhong, Fang

    2017-09-21

    In recent years, there is a rising interest in the number of food products containing probiotic bacteria with favorable health benefit effects. However, the viability of probiotic bacteria is always questionable when they exposure to the harsh environment during processing, storage and gastrointestinal digestion. To overcome these problems, microencapsulation of cells is currently receiving considerable attention and has obtained valuable effects. According to the drying temperature, the commonly used technologies can be divided into two patterns: high temperature drying (spray drying, fluid bed drying) and low temperature drying (ultrasonic vacuum spray drying, spray chilling, electrospinning, supercritical technique, freeze drying, extrusion, emulsion, enzyme gelation and impinging aerosol technique). Furthermore, not only should the probiotic bacteria maintain high viability during processing, they also need to keep alive during storage and gastrointestinal digestion, where they additionally suffer from water, oxygen, heat as well as strong acid and bile conditions. This review focuses on demonstrating the effects of different microencapsulation techniques on the survival of bacteria during processing as well as protective approaches and mechanisms to the encapsulated probiotic bacteria during storage and gastrointestinal digestion that currently reported in the literature.

  9. Surviving the crisis: Adaptive wisdom, coping mechanisms and local responses to avian influenza threats in Haining, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Letian; Pan, Tianshu

    2008-04-01

    Based on ethnographic research conducted in the summer of 2006, this paper examines local responses to the imminent threat of avian flu in Haining County of Zhejiang Province. During our field investigation, we conducted interviews with officials from local medical institutions (including the hospitals, the animal husbandry and veterinary station, and health clinics), to bureaus of public health and agro-economy. We also visited chicken farms, restaurants and farming households. We address the following factors that commonly structured the perceptions and actions of different social actors in the area of study: The changing mode of information-sharing and communication practices in the local communities; the official drive to professionalize the emergency response management system in the county; and the coping mechanisms that helped the villagers and town residents to weather the storm of avian flu. Our field research suggests that collective survival consciousness was translated into a spirit of voluntarism during the crisis. One important practical lesson we have learned from this study is that the adaptive wisdom embedded in local memories demonstrated its operational worth as a resourceful knowledge base for ordinary farmers to deal with food shortage, famine, plague and future pandemics.

  10. From nature to bedside: pro-survival and cell death mechanisms as therapeutic targets in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Teiten, Marie-Hélène; Radogna, Flavia; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Cell death is an important physiological regulator during development, tissue homeostasis and stress response but it is also a protective tumor suppressive mechanism. Tumor cells almost univers