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  1. Surgical management of intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsementzis, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Traditional and recent developments in the management of spontaneous intracranial hematomas are reviewed. A comprehensive account of the epidemiological characteristics worldwide with an etiological analysis including prevention and prophylaxis introduce the size and clinical significance of this neurological problem. The usefulness and limitations of the available diagnostic methods are described. Most of the emphasis, however, is placed on the management and medicosurgical treatment of intracranial hematomas in correlation with their clinical presentation and localization. 80 references.

  2. Dabigatran-related intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in hematoma expansion.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Claus Z; Steiner, Thorsten; Tietze, Anna; Damgaard, Dorte

    2014-02-01

    Warfarin-related intracerebral hemorrhage carries a particularly high risk of neurologic deterioration and death because of a high rate of hematoma expansion of about 50%. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs)--apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban--have a significantly smaller risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, two facts make this situation complicated: First, the risk of hematoma expansion is unknown for NOACs. Second, there is no specific antidote for neither of the NOACs. We present a case that suggests that hematoma expansion may occur after NOAC-related ICH. PMID:24103671

  3. Intracerebral hematoma extends via perivascular spaces and perineurium.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Lü, Tian-Ming; Qiu, Guang; Huang, Rui-Yu; Fang, Min; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Duan; Liu, Xiao-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. ICH results in the formation of hematoma that affects not only the primary site of injury but also the remote regions. In fact, hematoma can extend via perivascular spaces (also called Virchow-Robin spaces, VRS) and perineurium in an animal model of ICH. In the present study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to investigate the characteristics of the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH. A total of 20 ICH patients without secondary subarachnoid and secondary intraventricular hemorrhages were recruited. Brain MRI scans, including SWI, T1, and T2-weighted images, were performed between 17 h to 7 days after the onset of ICH. MRI with SWI revealed that paramagnetic substances spread along the VRS or the perineurium. Such distribution could cause the formation of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the distribution of remote hemorrhagic lesions varied, depending on the size and location of the original hematoma. The unenhanced CT scans of the 20 patients did not show any hyperdensity around the blood vessels and nerve tracts outside the hematoma. These results indicate the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH, which is formed by the leakage of the original hematoma via the VRS or perineurium. We also provide a new explanation for the series of pathological processes involved in ICH, including the remote effects of hematoma and the formation of CMBs in patients with ICH. PMID:23812162

  4. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    PubMed

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  5. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  6. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Jing; Yu, Hong-Quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27630696

  7. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27630696

  8. Fatal endocarditis with methicilin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus and major complications: rhabdomyolysis, pericarditis, and intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Anca Meda; Azamfirei, Leonard; Szalman, Krisztina; Szekely, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over the last decades Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has become the dominant etiology of native valve infective endocarditis, with the community-acquired methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA) strains being the prevailing type. Case: We report here a case of extremely severe CA-MSSA aortic valve acute endocarditis associated with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in a previously healthy man and include a literature review. The patient developed severe and rare complications (purpura, purulent pericarditis, intracerebral hematoma, and rhabdomyolysis) through systemic embolism; they required drainage of pericardial empyema and cerebral hematoma, the latter eventually caused a fatal outcome. The strains recovered from sequential blood culture sets and pericardial fluid were MSSA negative for genes encoding for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST)-1 and Panton–Valentine leukocidin. C, G, and I enterotoxin genes were detected. Conclusions: This case with unusually severe evolution underlines the limited ability of vancomycin to control some MSSA infections, possibly due to potential involvement of SA virulence factors, hence the importance of clinical vigilance for community SAB cases. PMID:27741135

  9. CT Fluoroscopy-guided Aspiration of Intracerebral Hematomas: Technique and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kihwan; Kwon, O-Ki; Bang, Jae Seung; Oh, Chang Wan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The authors evaluated the feasibility and targeting accuracy of CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided catheter placement and aspiration of intracerebral hematoma (ICH)s. Materials and Methods Nine patients (mean age, 63.3 ± 15.3 years) were treated by CTF-guided hematoma aspiration under local anesthesia. The targeting errors in the lesion center, volume of the aspirated hematoma, accuracy of the final catheter position, procedure time, and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results All catheters were successfully placed in the center of the hematoma. The mean volume of the aspirated hematoma was 20.6 ± 8.8 mL (pre-treatment, 44.7 ± 20.1 mL; post-treatment, 24.1 ± 13.8 mL). The average procedure time was 25.1 minutes (range, 18-32 minutes). In one case with a scanty residual hematoma, the catheter was removed at the end of the procedure. In the remaining eight cases, the catheter was left in the residual hematoma for drainage and all catheter tips were accurately located in the final position. There were no procedure-related complications, including rebleeding and infection. Conclusion CTF-guided ICH aspiration is a feasible, quick, and accurate procedure which could substitute for stereotactic methods. The accurate catheter position provided by real-time observation enables an effective aspiration and drainage of hematomas. PMID:25874179

  10. [Improvement of MRI effectiveness in the detection of intracerebral hematoma. Double inversion recovery].

    PubMed

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Guseva, O I; Shumm, B A; Fomenkov, S A; Prokhorov, A V; Khetchikov, G V; Barkova, L A

    2009-01-01

    A study aimed at developing the pulse consequence, the double inversion recovery (DIR), using low field magnetic tomography, and assessing its effectiveness in the detection of intracerebral hematoma. The research has been conducted at "Ellipse" MR tomograph. The new pulse sequence has been created by the modification of the regular FLAIR, its technical parameters were as follows: the first TI - 90 ms, the second TI - 1300 ms, TR - 4665 ms, echo - 3. Twenty-seven patients have been enrolled in the study. The tissue contrast coefficients on FLAIR and DIR images have been compared. It has been shown that the contrast coefficient of normal brain structures and brain lesions on the DIR images in regard to the white matter are significantly higher than on the FLAIR images. Results of the study revealed that the dynamics of MR symptoms of intracerebral hematoma is faster on the DIR images compared to the FLAIR ones. This finding can be used for detection of intracerebral hematoma in difficult clinical cases.

  11. [A multi-factorial approach in the vital prognosis of spontaneous intracerebral hematoma].

    PubMed

    Senant, J; Samson, M; Proust, B; Szeibert, J; Onnient, Y

    1988-01-01

    The prognostic assessment of a patient with intra-cerebral hemorrhage (IH) requires simultaneous appraisal of several parameters. We have attempted this with a multivariate method: discriminant analysis. We studied retrospectively 142 patients with non-operated IH, not due to vascular malformation, distributed two months after the initial event in two groups: 92 living patients and 50 dead. Discriminant analysis of 21 parameters from the initial examination and CT scan, selected five factors which best separate the two groups, since 89% of the patients were well classified. These five parameters (age, consciousness impairment, temperature, volume of the hematoma and ventricular hemorrhage) combined, give a prognostic score which gives for each patient his probability of survival or death. The validity of the proposed model was controlled on a test-sample of 66 patients from another department. The possibility of giving a trustworthy spontaneous prognosis on the first day can enable the evaluation of the possible benefit from surgery, which we illustrated with a group of 23 operated patients. PMID:3047834

  12. Corticospinal Tract Compression by Hematoma in a Patient with Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Diffusion Tensor Tractography and Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Mi Young; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, Joong Hwi; Jeong, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Byung Yeun; Lee, Dong Gyu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate corticospinal tract compression that was due to a hematoma by using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and functional MRI (fMRI) in a patient with an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A 23-year-old right-handed woman presented with severe paralysis of her right extremities at the onset of a spontaneous ICH. Over the first three days from onset, the motor function of the affected upper and lower extremities rapidly recovered to the extent that she was able to overcome applied resistance to the affected limbs, and her limbs regained normal function 3 weeks after onset. The tract of the right hemisphere originated from the primary sensori-motor cortex (SM1) and it passed through the known corticospinal tract pathway. However, the tract of the left hemisphere was similar to that of the right hemisphere except that it was displaced to the antero-medial side by the hematoma at the cerebral peduncle. Only the contralateral SM1 area centered on the precentral knob was activated during affected (right) or unaffected (left) hand movements, respectively. In conclusion, fMRI and DTT demonstrated a corticospinal tract compression due to hematoma in this patient. We conclude that the combined use of these two modalities appears to improve the accuracy of investigating the state of the corticospinal tract. PMID:16502496

  13. A death due to perirenal hematoma complicating extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Koichi; Takahashi, Sayuri; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Nakajima, Makoto; Saka, Kanju; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2008-03-01

    Perirenal hematoma is an occasional complication of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) which does not usually require treatment. A 79-year-old woman died 23 h after ESWL. Forensic autopsy was performed to determine whether medical treatment contributed to her death. The cause of death was hemorrhagic shock due to massive hematoma from a ruptured small vein in the perirenal adipose capsule. No injury to other organs was found and the patient had neither coagulation abnormality nor venous disease. Perirenal hematoma can easily be diagnosed with abdominal sonography, if pain or symptoms of anemia develop. Doctors must be aware of the possibilities of severe renal hematomas after ESWL.

  14. Rate of Contrast Extravasation on CT Angiography Predicts Hematoma Expansion and Mortality in Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, H. Bart; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Musial, Hayley H.; Ciura, Viesha A.; Falcone, Guido J.; Ayres, Alison M.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Viswanathan, Anand; Anderson, Christopher D.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Pomerantz, Stuart R.; Ortiz, Claudia J.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Rosand, Jonathan; Romero, Javier M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the presence of contrast extravasation following CT angiography (CTA), termed the ‘spot sign’, predicts hematoma expansion and mortality. Since the biological underpinnings of the spot sign are not fully understood, we investigated whether the rate of contrast extravasation - which may reflect the rate of bleeding - predicts expansion and mortality beyond the simple presence of the spot sign. Methods Consecutive ICH patients with first-pass CTA followed by a 90-second delayed post-contrast CT (delayed CTA) were included. CTAs were reviewed for spot sign presence by two blinded readers. Spot sign volumes on first-pass and delayed CTA and ICH volumes were measured using semi-automated software. Extravasation rates were calculated and tested for association with hematoma expansion and mortality using uni- and multivariable logistic regression. Results 162 patients were included, 48 (30%) of whom had ≥1 spot sign. Median spot sign volume was 0.04mL on first-pass CTA and 0.4mL on delayed CTA. Median extravasation rate was 0.23mL/min overall, and 0.30mL/min among expanders versus 0.07mL/min in non-expanders. Extravasation rates were also significantly higher in patients who died in hospital: 0.27mL/min versus 0.04mL/min. In multivariable analysis, the extravasation rate was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (OR1.09 [95%CI 1.04–1.18], p=0.004), 90-day mortality (OR1.15 [95%CI 1.08–1.27], p=0.0004), and hematoma expansion (OR1.03 [95%CI 1.01–1.08], p=0.047). Conclusions Contrast extravasation rate, or spot sign growth, further refines the ability to predict hematoma expansion and mortality. Our results support the hypothesis that the spot sign directly measures active bleeding in acute ICH. PMID:26243220

  15. Day-night variability of hematoma expansion in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoying; Wu, Bo; Xu, Ye; Siwila-Sackman, Erica; Selim, Magdy

    2015-06-01

    The levels of several coagulation factors, able to influence hemostatic balance, display circadian variations. We hypothesized that the onset and extent of hematoma expansion (HE) following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) also display diurnal patterns. We reviewed clinical, laboratory, and radiological data from 111 consecutive patients with spontaneous ICH who had baseline head computed tomography (CT) scans within 3 h of ICH onset and follow-up CT during the following 72 h. We defined any HE (AHE) as any increase in hematoma volume from baseline to follow-up CT and significant HE (SHE) as an absolute increase in hematoma volume >6 mL or relative increase >33%. We categorized the patients into 2 groups based on the timing of the initial CT scans--day group (from 0800 to 2000 h) and night group (from 2000 to 0800 h)--and performed logistic regression analyses. We also analyzed the differences in the rates of HE between the groups during six 4-h periods spanning 24 h, using χ(2) tests. We found that the rates of AHE and SHE were higher in the day versus night group (75% vs. 48%; p = 0.009 for AHE and 47.6% vs. 25.9%; p = 0.047 for SHE). On multivariable logistic regression, day group assignment was independently associated with AHE (adjusted odds ratio = 3.53; p = 0.008) but not with SHE. Both AHE and SHE peaked in the early afternoon (1200-1600 h) and reached a nadir during the 2000 to 2400 h time period, and they were significantly different between the time periods (0000-0400, 0400-0800, 0800-1200, 1200-1600, 1600-2000, and 2000-2400 h); p = 0.002 and 0.029, respectively. These exploratory findings support the presence of a daily pattern in the occurrence of HE, with a higher risk during the day hours. Our results could have implications for future therapeutic efforts targeting HE in ICH and for the triage of ICH patients. They require further validation. PMID:25994102

  16. Design of a prospective, dose-escalation study evaluating the Safety of Pioglitazone for Hematoma Resolution in Intracerebral Hemorrhage (SHRINC).

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Nicole R; Shah, Jharna; Sangha, Navdeep; Sosa, Lenis; Martinez, Rebecca; Shen, Loren; Kasam, Mallikarjunarao; Morales, Miriam M; Hossain, M Monir; Barreto, Andrew D; Savitz, Sean I; Lopez, George; Misra, Vivek; Wu, Tzu-Ching; El Khoury, Ramy; Sarraj, Amrou; Sahota, Preeti; Hicks, William; Acosta, Indrani; Sline, M Rick; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Zhao, Xiurong; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Grotta, James C

    2013-07-01

    RATIONALE : Preclinical work demonstrates that the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma plays an important role in augmenting phagocytosis while modulating oxidative stress and inflammation. We propose that targeted stimulation of phagocytosis to promote efficient removal of the hematoma without harming surrounding brain cells may be a therapeutic option for intracerebral hemorrhage. AIMS : The primary objective is to assess the safety of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, pioglitazone, in increasing doses for three-days followed by a maintenance dose, when administered to patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage within 24 h of symptom onset compared with standard care. We will determine the maximum tolerated dose of pioglitazone. STUDY DESIGN : This is a prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation safety trial in which patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage are randomly allocated to placebo or treatment. The Continual Reassessment Method for dose finding is used to determine the maximum tolerated dose of pioglitazone. Hematoma and edema resolution is evaluated with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at specified time points. Functional outcome will be evaluated at three- and six-months. OUTCOMES : The primary safety outcome is mortality at discharge. Secondary safety outcomes include mortality at three-months and six-months, symptomatic cerebral edema, clinically significant congestive heart failure, edema, hypoglycemia, anemia, and hepatotoxicity. Radiographic outcomes will explore the time frame for resolution of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the hematoma. Clinical outcomes are measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), the Barthel Index, modified Rankin Scale, Stroke Impact Scale-16, and EuroQol at three- and six-months.

  17. Effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration on intracerebral hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghua; Shang, Xiao; Hao, Maolin; Zheng, Maoyong; Li, Yanxia; Liang, Zhigang; Cui, Yuanxiao; Liu, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the effects of human umbilical cord-mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration on neural functional recovery and p53 gene expression in rats with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Collagenase type-IV was injected to the caudate nucleus of the rats to make ICH models. One hundred and twenty Sprague-Dawley rats with successful modeling were randomly divided into 4 groups, including the ICH group, hematoma aspiration group, HUC-MSCs transplantation group and HUC-MSCs transplantation combined with hematoma aspiration group (combination group). Neural functional status of the rats was assessed by modified neurological severity score (mNSS). Expression of p53 in the cerebral tissues surrounding ICH was detected by immunohistochemical assays. The scores of mNSS and the expression of p53 gene in the hematoma aspiration group, the HUC-MSCs transplantation group and the combination group were significantly lower than those in the ICH group at each indicated time point (p < 0.05). Intriguingly, mNSS scores and p53 expression in the combination group were significantly lower than those in the hematoma aspiration group on day 7, 14 and 30 (p < 0.05), and significantly lower than those in the HUC-MSCs transplantation group on day 14 and 30 (p < 0.05). HUC-MSCs transplantation combined with minimally invasive hematoma aspiration is more effective than either therapy alone in rats with ICH and could distinctly reduce the damage of nerve cells. PMID:26807166

  18. [Features of memantine action profile in cholinergic deficit and intracerebral posttraumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke) models in rats].

    PubMed

    Garibova, T L; Voronina, T A; Litvinova, S A; Kuznetsova, A L; Kul'chikov, A E; Alesenko, A V

    2008-01-01

    Memantine, a low-affinity non-competitive antagonist of glutamatergic NMDA-subtype receptors, was used at a daily dose of 1 mg/kg over 10 days for the treatment of rats with cholinergic deficit induced by the chronic administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, 20 days). The drug prevented violation of the learning of conditioned active and passive avoidance reflexes and produced no significant effect on the emotional state of animals in elevated plus maze (EPM) test. In animals with intracerebral posttraumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke), memantine (2 mg/kg, for 3 days after operation) completely prevented the loss of animals, reduced the neurological deficit, improved conditioned passive avoidance reflex performance, and decreased emotional stress in the EPM test.

  19. Acute Spontaneous Subdural Hematoma due to Rupture of a Tiny Cortical Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Jin; Lee, Jae Il; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Ko, Jun Kyeung

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) of arterial origin is rare, especially SDH associated with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is extremely rare. The authors report a case of acute spontaneous SDH due to rupture of a tiny cortical AVM. A 51-year-old male presented with sudden onset headache and mentality deterioration without a history of trauma. Brain CT revealed a large volume acute SDH compressing the right cerebral hemisphere with subfalcine and tentorial herniation. Emergency decompressive craniectomy was performed to remove the hematoma and during surgery a small (5 mm sized) conglomerated aciniform mass with two surrounding enlarged vessels was identified on the parietal cortex. After warm saline irrigation of the mass, active bleeding developed from a one of the vessel. The bleeding was stopped by coagulation and the vessels were removed. Histopathological examination confirmed the lesion as an AVM. We concluded that a small cortical AVM existed at this area, and that the cortical AVM had caused the acute SDH. Follow up conventional angiography confirmed the absence of remnant AVM or any other vascular abnormality. This report demonstrates rupture of a cortical AVM is worth considering when a patient presents with non-traumatic SDH without intracerebral hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26819690

  20. The Effect of Minimally Invasive Hematoma Aspiration on the JNK Signal Transduction Pathway after Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Haitao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Guofang; Li, Zhaoxing; Luo, Kai; An, Jingjiao; Li, Guangcheng; Guo, Yunliang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive hematoma aspiration (MIHA) on the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: In this experiment, 300 adult male Wistar rats were randomly and averagely divided into sham-operated group, ICH group and MIHA group. In each group, 60 rats were used in the detection of indexes in this experiment, while the other 40 rats were used to replace rats which reached the exclusion criteria (accidental death or operation failure). In ICH group and MIHA group, ICH was induced by injection of 70 µL of autologous arterial blood into rat brain, while only the rats in MIHA group were treated by MIHA 6 h after ICH. Rats in sham-operated group were injected nothing into brains, and they were not treated either, like rats in ICH group. In each group, six rats were randomly selected to observe their Bederson’s scales persistently (6, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 h after ICH). According to the time they were sacrificed, the remaining rats in each group were divided into 3 subgroups (24, 72, 120 h). The change of brain water content (BWC) was measured by the wet weight to dry weight ratio method. The morphology of neurons in cortex was observed by the hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining. The expressions of phospho-c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (pJNK) and JNK in peri-hematomal brain tissue were determined by the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Results: At all time points, compared with the ICH groups, the expression of pJNK decreased obviously in MIHA groups (p < 0.05), while their Bederson’s scales and BWC declined, and neuron injury in the cortex was relieved. The expression level of JNK was not altered at different groups. The data obtained by IHC and WB indicated a high-level of consistency, which provided a certain dependability of the test results. Conclusion: The JNK signal transduction pathway could be activated after intracerebral hemorrhage, with the

  1. Blood glutamate grabbing does not reduce the hematoma in an intracerebral hemorrhage model but it is a safe excitotoxic treatment modality.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Candal, Andrés; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Rey, Ramón I; Argibay, Bárbara; Mirelman, David; Sobrino, Tomás; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Castillo, José; Campos, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that blood glutamate grabbing is an effective strategy to reduce the excitotoxic effect of extracellular glutamate released during ischemic brain injury. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of two of the most efficient blood glutamate grabbers (oxaloacetate and recombinant glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase 1: rGOT1) in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Intracerebral hemorrhage was produced by injecting collagenase into the basal ganglia. Three treatment groups were developed: a control group treated with saline, a group treated with oxaloacetate, and a final group treated with human rGOT1. Treatments were given 1 hour after hemorrhage. Hematoma volume (analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), neurologic deficit, and blood glutamate and GOT levels were quantified over a period of 14 days after surgery. The results observed showed that the treatments used induced a significant reduction of blood glutamate levels; however, they did not reduce the hematoma, nor did they improve the neurologic deficit. In the present experimental study, we have shown that this novel therapeutic strategy is not effective in case of ICH pathology. More importantly, these findings suggest that blood glutamate grabbers are a safe treatment modality that can be given in cases of suspected ischemic stroke without previous neuroimaging.

  2. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  3. Successful Nonoperative Management of Spontaneous Splenic Hematoma and Hemoperitoneum due to CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lianos, Georgios; Ignatiadou, Eleftheria; Bali, Christina; Harissis, Haralampos; Katsios, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous splenic hematoma or splenic rupture due to CMV infection in immunocompetent adults is rare and life-threatening. Case Report. Herein we report a rare case of spontaneous splenic hematoma and hemoperitoneum due to CMV infection in a 23-year-old Caucasian male in whom conservative management was successful. Conclusion. Spontaneous splenic hematoma and spontaneous splenic rupture are extremely rare conditions during primary CMV infection. Though rare, they must be always considered by the operating surgeon, because any misinterpretation may result in unfavorable outcomes. PMID:23227374

  4. Treatment of thoracic hemorrhage due to rupture of traumatic mediastinal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Fang; Cao, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Patients in traffic accidents are usually presented with pain and bleeding due to fractures or soft tissue injury. On some occasions, more severe complications may be triggered by the trauma. A review of the published English language literature reveals no survival case once the traumatic mediastinal hematoma is ruptured. In our case, a 54-year-old man suffering motorcycle accident was admitted to emergency department. Computed tomography scan revealed subdural hematoma combined with posterior mediastinal hematoma. The patient was saved and discharged with a satisfactory outcome. Here we hope to share our treatment experience in dealing with the patient with severe multiple trauma. PMID:27033275

  5. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H. Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  6. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia.

    PubMed

    Eker, Amber; Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  7. [Comparative assessment of MR-semiotics of acutest intracerebral hematomas in low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance tomography].

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, V I; Burenchev, D V; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Prokhorov, A V; Smirnov, A M; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    An objective of the study was to compare sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance (MR) tomography of acutest intracerebral hematomas (ICH) and to assess differences between symptoms in obtained images. A study was conducted using experimental ICH in rats (n=6). Hematomas were formed by two injections of autologic blood into the brain. MR-devices "Bio Spec 70/30" with magnetic field strength of 7 T and "Ellipse-150" with magnetic field strength of 0,15 T were used in the study. MR-tomography was carried out 3-5 h after the injections. Both MR-devices revealed the presence of pathological lesion in all animals. Extra highfield frequency MR-tomography showed the specific signs of ICH caused by the paramagnetic effect of deoxyhemoglobin in T2 and T2*-weighted images (WI) and low frequency MR-tomography - in T2*-WI only. The comparable sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency MR-devices in acutest ICH was established.

  8. [Neuroprotector effect of human recombinant erythropoietin sorbed on polymer nanoparticles studied on model of intracerebral post-traumatic hematoma (hemorrhagic stroke)].

    PubMed

    Balaban'ian, V Iu; Solev, I N; Elizarova, O S; Garibova, T L; Litvinova, S A; Voronina, T A

    2011-01-01

    The neuroprotective activity of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEpo) sorbed on poly(butyl)cyanoacrilate nanoparticles (EPO-PBCA) and on polylactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (EPO-PLGA) has been studied on Wistar rats with intracerebral post-traumatic hematoma (model of hemorrhagic stroke) (IPH-HS) in comparison to native r-HuEpo. It is established that EPO-PBCA produced a protective effect in rats after IPH-HS that was manifested by a decrease in the number of animals with neurological disorders such as circus movement, paresis, and paralysis of hind limbs; the drug also improved coordination (rotating rod test), reduced the number of lost animals, and decreased the loss weight among survived rats. In addition, EPO-PBCA optimized the research behavior of rats with IPH-HS in the open field test and prevented amnesia of passive avoidance reflex (PAR), which was caused by the IPH-HS. These effects were manifested during a two-week observation period. EPO-PLGA has a similar but much less pronounced effect on the major disorders caused by IPH-HS. The efficiency of native r-HuEpo as a neuropotective agent was insignificant and only manifested by decrease in the number of lost animals with IPH-HS.

  9. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  10. Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage following posterior fossa surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Malik, Vinod; Kovai, Priyamvadha; Aggarwal, Ashish; Khandelwal, Niranjan K.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed supratentorial intracerebral hematoma after posterior fossa surgery is uncommon. Only few cases have been reported in the past. The cause has been attributed to sitting position leading to changes in intracranial arterial and venous pressures. We report two cases of delayed intracerebral hematoma following posterior fossa surgery, none of which were operated in sitting position. MR venogram done in one patient showed venous sinus thrombosis. Intracererbal hematoma following infratentorial surgery is uncommon and is possibly due to venous sinus thrombosis leading to venous hypertension. Control of bleeding from venous sinuses due to avulsion of emissary veins during craniotomy/craniectomy possibly induces sinus thrombosis that may propagate antegrade or retrograde, leading to venous hypertension and parenchymal bleed. PMID:27366274

  11. Delayed Diagnosis of Pelvic Hematoma without Fracture Due to Military Parachuting.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cord W; Kotwal, Russ S; Kragh, John F

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has been conducting static-line parachute jumps for nearly a century. Beginning with World War II, military forces have also employed full-scale airborne operations as a method for insertion into combat. Through the years, injuries from blunt trauma as a result of static-line parachute jumps have evolved little with the refinement of equipment, training, and tactics. Parachute jumps continue to invoke primarily musculoskeletal injuries, especially to the lower extremities, back, neck, and head. These injuries are usually straightforward in their presentation and diagnosis. We describe the delayed diagnosis of a pelvic hematoma due to an uncommon blunt trauma jump injury. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of injury patterns during paratrooper operations, as well as to review the diagnosis and management of occult hemorrhage. Specific objectives for the readers are to (1) know the common injury types and patterns for airborne operations, (2) know the descent rate of T-10C/D parachutes and factors influencing the rate, (3) recognize signs and symptoms associated with a pelvic hematoma, and (4) recognize common complications resulting from a pelvic hematoma.

  12. Delayed Diagnosis of Pelvic Hematoma without Fracture Due to Military Parachuting.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cord W; Kotwal, Russ S; Kragh, John F

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has been conducting static-line parachute jumps for nearly a century. Beginning with World War II, military forces have also employed full-scale airborne operations as a method for insertion into combat. Through the years, injuries from blunt trauma as a result of static-line parachute jumps have evolved little with the refinement of equipment, training, and tactics. Parachute jumps continue to invoke primarily musculoskeletal injuries, especially to the lower extremities, back, neck, and head. These injuries are usually straightforward in their presentation and diagnosis. We describe the delayed diagnosis of a pelvic hematoma due to an uncommon blunt trauma jump injury. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of injury patterns during paratrooper operations, as well as to review the diagnosis and management of occult hemorrhage. Specific objectives for the readers are to (1) know the common injury types and patterns for airborne operations, (2) know the descent rate of T-10C/D parachutes and factors influencing the rate, (3) recognize signs and symptoms associated with a pelvic hematoma, and (4) recognize common complications resulting from a pelvic hematoma. PMID:24419827

  13. Subcapsular hematoma due to ESWL: risk factors. A study of 4,247 patients.

    PubMed

    Kostakopoulos, A; Stavropoulos, N J; Macrychoritis, C; Deliveliotis, C; Antonopoulos, K P; Picramenos, D

    1995-01-01

    A study of 4,247 shockwave lithotripsy treatment was performed to identify and analyze the risk factors for the development of post-extracorporeal shock-wave lithotropsy hematomas. The Dornier HM-3 and HM-4 lithotriptors were used. We recognized 23 hematomas in 23 patients (0.54%). Various factors were examined to identify the certain predisposing risk factors. There was no correlation of sex, age, stone number, stone size, stone location, number of shock waves and voltage used with the occurrence rate of hematoma. We found that patients with pre-existing hypertension and especially those with poor control of it had a significantly increased incidence of perinephric hematoma.

  14. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions.

  15. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:27631225

  16. [Intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages after administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemicstroke due to anterior cerebral artery dissection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Ken; Koyama, Seigo; Nakamura, Ryoichi

    2011-06-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of right hemiparesis. At admission, he was alert and well oriented. His verbal comprehension seemed good, but his speech was not fluent. He could not stand or walk owing to the right hemiparesis, which was severe in the lower extremity. Computed tomographic (CT) scans on admission showed no abnormality. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging performed after the CT showed a high-intensity lesion in the left cingulate gyrus. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed occlusion and irregularity of the left A2 portion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). At 1 h 50 min after the onset of the hemiparesis, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; 0.6 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. At 1 h after the administration of rt-PA, he became drowsy and his right hemiparesis deteriorated. CT scans performed again showed a hematoma in the left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the anterior interhemispheric fissure. He was treated conservatively. MRA performed on the 18th day after admission showed recanalization of the left ACA and abnormal dilatation of the left A2 segment. The abnormal dilatation was also depicted by 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) performed on the 26th day after admission and even on the 33rd and 77th days. As seen in our case, the definite diagnosis of dissection confined to the ACA frequently needs serial angiographies; therefore, its diagnosis immediately after the onset is often difficult. Thrombolytic therapy by intravenous administration of rt-PA for cerebral infarction caused by dissection of the ACA may recanalize the occluded site and facilitate the progression of the dissection, resulting in intracerebral and/or subarachnoid hemorrhages. In patients with cerebral infarction due to ACA dissection, strict control of blood pressure and careful observation are necessary after thrombolytic therapy by rt-PA.

  17. Memory impairment caused by cerebral hematoma in the left medial temporal lobe due to ruptured posterior cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive disorders, such as memory disturbances, are often observed following a subarachnoid hemorrhage. We present a very rare case where rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused restricted damage to the hippocampus unilaterally, and caused memory disturbances. Case presentation A 56-year-old, right-handed man, with a formal education history of 16 years and company employees was admitted to our hospital because of a consciousness disturbance. He was diagnosed as having a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a left posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm, and coil embolization was performed. Subsequently, he had neither motor paresis nor sensory disturbances, but he showed disorientation, and both retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Although immediate recall and remote memory were almost intact, his recent memory was moderately impaired. Both verbal and non-verbal memories were impaired. Brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cerebral hematoma in the left temporal lobe involving the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) demonstrated low perfusion areas in the left medial temporal lobe. Conclusions We suggest that the memory impairment was caused by local tissue destruction of Papez’s circuit in the dominant hemisphere due to the cerebral hematoma. PMID:24602130

  18. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH.

  19. Extensive cervicomediastinal hematoma due to spontaneous hemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, J.J.; Poelman, M.M.; Wiarda, B.M.; Bonjer, H.J.; Houdijk, A.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous extracapsular hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening manifestation of parathyroid gland adenomas. We present a case demonstrating that even in a patient with increased bleeding tendency due to anticoagulants, combined with compression of trachea and esophagus, conservative treatment can be successful. PMID:25935903

  20. Intracerebral bullet removal through an endoscopic transnasal craniectomy

    PubMed Central

    Villaret, Andrea Bolzoni; Zenga, Francesco; Esposito, Isabella; Rasulo, Frank; Fontanella, Marco; Nicolai, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, the endoscopic transnasal technique has been broadly applied as a feasible and less invasive approach to the skull base. The adaptability of the endoscopic technique allows a case-specific approach in order to minimize both endonasal and cranio-cerebral manipulation; therefore it can be also used in patients complaining exceptional skull base lesions and in weak patients. The objective of this paper is to present the first case of intracerebral bullet removal using a pure endoscopic transnasal route through a custom made unilateral craniectomy. Case Description: A 59-year-old patient was admitted to the emergency department after a gunshot injury to the head, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Admission Glasgow Coma Scale was 7. Brain computed tomography (CT) scan highlighted a right occipital hole defect due to perforative impact, intracerebral dislocations of bone fragments, right intracerebral and subdural hematoma, and midline shift to the left side; the bullet was localized in the right frontal lobe and its tip was in contact with the ethmoid roof. The patient underwent emergency decompressive craniectomy and evacuation of the subdural hematoma and abdominal explorative laparotomy, ileum resection, and gastrorrhaphy. After 1 month, the patient underwent endoscopic transnasal removal of the bullet and skull base reconstruction due to cerebrospinal fluid infection. The postoperative course was uneventful and he has done well in follow-up with no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak and preservation of olfaction. Conclusion: The adaptability of the endoscopic transnasal technique offers patients complaining exceptional skull base lesions a case-specific strategy minimizing morbidity and postoperative stay. PMID:23372971

  1. Can Herbal Medicine Cause Hematoma Enlargement of Hypertensive Intracerebral Hemorrhage within 24 hrs Time Window? A Retrospective Study of 256 Cases from a Single Center in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yafa; Guo, Jianwen; Liu, Xian; Li, Juehui; Wang, Jing; Hou, Lingbo

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective review was performed of consecutive patients presenting with HICH within 24 hours of ictus presenting between March 2008 and March 2013 who were diagnosed as having HICH by CT scan. Of the 256 patients who matched study inclusion standard, 43 patients hematoma was enlarged (16.8%). The number of the patients who did not take PBC or RBC herbal medicine, took the PBC herbal medicine, and took RBS herbal medicine was 19 (44.2%), 2 (4.7%), and 22 (51.2%) in hematoma enlargement group and 78 (36.6%), 26 (12.2%), and 109 (51.2%) in nonhematoma enlargement group, individually. There was no significant difference between two groups (P = 0.671). PBC and RBS herbal medicine did not increase the incidence of hematoma expansion of ICH within 24 hours after onset of symptom. PMID:25788965

  2. Intercellular Cross-talk in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating cerebrovascular disorder with high mortality and morbidity. Currently, there are few treatment strategies for ICH-induced brain injury. A recent increase in interest in the pathophysiology of ICH, has led to elucidation of the pathways underlying ICH-induced brain injury, pathways where intercellular and hematoma to cell signaling play important roles. In this review, we summarize recent advances in ICH research focusing on intercellular and hematoma:cell cross-talk related to brain injury and recovery after ICH. PMID:25863131

  3. The return of an old worm: cerebral paragonimiasis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2012-11-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.

  4. The Return of an Old Worm: Cerebral Paragonimiasis Presenting with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes. PMID:23166429

  5. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  6. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. Methods— We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Results— Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). Conclusions— The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. PMID:26931155

  7. Surgical Management of Aneurysmal Hematomas: Prognostic Factors and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Meneghelli, P; Cozzi, F; Hasanbelliu, A; Locatelli, F; Pasqualin, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    From 1991 until 2013, 304 patients with intracranial hematomas from aneurysmal rupture were managed surgically in our department, constituting 17 % of all patients with aneurysmal rupture. Of them, 242 patents presented with isolated intracerebral hematomas (in 69 cases associated with significant intraventricular hemorrhage), 50 patients presented with combined intracerebral and subdural hematomas (in 11 cases associated with significant intraventricular hemorrhage), and 12 presented with an isolated subdural hematoma. The surgical procedure consisted of simultaneous clipping of the aneurysm and evacuation of the hematoma in all cases. After surgery, 16 patients (5 %) submitted to an additional decompressive hemicraniectomy, and 66 patients (21 %) submitted to a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Clinical outcomes were assessed at discharge and at 6 months, using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS); a favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) was observed in 10 % of the cases at discharge, increasing to 31 % at 6 months; 6-month mortality was 40 %. Applying uni- and multivariate analysis, the following risk factors were associated with a significantly worse outcome: age >60; preoperative Hunt-Hess grades IV-V; pupillary mydriasis (only on univariate); midline shift >10 mm; hematoma volume >30 cc; and the presence of hemocephalus (i.e., packed intraventricular hemorrhage). Based on these results, an aggressive surgical treatment should be adopted for most cases with aneurysmal hematomas, excluding patients with bilateral mydriasis persisting after rescue therapy. PMID:27637622

  8. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24 hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30 ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH.

  9. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  10. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans-Juergen; Lott, Carsten; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  11. Noninvasive detection of intracerebral hemorrhage using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Hans J.; Lott, C.; Windirsch, Michael; Hanley, Daniel F.; Boor, Stephan; Brambrink, Ansgar; Dick, Wolfgang

    1997-12-01

    Intracerebral Hemorrhage (IH) is an important cause of secondary brain injury in neurosurgical patients. Early identification and treatment improve neurologic outcome. We have tested Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool compared to CT-Scans to detect IH. We prospectively studied 212 patients with neurologic symptoms associated with intracranial pathology before performing a CT-scan. NIRS signals indicated pathologies in 181 cases (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.29). In a subgroup of subdural hematomas NIRS detected 45 of 46 hematomas (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.79). Identification of intracerebral hemorrhage using NIRS has the potential to allow early treatment, thus possibly avoiding further injury.

  12. Postoperative extradural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Angelo; Ruggeri, Andrea; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative extradural hematoma (POEH) is a possible complication after head surgery, often neglected in the literature. In a single surgeon experience we found 13 cases of POEH (0.8%). We distinguished two subtypes: (1) larger hematomas (>40 cc) with typical features and overt clinical picture that always needed evacuation, and (2) smaller hematomas (<40 cc) with insidious clinical onset and different radiological features compared with traumatic and spontaneous extradural hematomas. On the basis of our experience, we propose that clinical picture and radiologic appearance lead the decision between conservative or interventional treatment of type II hematomas.

  13. Intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Reijmer, Yael D; Charidimou, Andreas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia are composed of cognitive deficits resulted from a range of vascular lesions and pathologies, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic. However the contribution of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presumed due to small vessel diseases on cognitive impairment is underestimated, in contrast to the numerous studies about the role of ischemic vascular disorders on cognition. In this review we summarize recent findings from clinical studies and appropriate basic science research to better elucidate the role and possible mechanisms of intracerebral hemorrhage in cognitive impairment and dementia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  14. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration.

  15. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Grosse Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration. PMID:26296471

  16. Coronary Intramural Hematoma Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takenobu; Kadota, Kazushige; Kubo, Shunsuke; Habara, Seiji; Mitsudo, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of intramural hematoma without ongoing myocardial ischemia that healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. A 37-year-old woman was admitted due to chest pain. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the distal portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, where intravascular ultrasound showed a hematoma, but optical coherence tomography could not detect the entry point. Therefore, we identified the intramural hematoma as the etiology. Because the coronary flow was maintained and chest pain disappeared, we chose conservative treatment. Fifteen days after admission, coronary computed tomography showed an improvement in the intramural hematoma. PMID:27477409

  17. Markerless surgical robotic system for intracerebral hemorrhage surgery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Cho, Hyunchul; Yoon, Siyeop; Park, Kyusic; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung; Kim, Laehyun; Lee, Deukhee

    2015-01-01

    Conventional intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) surgery uses a stereotactic frame to access an intracerebral hematoma. Using a stereotactic frame for ICH surgery requires a long preparation time. In order to resolve this problem, we propose a markerless surgical robotic system. This system uses weighted iterative closest point technology for surface registration, hand-eye calibration for needle insertion, and 3D surface scanning for registration. We need calibration to integrate the technologies: calibration of robot and needle coordinates and calibration of 3D surface scanning and needle coordinates. These calibrations are essential elements of the markerless surgical robotic system. This system has the advantages of being non-invasive, a short total operation time, and low radiation exposure compared to conventional ICH surgery. PMID:26737481

  18. Traumatic epidural hematoma in children.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Giovanni; Caroli, Emanuela; Raco, Antonino; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of childhood acute epidural hematoma and to report our experience in recent years. A series of 35 patients below the age of 15 years treated for acute epidural hematoma at our institution between June 1991 and December 2000 was analyzed in detail. Pediatric epidural hematoma presents both age-related and atypical features when compared with epidural hematoma in adults. In selected cases, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma results in an excellent outcome. Outcomes seem to be directly related to the patient's preoperative neurologic status and the presence of associated intracranial lesions.

  19. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  20. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  1. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  2. Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage after alcohol ingestion and illicit use of sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Antar, Veysel; Sutpideler, Neslihan; Baran, Oguz; Bitirak, Gorkem

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil is a drug used in the treatment of male impotence. Few cases of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage following the use of sildenafil have been cited in the literature. A 42-year-old man was admitted to the emergency outpatient clinic of İstanbul Educational and Research Hospital after sudden loss of consciousness. He had ingested alcohol, taken 50mg sildenafil and had sexual intercourse. Non-contrast cranial tomography revealed an intracerebral hematoma with extension to the ventricles. Sildenafil is a selective phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme inhibitor. With the inhibition of PDE-5, the amount of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP) in the smooth vascular muscle cells in the corpus cavernosum increases, leading to a relaxation of muscles and vasodilatation. Studies have shown that the NO-c-GMP pathway leads to cerebral vasodilatation with a similar mechanism. The literature has shown that the effect of PDE-1 and PDE-2 on cerebral bleeding control is affected by sildenafil. This increased blood flow increases the risk of intracranial haemorrhage. Although data concerning the presentation of intracerebral hematoma in connection with the combined use of alcohol ingestion and use of sildenafil is inadequate, it can nevertheless be thought that the combined use increases the risk of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage and caution is in order concerning the matter. PMID:26037192

  3. Intramural esophagic hematoma secondary to coumarinic anticoagulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Esophagic Intramural Hematoma is an uncommon clinical condition, with a prognosis which is essentially benign. On most cases, a predisposing or precipitating factor may be seen, with the most common ones being the history of esophagic instrumentation, food impactations and thrombocytopenia. In the following manuscript, the authors present the case of a 54-years-old male with history of valve replacement surgery, who was treated at the Clinica Cardiovascular (Medellin, Colombia), with a clinical case of Intramural Esophagic Hematoma that was later confirmed to be due to a Coumarinic overanticoagulation. On this case, it is evidenced that Intramural Esophagic Hematoma is an unrecognized complication of Courmarinic anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20069068

  4. [Retroperitoneal hematoma secondary to traumatic rupture of the psoas muscle].

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga, M; Benítez, J; Gallardo, C; Garrido, R; Casanueva, T

    1990-01-01

    Rupturing of the psoas muscle by closed injury as a result of the formation of a retroperitoneal hematoma is a very uncommon pathological entity, which may rise problems of differential diagnosis with kidney lesions. Supplementary explorations do not always clear up diagnostic doubts, and it is surgery, if indicated, that confirms the picture. We present a case of retroperitoneal hematoma of traumatic origin in a one-kidney ipsilateral patient, in whom the abdominal CAT revealed affection of the renal capsule associated with rupture of teh psoas. In the surgery carried out due to formation of an abscess in the hematoma we verified that the kidney was undamaged.

  5. Orbital subperiosteal hematoma from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, Clark; Angelidis, Matthew; Devita, Diane

    2010-09-01

    Only a few cases of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma due to scuba diving have been reported, and this is the first of such cases that underwent surgical intervention. This injury results from negative pressure within the face mask, suctioning orbital tissues into the mask after incomplete equilibration of pressure on descent. Valsalva maneuver is a second mechanism implicated in the etiology of this injury. Recognition of this injury is of the utmost importance because vision loss is a possible complication if there is compression of the optic nerve or increased intraocular pressure. In many cases of nontraumatic orbital hematoma, conservative management is adequate; however, this case was an exception due to worsening exam findings. Divers may be able to prevent this injury by frequent and gentle equilibration of mask pressure on descent.

  6. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry--a novel method to quantify blood volume in experimental models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Foerch, Christian; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2013-02-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10% of all strokes and has a significantly higher mortality than cerebral ischemia. For decades, ICH has been neglected by experimental stroke researchers. Recently, however, clinical trials on acute blood pressure lowering or hyperacute supplementation of coagulation factors in ICH have spurred an interest to also design and improve translational animal models of spontaneous and anticoagulant-associated ICH. Hematoma volume is a substantial outcome parameter of most experimental ICH studies. We present graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) as a suitable method to precisely quantify hematoma volumes in rodent models of ICH.

  7. Protective Effect of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ) in Rat Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjian; Shen, Jiabing; Song, Xinjian; Ge, Jianbin; Cai, Rixin; Dai, Aihua; Jiang, Zhongli

    2015-10-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has invoked considerable interest because of its presence in foods, antioxidant properties, cofactor of dehydrogenase, and amine oxidase. Protective roles of PQQ in central nervous system diseases, such as experimental stroke and spinal cord injury models have been emerged. However, it is unclear whether intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), as an acute devastating disease, can also benefit from PQQ in experimental conditions. Herein, we examined the possible effect of PQQ on neuronal functions following ICH in the adult rats. The results showed that rats pretreated with PQQ at 10 mg/kg effectively improved the locomotor functions, alleviated the hematoma volumes, and reduced the expansion of brain edema after ICH. Also, pretreated rats with PQQ obviously reduced the production of reactive oxygen species after ICH, probably due to its antioxidant properties. Further, we found that, Bcl-2/Bax, the important indicator of oxidative stress insult in mitochondria after ICH, exhibited increasing ratio in PQQ-pretreated groups. Moreover, activated caspase-3, the apoptotic executor, showed coincident alleviation in PQQ groups after ICH. Collectively, we speculated that PQQ might be an effective and potential neuroprotectant in clinical therapy for ICH.

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma infected by propionibacterium acnes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  9. Spontaneous soft tissue hematomas.

    PubMed

    Dohan, A; Darnige, L; Sapoval, M; Pellerin, O

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous muscle hematomas are a common and serious complication of anticoagulant treatment. The incidence of this event has increased along with the rise in the number of patients receiving anticoagulants. Radiological management is both diagnostic and interventional. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the main tool for the detection of hemorrhage to obtain a positive, topographic diagnosis and determine the severity. Detection of an active leak of contrast material during the arterial or venous phase is an indication for the use of arterial embolization. In addition, the interventional radiological procedure can be planned with CTA. Arterial embolization of the pedicles that are the source of the bleeding is an effective technique. The rate of technical and clinical success is 90% and 86%, respectively. PMID:26066549

  10. Delayed traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baratham, Gopal; Dennyson, William G.

    1972-01-01

    Twenty-one out of 7,866 head injuries were complicated by the development of delayed intracerebral haematomata. The age distribution of patients with this condition closely resembled that of patients with subdural haematomata and differed sharply from patients with extradural haemorrhage. This finding, combined with the fact that the two conditions often coexisted, suggests the possibility of similar aetiological factors operating in their production. The injury producing the lesion was often minor and the larger haematomata appeared to be associated with longer `asymptomatic' intervals. The neurological deterioration was in most instances clearly the result of an increase in intracranial pressure. When possible, angiography followed by definitive craniotomy was the most satisfactory method of management and multiple burr holes even when combined with needling of the hemisphere yielded unsatisfactory results. The distribution of lesions tended to confirm their traumatic origin. On no occasion was there a vascular abnormality to account for the haemorrhage and, despite the fact that the ages of most patients were in the seventh and eighth decades, the incidence of degenerative vascular disease was small. Contusional injury causes a local failure of the mechanisms that regulate cerebral blood flow. Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and venous congestion produce cerebral hyperaemia which encourages gradual haematoma formation particularly at the sites of injury. This explains not only the situation of the lesions but also the latency between the trauma and their development. PMID:5084138

  11. [Breast hematoma masking a sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Relea Sarabia, A; Bahamonde Cabria, S; González Rebollo, M; Encinas Gaspar, M B

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas account for less than 1% of malignant breast tumors. We present the case of a sarcoma (malignant fibrous histiocytoma) of the breast that debuted as a lump. The patient associated the lump with trauma, and the clinical, sonographic, and cytological findings were suggestive of a hematoma. The lump grew rapidly, and the follow-up sonogram one month later clearly revealed hypervascular solid poles. This atypical presentation is useful for reviewing the management of lesions suggestive of hematomas, which are often associated with nonspecific findings and occasionally with signs that raise suspicion of malignancy. The emergence of what appears to be a hematoma in the breast, even when accompanied by a history of trauma or a tendency toward bleeding, calls for prudence: very short-term follow-up and biopsy, even excisional biopsy, are recommended if the lesion does not evolve like a hematoma. PMID:26160042

  12. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  13. Pocket Hematoma: A Call for Definition.

    PubMed

    DE Sensi, Francesco; Miracapillo, Gennaro; Cresti, Alberto; Severi, Silva; Airaksinen, Kari Eino Juhani

    2015-08-01

    Pocket hematoma is a common complication of cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and a potential risk factor for device infections, especially in patients on oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment. There is a wide variability in the incidence of pocket hematoma and bleeding complications in the literature and the major cause for this seems to be the variability of the used definitions for hematomas. The lack of generally accepted definition for pocket hematoma renders the comparisons across the studies difficult. In this article, we briefly review the current literature on this issue and propose a uniform definition for pocket hematoma and criteria for grading the severity of hematoma in clinical practice and research.

  14. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  15. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis.

  16. Spontaneous intestinal intramural hematoma: What to do and not to do

    PubMed Central

    Yoldaş, Tayfun; Erol, Varlık; Çalışkan, Cemil; Akgün, Erhan; Korkut, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Spontaneous intestinal intramural hematoma is a rare complication of anticoagulant treatment. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with the diagnosis of intramural hematoma of the small intestine who were followed-up and treated in our clinic, and we aimed to determine current approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of intramural hematoma. Material and Methods: Between February 2010–October 2012, 14 patients diagnosed with small intestinal intramural hematoma were retrospectively analyzed. Nine patients were followed due to clinical findings and 5 patients underwent operation with a histopathological diagnosis of intramural hematoma. Results: Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated ileal and jejunal wall thickening in 10 patients, while findings were consistent with mesenteric vascular disease in four. Five patients were operated due to mechanical bowel obstruction and acute abdomen. The other 9 patients were followed up with medical treatment and 8 of these patients were already using warfarin due to cardiac bypass and valve replacement. Conclusion: Spontaneous intestinal intramural hematoma is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction due to intramural hematoma, which is encountered even more rarely. An intramural hematoma should be considered among differential diagnosis of patients who present with abdominal pain and symptoms of obstruction with a history of anticoagulant drug use and elevated International Normalized Ratio (INR) levels. Early diagnosis and medical follow-up can provide a good response to treatment in the majority of patients without requiring surgery. PMID:25931850

  17. Infected renal hematoma complicating anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Morduchowicz, G; Rabinovitz, M; Neuman, M; Pitlik, S

    1987-03-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous infection of a renal hematoma complicating warfarin sodium anticoagulant therapy. The infected hematoma was successfully drained by sonar-guided fine-needle aspiration. All reported cases of renal hematomas complicating anticoagulant therapy are reviewed.

  18. Postoperative chronic subdural hematoma following craniotomy--four case reports.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Ohkura, A; Sugita, Y; Sugita, S; Miyagi, J; Shigemori, M

    1995-02-01

    Postoperative chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) following craniotomy developed in only four of 372 patients undergoing craniotomy for aneurysm surgery (1 patient) and brain tumor surgery (3 patients) between April, 1991 and November, 1993, an incidence of only 1.1%. There were three males and one female, aged from 32 to 66 years (mean 56 yrs). The period between craniotomy and development of CSH ranged from 3 to 5 months (mean 4.3 mos). Postoperative hematomas were located on the operative sides in three patients and the contralateral side in the other. Early postoperative computed tomographic scans found subdural fluid collection in all patients. Magnetic resonance images showed linear meningeal enhancement in all patients. Postoperative CSH may be caused by mixture of blood in subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection which persists due to reduced brain elasticity and wide subarachnoid membrane opening resulting in neomembrane formation and finally development of hematoma. PMID:7753312

  19. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  20. Noninvasive, optoacoustic detection and characterization of intra- and extracranial hematomas and cerebral hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of intracranial hematomas is necessary to improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT and MRI can diagnose intracranial hematomas, but cannot be used until the patient arrives at a major healthcare facility, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Near infrared spectroscopy may suggest the presence of unilateral intracranial hematomas, but provides minimal information on hematoma type and location due to limitations associated with strong light scattering. We have used optoacoustics (which combines high endogenous optical contrast with the resolution of ultrasound) to diagnose hematomas and monitor cerebral oxygenation. We performed animal and clinical studies on detection and characterization of hematomas and on monitoring cerebral hypoxia by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Recently, we built a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPO-based optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range. We developed new patient interfaces for noninvasive, transcranial measurements in the transmission mode in the presence of dense hair and used it in patients with TBI. The optoacoustic system was capable of detecting and characterizing intra- and extracranial hematomas. SSS blood oxygenation was measured as well with the new interface. The obtained results indicate that the optoacoustic system in the transmission mode provides detection and characterization of hematomas in TBI patients, as well as cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring. The transmission mode approach can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  1. Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma concurrent with cranial subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Wonjun; Joo, Wonil; Chough, Jeongki; Park, Haekwan

    2013-07-01

    A 39-year old female presented with chronic spinal subdural hematoma manifesting as low back pain and radiating pain from both legs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) extending from L4 to S2 leading to severe central spinal canal stenosis. One day after admission, she complained of nausea and severe headache. Computed tomography of the brain revealed chronic SDH associated with midline shift. Intracranial chronic SDH was evacuated through two burr holes. Back pain and radiating leg pain derived from the spinal SDH diminished about 2 weeks after admission and spinal SDH was completely resolved on MRI obtained 3 months after onset. Physicians should be aware of such a condition and check the possibility of concurrent cranial SDH in patients with spinal SDH, especially with non-traumatic origin.

  2. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Sim, Sook Young

    2015-10-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  3. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  4. Predictors of outcome in childhood intracerebral hemorrhage: a prospective consecutive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Storm, Phillip B; Heuer, Gregory G; Zimmerman, Robert A; Feiler, Alana M; Kasner, Scott E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose To describe features of children with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and to determine predictors of short-term outcome in a single-center prospective cohort study. Methods Single-center prospective consecutive cohort study of spontaneous ICH in children age 1-18 years from January 2006 to June 2008. Exclusion criteria were inciting trauma; intracranial tumor; isolated epidural, subdural, intraventricular, or subarachnoid hemorrhage; hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke; and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Hospitalization records were abstracted. Follow-up assessments included outcome scores using the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM) and King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI). ICH volumes and total brain volumes (TBV) were measured by manual tracing. Results Twenty-two patients, median age of 10.3 years (range 4.2-16.6 years), had presenting symptoms of headache in 77%, focal deficits 50%, altered mental status 50%, and seizures 41%. Vascular malformations caused hemorrhage in 91%. Surgical treatment (hematoma evacuation, lesion embolization or excision) was performed during acute hospitalization in 50%. One patient died acutely. At median follow-up of 3.5 months (range 0.3-7.5 months), 71% of survivors had neurological deficits; 55% had clinically significant disability. Outcome based on PSOM and KOSCHI scores was worse in patients with ICH volume >2% of TBV (p=0.023) and altered mental status at presentation (p = 0.005). Conclusions Spontaneous childhood ICH was due mostly to vascular malformations. Acute surgical intervention was commonly performed. Although death was rare, 71% of survivors had persisting neurological deficits. Larger ICH volume and altered mental status predicted clinically significant disability. PMID:20019325

  5. Markerless registration for intracerebral hemorrhage surgical system using weighted Iterative Closest Point (ICP).

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Lee, Deukhee; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    It is required to use a stereotactic frame on a patient's crainial surface to access an intracerebral hematoma in conventional ICH (Intracerebral Hemorrhage) removal surgery. Since ICH using a stereotactic frame is an invasive procedure and also takes a long time, we attempt to develop a robotic ICH removal procedure with a markerless registration system using an optical 3-D scanner. Preoperative planning is performed using a patient's CT (Computed Tomography) images, which include the patient's 3-D geometrical information on the hematoma and internal structures of brain. To register the preplanned data and the intraoperative patient's data, the patient's facial surface is scanned by an optical 3-D scanner on the bed in the operating room. The intraoperatively scanned facial surface is registered to the pose of the patient's preoperative facial surface. The conventional ICP (Iterative Closest Point) algorithm can be used for the registration. In this paper, we propose a weighted ICP in order to improve the accuracy of the registration results. We investigated facial regions that can be used as anatomical landmarks. The facial regions for the landmarks in the preoperative 3-D model are weighted for more accurate registration. We increase weights at the relatively undeformed facial regions, and decrease weights at the other regions. As a result, more accurate and robust registration can be achieved from the preoperative data even with local facial shape changes. PMID:23367127

  6. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in northeast Malaysian patients: a four-year study.

    PubMed

    Muiz, A J; Abdullah, J; Naing, N N; Ghazaime, G; Ariff, A R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare nonsurgical versus stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematomas in relation to clinical aspects, computed tomographic imaging features of the brain, laboratory parameters and specific risk factors that may influence the outcome in southeast Asian Malay patients. Fifty-five of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) underwent stereotactic aspiration and 57 did not. Analysis was done on risk factors, locations and treatments of ICH, and the final outcomes measured by the Glasgow Outcome Scale. A total of 112 patients were evaluated. Mean age was 52 years with ages ranging from 12 to 80 years. Hypertension was seen in 60.7% of patients with ICH. The mortality rate was 25% by 3 months. 58.9% had a poor final outcome, while 41.1% had a good outcome. The selected variables were incorporated into models generated by multiple logistic regression method analysis to define the significant predictors of outcome. Significant predictors of outcome were the Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, the duration of surgery and the total volume of the hematoma. Significant predictors of mortality were high total white blood cell differential count, low plasma protein, and high plasma lactate dehydrogenase and brain edema. The study suggests that stereotactic aspiration of patients with ICH does not offer any definite advantage over conservative treatment.

  7. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack. PMID:24063522

  8. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack.

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  10. Preputial hematoma in a stallion.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; McClure, J J; Usenik, E A

    1987-09-01

    An 8-year-old Quarter Horse stallion was admitted with a swelling involving the prepuce, dorsal part of the scrotum, and root of the penis. The swelling was first noticed 10 days after breeding, with no evidence that it had resulted from a kick by the mare. The penis was retracted into the prepuce, except for a 10- to 15-cm protrusion of the glans penis. Treatment included warm hydrotherapy, massage, stockinette compression, antidiuretics, antibiotics, penile support, and exercise, without success. At necropsy, a massive preputial hematoma was found extending forward from the root of the penis to 12 cm proximal to the glans penis. The exact origin of the hematoma could not be determined. Most likely, bleeding had originated from the vascular plexus lying subfascially on the surface of the penis outside the intact tunica albuginea or from a branch of the external pudendal artery.

  11. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. PMID:27126244

  12. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas.

  13. Effect of Decompressive Craniectomy on Perihematomal Edema in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Gratz, Pascal P.; Fiechter, Michael; Z’Graggen, Werner J.; Gautschi, Oliver P.; El-Koussy, Marwan; Gralla, Jan; Schaller, Karl; Zbinden, Martin; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Perihematomal edema contributes to secondary brain injury in the course of intracerebral hemorrhage. The effect of decompressive surgery on perihematomal edema after intracerebral hemorrhage is unknown. This study analyzed the course of PHE in patients who were or were not treated with decompressive craniectomy. Methods More than 100 computed tomography images from our published cohort of 25 patients were evaluated retrospectively at two university hospitals in Switzerland. Computed tomography scans covered the time from admission until day 100. Eleven patients were treated by decompressive craniectomy and 14 were treated conservatively. Absolute edema and hematoma volumes were assessed using 3-dimensional volumetric measurements. Relative edema volumes were calculated based on maximal hematoma volume. Results Absolute perihematomal edema increased from 42.9 ml to 125.6 ml (192.8%) after 21 days in the decompressive craniectomy group, versus 50.4 ml to 67.2 ml (33.3%) in the control group (Δ at day 21 = 58.4 ml, p = 0.031). Peak edema developed on days 25 and 35 in patients with decompressive craniectomy and controls respectively, and it took about 60 days for the edema to decline to baseline in both groups. Eight patients (73%) in the decompressive craniectomy group and 6 patients (43%) in the control group had a good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 4) at 6 months (P = 0.23). Conclusions Decompressive craniectomy is associated with a significant increase in perihematomal edema compared to patients who have been treated conservatively. Perihematomal edema itself lasts about 60 days if it is not treated, but decompressive craniectomy ameliorates the mass effect exerted by the intracerebral hemorrhage plus the perihematomal edema, as reflected by the reduced midline shift. PMID:26872068

  14. Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma mimicking traumatic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ogose, A; Hotta, T; Yamamura, S; Shioya, Y; Yazawa, T

    1998-01-01

    We describe the clinical course of a 16-year-old baseball player with a history of recurrent hematoma of the thigh. The lesion was aspirated percutaneously several times and curetted under the diagnosis of traumatic hematoma. Microscopical examination revealed massive hemorrhage, necrosis, and a small number of Ewing's sarcoma cells. He died of multiple metastases. With recurrent hematoma in the soft tissue, neoplastic lesions should be ruled out.

  15. Delayed Acute Subdural Hematoma Associated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed acute subdural hematoma (DASH) is a subdural hematoma which is detected later. An initial computed tomography (CT) does not reveal any intracranial hemorrhage at all. Few patients of DASH after mild traumatic brain injury associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been published. Patient Presentation: A 63-year-old woman presented with cardiac pulmonary arrest due to acute myocardial infarction and lethal arrhythmia. She had hit her head on the road. The initial CT did not reveal any hemorrhage in the intra-cranium. She fully recovered after PCI. However, 1 hour after PCI, she lost consciousness and immediate CT showed acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The period from losing consciousness to brain herniation presenting as anisocoria was very short—only 30 minutes in our patient. Although emergent evacuation of hematoma and external decompression were performed, the patient died 1 day after the operation. Conclusion: The authors encountered a patient of DASH after PCI that resulted in death. Clinicians should be aware that subdural hemorrhage can occur after PCI if no hemorrhage is noted in the initial head CT, and the operation should be performed as soon as possible when the consciousness level decreases. PMID:27526240

  16. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; de Asis Lorente, Francisco; Rivero, David; Eiras, José; Ara, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia) and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration. PMID:19838395

  17. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  18. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  19. Time Course and Predictors of Neurological Deterioration after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Aaron S.; Gilmore, Emily; Choi, H. Alex; Mayer, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neurological deterioration (ND) is a devastating complication following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) but little is known about time course and predictors. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of placebo patients in ICH trials. We performed CT scans within 3 hours of symptoms and at 24- and 72-hours; and clinical evaluations at baseline, 1-hour, and days 1, 2, 3, and 15. Timing of ND was predefined: hyperacute (within 1 hour), acute (1-24 hours), subacute (1-3 days), and delayed (3-15 days). Results We enrolled 376 patients and 176 (47%) had ND within 15 days. In multivariate analyses of ND by category, hyperacute ND was associated with hematoma expansion (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and baseline ICH volume (OR 1.04 per mL, 95% CI 1.02-1.06) ; acute ND with hematoma expansion (OR 7.59, 95% CI 3.91-14.74), baseline ICH volume (OR 1.02 per mL, 95% CI 1.01-1.04), admission GCS (OR 0.77 per point, 95% CI 0.65-0.91) and interventricular hemorrhage (IVH) (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.05-4.35); subacute ND with 72-hour edema (OR 1.03 per mL, 95% CI 1.02-1.05) and fever (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.01-6.14); and delayed ND with age (OR 1.11 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.18), troponin (OR 4.30 per point, 95% CI 1.71-10.77) and infections (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.11-12.23). Patients with ND had worse 90-day modified Rankin scores (5 vs. 3, p<0.001). Conclusions Neurological deterioration occurs frequently and predicts poor outcomes. Our results implicate hematoma expansion and IVH in early ND, and cerebral edema, fever, and medical complications in later ND. PMID:25657190

  20. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Neely, John C; Jones, Blaise V; Crone, Kerry R

    2008-03-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma.

  1. [Computed tomographic semiotics of chronic subdural hematomas].

    PubMed

    El'-Kadi, Kh A; Likhterman, L B; Kornichenko, V N

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the results of investigation of 72 patients with verified chronic subdural hematomas (CSH) has revealed their CT dense characteristics, the peculiarities of their structure compared with the time of their formation, the patients' age, the clinical stage of disease, and operative findings. Direct and indirect CT signs of uni- and bilateral hemispherical chronic subdural hematomas were described.

  2. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Intracerebral Hemorrhages Associated with Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Cordina, Steve M; Hassan, Ameer E; Ezzeddine, Mustapha A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: As clopidogrel is being increasingly used, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with clopidogrel are expected to increase. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of of ICH with clopidogrel in a consecutive series of patients in two hospitals. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medication history of 204 patients (112 in one hospital and 92 in another – both individually consecutive) admitted with ICH. We identified the patients who were using clopidogrel prior to ICH occurrence. The etiology of the ICH was categorized on the basis of clinical history and diagnostic imaging, and outcome was subsequently evaluated. Results: A total of 8 (4%) of the 204 patients were using clopidogrel prior to onset of ICH. Clopidogrel was the only medication in 3 patients and was used with aspirin or warfarin in 3 and 2 patients, respectively. Aspirin or warfarin was the only medication in 23 (%) and 14 (%) patients associated with ICH, respectively. The hematoma was located in the basal ganglia (n=2), lobes (n=2), thalamus (n=1), intraventricular (n=2), and cerebellar (n=2). One patient had secondary intraventricular extension. All patients using a combination of clopidogrel and warfarin prior to ICH died. Conclusion: The prevalence of ICH associated with clopidogrel is approximating the prevalence of aspirin- or warfarin-associated ICH. The mortality with clopidogrel related ICH appears to be high particularly when in combination with another antithrombotic agent. PMID:22518241

  3. Robot-assisted intracerebral hemorrhage evacuation: an experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgner, Jessica; Swaney, Philip J.; Lathrop, Ray A.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Webster, Robert J.

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel robotic approach for the rapid, minimally invasive treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH), in which a hematoma or blood clot arises in the brain parenchyma. We present a custom image-guided robot system that delivers a steerable cannula into the lesion and aspirates it from the inside. The steerable cannula consists of an initial straight tube delivered in a manner similar to image-guided biopsy (and which uses a commercial image guidance system), followed by the sequential deployment of multiple individual precurved elastic tubes. Rather than deploying the tubes simultaneously, as has been done in nearly all prior studies, we deploy the tubes one at a time, using a compilation of their individual workspaces to reach desired points inside the lesion. This represents a new paradigm in active cannula research, defining a novel procedure-planning problem. A design that solves this problem can potentially save many lives by enabling brain decompression both more rapidly and less invasively than is possible through the traditional open surgery approach. Experimental results include a comparison of the simulated and actual workspaces of the prototype robot, and an accuracy evaluation of the system.

  4. Clinical significance of dynamic monitoring by transcranial doppler ultrasound and intracranial pressure monitor after surgery of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zaiming; Chen, Qianxue; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Long; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Shenqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surgical method of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (HIH) and how to control the postoperative blood pressure. 96 HIH patients were performed the craniotomic hematoma dissection (CHD) and the hematoma-cavity drilling drainage (HCDD), respectively. Meanwhile, the intracranial pressure and mean arterial pressure of each patient were continuously monitored for 7 days, the postoperative 1(st), 3(rd), 7(th) and 14(th)-day average flow velocities and pulsatility indexes of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were monitored. CHD exhibited the significant difference in the long-term quality of life (ADL classification 6 months later) of patients with hematoma >50 ml than HCDD; furthermore, the postoperative 1(st), 3(rd), 7(th) and 14(th)-day TCD parameter analysis revealed that CHD exhibited better results in relieving the intracranial pressure and improving the cerebral blood flow than HCDD, and the postoperative ICP and MAP monitoring towards all patients could effectively control the blood pressure and prevent the further bleeding. The patients with hematoma >50 ml should choose CHD, and all HIH patients should be routinely performed the ICP and MAP monitoring.

  5. Are acute subdural hematomas possible without head trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Garbossa, D.; Altieri, R.; Specchia, F. M. Calamo; Agnoletti, A.; Pilloni, G.; Lanotte, M.; Spaziante, R.; Ducati, A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are rarely reported in the literature. In general, it is due to head trauma, but if the traumatic event is very mild, it is inadequate to explain the ASDH occurrence. Risk factors for the development of spontaneous ASDH include hypertension, vascular abnormalities and deficit of coagulation. We present two cases of ASDH in patients with the coagulation deficit and review of the literature to understand the coagulation factors role and platelet role in the management of ASDHs. PMID:25685219

  6. Are acute subdural hematomas possible without head trauma?

    PubMed

    Garbossa, D; Altieri, R; Specchia, F M Calamo; Agnoletti, A; Pilloni, G; Lanotte, M; Spaziante, R; Ducati, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are rarely reported in the literature. In general, it is due to head trauma, but if the traumatic event is very mild, it is inadequate to explain the ASDH occurrence. Risk factors for the development of spontaneous ASDH include hypertension, vascular abnormalities and deficit of coagulation. We present two cases of ASDH in patients with the coagulation deficit and review of the literature to understand the coagulation factors role and platelet role in the management of ASDHs.

  7. Predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with spontaneous primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Safatli, Diaa A.; Günther, Albrecht; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwarz, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a life threatening entity, and an early outcome assessment is mandatory for optimizing therapeutic efforts. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 342 patients with spontaneous primary ICH to evaluate possible predictors of 30-day mortality considering clinical, radiological, and therapeutical parameters. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. Results: From 342 patients (mean age: 67 years, mean Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] on admission: 9, mean ICH volume: 62.19 ml, most common hematoma location: basal ganglia [43.9%]), 102 received surgical and 240 conservative treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25.15%. In a multivariate analysis, GCS (Odds ratio [OR] =0.726, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.661–0.796, P < 0.001), bleeding volume (OR = 1.012 per ml, 95% CI = 1.007 – 1.017, P < 0.001), and infratentorial hematoma location (OR = 5.381, 95% CI = 2.166-13.356, P = 0.009) were significant predictors for the 30-day mortality. After receiver operating characteristics analysis, we defined a “high-risk group” for an unfavorable short-term outcome with GCS <11 and ICH volume >32 ml supratentorially or 21 ml infratentorially. Using Pearson correlation, we found a correlation of 0.986 between ICH score and 30-day mortality (P < 0.001), 0.853 between FUNC score and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001), and 0.924 between ICH-GS and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001). Conclusions: GCS score on admission together with the baseline volume and localization of the hemorrhage are strong

  8. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology. PMID:26048608

  9. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology.

  10. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes.

  11. Subcapsular hematoma after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Matheus Miranda; da Silva, Rodrigo Donalisio; Jaworski, Paulo; Kim, Fernando J; Molina, Wilson R

    2016-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is an uncommon complication after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy. We report on a 38-year-old male with an 8 mm lower pole stone who underwent a left ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy. The stone was successfully fragmented. Several hours after being discharged home, the patient returned complaining of back pain and hematuria. He was hemodynamically stable. Laboratory exams were normal. A CT study showed a crescent renal subcapsular hematoma surrounding the left kidney. The patient was admitted to the ward for conservative treatment. No additional intervention was necessary. Most subcapsular hematomas tend to resolve spontaneously. PMID:27544565

  12. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Kentaro; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation. PMID:27738545

  13. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain. PMID:27056873

  14. Delayed intracranial hematoma following stereoelectroencephalography for intractable epilepsy: case report.

    PubMed

    Derrey, Stéphane; Lebas, Axel; Parain, Dominique; Baray, Marie Gilles; Marguet, Christophe; Freger, Pierre; Proust, François

    2012-12-01

    Intracranial bleeding following stereoelectroencephalography (sEEG) is rare and commonly occurs early after electrode implantation. The authors report the case of a delayed intracranial hematoma following sEEG. This 10-year-old boy was referred to the authors' department to undergo an sEEG study for intractable epilepsy, with the hypothesis of a single localized epileptic zone in the left precentral region. To perform the exploration, 14 depth electrodes were implanted under stereotactic conditions. The results of a postoperative CT scan performed routinely at the end of the surgical procedure were normal. Eight days later, following an epileptic seizure, the child's condition worsened. The neurological examination revealed a left hemiparesis, agitation, and coma due to a right subdural hematoma with intraparenchymal bleeding. Despite a surgical evacuation followed by a decompressive craniectomy, the curative treatments were stopped 1 week later due to severe diffuse ischemic lesions found on MRI studies. This is the first observation of a delayed hematoma following an sEEG procedure. The mechanism underlying this complication remains unclear, but the rupture of a growing pseudoaneurysm caused by the electrode's implantation or the tearing of a neighboring vessel by an electrode were suspected. In consequence, physicians must remain vigilant during the entire sEEG recording period and probably also several days after electrode removal.

  15. Expanding Hematoma's Life-Threatening Neck and Face Emergency Management of Ballistic Injuries.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to bring attention to the morbidity and fatality of hemorrhage, how expanding hematoma and air compromise neck/face N/F injuries and present challenges. Large neck vessel ballistic injuries may lead to hemorrhage and expanding hematoma, resulting in airway compromise, due to injuries to the internal and/or external carotid arteries, internal jugular veins "internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, internal jugular vein," and the external carotid artery deep branches. This also leads to injuries to the cervical fascial layers (barriers of deep spaces) that facilitate pooling blood and hematoma into compartmental and large potential space which effects the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, and trachea.The expanding hematomas distort neck anatomical landmarks so "no neck zones" classifications are applicable. As the spectrum of injuries continues to evolve, the clinical characterization needs a new categorization based on compartmental hematoma and potential space anatomical location like retropharyngeal, parapharyngeal, sublingual, submandibular spaces, retrobulbar, and cheek compartment space hematomas.Presence of symptoms and location of the hematoma generally dictate what type of procedure is needed and how urgently it needs to be appropriately performed.Two unusual patients of pseudoaneurysms facial artery injuries with extravasation of blood producing a pulsating hematoma are referred to. Another patient considers large internal carotid artery injuries pseudoaneurysms revealed in angiography.The immediate management of life-saving patients requires aggressive airway maintenance at the scene, conscious victim will often obtain a posture that clears his airway and the semiconscious or unconscious put him in prone position. Air compromise may need emergency intubation, large bore cannula cricothyroidotomy, cricothyrotomy and at medical facilities tracheostomy. PMID:27315316

  16. Non-traumatic Bilateral Orbital Subperiosteal Hematoma in a Person Who Attempted Suicide by Hanging.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keiji; Morita, Seiji; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mariko; Taira, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-09-01

    Orbital subperiosteal hematomas are rare and most often result from facial trauma; however, occurrence of these hematomas due to non-traumatic causes is extremely rare. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department because he became comatose after attempting suicide by hanging. He underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck. CT findings revealed a bilateral orbital subperiosteal hematoma. We then performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head for definite diagnosis of hematoma. There is no consensus regarding if this condition should be treated conservatively or surgically. Conservative management was selected for this patient because he was in deep coma. Some non-traumatic causes of orbital subperiosteal hematoma include weight lifting, coughing, vomiting, Valsalva maneuver, labor, and scuba diving. Sudden elevations in cranial pressure may be the mechanism underlying this condition. Although suicide attempt by hanging could have caused a sudden elevation in cranial pressure, this is the first report of the occurrence of this condition. Patients with orbital subperiosteal hematomas generally complain of blurred vision, eye pain, or exophthalmos. However, identifying this sign may be difficult in patients with disturbed consciousness. PMID:25248423

  17. Non-traumatic Bilateral Orbital Subperiosteal Hematoma in a Person Who Attempted Suicide by Hanging.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keiji; Morita, Seiji; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mariko; Taira, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-09-01

    Orbital subperiosteal hematomas are rare and most often result from facial trauma; however, occurrence of these hematomas due to non-traumatic causes is extremely rare. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department because he became comatose after attempting suicide by hanging. He underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck. CT findings revealed a bilateral orbital subperiosteal hematoma. We then performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head for definite diagnosis of hematoma. There is no consensus regarding if this condition should be treated conservatively or surgically. Conservative management was selected for this patient because he was in deep coma. Some non-traumatic causes of orbital subperiosteal hematoma include weight lifting, coughing, vomiting, Valsalva maneuver, labor, and scuba diving. Sudden elevations in cranial pressure may be the mechanism underlying this condition. Although suicide attempt by hanging could have caused a sudden elevation in cranial pressure, this is the first report of the occurrence of this condition. Patients with orbital subperiosteal hematomas generally complain of blurred vision, eye pain, or exophthalmos. However, identifying this sign may be difficult in patients with disturbed consciousness.

  18. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release.

  19. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release. PMID:26835213

  20. Multiple spontaneous visceral hematomas revealing polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Allanore, Yannick; Rosenberg, Carole; Vignaux, Olivier; Legmann, Paul; Kanev, K; Menkes, Charles J; Kahan, Andre

    2004-09-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare life-threatening disease characterized by necrotizing vasculitis of small and median arteries. We describe the exceptional case of a 28-year-old man with successive spontaneous visceral hematomas of the kidney, bladder, and liver. Arteriography was performed for a recent spontaneous hepatic hematoma and a microaneurysm was detected, allowing the diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa and prescription of appropriate treatment.

  1. Clinical and Pathological Characteristics of Organized Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Nobuo; Watanabe, Tomoo; Ito, Tsukasa; Kubota, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ishida, Akihiro; Aoyagi, Masaru; Matsubara, Atsushi; Izuhara, Kenji; Kakehata, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To study the clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with organized hematoma with malignant features in maxillary sinuses. Subjects and Methods. This was a retrospective study of five patients who were treated surgically for organized hematoma. The preoperative CT and MRI findings were studied clinically. The expressions of CD31, CD34, and periostin in surgical samples were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results. The clinical features of organized hematoma, such as a mass expanding from the maxillary sinus with bone destruction, resembled those of maxillary carcinoma. However, CT and MRI provided sufficient and useful information to differentiate this condition from malignancy. Surgical resection was the first-line treatment because of the presence of a firm capsule. Characteristic histopathological findings were a mixture of dilated vessels, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibrosis, hyalinization, and neovascularization. The expressions of periostin, CD31, and CD34 were observed in organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. Conclusion. The expressions of periostin, CD31, and CD34 were observed in organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. Organized hematoma is characterized pathologically by a mixture of bleeding, dilated vessels, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibrosis, hyalinization, and neovascularization. CT and MRI show heterogeneous findings reflecting a mixture of these pathological entities. PMID:23533421

  2. Development in intracerebral stem cell grafts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Stephanny; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2015-01-01

    The field of stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising research area for brain repair. Optimizing the safety and efficacy of the therapy for clinical trials will require revisiting transplantation protocols. The cell delivery route stands as a key translational item that warrants careful consideration in facilitating the success of stem cell therapy in the clinic. Intracerebral administration, compared to peripheral route, requires an invasive procedure to directly implant stem cells into injured brain. Although invasive, intracerebral transplantation circumvents the prohibitive blood brain barrier in allowing grafted cells when delivered peripherally to penetrate the brain and reach the discreet damaged brain tissues. This review will highlight milestone discoveries in cell therapy for neurological disorders, with emphasis on intracerebral transplantation in relevant animal models and provide insights necessary to optimize the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. PMID:25739415

  3. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  4. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  5. PREDICTORS OF HIGHLY PREVALENT BRAIN ISCHEMIA IN INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Gibbons, M. Christopher; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; German, Laura; Sobotka, Ian; Edwards, Dorothy; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and temporal profile of concurrent ischemic lesions in patients with acute primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Patients were recruited within a prospective, longitudinal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based study of primary ICH. Clinical, demographic, and MRI data were collected on all subjects at baseline and 1 month. Results Of the 138 patients enrolled, mean age was 59 years, 54% were male, 73% black, and 84% had a history of hypertension. At baseline, ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were found in 35% of patients. At 1 month, lesions were present in 27%, and of these lesions, 83% were new and not present at baseline. ICH volume (p=0.025), intraventricular hemorrhage (p=0.019), presence of microbleeds (p=0.024), and large, early reductions in mean arterial pressure (p=0.003) were independent predictors of baseline DWI lesions. A multivariate logistical model predicting the presence of 1 month DWI lesions included history of any prior stroke (p=0.012), presence of 1 or more microbleeds (p=0.04), black race (p=0.641), and presence of a DWI lesion at baseline (p=0.007) Interpretation This study demonstrates that more than 1/3 of patients with primary ICH have active cerebral ischemia at baseline remote from the index hematoma, and 1/4 of patients experience ongoing, acute ischemic events at 1 month. Multivariate analyses implicate blood pressure reductions in the setting of an active vasculopathy as a potential underlying mechanism. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of these lesions on outcome and optimal management strategies to arrest vascular damage. PMID:22367992

  6. Progesterone Improves Neurobehavioral Outcome in Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Wang, Haichen; Jeong, Seongtae; Hsieh, Justin T; Majeed, Mohammed; Dawson, Hana; Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S; James, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    In models of acute brain injury, progesterone improves recovery through several mechanisms including modulation of neuroinflammation. Secondary injury from neuroinflammation is a potential therapeutic target after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). For potential translation of progesterone as a clinical acute ICH therapeutic, the present study sought to define efficacy of exogenous progesterone administration in ICH-relevant experimental paradigms. Young and aged C57BL/6 male, female, and ovariectomized (OVX) mice underwent left intrastriatal collagenase (0.05-0.075 U) or autologous whole blood (35 μl) injection. Progesterone at varying doses (4-16 mg/kg) was administered at 2, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h after injury. Rotarod and Morris water maze latencies were measured on days 1-7 and days 28-31 after injury, respectively. Hematoma volume, brain water content (cerebral edema), complementary immunohistochemistry, multiplex cytokine arrays, and inflammatory proteins were assessed at prespecified time points after injury. Progesterone (4 mg/kg) administration improved rotarod and water maze latencies (p < 0.01), and decreased cerebral edema (p < 0.05), microglial proliferation, and neuronal loss (p < 0.01) in young and aged male, young OVX, and aged female mice. Brain concentration of proinflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor-associated proteins were also decreased after progesterone (4 mg/kg) treatment (p < 0.01). Progesterone-treated young female mice showed no detectable effects. Exogenous progesterone improved short- and long-term neurobehavioral recovery and modulated neuroinflammation in male and OVX mice after ICH. Future studies should validate these findings, and address timing and length of administration before translation to clinical trial.

  7. Moyamoya disease manifested as multiple simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhages: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinlu; Yuan, Yongjie; Li, Wei; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (MSIH) caused by Moyamoya disease (MMD) is extremely rare. To date, the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and mechanism of MMD-induced MSIH have not yet been elucidated. In order to improve the understanding on such cases, the present study described a rare case of MSIH caused by MMD. A 40-year-old female patient with no history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus experienced a sudden headache followed by coma. Cranial computed tomography (CT) examination revealed MSIH in the left frontal area, temporal lobe and basal ganglia. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography examinations revealed typical characteristics of MMD. Subsequent to excluding disorders of the blood system and blood coagulation, we concluded that the present case of MSIH was caused by MMD. Hematoma evacuation and decompressive craniectomy were performed with satisfactory results. In addition, after reviewing previous MSIH cases in the literature, potential mechanisms of MMD-mediated MSIH were considered. In conclusion, MMD should be considered as a possible cause of MSIH during diagnosis and treatment. MMD can lead to pathological changes in the fragility of small arteries; therefore, rupture and hemorrhage at one site may induce a transient increase in blood pressure, causing the rupture of small arteries at other sites, and thus leading to MSIH. Hematoma evacuation and decompression should be conducted in selective cases of MMD-induced MSIH in order to achieve a good prognosis. PMID:27588064

  8. Retropharyngeal hematoma secondary to whiplash injury in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nurata, Hakan; Yilmaz, Muhammet Bahadır; Borcek, Alp Ozgun; Oner, Ali Yusuf; Baykaner, M Kemali

    2012-01-01

    Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD) has been reported as an adult phenomenon. Whiplash injury has classically been described as a cervical soft tissue hyperextension- flexion injury after a trauma such as a rear end impact car crash, contact sport injuries, blows to the head from a falling object or a punch and shaken baby syndrome and is mostly seen in adults . It is important as it may cause severe disability due to spinal cord injury, decrease work productivity and even retropharyngeal hematoma resulting airway obstruction and mortality due to bleeding amongst deep cervical fascias. We describe a case of retropharyngeal hematoma after whiplash injury in a childhood.

  9. Heritability Estimates Identify a Substantial Genetic Contribution to Risk and Outcome of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Devan, William J.; Falcone, Guido J.; Anderson, Christopher D.; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Hansen, Björn M.; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Soriano, Carolina; Ayres, Alison M.; Schwab, Kristin; Kassis, Sylvia Baedorf; Valant, Valerie; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Viswanathan, Anand; Rost, Natalia S.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Freudenberger, Paul; Stögerer, Eva-Maria; Norrving, Bo; Tirschwell, David L.; Selim, Magdy; Brown, Devin L.; Silliman, Scott L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Montaner, Joan; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Delgado, Pilar; Greenberg, Steven M.; Roquer, Jaume; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan; Biffi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies suggest that genetic variation plays a substantial role in occurrence and evolution of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Genetic contribution to disease can be determined by calculating heritability using family-based data, but such an approach is impractical for ICH because of lack of large pedigree-based studies. However, a novel analytic tool based on genome-wide data allows heritability estimation from unrelated subjects. We sought to apply this method to provide heritability estimates for ICH risk, severity, and outcome. Methods We analyzed genome-wide genotype data for 791 ICH cases and 876 controls, and determined heritability as the proportion of variation in phenotype attributable to captured genetic variants. Contribution to heritability was separately estimated for the APOE (encoding apolipoprotein E) gene, an established genetic risk factor, and for the rest of the genome. Analyzed phenotypes included ICH risk, admission hematoma volume, and 90-day mortality. Results ICH risk heritability was estimated at 29% (SE, 11%) for non-APOE loci and at 15% (SE, 10%) for APOE. Heritability for 90-day ICH mortality was 41% for non-APOE loci and 10% (SE, 9%) for APOE. Genetic influence on hematoma volume was also substantial: admission volume heritability was estimated at 60% (SE, 70%) for non-APOE loci and at 12% (SE, 4%) for APOE. Conclusions Genetic variation plays a substantial role in ICH risk, outcome, and hematoma volume. Previously reported risk variants account for only a portion of inherited genetic influence on ICH pathophysiology, pointing to additional loci yet to be identified. PMID:23559261

  10. Modern intraoperative imaging modalities for the vascular neurosurgeon treating intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Goren, Oded; Monteith, Stephen J; Hadani, Moshe; Bakon, Mati; Harnof, Sagi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews the current intraoperative imaging tools that are available to assist neurosurgeons in the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This review shares the authors' experience with each modality and discusses the advantages, potential limitations, and disadvantages of each. Surgery for ICH is directed at blood clot removal, reduction of intracranial pressure, and minimization of secondary damage associated with hematoma breakdown products. For effective occlusion and safe obliteration of vascular anomalies associated with ICH, vascular neurosurgeons today require a thorough understanding of the various intraoperative imaging modalities available for obtaining real-time information. Use of one or more of these modalities may improve the surgeon's confidence during the procedure, the patient's safety during surgery, and surgical outcome. The modern techniques discussed include 1) indocyanine green-based video angiography, which provides real-time information based on high-quality images showing the residual filling of vascular pathological entities and the patency of blood vessels of any size in the surgical field; and 2) intraoperative angiography, which remains the gold standard intraoperative diagnostic test in the surgical management of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. Hybrid procedures, providing multimodality image-guided surgeries and combining endovascular with microsurgical strategies within the same surgical session, have become feasible and safe. Microdoppler is a safe, noninvasive, and reliable technique for evaluation of hemodynamics of vessels in the surgical field, with the advantage of ease of use. Intraoperative MRI provides an effective navigation tool for cavernoma surgery, in addition to assessing the extent of resection during the procedure. Intraoperative CT scanning has the advantage of very high sensitivity to acute bleeding, thereby assisting in the confirmation of the extent of hematoma evacuation and

  11. Laparoscopic evacuation of a subcapsular renal hematoma causing symptomatic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Graham, C W; Lynch, S C; Muskat, P C; Mokulis, J A

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a subcapsular hematoma following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy which presented as symptomatic hypertension. When medical therapy proved ineffective, laparoscopic decompression of the hematoma corrected the hypertension.

  12. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Samuel; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Araújo Correia, Luís

    2016-08-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with sudden left quadrant abdominal pain and hematochezia. There was no history of trauma. He denied other symptoms or taking off-the-counter medication. His medical history was relevant for ischemic and aortic-mitral valve disease with prosthetic valves for which he was medicated with aspirin and warfarin. On physical examination the patient presented normal vital signs with tenderness on palpation of the left side of the abdomen. Laboratory tests revealed moderate anemia (10.8 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (135.000x10^9 U/L) with therapeutic international normalized ratio (2.53). Colonoscopy revealed an extensive area of erythematous and bluish mucosa with an apparent torsion of the proximal descending colon around a volumous hematoma measuring 6.5x3 cm (Figure 1 A-C). Urgent abdominal CT confirmed the presence of a large intramural hematoma of the descending colon (Figure 2 A-B). A conservative approach was adopted with temporary suspension of anticoagulation. Given the high thrombotic risk, abdominal ultrasound was performed after 72 hours showing considerable reduction in the size of the hematoma. Anti-coagulation was then resumed without complications. One month later, colonoscopy was repeated showing complete healing of the mucosa. The increasing use of anti-aggregating and anti-coagulant therapy, especially in elderly patients, explains the increasing incidence of bleeding events seen in this population. However, gastrointestinal hematomas are estimated to occur in only 1 for every 250.000 anti-coagulated patients. Diagnosis is based on characteristic radiologic findings. While most parietal hematomas can be approached conservatively, surgery is indicated in the presence of complications or persistence of the hematoma. PMID:27554386

  13. Subcorneal hematomas in excessive video game play.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Maria; Rizzo, Jason; Lennox, Luke; Rothman, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcorneal hematomas caused by excessive video game play in a 19-year-old man. The hematomas occurred in a setting of thrombocytopenia secondary to induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. It was concluded that thrombocytopenia subsequent to prior friction from heavy use of a video game controller allowed for traumatic subcorneal hemorrhage of the hands. Using our case as a springboard, we summarize other reports with video game associated pathologies in the medical literature. Overall, cognizance of the popularity of video games and related pathologies can be an asset for dermatologists who evaluate pediatric patients. PMID:26919354

  14. Subcorneal hematomas in excessive video game play.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Maria; Rizzo, Jason; Lennox, Luke; Rothman, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcorneal hematomas caused by excessive video game play in a 19-year-old man. The hematomas occurred in a setting of thrombocytopenia secondary to induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. It was concluded that thrombocytopenia subsequent to prior friction from heavy use of a video game controller allowed for traumatic subcorneal hemorrhage of the hands. Using our case as a springboard, we summarize other reports with video game associated pathologies in the medical literature. Overall, cognizance of the popularity of video games and related pathologies can be an asset for dermatologists who evaluate pediatric patients.

  15. [Intracerebral aneurysm--treatment options, informed consent, and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Burkhardt, Werner Friedrich; Zinn, Pascal Olivier; Bozinov, Oliver; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    All medical subspecialties and, in particular, high-tech field neurosurgery are subject to continuous change in therapeutic concepts due to novel treatment options emerging through research and evolution in the field. Hence, the question arises if the patient's informed consent needs to be adjusted in the face of multiple therapeutic options with different configurations of risk/benefit relationships. In this paper we discuss different therapeutic scenarios with regard to ruptured intracerebral aneurysms (RIA) and unruptured intracerebral aneurysms (UIA), and we advise the medical doctor involved in the process. Indeed, experienced neurosurgeons and endovascular interventionalists are very familiar with the management of these scenarios; likewise, interns, residents, and otherwise affiliated physicians may be faced with these situations. In general, asymptomatic and mentally capacitated patients as well as legal guardians of minor patients and of mentally incapacitated patients with incidental aneurysms and more than one therapeutic option need to be accurately informed about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options available to them. In case of emergency or when treating a mentally disabled patient who is incapable of making a sound judgment and has no legal guardian, the attending doctor will have to choose the best possible treatment option. PMID:21958620

  16. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  17. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  18. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  19. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Velickovic, Mirko; Ballhause, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention. PMID:27803810

  20. [Isolated ipsilateral lateropulsion caused by bulbar hematoma].

    PubMed

    Hommel, M; Borgel, F; Gaio, J M; Lavernhe, G; Perret, J

    1985-01-01

    A case of hematoma involving probably the reticular formation of the medulla oblongata is reported. Examination showed a soft palate paresis and an ipsilateral axial lateropulsion without vertigo or oculomotor disorders. The mechanism of the lateropulsion is discussed. During the spontaneous recovery a transient hydrocephalus was observed.

  1. Supratentorial pressures. Part II: Intracerebral pulse waves.

    PubMed

    Miller, J D; Peeler, D F; Pattisapu, J; Parent, A D

    1987-09-01

    Intracerebral pulse waves were recorded in cat and monkey while intracranial pressure (ICP) manipulations were performed. The intracerebral pulse waves appeared comparable to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations. The wave forms were divided into multiple smaller waves, designated P1 to P4. The P1 component was primarily of arterial origin and was accentuated by increasing ICP unrelated to increased venous pressure, most commonly from a mass lesion. Bilateral carotid occlusion resulted in decreased amplitude of P1. Venous hypertension from jugular venous or sagittal sinus occlusion, on the other hand, accentuated waves P2 and P3 more than P1. This is consistent with a Starling resistor model of the cerebral venous system in which mass lesions may compress low-pressure veins and accentuate the arterial pressure-dependent P1 wave, whereas venous hypertension causes increased prominence of the later P2 and P3 waves. PMID:2891069

  2. Increasing the effectiveness of intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice: a neurosurgical point of view.

    PubMed

    Mathon, Bertrand; Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Le Duigou, Caroline; Clemenceau, Stéphane; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral injections of tracers or viral constructs in rodents are now commonly used in the neurosciences and must be executed perfectly. The purpose of this article is to update existing protocols for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice. Our procedure for stereotaxic injections in adult mice allows the investigator to improve the effectiveness and safety, and save time. Furthermore, for the first time, we describe a two-handed procedure for intracerebral injections in neonatal mice that can be performed by a single operator in a very short time. Our technique using the stereotaxic arm allows a higher precision than freehand techniques previously described. Stereotaxic injections in adult mice can be performed in 20 min and have >90% efficacy in targeting the injection site. Injections in neonatal mice can be performed in 5 min. Efficacy depends on the difficulty of precisely localizing the injection sites, due to the small size of the animal. We describe an innovative, effortless, and reproducible surgical protocol for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice.

  3. Intracerebral fibroma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Stephen E.; McGinity, Michael J.; Henry, James M.; Vecil, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral fibromas are among the most rare neoplasms found in the central nervous system. Ten previously reported cases have been documented in the literature including only two reported cases since 1985. As a result, little is known about these uncommon intracerebral fibrous tumors. We report a case of an intracerebral fibroma without dural or leptomeningeal attachment, discuss the pertinent diagnostic findings and briefly review all prior reports of this entity. PMID:27194681

  4. An interesting case of intracerebral MRSA.

    PubMed

    Estridge, Robert; Contini, Shawnelle

    2016-10-01

    This article describes a patient whose intracerebral MRSA may have been caused by a spider bite to the thigh 2 months earlier. The patient's headache, nausea, and vomiting initially were thought to be caused by a high-grade glioma. Most brain abscesses have otogenic sources and are not from distant hematogenous spread. Although systemic antibiotics help with symptomatology, surgical eradication (when feasible) followed by IV antibiotics, provides definitive treatment. PMID:27685512

  5. Intracerebral lymphoma deposits: investigation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, P.N.; Wise, R.J.S.

    1984-06-01

    In a recently studied series of 12 patients with intracerebral lymphoma deposits, the following are noteworthy: Although most intracerebral lymphoma deposits are dramatically and homogenously enhanced on CT brain scan, this is not always the case; two patients with apparently necrotic centers are presented. Subtraction of enhanced CT brain scanning cuts before and after radiotherapy allow a quantitation of tumor response. The apparent paradox of deficient lymphoma deposit angiogenesis on angiography and good enhancement on CT scan was probed by positron emission topmography (ECAT) in the only patient who did not have a confounding prior craniotomy. ECAT and histopathological examination suggest that the microvasculature of intracerebral lymphoma deposits is rich. The ECAT data demonstrated that regional tumor blood flow was comparable to that in grey matter, but tumor oxygen metabolism was intermediate between grey and white matter. The interesting observation of coupled depression of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the cerebrum overlying the tumor and its surrounding edema is discussed. A protracted radiotherapy prescription (with daily fractions of 175 cGY) is favored.

  6. Polyarteritis with symptomatic intracerebral aneurysms at initial presentation.

    PubMed

    Munn, E J; Alloway, J A; Diffin, D C; Arroyo, R A

    1998-10-01

    Polyarteritis rarely involves the cerebral vasculature, and has not been reported to have an initial presentation with intracerebral aneurysms. We describe the first case of polyarteritis presenting with symptomatic intracerebral aneurysms. A literature review from 1966 to 1997 identified 5 additional cases with evidence of intracerebral aneurysms and polyarteritis. The cases reviewed all had evidence of longstanding systemic symptoms suggestive of polyarteritis prior to diagnosis. Polyarteritis with intracerebral aneurysms is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and therefore must be recognized and treated early.

  7. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  8. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    PubMed

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists. PMID:24553773

  9. [Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tosato, F; Palermo, S; Carnevale, L; Paolini, A

    2000-01-01

    The A.A. present a case report of retroperitoneal spontaneous hematoma and put in evidence the difficulties in making an etiopathogenetic diagnosis of spontaneous renal cyst rupture. The patient was a 72 years old man admitted to the hospital in emergency for a painful ipogastric syntomatology and biliary vomit. The ecography showed a distanced gallbladder and the endoscopy evidenced a duodenal stenosis with compression of the gastric posterior wall, so that we were initially directed towards a pancreatic tumor even if the modest increase of the serum bilirubinemy and mostly the fact that direct component was almost normal, gave us strong doubts. The spiral TC gave finally the diagnosis of retroperitoneal hematoma and the presence of a bilateral polycystic kidney with several subcapsular cyst, let us suggest, as well as the anamnestic report of a physical stress, a renal origin of the bleeding. A wild literature review did not evidence other similar cases, but the ecclusion of other possible causes of retroperitoneal hematoma, suggested this conclusion.

  10. Spontaneous intrathyroidal hematoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A.E.; Dhaliwal, Sandeep; Tam, Samantha; Low, T. Hubert; Hughes, Brian; Fung, Kevin; MacNeil, S. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage is a rare occurrence that results in pain, discomfort, and occasionally compressive symptoms. Infrequently, extensive thyroid hemorrhage can result in a rapidly expanding hematoma resulting in airway compromise. This is a case of an otherwise healthy young woman, 3 months postpartum, with a slowly expanding spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage that measured at 7 × 5.5 × 5 cm by computed tomography. She ultimately required intubation to manage respiratory distress and subsequently a hemithyroidectomy for definitive treatment. The case presentation is followed by a literature review where known etiologies of thyroid hematoma including traumatic and nontraumatic causes, precipitating anticoagulation, and spontaneous rupture of branches of the external carotid artery are outlined. The potential links to pregnancy are explored. The roles of bedside thyroid ultrasound in the emergency department and lateral neck roentgenogram in diagnosis are explored. The importance of airway management and indications for conservative versus surgical treatments are discussed. Conclusions: This is a case of a spontaneous intrathyroidal hemorrhage, which progressed over days to ultimately cause airway compromise. It is imperative that physicians are educated on the appropriate detection and management of the potentially life-threatening spontaneous thyroid hematoma. PMID:27583841

  11. Different perceived foreign accents in one patient after prerolandic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Christoph, D H; de Freitas, G R; Dos Santos, D P; Lima, M A S D; Araújo, A Q C; Carota, A

    2004-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS), a rare disorder characterized by the emergence of a new accent perceived as foreign by listeners, is usually reported with left brain damage. We here report the case of a 28-year-old native Brazilian who appeared, to the examiner, to show a North American accent during recovery from Broca's aphasia. The lesion was due to a frontal hematoma. Without referring specifically to speech, we asked 10 independent observers to comment on a videotape of the patient's interview. Seven reported that the patient had a foreign accent, while 3 simply noted a 'strange' accent. The observers did not agree on the origin of the accent, 5 identifying it as Spanish, 1 as German, and 1 as south Brazilian. These findings suggest that FAS is not due to the acquisition of a specific foreign accent, but to impairment of the suprasegmental linguistic abilities (tone, accent, pauses, rhythm, and vocal stress) that make it possible to distinguish native language.

  12. Surgical treatment of supra- and infratentorial epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang; Guoping, Li

    2013-01-01

    Supra- and infratentorial acute epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a common type of posterior fossa epidural hematoma (PFEDH), representing 11- 64% of all PFEDHs. Although SIEDH is associated with typical characteristics, it might be difficult to diagnose when presenting as infratentorial acute epidural hematoma, which is clinically silent and has nonspecific symptoms. However, this type of hematoma can often be rapidly deteriorating, causing a sharp rise in intracranial pressure that leads to a life-threatening foramen magnum herniation. Early diagnosis and management of SIEDH are imperative. Traditional surgical management has always required relatively large craniotomies, larger than the hematoma itself, to expose its edge, and then tack up the dura matter). It usually opens the window and emphasizes retention of the bone bridge outside the transverse sinus. This method can effectively eliminate the hematoma, but it is associated with larger postoperative wound, longer operation time, larger skull defect, and more complications. Hence, exploration into a better surgical method is direly needed.

  13. Prognostic factors in patients with intracerebral haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, C L; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; van Gijn, J

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study, the prognostic value of clinical characteristics in 157 consecutive patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage were examined by means of multivariate analysis. Two days after the event 37 (24%) patients had died. Factors independently contributing to the prediction of two day mortality were pineal gland displacement on CT of 3 mm or more (p less than 0.001), blood glucose level on admission of 8.0 mmol/l or more (p = 0.01), eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of eight out of 10 or less (p = 0.022) and haematoma volume of 40 cm3 or more (p = 0.037). Between the third day and one year after the event another 46 of the 120 two day survivors had died; the independent prognostic indicators for death during that period were: age 70 years or more (p less than 0.001) and severe handicap (Rankin grade five) on the third day (p less than 0.001). Functional independence (Rankin grade two or less) at one year was most common not only with the converse features of age less than 70 years (p less than 0.01) and Rankin grade four or less on the third day (p = 0.002), but also with an eye and motor score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of nine or 10 on the third day (p less than 0.001). The 120 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage who were still alive two days after the event were matched with 120 patients with cerebral infarction, according to age, level of consciousness on the third day after stroke (Glasgow Coma Scale) and handicap (Rankin grade). Survival and handicap after one year did not differ between these two groups. The conclusion drawn is that it is not the cause (intracerebral haemorrhage or cerebral infarction) but the extent of the brain lesion that determines the outcome in patients who survive the first two days. PMID:1527534

  14. New observations in scintigraphy of subdural and extradural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, W.M.; Gilson, A.J.; Janowitz, W.; Zusmer, N.; Maturo, V.

    1980-11-01

    Static radionuclide images of subacute subdural hematomas demonstrate significant variations in findings over a 3-hr period in the same patient. The lesion can appear, disappear, and reconstitute in an entirely different pattern. This transformation has not appeared in extradural hematomas, and may provide a differential diagnostic sign. In patients with a clinical history or physical findings suspicious for these intracranial hematomas, immediate and sequential delayed static imaging is recommended.

  15. Intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial trauma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, D.B.; Hertzanu, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with delayed frontal intracerebral pneumatoceles following facial injury are presented. In one patient an unusual appearance of bilateral and symmetrical frontal lobe pneumatoceles was demonstrated. While diagnosis is not difficult on routine radiographs, CT is valuable for determining effects on the brain and clearly delineating the fracture site; CT shows the location of the pneumatocele and may show an associated air-fluid level, mass effect or surrounding edema, or rim enhancement following administration of contrast material. The radiological appearances in conjunction with the clinical findings are highly characteristic and should not be mistaken for gas-forming cerebral abscesses.

  16. Anterior ethmoidal artery aneurysm and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    da Costa, L B; Valiante, T; Terbrugge, K; Tymianski, M

    2006-09-01

    The association between the formation of intracranial aneurysms and situations of increased blood flow in certain areas of the brain is well accepted today. It has been seen in association with arteriovenous malformations of the brain, carotid occlusion, and Moyamoya disease. The occurrence of aneurysms in small arteries of the skull base, with the exception of the intracavernous carotid artery, however, is rare. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior ethmoidal artery aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case of documented intracranial bleeding from such a lesion.

  17. Idea on prevention from postoperative intraorbital hematoma in orbital surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, D G

    2014-01-01

    The retrobulbar hematoma is a rare complication after orbital surgery. Despite of its rareness, the retrobulbar hematoma may be disastrous to the patient's vision (Chen et al. in J Craniofac Surg 20:963--967, 2009). Since 2007, I have applied the combined use of a scalp vein set and a vacuumed blood sampling bottle in all of the orbital surgeries. In my study, I achieved a good result, and I will introduce this simple method as one of alternatives for the prevention from the postoperative intraorbital hematoma including the retrobulbar hematoma. PMID:24533408

  18. Comparison between Decompressive Craniectomy with Durotomy and Conservative Treatment in Spontaneous Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Satter, A R; Islam, M R; Haque, M R; Mahmood, E; Rahman, M Z; Barman, N; Rahman, M A

    2016-04-01

    Large Intracerebral hematoma (ICH), compounded by perihematomal edema can produce severe elevations of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy (DC) beneficially addresses mass effect. Therefore this study is aimed to prove that decompressive craniectomy with durotomy has better outcome in patients with spontaneous supratentorial ICH than conservatively treated patients. This Quasi-Experimental study was carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, Dhaka Medical College & Hospital (DMCH), Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2012 to December 2013 using purposive sampling procedure. A total of 80 admitted adult hypertensive patients with spontaneous supratentorial ICH were enrolled in the study population fulfilling all selection criteria. Of them 40 patients underwent decompressive craniectomy with durotomy was considered as surgical group and 40 patients were treated conservatively was considered as conservative group. All the cases were continuously followed up and GCS score at 7(th) day of treatment (D7) and at discharge was recorded. Mean±SD hematoma volume was 56.91±13.72ml in surgical patients and in conservative group 51.80±13.58ml. Outcome measured by modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Sixty percent (60%) patients had good outcome (mRS 0-4) and 40% patients had poor outcome (mRS 5-6) in surgical group. On the other hand, 52.5% patients had good (mRS 0-4) and 47.5% had poor (mRS 5-6) outcome in conservative group. In logistic regression analysis, conservative group was 3.643 times more prone to develop poor outcome than surgical group which was statistically significant (95% CI, 1.040-13.047; p value <0.05) and volume of hematoma [OR (95% CI), 1.131(1.059-1.207); p value <0.001)] was the most important predictor of outcome. This study indicates that decompressive craniectomy with preservation of brain integrity in patients with spontaneous supratentorial ICH is feasible and safe. It can be a useful alternative surgical procedure in the treatment of

  19. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Cademartori, M S; Mamani, R S; Beltrame, C M; Cademartori, C G

    1984-03-01

    A case of spontaneous dorso- lumbar spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy is reported. The hematoma was removed 8 hours after the onset of paraplegia, and there was no evidence of vascular malformation. The motor deficit remained unchanged post-operatively. The etiology, clinical findings and the value of early laminectomy are discussed.

  20. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  1. History and Mechanism for Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage with Scalp Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Guan, Ling; Wang, Yan; Xie, Cheng-Long; Lin, Xian-Ming; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is an important public health problem with high rates of mortality, morbidity, and disability, but no clinically proven treatment strategy is available to date. Scalp acupuncture (SA) refers to a therapy for treating diseases by needling and stimulating the specific areas of the scalp. The evidence from clinical studies suggested that SA therapy may produce significant benefits for patients with acute ICH. However, the therapeutic mechanisms are yet not well addressed. Therefore, in this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview on the history and mechanisms of SA therapy on acute ICH. Although SA has been practiced for thousands of years in China and could date back to 5 BC, SA therapy for acute ICH develops only in the recent 30 years. The possible mechanisms associated with the therapeutic effects of SA on ICH include the influence on hematoma, brain edema, and blood brain barrier, the products released from haematoma, the immune and inflammatory reaction, focal perihemorrhagic hypoperfusion and hemorheology, neuroelectrophysiology, and so on. At last, the existence of instant effect of SA on acute ICH and its possible mechanisms are presented. PMID:22474527

  2. Kernohan's notch phenomenon in chronic subdural hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Jung-Kil; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Jung, Shin; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han; Kang, Sam-Suk

    2007-10-01

    We report two cases of Kernohan's notch phenomenon secondary to chronic subdural hematoma detected by MRI. In the first case, the patient was drowsy with an oculomotor palsy and a hemiparesis ipsilateral to the chronic subdural hematoma. MRI in the post-operative period showed no abnormal signal or deformity of the crus cerebri. The neurological signs immediately resolved after trephination. In the second case, the patient was admitted with progressive decrease in their level of consciousness and ipsilateral hemiparesis with the chronic subdural hematoma. MRI on admission revealed an abnormal signal in the contralateral crus cerebri against the chronic subdural hematoma. After surgery, the mental state gradually recovered to normal with some degree of residual hemiparesis. In patients with chronic subdural hematoma, a compressive deformity of the crus cerebri, without abnormal signal on MRI, may predict a better neurological recovery in patients with Kernohan's notch phenomenon.

  3. Traumatic extradural hematoma of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Garza-Mercado, R

    1989-03-01

    An example of a traumatic extradural hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred in a 32-year-old man who suffered from chronic ankylosing spondylitis is reported. Progressive sensory and motor deficit ensued some 3 hours after the patient fell from a standing position. The patient landed on his back, striking his head on the floor. After being helped up, he was able to walk unassisted to a nearby chair, where he sat down until his left lower extremity--and shortly afterwards, the right one--became numb and weak. On admission, the patient was found to have tetraparesis that was more pronounced in the lower extremities and associated with incomplete sensation to pinprick at level T7-T10. He also had painless distention of the urinary bladder. After a few hours, the weakness in his limbs increased and his sensory level rose to C5 bilaterally. A horizontal diastatic fracture across the vertebral body of C7 was discovered on plain x-ray films of the spine, and an extradural hematoma extending dorsally from C5 to T1 was revealed by emergency magnetic resonance imaging. After an emergency decompressive cervical laminectomy and removal of the clot, the patient rapidly regained complete neurological function, except with regard to both the urinary bladder and the rectum, which remained abnormal for almost 7 weeks after the operation.

  4. Delayed Intracerebral Hemorrhage Secondary to Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Chen, Yi-Li; Yang, Shu-Xu; Wang, Yi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a routine procedure for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion, and is associated with many complications. A delayed hemorrhage after the VP shunt surgery, however, is quite rare. In this study, we report a case involving late-onset hemorrhage. The 67-year-old male patient with a history of head trauma and brain surgery underwent a VP shunt placement for hydrocephalus. The surgery course was uneventful and no bleeding was revealed in the first computed tomographic (CT) scan after the procedure. However, a massive intraparenchymal and intraventricular hemorrhage occurred 8 h following adjustment of the valve system on the 8th day after surgery. Erosion of the vasculature by catheter cannulation and a sudden reduction of CSF pressure after downregulation of the valve could be one of the possible causes of the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). PMID:26632700

  5. Treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage: the clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Sterzi, R; Vidale, S

    2004-03-01

    Of all strokes 10% to 15% are intracerebral hemorrhage, primary ICH accounting for more than 75% of cases. A correct evaluation and management must start in the emergency room, in particular for patients who rapidly deteriorate. The diffusion of organized care for stroke patients and the availability of the stroke units in Italian hospitals, may represent a further opportunity to improve the outcome of patients with ICH. Despite the bulk of evidences coming from the randomized clinical therapeutic trials for acute ischemic stroke, the available data for randomized surgical trials are scanty. In these small randomized studies, neither surgical nor medical treatment has conclusively been shown to benefit patients with ICH. Surgical techniques are improving but it is important to find out the time window during which surgical evacuation is most effective with respect to the long-term outcome. The use of thrombolytic therapy to promote the resolution of ventricular blood clots appears to be promising.

  6. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  7. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jaime Robenolt; Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Parker, Dennis; Zimmerman, Lisa Hall; Rhoney, Denise H

    2014-11-20

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN) during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients). Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01), infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007) as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8-25) vs. 6 (3-9) days; p < 0.001). Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5%) patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population.

  8. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Robenolt Gray, Jaime; Morbitzer, Kathryn A.; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Parker, Dennis; Hall Zimmerman, Lisa; Rhoney, Denise H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN) during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients). Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01), infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007) as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8–25) vs. 6 (3–9) days; p < 0.001). Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5%) patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population. PMID:26237605

  9. [Intramural duodenal hematoma and acute pancreatitis as a complication of diagnostic biopsy of a duodenal 6-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Krzesiek, Elżbieta; Iwańczak, Barbara; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Hematoma duodenum is a very rare complication of diagnostic endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract when biopsy of the duodenum is performed (average frequency is estimated as 1:1,250 biopsies). Most often, it affects children and young adults without any risk factors. Symptoms result from obstruction of the duodenum and compression of the adjacent structures. Conservative treatment, which consists of parenteral nutrition and aspiration of gastric contents until the absorption of hematoma and patency of the gastrointestinal tract returns, is preferred. This paper describes a 6-year-old boy diagnosed due to short stature and low weight in whom the diagnostic biopsy of the duodenum caused formation of a hematoma in the descending duodenum and led to total ileus and acute pancreatitis. The boy was treated conservatively with good result and complete resolution of symptoms was achived.

  10. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  13. [Spontaneous hematoma of the atrial wall].

    PubMed

    Iglesias López, A; Rodríguez Pan, A; Pazos Silva, V

    2014-01-01

    The clinical signs of heart masses tend to be nonspecific, generally depending more on their repercussions on heart function caused by their location rather than on their type. Imaging techniques make it possible to limit the differential diagnosis of heart masses based on their location, morphology, and characteristics of echogenicity, density, or intensity, depending on the technique used to study them. We present the case of a woman with squeezing mid chest pain irradiating to her shoulder and positive cardiac markers in whom a left atrial mass was identified at echocardiography. This finding was confirmed at chest CT. The signs at chest CT were compatible with a mural hematoma and this diagnosis was confirmed after intraoperative biopsy.

  14. Epidural hematoma after minor oral trauma.

    PubMed

    Rice, J O; Walters, C; Olson, R E; Pearson, D

    1976-07-01

    A case report was presented in which a 15-year-old boy was beaten about the head with a baseball bat. Intraoral trauma and facial lacerations were repaired. Since results of the neurological examination were within normal limits, the patient was discharged. The next day, the patient became lethargic; however, the patient's mother did not bring the patient back to the hospital until the routine postoperative visit. At that time, the patient had right hemiparesis, was unable to speak, and was clearly obtunded. A carotid angiogram disclosed a left venous epidural hematoma in the parietal area. A craniotomy was performed with good results. The importance of follow-up neurologic examinations in cases of trauma to the face and head is stressed.

  15. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  16. Life-threatening paraspinal muscle hematoma after percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Nam-Su; Lee, Jae-Heon; Lee, Han-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and hematoma formation is rarely reported in percutaneous vertebroplasty procedure. An 84 year old male presented with a large paraspinal muscle hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty. The patient had neither any prior bleeding disorder nor any anticoagulant treatment. Vital signs of the patient were unstable, and his hemoglobin level decreased daily. After a month of conservative treatment, including transfusion, cryotherapy, pain control and bed rest, his hemoglobin level remained stable and he showed relief from pain. Four months later, hematoma resolved spontaneously and he could walk without back pain. PMID:27746502

  17. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  18. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  19. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to subcapsular renal hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Balci, N C; Sirvanci, M; Tüfek, I; Onat, L; Duran, C

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare intraabdominal bleeding. In this report we present a case of a nontraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma. A 54-year-old patient who was under warfarin therapy, developed subcapsular right renal hematoma. Subcapsular and retroperitoneal hemorrhage were low signal on T1- and T2-weighted images consistent with acute stage of blood. The source of subcapsular hematoma was shown to be the rupture of hemorrhagic renal cyst on MRI. Extension of hemorrhage into the retroperitoneal space anterior to right psoas muscle was also successfully shown on MRI. Patient underwent nephrectomy and retroperitoneal blood was evacuated.

  20. [Roentgenographic aspects of subcapsular renal hematomas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, G; Villoutreix, H

    1975-03-01

    About four cases, the authors exhibit roentgenographic features of subcapsular hematomas. They particularly emphasize the interest of nephrotomography and angiography two provide the typical signs; i.e.: flattening of the lacteral border of the renal parenchyma, absence of acute edges between normal renal outline and flattened portion, and at last, displaced capsular artery and/or renal capsule itself. Between flattening of kidney and capsular artery or capsule, one may individualize a mass of soft tissue density, convex or biconvex, corresponding to the hematomas. Particular attention is required concerning differential diagnosis with renal cyst, and possibility of a small neoplasm, sometimes indetectable at angiography, as a cause of "spontaneous" subcapsular hematoma.

  1. Extradural hematoma surgery in a child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Perioperative concerns.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Upendra; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Patra, Chitralekha; Ganjoo, Pragati

    2013-05-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by premature ageing, severe growth failure, and very early onset atherosclerosis. Psychologically and emotionally child-like, these patients suffer from physiological changes of old age. Early and progressive atherosclerosis of intra-cranial vessels in HGPS patients, along with a thin skin and fragile vessels, make these patients susceptible to intra-cranial hematomas following relatively trivial injuries and to severe intra-cranial disease. Anesthetizing HGPS patients for surgery can be challenging due to the presence of a possible difficult airway, multi-system derangements, and associated skin, bone and joint disease. We report here one such child with HGPS who underwent craniotomy and evacuation of an extradural hematoma that developed after minor head trauma. Securing his airway during surgery was difficult.

  2. A missed Behçet’s case presenting with spontaneous epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Levent; Mengi, Gönen; Özyemişçi-Taşkıran, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Spinal vascular events related to Behçet’s disease are relatively uncommon. Deep vein thrombosis is the most frequent vascular involvement. Anticoagulant therapy is a debated issue in Behçet’s disease. In this case report, we present a patient with a delayed diagnosis of Behçet’s disease after development of cervical epidural hematoma following anticoagulant therapy due to deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy without immunosuppressive therapy leading to uncontrolled systemic inflammation may be the cause of spinal epidural hematoma. On the other hand, epidural vascular involvement as a vasculitic manifestation of Behçet’s disease in conjunction with anticoagulant therapy may have predisposed to spontaneous bleeding via increased fragility or microaneurysms in epidural arteries. In this case report, the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to Behçet’s disease is emphasized.

  3. Intracerebral haemorrhage in Down syndrome: protected or predisposed?

    PubMed

    Buss, Lewis; Fisher, Elizabeth; Hardy, John; Nizetic, Dean; Groet, Jurgen; Pulford, Laura; Strydom, André

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), which arises from trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with deposition of large amounts of amyloid within the central nervous system. Amyloid accumulates in two compartments: as plaques within the brain parenchyma and in vessel walls of the cerebral microvasculature. The parenchymal plaque amyloid is thought to result in an early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia, a phenomenon so common amongst people with DS that it could be considered a defining feature of the condition. The amyloid precursor protein ( APP) gene lies on chromosome 21 and its presence in three copies in DS is thought to largely drive the early onset AD. In contrast, intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the main clinical consequence of vascular amyloidosis, is a more poorly defined feature of DS. We review recent epidemiological data on stroke (including haemorrhagic stroke) in order to make comparisons with a rare form of familial AD due to duplication (i.e. having three copies) of the APP region on chromosome 21, here called 'dup-APP', which is associated with more frequent and severe ICH. We conclude that although people with DS are at increased risk of ICH, this is less common than in dup-APP, suggesting the presence of mechanisms that act protectively. We review these mechanisms and consider comparative research into DS and dup-APP that may yield further pathophysiological insight. PMID:27239286

  4. Animal Stroke Model: Ischemia-Reperfusion and Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changhong; Sy, Christopher; Gao, Jinhuan; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major health issue worldwide-one with serious financial and public health implications. As a result, ongoing clinical research on novel and improved stroke therapies is not only pertinent but also paramount. Due to the complexity of a stroke-like event and its many sequelae, devising usable methods and experimental models are necessary to study and better understand the pathophysiological processes that ensue. As it stands, animal models that simulate stroke-like events have proven to be the most logical and effective options in regards to experimental studies. A number of animal stroke models exist and have been demonstrated in previous studies on ischemic as well as hemorrhagic stroke. Considering the efficiency and reproducibility of animal models, here, we introduce an ischemic stroke model induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and an intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke model induced by collagenase injection. The models outlined here have been proven to demonstrate the clinical relevance desired for use in continued research on stroke pathophysiology and the study of future therapeutic options. PMID:27604729

  5. [Treatment of subungual hematoma in office and outdoor conditions].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Treptising with an glowing spike or paperclip can be performed everywhere without local anesthesia and even by non-professionals. Evacuation of hematoma with a Insulin-Syringe/Needle in small nails (children, toe 2 - 5) is an interesting alternative.

  6. [An operated case of a meningioma causing acute subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Koyama, Shinya; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sannohe, Seiya; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Midorikawa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2013-03-01

    We report a rare case of a meningioma causing acute hematoma. A 67-year-old woman presented with sudden headache. No evidence of trauma was seen. CT demonstrated a subdural hematoma in the convexity of the fronto-temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity in the convexity of the frontal lobe. One week later, the patient underwent hematoma evacuation and tumor resection including the attached dura mater. The histological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma. The clot was connected directly to the tumor and the origin of the subdural hematoma was identified as the meningioma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the headache improved. Meningiomas have a relatively benign course but rarely present with hemorrhage. Surgical exploration is the effective and recommended treatment.

  7. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  8. Blood Pressure Management in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Yousef; Qureshi, Adnan

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with devastating outcomes. Admission to the intensive care unit has been the only proven course to improve outcomes. All other treatment modalities have failed so far. The majority of patients presenting with ICH have an elevated blood pressure (BP). Initial data on the safety and efficacy of BP treatment in acute ICH have been conflicting. This has led to large prospective and randomized clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of early BP lowering in acute ICH. These trials showed safety and a tendency toward improved functional outcomes. In fact, the results of three subsequent meta-analyses also showed safety and possible efficacy of early lowering of BP in ICH. Based on the results of the published clinical trials and meta-analyses, the American Heart Association and the European Stroke Association concluded that early intensive treatment of BP in acute ICH is safe and might improve functional outcome. The authors advocate that-pending additional data from ongoing trials-health care professionals should maintain the SBp < 140 mm Hg in patients presenting with acute ICH. PMID:27214702

  9. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  10. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  11. [Cervicodorsal subdural hematoma caused by coumarinic rodenticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Ruel, J H; Ffrench, P; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1990-01-01

    A 59-year old man developed subacute tetraparesis following severe sudden neck pain. MRI showed a subdural cervical hematoma. Prothrombin complex activity was low. An unusual coagulopathy after rodenticides exposure was found. Diphenacoum, an effective antagonist of vitamin K1, was present in the patients plasma. Specific medical management led to a complete recovery. Follow-up MRI seventy days later confirmed the complete disappearance of the hematoma. PMID:2330467

  12. [Subcapsular hematoma of the liver after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Ishizuka, E; Iwasaki, A; Saito, R

    1998-03-01

    We experienced a case of a hepatic subcapsular hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for a right renal stone. To our knowledge this presentation is the second case in the Japanese literature. A 63-year-old female with a right renal stone received 2,800 shots of 14.0 kilo-volts shockwave with Sonolith 3,000. Preoperative examination of the blood disclosed no abnormalities in the coagulating system except slight reduction of platelet count and slight impairment of liver function. Postoperative routine ultrasound echograms revealed a hepatic subcapsular hematoma although she had no symptom. The size of the hematoma measured 11.0 x 5.0 cm in computed tomograms (CT). She was carefully observed without any treatments because the hematoma did not increase in size. CT scans 6 months after the ESWL treatment demonstrated neither hematoma nor masses in the liver. As a complication of ESWL for urolithiasis a hepatic subcapsular hematoma is very rare. We herein presented the case and discussed the complications of ESWL briefly in the literature.

  13. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD.

  14. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. PMID:24447643

  15. Evolution of intracerebral hemorrhage after intravenous tPA: reversal of harmful effects with mast cell stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Ivan; Mattila, Olli S; Strbian, Daniel; Meretoja, Atte; Shekhar, Shashank; Saksi, Jani; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Rantanen, Ville; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) traditionally demands baseline imaging to rule out intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which causes delays in treatment. Preventing possible adverse effects of tPA on ICH would allow rapid on-site thrombolysis in patients with presumed acute ischemic stroke, reducing onset-to-treatment times. We examined how intravenous tPA alters ICH evolution during an extended follow-up, and how mast cell stabilization affects this process. Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced in rats by collagenase injection. Rats received either saline (n=10), tPA (n=13), tPA+low-dose cromoglycate (n=10), or tPA+high-dose cromoglycate (n=10). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 24, 48, and 72 hours after ICH induction, together with neurologic evaluations. During 72 hours of follow-up, tPA administration did not significantly increase hematoma volume (mean±s.d. 83.5±14.3 versus 66.7±14.7 μL; P=0.256) or hemispheric expansion (14.5±5.0 versus 11.5±5.0% P=0.457) compared with saline. However, tPA-treated animals had worse neurologic outcomes (P<0.05), and mortality (8/13 versus 3/10). Combining tPA with high-dose cromoglycate mitigated hemispheric expansion (7.4±1.7 versus 14.5±5.0% P=0.01), improved neurologic outcome (P<0.001) and decreased mortality (1/10; P<0.05) compared with tPA alone. Our results suggest tPA increases neurologic deficit in ICH, an effect that was abolished by concomitant mast cell stabilization. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:24169849

  16. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Case-Control Study Using Propensity Score Matching.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0.014). Surgery could

  17. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Case-Control Study Using Propensity Score Matching.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0.014). Surgery could

  18. Mouse Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Ventricle, Cortex, and Hippocampus by Injections of Autologous Blood or Collagenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Gao, Yufeng; Chang, Che-Feng; Wan, Jie-ru; Zhu, Shan-shan; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating condition. Existing preclinical ICH models focus largely on striatum but neglect other brain areas such as ventricle, cortex, and hippocampus. Clinically, however, hemorrhagic strokes do occur in these other brain regions. In this study, we established mouse hemorrhagic models that utilize stereotactic injections of autologous whole blood or collagenase to produce ventricular, cortical, and hippocampal injury. We validated and characterized these models by histology, immunohistochemistry, and neurobehavioral tests. In the intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) model, C57BL/6 mice that received unilateral ventricular injections of whole blood demonstrated bilateral ventricular hematomas, ventricular enlargement, and brain edema in the ipsilateral cortex and basal ganglia at 72 h. Unilateral injections of collagenase (150 U/ml) caused reproducible hematomas and brain edema in the frontal cortex in the cortical ICH (c-ICH) model and in the hippocampus in the hippocampal ICH (h-ICH) model. Immunostaining revealed cellular inflammation and neuronal death in the periventricular regions in the IVH brain and in the perihematomal regions in the c-ICH and h-ICH brains. Locomotor abnormalities measured with a 24-point scoring system were present in all three models, especially on days 1, 3, and 7 post-ICH. Locomotor deficits measured by the wire-hanging test were present in models of IVH and c-ICH, but not h-ICH. Interestingly, mice in the c-ICH model demonstrated emotional abnormality, as measured by the tail suspension test and forced swim test, whereas h-ICH mice exhibited memory abnormality, as measured by the novel object recognition test. All three ICH models generated reproducible brain damage, brain edema, inflammation, and consistent locomotor deficits. Additionally, the c-ICH model produced emotional deficits and the h-ICH model produced cognitive deficits. These three models closely mimic human ICH and should be useful for

  19. A new NOTCH3 mutation presenting as primary intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pradotto, Luca; Orsi, Laura; Daniele, Dino; Caroppo, Paola; Lauro, Danilo; Milesi, Alessandra; Sellitti, Luigi; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-04-15

    Primary intracerebral haemorrhages (PICH) are defined as haemorrhages within the brain parenchyma in the absence of readily identifiable causes. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy) is a hereditary vascular disease and its mainly clinical manifestations are early-onset infarcts. Spontaneous lobar haematomas are a rare occurrence. We report a very unusual presentation of CADASIL in a 65 year-old man carrying a new NOTCH3 mutation. The clinical onset of the disease was related to an intracerebral haematoma following colon surgery and causing a delirium. In brief, our report suggests that CADASIL must be considered in patient with PICH. PMID:22206696

  20. The radical scavenger edaravone improves neurologic function and perihematomal glucose metabolism after acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hanbing; Cui, Derong; Yang, Dehua; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhao, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative injury caused by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the progression of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced secondary brain injury. Previous studies have demonstrated that the free radical scavenger edaravone may prevent neuronal injury and brain edema after ICH. However, the influence of edaravone on cerebral metabolism in the early stages after ICH and the underlying mechanism have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of edaravone on perihematomal glucose metabolism using (18)F-fluorordeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Additionally, the neurologic deficits, brain edemas, and cell death that followed ICH were quantitatively analyzed. After blood infusion, the rats treated with edaravone showed significant improvement in both forelimb placing and corner turn tests compared with those treated with vehicle. Moreover, the brain water content of the edaravone-treated group was significantly decreased compared with that of the vehicle group on day 3 after ICH. PET/CT images of ICH rats exhibited obvious decreases in FDG standardized uptake values in perihematomal region on day 3, and the lesion-to-normal ratio of the edaravone-treated ICH rats was significantly increased compared with that of the control rats. Calculation of the brain injury volumes from the PET/CT images revealed that the volumes of the blood-induced injuries were significantly smaller in the edaravone group compared with the vehicle group. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assays performed 3 days after ICH revealed that the numbers of apoptotic cells in perihematomal region of edaravone-treated ICH rats were decreased relative to the vehicle group. Thus, the present study demonstrates that edaravone has scavenging properties that attenuate neurologic behavioral deficits and brain edema in the early period of ICH. Additionally, edaravone may improve

  1. The MTHFR C677T Polymorphism and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Xie, Zhiyi; Li, Yunke; Zheng, Jun; Fang, Yuan; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism has been speculated to be and extensively investigated as a risk factor for various vascular diseases, including intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, results from published studies regarding the role of C677T polymorphism in ICH risk in Chinese populations were contradictory rather than conclusive. Material/Methods In this study, a total of 180 ICH patients and 180 matched controls of Chinese Han ethnicity were enrolled. The MTHFR C677T polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reaction (PCR-LDR). A meta-analysis was conducted by combining our data with previous relevant studies in Chinese populations. Results In our case-control study, similar allele frequency (p=0.492) and genotype distribution (p=0.748) of MTHFR C677T polymorphism were detected between ICH patients and controls. Further analysis based on hematoma location did not show a significant association. When combined with previous studies, however, C677T polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for ICH in Chinese populations (recessive model: OR=1.57, 95%CI=1.29–1.91). When focusing on the Han ethnicity, carriers of the TT genotype had an increased risk of ICH (recessive model: OR=1.36, 95%CI=1.05–1.75). Conclusions In this case-control study we did not observe that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism was associated with ICH risk in people of Chinese Han ethnicity. However, when combined with previous published studies, a significant association of C677T polymorphism with an increased risk of ICH was detected in Chinese populations, and also in the subgroup analysis focusing on Han ethnicity. PMID:26757363

  2. Fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus Fails to Improve Outcomes Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Sherrefa R; Iniaghe, Loretta O; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most fatal stroke subtype, with no effective therapies. Hematoma expansion and inflammation play major roles in the pathophysiology of ICH, contributing to primary and secondary brain injury, respectively. Fucoidan, a polysaccharide from the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus, has been reported to activate a platelet receptor that may function in limiting bleeding, and to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. As such, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of fucoidan on hemorrhaging and neurological outcomes after ICH. Male CD-1 mice were subjected to experimental ICH by infusion of bacterial collagenase. Animals were randomly divided into the following groups: sham, ICH + vehicle, ICH + 25 mg/kg fucoidan, ICH + 75 mg/kg fucoidan, and ICH + 100 mg/kg fucoidan. Brain water content, neurobehavioral outcomes, and hemoglobin content were evaluated at 24 h post ICH. Our findings show that fucoidan failed to attenuate the ICH-induced increase in BWC. The neurological deficits that result from ICH also did not differ in the treatment groups at all three doses. Finally, we found that fucoidan had no effect on the hemoglobin content after ICH. We postulate that fucoidan treatment did not improve the measured outcomes after ICH because we used crude fucoidan, which has a high molecular weight, in our study. High-molecular-weight fucoidans are reported to have less therapeutic potential than low molecular weight fucoidans. They have been shown to exhibit anti-coagulant and pro-apoptotic properties, which seem to outweigh their anti-inflammatory and potential procoagulant abilities. We propose that using a low-molecular-weight fucoidan, or fractionating the crude polysaccharide, may be effective in treating ICH. Future studies are needed to confirm this.

  3. Efficacy and safety of intravenous nimodipine administration for treatment of hypertension in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqian; Fang, Wei; Tao, Lei; Li, Min; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Yafei; Ge, Shunnan; Gao, Li; Zhang, Bin; Li, Zhihong; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Boliang; Li, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Background Nicardipine (NC) is the most commonly used antihypertensive drug in neurological patients with hypertension. Although nimodipine (NM) is widely used to treat cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, trials exploring its antihypertensive effect after intravenous administration in subjects with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are scarce. Methods A retrospective study was carried out to compare the safety and efficacy of NC and NM administered intravenously in patients with ICH. Therapeutic responses were assessed by achievement of goal blood pressure (BP); use of additional medications for BP control; proportion of time spent within goal; variability in BP; time to goal BP; number of dose adjustments; variability in ICH volume, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and intracranial pressure; and drug-related complications. Results A total of 87 patients were eligible for analysis (n=46 [NC]; n=41 [NM]), and baseline characteristics between groups were similar. Both agents were effective in achieving goal BP during infusion, with 93.5% and 87.8% patients in the NC and NM groups achieving goal, respectively. Fewer additional medications were needed to control BP in the NC group. BP variability was similar and no differences were observed in the mean time to goal BP and mean numbers of dose adjustments between both groups. Interestingly, intracranial pressure declined (P=0.048) during NC administration but increased (P=0.066) after NM treatment. Finally, the incidences of hematoma expansion, neurological deterioration, and adverse drug events were similar in both groups. Conclusion NM is effective and safe for BP control in patients with ICH. PMID:26056454

  4. Surgical Treatment of a Life-Threatening Large Retropharyngeal Hematoma after Minor Trauma : Two Case Reports and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hoon; Jeong, Eui-Kyun; Kang, Dong-Ho; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2015-09-01

    Only a few cases of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) injury related with retropharyngeal hematoma without fracture have previously been reported. The treatment of choice for retropharyngeal hematoma is generally considered to be conservative care, but we believe that early surgery of this pathology would be better in certain situations. Here, we describe two cases with life-threatening large retropharyngeal hematomas related with ALL injuries and operated on at an early stage. Two previously healthy patients visited the emergency room with neck pain and dyspnea after falling. Serious neck swelling was observed and lateral neck X-ray showed severe widening of the prevertebral space. Due to dyspnea progression, emergency endotracheal intubation was performed. Although there was no primary cause of the retropharyngeal hematoma on preoperative examination, ALL tearing was intraoperatively confirmed during early surgery. The in-hospital evolutions of the patients were favorable after surgery. We should bear in mind the possibility of ALL injury and perform early surgery where possible given the earlier convalescence and good prognosis. PMID:26539280

  5. A tale of two acute extradural hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Jite, Ikechi E.; Smith, Omolara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In much of the Western hemisphere, mortality from traumatic acute extradural hematomas (AEDH) has been drastically brought down toward 0%. This is still not the case however in most developing countries. Case Description: This report represents a tragi-comic tale of two cases of traumatic AEDH managed by an academic neurosurgeon in a neurosurgically ill-resourced private health facility during a nationwide industrial strike action preventing clinical-surgical care in the principal author's University Teaching Hospital. A young man presented with altered consciousness, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 14/15, following a road accident. The cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained only 9 h after its request, long after the man had actually deteriorated to GCS 7/15 with pupillary changes. The neurosurgeon, summoned from the nearby University Teaching Hospital for the operative care of this man, arrived on-site and was about moving the patient into the operative room when he took the final breaths and died, all within 2 h of the belated neuroimaging. This scenario repeated itself in the same health facility just 24 h later with another young man who presented GCS 7/15 and another identical CT evidence of traumatic AEDH. With more financially able relations, the diagnostic/surgical care of this second patient was much more prompt. He made a very brisk recovery from neurosurgical operative intervention. He is alive and well, 5-month postoperative. Conclusions: In most low-resourced health systems of the developing countries, a significant proportion of potentially salvageable cases of AEDH still perish from this disease condition. PMID:27213108

  6. Intracerebral metaplastic meningioma with prominent ossification and extensive calcification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingxiang; Petersson, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a patient (male 26 years) with a short history of recurrent seizures induced by a largely intracerebrally located frontal lobe meningioma. The tumor displayed a heretofore unpublished combination of extensive metaplastic bone formation and prominent non-psammomatous calcifications with focal chicken-wire pattern. PMID:21769319

  7. Intracerebral hemorrhage caused by varicella-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo, Jairo; Castellanos, María Fernanda; Omaña, Claudia Rosa; Chaín, Miguel; Villamizar, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a previously healthy 44-years-old man with chickenpox, severe thrombocytopenia, mucosal hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with platelets and high doses of steroids. He recovered although with persistent left homonymous hemianopsia and epilepsy, which were controlled with medication. PMID:27622799

  8. A case of right renal infarction and subcapsular hematoma that simultaneously developed after cardiac angiography.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S H; Cho, H C; Lee, S W; Kim, D Y; Joo, W C; Lee, W H; Song, J H; Kim, M-J

    2009-01-01

    Of the several complications known to develop after cardiac catheterization, simultaneous acute renal infarction and renal subcapsular hematoma is rare. Here, the authors report a case of acute renal infarction with subcapsular hematoma that developed 4 hours after cardiac catheterization.

  9. [Qualitative histological diagnostics of the remoteness of traumatic subdural hematomas].

    PubMed

    Nedugov, G V

    2011-01-01

    The present histological study was based on the examination of dura mater, capsules, and contents of 200 subdural hematomas (SDH) obtained from the corpses of subjects with a non-penetrating craniocerebral injury within a period from 1 hour to 2.5 years after the trauma. A total of 14 well-reproducible qualitative morphological criteria have been identified for diagnostics of the prescription of subdural hematomas; the probability and the exact earliest and latest times of their manifestation at different dates of the posttraumatic period were calculated. Sensitivity, specificity, and prognostic value of the proposed qualitative morphological criteria for the prescription of traumatic subdural hematomas were evaluated. The results of the study can be used in the practical work of forensic medical experts.

  10. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management.

  11. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  12. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  13. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  14. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  15. Promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis therapy for acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-qin; Wei, Jing-jing; Xia, Wan; Li, Ji-huang; Liu, Ai-ju; Yin, Su-bing; Wang, Chen; Song, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Guo-qing; Fan, Ji-ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the current evidence available regarding the promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis (PBCRBS) therapy for Chinese patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: Six databases were searched from their inception to November 2013. The studies assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' were selected for detailed assessment and meta-analysis. The herbal compositions for PBCRBS therapy for acute ICH patients were also assessed. Results: From the 6 databases, 292 studies claimed randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Nine studies with 798 individuals were assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' by using the Cochrane RoB tool. Meta-analysis showed that PBCRBS monotherapy and adjuvant therapy for acute ICH could improve the neurological function deficit, reduce the volume of hematoma and perihematomal edema, and lower the mortality rate and dependency. Moreover, there were fewer adverse effects when compared with Western conventional medication controls. Xueshuantong Injection and Fufang Danshen Injection, Buyang Huanwu Decoction and Liangxue Tongyu formula, and three herbs (danshen root, sanqi and leech) were the most commonly used Chinese herbal patent injections, herbal prescriptions and single herbs, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the apparently positive findings, it is premature to conclude that there is sufficient efficacy and safety of PBCRBS for ICH because of the high clinical heterogeneity of the included studies and small number of trials in the meta-analysis. Further large sample-sizes and rigorously designed RCTs are needed. PMID:25960132

  16. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg's test and Egger's regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  17. Association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene A/T polymorphism and primary intracerebral hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zusen; Ye, Qiang; Shao, Bei; He, Jincai; Zhu, Zhenguo; Cheng, Jianhua; Chen, Yanyan; Chen, Siyan; Huang, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to use meta-analysis to explain the association between alpha-1 antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene A/T polymorphism and the risk of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Relevant studies before 1 June 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane database and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and the references of retrieved articles. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used to assess the strength of the association. Five independent publications, with 774 PICH cases and 940 controls, were included. There was no statistical evidence of association between ACT polymorphism and PICH risk under all genetic models in overall estimates (allele model: OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.80-1.28; heterozygote model: OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.60-1.45; homozygote model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.59-1.80; dominant model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.65-1.46; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.72-1.57). No association was found in subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, location of hematoma and blood pressure. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the combined results were stable and reliable. No significant publication bias was found by Begg’s test and Egger’s regression test. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that ACT polymorphism is unlikely to contribute to PICH susceptibility. PMID:26885003

  18. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  19. A Lethal Complication of Endoscopic Therapy: Duodenal Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Calhan, Turan; Kahraman, Resul; Soydaş, Barış; Tosun, Ali; Cebeci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal intramural hematoma (DIH) usually occurs in childhood and young adults following blunt abdominal trauma. It may also develop in the presence of coagulation disorders and may rarely be an iatrogenic outcome of endoscopic procedures. Management of DIH is usually a conservative approach. A case of intramural duodenal hematoma that developed following endoscopic epinephrine sclerotherapy and/or argon plasma coagulation and that was nonresponsive to conservative therapy in a patient with chronic renal failure who died from sepsis is being discussed in this report. Clinicians should be aware of such possible complications after endoscopic hemostasis in patients with coagulation disorders. PMID:26697240

  20. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. PMID:24220549

  1. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively. PMID:23293672

  2. Single burr hole evacuation for traumatic acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Osamu; Kameyama, Motonobu; Shimosegawa, Yasuko; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Sugai, Kazuyuki; Onuma, Takehide

    2002-08-01

    A 57-year-old man and a 55-year-old man presented with acute subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa due to trauma. Both were comatose preoperatively. Emergent single burr hole evacuation in the posterior cranial fossa was performed in the emergency room immediately after computed tomography. Neurological symptoms improved dramatically just after initiating the burr hole evacuation in both patients. A 57-year-old man became alert and could walk unassisted 1 month after surgery. The other could walk with assistance 4 months after surgery, although psychic disturbance resulting from cerebral contusion remained. Single burr hole evacuation in the emergency room is a useful treatment for acute subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa because the procedure can be performed easily and rapidly, thus achieving reduction of intracranial pressure. Progressing neurological deterioration, reversibility of brainstem function by mannitol administration and the sign of brainstem compression and noncommunicating hydrocephalus are good indicators for this treatment.

  3. Genomic profiles of damage and protection in human intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, S Thomas; Vespa, Paul M; Saver, Jeffery L; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Starkman, Sidney; Miller, Chad M; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Liebeskind, David S; Martin, Neil A

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) produces a high rate of death and disability. The molecular mechanisms of damage in perihematomal tissue in humans have not been systematically characterized. This study determines the gene expression profile and molecular networks that are induced in human perihematomal tissue through molecular analysis of tissue obtained from endoscopic clot evacuation. Differentially expressed genes and their cellular origin were confirmed in a mouse model of ICH. A total of 624 genes showed altered regulation in human ICH. Bioinformatic analysis shows that these genes form interconnected networks of proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and neuronal signaling cascades. Intracerebral hemorrhage evokes coordinated upregulation of proinflammatory signaling through specific cytokines and chemokines and their downstream molecular pathways. Anti-inflammatory networks are also induced by ICH, including annexins A1 and A2 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF β) and their intracellular cascades. Intracerebral hemorrhage downregulates many neuronal signaling systems, including the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor complex and membrane ion channels. Select portions of these molecular networks were confirmed in the mouse, and the proteins in a subset of these networks localized to subsets of neurons, oligodendrocytes, or leukocytes. These inflammatory and anti-inflammatory networks interact at several key points in neutrophil signaling, apoptotic cell death, and protease responses, and indicate that secondary damage in ICH activates opposing molecular systems. PMID:18628781

  4. Chronic expanding hematoma with a significantly high fluorodeoxyglucose uptake on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, mimicking a malignant soft tissue tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare persistent hematoma that can sometimes be misdiagnosed as a malignant tumor due to its clinical and radiological features. Case presentation A 42-year-old Japanese man with a large mass in his leg, suggestive of malignancy, presented to our hospital. He had been aware of the leg swelling for the last eight years. A magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a large mass with two components. One was a large, well-defined cystic mass (13×9cm) showing high intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images, and the other was a solid mass (3.5×2.5cm, adjacent to the large mass) with high intensity on T1-weighted images. Two-[18F]fluoro-2 deoxy-D glucose positron emission tomography images revealed increased uptake with a maximum standardized uptake value of 15.8 in the solid mass. As these findings were considered suggestive of hematoma associated with a malignant lesion, an open biopsy was performed. A pathological examination demonstrated a hematoma with xanthogranuloma, and no malignant cells were evident. Therefore, we resected the tumor including both components, and the histological diagnosis was chronic expanding hematoma. Clinical diagnosis based on 2-[18F]fluoro-2 deoxy-D glucose uptake is sometimes limited by the fact that 2-[18F]fluoro-2 deoxy-D glucose is taken up by not only malignant tumor cells but also macrophages and tissues with granulation or inflammation. Conclusions Significantly increased standardized uptake value in the peripheral rim of the lesion on 2-[18F]fluoro-2 deoxy-D glucose positron emission tomography imaging, mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma, should be recognized as a potential diagnostic pitfall in cases of chronic expanding hematoma. PMID:25335527

  5. PRM/NIR sensor for brain hematoma detection and oxygenation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liu; Lee, Hyo Sang; Lokos, Sandor; Kim, Jin; Hanley, Daniel F.; Wilson, David A.

    1997-06-01

    The pseudo-random modulation/near IR sensor (PRM/NIR Sensor) is a low cost portable system designed for time-resolved tissue diagnosis, especially hematoma detection in the emergency care facility. The sensor consists of a personal computer and a hardware unit enclosed in a box of size 37 X 37 X 31 cm3 and of weight less than 10 kg. Two pseudo-random modulated diode lasers emitting at 670 nm and 810 nm are used in the sensor as light sources. The sensor can be operated either in a single wavelength mode or a true differential mode. Optical fiber bundles are used for convenient light delivery and color filters are used to reject room light. Based on a proprietary resolution- enhancement correlation technique, the system achieves a time resolution better than 40 ps with a PRM modulation speed of 200 MHz and a sampling rate of 1-10 Gs/s. Using the prototype sensor, phantom experiments have been conducted to study the feasibility of the sensor. Brain's optical properties are simulated with solutions of intralipid and ink. Hematomas are simulated with bags of paint and hemoglobin immersed in the solution of varies sizes, depths, and orientations. Effects of human skull and hair are studied experimentally. In animal experiment, the sensor was used to monitor the cerebral oxygenation change due to hypercapnia, hypoxia, and hyperventilation. Good correlations were found between NIR measurement parameters and physiological changes induced to the animals.

  6. The role of subgaleal suction drain placement in chronic subdural hematoma evacuation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Chourasia, Ishwar D.; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is lack of uniformity about the preferred surgical treatment, role of drain, and type of drain among various surgeons in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The present study is aimed to evaluate role of subgaleal drain. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of 260 patients of CSDH treated surgically. Burr-hole irrigation with and without suction drain was done in 140 and 120 patients, respectively. Out of 120 patients without suction drain 60 each were managed by single and two burr holes. Pre- and postoperative GCS was recorded. Recurrent hematomas, CSDH secondary to tumor, due to intracranial hypotension, coagulopathy, children below 18 years, and patients treated by twist drill craniostomy or craniotomy were excluded. Subgaleal closed-system drainage with low negative pressure was used. Results: Age of the patients ranged from 18 to 75 years with mean age of 57 years. There were 9, 47, 204 patients in GCS of 3-8, 9-12, and 13-15, respectively. Both the groups were comparable in terms of age, etiology, gender, and neurological status. There was no difference in the mortality in both the group. The recurrence and postoperative pneumocephalus was significantly less in suction drain group as compared to without drain group. There was no infection or any other complication related to suction drainage. Conclusion: Subgaleal closed suction drainage was safe, simple, and effective in the management of CSDH. Recurrence rate was low in the suction drain group. PMID:27366247

  7. Anemia is an independent prognostic factor in intracerebral hemorrhage: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To date only two studies have evaluated anemia status in acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) reporting that on admission anemia (OAA) was associated with larger hematoma volume, and lower hemoglobin levels during hospital stay, which related to poorer outcome. The question remains whether anemia influences outcome through related volume-effects or itself has an independent impact? Methods This single-center investigation included 435 consecutive patients with spontaneous ICH admitted to the Department of Neurology over five years. Functional short- and long-term outcome (3 months and 1 year) were analyzed for anemia status. Multivariate logistic and graphical regression analyses were calculated for associations of anemia and to determine independent effects on functional outcome. It was decided to perform a separate analysis for patients with ICH-volume <30cm3 (minor-volume-ICH). Results Overall short-term-outcome was worse in anemic patients (mRS[4-6] OAA = 93.3% vs. non-OAA = 61.2%, P < 0.01), and there was a further shift towards an increased long-term mortality (P = 0.02). The probability of unfavorable long-term-outcome (mRS[4-6]) in OAA was elevated 7-fold (OR:7.5; P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) analysis revealed a positive but poor association of ICH-volume and anemia (AUC = 0.67) suggesting volume-undriven outcome-effects of anemia (AUC = 0.75). Multivariate regression analyses revealed that anemia, besides established parameters, has the strongest relation to unfavorable outcome (OR:3.0; P < 0.01). This is even more pronounced in minor-volume-ICH (OR:5.6; P < 0.01). Conclusions Anemia seems to be a previously unrecognized significant predictor of unfavorable functional outcome with independent effects beyond its association with larger hemorrhage volumes. The recognition of anemia and its treatment may possibly influence outcome after ICH and as such prospective interventional studies are warranted. PMID:23880122

  8. Surgery versus Conservative Treatment for Spontaneous Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Spot Sign Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hui-Tae; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective An advantage of surgical treatment over conservative treatment of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is controversial. Recent reports suggest that contrast extravasations on CT angiography (CTA) might serve as a crucial predictor of hematoma expansion and mortality. The purpose of this study was aimed at investigating the efficacy of surgical treatment in patients with spot sign positive ICH. Methods We used our institutional medical data search system to identify all adult patients who admitted for treatment of ICH between January 1, 2007 and January 31, 2012. Patients were classified two groups into a surgical group (n=27) and a conservative treatment group (n=28). Admission criteria were the following: age 20-79 years, spontaneous supratentorial ICH, Glasgow Coma Score Ranging from 9 to 14, ICH volume ≥20 mL, and treatment within 24 hours. Results Fifty-five patients were analyzed. There was no significant difference in the ICU stay between the conservative treatment group (7.36±3.66 days) and the surgical treatment group (6.93±2.20 days; p=0.950). There was a significant difference in the in-hospital stay between the conservative treatment group (13.93±8.87 days) and the surgical treatment group (20.33±6.37 days; p=0.001). Overall mortality at day 90 after ICH was 36.4%; this included 16 of 28 patients (57.1%) in the conservative group and 4 of 27 patients (14.8%) in the surgical group. In univariate analysis, there was a positive effect of the surgical treatment in reducing mortality at 90 days (p=0.002), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at 90-day (p=0.006), and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 90-day (p=0.023). In multivariate logistic analysis, there was a significant difference in mortality (odds ratio, 0.211; 95% confidence interval, 0.049-0.906; p=0.036) between the groups at 90-day follow-up. However, there was no significant difference in GOS (odds ratio, 0.371; 95% confidence interval, 0.031-4.446; p=0.434) and mRS (odds ratio, 1

  9. APOE Genotype Predicts Extent of Bleeding and Outcome in Lobar Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Alessandro; Anderson, Christopher D.; Jagiella, Jeremiasz M.; Schmidt, Helena; Kissela, Brett; Hansen, Björn M.; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Pires, Caroline R.; Ayres, Alison M.; Schwab, Kristin; Cortellini, Lynelle; Pera, Joanna; Urbanik, Andrzej; Romero, Javier M.; Rost, Natalia S.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pichler, Alexander; Enzinger, Christian; Rabionet, Raquel; Norrving, Bo; Tirschwell, David L.; Selim, Magdy; Brown, Devin L.; Silliman, Scott L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Broderick, Joseph P.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Roquer, Jaume; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background APOE alleles ε2/ε4 increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the lobar regions, presumably through their influence on risk of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We investigated whether these variants also associate with ICH severity, specifically larger ICH volume at presentation. Methods We initially investigated the association of ε2/ε4 with ICH volume and outcome in a Discovery sample of 865 individuals of European ancestry. Replication was completed in two samples, comprising 946 Europeans (Replication I) and 214 African-Americans (Replication II) respectively. Admission ICH volume was quantified on CT scan. Poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale: 3 – 6) and mortality were assessed at 90 days. Findings Among patients with lobar ICH, APOE ε2 was associated with larger ICH volume: each allele copy increased hematoma size by 5·3 cc (95% CI 4·1 – 6·2 cc, p = 0.004), with replication in Europeans (p = 0·008) and African Americans (p = 0·016). Consistent with this, ε2 was associated with both mortality (OR = 1·50, 1·23 – 1·82, p = 2·45 × 10−5) and poor functional outcome (OR = 1·52, 1·25 – 1·85, p = 1·74 × 10−5). We were not able to replicate published associations between ε4 and overall ICH mortality in a meta-analysis of all available data (n = 2202 ICH cases, OR = 1·08, 95% CI: 0·86 – 1·36, p = 0·52). Interpretation In lobar ICH, APOE ε2 is associated with larger ICH volume at presentation, and hence increased mortality and disability. These findings suggest a role for the vasculopathic changes associated with the ε2 allele in influencing the severity and clinical course of lobar ICH. Funding This study was funded by NIH-NINDS, the American Heart Association, government agencies in Spain, Poland and Austria, academic institutions in Sweden and Austria, and philanthropic organizations. PMID:21741316

  10. Surgical treatment of poor grade middle cerebral artery aneurysms associated with large sylvian hematomas following prophylactic hinged craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Jun; Ye, You-Fan; Shen, Yin; Zhu, Rui; Yao, Dong-Xiao; Zhao, Hong-Yang

    2014-10-01

    The clinical characteristics of patients who presented in poor clinical grade due to ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms (MCAAs) associated with large sylvian hematomas (SylH) were analyzed and an ingenious designed prophylactic hinged craniectomy was introduced. Twenty-eight patients were graded into Hunt-Hess grades IV-V and emergency standard micro-neurosurgeries (aneurysm clipping, hematoma evacuation and prophylactic hinged craniectomy) were performed, and their clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. 46.43% of the patients reached encouraged favorable outcomes on discharge. The favorable outcome group and the poor outcome group significantly differed in terms of patients' anisocoria, Hunt-Hess grade before surgery, extent of the midline shift and time to the surgery after bleeding (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in age, sex, volume and location of the hematoma, size of aneurysm between the favorable and poor groups (P>0.05). However, ingenious designed prophylactic hinged craniectomy efficiently reduced the patients' intracranial pressure (ICP) after surgery. It was suggested that preoperative conditions such as Hunt-Hess grading, extent of the midline shift and the occurrence of cerebral hernia affect the prognosis of patients, but time to the surgery after bleeding and prophylactic hinged craniectomy are of significant importance for optimizing the prognosis of MCAA patients presenting with large SylH.

  11. Preoperative angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor usage in patients with chronic subdural hematoma: Associations with initial presentation and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Schmidt, Tobias; Mitova, Tatyana; Fierstra, Jorn; Bellut, David; Regli, Luca; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bozinov, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the association of preoperative usage of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with the initial presentation and clinical outcome of patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Patients treated for cSDH between 2009 and 2013 at our institution were included in this retrospective case-control study. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Out of 203 patients (58 females, mean age 73.2years), 53 (26%) patients were on ACE inhibitors before their presentation with cSDH. Median initial hematoma volume in individuals with ACE inhibitors (179.2±standard error of the mean [SEM] 13.0ml) was significantly higher compared to patients without ACE inhibitors (140.4±SEM 6.2ml; p=0.007). There was an increased probability of surgical reintervention in the ACE inhibitor group (12/53, 23% versus 19/153, 12%; p=0.079), especially in patients older than 80years (6/23, 26% versus 3/45, 7%; p=0.026). ACE inhibitors are associated with higher hematoma volume in patients with cSDH and with a higher frequency of recurrences requiring surgery (especially in the very old). We hypothesize that these effects are due to ACE inhibitor induced bradykinin elevation causing increased vascular permeability of the highly vascularized neomembranes in cSDH. PMID:26898577

  12. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  13. Congenital afibrinogenemia: a case report of a spontaneous hepatic hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Malaquin, Stephanie; Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Badoux, Louise; Mahjoub, Yazine; Dupont, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Afibrinogenemia is a rare coagulation disorder. Clinical features of spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma, or after surgery have been described as well as thrombo-embolic complications. In this article, we presented the case of a 19-year old female with congenital afibrinogenemia who was admitted with a spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. Conclusions: Supportive treatment including transfusion and fibrinogen administration, associated with repeated packing surgeries and selective embolization, were successfully performed. PMID:27428204

  14. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  15. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  16. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome.

  17. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  18. Chronic expanding hematoma with bronchopleural fistula and empyema space.

    PubMed

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Imai, Tadashi

    2009-06-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma of the thorax is not typically accompanied by a bronchopleural fistula or purulent lesion. We report an extremely rare case of chronic expanding hematoma with a bronchopleural fistula and empyema space in a 66-year-old man with a history of tuberculous pleurisy admitted because of fever and bloody sputa. Computed tomography and a magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge mass and an air space in the right thorax. A fiber-optic bronchoscope examination showed hemorrhagic effusion from the apical bronchus of the right lower lobe. First, open-window thoracostomy was undertaken to control the septic state and to prevent aspiration of infected pleural fluid. At operation, air leakage was found at the most superior portion in the rear of the thoracic empyema space; this was thought to be from the bronchopleural fistula. Enterococcus casseliflavus was detected in cultures for bacteria of the effusion from the empyema space. After an improvement of his general condition, a radical operation, including the complete extirpation of the hematoma and intrathoracic muscle transposition using the latissimus dorsi muscle, was successfully performed. PMID:19597392

  19. Traumatic tentorial hematoma in two-wheeler riders: Correlation with helmet use

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Dawar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tentorial hematoma is frequently seen in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, especially in motorized two-wheeler riders following head injury. However its relevance and prognostic significance are not known. Objective: To evaluate patients of TBI with tentorial hematoma using a simple grading system and attempt to correlate this grading with factors like helmet use and neurological outcome. Materials and Methods: This prospective study over a 1-year period included patients with TBI who had tentorial hematoma in the initial plain head. Patients were divided into three grades based on the initial CT findings: Grade I: Isolated tentorial hematoma, grade II: tentorial hematoma with midline shift but open cisterns and grade III: Tentorial hematoma with effaced cisterns. Clinical and radiological records of patients including admission GCS and GOS at discharge were assessed in all cases. Observations: A total of 1786 patients of TBI were admitted during the study period. Of these, 106 (5.9%) patients had tentorial hematoma. 84.9% (n = 90) were male and 15.1% (n = 16) were female with the mean age being 36.5 years (range 2-66 years). The mean admission GCS was 13, 11 and 8 in patients with grade I, II and III tentorial hematoma respectively. 43.4% (n = 46) of the patients had grade I, 32.1% (n = 34) had grade II and 24.5% (n = 26) patients had grade III tentorial hematoma. Seventy-one patients (84.5%) were riding motorized two wheelers with 63 (89%) wearing helmets. The majority of the patients wearing helmets (58.8%) had grade I hematoma with 35% (n = 22) having grade II hematoma and only 6.3% (n = 4) having grade III hematoma. Overall, there were 20 deaths. 50% (n = 10) of the deaths were in patients with grade III hematoma and 40% (n = 8) of the deaths were in patients with grade II hematoma. There were two (10%) deaths in patients with grade I hematoma (both unrelated to head injury). The mean GOS at the time of discharge was 5, 4.1 and 2.2 in patients

  20. Traumatic tentorial hematoma in two-wheeler riders: Correlation with helmet use

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Dawar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tentorial hematoma is frequently seen in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, especially in motorized two-wheeler riders following head injury. However its relevance and prognostic significance are not known. Objective: To evaluate patients of TBI with tentorial hematoma using a simple grading system and attempt to correlate this grading with factors like helmet use and neurological outcome. Materials and Methods: This prospective study over a 1-year period included patients with TBI who had tentorial hematoma in the initial plain head. Patients were divided into three grades based on the initial CT findings: Grade I: Isolated tentorial hematoma, grade II: tentorial hematoma with midline shift but open cisterns and grade III: Tentorial hematoma with effaced cisterns. Clinical and radiological records of patients including admission GCS and GOS at discharge were assessed in all cases. Observations: A total of 1786 patients of TBI were admitted during the study period. Of these, 106 (5.9%) patients had tentorial hematoma. 84.9% (n = 90) were male and 15.1% (n = 16) were female with the mean age being 36.5 years (range 2-66 years). The mean admission GCS was 13, 11 and 8 in patients with grade I, II and III tentorial hematoma respectively. 43.4% (n = 46) of the patients had grade I, 32.1% (n = 34) had grade II and 24.5% (n = 26) patients had grade III tentorial hematoma. Seventy-one patients (84.5%) were riding motorized two wheelers with 63 (89%) wearing helmets. The majority of the patients wearing helmets (58.8%) had grade I hematoma with 35% (n = 22) having grade II hematoma and only 6.3% (n = 4) having grade III hematoma. Overall, there were 20 deaths. 50% (n = 10) of the deaths were in patients with grade III hematoma and 40% (n = 8) of the deaths were in patients with grade II hematoma. There were two (10%) deaths in patients with grade I hematoma (both unrelated to head injury). The mean GOS at the time of discharge was 5, 4.1 and 2.2 in patients

  1. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5840 Section 882.5840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5840 Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief is a device that applies electrical...

  6. [Acute epidural hematoma with extravasation on cerebral angiogram in an infant (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oseki, J; Oana, K; Kobayashi, T; Kawada, Y; Kanaya, H

    1977-03-01

    The authors recently operated on a boy four years of age with acute epidural hematoma showing an extravasation on the cerebral angiogram. The hematoma (hematoma volume 125 ml) was evacuated 7 hours after the head injury. The postoperative course was quite uneventful, and he was discharged a month after surgery without any neurologic deficits. The authors reviewed the literature and found 4 cases of acute epidural hematoma with extravasations in infants and children. In all cases the operative results were good. The age incidence and frequency of occurence overall for acute epidural hematomas, extravasations on cerebral angiograms and their mechanism, and the length of time from injury to operation were also discussed. It should be emphasized that, for acute epidural hematoma in infants and children, the early diagnosis and early surgery are essential to save the patients.

  7. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Conclusion: Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage. PMID:26862454

  8. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Short-Course Deep Sedation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage After Surgery: A Non-Randomized Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dapeng; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qiushi; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background While mild and moderate sedation have been widely used to reduce sudden agitation in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients after surgery, agitation is still a frequent problem, which may cause postoperative blood pressure fluctuation. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course deep sedation for the treatment of ICH after surgery. Material/Methods A total of 41 ICH patients who received surgery, including traditional craniotomy hematoma removal and decompressive craniectomy, were including in this non-randomized control study. Patients in the deep sedation group received continuous postoperative sedation with a target course for ≤12 hours and reached SAS scores of 1~2. Patients in the traditional sedition group received continuous light sedation and reached SAS scores of 3~4. Additional therapeutic interventions included antihypertensive treatment, mechanical ventilation, tracheotomy, and re-operation. Results Patients in the deep sedation group had deeper sedation degree, and lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Residual hematoma after surgery in patients in the deep sedation group were smaller on the second, seventh, and fourteenth day after surgery (p=0.023, 0.003, 0.004, respectively). The 3-month mortality and quality of life of patients in the deep sedation group were lower and better than that of patients in the traditional sedation group, respectively (p=0.044, p<0.01). No significant difference in the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ICU days were observed between the two groups. Conclusions Short-course deep sedation therapy in ICH patients after surgery is efficient in controlling postoperative blood pressure, reducing re-bleeding, and improving clinical prognosis. PMID:27466863

  9. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Short-Course Deep Sedation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracerebral Hemorrhage After Surgery: A Non-Randomized Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dapeng; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qiushi; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND While mild and moderate sedation have been widely used to reduce sudden agitation in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients after surgery, agitation is still a frequent problem, which may cause postoperative blood pressure fluctuation. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course deep sedation for the treatment of ICH after surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 41 ICH patients who received surgery, including traditional craniotomy hematoma removal and decompressive craniectomy, were including in this non-randomized control study. Patients in the deep sedation group received continuous postoperative sedation with a target course for ≤12 hours and reached SAS scores of 1~2. Patients in the traditional sedition group received continuous light sedation and reached SAS scores of 3~4. Additional therapeutic interventions included antihypertensive treatment, mechanical ventilation, tracheotomy, and re-operation. RESULTS Patients in the deep sedation group had deeper sedation degree, and lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Residual hematoma after surgery in patients in the deep sedation group were smaller on the second, seventh, and fourteenth day after surgery (p=0.023, 0.003, 0.004, respectively). The 3-month mortality and quality of life of patients in the deep sedation group were lower and better than that of patients in the traditional sedation group, respectively (p=0.044, p<0.01). No significant difference in the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ICU days were observed between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Short-course deep sedation therapy in ICH patients after surgery is efficient in controlling postoperative blood pressure, reducing re-bleeding, and improving clinical prognosis.

  10. Multiple postoperative intracerebral haematomas remote from the site of craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Rapanà, A; Lamaida, E; Pizza, V

    1998-08-01

    A postoperative haemorrhage is a common and serious complication of a neurosurgical procedure. It usually occurs at the site of the surgery, but on occasion a postoperative haematoma is found at a distance from the previous craniotomy. Multiple postoperative haemorrhages are extremely rare. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, operated on for the removal of a supratentorial astrocytoma, who developed in the early post-operative period multiple bilateral intracerebral haematomas without involvement of the surgical bed. PMID:10070433

  11. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Gan, Qi; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS) also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH. PMID:26843907

  12. Intracerebral haemorrhage profiles are changing: results from the Dijon population-based study.

    PubMed

    Béjot, Yannick; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Durier, Jérôme; Aboa-Eboulé, Corine; Rouaud, Olivier; Giroud, Maurice

    2013-02-01

    Incidence of intracerebral haemorrhage over the past three decades is reported as stable. This disappointing finding is questionable and suggests that any reduction in intracerebral haemorrhage incidence associated with improvements in primary prevention, namely, better control of blood pressure, might have been offset by an increase in cases of intracerebral haemorrhage owing to other factors, including the use of antithrombotic drugs in the ageing population. Therefore, we aimed to analyse trends in intracerebral haemorrhage incidence from 1985 to 2008 in the population-based registry of Dijon, France, taking into consideration the intracerebral haemorrhage location, the effect of age and the changes in the distribution of risk factors and premorbid treatments. Incidence rates were calculated and temporal trends were analysed by age groups (<60, 60-74 and ≥75 years) and intracerebral haemorrhage location (lobar or deep) according to study periods 1985-92, 1993-2000 and 2001-08. Over the 24 years of the study, 3948 patients with first-ever stroke were recorded. Among these, 441 had intracerebral haemorrhage (48.3% male), including 49% lobar, 37% deep, 9% infratentorial and 5% of undetermined location. Mean age at onset increased from 67.3 ± 15.9 years to 74.7 ± 16.7 years over the study period (P < 0.001). Overall crude incidence was 12.4/100,000/year (95% confidence interval: 11.2-13.6) and remained stable over time. However, an ∼80% increase in intracerebral haemorrhage incidence among people aged ≥75 years was observed between the first and both second and third study periods, contrasting with a 50% decrease in that in individuals aged <60 years, and stable incidence in those aged 60-74 years. This result was attributed to a 2-fold increase in lobar intracerebral haemorrhage in the elderly, concomitantly with an observed rise in the premorbid use of antithrombotics at this age, whatever the intracerebral haemorrhage location considered. In conclusion

  13. Esophageal dissection and hematoma associated with obstruction in an Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus).

    PubMed

    Phair, Kristen A; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Pye, Geoffrey W; Pessier, Allan P; Clippinger, Tracy L

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old female Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) developed a sudden onset of excessive salivation and dysphagia. Esophageal obstruction was suspected; possibly related to palm frond ingestion. Esophageal endoscopy revealed a mat of plant material in the distal esophagus. An initial attempt at relieving the obstruction was unsuccessful, but subsequent use of custom-made instruments along with insufflation and hydropulsion enabled partial removal of the material. Postimmobilization care included aggressive intravenous and rectal fluids, anti-inflammatory and antibiotic administration, and fasting. Despite treatment, the dysphagia persisted and the elephant was euthanized due to lack of improvement and grave prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed remaining plant material in the esophagus, complicated by an esophageal dissection, mural hematoma, and secondary bacterial infection. Iatrogenic trauma may have contributed to the extent of esophageal injury. Although treatment was ultimately unsuccessful, the supportive care employed could potentially aid recovery in cases of less severe esophageal trauma. PMID:25000713

  14. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions.

  15. Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Altinel, Faruk; Altin, Cihan; Gezmis, Esin; Altinors, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH. PMID:26396617

  16. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions. PMID:27695560

  17. Primary Renal Lymphoma Mimicking a Subcapsular Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  18. Primary renal lymphoma mimicking a subcapsular hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D

    2013-08-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  19. Seventeen cases with subungual hematoma treated by CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Deming

    1996-09-01

    In order to find a therapy which doesn't have any influence upon the patients working and living and also makes no pain to the patients, CO2 laser is used to treat the 17 patients with subungual hematoma (SM). Satisfactory curative effect is obtained. Through the clinical observation on the treatment of the 17 cases with SM, the effective rate reached 98 percent. CO2 laser is sure to provide safe, simple operation and short curative course with no pain to the patients, it has a certain practical value for clinical application.

  20. Epidural hematoma secondary to sinusitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Olshinka, Noam; Cherniavsky, Evgenia; Forer, Boaz; Bibi, Haim

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma is a potentially life threatening event that demands prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment, usually following head trauma. We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with no history of head trauma, and who was diagnosed with epidural hematoma secondary to frontal sinusitis; and the medical literature was reviewed. PMID:24370469

  1. Computed tomography of intramural hematoma of the small intestime: a report of 3 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Plojoux, O.; Hauser, H.; Wettstein, P.

    1982-08-01

    CT findings in 3 cases of intramural hematoma of the small intestine are described. One patient needed surgery. CT characteristics were specific and included a region of increased density (50-80 H) representing the hematoma. The differential diagnosis includes tumor (lymphoma or melanoma) and inflammatory disease (Crohn disease or pancreatic cyst.)

  2. Spontaneous sublingual space hematoma secondary to hypertension: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Shouvanik; Guha, Rajdeep; Satpathy, Anupama; Guha, Paromita

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual hematoma is a rare complication of oral anticoagulant use. Spontaneous sublingual hematoma secondary to hypertension is even rarer and their management remains enigmatic. We present such a case that we successfully managed conservatively along with a review of relevant literatures. PMID:26668463

  3. Cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin reduced white matter injury and prevented post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongwei; Ma, Kang; Zhao, Hengli; Feng, Zhou; Yang, Yang; Ge, Hongfei; Zhang, Xuan; Tang, Jun; Yin, Yi; Liu, Xin; Tan, Liang; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and disability associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) secondary to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) represent a global burden. To date, there is no effective therapy for ICH other than supportive care. In this study, we assessed the neuroprotective effects of Cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin (CEGI) injection in a rat model of ICH with ventricular extension (IVH/ICH). The IVH/ICH rat model was induced via injection of type IV collagenase in the caudate nucleus of Sprague-Dawley rats. The experimental animals were randomized to receive CEGI, monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM-1), or normal saline. The modified Garcia scale, corner turn test, immunofluorescence staining for myelin basic protein (MBP) and microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and magnetic resonance imaging were employed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CEGI in the IVH/ICH rat model. CEGI treatment significantly alleviated the neurobehavioral dysfunction, reduced the lateral ventricular enlargement, promoted hematoma absorption, effectively up-regulated MBP/MAP-2 expression, and ameliorated white matter fiber damage post-ICH induction. Our results demonstrate that CEGI has significant neuroprotective effects in a rat model of IVH/ICH. Therefore, it can be used as a candidate drug for the clinical treatment of IVH/ICH. PMID:27782218

  4. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  5. The annular hematoma of the shrew yolk-sac placenta.

    PubMed

    King, B F; Enders, A C; Wimsatt, W A

    1978-05-01

    The annular hematoma of the shrew, Blarina brevicauda, is a specialized portion of the yolk-sac wall. In this study, we have examined the fine structure of the different cellular components of the anular hematoma. Small pieces of the gestation sacs from seven pregnant shrews were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and processed for transmission electron microscopy. In the area of the trophoblastic curtain, the maternal capillary endothelial cells were hypertrophied and syncytial trophoblast surrounded the capillaries. Cellular trophoblast covered part of the luminal surface of the curtain region, whereas masses of apparently degenerating syncytium were present on other areas of the surface. Maternal erythrocytes, released into the uterine lumen from the curtain region, were phagocytized and degraded by the columnar cells of the trophoblastic annulus. No evidence of iron or pigment accumulation was evident in the parietal endodermal cells underlying the annular trophoblast. Parietal endodermal cells were characterized by cuboidal shape, widely dilated intercellular spaces, and cytoplasm containing granular endoplasmic reticulum. Endodermal cells of the visceral yolk-sac accumulated large numbers of electron-dense granules as well as glycogen in their cytoplasm. Hemopoietic areas and vitelline capillaries were found subjacent to the visceral endoderm. The various portions of the yolk-sac wall of Blarina appear to perform complementary functions which are probably important in maternal-fetal iron transfer. PMID:677046

  6. Traumatic pseudocyst due to blunt trauma: Case report.

    PubMed

    Becel, Sinan; Oztok, Beliz; Kurtoglu Celik, Gulhan; Icme, Ferhat; Sener, Alp; Pamukcu Gunaydin, Gul

    2015-09-01

    Damage to lung parenchyma due to blunt thoracic trauma often appears as contusion or hematoma. Cavitary lung lesions or pseudocyst formation due to trauma is a rare phenomenon. In the literature traumatic pseudocysts are also known as pseudocystic hematomas, traumatic lung cavity and traumatic pneumotocel. Traumatic pseudocysts usually have good clinical prognosis, recover spontaneously with supportive treatment and do not require surgery. In this article, we present the case of 52 year old male who was brought to the emergency department after a fall from height and was diagnosed with lung contusions and traumatic cyst. PMID:27239612

  7. Chronic intracerebral cannula can affect feeding behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Larue-Achagiotis, C; Louis-Sylvestre, J

    1989-04-01

    Intracerebral cannulae were placed in the lateral ventricle of rats. It was shown that the cannulae per se can affect feeding behavior. After recovery from surgery, rats displayed an unusual eating rate which consisted of very long, slow and large meals. This slow eating rate led to a modification of the circadian pattern; it induced a decrease in night-time and increase in day-time cumulative intakes. This phenomenon appeared when cannulae crossed the cortical motor area concerned with forelimb movements. Different stereotaxic coordinates had to be used in order to place cannulae in the lateral ventricle without disturbing the feeding pattern. This observation underlines the importance of recording feeding pattern before any surgery in any study of feeding behavior.

  8. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume). Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p < 0.05) with 80% power. Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs) of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days). Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  9. Unpredicted Sudden Death due to Recurrent Infratentorial Hemangiopericytoma Presenting as Massive Intratumoral Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshihide; Kato, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Murayama, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Unpredicted sudden death arising from hemangiopericytoma with massive intracranial hemorrhage is quite rare. We encountered a patient with recurrent infratentorial hemangiopericytoma presenting as life-threatening massive intracerebral hemorrhage. A 43-year-old man who had undergone craniotomy for total resection of an infratentorial hemangiopericytoma 17 months earlier presented with morning headache and generalized convulsions. Computed tomography revealed a massive hematoma in the right infratentorial region causing tonsillar herniation and emergency surgery was performed to evacuate the hematoma. Histological findings revealed hemangiopericytoma with hemorrhage. Neurological status remained unimproved and brain death was confirmed postoperatively. Hemangiopericytoma presenting as massive hemorrhage is quite rare. Since the risk of life-threatening massive hemorrhage should be considered, careful postoperative long-term follow-up is very important to identify tumor recurrences, particularly in the posterior cranial fossa, even if the tumor is completely removed.

  10. Acute ischaemic brain lesions in intracerebral haemorrhage: multicentre cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Simone M; Charidimou, Andreas; Gadapa, Naveen; Dolan, Eamon; Antoun, Nagui; Peeters, Andre; Vandermeeren, Yves; Laloux, Patrice; Baron, Jean-Claude; Jäger, Hans R; Werring, David J

    2011-08-01

    Subclinical acute ischaemic lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging have recently been described in spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and may be important to understand pathophysiology and guide treatment. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that ischaemic lesions are related to magnetic resonance imaging markers of the severity and type of small-vessel disease (hypertensive arteriopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy) in a multicentre, cross-sectional study. We studied consecutive patients with intracerebral haemorrhage from four specialist stroke centres, and age-matched stroke service referrals without intracerebral haemorrhage. Acute ischaemic lesions were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (<3 months after intracerebral haemorrhage) using diffusion-weighted imaging. White matter changes and cerebral microbleeds were rated with validated scales. We investigated associations between diffusion-weighted imaging lesions, clinical and radiological characteristics. We included 114 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (39 with clinically probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy) and 47 age-matched controls. The prevalence of diffusion-weighted imaging lesions was 9/39 (23%) in probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage versus 6/75 (8%) in the remaining patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (P = 0.024); no diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were found in controls. Diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were mainly cortical and were associated with mean white matter change score (odds ratio 1.14 per unit increase, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.28, P = 0.024) and the presence of strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds (odds ratio 3.85, 95% confidence interval 1.15-12.93, P = 0.029). Acute, subclinical ischaemic brain lesions are frequent but previously underestimated after intracerebral haemorrhage, and are three times more common in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage than in

  11. Delayed Intracerebral Hemorrhage from a Pseudoaneurysm Following a Depressed Skull Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Pouya; Wewel, Joshua T.; Dua, Sumeet G.; Chen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old male presented with delayed intracerebral hemorrhage from a ruptured distal middle cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that followed a compound depressed skull fracture from years ago. The brain protrusion through the skull defect likely resulted in stretching and subsequent tearing of the arterial wall resulting in the pseudoaneurysm formation. No prior report of such a clinical occurrence exists in the literature. We highlight an unusual but treatable cause for intracerebral hemorrhage following surgery for traumatic brain injury. PMID:26958412

  12. [Intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome-Prevalemce and clinical characteristics].

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryuhei; Iwaki, Hirotaka; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Ota, Shinzo; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Of the 11,161 cases of stroke observed for over 9 years, 21 cases in which both levels of serum albumin and cholesterol were < 3 g/dl and > 250 mg/dl, respectively, were identified. Out of these 21 cases, cases of severe proteinuria, i.e., nephrotic syndrome were selected. These included 10 cases of arterial ischemic thrombosis, 2 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage. The incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome was 0.18% of total stroke or 0.036% intracerebral hemorrhage. Nephrotic syndrome essentially induced a hypercoagulable state. The 4 cases with intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome, however, had strong risk factors for intracerebral hemorrhage, suggesting that they overcame the risk for thrombophilia. The diseases associated with the nephrotic syndrome were diabetic nephropathy and amyloidosis in 3 cases and in 1 case, respectively. The nephrotic syndrome tends to be associated with a risk for venous or arterial thrombosis. In addition, we must pay attention to intracerebral hemorrhage associated with nephrotic syndrome in cases of stroke. PMID:26887837

  13. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective. PMID:26981295

  14. Intracerebral functional connectivity-guided neurofeedback as a putative rehabilitative intervention for ameliorating auditory-related dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) constitutes one of the most eligible candidates for neurofeedback applications, principally due to its excellent temporal resolution best reflecting the natural dynamics of brain processes. In addition, EEG is easy to use and provides the opportunity for mobile applications. In the present opinion article, we pinpoint the advantages of using intracerebral functional connectivity (IFC) instead of quantitative scalp EEG for interventional applications. In fact, due to the convergence of multiple signals originating from different spatial locations and electrophysiological interactions, miscellaneous scalp signals are too unspecific for therapeutic neurofeedback applications. Otherwise, IFC opens novel perspectives for influencing brain activity in specific dysfunctional small- and large-scale neuronal networks with a reasonable spatial resolution. In the present article, we propose concrete interventional IFC applications that may be used to ameliorate auditory-related dysfunctions such as developmental dyslexia. PMID:25400606

  15. Rupture of uterine serosal hematoma: delayed complication of uterine perforation.

    PubMed

    Seol, H J; Ki, K D

    2015-01-01

    Uterine perforation, a major complication of dilatation and curettage (D&C), is typically recognized at the time of the procedure. Large defects in the uterine wall or injury to other intraabdominal organs can result in an acute abdomen requiring immediate surgical treatment. On the other hand, small perforations usually resolve on their own without any long-term consequences. Here, the authors report a case of delayed hemoperitoneum, ten days after the D&C evacuation of an early pregnancy. Initially, intramural pregnancy was the suspected etiology. However, histopathology suggested that the inciting event was the rupture of a serosal uterine hematoma, which likely resulted from an incomplete uterine perforation during D&C. The patient did well after undergoing an uneventful laparoscopy.

  16. [Intramural hematoma of the ileum complicating anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, B; Sánchez González, F; Aguirrezabalaga González, J; Crespo García, C; Lago Novoa, M; Blanco Freire, N

    1994-07-01

    The development of abdominal pain in the patient receiving anticoagulant therapy is more likely to pose a diagnostic dilemma. A group of intra-abdominal bleeding syndromes, which are extremely rare in patients with normal haemostasis, have been described in patients on anticoagulant therapy. Theses syndromes are of particular interest to surgeons because they simulate acute surgical conditions of the abdomen. We herein report the preoperative diagnosis of a spontaneous intramural hematoma of the small bowel by computed tomography. The authors conclude that CT should be used early in the diagnostic evaluation of abdominal pain and of acute abdomen in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. Indications for the operative management of these patients include active bleeding, pneumoperitoneum, failure to improve with conservative management within 72 hours, worsening of symptoms, and uncertain diagnosis.

  17. Cavernous hemangioma with hematoma in the chest wall due to penetration from the anterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Miwa, Ken; Miyoshi, Kenichirou; Adachi, Yoshin; Fujioka, Shinji; Taniguchi, Yuji; Yaniguchi, Yuji

    2007-04-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old man who visited the hospital with swelling of the anterior chest. Chest computed tomography detected a tumor developing from the anterior mediastinum to the anterior chest wall. There was weak contrast enhancement inside the tumor, and calcification was observed in the central region. A soft tumor with an obscure border and that adhered to the back of the left sternum was surgically removed with thymic fat including the region of the chest wall that had been penetrated by the tumor. The tumor measured 30 x 25 mm, and a phlebolith was observed in the center. The pathological tissue was diagnosed to be a cavernous hemangioma, and there were no malignant findings in the endothelial cells. Mediastinal hemangioma should therefore be kept in mind during an evaluation of mediastinal tumors, and one must also take into account the effect on the surrounding organs. PMID:17491358

  18. Obturator Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Hematoma After Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun H.; Abbott, Daniel; Gewirtz, Eric; Hauck, Ellen; Eun, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obturator nerve injury is a known injury after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and patients often present with motor and sensory deficits in the immediate postoperative period. We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with motor deficits, indicative of obturator neurapraxia after RALP upon waking from anesthesia. Work-up revealed an expansile hematoma possibly compressing the obturator nerve. After evacuation of the hematoma, the patient had immediate improvement of his neurologic deficits. Our patient's clinical vignette illustrates the importance of considering postsurgical hematoma in the differential diagnosis when patients present with signs and symptoms of obturator neurapraxia after RALP. PMID:27579444

  19. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation-induced perinephric hematoma with acute renal failure in a solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lee C; Chan, Sarah W; Macejko, Amanda M; Lin, William W

    2008-07-01

    Iatrogenic occurrences (including radiologically guided renal biopsy, shockwave lithotripsy, and minimally invasive ablative procedures) of subcapsular hematoma that lead to acute renal failure are rare but serious. The advancement of minimally invasive procedures has led to an increase in this complication, especially in patients with a solitary kidney. Fortunately, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma in these patients allows decompression of the renal parenchyma and recovery of renal function. We report a case of acute renal failure in a patient with a solitary kidney that resulted from a subcapsular hematoma as a complication of radiofrequency ablation.

  20. Laparoscopic drainage of a post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Banieghbal, Behrouz; Vermaak, Cobus; Beale, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Duodenal intramural hematoma owing to blunt abdominal trauma is a relatively rare condition and is normally managed non-operatively. In this paper, we present the case of an 11-year-old boy with a post-traumatic duodenal hematoma, who after failing conservative management, underwent laparoscopic drainage. A four-port approach in a similar position to the laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used. After disentangling the inflammatory mass, the duodenal serosa was opened by simple hook diathermy and the hematoma evacuated. The child recovered uneventfully and was discharged home 48 hours later. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this condition has been successfully treated laparoscopically.

  1. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  2. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  3. Obturator Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Hematoma After Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun H; Kaplan, Joshua R; Abbott, Daniel; Gewirtz, Eric; Hauck, Ellen; Eun, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Obturator nerve injury is a known injury after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and patients often present with motor and sensory deficits in the immediate postoperative period. We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with motor deficits, indicative of obturator neurapraxia after RALP upon waking from anesthesia. Work-up revealed an expansile hematoma possibly compressing the obturator nerve. After evacuation of the hematoma, the patient had immediate improvement of his neurologic deficits. Our patient's clinical vignette illustrates the importance of considering postsurgical hematoma in the differential diagnosis when patients present with signs and symptoms of obturator neurapraxia after RALP. PMID:27579444

  4. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Lerpiniere, Christine; Farrall, Andrew J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; White, Philip M.; Torgersen, Antonia; Ironside, James W.; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain. Methods We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity) to conduct a research autopsy. Results Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37%) could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49%) consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46) differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249) by being older (median age 80, IQR 76–86 vs. 75, IQR 65–83, p = 0.002) and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23ml, IQR 13–50 vs. 13ml, IQR 4–40; p = 0.002). Conclusions Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes. PMID:26302447

  5. A National Perspective of Do-Not-Resuscitate Order Utilization Predictors in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achint A; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Benjo, Alexandre; Jani, Vishal B; Annapureddy, Narender; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Simoes, Priya K; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya; Sinha, Vikash; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Pathak, Ambarish; Nadkarni, Girish N

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders are linked to poorer outcomes in patients with ICH, possibly due to less active management. Demographic, regional, and social factors, not related to ICH severity, have not been adequately looked at as significant predictors of DNR utilization. We reviewed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database in 2011 for adult ICH admissions and DNR status. We generated hierarchical 2-level multivariate regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios. We analyzed 25 768 ICH hospitalizations, 18% of which (4620 hospitalizations) had DNR orders, corresponding to national estimates of 126 254 and 22 668, respectively. In multivariable regression, female gender, white or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, no insurance coverage, and teaching hospitals were significantly associated with increased DNR utilization after adjusting for confounders. There was also significantly more interhospital variability in the lowest quartile of hospital volume. In conclusion, demographic factors and insurance status are significantly associated with increased DNR utilization, with more individual hospital variability in low-volume hospitals. The reasons for this are likely qualitative and linked to patient, provider, and hospital practices. PMID:26753051

  6. Patient-tailored multimodal neuroimaging, visualization and quantification of human intra-cerebral hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Sheng-Yang M.; Irimia, Andrei; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2016-03-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the heterogeneity of lesion sizes and types necessitates a variety of imaging modalities to acquire a comprehensive perspective on injury extent. Although it is advantageous to combine imaging modalities and to leverage their complementary benefits, there are difficulties in integrating information across imaging types. Thus, it is important that efforts be dedicated to the creation and sustained refinement of resources for multimodal data integration. Here, we propose a novel approach to the integration of neuroimaging data acquired from human patients with TBI/ICH using various modalities; we also demonstrate the integrated use of multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data for TBI analysis based on both visual observations and quantitative metrics. 3D models of healthy-appearing tissues and TBIrelated pathology are generated, both of which are derived from multimodal imaging data. MRI volumes acquired using FLAIR, SWI, and T2 GRE are used to segment pathology. Healthy tissues are segmented using user-supervised tools, and results are visualized using a novel graphical approach called a `connectogram', where brain connectivity information is depicted within a circle of radially aligned elements. Inter-region connectivity and its strength are represented by links of variable opacities drawn between regions, where opacity reflects the percentage longitudinal change in brain connectivity density. Our method for integrating, analyzing and visualizing structural brain changes due to TBI and ICH can promote knowledge extraction and enhance the understanding of mechanisms underlying recovery.

  7. Steps to consider in the approach and management of critically ill patient with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Piñero, Gustavo Rene; Koller, Patricia; Masotti, Luca; Di Napoli, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is a type of stroke associated with poor outcomes. Mortality is elevated, especially in the acute phase. From a pathophysiological point of view the bleeding must traverse different stages dominated by the possibility of re-bleeding, edema, intracranial hypertension, inflammation and neurotoxicity due to blood degradation products, mainly hemoglobin and thrombin. Neurological deterioration and death are common in early hours, so it is a true neurological-neurosurgical emergency. Time is brain so that action should be taken fast and accurately. The most significant prognostic factors are level of consciousness, location, volume and ventricular extension of the bleeding. Nihilism and early withdrawal of active therapy undoubtedly influence the final result. Although there are no proven therapeutic measures, treatment should be individualized and guided preferably by pathophysiology. The multidisciplinary teamwork is essential. Results of recently completed studies have birth to promising new strategies. For correct management it’s important to establish an orderly and systematic strategy based on clinical stabilization, evaluation and establishment of prognosis, avoiding secondary insults and adoption of specific individualized therapies, including hemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Uncertainty continues regarding the role of surgery. PMID:26261773

  8. Steps to consider in the approach and management of critically ill patient with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Piñero, Gustavo Rene; Koller, Patricia; Masotti, Luca; Di Napoli, Mario

    2015-08-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is a type of stroke associated with poor outcomes. Mortality is elevated, especially in the acute phase. From a pathophysiological point of view the bleeding must traverse different stages dominated by the possibility of re-bleeding, edema, intracranial hypertension, inflammation and neurotoxicity due to blood degradation products, mainly hemoglobin and thrombin. Neurological deterioration and death are common in early hours, so it is a true neurological-neurosurgical emergency. Time is brain so that action should be taken fast and accurately. The most significant prognostic factors are level of consciousness, location, volume and ventricular extension of the bleeding. Nihilism and early withdrawal of active therapy undoubtedly influence the final result. Although there are no proven therapeutic measures, treatment should be individualized and guided preferably by pathophysiology. The multidisciplinary teamwork is essential. Results of recently completed studies have birth to promising new strategies. For correct management it's important to establish an orderly and systematic strategy based on clinical stabilization, evaluation and establishment of prognosis, avoiding secondary insults and adoption of specific individualized therapies, including hemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Uncertainty continues regarding the role of surgery. PMID:26261773

  9. A National Perspective of Do-Not-Resuscitate Order Utilization Predictors in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achint A.; Benjo, Alexandre; Jani, Vishal B.; Annapureddy, Narender; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Simoes, Priya K.; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya; Sinha, Vikash; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Pathak, Ambarish; Nadkarni, Girish N.

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders are linked to poorer outcomes in patients with ICH, possibly due to less active management. Demographic, regional, and social factors, not related to ICH severity, have not been adequately looked at as significant predictors of DNR utilization. We reviewed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database in 2011 for adult ICH admissions and DNR status. We generated hierarchical 2-level multivariate regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios. We analyzed 25 768 ICH hospitalizations, 18% of which (4620 hospitalizations) had DNR orders, corresponding to national estimates of 126 254 and 22 668, respectively. In multivariable regression, female gender, white or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, no insurance coverage, and teaching hospitals were significantly associated with increased DNR utilization after adjusting for confounders. There was also significantly more interhospital variability in the lowest quartile of hospital volume. In conclusion, demographic factors and insurance status are significantly associated with increased DNR utilization, with more individual hospital variability in low-volume hospitals. The reasons for this are likely qualitative and linked to patient, provider, and hospital practices. PMID:26753051

  10. Case report: chronic sub-dural hematoma following high-speed ejection.

    PubMed

    Warburton, R

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports a case of chronic sub-dural hematoma occurring in a pilot after a high-speed ejection that was within the survival envelope of the Mark 10 Martin Baker ejection seat. The events leading up to the ejection, his subsequent hospitalization for treatment of immediate injuries and late development of neurological signs, 6 weeks after the ejection, are presented. (A thorough search of literature has failed to reveal any previously published account of chronic sub-dural hematoma as a post-ejection complication.) His surgical treatment, recovery, and final assessment are discussed together with the possible causes of his sub-dural hematoma. Flight surgeons should take careful note of the events in this case. Sub-dural hematoma is frequently difficult to diagnose but it should not be discounted as a potential late complication from an ejection which is within the parameters of survivability and which yields, initially, only signs of relatively minor injury. PMID:8338501

  11. Bilateral Traumatic Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage Associated With Epidural Hematoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; M. Rubiano, Andres; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic basal ganglia hematoma is a rare condition defined as presence of hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia or adjacent structures suchas internal capsule, putamen and thalamus. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma are among the devastating and rare condition. We herein report a 28-year old man, a victim of car-car accident who was brought to our surgical emergency room by immediate loss of consciousness and was diagnosed to have hyperdense lesion in the basal ganglia bilaterally, with the presence of right parietal epidural hematoma. Craniotomy and epidural hematoma drainage were considered, associated to conservative management of gangliobasal traumatic contusions. On day 7 the patient had sudden neurologic deterioration, cardiac arrest unresponsive to resuscitation. Management of these lesions is similar to any other injury in moderate to severe traumatic injury. The use of intracranial pressure monitoring must be guaranteed. PMID:27162882

  12. Nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma in a scuba diver: CT and MR findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C; Kucharczyk, W

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma occurring in a young adult scuba diver. The clinical presentation, imaging findings (CT and magnetic resonance), and pathogenesis are discussed.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of suppression of astrocytic activation by arundic acid on brain injuries in rats with acute subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Yonezawa, Taiji

    2013-06-26

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) can cause massive ischemic cerebral blood flow (CBF) underneath the hematoma, but early surgical evacuation of the mass reduces mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether arundic acid improves the secondary ischemic damage induced by ASDH. Our results confirmed that arundic acid decreases the expression of S100 protein produced by activated astrocytes around ischemic lesions due to cytotoxic edema after ASDH as well as reducing infarction volumes and numbers of apoptotic cells around the ischemic lesions. In this study, we also evaluate the relationship of brain edema and the expression of Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in an ASDH model. The expression of AQP4 was decreased in the acute phase after ASDH. Cytotoxic edema, assumed to be the main cause of ASDH, could also cause ischemic lesions around the edema area. Arundic acid decreased the infarction volume and number of apoptotic cells via suppression of S100 protein expression in ischemic lesions without changing the expression of AQP4.

  14. Stem cell therapy in intracerebral hemorrhage rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Marcos F; Horn, Ana P

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a very complex pathology, with many different not fully elucidated etiologies and prognostics. It is the most severe subtype of stroke, with high mortality and morbidity rates. Unfortunately, despite the numerous promising preclinical assays including neuroprotective, anti-hypertensive, and anti-inflammatory drugs, to this moment only symptomatic treatments are available, motivating the search for new alternatives. In this context, stem cell therapy emerged as a promising tool. However, more than a decade has passed, and there is still much to be learned not only about stem cells, but also about ICH itself, and how these two pieces come together. To date, rats have been the most widely used animal model in this research field, and there is much more to be learned from and about them. In this review, we first summarize ICH epidemiology, risk factors, and pathophysiology. We then present different methods utilized to induce ICH in rats, and examine how accurately they represent the human disease. Next, we discuss the different types of stem cells used in previous ICH studies, also taking into account the tested transplantation sites. Finally, we summarize what has been achieved in assays with stem cells in rat models of ICH, and point out some relevant issues where attention must be given in future efforts. PMID:25914768

  15. Local aspects of sleep: observations from intracerebral recordings in humans.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Lino; De Gennaro, Luigi; Proserpio, Paola; Moroni, Fabio; Sarasso, Simone; Pigorini, Andrea; De Carli, Fabrizio; Ferrara, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Human sleep is considered a global phenomenon, orchestrated by central specialized neuronal networks modulating the whole-brain activity. However, recent studies point to a local regulation of sleep. Sleep disorders, such as sleepwalking, suggest that electroencephalographic (EEG) features of sleep and wakefulness might be simultaneously present in different cerebral regions. Recently, intracranial EEG recording techniques, mainly applied for the presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients, have provided new and interesting information on the activity of different cortical and subcortical structures during sleep in humans. In particular, it has been observed that the thalamus, during the transition between wake and sleep undergoes a deactivation process that precedes the one occurring within the cortex, with extensive cortical territories maintaining an activated pattern for several minutes after the thalamic deactivation. Very recent intracerebral EEG studies have also shown that human NREM sleep can be characterized by the coexistence of wake-like and sleep-like EEG patterns in different cortical areas. Moreover, unit-firing recordings in multiple brain regions of neurosurgical patients evidenced that most sleep slow waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states do occur locally. These findings add a new dimension to the concept of local sleep regulation and opens new perspectives in the interpretation of the substrates underlying behavioral states of vigilance. The implications for sleep medicine are also discussed. PMID:22877668

  16. Rare Coding Variation and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Radmanesh, Farid; Falcone, Guido J.; Anderson, Christopher D.; McWilliams, David; Devan, William J.; Brown, W Mark; Battey, Thomas W. K.; Ayres, Alison M.; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Schwab, Kristin; Sun, Guangyun; Deka, Ranjan; Viswanathan, Anand; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Tirschwell, David L.; Silliman, Scott L.; Selim, Magdy; Meschia, James F.; Brown, Devin L.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Woo, Daniel; Rosand, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has a substantial genetic component. We performed a preliminary search for rare coding variants associated with ICH. Methods 757 cases and 795 controls were genotyped using the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip (Illumina, Inc. San Diego, CA, USA). Meta-analyses of single-variant and gene-based association were computed. Results No rare coding variants were associated with ICH. Three common variants on chromosome 19q13 at an established susceptibility locus, encompassing TOMM40, APOE, and APOC1 met genome-wide significance (p<5e-08). After adjusting for the APOE epsilon alleles, this locus was no longer convincingly associated with ICH. No gene reached genome-wide significance level in gene-based association testing. Conclusions While no coding variants of large effect were detected, this study further underscores a major challenge for the study of genetic susceptibility loci – large sample sizes are required for sufficient power except for loci with large effects. PMID:26111891

  17. Assessing functional outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Richard; Lekic, Tim; Rojas, Hugo; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2009-07-14

    Translational neuroprotective and drug development studies need to be gauged against well-characterized functional outcomes, including motor, sensory and cognitive domains. Since intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causes dramatic neurological and cognitive deficits in humans, we hypothesized that ICH would result in prolonged motor-sensory and learning/memory deficits in rats. Neurological tests of sensorimotor functions were performed before ICH, 1-3 days and 10 weeks after ICH. Water maze, open field, and rotarod performance was tested 2 and 8 weeks after ICH. Early neurological evaluations revealed significant deficits, with almost full recovery by 10 weeks. The water maze revealed significant learning (but not motor) deficits at 2 weeks, but by 8 weeks, the learning deficits had diminished and significant motor deficits had emerged, coinciding with a drop in activity. The injured hemisphere showed significant atrophy at sacrifice. Therefore, ICH produced detectable cognitive and motor deficits in rats that evolved over a 10-week period, and thereby provides a suitable baseline for analysis of future therapeutic interventions following hemorrhagic stroke.

  18. A critical appraisal of experimental intracerebral hemorrhage research

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Crystal L; Paquette, Rosalie; Colbourne, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood of translating therapeutic interventions for stroke rests on the quality of preclinical science. Given the limited success of putative treatments for ischemic stroke and the reasons put forth to explain it, we sought to determine whether such problems hamper progress for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Approximately 10% to 20% of strokes result from an ICH, which results in considerable disability and high mortality. Several animal models reproduce ICH and its underlying pathophysiology, and these models have been widely used to evaluate treatments. As yet, however, none has successfully translated. In this review, we focus on rodent models of ICH, highlighting differences among them (e.g., pathophysiology), issues with experimental design and analysis, and choice of end points. A Pub Med search for experimental ICH (years: 2007 to 31 July 2011) found 121 papers. Of these, 84% tested neuroprotectants, 11% tested stem cell therapies, and 5% tested rehabilitation therapies. We reviewed these to examine study quality (e.g., use of blinding procedures) and choice of end points (e.g., behavioral testing). Not surprisingly, the problems that have plagued the ischemia field are also prevalent in ICH literature. Based on these data, several recommendations are put forth to facilitate progress in identifying effective treatments for ICH. PMID:22293989

  19. Influence of amphetamine on recovery after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Auriat, Angela M; Colbourne, Frederick

    2008-01-25

    D-amphetamine (AMP) paired with physical activity (e.g., beam walking) improves recovery after ischemic injury to the cortical motor system of rodents. We tested whether AMP promotes recovery after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. A moderate-sized ICH was produced by stereotaxically injecting collagenase into the striatum. Five days later rats were placed into either environmental enrichment cages (EE) or a control condition (group housing in standard cages) until euthanasia at 4 weeks post-ICH. Animals were injected with either AMP (2 mg/kg i.p.) or sterile saline on days 7, 9 and 11 after ICH. Rats in EE also received training on beam (walking) and tray (skilled reaching) tasks 30 min after each injection. Walking (beam and ladder task), skilled reaching (tray and staircase tasks) and neurological deficits (NDS) were repeatedly assessed. We predicted that EE would improve recovery and that AMP would further enhance it. Results showed that EE, but not AMP, significantly and consistently improved recovery on the beam and ladder task. Neither treatment significantly affected skilled reaching. Lesion volume was not significantly different among groups (overall average: 44.6 mm(3) of tissue lost +/-15.3 S.D.). In conclusion, EE provides modest benefit for striatal ICH whereas AMP does not. This suggests that AMP will not provide substantial benefit to those patients with severe ICH affecting the basal ganglia. PMID:17904232

  20. Etiology of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH): novel insights from Zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Eisa-Beygi, Shahram; Rezaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most severe subtype of stroke. Treatment options are scarce and given the high morbidity and mortality, relatively ineffective. Since patients with ICH may have an unknown heritable component, the need to identify potential risk factors necessitates the use of animal models to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of neurovascular development and, thereby, identify candidate regulatory pathways that are likely to be disrupted in patients with ICH. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exhibits the anatomical and physiological complexity of a closed circulatory system observed in all vertebrates (with arteries, veins and capillaries). Moreover, studies over the last decade, aided by the application of chemical mutagenesis screens, morpholino mediated knockdown approaches and tissue-specific transgenic markers, have paved the way for the identification of several genes and signaling pathways that regulate developmental neurovascular stabilization. We hypothesize that mutations in these genes or pharmacological perturbations of these gene-products may account, at least in part, for the etiology of some forms of spontaneous ICH in humans. PMID:27251071

  1. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome.

  2. Adrenal Hematoma and Right Hemothorax after Echis Carinatus Bite: An Unusual Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Singh, Jagdish; Gandhi, Ronak; Bhansali, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Common bleeding manifestations after viperine bite include bleeding from site of bite, bleeding gums, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, hematemesis, and intracranial bleed. Bleeding in the adrenal gland is a rare manifestation. We report here a patient of viperine bite who developed right adrenal hematoma and right hemothorax after 3 days of bite. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of adrenal hematoma and right hemothorax after Echis carinatus bite. PMID:25948976

  3. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  4. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week. PMID:21814382

  5. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Karim, Abdul-Rahman R; Vo, Minh; Main, Michael L; Grantham, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  6. A Motion Simulator Ride Associated With Headache and Subdural Hematoma: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Robert A; Evans, Randolph W; Baskin, David S

    2016-02-01

    We report the first case report of symptomatic bilateral subdural hematomas (SDH) associated with riding a centrifugal motion simulator ride. A previously healthy 55-year-old male developed new onset daily headaches 1 week after going on the ride that were due to symptomatic bilateral SDH requiring operative intervention with a full recovery. There was no history of other trauma or other systemic or intracranial abnormality to account for the development of the SDH. We review the headaches and other clinical features associated with chronic SDH. Twelve cases of roller coaster headaches due to SDH associated with riding roller coasters have been reported. The pathophysiology is reviewed, which we believe is the same mechanism that may be responsible in this case. Although it is possible that this neurovascular injury is truly rare, it is also possible that this injury is underreported as patients and physicians may not make the association or physicians have not reported additional cases. The risk of this injury likely increases with age, as the size of the subdural space increases, and may support the maxim that "roller coasters and simulators are for kids." PMID:26581189

  7. [Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) complicated by bilateral occipital lobe infarction: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kanae; Naraoka, Masato; Shimamura, Norihito; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a common disease that is treated with burr hole drainage by neurosurgeons. The outcome of CSH is mostly favorable. We treated 2 cases with bilateral occipital lobe infarction due to CSH. A 57-year-old woman was ambulatory when she visited a clinic for evaluation of headache. One hour after the CT was taken, she developed acute impairment of consciousness, so that she was referred to our hospital. The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with a history of depression who was involved in a traffic accident 5 weeks before admission to our hospital. She was at first admitted to a psychiatric hospital for evaluation of gait disturbance. Three weeks after she was admitted to the psychiatric hospital, she fell into a coma. She was referred to our hospital. Their brain CT on admission revealed compressed ambient and interpeduncular cistern and bilateral CSH. Although burr hole drainage surgery was performed, the 2 patients developed severe sequelae due to occipital lobe infarction caused by central transtentorial herniation.

  8. Vaccum drainage system application in the management of operation-related non-regional epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidural intracranial hematoma is one of the most common complications of surgeries for intracranial tumors. The non-regional epidural hematoma is related to severe fluctuation of the intracranial pressure during the operation. The traditional management of hematoma evacuation through craniotomy is time-consuming and may aggravate intracranial pressure imbalance, which causes further complications. We designed a method using vaccum epidural drainage system, and tried to evaluate advantage and the disadvantage of this new technique. Methods Seven patients of intracranial tumors were selected. All of the patients received tumor resection and intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma was confirmed through intra-operative ultrasound or CT scan. The vaccum drainage system was applied. Another ten patients who received craniotomy for intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma evacuation were selected as comparison. Regular tests, like serial CT scan, were performed afterward to evaluate the effectiveness and to help deciding when to remove the drainage system. Results The vaccum drainage method was effective in epidual hemotoma clearance and prevented recurrent epidural hemorrhage. The drainage systems were removed within 4 days. All of the patients recovered well. No complications related to the drainage system were observed. Conclusions Compared to the traditional craniotomy, the new method of epidural hemoatoma management using vaccum epidural drainage system proved to be as effective in hematoma clearance, and was less-invasive and easier to perform, with less complication, shorter hospitalization, less economic burden, and better prognosis. PMID:23842198

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Panax notoginseng Saponin Therapy for Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Meta-Analysis, and Mini Review of Potential Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongying; Huang, Ping; Yu, Zhaosheng; Xing, Daniel H.; Ouyang, Shuai; Xing, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial/intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a leading cause of death and disability in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. No proven drug is available for ICH. Panax notoginseng (total saponin extraction, PNS) is one of the most valuable herb medicines for stroke and cerebralvascular disorders in China. We searched for randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) involving PNS injection to treat cerebral hemorrhage for meta-analysis from various databases including the Chinese Stroke Trials Register, the trials register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Chinese BioMedical disk, and China Doctorate/Master Dissertations Databases. The quality of the eligible trials was assessed by Jadad’s scale. Twenty (20) of the 24 identified randomized controlled trials matched the inclusive criteria including 984 ICH patients with PNS injection and 907 ICH patients with current treatment (CT). Compared to the CT groups, PNS-treated patients showed better outcomes in the effectiveness rate (ER), neurological deficit score, intracranial hematoma volume, intracerebral edema volume, Barthel index, the number of patients died, and incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: PNS injection is superior to CT for acute ICH. A review of the literature shows that PNS may exert multiple protective mechanisms against ICH-induced brain damage including hemostasis, anti-coagulation, anti-thromboembolism, cerebral vasodilation, invigorated blood dynamics, anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and anti-hyperglycemic effects. Since vitamin C and other brain cell activators (BCA) that are not considered common practice were also used as parts of the CT in several trials, potential PNS and BCA interactions could exist that may have made the effect of PNS therapy less or more impressive than by PNS therapy alone. Future PNS trials with and without the inclusion of such controversial BCAs as part of the CT could

  10. [Treatment of Non-Traumatic Spinal Epidural Hematoma:A Report of Five Cases and a Systematic Review of the Literature].

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukinori; Toda, Hiroki; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Yamamoto, Yu; Nagai, Yasunori; Yoshimoto, Naoya; Goto, Masanori; Nishida, Namiko; Iwasaki, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    Objective:Non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma(SEH)is relatively rare. We report five cases of SEH, review the relevant literature, and discuss the current treatment strategies for non-traumatic SEH in Japan. Methods:Clinical data of cases with non-traumatic SEH treated at our institute from 2008 to 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, we identified the relevant literature using the Japan Medical Abstracts Society databases for peer-reviewed articles published from Jan 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 2015. The search terms "spinal", "epidural hematoma", and "non-traumatic OR spontaneous" were used. Treatment strategies were summarized according to the treatment criteria. Results:Five patients(1 man and 4 women;age, 59-86 years;mean age, 74 years)were treated for SEH. Hematomas were located in the cervical(n=1), cervicothoracic(n=2), thoracic(n=1), and thoracolumbar(n=1)regions. All patients suffered sudden neck and/or back pain followed by subsequent neurological deterioration. Four patients were under antithrombotic treatment, and underwent laminectomy and drainage of the hematoma due to severe and progressive neurological deficits. All patients demonstrated significant neurological recovery. Seventy-seven articles from domestic institutes and hospitals were identified. Their criteria for conservative and surgical treatments differed based on the time from the onset and severity. Conclusion:Five cases of non-traumatic SEH were treated successfully. Patients with moderate to severe neurological deficit need timely surgical management, while non-surgical treatment may be indicated in mild deficits. To standardize the optimal treatment for non-traumatic SEH, an appropriate assessment system incorporating the time from onset and severity of neurological impairment should be established. PMID:27506844

  11. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  12. Role of in-111 labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in the diagnosis of intracerebral lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Swyer, A.J.; Kim, C.K.; Muzinic, M.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of intracerebral enhancing lesions on contrast computed tomography includes tumors, abscesses, and cerebrovascular accidents. Particularly important is the differentiation between tumor and abscess. While In-111 labeled leukocyte imaging is an accurate test for identification of foci of infection in general, the role of this procedure in the evaluation of the intracranial lesion is not well established. We undertook a retrospective review of 16 patients with contrast enhancing intracerebral lesions identified on computed tomography, who were also studied with labeled leukocyte imaging. Final diagnoses were: abscess (n = 2), primary brain tumor (n = 6), metastasis (n = 4), dermoid cyst (n = 1), and cerebral infarct (n = 3). There were two positive labeled leukocyte studies; both were cerebral abscesses. No labeled leukocyte activity was identified in any of the tumors or infarcts. We conclude that In-111 labeled leukocyte imaging is an accurate method of differentiating infectious from noninfectious causes of intracerebral lesions identified on computed tomography.

  13. The assay of anti-pyretic drugs in mice, using intracerebral injection of pyretogenins.

    PubMed

    Cashin, C H; Heading, C E

    1968-09-01

    1. A simple, cheap, and reliable method is described for the screening of new compounds for anti-pyretic activity. It involves the intracerebral injection of a suitable pyretogenin in conscious mice.2. The pyretic response is related to the logarithm of the dose in a substantially linear manner when "E" Pyrogen is used.3. A selection of established anti-pyretic drugs were effective in oral doses approaching those used clinically, which shows that the method is unusually sensitive.4. The response to intracerebral pyretogenin is not unduly influenced by drugs known to cause hypothermia.5. It is suggested that "E" Pyrogen injected intracerebrally has a direct effect on the central nervous system, rather than an indirect action through release of endogenous pyrogen. PMID:5676003

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed 'placental infarction hematoma' is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such a lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This paper describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma.

  15. Treadmill exercise ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Joo Hwan; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Ju Ho; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2016-08-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe type of stroke causing neurological dysfunction with high mortality rate. Depression is one of the most common complications of ICH. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on ICH-induced depressive symptoms in relation with apoptosis were investigated using rats. ICH rat model was induced by injection of collagenase into the hippocampus using stereotaxic instrument. Open field test for activity and forced swimming test for depressive symptoms were conducted. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Western blot analysis for 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in the dorsal raphe was also conducted for biomarkers of depression. In the present results, immobility time was increased and climbing time was decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited immobility time and increased climbing time in ICH rats. DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were enhanced by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise suppressed ICH-induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression. Bax expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited Bax expression in the ICH rats. Expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the dorsal raphe were decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise increased expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the ICH rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms through inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:27656626

  16. APOE polymorphisms influence longitudinal lipid trends preceding intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Chia-Ling; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Ayres, Alison M.; Gurol, M. Edip; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Biffi, Alessandro; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine whether APOE genotype influences a previously observed decline in serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels preceding primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), as a potential demonstration of nonamyloid mechanisms of APOE in ICH risk. Methods: We performed a single-center retrospective longitudinal analysis using patients with known APOE genotype drawn from an ongoing cohort study of ICH. Serum lipid measurements for TC, triglycerides (TGs), LDL, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) collected within 2 years before and after index ICH were extracted from electronic medical records. Piecewise linear mixed-effects models were used to compare APOE allele–specific effects on temporal serum lipid trends in ICH. Demographics, medical history, medications, and health maintenance data were included as fixed effects. Inter- and intraindividual variations in lipid levels were modeled as random effects. Results: A total of 124 ICH cases were analyzed. APOE ε4 carriers had greater rates of decline in serum TC and LDL within 6 months preceding ICH (TC: −7.30 mg/dL/mo, p = 0.0035; LDL: −8.44 mg/dL/mo, p = 0.0001). Conversely, serum TC and LDL levels in APOE ε2 carriers were unchanged within the same time period. APOE genotype had no associations with serum HDL or TG trends. Conclusions: APOE allele status predicts serum TC and LDL changes preceding acute ICH. Our results have implications for ongoing efforts in dissecting the role of dyslipidemia in cerebrovascular disease risk. APOE genotype–specific influence on lipid trends provides a clue for one mechanism by which APOE may influence risk of ICH. Further characterization of the metabolic roles of APOE is needed to improve the understanding of APOE biology in cerebrovascular disease risk. PMID:27433544

  17. Evaluating dipolar source localization feasibility from intracerebral SEEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Caune, V; Ranta, R; Le Cam, S; Hofmanis, J; Maillard, L; Koessler, L; Louis-Dorr, V

    2014-09-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) is considered as the golden standard for exploring targeted structures during pre-surgical evaluation in drug-resistant partial epilepsy. The depth electrodes, inserted in the brain, consist of several collinear measuring contacts (sensors). Clinical routine analysis of SEEG signals is performed on bipolar montage, providing a focal view of the explored structures, thus eliminating activities of distant sources that propagate through the brain volume. We propose in this paper to exploit the common reference SEEG signals. In this case, the volume propagation information is preserved and electrical source localization (ESL) approaches can be proposed. Current ESL approaches used to localize and estimate the activity of the neural generators are mainly based on surface EEG/MEG signals, but very few studies exist on real SEEG recordings, and the case of equivalent current dipole source localization has not been explored yet in this context. In this study, we investigate the influence of volume conduction model, spatial configuration of SEEG sensors and level of noise on the ESL accuracy, using a realistic simulation setup. Localizations on real SEEG signals recorded during intracerebral electrical stimulations (ICS, known sources) as well as on epileptic interictal spikes are carried out. Our results show that, under certain conditions, a straightforward approach based on an equivalent current dipole model for the source and on simple analytical volume conduction models yields sufficiently precise solutions (below 10mm) of the localization problem. Thus, electrical source imaging using SEEG signals is a promising tool for distant brain source investigation and might be used as a complement to routine visual interpretations.

  18. High Rate of Microbleed Formation Following Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Jason; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Norato, Gina; Sobotka, Ian; Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Gibbons, M. Chris; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Russell, Laura; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate the frequency of microbleed (MB) development following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a predominantly African-American population and to identify predictors of new MB formation. Methods The DECIPHER study was a prospective, longitudinal, MR-based cohort study designed to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for MBs and to evaluate the prognostic impact of MBs in this ICH population. We evaluated new MB formation in 2 time periods: from baseline to 30 days and from 30 days to year 1. Results Of 200 subjects enrolled in DECIPHER, 84 had MRIs at all required timepoints to meet criteria for this analysis. In the baseline to day 30 analysis, 11 (13.1%) had new MBs, compared to 25 (29.8%) in the day 30 to year 1 analysis. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [95% CI 1.01, 1.08], p=0.01) was associated with new MB formation at 30 days. A logistic regression model predicting new MB at 1 year included baseline number of MBs (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.11], p=0.046), baseline age (OR 1.05 [1.00, 1.10], p=0.04) and WMD disease score (OR 1.18 [0.96, 1.45]. p=0.115). Overall 28 of 84 (33.3%) ICH subjects formed new MBs at some point in the first year post-ICH. Conclusions We found that one-third of ICH subjects in this cohort surviving one year developed new MBs, which suggests a dynamic and rapidly progressive vasculopathy. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of new MB formation on patient outcomes. PMID:26311530

  19. Poor Long-Term Blood Pressure Control after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zahuranec, Darin B.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Menon, Ravi S.; Fernandez, Stephen J.; Burgess, Richard E.; Sobotka, Ian A.; German, Laura; Trouth, Anna J.; Shara, Nawar M.; Gibbons, M. Chris; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypertension is the most important risk factor associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We explored racial differences in blood pressure (BP) control after ICH and assessed predictors of BP control at presentation, 30 days, and 1 year in a prospective cohort study. Methods Subjects with spontaneous ICH were identified from the DiffErenCes in the Imaging of Primary Hemorrhage based on Ethnicity or Race (DECIPHER) Project. Blood pressure was compared by race at each time point. Multivariable linear regression was used to determine predictors of presenting mean arterial pressure (MAP), and longitudinal linear regression was used to assess predictors of MAP at follow-up. Results A total of 162 patients were included (mean age 59, 53% male, 77% black). MAP at presentation was 9.6 mmHg higher in blacks than whites despite adjustment for confounders (p=0.065). Fewer than 20% of patients had normal blood pressure (<120/80 mmHg) at 30 days or 1 year. While there was no difference at 30 days (p=0.331), blacks were more likely than whites to have Stage I/II hypertension at one year (p=0.036). Factors associated with lower MAP at follow-up in multivariable analysis were being married at baseline (p=0.032) and living in a facility (versus personal residence) at the time of BP measurement (p=0.023). Conclusions Long-term blood pressure control is inadequate in patients following ICH, particularly in blacks. Further studies are needed to understand the role of social support and barriers to control to identify optimal approaches to improve blood pressure in this high-risk population. PMID:22903494

  20. Racial differences in microbleed prevalence in primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, B R.; Hsia, A W.; Merino, J G.; Burgess, R E.; Fifi, J T.; Davis, L; Warach, S; Kidwell, C S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Primary intracerebral hemorrhage is two to three times more common in many racial populations, including black patients. Previous studies have shown that microbleeds, identified on gradient echo MRI (GRE), are present in 50–80% of patients with primary ICH. The objective of this study was to compare, by race, the rates, risk factors, and topography of microbleeds in patients hospitalized for primary ICH. Methods: Patients diagnosed with primary ICH at two metropolitan stroke centers were included. Clinical and neuroimaging data were recorded for each patient. Analyses were performed to compare baseline characteristics as well as imaging findings by race. Results: A total of 87 patients met inclusion criteria (42 black subjects, 45 white subjects). The black cohort was younger (p < 0.001), and had a greater rate of hypertension (p = 0.001), but not other vascular risk factors. Microbleeds were more prevalent in the black population, with 74% of blacks having one or more microbleeds compared to 42% of whites (p = 0.005). The black population also tended to have a greater frequency of microbleeds in multiple territories than the white population (38% vs 22%, p = 0.106). When adjusting for age, hypertension, and alcohol use, race was an independent predictor of microbleeds (OR 3.308, 95% CI 1.144–9.571, p = 0.027). Conclusions: These pilot data suggest that significant racial differences exist in the frequency and topography of microbleeds in patients with primary ICH. Microbleeds may be an important emerging imaging biomarker with the potential to provide insights into ICH pathophysiology, prognosis, and disease progression, as well as possible therapeutic strategies, particularly in medically underserved populations. GLOSSARY CAA = cerebral amyloid angiopathy; FLAIR = fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; FOV = field of view; GRE = gradient echo imaging; SES = socioeconomic status; TE = echo time; TR = repetition time. PMID:18838665

  1. Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Tomoko; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hu, Lily J.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

  2. Treadmill exercise ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced depression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Joo Hwan; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Ju Ho; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe type of stroke causing neurological dysfunction with high mortality rate. Depression is one of the most common complications of ICH. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on ICH-induced depressive symptoms in relation with apoptosis were investigated using rats. ICH rat model was induced by injection of collagenase into the hippocampus using stereotaxic instrument. Open field test for activity and forced swimming test for depressive symptoms were conducted. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Western blot analysis for 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in the dorsal raphe was also conducted for biomarkers of depression. In the present results, immobility time was increased and climbing time was decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited immobility time and increased climbing time in ICH rats. DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were enhanced by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise suppressed ICH-induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression. Bax expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited Bax expression in the ICH rats. Expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the dorsal raphe were decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise increased expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the ICH rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms through inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:27656626

  3. Assessing cognitive function after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Crystal L; Langdon, Kristopher D; Churchill, Kayla P; Granter-Button, Shirley; Corbett, Dale

    2009-03-17

    Preclinical studies must rigorously assess whether putative therapies improve motor and cognitive function following brain injury. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causes significant sensory-motor and cognitive deficits in humans. However, no study has evaluated cognition in rodent ICH models. Thus, we used a battery of tests to comprehensively examine whether a striatal ICH causes cognitive impairments in rats. Bacterial collagenase (or sterile saline for SHAM surgery) was injected into the striatum to create an ICH. Two days later, functional deficits were assessed using a neurological deficit scale (NDS), which is most sensitive to ICH injury. Sensory and/or motor deficits may confound cognitive testing; thus, we waited until these had resolved before testing learning and memory. Testing was conducted 1-7 months after ICH and included spontaneous alternation, elevated plus maze, open-field, Morris water maze, T-maze (win-shift and win-stay paradigms), and the radial arm maze (eight and four arms baited protocols). Significant motor deficits at 2 days completely resolved by 1 month, at which time cognitive testing began. In contrast to persistent cognitive deficits that occur after ICH in humans, we did not detect significant learning or memory deficits after ICH in rats. Our results suggest that these tests will not likely be useful for assessing outcome in experimental ICH studies. In conclusion, animal models that better mimic clinical ICH (both motor and cognitive deficits) must be developed. This may include increasing ICH severity or injuring other functional subdivisions within the striatum that may lead to more profound cognitive deficits.

  4. Clinical features of recurrent stroke after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Yoshioka, Shotaroh; Sasaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-06-14

    There have been many reports about the prognosis and risk factors of stroke recurrence following brain infarction (BI). However, little is known about the stroke recurrence after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Therefore, we explored the recurrent stroke patients after initial PICH retrospectively, to reveal the critical factors of stroke recurrence. Acute BI (n=4013) and acute PICH patients (n=1067) admitted to the hospital between April 2000 and March 2009 were consecutively screened. PICH patients with a history of ICH and BI patients with a history of ICH were then classified into the ICH-ICH group (n=64, age 70.8±9.5 years) and ICH-BI group (n=52, age 72.8±9.7years), respectively. ICH lesions were categorized into ganglionic and lober types according to the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Subtypes of BI were classified into cardioembolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, small-artery occlusion and others. There was no difference in incidence of risk factors between ICH-ICH and ICH-BI groups. Distribution of initial PICH lesions was significantly abundant in the lobar type in the ICH-ICH group (P<0.01) and in ganglionic type in the ICH-BI group (P<0.02). Age of onset was significantly older in recurrent lobar ICH compared with recurrent ganglionic ICH (P<0.01: 73.6±10.0 and 59.1±9.0 years, respectively). In conclusion, ganglionic ICH patients may have a chance of recurrent stroke in both brain infarction and ganglionic ICH, suggesting the participation of atherosclerosis in intracranial arteries. Lobar ICH patients were older and prone to recurrent lobar ICH, suggesting the participation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a risk of stroke recurrence. PMID:23139848

  5. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. PMID:23088860

  6. Treadmill exercise ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced depression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Joo Hwan; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Ju Ho; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe type of stroke causing neurological dysfunction with high mortality rate. Depression is one of the most common complications of ICH. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on ICH-induced depressive symptoms in relation with apoptosis were investigated using rats. ICH rat model was induced by injection of collagenase into the hippocampus using stereotaxic instrument. Open field test for activity and forced swimming test for depressive symptoms were conducted. Apoptosis in the hippocampus was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Western blot analysis for 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in the dorsal raphe was also conducted for biomarkers of depression. In the present results, immobility time was increased and climbing time was decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited immobility time and increased climbing time in ICH rats. DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were enhanced by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise suppressed ICH-induced DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression. Bax expression in the hippocampus was increased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise inhibited Bax expression in the ICH rats. Expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the dorsal raphe were decreased by induction of ICH and treadmill exercise increased expressions of 5-HT and TPH in the ICH rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms through inhibiting apoptosis.

  7. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  8. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Karibe, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Motonobu; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Narisawa, Ayumi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-05-15

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  9. Experimental studies on brain hematoma detection and oxygenation monitoring using PRM/NIR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liu; Lee, Hyo Sang; Wilson, David A.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Lokos, Sandor; Kim, Jin

    1997-08-01

    Real time noninvasive head injury detection is needed in critical care facilities and triage site with limited resources. One tool missing right now is a small and fast noninvasive sensor which can help urgent care workers to (1) diagnose the location and severity of the injury, (2) to perform on site pre-hospital treatment if necessary, and (3) to make a decision on what kind of further medical action is needed. On the other hand, continuous monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation is also needed in intensive care unit and in operation rooms. Pseudo-random modulation/near infrared sensor (PRM/NIR sensor) is developed to address these issues. It relies on advanced techniques in diode laser cw modulation and time resolved spectroscopy to perform fast and noninvasive brain tissue diagnostics. Phantom experiments have been conducted to study the feasibility of the sensor. Brain's optical properties are simulated with solutions of intralipid and ink. Hematomas are simulated with bags of paint and hemoglobin immersed in the solution of varies sizes, depths, and orientations. Effects of human skull and hair are studied experimentally. In animal experiment, the sensor was used to monitor the cerebral oxygenation change due to hypercapnia, hypoxia, and hyperventilation. Good correlations were found between NIR measurement parameters and physiological changes induced to the animals.

  10. Unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as an initial presentation of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Hironaka, Yasuo; Kawai, Hisashi; Park, Young-Su; Taoka, Toshiaki; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is well known as a symptom of microvascular infarction and intracranial aneurysm, but unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as an initial manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare clinical condition. We report a rare case of an 84-year-old woman with bilateral CSDH who presented with unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as the initial symptom. The patient, who had a medical history of minor head injury 3 weeks prior, presented with left ptosis, diplopia, and vomiting. She had taken an antiplatelet drug for lacunar cerebral infarction. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed bilateral CSDH with a slight midline shift to the left side. She underwent an urgent evacuation through bilateral frontal burr holes. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) after evacuation revealed no intracranial aneurysms, but constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the left posterior cerebral artery (PCA) ran much more anteriorly and inferiorly compared with the right PCA and the left oculomotor nerve passed very closely between the left PCA and the left superior cerebellar artery (SCA). There is the possibility that the strong compression to the left uncus, the left PCA, and the left SCA due to the bilateral CSDH resulted in left oculomotor nerve palsy with an initial manifestation without unconsciousness. Unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy as an initial presentation caused by bilateral CSDH without unconsciousness is a rare clinical condition, but this situation is very important as a differential diagnosis of unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy.

  11. Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants with Abusive Head Trauma: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    KARIBE, Hiroshi; KAMEYAMA, Motonobu; HAYASHI, Toshiaki; NARISAWA, Ayumi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    The number of cases with child abuse is increasing in Japan, and abusive head trauma (AHT) is a major cause of death in abused children. Child abuse has been recognized by the late 19th century, and widely accepted as battered child syndrome in the middle of the 20th century. As terms, there had been considerable mechanistic controversies between shaken-baby and -impact syndrome until the beginning of the 21st century. In recent years, AHT has been utilized as a less mechanistic term. Most of the characteristics of AHT in Japan have been similar to those in the United States as follows: infant is the most common victim, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common intracranial lesion, and retinal hemorrhage is often complicated. On the other hand, several characteristics have been different as follows: mother is the most common perpetrators, impact is a more common mechanism of trauma than shaking, and external trauma is more common reflecting the existence of impact. Since AHT as well as child abuse is a social pathological phenomenon influenced by victims, perpetrators, socioeconomic circumstances, and so on, various aspects of AHT as well as child abuse can be changed with times. Actually, a recent paper suggests such changes in infants with acute SDH due to AHT. In this review article, AHT, abusive infantile acute SDH in particular, are reviewed from the aspect of neurosurgical perspectives, including its mechanisms of trauma, biomechanics, clinical features, management, and prognosis, to update the trend in Japan. PMID:26960448

  12. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  13. [Advance in research on the genetic etiology of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Kang, Jifeng; Huang, Qing; Liu, Yunhai

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is a form of brain parenchymal hemorrhage caused by a variety of non-traumatic reasons, resulting in cerebral artery, veins or capillaries rupture. The etiology of SICH is variable, with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage being the most common, accounting for 60% ~ 81% of all cases. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, drug use related hemorrhage, Moyamoya disease are also important causes of SICH. Previous studies showed that genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of SICH. Here the genetic mechanisms of SICH and classification of its etiology are reviewed. PMID:27577228

  14. Noonan phenotype associated with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral vascular anomalies: case report.

    PubMed

    Hara, T; Sasaki, T; Miyauchi, H; Takakura, K

    1993-01-01

    A case of a 19-year-old man with multiple characteristics of the Noonan phenotype and a massive intracerebral hemorrhage in the left putaminal region is presented. The hemorrhage was removed surgically, and the patient made a good recovery and was finally able to walk unassisted. Postoperative cerebral angiograms revealed various vascular anomalies, including a small aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second detailed case report of an association of the Noonan phenotype with cerebral vascular anomalies presenting intracerebral hemorrhage. The etiology of this syndrome remains unknown but the possible causes of this rare association are discussed.

  15. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with an arachnoid cyst in a juvenile taekwondo athlete: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic subdural hematoma and arachnoid cysts are common lesions in neurosurgical practice. Arachnoid cysts are a well-known predisposing factor for chronic subdural hematoma. Here, we present a 12-year-old taekwondo athlete with chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts. The chronic subdural hematoma was evacuated through 2 burr holes and the patient was discharged in good condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of chronic subdural hematoma with associated arachnoid cysts in a taekwondo athlete. We also review the literature on sports-related chronic subdural hematomas associated with arachnoid cysts in children. PMID:22832284

  16. P2X7 Receptor Suppression Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier through Inhibiting RhoA Activation after Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yang; Li, Qiang; Zhang, John H; Liu, Xin; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Blockading P2X7 receptor(P2X7R) provides neuroprotection toward various neurological disorders, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, whether and how P2X7 receptor suppression protects blood-brain barrier(BBB) after intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH) remains unexplored. In present study, intrastriatal autologous-blood injection was used to mimic ICH in rats. Selective P2X7R inhibitor A438079, P2X7R agonist BzATP, and P2X7R siRNA were administrated to evaluate the effects of P2X7R suppression. Selective RhoA inhibitor C3 transferase was administered to clarify the involvement of RhoA. Post-assessments, including neurological deficits, Fluoro-Jade C staining, brain edema, Evans blue extravasation and fluorescence, western blot, RhoA activity assay and immunohistochemistry were performed. Then the key results were verified in collagenase induced ICH model. We found that endogenous P2X7R increased at 3 hrs after ICH with peak at 24 hrs, then returned to normal at 72 hrs after ICH. Enhanced immunoreactivity was observed on the neurovascular structure around hematoma at 24 hrs after ICH, along with perivascular astrocytes and endothelial cells. Both A438079 and P2X7R siRNA alleviated neurological deficits, brain edema, and BBB disruption after ICH, in association with RhoA activation and down-regulated endothelial junction proteins. However, BzATP abolished those effects. In addition, C3 transferase reduced brain injury and increased endothelial junction proteins' expression after ICH. These data indicated P2X7R suppression could preserve BBB integrity after ICH through inhibiting RhoA activation. PMID:26980524

  17. P2X7 Receptor Suppression Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier through Inhibiting RhoA Activation after Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yang; Li, Qiang; Zhang, John H.; Liu, Xin; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Blockading P2X7 receptor(P2X7R) provides neuroprotection toward various neurological disorders, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, whether and how P2X7 receptor suppression protects blood-brain barrier(BBB) after intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH) remains unexplored. In present study, intrastriatal autologous-blood injection was used to mimic ICH in rats. Selective P2X7R inhibitor A438079, P2X7R agonist BzATP, and P2X7R siRNA were administrated to evaluate the effects of P2X7R suppression. Selective RhoA inhibitor C3 transferase was administered to clarify the involvement of RhoA. Post-assessments, including neurological deficits, Fluoro-Jade C staining, brain edema, Evans blue extravasation and fluorescence, western blot, RhoA activity assay and immunohistochemistry were performed. Then the key results were verified in collagenase induced ICH model. We found that endogenous P2X7R increased at 3 hrs after ICH with peak at 24 hrs, then returned to normal at 72 hrs after ICH. Enhanced immunoreactivity was observed on the neurovascular structure around hematoma at 24 hrs after ICH, along with perivascular astrocytes and endothelial cells. Both A438079 and P2X7R siRNA alleviated neurological deficits, brain edema, and BBB disruption after ICH, in association with RhoA activation and down-regulated endothelial junction proteins. However, BzATP abolished those effects. In addition, C3 transferase reduced brain injury and increased endothelial junction proteins’ expression after ICH. These data indicated P2X7R suppression could preserve BBB integrity after ICH through inhibiting RhoA activation. PMID:26980524

  18. Intracerebral and Intravenous Transplantation Represents a Favorable Approach for Application of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiang; Wang, Bin; Wang, Lian; Dong, Fang; Bai, Gang; Liu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is one severe subtype of stroke, with a very complex pathology. Stem cell-based therapy holds promising potential in the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) have a therapeutic effect in recovery from brain damage following ICH. The aim of this study was to identify an effective and convenient way of using UC-MSCs in the ICH rat model. Material/Methods CM-DiI-labeled human UC-MSCs were transplanted intracerebrally or intravenously into collagenase VII-induced ICH rat models. Neurological function was evaluated before ICH and at 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after treatment. ICH rats were sacrificed to evaluate the injury volume. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis and vascular areas were investigated using microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) immunohistochemistry at two weeks after transplantation. Results The intracerebral and intravenous administration of UC-MSCs both resulted in significant improvement in neurological function and decrease in injury volume of ICH rats. Transplanted UC-MSCs were chemotactic in vivo and showed a predominant distribution around the ICH region. In addition, UC-MSCs could integrate into the cerebral vasculature in both groups. Conclusions Both intracerebral and intravenous administration of UC-MSCs could have a favorable effect on recovery of neurological function in ICH rats, although the fundamental mechanisms may be different between the two groups. Our data suggest that intravenous implantation of UC-MSCs could serve as a favorable approach for cell-based therapy in central nervous system (CNS) diseases according to clinical needs. PMID:27703134

  19. Endoscopic drainage of orbital subperiosteal hematoma secondary to acute rhinosinusitis in a child.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Honkura, Yohei; Ozawa, Daiki; Okumura, Yuri; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Takenori; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kenichi; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with secondary orbital infection, most commonly subperiosteal abscess. Although orbital subperiosteal abscess is a deadly disease that might lead to blind and cavernous sinus thrombosis, recent review of literature showed that immediate surgical intervention might not always be necessary for subperiosteal abscess. Orbital inflammation secondary to sinusitis is common in children, whereas orbital subperiosteal hematoma secondary to sinusitis is extremely rare, with only 11 reported cases, including one case in children. All the cases were treated with surgical intervention. Here we present a 12-year-old girl with rhinosinusitis and proptosis. Emergent endoscopic sinus surgery with partial removal of the lamina papyracea revealed dark brown fluid in the subperiosteal space. The patient was symptom-free 2 weeks after surgery. The present case was treated exclusively via an endonasal approach, whereas all 11 previous cases of subperiosteal hematoma were treated with external incision. The endonasal approach is favorable, especially for young female patients. Our review of literature shows that sudden onset, afebrile, and few signs of inflammation on blood test in patients with subperiosteal lesion may indicate subperiosteal hematoma. Surgery rather than antibiotic administration should be considered for the treatment of suspected subperiosteal hematoma. Treatment through only the endonasal approach is possible even if the hematoma is located in the roof of the orbit. PMID:24965687

  20. [Acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa in a case of von Willebrand's disease].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, N; Mine, T; Ikeda, E; Iwai, H; Kusano, S

    1988-01-01

    A rare case of acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with von Willebrand's disease is reported. A 9-year-old boy fell down and hit his occipital region against a floor. Soon after he came home and slept, but three hours later he began to vomit and became drowsiness. He visited our hospital and his Glasgow Coma Scale showed 13 points. CT scan on admission showed acute epidural hematoma of left posterior fossa and contusional hematoma in the right temporal lobe. The bleeding time was over 18 minutes. He had been suspected to be suffering from von Willebrand's disease two years ago. Then fresh blood, fresh frozen plasma and anti-hemophilic globulin were prepared. Ten hours after injury, the operation was begun. Fresh epidural hematoma existed as a clot beyond transverse sinus. During the procedure of dural tenting suture, diffuse bleeding from bone, muscle, subcutaneous tissue and dura occurred and it was difficult to stop the bleeding. By using fresh blood and anti-hemophilic globulin, the bleeding was controlled, and then the operation was achieved. In the postoperative course a new epidural hematoma was found in the left temporal region and a new but asymptomatic retinal hemorrhage was found in his right eye. He was discharged without any neurological deficits 25 days after operation.

  1. Amniotic fluid 'sludge' detected in patients with subchorionic hematoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, E; Tomimatsu, T; Kanagawa, T; Sawada, K; Kinugasa, Y; Mimura, K; Kimura, T

    2009-04-01

    Amniotic fluid 'sludge' is defined as the presence of dense aggregates of particulate matter in close proximity to the internal cervical os. It is of clinical significance in asymptomatic patients at high risk for spontaneous delivery, and in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Subchorionic hematoma is another ultrasound finding that is associated with a higher incidence of threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery. We report two cases of occurrence of amniotic fluid sludge in patients with previously detected large subchorionic hematoma. In the first case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasonography at 13 + 1 and 18 + 6 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption and emergency Cesarean section. In the second case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasound at 11 + 3 and 15 + 5 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by miscarriage with histological chorioamnionitis. The coincidence of subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge in these cases points to a possible connection between these two significant ultrasound findings. PMID:19308930

  2. Amniotic fluid 'sludge' detected in patients with subchorionic hematoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, E; Tomimatsu, T; Kanagawa, T; Sawada, K; Kinugasa, Y; Mimura, K; Kimura, T

    2009-04-01

    Amniotic fluid 'sludge' is defined as the presence of dense aggregates of particulate matter in close proximity to the internal cervical os. It is of clinical significance in asymptomatic patients at high risk for spontaneous delivery, and in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Subchorionic hematoma is another ultrasound finding that is associated with a higher incidence of threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery. We report two cases of occurrence of amniotic fluid sludge in patients with previously detected large subchorionic hematoma. In the first case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasonography at 13 + 1 and 18 + 6 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption and emergency Cesarean section. In the second case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasound at 11 + 3 and 15 + 5 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by miscarriage with histological chorioamnionitis. The coincidence of subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge in these cases points to a possible connection between these two significant ultrasound findings.

  3. Delayed rehabilitation lessens brain injury and improves recovery after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Auriat, Angela M; Colbourne, Frederick

    2009-01-28

    Rehabilitation improves recovery after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. In some cases, brain damage is attenuated. In this study, we tested whether environmental enrichment (EE) combined with skilled reach training improves recovery and lessens brain injury after ICH in rats. Collagenase was injected stereotaxically to produce a moderate-sized striatal ICH. One week after ICH rats were either placed into a rehabilitation (REHAB) or control (CONT) condition. The REHAB rats received 15 h of EE and four 15-minute reach-training sessions daily over 5 days a week for 2 weeks. The CONT rats stayed in standard group cages. Skilled reaching (staircase test), walking (horizontal ladder) and forelimb use bias (cylinder test) were assessed at 4 and 6 weeks after ICH. Lesion volume, corpus callosum volume and cortical thickness were calculated 46 days after ICH. The REHAB treatment reduced lesion volume by 28% (p=0.019) without affecting the corpus callosum volume (p=0.405) or cortical thickness (p=0.300), thus indicating that protection was due to lessening striatal injury. As well, REHAB significantly improved skilled reaching ability in the staircase apparatus at 4 (p=0.002) and 6 weeks (p<0.001) post-ICH. Transient benefit was obtained in the ladder test at 4 weeks (p=0.021). Unexpectedly, REHAB treatment lessened spontaneous use of the contralateral-to-ICH limb at 4 (p=0.045) and 6 weeks (p=0.041). In summary, the combination of EE and reach training significantly attenuates lesion volume (striatal injury) while improving skilled reaching and walking ability. These findings encourage the use of early rehabilitation therapies in patients suffering from basal ganglia hemorrhaging. PMID:19059222

  4. Large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of renal calculi in a spina bifida patient: lessons we learn

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Samsudin, Azi; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M; Selmi, Fahed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paraplegic patients are at greater risk of developing complications following ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of urine infection associated with neuropathic bladder, difficulties in access due to altered anatomy of urinary bladder and urethra, spinal curvature, spasticity, and contractures. We report the occurrence of large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopy and discuss lessons we learn from this case. Case report A 48-year-old male patient with spina bifida underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and ureteric stenting for left ureteric stone and staghorn calculus with hydronephrosis; laser lithotripsy was repeated after 3 months; both procedures were performed by a senior urologist and did not result in any complications. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed 5 months later by a urological trainee; it was difficult to negotiate the scope as vision became poor because of bleeding (as a result of the procedure). Postoperatively, hematuria persisted; temperature was 39°C. Cefuroxime was given intravenously followed by gentamicin for 5 days; hematuria subsided gradually; he was discharged home. Ten days later, this patient developed temperature, the urine culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ciprofloxacin was given orally. Computed tomography (CT) of the urinary tract, performed 4 weeks after ureteroscopy, revealed a 9×7 cm subcapsular collection on the left kidney compressing underlying parenchyma. Percutaneous drainage was not feasible because of severe curvature of spine. Isotope renogram revealed deterioration in left renal function from 30% to 17%. Follow-up CT revealed reduction in the size of subcapsular hematoma, no hydronephrosis, and several residual calculi. Conclusion Risk of subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic lithotripsy can be reduced by avoiding prolonged endoscopy and performing ureteroscopy under low pressure. When a paraplegic patient develops features of infection after ureteroscopy, renal

  5. Large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of renal calculi in a spina bifida patient: lessons we learn

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Samsudin, Azi; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M; Selmi, Fahed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paraplegic patients are at greater risk of developing complications following ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of urine infection associated with neuropathic bladder, difficulties in access due to altered anatomy of urinary bladder and urethra, spinal curvature, spasticity, and contractures. We report the occurrence of large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopy and discuss lessons we learn from this case. Case report A 48-year-old male patient with spina bifida underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and ureteric stenting for left ureteric stone and staghorn calculus with hydronephrosis; laser lithotripsy was repeated after 3 months; both procedures were performed by a senior urologist and did not result in any complications. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed 5 months later by a urological trainee; it was difficult to negotiate the scope as vision became poor because of bleeding (as a result of the procedure). Postoperatively, hematuria persisted; temperature was 39°C. Cefuroxime was given intravenously followed by gentamicin for 5 days; hematuria subsided gradually; he was discharged home. Ten days later, this patient developed temperature, the urine culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ciprofloxacin was given orally. Computed tomography (CT) of the urinary tract, performed 4 weeks after ureteroscopy, revealed a 9×7 cm subcapsular collection on the left kidney compressing underlying parenchyma. Percutaneous drainage was not feasible because of severe curvature of spine. Isotope renogram revealed deterioration in left renal function from 30% to 17%. Follow-up CT revealed reduction in the size of subcapsular hematoma, no hydronephrosis, and several residual calculi. Conclusion Risk of subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic lithotripsy can be reduced by avoiding prolonged endoscopy and performing ureteroscopy under low pressure. When a paraplegic patient develops features of infection after ureteroscopy, renal

  6. A “Pseudo-cavernoma” – an encapsulated Hematoma of the Choroid Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Turner, Michael S.; Pytel, Peter; Awad, Issam A.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first report of an intraventricular encapsulated hematoma, mimicking cavernous malformation on imaging and gross lesion appearance. A 47-year-old female on anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation presented with left upper extremity apraxia, neglect, and mild gait imbalance. Her brain CT scan and MRI revealed multilobulated lesions involving the choroid plexus in the atria of both lateral ventricles. The intraoperative appearance was that of encapsulated mass, with blood clots at different stages of liquefaction and organization, all consistent with the gross appearance of a cavernous malformation. However, histopathologic examination demonstrated hematoma with components at different ages, and normal vessel infiltration without any hint of cavernous malformation histology, or underlying neoplasia. Encapsulated hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic intraventricular masses. PMID:21435884

  7. A "pseudo-cavernoma" - an encapsulated hematoma of the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Turner, Michael S; Pytel, Peter; Awad, Issam A

    2011-06-01

    We present the first report of an intraventricular encapsulated hematoma, mimicking cavernous malformation on imaging and gross lesion appearance. A 47-year-old female on anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation presented with left upper extremity apraxia, neglect, and mild gait imbalance. Her brain CT scan and MRI revealed multilobulated lesions involving the choroid plexus in the atria of both lateral ventricles. The intraoperative appearance was that of encapsulated mass, with blood clots at different stages of liquefaction and organization, all consistent with the gross appearance of a cavernous malformation. However, histopathologic examination demonstrated hematoma with components at different ages, and normal vessel infiltration without any hint of cavernous malformation histology, or underlying neoplasia. Encapsulated hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic intraventricular masses.

  8. Identification of Hematomas in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using an Index of Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Naunheim, Rosanne; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Mould, W. Andrew; Hanley, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rapid identification of traumatic intracranial hematomas following closed head injury represents a significant health care need because of the potentially life-threatening risk they present. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of an index of brain electrical activity used to identify intracranial hematomas in traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage located on the forehead of 394 closed head injured patients who were referred for CT scans as part of their standard ED assessment. A total of 116 of these patients were found to be CT positive (CT+), of which 46 patients with traumatic intracranial hematomas (CT+) were identified for study. A total of 278 patients were found to be CT negative (CT−) and were used as controls. CT scans were subjected to quanitative measurements of volume of blood and distance of bleed from recording electrodes by blinded independent experts, implementing a validated method for hematoma measurement. Using an algorithm based on brain electrical activity developed on a large independent cohort of TBI patients and controls (TBI-Index), patients were classified as either positive or negative for structural brain injury. Sensitivity to hematomas was found to be 95.7% (95% CI=85.2, 99.5), specificity was 43.9% (95% CI=38.0, 49.9). There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and distance of the bleed from recording sites (F=0.044, p=0.833), or volume of blood measured F=0.179, p=0.674). Results of this study are a validation and extension of previously published retrospective findings in an independent population, and provide evidence that a TBI-Index for structural brain injury is a highly sensitive measure for the detection of potentially life-threatening traumatic intracranial hematomas, and could contribute to the rapid, quantitative evaluation and treatment of such patients. PMID:25054838

  9. Role of admission serum albumin levels in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Yang, Ju Dong; Hinduja, Archana

    2016-03-01

    Low serum albumin levels have been reported to be an independent predictor of increased morbidity and mortality in multiple disease conditions. The aim of our study was to identify the impact of low serum albumin levels on mortality and outcomes at discharge in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed our prospective database of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage from January 2010 to December 2011. Patients were dichotomized into two groups based on their serum albumin levels upon admission. Hypoalbuminemia was defined as serum albumin levels ≤3.4 g/dl. The two groups were compared using Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and t test for continuous variables. Poor outcome was defined as death or discharge to a long-term nursing facility (modified Rankin Score 4-6). Out of 97 patients admitted with intracerebral hemorrhage, 90 met our inclusion criteria (42 had normal levels and 48 had hypoalbuminemia). The baseline characteristics, risk factors, etiology, location and volume of intracerebral hemorrhage, admission blood glucose, white cell count, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and complications were similar between both groups. Although admission hypoalbuminemia did not impact in-hospital mortality (28 vs 24 %, p = 0.635), there was a significant increase in poor outcomes at discharge (59 vs 31 %, p = 0.009) (OR 1.8; 95 % CI; 1.2-2.8). Similar to other diseases, hypoalbuminemia was associated with poor functional outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. This will need to be confirmed in larger prospective studies before adopting therapeutic and preventive strategies in future. PMID:26133948

  10. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  11. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  12. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  13. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI.

  14. Bilateral Chronic Subdural Nontraumatic Hematoma in a Woman Affected by AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Luongo, M.; Grassi, M.; Godano, U.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a condition frequently seen in neurosurgical practice, especially among the elderly. It is often preceded by head injury, even a trivial trauma. Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a disorder involving extracellular tissue deposition of misfolded native proteins called amyloids. The several types of amyloidosis differ by source of proteins, organ involvement, treatment, and prognosis. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman affected by AL amyloidosis, harboring surgically treated bilateral chronic nontraumatic subdural hematoma, and we suggest a possible correlation between the clinical entities of CSDH and AL amyloidosis. PMID:26251797

  15. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, José A; Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  16. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  17. Blunt traumatic superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as gluteal hematoma without bony injury: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Annu; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Pawan; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Atin

    2016-08-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries to the superior gluteal artery are rare in clinic. A majority of injuries present as aneurysms following penetrating trauma, fracture pelvis or posterior dislocation of the hip joint. We reported a rare case of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma presenting as large expanding right gluteal hematoma without any bony injury. The gluteal hematoma was suspected clinically, confirmed by ultrasound and the arterial injury was diagnosed by CT angiography that revealed a large right gluteal hematoma with a focal contrast leakage forming a pseudoaneurysm within the hematoma. Pseudoaneurysm arose from the superior gluteal branch of right internal iliac artery, which was successfully angioembolized. The patient was discharged on day 4 of hospitalization with resolving gluteal hematoma. This report highlighted the importance of considering an arterial injury following blunt trauma to the buttocks with subsequent painful swelling. Acknowledgment of this rare injury pattern was necessary to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27578385

  18. Acute symptomatic hematoma with defined etiology seven years after breast reconstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Akhil K; Kim, John YS

    2010-01-01

    Augmentation mammaplasty with implants can be complicated by hematoma formation. The majority of hematomas occur in the immediate postoperative period. There are, however, some reports of hematomas with a delayed presentation. These hematomas in the late postoperative period are rare, and many of these cases do not have a definitive mechanism of injury or develop symptoms immediately after the triggering event. A case of late capsular hematoma seven years after breast reconstruction with a saline implant following mastectomy is presented. In contrast to the majority of published cases, the patient presented with both a known and traceable cause of her bleed and with symptoms that developed immediately after the initial event. Furthermore, the mechanism of her injury was consistent with a bleeding capsular tear that was observed intraoperatively. The present case emphasizes the importance of thorough evaluation and management of patients with a history of breast reconstruction. PMID:21629619

  19. Outcomes and management of type A intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Harleen K.; Tanaka, Akiko; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M.; Afifi, Rana O.; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Initial optimal management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) with intramural hematoma (ATAIMH) remains controversial, especially between centers in the Eastern vs. Western worlds. We examined the literature and our experience to report outcomes after repair of ATAIMH. Methods We reviewed the hospital, follow-up clinic records and online mortality databases for all patients who presented to our center for open repair of ATAAD between 1999 and 2014. Preoperative characteristics, early and long-term outcomes were compared between classic ATAAD vs. ATAIMH. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank statistics. Results Of the 523 repaired ATAAD, 101 patients (19%) presented with IMH and 422 (81%) had classic dissection. ATAIMH were significantly older (64.8±12.9 vs. 56.8±14.6 years; P<0.001), more commonly females (39% vs. 26%; P=0.010), had poor baseline renal function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate) (P<0.017), more retrograde dissections (27% vs. 8.3%; P<0.001), and less distal malperfusion (5% vs. 15%; P<0.001). Age greater than 60 years, female sex, retrograde dissection, and Marfan syndrome were strongly correlated with ATAIMH. Time to repair for ATAIMH was longer (median, 55.3 vs. 9.8 hours; P<0.001) with one death in ATAIMH within three days of presentation (0.9% vs. 6%; P=0.040). In all, 30-day mortality in ATAIMH was not different from classic ATAAD (12% vs.16%; P=0.289). A significantly lower incidence of postoperative dialysis in ATAIMH was noted (10% vs. 19%; P=0.034). When adjusted for age and renal function, late survival was improved with IMH (P<0.039). Conclusions ATAIMH continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, comparable to classic aortic dissection. A multidisciplinary management approach involving aggressive medical management and risk stratification for timely surgical intervention, along with genetic profiling, is recommended for optimal care. Long-term monitoring is mandatory to assess

  20. Beyond the core face-processing network: Intracerebral stimulation of a face-selective area in the right anterior fusiform gyrus elicits transient prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Rossion, Bruno; Brissart, Hélène; Frismand, Solène; Jacques, Corentin; Hossu, Gabriela; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Vespignani, Hervé; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Maillard, Louis

    2015-11-01

    According to neuropsychological evidence, a distributed network of regions of the ventral visual pathway - from the lateral occipital cortex to the temporal pole - supports face recognition. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have generally confined ventral face-selective areas to the posterior section of the occipito-temporal cortex, i.e., the inferior occipital gyrus occipital face area (OFA) and the posterior and middle fusiform gyrus fusiform face area (FFA). There is recent evidence that intracranial electrical stimulation of these areas in the right hemisphere elicits face matching and recognition impairments (i.e., prosopagnosia) as well as perceptual face distortions. Here we report a case of transient inability to recognize faces following electrical stimulation of the right anterior fusiform gyrus, in a region located anteriorly to the FFA. There was no perceptual face distortion reported during stimulation. Although no fMRI face-selective responses were found in this region due to a severe signal drop-out as in previous studies, intracerebral face-selective event-related potentials and gamma range electrophysiological responses were found at the critical site of stimulation. These results point to a causal role in face recognition of the right anterior fusiform gyrus and more generally of face-selective areas located beyond the "core" face-processing network in the right ventral temporal cortex. It also illustrates the diagnostic value of intracerebral electrophysiological recordings and stimulation in understanding the neural basis of face recognition and visual recognition in general.

  1. Beyond the core face-processing network: Intracerebral stimulation of a face-selective area in the right anterior fusiform gyrus elicits transient prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Rossion, Bruno; Brissart, Hélène; Frismand, Solène; Jacques, Corentin; Hossu, Gabriela; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Vespignani, Hervé; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Maillard, Louis

    2015-11-01

    According to neuropsychological evidence, a distributed network of regions of the ventral visual pathway - from the lateral occipital cortex to the temporal pole - supports face recognition. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have generally confined ventral face-selective areas to the posterior section of the occipito-temporal cortex, i.e., the inferior occipital gyrus occipital face area (OFA) and the posterior and middle fusiform gyrus fusiform face area (FFA). There is recent evidence that intracranial electrical stimulation of these areas in the right hemisphere elicits face matching and recognition impairments (i.e., prosopagnosia) as well as perceptual face distortions. Here we report a case of transient inability to recognize faces following electrical stimulation of the right anterior fusiform gyrus, in a region located anteriorly to the FFA. There was no perceptual face distortion reported during stimulation. Although no fMRI face-selective responses were found in this region due to a severe signal drop-out as in previous studies, intracerebral face-selective event-related potentials and gamma range electrophysiological responses were found at the critical site of stimulation. These results point to a causal role in face recognition of the right anterior fusiform gyrus and more generally of face-selective areas located beyond the "core" face-processing network in the right ventral temporal cortex. It also illustrates the diagnostic value of intracerebral electrophysiological recordings and stimulation in understanding the neural basis of face recognition and visual recognition in general. PMID:26143305

  2. Management for traumatic chronic subdural hematoma patients with well-controlled shunt system for hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shoko Mitrrt; Tomia, Yusuke; Murakami, Hideki; Nakane, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic CSDH enlarged in two cases with VP or LP shunt system although the shunt valve pressure was increased to 200 mmH2O. In surgery, the hematoma cavity pressure was found to be 130 and 140 mmH2O, suggesting that to raise the shunt valve pressure is not effective for decreasing CSDH volume.

  3. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  4. Fatal retropleural hematoma complicating internal jugular vein catheterization. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kontozoglou, T; Mambo, N

    1983-06-01

    This report describes a case of fatal retropleural hematoma complicating percutaneous insertion of a central vein catheter. The patient was a 55-year-old female undergoing surgery for severe rheumatic mitral valve disease. Factors responsible for this catastrophic incident are the anticoagulation of the patient, the edematous state of the soft tissues, and the multiple punctures of the wall of the jugular vein.

  5. Spontaneously Resolved Recurrent Cervical Epidural Hematoma in a 37-Week Primigravida.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Deguchi, Masao; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kanamono, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To describe a patient with a recurrent spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) during pregnancy that had spontaneous remission. Methods A 27-year-old primigravida at 37 weeks' gestation suddenly felt a strong left shoulder pain without any trauma. She had a history of fenestration for a spontaneous cervical hematoma when she was 18 years old. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a recurrence of the cervical epidural hematoma at the C4-T1 level, but she had no paralysis. Results The patient subsequently underwent a cesarean section and delivered a healthy male infant. Her spinal epidural hematoma disappeared. Multislice computed tomography showed no evidence for a vascular malformation or tumor. Three years after the initial cesarean section, she underwent a second one and delivered another male infant. Conclusions We report on a rare case of recurrent SSEH during pregnancy with no neurologic deficits that was treated nonoperatively with close observation and resulted in spontaneous resolution. In such patients with no neurologic deficits, nonoperative management with close observation may be a reasonable alternative. PMID:26430600

  6. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  7. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  8. Types of Thromboembolic Complications in Coil Embolization for Intracerebral Aneurysms and Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Sung-Hak

    2009-01-01

    Objective We describe our clinical experiences and outcomes in patients who had thromboembolic complications occurring during endovascular treatment of intracerebral aneurysms with a review of the literature. The types of thromboembolic complications were divided and the treatment modalities for each type were described. Methods Between August 2004 and March 2009 we performed endovascular embolization with Guglielmi detachable coils for 173 patients with 189 cerebral aneurysms, including ruptured and unruptured aneurysms at our hospital. Sixty-eight patients were males and 105 patients were females. The age of patients ranged from 22-82 years (average, 58.8 years). We retrospectively evaluated this group with regard to complication rates and outcomes. The types of thromboembolic complications were classified into the following three categories: mechanical obstruction, distal embolic stroke, and stent-induced complications, which corresponded to types I, II, and III, respectively. A comparison of the clinical results was made for each type of complication. Results Only eight patients had a thromboembolic complication during or after a procedure (4.6%). Of the eight patients, two had a mechanical obstruction as the causative factor; the other three patients had distal embolic stroke as the causative factor. The remaining three patients had stent-induced complications. In cases of mechanical obstruction, recanalization occurred due to the use of intra-arterial thrombolytic agents in one of two patients. Nevertheless, a poor prognosis was seen. In the cases of stent-induced complications, in one of three patients in whom a thrombus developed following stent insertion, a middle cerebral artery territory infarct developed with a poor prognosis despite the use of wiring and an intra-arterial thrombolytic agent. In the cases of distal embolic stroke, all three patients achieved good results following the use of antiplatelet agents. Conclusion Treatment for thromboemboic

  9. Recurrent hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages: what should we do when a new hemispheric ischaemic event strikes?

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Osama S M

    2012-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage is usually a once in a lifetime event and recurrences are rare. Most recurrences usually develop within 2 years of the first event and the majority usually target the basal ganglia and thalami. Failure of blood pressure control is the most important, potentially preventable, culprit behind the development of primary intracerebral haemorrhages. However, the occurrence of a recurrent bleed in patients with optimally controlled hypertension should always prompt the physician to think of a new co-operating factor. We report on a 60-year-old hypertensive woman who developed right-sided thalamic haemorrhage 5 days after sustaining a lacunar infarct of the left thalamus for which she had been prescribed a dual antiplatelet therapy: aspirin and clopidrogrel. She had a history of two bilateral sequential hypertensive deep cerebellar haemorrhages which were developed 2 years ago. PMID:23264163

  10. Recurrent hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhages: what should we do when a new hemispheric ischaemic event strikes?

    PubMed

    Amin, Osama S M

    2012-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage is usually a once in a lifetime event and recurrences are rare. Most recurrences usually develop within 2 years of the first event and the majority usually target the basal ganglia and thalami. Failure of blood pressure control is the most important, potentially preventable, culprit behind the development of primary intracerebral haemorrhages. However, the occurrence of a recurrent bleed in patients with optimally controlled hypertension should always prompt the physician to think of a new co-operating factor. We report on a 60-year-old hypertensive woman who developed right-sided thalamic haemorrhage 5 days after sustaining a lacunar infarct of the left thalamus for which she had been prescribed a dual antiplatelet therapy: aspirin and clopidrogrel. She had a history of two bilateral sequential hypertensive deep cerebellar haemorrhages which were developed 2 years ago. PMID:23264163

  11. [Brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma with acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a surgical case report].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-01

    We report a rare case of brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 79-year-old woman presented with sudden headache and monoplegia of the right upper limb 10 years after diagnosis of thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma. Despite the known metastatic lesions in the cervical lymph nodes and lungs, she had been well for 10 years since thyroidectomy, focal irradiation and internal radiation of 131I. CT demonstrated intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity. She underwent radical surgery on the day of the onset and the histological diagnosis was metastatic brain tumor of thyroid papillary carcinoma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the monoplegia was improved. Papillary thyroid carcinoma has a relatively benign course, and surgical removal of the brain metastasis is able to contribute to longer survival times for patients.

  12. Protective effect of picolinic acid on mice intracerebrally infected with lethal doses of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Mazzolla, R; Pitzurra, L; Barluzzi, R; Bistoni, F

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of picolinic acid (PLA), a product of tryptophan degradation, on mouse susceptibility to intracerebral infection with Candida albicans. We show that intraperitoneal administration of PLA significantly enhances the median survival time of mice inoculated with the lethal challenge. Furthermore, intracerebral administration of this agent induces a protective state against the local lethal infection, the phenomenon depending upon the administration schedule and doses of PLA employed. According to survival data, yeast growth in the brain as well as yeast colonization of the kidneys are drastically reduced in PLA-treated mice compared with those for untreated controls. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of brain tissues demonstrates that mRNA levels specific for tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are augmented and induced, respectively, after inoculation of PLA. These results indicate that PLA has a protective effect likely involving elicitation of a cytokine response in vivo against fungal infections. Images PMID:7506894

  13. Peripheral effects induced in BALB/c mice infected with DENV by the intracerebral route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E R A; Amorim, J F S; Paes, M V; Azevedo, A S; Gonçalves, A J S; Costa, S M; Mantuano-Barradas, M; Póvoa, T F; de Meis, J; Basílio-de-Oliveira, C A; Nogueira, A C M A; Alves, A M B

    2016-02-01

    The lack of an immunocompetent animal model for dengue mimicking the disease in humans is a limitation for advances in this field. Inoculation by intracerebral route of neuroadapted dengue strains in mice is normally lethal and provides a straightforward readout parameter for vaccine testing. However, systemic effects of infection and the immune response elicited in this model remain poorly described. In the present work, BALB/c mice infected by the intracerebral route with neuroadapted DENV2 exhibited several evidences of systemic involvement. DENV-inoculated mice presented virus infective particles in the brain followed by viremia, especially in late stages of infection. Infection induced cellular and humoral responses, with presence of activated T cells in spleen and blood, lymphocyte infiltration and tissue damages in brain and liver, and an increase in serum levels of some pro-inflammatory cytokines. Data highlighted an interplay between the central nervous system commitment and peripheral effects under this experimental condition. PMID:26748331

  14. [THE AGING OF MICROVASCULAR NETWORK FORMED IN CORTEX FOLLOWING INTRACEREBRAL TRANSPLANTATION OF MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, I B; Anisimov, S V; Puzanov, M V; Sergeev, I V; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2015-01-01

    Using a TV device to study microcirculation in brain we found that intracerebral transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to 12-months old rats led to a significant increase (circa 1,5-fold times) of microvascular density in pia tissue and to increased constriction reactions of pia arterioles in response to noradrenalin application on a brain surface. Both microvascular density and pia arterioles reactivity was completely preserved in aging until 22-24 months. PMID:26390610

  15. The effects of intra-cerebral drug infusions on animals' unconditioned fear reactions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Engin, Elif; Treit, Dallas

    2008-08-01

    Intra-cerebral (i.c.) microinfusion of selective receptor agonists and antagonists into behaving animals can provide both neuroanatomical and neurochemical insights into the neural mechanisms of anxiety. However, there have been no systematic reviews of the results of this experimental approach that include both a range of unconditioned anxiety reactions and a sufficiently broad theoretical context. Here we focus on amino acid, monoamine, cholinergic and peptidergic receptor ligands microinfused into neural structures previously implicated in anxiety, and subsequent behavioral effects in animal models of unconditioned anxiety or fear. GABAA receptor agonists and glutamate receptor antagonists produced the most robust anxiolytic-like behavioral effects, in the majority of neural substrates and animal models. In contrast, ligands of the other receptor systems had more selective, site-specific anti-anxiety effects. For example, 5-HT1A receptor agonists produced anxiolytic-like effects in the raphe nuclei, but inconsistent effects in the amygdala, septum, and hippocampus. Conversely, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists produced anxiolytic-like effects in the amygdala but not in the raphe nuclei. Nicotinic receptor agonists produced anxiolytic-like effects in the raphe and anxiogenic effects in the septum and hippocampus. Unexpectedly, physostigmine, a general cholinergic agonist, produced anxiolytic-like effects in the hippocampus. Neuropeptide receptors, although they are popular targets for the development of selective anxiolytic agents, had the least reliable effects across different animal models and brain structures, perhaps due in part to the fact that selective receptor ligands are relatively scarce. While some inconsistencies in the microinfusion data can easily be attributed to pharmacological variables such as dose or ligand selectivity, in other instances pharmacological explanations are more difficult to invoke: e.g., even the same dose of a known anxiolytic

  16. Evidence of Dissociated Arousal States During NREM Parasomnia from an Intracerebral Neurophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Terzaghi, Michele; Sartori, Ivana; Tassi, Laura; Didato, Giuseppe; Rustioni, Valter; LoRusso, Giorgio; Manni, Raffaele; Nobili, Lino

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Arousal parasomnias are expressions of sleep/wake state dissociations in which wakefulness and NREM sleep seem to coexist. We describe the results of a neurophysiological (intracerebral EEG) investigation that captured an episode of confusional arousal. Design: Observational analysis. Setting: Tertiary sleep center. Subject: A 20-year-old male with refractory focal epilepsy. Measurements and Results: The intracerebral EEG findings documented the presence of a local arousal of the motor and cingulate cortices associated with increased delta activity in the frontoparietal associative cortices; these findings were noted preceding the onset and persisting throughout the episode. Conclusions: The presence of dissociated sleep/wake states in confusional arousals is the expression not of a global phenomenon, but rather of the coexistence of different local states of being: arousal of the motor and cingulate cortices and inhibition of the associative ones. Whether this is an exclusive feature of NREM parasomnias, or a common substrate on which other triggering elements act, needs to be clarified. Citation: Terzaghi M; Sartori I; Tassi L; Didato G; Rustioni V; LoRusso G; Manni R; Nobili L. Evidence of dissociated arousal states during NREM parasomnia from an intracerebral neurophysiological study. SLEEP 2009;32(3):409–412. PMID:19294961

  17. An intra-cerebral abscess in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome: An unusual case

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Allan; White, Mark A.J.; Gallo, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present an unusual case where a large intra-cerebral abscess with severe complications was treated successfully with medical management alone in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome. Presentation of case A 40 year old patient with Eisenmenger syndrome presented with a seven day history of headache, neck pain and intermittent vomiting and fever. The only neurological examination finding was blurred vision. MRI revealed a large left occipital lobe abscess, which subsequently ruptured into the lateral ventricle with associated ventriculitis and hydrocephalus. This complicated abscess was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics alone, with complete resolution of the abscess and hydrocephalus on MRI at 13 months post-diagnosis. Discussion Patients with congenital cyanotic heart conditions, like Eisenmenger syndrome, are at increased risk of developing intra-cerebral abscesses. Effectively managing large abscesses with associated intra-ventricular rupture and hydrocephalus in these patients without any form of surgical intervention, including aspiration, is extremely rare. Conclusion Patients with congenital cyanotic heart disease who develop large intra-cerebral abscesses with severe complications, which would normally warrant surgical intervention, have the potential to be successfully treated with antibiotics alone with excellent outcome. PMID:26859871

  18. Neuroprotective effects of bovine colostrum on intracerebral hemorrhage-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Eun; Ko, Il Gyu; Shin, Mal Soon; Kim, Chang Ju; Ko, Young Gwan; Cho, Hanjin

    2012-08-01

    Brain cell death after intracerebral hemorrhage may be mediated in part by an apoptotic mechanism. Colostrum is the first milk produced by mammals for their young. It plays an important role in protection and development by providing various antibodies, growth factors and nutrients, and has been used for various diseases in many countries. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of bovine colostrum using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and an intracerebral hemorrhage animal model. We performed densitometric measurements of propidium iodide uptake, a step-down avoidance task, Nissl staining, and caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. The present results revealed that colostrum treatment significantly suppressed N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus. Moreover, colostrum treatment improved short-term memory by suppressing hemorrhage-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death and decreasing the volume of the lesion induced by intracerebral hemorrhage in the rat hippocampus. These results suggest that colostrum may have a beneficial role in recovering brain function following hemorrhagic stroke by suppressing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25624793

  19. Neuroprotective effects of bovine colostrum on intracerebral hemorrhage-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Ko, Il Gyu; Shin, Mal Soon; Kim, Chang Ju; Ko, Young Gwan; Cho, Hanjin

    2012-01-01

    Brain cell death after intracerebral hemorrhage may be mediated in part by an apoptotic mechanism. Colostrum is the first milk produced by mammals for their young. It plays an important role in protection and development by providing various antibodies, growth factors and nutrients, and has been used for various diseases in many countries. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of bovine colostrum using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and an intracerebral hemorrhage animal model. We performed densitometric measurements of propidium iodide uptake, a step-down avoidance task, Nissl staining, and caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. The present results revealed that colostrum treatment significantly suppressed N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus. Moreover, colostrum treatment improved short-term memory by suppressing hemorrhage-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death and decreasing the volume of the lesion induced by intracerebral hemorrhage in the rat hippocampus. These results suggest that colostrum may have a beneficial role in recovering brain function following hemorrhagic stroke by suppressing apoptotic cell death. PMID:25624793

  20. Behavioral consequences of intracerebral vasopressin and oxytocin: focus on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, M; Wotjak, C T; Neumann, I; Ludwig, M; Landgraf, R

    1996-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of David de Wied and his colleagues, the neuropeptides arginine vasopressin and oxytocin have been thought to play a pivotal role in behavioral regulation in general, and in learning and memory in particular. The present review focuses on the behavioral effects of intracerebral arginine vasopressin and oxytocin, with particular emphasis on the role of these neuropeptides as signals in interneuronal communication. We also discuss several methodological approaches that have been used to reveal the importance of these intracerebral neuropeptides as signals within signaling cascades. The literature suggests that arginine vasopressin improves, and oxytocin impairs, learning and memory. However, a critical analysis of the subject indicates the necessity for a revision of this generalized concept. We suggest that, depending on the behavioral test and the brain area under study, these endogenous neuropeptides are differentially involved in behavioral regulation; thus, generalizations derived from a single behavioral task should be avoided. In particular, recent studies on rodents indicate that socially relevant behaviors triggered by olfactory stimuli and paradigms in which the animals have to cope with an intense stressor (e.g., foot-shock motivated active or passive avoidance) are controlled by both arginine vasopressin and oxytocin released intracerebrally.

  1. Efficacy of deferoxamine in animal models of intracerebral hemorrhage: a systematic review and stratified meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han-Jin; He, Hao-yu; Yang, A-Li; Zhou, Hua-Jun; Wang, Cong; Luo, Jie-Kun; Lin, Yuan; Tang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subtype of stroke associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. No proven treatments are available for this condition. Iron-mediated free radical injury is associated with secondary damage following ICH. Deferoxamine (DFX), a ferric-iron chelator, is a candidate drug for the treatment of ICH. We performed a systematic review of studies involving the administration of DFX following ICH. In total, 20 studies were identified that described the efficacy of DFX in animal models of ICH and assessed changes in the brain water content, neurobehavioral score, or both. DFX reduced the brain water content by 85.7% in animal models of ICH (-0.86, 95% CI: -.48- -0.23; P < 0.01; 23 comparisons), and improved the neurobehavioral score by -1.08 (95% CI: -1.23- -0.92; P < 0.01; 62 comparisons). DFX was most efficacious when administered 2-4 h after ICH at a dose of 10-50 mg/kg depending on species, and this beneficial effect remained for up to 24 h postinjury. The efficacy was higher with phenobarbital anesthesia, intramuscular injection, and lysed erythrocyte infusion, and in Fischer 344 rats or aged animals. Overall, although DFX was found to be effective in experimental ICH, additional confirmation is needed due to possible publication bias, poor study quality, and the limited number of studies conducting clinical trials.

  2. Outcome and prognostic factors for dogs with a histological diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy: 35 cases (2001-2013).

    PubMed

    Patten, Steve G; Boston, Sarah E; Monteith, Gabrielle J

    2016-08-01

    Canine splenic hematoma can be indistinguishable from hemangiosarcoma on clinical presentation and grossly at the time of surgery. However, hemangiosarcoma represents an aggressive malignancy and a misdiagnosis of hematoma would forgo indications for chemotherapy. This study describes a long-term follow-up of cases with a histologic diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy to determine if the clinical course of the disease corroborated the diagnosis. Thirty-five dogs were evaluated to determine survival and prognostic associations with signalment and clinical data. Overall median survival time was 647 days (range: 0 to 3287 days). Statistically significant variables included a palpable abdominal mass during physical examination, sub-clinical coagulopathy, and metastasis. Four cases (11%) had reported evidence of metastasis at the time of euthanasia; 1 case was histologically confirmed. Overall prognosis for splenic hematoma appears excellent, as expected, but a small proportion of cases may have an undiagnosed malignant component. PMID:27493283

  3. Retroperitoneal hematoma: an unexpected complication during intervention on an occluded superficial femoral artery via a retrograde popliteal artery approach.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri I; Beedupalli, Jagan; Varma, Jai

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease involvement of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is common. Different endovascular techniques are used successfully for revascularization of this artery. A retrograde approach to chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the SFA through the ipsilateral popliteal artery has been used occasionally if an antegrade approach is not feasible or has failed. Some of the known complications encountered during this approach are arteriovenous fistula formation at the access site, occlusion of the popliteal artery if closure devices are used, and bleeding. There are no reports of perforation or bleeding of the SFA or the external iliac artery (EIA) during a popliteal approach, probably due to lack of flow in the occluded segment of the SFA. We report a case in which a retroperitoneal hematoma occurred due to retrograde blood flow through the established true channel in the proximal SFA and subsequently to the dissection plane with a wire tip perforation in the EIA, which was treated by stopping retrograde filling with prolonged balloon inflation in the distal SFA before the CTO. PMID:23890758

  4. [A Case of Organizing Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Endoscopic Burr-Hole Surgery Using a Curettage and Suction Technique].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Oshiro, Shinya; Koga, Takaomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-09-01

    A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital because of difficulty with discrete movement of the right upper limb and dysarthria. Computed tomography(CT)of the head revealed a chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH)on the left side. The patient underwent single burr-hole irrigation and drainage on the same day. In addition to the burr hole, a cross-shaped dural incision was made which revealed a thick outer membrane and solidified hematoma. We removed as much of the clotted hematoma as possible using a curved suction tube under neuroendoscopy. The postoperative CT revealed that the hematoma was partially removed and the mass effect was reduced. As a result, the patient's neurological deficits improved. We reached a diagnosis of organizing CSDH following histologic examination of the removed hematoma that showed inflammatory cell infiltration and multiplication of fibroblasts. Neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation via a burr hole is minimally invasive and may be a useful procedure in the treatment of some cases of organizing CSDH. PMID:27605476

  5. Intramural duodenal hematoma after submucosal injection of epinephrine for a bleeding ulcer: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    DIBRA, A.; KËLLIÇI, S.; ÇELIKU, E.; DRAÇINI, Xh.; MATURO, A.; ÇELIKU, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of endoscopic therapy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with no evidence of other pathologies. A 18-year-old man was admitted in emergency room with gastrointestinal bleeding manifested by melena. Previous medical history revealed that he had endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer 5 months before. Endoscopy revealed a Forrest 2a ulcer in the duodenal bulb and sclerotherapy was performed by injecting 10 ml of 0.2% epinephrine and 20 ml of NaCl 0.9% solution. Upper occlusion’s signs appeared 36 hours after the procedure. The hematoma, that was identified by endoscopy and confirmed by MRI and CT scan of the abdomen, caused transient duodenal obstruction. Combined conservative management with nasogastric tube and total parenteral nutrition resulted in reduction of obstructive symptoms within 4 weeks. PMID:25827667

  6. Bilateral posterior fossa chronic subdural hematoma treated with craniectomy: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Yushin; Matsumoto, Jun; Ohta, Kazutaka; Hasegawa, Shu; Miura, Masaki; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior chronic subdural hematomas (pCSHs) are rare. Their diagnosis and treatment are difficult. Description: A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with nausea, headache, and mild consciousness disturbance. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral pCSH. To prevent further neurological deterioration, we performed surgery under general anesthesia by midline suboccipital craniectomy. Unexpected bleeding from a developed circuitous occipital sinus was stopped with hemoclips. After hematoma removal, she recovered and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. By the 19th postoperative day, she had developed no neurologic deficits. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates the risk of blind surgical therapy in patients with pCSH. In such patients, posterior fossa craniectomy may be preferable in terms of diagnosis and safe treatment. PMID:27213111

  7. Spontaneous Resolution of a Large Chronic Subdural Hematoma Which Required Surgical Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Seok; Park, Young Seok; Min, Kyung Soo; Lee, Mou Seop

    2015-09-01

    We report on a case of an 87-year-old woman who showed spontaneous resolution of a large chronic subdural hematoma which required surgical decompression. She had suffered from confused mentality and right side weakness of motor grade II for 10 days. The initial brain CT scan showed a 22 mm thick low density lesion located in the left fronto-temporo-parietal region with midline shift (12 mm) which required emergency decompression. However, because she and her family did not want surgery, she was followed up in the outpatient clinic. Five months later, follow up brain CT showed that the CSDH had disappeared and the patient became neurologically normal. The reasons for spontaneous resolution of CSDH remain unclear. We discuss the possible relation between mechanisms of physio-pathogenesis and spontaneous resolution of a large chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) in an elderly patient. PMID:26539279

  8. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Hassan, Samer; Thumallapally, Nishitha; Dai, Qun

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs) led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH). Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine. PMID:26543654

  9. Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Eccentric Exercise Using a Vibrating Belt Machine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hey-Ran; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in a 75-year-old man after exercise using a vibrating belt machine on the head. He suffered from headache and intermittent left side numbness for ten days. He denied any head injuries except eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt on his own head for 20 days. An MRI revealed bilateral CSDH. The hematoma was isodense on the CT scan. We made burr-holes on the both sides under local anesthesia. We identified the neomembrane and dark red subdural fluid on both sides. In the postoperative CT scan, we found an arachnoid cyst on the left temporal pole. Although the arachnoid cyst itself is asymptomatic, trivial injury such as vibrating the head may cause a CSDH. PMID:24278662

  10. Traumatic pelvic hematoma after a military static-line parachute jump: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barbee, George A; Booms, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The authors report five cases of pelvic hematoma without associated pelvic fracture after military static-line parachute operations, a significantly underreported injury. The case reports and discussion include initial emergency department presentation, stabilization requirements, and imaging, disposition, and management recommendations. Data were collected retrospectively through review of medical records from a single institution over the course of a single calendar year, 2012-2013. Pelvic hematoma should be strongly considered in the patient with lower abdominal, hip, or pelvic pain after blunt injury from parachute landing fall even in the absence of associated fracture. The cases discussed display this underreported injury and highlight the frequent necessity for admission to a high-acuity care center for close monitoring. PMID:25344704

  11. Traumatic pelvic hematoma after a military static-line parachute jump: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barbee, George A; Booms, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The authors report five cases of pelvic hematoma without associated pelvic fracture after military static-line parachute operations, a significantly underreported injury. The case reports and discussion include initial emergency department presentation, stabilization requirements, and imaging, disposition, and management recommendations. Data were collected retrospectively through review of medical records from a single institution over the course of a single calendar year, 2012-2013. Pelvic hematoma should be strongly considered in the patient with lower abdominal, hip, or pelvic pain after blunt injury from parachute landing fall even in the absence of associated fracture. The cases discussed display this underreported injury and highlight the frequent necessity for admission to a high-acuity care center for close monitoring.

  12. Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis with Subsequent Pulmonary Thromboembolism: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min Kwak, Ho-Sung; Jin, Gong-Young; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2006-06-15

    A 38-year-old male was initially admitted for left leg swelling. He was diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left leg and a pulmonary thromboembolism by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) with delayed lower extremity CT. The DVT was treated by thrombolysis and a venous stent. Four hours later, he complained of severe back pain and a sensation of separation of his body and lower extremities; he experienced paraplegia early in the morning of the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal epidural hematoma between T11 and L2, which decompressed following surgery. We, therefore, report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma after thrombolysis in a case of DVT with a pulmonary thromboembolism.

  13. Spontaneous subdural hematoma and antiplatelet therapy: Does efficacy of Ticagrelor come with added risk?

    PubMed

    Suryanarayana Sharma, Pattanagere Manjunatha; Tekkatte Jagannatha, Aniruddha; Javali, Mahendra; Hegde, Anupama Venkatasubba; Mahale, Rohan; Madhusudhan; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy has established clinical benefit on cardiovascular outcome and has reduced the rates of re-infarction/in stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes. Major bleeding episodes can occur with antiplatelet therapy and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most feared complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Identification of high risk groups and judicious use of antiplatelet therapy reduces the bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is a newer P2Y12 receptor antagonist with established clinical benefit. However, risks of having an ICH with these newer molecules cannot be ignored. Here, we report a case of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma developing in a patient on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor. Early recognition, discontinuation of the medication and appropriate management resulted in resolution of hematoma and good clinical outcome. Authors have reviewed the antithrombotic drugs and their tendencies in causing intracranial bleeds from a neurophysicians perspective. PMID:26995425

  14. [Post-traumatic hematoma simulating a left-sided adrenal gland tumor].

    PubMed

    Will, C H; Hoeppener, H J; Beutler, W

    1990-01-01

    Typical signs of posttraumatic adrenal gland haematoma in computer-tomography are, besides an enlargement of the adrenal gland, a stripy infiltration of surrounding tissue and a thickening of the homolateral crus of the diaphragma, located primarily in the right adrenal gland. We report a case of an isolated enlargement of the left adrenal gland with normal surrounding tissue, which histologically proved to be a posttraumatic hematoma within the adrenal gland medulla.

  15. Time interval to surgery and outcomes following the surgical treatment of acute traumatic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Kwon, Churl-Su; Phillips, H Westley; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-12-01

    Although the pre-surgical management of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma prioritizes rapid transport to the operating room, there is conflicting evidence regarding the importance of time interval from injury to surgery with regards to outcomes. We sought to determine the association of surgical timing with outcomes for subdural hematoma. A retrospective review was performed of 522 consecutive patients admitted to a single center from 2006-2012 who underwent emergent craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma. After excluding patients with unknown time of injury, penetrating trauma, concurrent cerebrovascular injury, epidural hematoma, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL, there remained 45 patients identified for analysis. Using a multiple regression model, we examined the effect of surgical timing, in addition to other variables on in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), as well as the need for tracheostomy or gastrostomy (secondary outcome). We found that increasing injury severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.035-1.270; p=0.009) and age (OR1.066; 95%CI 1.006-1.129; p=0.031) were associated with in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis. In this model, increasing time to surgery was not associated with mortality, and in fact had a significant effect in decreasing mortality (OR 0.984; 95%CI 0.971-0.997; p=0.018). Premorbid aspirin use was associated with a paradoxical decrease in mortality (OR 0.019; 95%CI 0.001-0.392; p=0.010). In this patient sample, shorter time interval from injury to surgery was not associated with better outcomes. While there are potential confounding factors, these findings support the evaluation of rigorous preoperative resuscitation as a priority in future study. PMID:25065950

  16. No more Doritos and lobster tails: a case report of life-threatening sublingual hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Huma; Gilani, Javed M; Khan, Omar A

    2009-07-01

    This case report highlights a life-threatening complication of mild hemophilia A. We report the onset of airway compromise through a massive sublingual hematoma in a 67-year-old male suffering from the mild form of hemophilia A. This case emphasizes the need for prompt medical attention and recognition of potentially serious complications of the disease in patients suffering with even mild form of this bleeding diathesis. PMID:19902776

  17. [Retroperitoneal hematoma revealing a tumor of the inferior vena cava: about a case].

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Karim; Malki, Sidi Mohamed; Er-Raji, Ihssane; Derkaoui, Ali; Shimi, Abdelkrim; Khatouf, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the inferior vena cava are rare, their most common histology is represented by leiomyosarcoma. They have few specific clinical features, however, the literature does not report hemorrhagic manifestations. Preoperative diagnosis is based on tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); it is confirmed by histology. We report a case with retroperitoneal hematoma revealing a tumor of the inferior vena cava. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological findings. PMID:27642432

  18. Ultrasonographic evaluation of neck hematoma and block salvage after failed neurostimulation-guided interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stephen M; Unger, M W Todd; Colson, James D; Serafini, Mario

    2010-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthetic techniques have shown some advantages over conventional paresthesia and neurostimulation techniques. We report the case of a neurostimulation-guided continuous interscalene block that would have ended in complication were it not for experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Familiarity with ultrasound-guided block techniques permitted assessment of a neck hematoma during interscalene block and ultimately allowed successful peripheral nerve block.

  19. Ventricular tachycardia from intracardiac hematoma in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Solhpour, Amirreza; Ananaba-Ekeruo, Ijeoma; Memon, Nada B; Kantharia, Bharat K

    2014-01-01

    In the victims of motor vehicle accidents, unrecognized myocardial injuries may pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we present a case of a 17-year-old man who developed multiple ventricular premature complexes and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. We discuss significance of the electrocardiographic abnormalities in making an accurate diagnosis of cardiac hematoma and its management. PMID:24581106

  20. [Postoperative epidural hematoma remote from the site of craniotomy for STA-MCA anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Ohata, Hiroto; Yamada, Tadanori; Dohi, Shuji

    2008-06-01

    We experienced a case in which the cause of acute brain swelling following resection of dura matter could not be recognized until the postoperative CT scan. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of Moyamoya disease. Right hemiplegia developed a month before operation, so that the anti-platelet therapy was continued. At the end of dural resection the brain started to bulge and the brain swelling increased progressively. The patient was immediately placed on a head up position and received a rapid administration of mannitol for the treatment. The operator performed the echo examination for clarifying the cause of the brain swelling, but they could not find it. As the brain swelling slightly improved by the treatment, the surgery was performed continuously At the end of the operation the patient was moved for a CT scan and it showed mass effect caused by epidural hematoma over the left temporal region distant from the site of craniotomy. Evacuation of the hematoma was carried out urgently. At discharge, she was conscious and had no focal neurological deficits. The occurrence of the epidural hematoma is one of the reasons for unknown brain swelling during surgery. We strongly recommend that any sudden deterioration during the operation should be treated with emergency CT scan. PMID:18546910

  1. Rare complication after a transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a giant retroperitoneal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Chiancone, Francesco; Mirone, Vincenzo; Fedelini, Maurizio; Meccariello, Clemente; Pucci, Luigi; Carrino, Maurizio; Fedelini, Paolo

    2016-05-24

    Common complications related to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic needle biopsy are hematuria, hematospermia, and hematochezia. To the best of our knowledge, we report the second case of a very large hematoma extending from the pelvis into the retroperitoneal space in literature.A 66-year-old man with a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5.4 ng/ml was admitted to our department for a TRUS-guided prostatic needle biopsy. Laboratory values on the day before biopsy, including coagulation studies, were all normal. The patients did not take any anticoagulant drugs. No immediate complications were encountered. Nevertheless, 7 hours after the biopsy, the patient reached our emergency department with severe diffuse abdominal pain, hypotension, tachycardia, and confusional state. He underwent an ultrasonography and then a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed "a blood collection in the pelvis that extending to the lower pole of left kidney associated with a focus of active contrast extravasation, indicating active ongoing prostate bleeding." Consequently, he underwent a diagnostic angiography that showed no more contrast extravasation, without the need of embolization. Management of hematoma has been conservative and hematoma was completely reabsorbed 4 months later.

  2. Spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma in type 2B von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Eichele, Derrick D; Ross, Meredith; Tang, Patrick; Hutchins, Grant F; Mailliard, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Intramural duodenal hematoma is a rare cause of a proximal gastrointestinal tract obstruction. Presentation of intramural duodenal hematoma most often occurs following blunt abdominal trauma in children, but spontaneous non-traumatic cases have been linked to anticoagulant therapy, pancreatitis, malignancy, vasculitis and endoscopy. We report an unusual case of spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma presenting as an intestinal obstruction associated with acute pancreatitis in a patient with established von Willebrand disease, type 2B. The patient presented with abrupt onset of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography imaging identified an intramural duodenal mass consistent with blood measuring 4.7 cm × 8.7 cm in the second portion of the duodenum abutting on the head of the pancreas. Serum lipase was 3828 units/L. Patient was managed conservatively with bowel rest, continuous nasogastric decompression, total parenteral nutrition, recombinant factor VIII (humateP) and transfusion. Symptoms resolved over the course of the hospitalization. This case highlights an important complication of an inherited coagulopathy. PMID:24222967

  3. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Therapeutic Strategies and Outcomes of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Koichi; MIMA, Tatsuo; AKIBA, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has increasingly been recognized, and it is well known that SIH is sometimes complicated by chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, 55 cases of SIH with SDH were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on therapeutic strategies and outcomes. Of 169 SIH cases (75 males, 84 females), 55 (36 males, 19 females) were complicated by SDH. SIH was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, neuroimaging, and/or low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Presence of orthostatic headache and diffuse meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging were regarded as the most important criteria. Among 55 SIH with SDH cases, 13 improved with conservative treatment, 25 initially received an epidural blood patch (EBP), and 17 initially underwent irrigation of the hematomas. Of the 25 initially treated with EBP, 7 (28.0%) needed SDH surgery and 18 (72.0%) recovered fully without surgery. Of 17 SDH cases initially treated with surgery, 6 (35.7%) required no EBP therapy and the other 11 (64.3%) needed EBP and/or additional SDH operations. In the latter group, 2 cases had transient severe complications during and after the procedures. One of these 2 cases developed a hoarse voice complication. Despite this single, non-severe complication, all enrolled in this study achieved good outcomes. The present study suggests that patients initially receiving SDH surgery may need additional treatments and may occasionally have complications. If conservative treatment is insufficient, EBP should be performed prior to hematoma irrigation. PMID:26489406

  4. Acute carotid artery dissection treated with stenting and hematoma aspiration guided by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liming; Zha, Changsong; Liu, Hao; Xu, Jianjun; Xiang, Yuexia; Zou, Zhongmin

    2013-10-01

    We report the successful treatment of dissection with stenosis of the carotid artery by stenting and aspiration of hematoma. A male patient, presenting with acute blurred vision and weakness and numbness of the right side of his body, was diagnosed with common carotid artery (CCA) dissection and severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery and CCA by digital subtraction arteriography and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU). Two stents were separately implanted into the left internal carotid artery and CCA to restore blood flow and seal the opening of the dissection. The hematoma inside the CCA dissection was transcutaneously aspirated under CDU guidance after thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator. Three days after the operation, the dissection was still sealed. The patient was discharged 1 week later without any signs or symptoms. Follow-up examination at 70 days confirmed complete healing of the CCA dissection. Transcutaneous intradissection hematoma aspiration with CDU guidance may be applicable in treating arterial dissection, especially when conservative treatments cannot be expected to improve severe flow disturbances. PMID:22941665

  5. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma management with minimally invasive surgery through tubular retractors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chao-Feng; Zhuang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Cai, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhao, Wei; Ahmada, Said Idrissa; Devi, Ramparsad Doorga; Kibria, Md Golam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To report a minimally invasive paraspinal approach in the treatment of a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). We additionally aim to review the relevant literature to enhance our knowledge of this disease. SSEH is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic disease. Currently, most appropriate management is emergence decompression laminectomy and hematoma evacuation. An 81-year-old woman was admitted to the neurology department with a chief complaint of bilateral numbness and weakness of the lower limbs and difficulty walking for 4 days with progressive weakness developed over the following 3 days accompanied with pain in the lower limbs and lower back. No history of trauma was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spine demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from T-12 to L-5 with thecal sac and cauda equina displacement anterior. The patient was treated in our department with a minimally invasive approach. This operation method had been approved by Chinese Independent Ethics Committee. Three months following the operation, the patient had regained the ability to walk with the aid of a cane and myodynamia tests revealed normal results for the left lower limb and a 4/5 grade for the right limb. Importantly, no complications were exhibited from the surgical operation. The minimally invasive paraspinal approach through tubular retractors is demonstrated here as an effective alternative method for the treatment of SSEH. PMID:27367986

  6. [A case of acute intracranial epidural hematoma caused by chronic nasal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kazunori; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial acute epidural hematoma(EDH)is rare. It is mostly caused by coagulation disorders, dural metastasis, or vascular malformations of the dura. We report a case of non-traumatic acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis and review the literature comprising 10 cases of acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis. A 16-year-old boy visited our outpatient clinic with a 2-day history of severe headache. He did not have fever or neurological abnormalities and showed no evidence of head trauma. Cranial computed tomography(CT)revealed sphenoid sinusitis and a small amount of epidural air in the middle fossa, but no other intracranial abnormalities. After eight days with no subsequent history of trauma, radiological exams showed a massive acute epidural hematoma in the left middle fossa and temporal convexity without any vascular lesion or skull fracture. The patient underwent a hematoma evacuation that revealed neither a skull fracture nor a vascular abnormality. In this adolescent, chronic nasal sinusitis caused fragility of the meningeal artery wall, an air collection in the epidural space, and the detachment of the dura mater from the inner surface of the skull, thereby resulting in a non-traumatic acute EDH.

  7. Prefectural difference in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage incidence in Japan analyzed with publically accessible diagnosis procedure combination data: possibilities and limitations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Annually reported, publically accessible Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) data from the Japanese government is a part of the total DPC database of the Japanese medical reimbursement system for hospitalization. Although medical issues can be evaluated with these data promptly, the applicability of these data in epidemiological analyses has not been assessed. METHODS: We performed analyses using only statistical indices reported on the a government website. As a preliminary step, the prefectural consistency of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) was examined with prefectural mortality over 20 years. Then the prefectural incidence of sICH for four years was calculated, utilizing publically accessible DPC data. To determine its reliability, the consistency was examined, and correlations were analyzed with three prefectural factors expected to have an effect: the elderly rate, mortality due to sICH, and the non-DPC bed rate. In addition, a comparison model between prefectures with this method was developed by analyzing other prefecture-specific factors. RESULTS: Prefectural mortality due to sICH and prefectural sICH incidence in the DPC database were both consistent over the years. Prefectural sICH incidence had a constant positive correlation with the elderly rate, a partial correlation with mortality due to sICH, but no correlation with the non-DPC bed rate, which is one of the major biases when utilizing the DPC database. In the comparison model, the factors of low income and alcohol consumption showed increased sICH incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Although careful attention to its limitations is required, publically accessible DPC data will provide insights into epidemiological issues. PMID:27384329

  8. Onychomycosis Due to Nondermatophytic Molds

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Min; Ha, Gyoung Yim

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there have been many studies about onychomycosis due to nondermatophytic molds (NDM), few studies about etiologic agents including NDM in onychomycosis have been reported in Korea. Objective: This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Objective This study investigated onychomycosis due to NDM in the Gyeongju area of Korea. Methods In the 10-year period from 1999~2009, we reviewed 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM. The etiologic agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. In some cases, internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis was done. NDM isolated considered pathogens when the presence of fungal elements was identified by direct microscopy observation and in follow-up cultures yielding the same fungi. Results Onychomycosis due to NDM comprised 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 patients with onychomycosis due to NDM, 84.7% were toenail onychomycosis and 15.3% were fingernail onychomycosis. The incidence rate was highest in the fifth decade (27.1%). The ratio of male to female patients was 1:1.6. The frequency of associated diseases, in descending order, was hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cerebral hematoma. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (86.4%) was the most common clinical type of onychomycosis. Aspergillus spp. was the most frequently isolated etiologic agent of onychomycosis due to NDM (83.0%). Other causative agents were Scopulariopsis brevicaulis (10.2%), Acremonium spp. (3.4%), Fusarium solani (1.7%), and Chaetomium globosum (1.7%). Conclusion Because of the increase in onychomycosis due to NDM, we suggest the need of a careful mycological examination in patients with onychomycosis. PMID:22577268

  9. Magnetoencephalographic representation of the sensorimotor hand area in cases of intracerebral tumour

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, M; Fukuda, M; Kameyama, S; Kawaguchi, T; Masuda, H; Tanaka, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in localising the primary hand motor area and evaluating cortical distortion of the sensorimotor cortices in patients with intracerebral tumour. Methods: 10 normal volunteers (controls) and 14 patients with an intracerebral tumour located around the central region were studied. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) following median nerve stimulation, and movement related cerebral magnetic fields (MRCFs) following index finger extension, were measured in all subjects and analysed by the equivalent current dipole (ECD) method to ascertain the neuronal sources of the primary sensory and motor components (N20m and MF, respectively). These ECD locations were defined as the primary hand sensory and motor areas and the positional relations between these two functional areas in controls and patients were investigated. Results: The standard range of ECD locations of MF to N20m was determined in controls. In 11 of the 14 patients, MRCFs could identify the primary motor hand area. ECD locations of MF were significantly closer to the N20m in the medial-lateral direction in patients than in controls. In patients with a tumour located below the sensorimotor hand area, relative ECD locations of MF to N20m moved anteriorly over the standard range determined in the control subjects. These MEG findings correlated well with radiological tumour locations. The mean estimated ECD strength of MF was significantly lower in patients than in controls. Conclusions: MRCF was useful in localising the primary motor hand area in patients with intracerebral tumour. The relative ECD locations of MF to N20m describe the anatomical distortion of the sensorimotor cortex. PMID:14638884

  10. Neuronal generators of the visual evoked potentials: intracerebral recording in awake humans.

    PubMed

    Ducati, A; Fava, E; Motti, E D

    1988-01-01

    Flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potentials were recorded in awake patients undergoing stereotactic procedures for severe dyskinetic disorders resistant to medical treatment. The nucleus ventralis lateralis thalami was reached via an occipital approach. VEPs were recorded on the scalp at the entrance of the intracerebral electrode, and serially from sites at different depths. A polarity reversal of the surface recorded wave form took place as the intracerebral electrode was advanced beneath the surface cortical layers. As concerns F-VEPs, most of the scalp activity mirrored the potentials recorded down to the depth of 70-65 mm from the thalamus. The largest amplitude of intracerebral F-VEPs was obtained from recording sites at 50-70 mm from the thalamus, i.e., in the depth of the calcarine fissure. A negative wave, peaking around 47-50 msec, became evident in recording sites at 30-40 mm from the thalamus but vanished as the electrode was advanced farther. In only one patient could we record a small negative wave, peaking at 33 msec, in the vicinity of the corpus geniculatum externum. Furthermore, the oscillatory activity recorded from the scalp appeared to be generated in the cortical layers. PR-VEPs also underwent polarity reversal as the electrode traversed the cortex. PR-VEPs disappeared more superficially than F-VEPs. No PR-evoked activity could be recorded in the vicinity of the corpus geniculatum externum. We conclude that slow and fast components of VEPs recorded from the scalp are entirely generated in cortical layers.

  11. A nude rat model for neutron capture therapy of human intracerebral melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.F.; Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Staubus, A.E.; Soloway, A.H.; Moeschberger, M.L. ); Coderre, J.A. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1994-03-30

    The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for intracerebral melanoma using nude rats, the human melanoma cell line MRA 27, and boronophenylalanine as the capture agent. MRA 27 cells (2 [times] 10[sup 5]) were implanted intracerebrally, and 30 days later, 120 mg of [sup 10]B-L-BPA were injected intraperitoneally into nude rats. Thirty days following implantation, tumor bearing rats were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. Six hours following administration of BPA, tumor, blood, and normal brain boron-10 levels were 23.7, 9.4, and 8.4 [mu]g/g respectively. Median survival time of untreated rats was 44 days compared to 76 days and 93 days for those receiving physical doses of 2.73 Gy and 3.64 Gy, respectively. Rats that have received both [sup 10]B-BPA and physical doses of 1.82, 2.73, or 3.64 Gy had median survival times of 170, 182, and 262 days, respectively. Forty percent of rats that had received the highest tumor dose (10.1 Gy) survived for > 300 days and in a replicate experiment 21% of the rats were longterm survivors (>220 days). Animals that received 12 Gy in a single dose or 18 Gy fractionated (2 Gy [times] 9) of gamma photons from a [sup 137]Cs source had median survival times of 86 and 79 days, respectively, compared to 47 days for untreated animals. Histopathologic examination of the brains of longterm surviving rats, euthanized at 8 or 16 months following BNCT, showed no residual tumor, but dense accumulations of melanin laden macrophages and minimal gliosis were observed. Significant prolongations in median survival time were noted in nude rats with intracerebral human melanoma that had received BNCT, thereby suggesting therapeutic efficacy. Large animal studies should be carried out to further assess BNCT of intracerebral melanoma before any human trials are contemplated. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Elucidation of the role of biological factors and device design in cerebral NIRS using an in vivo hematoma model based on high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Huang, Stanley; Myers, Matthew; Chen, Yu; Welle, Cristin; Pfefer, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging medical countermeasure for rapid, field detection of hematomas caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Bench and animal tests to determine NIRS sensitivity and specificity are needed. However, current animal models involving non-invasively induced, localized neural damage are limited. We investigated an in vivo murine hematoma model in which cerebral hemorrhage was induced noninvasively by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with calibrated positioning and parameters. To characterize the morphology of induced hematomas, we used skull-intact histological evaluation. A multi-wavelength fiber-optic NIRS system with three source-detector separation distances was used to detect hematoma A 1.1 MHz transducer produced consistent small-to-medium hematoma localized to a single hemisphere, along with bruising of the scalp, with a low mortality rate. A 220 kHz transducer produced larger, more diffuse hematomas, with higher variability in size and a correspondingly higher mortality rate. No skin bruising or blood accumulation between the skin and skull was observed following injury application with the 220 kHz transducer. Histological analysis showed higher sensitivity for larger hematomas (>4x4 mm2). NIRS optical density change after HIFU was able to detect all hematomas, with sensitivity dependent on wavelength and separation distance. While improvements in methods for validating cerebral blood distribution are needed, the HIFU hematoma model provided useful insights that will inform development of biologically relevant, performance test methods for cerebral NIRS systems.

  13. Relationship between Interleukin-6 (−174G/C and −572C/G) Promoter Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Misra, Shubham; Kumar Yadav, Arun; Kumar, Amit; Sriwastva, Mukesh; Prasad, Kameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of −174G/C and −572C/G in the Interleukin-6 (IL-6) promoter gene can affect both transcription and secretion of IL-6 and may be involved in the inflammatory mechanisms in early and delayed phases after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The role of these polymorphisms remains unclear for the pathogenesis of ICH. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE and Google Scholar searches were conducted from January 1, 1950 to February 29, 2016 and were supplemented with relevant articles identified in the references. The following search terms were used: (‘interleukin-6’ or ‘IL-6’) and (‘genetic polymorphism’ or ‘single nucleotide polymorphisms’ or ‘SNP’) and (‘intracerebral hemorrhage’ or ‘ICH’) and (‘hemorrhagic stroke’ or ‘HS’). Fixed or random effects models were used to estimate the pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Begg's funnel plot was used to assess the potential for publication bias. Results In our meta-analysis, three case-control studies involving 446 ICH cases and 2,322 controls were included. No significant association was observed for the IL-6 (-174G/C and −572C/G) gene polymorphisms with the risk of ICH under dominant, recessive and allelic models. Conclusion Our meta-analysis suggests that IL-6 gene polymorphisms are not associated with the risk of ICH. However, caution must be taken while considering the results of our meta-analysis due to the presence of small sample size. Our results cannot be extrapolated to represent the effect of entire IL-6 genetic polymorphism on stroke patients worldwide. Therefore, further well-designed studies with large sample size are warranted to validate our findings and provide a profound conclusion. PMID:27752477

  14. Complementary role of CT and In-111 leukocyte scans in the diagnosis of infected hematoma and thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Floyd, W.; Raval, B.; Sandler, C.; Gobuty, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with traumatic hematomas or those with indwelling catheters who subsequently develop fever and sepsis without clinical localizing signs to indicate an inflammatory focus can present a diagnostic dilemma. Early diagnosis of an infected hematoma or thrombus is important to optimal management. CT can provide, exquisite delineation of anatomy identifying and localizing a post-traumatic fluid collection but cannot reliably distinguish hematoma from abscess in all cases. A thrombus at a catheter tip may be too small to be resolved; when identified, the question of infection again remains. In-111 leukocyte scanning provides a method for identifying or ruling out infection in these situations. The authors performed In-111 leukocyte scans on 15 patients with indwelling catheters. Five of these patients were febrile with positive blood cultures. In-111 leukocyte scans showed positive findings in 8 patients: 5 showed surgically confirmed infected hematomas in the abdomen (3 in the pelvis, 1 in a kidney, 1 in the splenic bed), and 3 showed infected thrombosis in catheter tips. The authors conclude that CT scanning and In-111 leukocyte scanning play complementary roles in the evaluation of traumatic hematomas and thrombosis, the former providing precise anatomic delineation and the latter providing evidence of inflammation.

  15. Functional outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage - a review of the potential role of antiapoptotic agents.

    PubMed

    Salihu, Abubakar Tijjani; Muthuraju, Sangu; Idris, Zamzuri; Izaini Ghani, Abdul Rahman; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the second most common form of stroke and is associated with greater mortality and morbidity compared with ischaemic stroke. The current ICH management strategies, which mainly target primary injury mechanisms, have not been shown to improve patient's functional outcome. Consequently, multimodality treatment approaches that will focus on both primary and secondary pathophysiology have been suggested. During the last decade, a proliferation of experimental studies has demonstrated the role of apoptosis in secondary neuronal loss at the periphery of the clot after ICH. Subsequently, the value of certain antiapoptotic agents in reducing neuronal death and improving functional outcome following ICH was evaluated in animal models. Preliminary evidence from those studies strongly supports the potential role of antiapoptotic agents in reducing neuronal death and improving functional outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Expectedly, the ongoing and subsequent clinical trials will substantiate these findings and provide clear information on the most potent and safe antiapoptotic agents, their appropriate dosage, and temporal window of action, thereby making them suitable for the multimodality treatment approach. PMID:26641962

  16. Endothelial depletion of murine SRF/MRTF provokes intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Castaneda Vega, Salvador; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Calaminus, Carsten; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mauel, Susanne; Breithaupt, Angele; Gruber, Achim D.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Olson, Eric N.; Adams, Ralf H.; Pichler, Bernd J.; Nordheim, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke and vascular dementia are age- and hypertension-associated manifestations of human cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Cerebral microvessels are formed by endothelial cells (ECs), which are connected through tight junctions, adherens junctions, and stabilizing basement membrane structures. These endothelial connections ensure both vessel stability and blood–brain barrier (BBB) functions, the latter enabling selective exchange of ions, bioactive molecules, and cells between the bloodstream and brain tissue. SrfiECKO mice, permitting conditional EC-specific depletion of the transcription factor Serum Response Factor (SRF), suffer from loss of BBB integrity and intracerebral hemorrhaging. Cerebral microbleeds and larger hemorrhages developed upon postnatal and adult depletion of either SRF or its cofactors Myocardin Related Transcription Factor (MRTF-A/-B), revealing essential requirements of ongoing SRF/MRTF activity for maintenance of cerebral small vessel integrity. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging allowed detection, localization, and time-resolved quantification of BBB permeability and hemorrhage formation in SrfiECKO brains. At the molecular level, direct and indirect SRF/MRTF target genes, encoding structural components of tight junctions (Claudins and ZO proteins), adherens junctions (VE-cadherin, α-Actinin), and the basement membrane (Collagen IV), were down-regulated upon SRF depletion. These results identify SRF and its MRTF cofactors as major transcriptional regulators of EC junctional stability, guaranteeing physiological functions of the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesize that impairments in SRF/MRTF activity contribute to human SVD pathology. PMID:26221020

  17. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Hervé; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors. PMID:24733699

  18. Longitudinal quantification and visualization of intracerebral hemorrhage using multimodal magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goh, S.Y. Matthew; Irimia, Andrei; Torgerson, Carinna M.; Tubi, Meral A.; Real, Courtney R.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Martin, Neil A.; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate a set of approaches using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography whereby pathology-affected white matter (WM) fibers in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can be selectively visualized. Methods Using structural neuroimaging and DTI volumes acquired longitudinally from three representative ICH patients, the spatial configuration of ICH-related trauma is delineated and the WM fiber bundles intersecting each ICH lesion are identified and visualized. Both the extent of ICH lesions as well as the proportion of WM fibers intersecting the ICH pathology are quantified and compared across subjects. Results Our method successfully demonstrates longitudinal volumetric differences in ICH lesion load and differences across time in percentage of fibers which intersect the primary injury. Conclusions Because neurological conditions such as intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) frequently exhibit pathology-related effects which lead to the exertion of mechanical pressure upon surrounding tissues, and thereby to the deformation and/or displacement of WM fibers, DTI fiber tractography is highly suitable for assessing longitudinal changes in WM fiber integrity and mechanical displacement. PMID:25518865

  19. Right hemispheric dominance of visual phenomena evoked by intracerebral stimulation of the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Koessler, Laurent; Vespignani, Hervé; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Electrical brain stimulation can provide important information about the functional organization of the human visual cortex. Here, we report the visual phenomena evoked by a large number (562) of intracerebral electrical stimulations performed at low-intensity with depth electrodes implanted in the occipito-parieto-temporal cortex of 22 epileptic patients. Focal electrical stimulation evoked primarily visual hallucinations with various complexities: simple (spot or blob), intermediary (geometric forms), or complex meaningful shapes (faces); visual illusions and impairments of visual recognition were more rarely observed. With the exception of the most posterior cortical sites, the probability of evoking a visual phenomenon was significantly higher in the right than the left hemisphere. Intermediary and complex hallucinations, illusions, and visual recognition impairments were almost exclusively evoked by stimulation in the right hemisphere. The probability of evoking a visual phenomenon decreased substantially from the occipital pole to the most anterior sites of the temporal lobe, and this decrease was more pronounced in the left hemisphere. The greater sensitivity of the right occipito-parieto-temporal regions to intracerebral electrical stimulation to evoke visual phenomena supports a predominant role of right hemispheric visual areas from perception to recognition of visual forms, regardless of visuospatial and attentional factors.

  20. Skilled reaching training promotes astroglial changes and facilitated sensorimotor recovery after collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mestriner, R G; Pagnussat, A S; Boisserand, L S B; Valentim, L; Netto, C A

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating type of stroke and a leading cause of disability and mortality worldwide. Although rehabilitation improves recovery after ICH the cellular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We decided to examine if skilled (SK) and unskilled (US) training after sham or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) surgeries would induce GFAP+ astrocytic changes and whether these modifications can be associated with functional improvement. A 4-week course of motor training, involving either skilled and unskilled training began seven days after surgery; sensorimotor recovery was evaluated using Staircase, ladder walk and cylinder tests. Histological and morphometric analyses were used to assess GFAP+ cell bilaterally in forelimb sensorimotor cortex and dorsolateral striatum. All behavioral tests showed that ICH-SK rats experienced a greater degree of recovery when compared to ICH no task or ICH-US groups; no behavioral differences were found among all sham groups. Astrocytic density was increased in all analyzed structures for ICH no task, ICH-SK and ICH-US rats. Morphological analysis revealed an increased number of primary processes in ipsilateral (to lesion) sensorimotor cortex for all ICH groups. Present results also revealed that both ICH and SK induced an increased length of GFAP+ primary process; there was a further increase in length processes for ICH-SK group in sensorimotor cortex and ipsilateral striatum. We suggest that skilled reaching is an effective intervention to promote astrocytic plasticity and recovery after ICH. PMID:20850433

  1. Prediction of the incidence of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage from meteorological data.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Akira; Teraoka, Akira

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed the relationship between the incidence of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and various meteorological data (daily atmospheric air pressure, air temperature, precipitation, humidity, presence of typhoons, occurrence of the rainy season, wind velocity, and wind direction) for patients at Teraoka Memorial Hospital in Shin-ichi Town, Japan, from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2003. All data were analyzed by contingency table analysis and multivariate regression analysis. From January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003, we identified high-risk ICH days as those days for which the preceding 3 days mean recorded air pressure of 1,015 hPa or more and then conducted a statistical comparison of the incidence of ICH on high-risk ICH days with that on the other days. Our subjects were 164 patients with ICH. The relative risk of high-risk ICH days is 1.46 (Fisher's exact test, p=0.04). Mann-Whitney's U-tests indicate ICH tends to occur on days with lower maximum air temperature. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that 3 incidences influence the occurrence of intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.01 each): (1) days associated with 4-day periods of mean air pressure in excess of 1,015 hPa; (2) days during which a typhoon was approaching; and (3) days with west or southwest wind . Detailed examination of meteorological data indicates a relationship with the incident rate of ICH.

  2. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II) set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/). This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967 PMID:23171588

  3. Thalamic Reorganization in Chronic Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Kim, Seong Ho; Jung, Young Jin; Hong, Ji Heon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate changes of synaptic area of the spinothalamic tract and its thalamocortical pathway (STT) in the thalamus in chronic patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Twenty four patients with a lesion in the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) of the thalamus following putaminal hemorrhage were recruited for this study. The subscale for tactile sensation of the Nottingham Sensory Assessment (NSA) was used for the determination of somatosensory function. Diffusion tensor tractography of the STT was reconstructed using the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Software Library. We classified patients according to 2 groups: the VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in the VPL; and the non-VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in other thalamic areas, except for the VPL. Thirteen patients belonged to the VPL group, and 8 patients belonged to the non-VPL group. Three patients were excluded from grouping due to interrupted integrity of the STTs. The tactile sensation score of the NSA in the non-VPL group (10.50 ± 0.93) was significantly decreased compared with that of the VPL group (19.45 ± 1.33) (P < 0.05). We found that 2 types of patient had recovered via the VPL area or other areas of the STT. It appears that patients who showed shifting of the thalamic synaptic area of the STT might have recovered by the process of thalamic reorganization following thalamic injury. In addition, thalamic reorganization appears to be related to poorer somatosensory outcome. PMID:26313781

  4. Multiple Intracerebral Hemorrhages in an Old Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Ştefănescu, V; Traşcă, Daniela; Şerban-Pereţeanu, Adelina; Chicoş, B; Cojocaru, M

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old Caucasian man was admitted in the Department of Neurology for visual disturbances, started two days before. The next day the patient experienced headache, fever and gait disturbances. He had hypertension, diabetes mellitus, an ischemic stroke 13 years ago, longstanding seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (17 years), polynodular goiter, right ischio-pubian fracture and right femoral vein thrombosis a year ago due to a car accident, since he is treated with oral anticoagulants associated to antiaggregant, hypotensors, statin and oral antidiabetics. The neurologic examination had evidenced nuchal rigidity, left homonymous hemianopsia, left central facial palsy, ataxia of the inferior limbs with wide-based gait, achilean reflexes abolished bilaterally, bilaterally abolished plantar reflexes, ideomotor apraxia, dysarthria, hypoprosexia, and preserved consciousness patient. A non-contrast cerebral CT scan had shown right temporal and parieto-occipital intraparenchymatous hemorrhages, a right frontal sequelar lesion, multiple old lacunar infarets, cortical atrophy. Laboratory findings included an inflammatory syndrome, absence of rheumatoid arthritis positive serology, normal coagulogram, an elevated proteinuria. The cerebral IRM performed on the seventh day of hospitalisation was suggestive for subacute right parietal hemorrhage, old cerebral infarction in the right anterior cerebral artery area, old lacunar infarcts and cerebral atrophy. The anticoagulant and antiaggregant treatment was stopped after a generalized tonic-clonic seizure occurred. Antiedematous, hypotensor, anticonvulsivant, beta-blocker, and symptomatic treatment was started, while the antidiabetic treatment was continued. All symptoms remitted. Arguments for amyloid angiopathy in our patient are previous non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke and a chronic inflammatory disease- rheumatoid arthritis in his personal medical history. PMID:26939215

  5. Protective role of free and quercetin-loaded nanoemulsion against damage induced by intracerebral haemorrhage in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galho, A. R.; Cordeiro, M. F.; Ribeiro, S. A.; Marques, M. S.; Antunes, M. F. D.; Luz, D. C.; Hädrich, G.; Muccillo-Baisch, A. L.; Barros, D. M.; Lima, J. V.; Dora, C. L.; Horn, A. P.

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a worldwide public health problem. Experimental studies have shown that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ICH and could represent a target for its treatment. However, the blood-brain barrier is an obstacle to be overcome, as it hampers the administration of compounds to the central nervous system. In this study, we compared the effects of a quercetin-loaded nanoemulsion (QU-N) with the free form of the drug (QU-SP) in a collagenase-induced ICH rat model. Quercetin (QU) is a polyphenol that has an antioxidant effect in vitro, but due to its high lipophilicity, it has low bioavailability in vivo. In this study, animals submitted or not to ICH were treated with a single intraperitoneal QU dose (free or nanoemulsion) of 30 mg kg-1. Motor assessment was evaluated by the open field, foot fault and beam walking behavioural tests. 72 h after surgery the haematoma size was evaluated and biochemical measurements were performed. Animals treated with QU-N had a significant improvement in the beam walking and open field tests. Also, QU-N was able to reduce the size of the haematoma, preserving the activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST), increasing GSH content, and the total antioxidant capacity. QU-SP recovered locomotor activity and increased the GSH content and the total antioxidant capacity. Thus, it can be observed that QU presented antioxidant activity in both formulations, but the incorporation into nanoemulsions increased its antioxidant effect, which was reflected in the improvement of the motor skills and in the haematoma size decrement. These results suggest that the nanoemulsion containing QU developed in this study could be promising for future studies on treatments for ICH.

  6. Protective role of free and quercetin-loaded nanoemulsion against damage induced by intracerebral haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Galho, A R; Cordeiro, M F; Ribeiro, S A; Marques, M S; Antunes, M F D; Luz, D C; Hädrich, G; Muccillo-Baisch, A L; Barros, D M; Lima, J V; Dora, C L; Horn, A P

    2016-04-29

    Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a worldwide public health problem. Experimental studies have shown that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ICH and could represent a target for its treatment. However, the blood-brain barrier is an obstacle to be overcome, as it hampers the administration of compounds to the central nervous system. In this study, we compared the effects of a quercetin-loaded nanoemulsion (QU-N) with the free form of the drug (QU-SP) in a collagenase-induced ICH rat model. Quercetin (QU) is a polyphenol that has an antioxidant effect in vitro, but due to its high lipophilicity, it has low bioavailability in vivo. In this study, animals submitted or not to ICH were treated with a single intraperitoneal QU dose (free or nanoemulsion) of 30 mg kg(-1). Motor assessment was evaluated by the open field, foot fault and beam walking behavioural tests. 72 h after surgery the haematoma size was evaluated and biochemical measurements were performed. Animals treated with QU-N had a significant improvement in the beam walking and open field tests. Also, QU-N was able to reduce the size of the haematoma, preserving the activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST), increasing GSH content, and the total antioxidant capacity. QU-SP recovered locomotor activity and increased the GSH content and the total antioxidant capacity. Thus, it can be observed that QU presented antioxidant activity in both formulations, but the incorporation into nanoemulsions increased its antioxidant effect, which was reflected in the improvement of the motor skills and in the haematoma size decrement. These results suggest that the nanoemulsion containing QU developed in this study could be promising for future studies on treatments for ICH. PMID:26965041

  7. Upper Airway Hematoma Secondary to Warfarin Therapy: A Systematic Review of Reported Cases

    PubMed Central

    Karmacharya, Paras; Pathak, Ranjan; Ghimire, Sailu; Shrestha, Pragya; Ghimire, Sushil; Poudel, Dilli Ram; Khanal, Raju; Shah, Shirin; Aryal, Madan Raj; Alweis, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Upper airway hematoma (UAH) is a rare but life-threatening complication of oral anticoagulants requiring early recognition. However, no consensus exists regarding the best approach to treatment. We therefore, sought to systematically review the published literature on UAH to elaborate its demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, complications, and outcomes. A systematic electronic search of PubMed and EMBASE for case reports, case series, and related articles of UAH related to warfarin published from inception (November 1950) to March 2015 was carried out. Categorical variables were expressed as percentage and continuous variables as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. All cases were reported to have UAH as a complication of anticoagulation therapy with warfarin. Demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, complications and outcomes of UAH were studied. Thirty-eight cases of UAH were identified from 34 reports in the literature. No gender preponderance (male = 52.78%) was seen and the average age of presentation was 60.11 ± 12.50 years. Dysphagia, sore throat, and neck swelling were the most common symptoms and the mean international normalized ratio (INR)at presentation was 8.07 ± 4.04. Most cases had sublingual hematoma (66.57%) followed by retropharyngeal hematoma (27.03%). Of the cases, 48.65% were managed conservatively while the rest underwent either cricothyrotomy or intubation with the time to resolution being 7.69 ± 5.44 days. UAH is a rare butpotentially serious complication of warfarin therapy. It is more common in the elderly population with supratherapeutic INR; inciting events were present in many cases. Overall, it has a good prognosis with significant morbidity present only if concomitant respiratory compromise is present. Reversal of anticoagulation with low threshold for artificial airway placement in the event of airway

  8. Intramural Hematoma of the Thoracic Aorta as a Form of Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Pukacki, Fryderyk; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Waclaw

    2007-09-15

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the thoracic aorta is a complication with unknown etiology and a poorly predictable prognosis. There is also considerable controversy about the management and prognosis of IMH as well as the treatment. We present two cases of endovascular treatment of IMH with stent-graft placement. On the basis of references, we discuss risks of progression of the given pathology and possible complications. Despite the lack of uniform opinion about the management of this disorder, we present our observations of and experiences with endovascular treatment of IMH of the thoracic aorta.

  9. Pin-site epidural hematoma: A catastrophic complication of cranial fixation in a child

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Prasad; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Kartikueyan, Rajaraman; Patel, Sachinkumar Maheshbhai

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fixation with pins is a routine adjunct in neurosurgery and is usually considered safe. A rarely reported complication is skull fracture at the pin site and consequent epidural hematoma. Usually, these are picked up only postoperatively and rarely, intraoperatively if there is unexplained “brain bulge” in which case the operation should be terminated and urgent imaging has to be done. We describe such a complication that occurred while operating on a 12-year-old child with a posterior fossa tumor and review the available literature dealing with such events. PMID:27114664

  10. Dialysis-induced Subdural Hematoma in an Arachnoid Cyst Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a neurological complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although an AC can increase the risk of a subdural hematoma, the clinical presentation of bleeding into an AC associated with ADPKD is not well known. We herein report the case of a 59-year-old woman in whom the initiation of hemodialysis for renal failure led to AC bleeding. A change of anticoagulant from heparin to nafamostat mesilate allowed dialysis to continue without rebleeding. These findings suggest that hemodialysis in patients with an AC associated with ADPKD may increase the risk of bleeding. Nafamostat mesilate may be useful in such cases. PMID:27477416

  11. [Acute Subdural Hematoma in Snowboarders:A Multivariate Analysis of 79 Cases].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinya; Fukuda, Osamu; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Snowboarding-related head injuries have become less common as the number of snowboarders has decreased;however, severe head injuries, such as acute subdural hematomas, occur every snowboarding season. We investigated the characteristics of cases of snowboarding-related acute subdural hematoma treated at our hospital. A total of 3,632 patients with snowboarding-related head injuries seen at our hospital between the 1995/96 and 2012/13 snowboarding seasons were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine(2.2%)patients were diagnosed with acute subdural hematomas using computed tomography. We statistically analyzed the patient questionnaire responses, clinical records, and radiological findings. We compared the findings of the acute subdural hematoma(ASDH)group with those of the non-ASDH group. Among beginners, falling on a slope, incidents involving gentle slopes, and injuries of unknown origin were significantly more common in the ASDH group. On the other hand, among the intermediate snowboarders, incidents involving jumps, jump failure, and collisions with other snowboarders were more common in the non-ASDH group. Secondly, in an analysis involving subjects who had an ASDH, we compared the beginner group with the intermediate/advanced group. Falling on a slope, incidents involving gentle slopes, pure ASDH, diffuse brain swelling, and death were more common in the beginner group, and ASDH combined with contusions or subarachnoid hemorrhaging and incidents involving a jump were more common in the intermediate/advanced group. Finally, we summarized the cases of 10 subjects with an ASDH as well as diffuse brain swelling. Nine of the 10 patients died, 8 were first-timers or beginners, 6 had incidents involving flat or gentle slopes, and 5 had fallen on a slope. Snowboarding is a recreational sport;therefore, snowboarders must take responsibility for their actions. However, snowboarders, especially beginners, could decrease their risk of ASDH if they are informed about ASDH and

  12. [Percutaneous gastrostomy complicated with abdominal wall hematoma; severe anemia secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Chu, D; Chamorro, S; Arrieta, F; Cobo, M E; Calañas, A; Botella, J I; Balsa, J; Zamarrón, I; Vázquez, C

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) is a safe and effective procedure that offers clear advantages over nasogastric tube feeding to ensure adequate nutrition in patients with swallowing problems who have an intact digestive tract. With proper placement and monitoring methodology there are few complications in both the peritrack procedure as in the long run. However, despite being considered a safe technique it is not devoided of serious complications. We report a patient with dysphagia, requiring percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement developing a severe anemia with severe subcutaneous hematoma, given the exceptional case and literature review.

  13. Spinal subdural hematoma with cauda equina syndrome: A complication of combined spinal epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Sethi, Priyanka; Jain, Jitesh Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) is considered safe in lower limb surgeries. We report a case of sudden neurological deterioration in a stable postoperative patient who was given CSE for total knee replacement and low molecular weight heparin in postoperative period. On the 4th postoperative day, she developed sudden onset weakness in left lower limb along with bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging spine revealed a subdural hematoma at L2-L3 level. Immediate laminectomy along with cord decompression was done and patient recovered well except for a persistent foot drop on left side. PMID:25948911

  14. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104

  15. [An infant with a fatal cerebral hemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency].

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; van der Blij, J F; Tegelaers, F P; Peters, M

    1996-04-27

    A 7-week old, male infant died from an intracerebral haemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency. He had been exclusively breast-fed. Directly after birth no vitamin K was administered. From day 10 a daily dose of 25 microgram vitamin K was given orally. At post mortem a mild cholestasis was found which may have been an additional factor contributing to late vitamin K deficiency.

  16. Bioavailability, biodistribution, and CNS toxicity of clinical-grade parvovirus H1 after intravenous and intracerebral injection in rats.

    PubMed

    Geletneky, Karsten; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Pohlmeyer-Esch, Gabriele; Loebhard, Stephanie; Leuchs, Barbara; Hoefer, Constance; Jochims, Karin; Dahm, Michael; Huber, Bernard; Rommelaere, Jean; Krebs, Ottheinz; Hajda, Jacek

    2015-02-01

    The autonomous parvovirus H1 (H1PV) is transmitted in rodent populations. The natural host is the rat, in which H1PV infection is pathogenic only in fetuses and newborns. H1PV infection of human cancer cells leads to strong oncolytic effects in preclinical models. In preparation for a clinical trial of H1PV injection in patients with malignant brain tumors, H1PV had to be prepared to Good Manufacturing Practice standards, including extensive toxicology testing in rats. Because the trial involves direct intracerebral injection of H1PV into the tumor and around the resection cavity, possible toxicity to CNS tissue had to be investigated. In addition, quantitative blood levels and the tissue distribution of H1PV after single intracerebral or intravenous injection were measured. Direct injection of H1PV into rat brain at 3 dose levels (maximum, 7.96 × 107 pfu) did not cause any macroscopic or histologic pathology. Furthermore, H1PV infection of the brain did not alter central or autonomous nervous system function. H1PV DNA was detected in almost all organs at 6 h, 48 h, and 14 d after intravenous and intracerebral injection, with the highest levels in liver and spleen. H1PV concentrations in most organs were similar after intravenous and intracerebral injection, indicating high permeability of the blood-brain barrier for this small virus. The current results demonstrate wide organ distribution of H1PV after intravenous or intracerebral injection, confirm that H1PV is nonpathogenic in adult rats even after direct injection into the brain, and form the basis for the ongoing ParvOryx01 clinical trial. PMID:25730755

  17. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Concurrent Spontaneous Hematomas of the Rectus Sheath and Psoas Muscle in Patients Undergoing Anticoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, Antonio; Medina, Jose Garcia; Mundo, Elena; Medina, Vicente Garcia; Leal, Rafael

    2004-11-15

    We report a case of concurrent rectus sheath and psoas hematomas in a patient undergoing anticoagulant therapy, treated by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of inferior epigastric and lumbar arteries. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated signs of active bleeding in two hematomas of the anterior and posterior abdominal walls. Transfemoral arteriogram confirmed the extravasation of contrast from the right inferior epigastric artery (RIEA). Indirect signs of bleeding were also found in a right lumbar artery (RLA). We successfully performed TAE of the feeding arteries. There have been few reports in the literature of such spontaneous hemorrhages in patients undergoing anticoagulation, successfully treated by TAE.

  18. Subdural Hematoma Associated with Dasatinib and Intrathecal Methotrexate Treatment in Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Atsujiro; Kojima, Kensuke; Kizuka, Haruna; Sano, Haruhiko; Shindo, Takero; Kubota, Yasushi; Ando, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib has been associated with an increased risk of bleeding, with the most prominent risk noted in patients with advanced-stage chronic myeloid leukemia and thrombocytopenia. We herein report two cases of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in which a subdural hematoma developed in association with low-dose (40-50 mg/day) dasatinib treatment and lumbar puncture for intrathecal methotrexate injection. Both patients were in complete remission, with normal platelet counts and coagulation status. We suggest that dasatinib, even at a low dose, may impair platelet aggregation and that lumbar puncture may increase the risk of a subdural hematoma (occasionally bilateral) in patients receiving dasatinib. PMID:27629971

  19. BILATERAL SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL BLOCKS AS THE PRIMARY ANESTHETIC FOR THE PATIENT UNDERGOING AN EVACUATION OF NECK HEMATOMA AFTER PARATHYROID SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Heller, Benjamin; Levine, Adam

    2015-10-01

    This is the case of an 80-year-old female who presented for evacuation of a neck hematoma on POD#3 after a parathyroidectomy. Her medical history included coronary artery disease with a drug-eluding stent, off aspirin for 2 weeks. She had a significant hematoma from the hyoid bone extending down to below the suprasternal notch. She reported hoarseness. The anesthesiology team provided regional anesthesia with bilateral superficial cervical blocks, supplemented with minimal sedation for patient compliance. The surgical team used no adjuvant local anesthetic. A deep exploration was performed and significant clot was evacuated. The patient went home safely from the PACU. PMID:26860031

  20. Life-threatening large subcutaneous hematoma after minor head trauma: A young female patient who was suspected of having new Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, So; Ota, Takahiro; Mizutani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening large subcutaneous hematomas after minor injury are rare clinical states for young people; however these patients may have hidden diseases, which can cause a tendency to bleed. A 31-year-old woman visited our hospital after minor injury. The first computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a small subcutaneous hematoma, but her head bulged and the second CT scan revealed her subcutaneous hematoma had become enlarged. Two surgeries were needed to stop the bleeding and. Though she received intensive care, she died 48 days after onset. The new Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), known as EDS Kosho type (EDSKT), is a connective tissue disease, in which patients often experience large subcutaneous hematomas. We suspected our patient had EDSKT because her clinical features were compatible with this syndrome. Our findings support the notion that large subcutaneous hematomas in young patients with connective tissue disease can be fatal; a careful follow-up is required. PMID:25972953

  1. Local Inflammation in Fracture Hematoma: Results from a Combined Trauma Model in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Eschbach, D.; Pfeifer, R.; Hübenthal, S.; Sassen, M.; Steinfeldt, T.; Wulf, H.; Ruchholtz, S.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies showed significant interaction between the local and systemic inflammatory response after severe trauma in small animal models. The purpose of this study was to establish a new combined trauma model in pigs to investigate fracture-associated local inflammation and gain information about the early inflammatory stages after polytrauma. Material and Methods. Combined trauma consisted of tibial fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration, and controlled hemorrhage. Animals were mechanically ventilated and under ICU-monitoring for 48 h. Blood and fracture hematoma samples were collected during the time course of the study. Local and systemic levels of serum cytokines and diverse alarmins were measured by ELISA kit. Results. A statistical significant difference in the systemic serum values of IL-6 and HMGB1 was observed when compared to the sham. Moreover, there was a statistical significant difference in the serum values of the fracture hematoma of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and HMGB1 when compared to the systemic inflammatory response. However a decrease of local proinflammatory concentrations was observed while anti-inflammatory mediators increased. Conclusion. Our data showed a time-dependent activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. Indeed it is the first study focusing on the local and systemic inflammatory response to multiple-trauma in a large animal model. PMID:25694748

  2. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    PubMed

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall.

  3. Intracranial subdural hematoma and pneumocephalus after spinal instrumentation of myelodysplastic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Roman; Maliszewski, Mariusz; Krawczyk, Lech

    2011-01-01

    To report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma, pneumocephalus, and pneumorachis, which occurred because of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a malpositioned transpedicular screw during spinal surgery for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis accompanied with hydrocephalus. Intracranial hemorrhage may occur as a consequence of dural sac penetration and CSF leakage after various medical procedures at the spinal level. The awareness of this severe complication is especially important during spinal instrumentation procedures in which inadvertent dural sac violation and CSF loss may be overlooked. A case report and literature review are presented here. A 12-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus underwent instrumentation for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis. Postoperatively, she became aphasic and increasingly somnolent. An urgent computed tomographic scan of the head and spine showed massive intracranial hematoma, pneumocephalus, pneumorachis, and a malpositioned pedicular screw that caused CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and bleeding remote from the surgical site. The patient needed neurosurgical cranial decompression and subsequent spinal reoperation with dural tear repair. The final outcome was an uneventful complete recovery. The increasing use of pedicular screws in spinal surgery carries a potential risk of occult dural sac violation with subsequent CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and the possibility of intracranial bleeding and pneumocephalus remote from the surgical site. This potentially fatal complication should always be considered after spinal surgery in the presence of early signs of neurological deterioration and necessitates an urgent cranial and spinal imaging to confirm the diagnosis and to make adequate treatment decisions. PMID:20829719

  4. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  5. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  6. Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2016 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  7. Intracerebral Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin infection-induced immune responses in the CNS 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JangEun; Ling, Changying; Kosmalski, Michelle M.; Hulseberg, Paul; Schreiber, Heidi A.; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    To study whether cerebral mycobacterial infection induces granuloma and protective immunity similar to systemic infection, we intracerebrally infected mice with Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette-Guerin. Granuloma and IFN-γ+CD4+ T cell responses are induced in the central nervous system (CNS) similar to periphery, but the presence of IFN-γIL-17 double-positive CD4+ T cells is unique to the CNS. The major CNS source of TNF-α is microglia, with modest production by CD4+ T cells and macrophage. Protective immunity is accompanied by accumulation of Foxp3+CD4+ T cells and PD-L2+ dendritic cells, suggesting that both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses develop in the CNS following mycobacterial infection. PMID:19535154

  8. From discharge planner to "concierge": recommendations for hospital social work by clients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kristen F; Ing, Marissa M; Vento, Megan A; Nakagawa, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act and budget cuts have changed the role of hospital social workers by placing pressure on them to conduct speedy discharges and decrease readmission rates. This qualitative study aimed to assess if hospital social work is meeting the needs of clients in the hospital and postdischarge. Semistructured interviews with 10 clients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 11 caregivers were conducted. Participants reported that social work services were not meeting their needs. Clients with ICH and their caregivers expressed needs from social workers that surpassed their roles as discharge planners, including counseling, help with finances and insurance, and advocacy. Participants wanted social work services to begin early in acute treatment with continuity postdischarge. Social workers should conduct ethical social work by meeting clients where they are, addressing needs as prioritized by the client, and advocating individually and organizationally for clients.

  9. Delayed Intracerebral Hemorrhage Secondary to Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Chen, Yi-Li; Yang, Shu-Xu; Wang, Yi-Rong

    2015-11-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a routine procedure for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion, and is associated with many complications. A delayed hemorrhage after the VP shunt surgery, however, is quite rare. In this study, we report a case involving late-onset hemorrhage. The 67-year-old male patient with a history of head trauma and brain surgery underwent a VP shunt placement for hydrocephalus. The surgery course was uneventful and no bleeding was revealed in the first computed tomographic (CT) scan after the procedure. However, a massive intraparenchymal and intraventricular hemorrhage occurred 8 h following adjustment of the valve system on the 8th day after surgery.Erosion of the vasculature by catheter cannulation and a sudden reduction of CSF pressure after downregulation of the valve could be one of the possible causes of the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

  10. [Residual neurovirulence of the chimera of Langat and Denge-4 flaviviruses in intracerebral infection of monkeys].

    PubMed

    Karganova, G G; Pripuzova, N S; Tereshkina, N V; Gmyl', L V; Dzhivanian, T I; Rumiantsev, A A; Lashkevich, V A

    2005-01-01

    The residual neurovirulence of the previously obtained chimeric virus Tp21/DEN4, containing the RNA region encoding the pre M and E structural enzymes, strain Tp21, virus Langat, and the remaining part of the genome from the Denge 4 virus, was studied in experiments with monkeys Cercopithecus aethiops involving the intracerebral administration of the virus. The tick-borne encephalitis virus, strain Absettarov, was used as positive control. A comparative analysis of the experimental and published data showed the chimeric virus to be less virulent by its degree of morphological affection in the CNS zones, its spread into the CNS and by a percentage share of animals with viremia versus the Tp21 parent strain and Elantsev strain of the Langat virus.

  11. Should antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection be tailored for intracerebral penetration?

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, P.P.; Ellis, R.; Best, B.M.; Letendre, S.

    2015-01-01

    The continuous replication of HIV-1 in the central nervous system, in particular the brain, and its potential long-term deleterious effect is the focus of this review. Cognitive deficits are observed in a significant percentage of HIV-1-infected patients. That may occur despite successful peripheral suppression of the HIV-1 replication. Compartmentalisation of HIV-1 in the brain, genetic mutation of HIV-1, age, HCV coinfection and poor intracerebral penetration, as well as possibly a direct toxic effect of antiretroviral drugs, are factors that may account for potential creeping damage of the brain after many years of treatment. Patients with neurological symptoms or cognitive deficits may require another approach to the treatment of their HIV infection. PMID:19749389

  12. The Injury and Therapy of Reactive Oxygen Species in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Looking at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Chen, Weixiang; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is an emerging major health problem often resulting in death or disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been identified as one of the major damaging factors in ischemic stroke. However, there is less discussion about ROS in hemorrhage stroke. Metabolic products of hemoglobin, excitatory amino acids, and inflammatory cells are all sources of ROS, and ROS harm the central nervous system through cell death and structural damage, especially disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We have considered the antioxidant system of the CNS itself and the drugs aiming to decrease ROS after ICH, and we find that mitochondria are key players in all of these aspects. Moreover, when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opens, ROS-induced ROS release, which leads to extensive liberation of ROS and mitochondrial failure, occurs. Therefore, the mitochondrion may be a significant target for elucidating the problem of ROS in ICH; however, additional experimental support is required. PMID:27293511

  13. Recruitment of Black Subjects for a Natural History Study of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Dorothy F.; Menon, Ravi; Fokar, Ali; Gibbons, Christopher; Wing, Jeffrey; Sanchez, Brisa; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, recruitment of minority subjects for clinical research has been challenging. We developed culturally-tailored recruitment materials for a longitudinal, natural history study of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and trained recruiting coordinators in cultural competence. Of 285 subjects meeting inclusion criteria, 158 (55% of eligible) agreed to participate (60% of eligible blacks vs. 45% of eligible non-blacks, p = 0.02). Of those enrolled, 138 (87%) agreed to participate in the genetic sub-study (86% of blacks vs. 90% of non-blacks enrolled, p = 0.78). Of those subjects who refused enrollment, lack of interest in research (42%) was the most common reason for the study as a whole. A higher rate of enrollment was achieved in blacks vs. non-blacks in this ICH clinical research study employing culturally-tailored recruitment approaches and training of recruitment coordinators to overcome traditional recruitment barriers to research participation in minority patients. PMID:23377714

  14. Recruitment of black subjects for a natural history study of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Dorothy F; Menon, Ravi; Fokar, Ali; Gibbons, Christopher; Wing, Jeffrey; Sanchez, Brisa; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2013-02-01

    Historically, recruitment of minority subjects for clinical research has been challenging. We developed culturally-tailored recruitment materials for a longitudinal, natural history study of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and trained recruiting coordinators in cultural competence. Of 285 subjects meeting inclusion criteria, 158 (55% of those eligible) agreed to participate (60% of eligible Blacks vs. 45% of eligible non-Blacks, p..02). Of those enrolled, 138 (87%) agreed to participate in the genetic sub-study (86% of Blacks vs. 90% of non-Blacks enrolled, p..78). Of those subjects who refused enrollment, lack of interest in research (42%) was the most common reason given for the study as a whole. A higher rate of enrollment was achieved in Blacks vs. non-Blacks in this ICH clinical research study employing culturally tailored recruitment approaches and training of recruitment coordinators to overcome traditional recruitment barriers to research participation in minority patients. PMID:23377714

  15. The Injury and Therapy of Reactive Oxygen Species in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Looking at Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jie; Chen, Weixiang; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is an emerging major health problem often resulting in death or disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been identified as one of the major damaging factors in ischemic stroke. However, there is less discussion about ROS in hemorrhage stroke. Metabolic products of hemoglobin, excitatory amino acids, and inflammatory cells are all sources of ROS, and ROS harm the central nervous system through cell death and structural damage, especially disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We have considered the antioxidant system of the CNS itself and the drugs aiming to decrease ROS after ICH, and we find that mitochondria are key players in all of these aspects. Moreover, when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opens, ROS-induced ROS release, which leads to extensive liberation of ROS and mitochondrial failure, occurs. Therefore, the mitochondrion may be a significant target for elucidating the problem of ROS in ICH; however, additional experimental support is required.

  16. Beware of delayed severe brain swelling after intracerebral haematoma in HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, PA; Labram, EK; Shetty, A

    2013-01-01

    Haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome is a condition associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes during pregnancy and peripartum, including neurological complications. We report the third case in the world literature of delayed brain swelling following cerebral haemorrhage as a complication of HELLP syndrome. A 36-year-old woman in labour developed HELLP, which was complicated with intracerebral haematoma. This was evacuated, but motor impairment persisted after surgery and unfortunately the patient died unexpectedly during the 11th postoperative day. Computer tomographic brain scans documented diffuse cerebral swelling, which we think may have been caused by cerebral vasospasm. Cerebral vasospasm should always be considered when managing patients who suffered from stroke complicating HELLP syndrome. Close monitoring is advised even in later stages of recovery.

  17. A unique experiment in neurological surgery: intracerebral injection of antitoxin for tetanus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neal B; Pendleton, Courtney; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2010-06-01

    The discipline of neurological surgery was considered primarily "hopeless" and, at best, experimental in the late 19th century. Harvey Cushing's efforts during his initial uncharted voyage through the surgery of the human cranium were rudimentary and exploratory. A direct review of his available patient records from early in his career provides the opportunity to look back at Cushing as a physician-scientist, uncovering work that demonstrates that he was at the forefront of neurosurgical intervention in avenues that have been largely overlooked. The authors present Cushing's notes pertaining to a case of tetanus. This case represents the intersection of neurosurgery and tetanus treatment in Dr. Cushing's intracerebral injection of antitoxin to treat generalized tetanus. PMID:19817546

  18. Temporary postoperative visual loss associated with intracerebral hemorrhage after laparoscopic appendectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyo Jin; Jun, Jong Hun; Cha, Dong Guk; Lee, Young Sun

    2014-09-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) after non-ophthalmic surgery is rare, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.013 to 0.2%. Most perioperative visual loss is associated with spine operations and cardiac bypass procedures. The most common cause of POVL is ischemic optic neuropathy. However, there are no previous reports of postoperative visual loss after laparoscopic appendectomy. A 43-year-old female with no underlying disease underwent laparoscopic appendectomy; the operation was completed in one hour and her blood pressure was stable during the perioperative period. In the post-anesthetic care unit, the patient complained of nausea and headache, but she did not complain of any unusual visual symptoms. Approximately one hour after arriving at the ward, the patient complained of visual disturbance. Neurologic examination revealed left homonymous hemianopsia, and subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage were found in the occipital area on brain MRI. PMID:25302101

  19. Perihematomal Cellular Injury Is Reduced by Trans-sodium Crocetinate in a Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Schretter, Catherine; Clarke, Ryon; Lee, Kevin S

    2015-10-01

    The carotenoid compound trans-sodium crocetinate (TSC) has been shown to increase oxygenation in various tissues, including the brain. Notably, TSC can enhance oxygenation under conditions of reduced blood flow, thus attenuating the depth of an ischemic challenge. This study examined the impact of TSC on neuronal loss in an animal model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Utilizing a rat model of collagenase injection, TSC was shown to reduce perihematomal cellular loss after ICH, as assessed by Fluoro-Jade B staining in tissue sections. This is the first evidence demonstrating that TSC is capable of limiting hemorrhagic injury to neurons in the brain. The finding supports the concept that TSC may represent a candidate therapeutic for early intervention regardless of whether a stroke is hemorrhagic or ischemic in nature.

  20. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  1. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Akpınar, Aykut; Celik, Bahattin; Canbek, Ihsan; Karavelioğlu, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH) is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia. PMID:27478663

  2. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... or walking Headache Lethargy or confusion Loss of consciousness Nausea and vomiting Numbness Seizures Slurred speech Visual ... Inability to speak Lethargy or confusion Loss of consciousness Nausea and vomiting Numbness Recent cognitive decline in ...

  3. Epidural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that results in even a brief loss of consciousness , or if there are any other symptoms after a head injury (even without loss of consciousness). The typical pattern of symptoms that indicate an ...

  4. Subungual Hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  5. Comparison of Brain Networks During Interictal Oscillations and Spikes on Magnetoencephalography and Intracerebral EEG.

    PubMed

    Jmail, Nawel; Gavaret, Martine; Bartolomei, F; Chauvel, P; Badier, Jean-Michel; Bénar, Christian-G

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic source localization in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) allows finding the generators of transient interictal epileptiform discharges ('interictal spikes'). In intracerebral EEG (iEEG), oscillatory activity (above 30 Hz) has also been shown to be a marker of neuronal dysfunction. Still, the difference between networks involved in transient and oscillatory activities remains largely unknown. Our goal was thus to extract and compare the networks involved in interictal oscillations and spikes, and to compare the non-invasive results to those obtained directly within the brain. In five patients with both MEG and iEEG recordings, we computed correlation graphs across regions, for (1) interictal spikes and (2) epileptic oscillations around 30 Hz. We show that the corresponding networks can involve a widespread set of regions (average of 10 per patient), with only partial overlap (38 % of the total number of regions in MEG, 50 % in iEEG). The non-invasive results were concordant with intracerebral recordings (79 % for the spikes and 50 % for the oscillations). We compared our interictal results to iEEG ictal data. The regions labeled as seizure onset zone (SOZ) belonged to interictal networks in a large proportion of cases: 75 % (resp. 58 %) for spikes and 58 % (resp. 33 %) for oscillations in iEEG (resp. MEG). A subset of SOZ regions were detected by one type of discharges but not the other (25 % for spikes and 8 % for oscillations). Our study suggests that spike and oscillatory activities involve overlapping but distinct networks, and are complementary for presurgical mapping. PMID:27334988

  6. From Intracerebral EEG Signals to Brain Connectivity: Identification of Epileptogenic Networks in Partial Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Fabrice; Chauvel, Patrick; Biraben, Arnaud; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by recurring seizures. In 30% of patients, seizures are insufficiently reduced by anti-epileptic drugs. In the case where seizures originate from a relatively circumscribed region of the brain, epilepsy is said to be partial and surgery can be indicated. The success of epilepsy surgery depends on the accurate localization and delineation of the epileptogenic zone (which often involves several structures), responsible for seizures. It requires a comprehensive pre-surgical evaluation of patients that includes not only imaging data but also long-term monitoring of electrophysiological signals (scalp and intracerebral EEG). During the past decades, considerable effort has been devoted to the development of signal analysis techniques aimed at characterizing the functional connectivity among spatially distributed regions over interictal (outside seizures) or ictal (during seizures) periods from EEG data. Most of these methods rely on the measurement of statistical couplings among signals recorded from distinct brain sites. However, methods differ with respect to underlying theoretical principles (mostly coming from the field of statistics or the field of non-linear physics). The objectives of this paper are: (i) to provide an brief overview of methods aimed at characterizing functional brain connectivity from electrophysiological data, (ii) to provide concrete application examples in the context of drug-refractory partial epilepsies, and iii) to highlight some key points emerging from results obtained both on real intracerebral EEG signals and on signals simulated from physiologically plausible models in which the underlying connectivity patterns are known a priori (ground truth). PMID:21152345

  7. Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of the Literature Focusing on Reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chari, Aswin; Hocking, Katie C; Broughton, Ellie; Turner, Carole; Santarius, Thomas; Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G

    2016-07-01

    The plethora of studies in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has not resulted in the development of an evidence-based treatment strategy, largely due to heterogeneous outcome measures that preclude cross-study comparisons and guideline development. This study aimed to identify and quantify the heterogeneity of outcome measures reported in the CSDH literature and to build a case for the development of a consensus-based core outcome set. This systematic review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews (CRD42014007266). All full-text English language studies with >10 patients (prospective) or >100 patients (retrospective) published after 1990 examining clinical outcomes in CSDH were eligible for inclusion. One hundred two eligible studies were found. There were 14 (13.7%) randomized controlled trials, one single arm trial (1.0%), 25 (24.5%) cohort comparison studies, and 62 (60.8%) prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Outcome domains reported by the studies included mortality (63.8% of included studies), recurrence (94.1%), complications (48.0%), functional outcomes (40.2%), and radiological (38.2%) outcomes. There was significant heterogeneity in the definitions of the outcome measures, as evidenced by the seven different definitions of the term "recurrence," with no definition given in 19 studies. The time-points of assessment for all the outcome domains varied greatly from inpatient/hospital discharge to 18 months. This study establishes and quantifies the heterogeneity of outcome measure reporting in CSDH and builds the case for the development of a robust consensus-based core outcome set for future studies to adhere to as part of the Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in CSDH (CODE-CSDH) project.

  8. Surgical trial in traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (STITCH(Trauma)): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in over 60% of severe head injuries in one of three types: extradural (EDH); subdural (SDH); and intraparenchymal (TICH). Prompt surgical removal of significant SDH and EDH is established and widely accepted. However, TICH is more common and is found in more than 40% of severe head injuries. It is associated with a worse outcome but the role for surgical removal remains undefined. Surgical practice in the treatment of TICHs differs widely around the world. The aim of early surgery in TICH removal is to prevent secondary brain injury. There have been trials of surgery for spontaneous ICH (including the STICH II trial), but none so far of surgery for TICH. Methods/Design The UK National Institutes of Health Research has funded STITCH(Trauma) to determine whether a policy of early surgery in patients with TICH improves outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It will include a health economics component and carry out a subgroup analysis of patients undergoing invasive monitoring. This is an international multicenter pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Patients are eligible if: they are within 48 h of injury; they have evidence of TICH on CT scan with a confluent volume of attenuation significantly raised above that of the background white and grey matter that has a total volume >10 mL; and their treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise. Patients will be ineligible if they have: a significant surface hematoma (EDH or SDH) requiring surgery; a hemorrhage/contusion located in the cerebellum; three or more separate hematomas fulfilling inclusion criteria; or severe pre-existing physical or mental disability or severe co-morbidity which would lead to poor outcome even if the patient made a full recovery from the head injury. Patients will be randomized via an independent service. Patients randomized to surgery receive surgery within 12 h. Both groups will be monitored according to standard neurosurgical

  9. [Shock secondary to extrinsic compression of the right atrium by postoperative mediastinal hematoma. Pseudotumor echocardiography image in right atrium].

    PubMed

    Jordán, A J; García, M; Santos, F; González, M; Gómez, J; García De Burgos, F

    2001-03-01

    We present the case of a 64 year-old patient in whom an aortic Saint Jude prosthesis, a Cosgrove's mitral annulus and triple coronary artery by-pass graft were implanted, and who presented with shock related to extrinsic compression of the right atrium by a mediastinal hematoma within the first postoperative month. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed a right atrial , hampering right atrium drainage. The extrapericardial location of the hematoma is of note and was diagnosed with the aid of thoracic computerized tomography. We present the case of a 64 year-old patient in whom an aortic Saint Jude prosthesis, a Cosgrove's mitral annulus and triple coronary artery by-pass graft were implanted, and who presented with shock related to extrinsic compression of the right atrium by a mediastinal hematoma within the first postoperative month. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed a right atrial , hampering right atrium drainage. The extrapericardial location of the hematoma is of note and was diagnosed with the aid of thoracic computerized tomography.

  10. Treatment Efficacy of the Transsylvian Approach Versus the Transtemporal Cortex Approach to Evacuate Basal Ganglia Hematoma Under a Microscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Liu, Hao; Peng, Lin; Li, Hao; Wang, Jiying; Jiang, Yong; Gu, Yingjiang

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the transsylvian approach versus the transtemporal cortex approach to evacuate basal ganglia hemorrhage under a microscope. The relevant literature was collected from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese Biomedical Literature database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. The meta-analysis was conducted by Stata 12.0 software. Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were 659 patients, including 329 patients who were treated by the transsylvian approach and 330 patients who were treated by the transtemporal cortex approach. There were significant advantages in the transsylvian approach group, including a high clearance rate of hematoma (OR = 2.361; 95% CI: 1.443-3.861) and a better postoperative recovery (OR = 2.248; 95% CI: 1.598-3.160). A better postoperative recovery could also be found in patients with a history of hypertension (OR = 2.063; 95% CI: 1.429-2.980) and patients whose volume of hematoma ranged from 25 to 60 mL (OR = 2.275; 95% CI: 1.466-3.529). The authors conclude that there are significant advantages to the transsylvian approach, such as a high clearance rate of hematoma and a good postoperative recovery. These advantages should be taken into account when devising appropriate therapeutic strategies for patients with basal ganglia hematoma. PMID:26967068

  11. Primary intracerebral hemorrhage mortality reduction after installation of a tap-water supply system in an arseniasis-endemic area in southwestern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Lin, Meng-Chiao; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2007-03-15

    Mortality and morbidity of vascular diseases, including stroke, are known to be associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic through drinking water. A tap-water supply system was implemented in the early 1960s in the blackfoot disease (BFD) endemic areas of Taiwan. The objective of this study was to examine whether mortality attributed to stroke decreased among residents living in the BFD-endemic areas after the curtailment of arsenic exposure. Further it was of interest to determine whether arsenic exposure was related to a specific type of stroke. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for stroke were calculated for the BFD endemic area for the years 1971-2000. The study results show that mortality due to primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PIH) declined gradually after the improvement of drinking-water supply system by elimination of arsenic exposure through removal of artesian well water. Based on the reversibility and specificity criteria, the association between arsenic exposure and mortality due to PIH is likely to be causal.

  12. Spine subdural hematoma: a rare complication associated with vitamin K antagonist (VKA).

    PubMed

    Flato, Uri Adrian Prync; Rheder, Paulo Sérgio; Guimarães, Helio Penna; Flato, Elias Silva; Cretella, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare condition, which is difficult to diagnose, related to Vitamin K Antagonist. This a case report of a life-threatening situation in a octogenarian patient with a history of recent atrial fibrillation that received K-Vitamin Antagonist (KVA) therapy. The history and the clinical assessment were normal at the admission, associated with increase in the coagulation parameters (INR >10). Twenty-four hours after the admission, the patient developed progressive tetraparesis and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was performed, disclosing the evidence of a SSDH (Figure 1). An emergency neurosurgical intervention was performed associated with normalization of the coagulation parameters. After the procedure, the patient presented improvement of the neurological symptoms.

  13. Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization in Recurrent Chronic Subdural Hematoma Combined with Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiin; Whang, Kum; Hong, Soon-Ki; Pyen, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Kim, So-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a collection of old blood and its breakdown products between the surface of the brain parenchyma and the outermost layer called the dura. The most common treatment option for primary CSDH is burr-hole trephination; however, the treatment method for recurrent CSDH is still widely debated. An arachnoid cyst (AC) is a sac filled with cerebrospinal fluid located between the brain or spinal cord and the arachnoid membrane, which is one of the three meninges covering the brain or spinal cord. Although it is rare, the cyst is associated with CSDH in juveniles, and the recurrence rate of CSDH increases in such cases. Much of the literature has supported the preventive role of middle meningeal artery (MMA) embolization in recurrent CSDH. We report a 13-year-old male patient with recurrent CSDH and AC where the early intervention of MMA embolization was proven effective in preventing the further recurrence of CSDH. PMID:27169092

  14. Abdominal wall injuries: rectus abdominis strains, oblique strains, rectus sheath hematoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rob

    2006-04-01

    Abdominal wall injuries are reported to be less common than actually perceived by sports medicine practitioners. National Collegiate Athletic Association injury statistics for 2004-2005 cite a high of 0.71 abdominal muscle injuries per 1000 player-hours in wrestling competition to a low of 0.01 injuries per 1000 player-hours in autumn football practices. British professional soccer clubs reported an incidence of "torso" injuries of up to 7% of all injuries over the course of several seasons. Injury definition is most likely the explanation for this discrepancy. The abdominal wall muscles (rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, and transverse abdominis) are injured by direct blows to the abdomen or by sudden or repetitive trunk movement, either rotation or flexion/extension. With the exception of the rare rectus sheath hematoma that does not self-tamponade, the treatment for these problems is nonoperative with symptoms guiding rehabilitation and return to play decisions.

  15. Symptoms of an Intrauterine Hematoma Associated with Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lan; Wei, Zhaolian; Cao, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the predictive value of the symptoms of an intrauterine hematoma (IUH) for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods A literature review was performed with the search terms, including intrauterine/subchorionic/retroplacental/subplacental hematoma/hemorrhage/bleeding/collection/fluid, covering the period from January, 1981 to January, 2014. We just focused on the pregnancy outcomes associated with different symptoms of an IUH. Results It is generally agreed that a retroplacental, posterior or subchorionic in the fundus of uterus, and/or persistent IUH is associated with adverse outcomes in the ongoing pregnancy. However, the prognosis value of both volume and gestational age at diagnosis of IUH still remains controversial. Some researchers argue that a large IUH is associated with an increased risk of adverse events during pregnancy while others refuted. It is believed by some that the earlier an IUH was detected, the higher the risk for adverse outcomes would be, while no or weak association were reported by other studies. The prognostic value of the simultaneous presence of vaginal bleeding on pregnancy outcome is also controversial. Conclusions Both the position relative to the placenta or uterus and duration of IUH have strong predictive value on the prognosis in the ongoing pregnancy. However, the prognostic values of the IUH volume, gestational age at diagnosis and the simultaneous presence of vaginal bleeding remain controversial up to now. Moreover, most of previous reports are small, uncontrolled studies with incomplete information. Prospective, large sample, cohorts studies which take all detailed symptoms of an IUH into consideration are needed when we evaluate its clinical significance in the prognosis of pregnancy. PMID:25369062

  16. Supratentorial extradural hematoma in children: An institutional clinical experience of 65 cases

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Pratap Chandra; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Srikant; Deo, Rama Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objective: To survey the epidemiology, management, and severity of extradural hematoma (EDH) in children. Materials and Methods: All patients of EDH (n = 65) in the age group of 0–16 years admitted to our department during the period of August 13 and July 14 were analyzed retrospectively from the hospital records. In all patients, age, sex, mode of injury, clinical presentation, site of EDH, management, duration of hospitalization, and outcome were evaluated. Observation and Results: Of 65 patients, males were 70.76% with a male to female ratio of 2.4:1, most of the victims (47.69%) were in the age group of 11–16 years. Mean duration of hospitalization was 4.32 days. The most common mode of injury was fall from height in 29 cases (44.61%) followed by road traffic accident (RTA) in 23 cases (35.35%). Temporoparietal EDH was the most common computed tomography finding present in 22 (33.84%) patients. 67.69% patients presented to casualty with minor head injury having Glasgow coma scale (GCS) between 14 and 15. Most common presenting feature was vomiting in 52 cases (80%) and next to it was altered sensorium. The mortality rate was 7.69% (n = 5). Conclusion: Extradural hematoma is a life-threatening entity encountered in pediatric head injury. Timely intervention and diagnosis decrease mortality to a great degree. Most of the mortality is encountered in patients who presented late at the neurosurgical unit with low GCS. PMID:26167211

  17. [Reduction cranioplasty for a case of intractable chronic subdural hematoma in infancy].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, K; Asano, T; Shigeno, T; Matsui, T; Ito, S; Nakaguti, H

    1994-01-01

    Although almost all infants suffering chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) are successfully treated by established methods such as a subdural puncture, burr holes and shunting procedures, infantile CSDH with progressive craniocerebral disproportion requires a special therapeutical regimen. Clinical efforts such as reduction cranioplasty have been made as a treatment for these cases. This is a case report of a 9-month-old male infant with an intractable CSDH, bilateral and large, and subsequent brain atrophy caused by traumatic head injury. Excellent results were obtained by a modified reduction cranioplasty. In brief, the patient was supine-positioned with a 20-degree flexion of the head in an attempt to obtain a large operative field. Bicoronal skin incision was combined with an additional linear one on the midline (T-shaped incision). Bilateral frontoparietal craniotomy with periosteum was made to keep the midline bony bridge overlying the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). The resulting extensive dural opening allowed complete evacuation of the subdural hematoma. Thereafter, the anterior part, ca. 4cm in width, of the bony bridge was removed in order to make the remaining bone able to be manipulated and connected to the frontal bone. Prior to this stage, SSS close to the crista galli was ligated and cut with the falx to avoid postoperative kinking. The dura mater was sutured so as not to leave an excessive subdural space. The bone flaps were trimmed to complete a good-shaped reconstruction. Finally, the excessive scalp was removed because the original scalp was too large for the reconstructed skull.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8295704

  18. Volumetric electromagnetic phase-shift spectroscopy of brain edema and hematoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Cesar A; Valencia, Jose A; Mora, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Fernando; Velasco, Beatriz; Porras, Martin A; Salgado, Javier; Polo, Salvador M; Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Cordero, Sergio; Rubinsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the need of poor and rural Mexico, where the population has limited access to advanced medical technology and services, we have developed a new paradigm for medical diagnostic based on the technology of "Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase Shift Spectroscopy" (VEPS), as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. VEPS, can detect changes in tissue properties inside the body through non-contact, multi-frequency electromagnetic measurements from the exterior of the body, and thereby provide rapid and inexpensive diagnostics in a way that is amenable for use in economically disadvantaged parts of the world. We describe the technology and report results from a limited pilot study with 46 healthy volunteers and eight patients with CT radiology confirmed brain edema and brain hematoma. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Mann-Whitney U test, shows that in the frequency range of from 26 MHz to 39 MHz, VEPS can distinguish non-invasively and without contact, with a statistical significance of p<0.05, between healthy subjects and those with a medical conditions in the brain. In the frequency range of between 153 MHz to 166 MHz it can distinguish with a statistical significance of p<0.05 between subjects with brain edema and those with a hematoma in the brain. A classifier build from measurements in these two frequency ranges can provide instantaneous diagnostic of the medical condition of the brain of a patient, from a single set of measurements. While this is a small-scale pilot study, it illustrates the potential of VEPS to change the paradigm of medical diagnostic of brain injury through a VEPS classifier-based technology. Obviously substantially larger-scale studies are needed to verify and expand on the findings in this small pilot study.

  19. Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase-Shift Spectroscopy of Brain Edema and Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Cesar A.; Valencia, Jose A.; Mora, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Fernando; Velasco, Beatriz; Porras, Martin A.; Salgado, Javier; Polo, Salvador M.; Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Cordero, Sergio; Rubinsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the need of poor and rural Mexico, where the population has limited access to advanced medical technology and services, we have developed a new paradigm for medical diagnostic based on the technology of “Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase Shift Spectroscopy” (VEPS), as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. VEPS, can detect changes in tissue properties inside the body through non-contact, multi-frequency electromagnetic measurements from the exterior of the body, and thereby provide rapid and inexpensive diagnostics in a way that is amenable for use in economically disadvantaged parts of the world. We describe the technology and report results from a limited pilot study with 46 healthy volunteers and eight patients with CT radiology confirmed brain edema and brain hematoma. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Mann-Whitney U test, shows that in the frequency range of from 26 MHz to 39 MHz, VEPS can distinguish non-invasively and without contact, with a statistical significance of p<0.05, between healthy subjects and those with a medical conditions in the brain. In the frequency range of between 153 MHz to 166 MHz it can distinguish with a statistical significance of p<0.05 between subjects with brain edema and those with a hematoma in the brain. A classifier build from measurements in these two frequency ranges can provide instantaneous diagnostic of the medical condition of the brain of a patient, from a single set of measurements. While this is a small-scale pilot study, it illustrates the potential of VEPS to change the paradigm of medical diagnostic of brain injury through a VEPS classifier-based technology. Obviously substantially larger-scale studies are needed to verify and expand on the findings in this small pilot study. PMID:23691001

  20. Unusual presenting of acute aortic dissection due to penetrating atheromatous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Atas, Halil; Durmus, Erdal; Sunbul, Murat; Birkan, Yasar; Ozben, Beste

    2014-07-01

    Penetrating atheromatous ulcer (PAU) is an atherosclerotic ulcer penetrating the internal elastic lamina of the aortic wall causing a hematoma within the media layer of aorta. They are commonly located in the descending aorta of the elderly and hypertensive patients. They may rarely be complicated by aortic dissection. We report a relative young normotensive patient presenting with acute aortic dissection due to PAU located in the ascending aorta.

  1. MR Imaging Evaluation of Intracerebral Hemorrhages and T2 Hyperintense White Matter Lesions Appearing after Radiation Therapy in Adult Patients with Primary Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Il Han; Choi, Seung Hong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency and severity of intracerebral hemorrhages and T2 hyperintense white matter lesions (WMLs) following radiation therapy for brain tumors in adult patients. Of 648 adult brain tumor patients who received radiation therapy at our institute, magnetic resonance (MR) image data consisting of a gradient echo (GRE) and FLAIR T2-weighted image were available three and five years after radiation therapy in 81 patients. Intracerebral hemorrhage was defined as a hypointense dot lesion appearing on GRE images after radiation therapy. The number and size of the lesions were evaluated. The T2 hyperintense WMLs observed on the FLAIR sequences were graded according to the extent of the lesion. Intracerebral hemorrhage was detected in 21 (25.9%) and 35 (43.2) patients in the three- and five-year follow-up images, respectively. The number of intracerebral hemorrhages per patient tended to increase as the follow-up period increased, whereas the size of the intracerebral hemorrhages exhibited little variation over the course of follow-up. T2 hyperintense WMLs were observed in 27 (33.3%) and 32 (39.5) patients in the three and five year follow-up images, respectively. The age at the time of radiation therapy was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the patients with T2 hyperintense WMLs than in those without lesions. Intracerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon in adult brain tumor patients undergoing radiation therapy. The incidence and number of intracerebral hemorrhages increased over the course of follow-up. T2 hyperintense WMLs were observed in more than one-third of the study population. PMID:26322780

  2. Prognostic Value of Admission Blood Glucose in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Guo, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate prognostic value of elevated admission blood glucose (ABG) for clinical outcomes in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a representative large cohort. Data of ICH patients with onset time ≤24 h were derived from the China National Stroke Registry. Clinical outcomes included 3-month poor outcome (death or dependency) and death. Logistic regression was performed for the association between ABG and clinical outcomes, both in the entire cohort and in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. 2951 ICH patients were enrolled, including 267 (9.0%) diabetics. In the entire cohort, there was a trend to increased risk of poor outcome with increasing ABG levels (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.15; P < 0.001). The risk of poor outcome was significantly greatest for the highest quartile (≥7.53 mmol/L) of ABG (adjusted OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17-2.03; p = 0.002, P for trend 0.004). We got similar association in non-diabetics but not in diabetics. Elevated ABG confers a higher risk of poor outcome in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. Elevated ABG is an independent predictor of 3-month poor outcome in ICH patients, the prognostic value of which is greater in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. PMID:27562114

  3. Relationship between intracerebral gamma oscillations and slow potentials in the human sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Szurhaj, William; Labyt, Etienne; Bourriez, Jean-Louis; Kahane, Philippe; Chauvel, Patrick; Mauguière, François; Derambure, Philippe

    2006-08-01

    Changes in sensorimotor rhythms (mu, beta and gamma) and movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) are both generated principally by the contralateral sensorimotor areas during the execution of self-paced movement. They appear to reflect movement control mechanisms, which remain partially unclear. With the aim of better understanding their sources and significance, we recorded MRCPs and sensorimotor rhythms during and after self-paced movement using intracerebral electrodes in eight epileptic subjects investigated by stereoelectroencephalography. The results showed that: (i) there is a strong spatial relationship between the late components of movement--the so-called motor potential (MP) and post-movement complex (PMc)--and gamma event-related synchronization (ERS) within the 40-60 Hz band, as the MP/PMc always occurred in contacts displaying gamma ERS (the primary sensorimotor areas), whereas mu and beta reactivities were more diffuse; and (ii) MPs and PMc are both generated by the primary motor and somatosensory areas, but with distinct sources. Hence, this could mean that kinesthesic sensory afferences project to neurons other than those firing during the pyramidal tract volley. The PMc and low gamma ERS represent two electrophysiological facets of kinesthesic feedback from the joints and muscles involved in the movement to the sensorimotor cortex. It could be suggested that gamma oscillations within the 40-60 Hz band could serve to synchronize the activities of the various neuronal populations involved in control of the ongoing movement. PMID:16930422

  4. Effect of treatment with baicalein on the intracerebral tumor growth and survival of orthotopic glioma models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Rong; Jiang, Yong-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Baicalein, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has been proved as a promising chemopreventive compound for many cancers. The aim of this work was to assess the anti-tumor effect of baicalein in the orthotopic glioma models. It was found that treatment of mice with U87 gliomas with baicalein (20 and 40 mg/kg/day, i.p.) significantly inhibited the intracerebral tumor growth and prolonged the survival. Furthermore, treatment with baicalein suppressed cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in U87 gliomas. In addition, treatment with baicalein reduced tumor permeability, attenuated edema of tumors and brains, and improved tight junctions in gliomas. Finally, treatment with baicalein reduced the expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and VEGFR2 in U87 gliomas. In addition, treatment with baicalein also markedly suppressed tumor growth and prolonged the survival of rats with 9L gliomas. In conclusion, baicalein has an obvious anti-tumor activity in the orthotopic glioma models. Our results suggested that treatment with baicalein might be an effective therapy for recurrent malignant brain cancers through suppressing tumor growth and alleviating edema.

  5. Parallel Information Processing in Motor Systems: Intracerebral Recordings of Readiness Potential and CNV in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rektor, Ivan

    2000-01-01

    We performed intracerebral recordings of Readiness Potential (RP) and Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) with simple repetitive distal limb movement in candidates for epilepsy surgery. In 26 patients (in Paris), depth electrodes were located in various cortical structures; in eight patients (in Brno), in the basal ganglia and the cortex. RPs were displayed in the conteral primary motor cortex, conteral somato-sensory cortex, and bilaterally in the SMA and the caudal part of the anterior cingulate cortices. CNVs were recorded in the same cortical regiom as the RP, as well as in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex, and bilaterally in the premotor fronto-lateral, parietal superior, and middle temporal regions. In the basal ganglia, the RP was recorded in the putamen in six of seven patients, and in the head of the caudate nucleus and the pallidum in the only patient with electrodes in these recording sites. We suggest that our results are consistent with a long-lasting, simultaneous activation of cortical and subcortical structures, before and during self-paced and stimulus-triggered movements. The particular regiom that are simultaneously active may be determined by the task context. PMID:10709215

  6. von Willebrand factor contributes to poor outcome in a mouse model of intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ximin; Cao, Yongliang; Wei, Lixiang; Cai, Ping; Xu, Haochen; Luo, Haiyu; Bai, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu; Liu, Jian-Ren; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating stroke subtype and has no proven treatment. von Willebrand factor (VWF) has recently been demonstrated to promote inflammation processes. The present study investigated the pathophysiological role of VWF after experimental ICH. Functional outcomes, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, cerebral inflammation and levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured in a mouse model of ICH induced by autologous blood injection. We show that VWF were increased in the plasma and was accumulated in the perihematomal regions of mice subjected to ICH. Injection of VWF resulted in incerased expression of proinflammatory mediators and activation of ICAM-1 and MMP-9, associated with elevated myeloperoxidase, recruitment of neutrophils and microglia. Moreover, mice treated with VWF showed dramatically decreased pericyte coverage, more severe BBB damage and edema formation, and neuronal injury was increased compared with controls. In contrast, blocking antibodies against VWF reduced BBB damage and edema formation and improved neurological function. Together, these data identify a critical role for VWF in cerebral inflammation and BBB damage after ICH. The therapeutic interventions targeting VWF may be a novel strategy to reduce ICH-related injury. PMID:27782211

  7. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  8. Scale Invariance Properties of Intracerebral EEG Improve Seizure Prediction in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gadhoumi, Kais; Gotman, Jean; Lina, Jean Marc

    2015-01-01

    Although treatment for epilepsy is available and effective for nearly 70 percent of patients, many remain in need of new therapeutic approaches. Predicting the impending seizures in these patients could significantly enhance their quality of life if the prediction performance is clinically practical. In this study, we investigate the improvement of the performance of a seizure prediction algorithm in 17 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy by means of a novel measure. Scale-free dynamics of the intracerebral EEG are quantified through robust estimates of the scaling exponents—the first cumulants—derived from a wavelet leader and bootstrap based multifractal analysis. The cumulants are investigated for the discriminability between preictal and interictal epochs. The performance of our recently published patient-specific seizure prediction algorithm is then out-of-sample tested on long-lasting data using combinations of cumulants and state similarity measures previously introduced. By using the first cumulant in combination with state similarity measures, up to 13 of 17 patients had seizures predicted above chance with clinically practical levels of sensitivity (80.5%) and specificity (25.1% of total time under warning) for prediction horizons above 25 min. These results indicate that the scale-free dynamics of the preictal state are different from those of the interictal state. Quantifiers of these dynamics may carry a predictive power that can be used to improve seizure prediction performance. PMID:25867083

  9. Increased Endothelial Progenitor Cell Levels are Associated with Good Outcome in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pías-Peleteiro, Juan; Pérez-Mato, María; López-Arias, Esteban; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Blanco, Miguel; Campos, Francisco; Castillo, José; Sobrino, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a role in the regeneration of damaged brain tissue. However, the relationship between circulating EPC levels and functional recovery in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has not yet been tested. Therefore, our aim was to study the influence of circulating EPCs on the outcome of ICH. Forty-six patients with primary ICH (males, 71.7%; age, 72.7 ± 10.8 years) were prospectively included in the study within 12 hours of symptom onset. The main outcome variable was good functional outcome at 12 months (modified Rankin scale ≤2), considering residual volume at 6 months as a secondary variable. Circulating EPC (CD34+/CD133+/KDR+) levels were measured by flow cytometry from blood samples obtained at admission, 72 hours and day 7. Our results indicate that patients with good outcome show higher EPC numbers at 72 hours and day 7 (all p < 0.001). However, only EPC levels at day 7 were independently associated with good functional outcome at 12 months (OR, 1.15; CI95%, 1.01–1.35) after adjustment by age, baseline stroke severity and ICH volume. Moreover, EPC levels at day 7 were negatively correlated to residual volume (r = −0.525; p = 0.005). In conclusion, these findings suggest that EPCs may play a role in the functional recovery of ICH patients. PMID:27346699

  10. Action of selected serotonin antagonists on hyperthermia evoked by intracerebrally injected beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Martin, G E; Bacino, C B; Papp, N L

    1981-01-01

    Methergoline, an antagonist of cerebral serotonin receptors, has been shown to significantly reduce the rise in rectal temperature (Tre) produced by the intracerebral microinjection of beta-endorphin. In this study the role of serotonin in the increase in Tre elicited by beta-endorphin was further examined using three additional serotonin antagonists. beta-Endorphin was administered twice to rats using a crossover design in which half of the animals were first pretreated with the vehicle solution and half with the antagonist. Serotonin antagonists used were: methergoline, methysergide, cinanserin and cyproheptadine. Although methergoline did cause a marked reduction in the beta-endorphin-induced rise in Tre, neither methysergide, nor cinanserin, nor cyproheptadine produced a marked reduction in the hyperthermia. Since methergoline also interacts with the dopamine receptor, the effect of a dopamine antagonist, haloperidol, on the endorphin-evoked response was also examined. Haloperidol failed to attenuate the rise in Tre. The reason for the apparent discrepancy in the action of these serotonin antagonists is unclear. Further research may reveal distinct subpopulations of serotonin receptors at which these antagonists exert differential effects.

  11. Debulking from within: a robotic steerable cannula for intracerebral hemorrhage evacuation.

    PubMed

    Burgner, Jessica; Swaney, Philip J; Lathrop, Ray A; Weaver, Kyle D; Webster, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    New approaches to intracerebral hemorrhage management are motivated by its high incidence and 40% mortality rate. Surgery is sometimes attempted to decompress the brain, although patient outcomes are similar regardless of whether surgery occurs. We hypothesize that surgical decompression is not more effective because current open surgical techniques disrupt healthy brain tissue to access the clot formed by the hemorrhage, offsetting the benefits of surgery. To address this, we propose a less invasive needle-based approach in which the clot is debulked from within using a superelastic, precurved aspiration cannula that is deployed from a needle. The tip of this aspiration cannula is controlled by coordinated insertion and retraction of the cannula and needle, as well as axial rotation of the cannula. We describe the design of a sterilizable and biocompatible robot that can control the three degrees of freedom of the needle and cannula. Image guidance is achieved by adapting an approach originally developed for brain biopsy. We provide an optimization method for the selection of the precurvatures of one or more sequentially used aspiration cannulas to maximize hemorrhage evacuation, based on preoperative medical image data. In vitro experiments demonstrate the feasibility of evacuating 83-92% of hemorrhage volume, depending on the number of tubes and deployment method used.

  12. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Felipe Gonçalves; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate of about 50% in the first 30 days, with limited treatment possibilities. In the past two decades, the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (particularly mesenchymal stem cells and mononuclear cells) has been intensively investigated in preclinical models of different neurological diseases, including models of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. More recently, clinical studies, most of them small, unblinded, and nonrandomized, have suggested that the therapy with bone marrow-derived cells is safe and feasible in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This review discusses the available evidence on the use of bone marrow-derived cells to treat hemorrhagic strokes. Distinctive properties of animal studies are analyzed, including study design, cell dose, administration route, therapeutic time window, and possible mechanisms of action. Furthermore, clinical trials are also reviewed and discussed, with the objective of improving future studies in the field.

  13. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Felipe Gonçalves; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate of about 50% in the first 30 days, with limited treatment possibilities. In the past two decades, the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (particularly mesenchymal stem cells and mononuclear cells) has been intensively investigated in preclinical models of different neurological diseases, including models of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. More recently, clinical studies, most of them small, unblinded, and nonrandomized, have suggested that the therapy with bone marrow-derived cells is safe and feasible in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This review discusses the available evidence on the use of bone marrow-derived cells to treat hemorrhagic strokes. Distinctive properties of animal studies are analyzed, including study design, cell dose, administration route, therapeutic time window, and possible mechanisms of action. Furthermore, clinical trials are also reviewed and discussed, with the objective of improving future studies in the field. PMID:27698671

  14. High Morphologic Plasticity of Microglia/Macrophages Following Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Sheng; Lin, Li; Liu, Yue; Wang, Jie; Chu, Jiang; Zhang, Teng; Ning, Lin-Na; Shi, Yan; Fang, Ying-Yan; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Qiu, Ming-Yi; Tian, Qing

    2016-01-01

    As current efforts have limited effects on the clinical outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the mechanisms including microglia/macrophages that involved inflammation need further investigation. Here, 0.4 units of collagenase VII were injected into the left caudate putamen (CPu) to duplicate ICH rat models. In the brains of ICH rats, microglia/macrophages, the nearest cells to the hemorrhagic center, were observed as ameboid and Prussian-blue positive. Furthermore, the ameboid microglia/macrophages were differentiation (CD) 68 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) positive, and neither CD206 nor chitinase3-like 3 (Ym1) positive, suggesting their strong abilities of phagocytosis and secretion of IL-1β. According to the distance to the hemorrhagic center, we selected four areas—I, II, III, and IV—to analyze the morphology of microglia/macrophages. The processes decreased successively from region I to region IV. Microglia/macrophages in region IV had no processes. The processes in region I were radially distributed, however, they showed obvious directivity towards the hemorrhagic center in regions II and III. Region III had the largest density of compactly arrayed microglia/macrophages. All these in vivo results present the high morphologic plasticity of microglia/macrophages and their functions in the pathogenesis of ICHs. PMID:27455236

  15. Systemic Hemin Therapy Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiangping; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key feature of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and may contribute to perihematomal cell injury. Pretreatment with the heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducer hemin improves barrier function and neurological outcome in experimental models of traumatic and ischemic CNS injury. Since hemin is already in clinical use to treat acute porphyrias, this translational study was designed to test its effect on BBB function when initiated after ICH in two mouse models. At a dose similar to those used in most preconditioning studies (26 mg/kg i.p.), post-hemorrhage treatment with hemin reduced parenchymal extravasation of Evans blue by about three-quarters in both the blood injection and collagenase ICH models. Similar efficacy was observed when treatment was begun at one or three hours. At the lower dose that is currently in clinical use (4 mg/kg beginning at 3 hours), hemin also improved barrier function in both models, as assessed by both Evans blue and FITC-dextran leakage; however, it was somewhat less potent, reducing Evans blue leakage by about half. This dose was nevertheless sufficient to attenuate striatal cell loss and accelerate neurological recovery. Consistent with prior observations, striatal HO-1 expression was increased by hemin, and was localized to perivascular cells. These results suggest that hemin may be an effective therapy for ICH with a clinically relevant time window. Further study of the repurposing of this old drug seems warranted. PMID:24952361

  16. A Qualitative Study of Transportation Challenges Among Intracerebral Hemorrhage Survivors and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Ing, Marissa M; Vento, Megan A; Nakagawa, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    Post-discharge barriers of hemorrhagic stroke survivors in Hawai‘i have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify common driving and transportation barriers among patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and their caregivers in the Honolulu community. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ICH patients (n = 10) and caregivers (n = 11) regarding their driving and transportation barriers. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. Participants reported that they needed transportation to attend to their recovery and remain safe. Informal transportation was desired, yet not always available to patients. A local paratransit service for people with disabilities was the most common form of alternative transportation used by patients; however, they reported difficulty obtaining this method of transportation. Participants with no other option used costly, private transportation. Most ICH survivors expressed great challenges with the available transportation services that are essential to their reintegration into the community after hospitalization. Greater effort to provide transportation options and eligibility information to the ICH patients and their caregivers may be needed to improve their post-discharge care. PMID:25414805

  17. A qualitative study of transportation challenges among intracerebral hemorrhage survivors and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Ing, Marissa M; Vento, Megan A; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Linton, Kristen F

    2014-11-01

    Post-discharge barriers of hemorrhagic stroke survivors in Hawai'i have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify common driving and transportation barriers among patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and their caregivers in the Honolulu community. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ICH patients (n = 10) and caregivers (n = 11) regarding their driving and transportation barriers. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze the interviews. Participants reported that they needed transportation to attend to their recovery and remain safe. Informal transportation was desired, yet not always available to patients. A local paratransit service for people with disabilities was the most common form of alternative transportation used by patients; however, they reported difficulty obtaining this method of transportation. Participants with no other option used costly, private transportation. Most ICH survivors expressed great challenges with the available transportation services that are essential to their reintegration into the community after hospitalization. Greater effort to provide transportation options and eligibility information to the ICH patients and their caregivers may be needed to improve their post-discharge care.

  18. Deferoxamine reduces intracerebral hemorrhage-induced white matter damage in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Okauchi, Masanobu; Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro; Gu, Yuxiang; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya

    2015-10-01

    Iron contributes to c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation in young rats and white matter injury in piglets after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In the present study, we examined the effect of deferoxamine on ICH-induced white matter injury and JNK activation and in aged rats. Male Fischer 344 rats (18months old) had either an intracaudate injection of 100μl of autologous blood or a needle insertion (sham). The rats were treated with deferoxamine or vehicle with different regimen (dosage, duration and time window). White matter injury and activation of JNK were examined. We found that a dose of DFX should be at more than 10mg/kg for a therapeutic duration more than 2days with a therapeutic time window of 12h to reduce ICH-induced white matter loss at 2months. ICH-induced white matter injury was associated with JNK activation. The protein levels of phosphorylated-JNK (P-JNK) were upregulated at day-1 after ICH and then gradually decreased. P-JNK immunoreactivity was mostly located in white matter bundles. ICH-induced JNK activation was reduced by DFX treatment. This study demonstrated that DFX can reduce ICH-induced JNK activation and white matter damage.

  19. Stem cell-based therapies for intracerebral hemorrhage in animal model: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xun; Qin, Jie; Song, Bo; Shi, Changhe; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Xinjing; Ji, Yan; Ji, Wei; Gong, Guangming; Xu, Yuming

    2015-08-01

    Stem cell to be a new intervention for treating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) might benefit humans. Therefore, we collected animal studies to find the effect of this innovative treatment. In July 2014, we searched Medline (from 1950), Embase (from 1980), China Biology Medicine disk (from 1978) for studies on stem cells used for treating experimental ICH in animal models that reported neurobehavioral and structural outcome. We evaluated the quality of these studies and used a weighted mean difference random affects model for the meta-analysis. We have collected 30 studies from 650 publications identified through systematic review describing the effects of 5 different type of stem cells on 12 different neurobehavioral scales with 1101 rodents or monkeys. Although there is lack of uniformity of the evaluation methods, these researches showed consistent improvements both in neurobehavioral function and structural outcomes. Besides, the quality of these studies needs to be raised. In conclusion, stem cells hold extensive potential in treating ICH, which should be further evaluated with more evidence-based, high-quality animal studies.

  20. Curcumin reduces brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yuan, Jichao; Zhu, Haitao; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Lan; Liao, Xiaojun; Wen, Zexian; Chen, Yaxing; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiangkai

    2016-05-01

    T lymphocytes contribute to inflammation, thereby exacerbating neuronal injury after cerebral ischemia. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that inflammation is a key contributor to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced secondary brain injury. Curcumin, a low-molecular-weight curry spice that is derived from the Curcuma longa plant, suppresses T lymphocyte proliferation and migration. Based on these findings, we investigated whether treatment with curcumin would reduce the number of cerebral T lymphocytes in mice with experimentally induced ICH. We found that a large number of T lymphocytes infiltrated the brain at 3days post-ICH. Curcumin significantly improved neurological scores and reduced brain edema in mice with ICH, consistent with a role in reducing neuroinflammation and neurovascular injury. Using flow cytometry, we observed significantly fewer T lymphocytes in brain samples obtained from the curcumin-treated group than in samples obtained from the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, Western blot analysis and immunostaining indicated that treatment with curcumin significantly reduced the expression of a vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), interferon-γ (INF-γ) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the mouse brain at 72h post-ICH. Our results suggest that administering curcumin may alleviate cerebral inflammation resulting from ICH, at least in part by reducing the infiltration of T lymphocytes into the brain. Therefore, preventing T lymphocytes from infiltrating the brain may become a new strategy for treating clinical ICH. PMID:27026486