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Sample records for intracochlear sound pressure

  1. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones with an Off-the-Shelf Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salcher, Rolf; Püschel, Klaus; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The standard method to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation to the inner ear is measurement of vibration response of the stapes in human cadaveric temporal bones (TBs) by laser Doppler vibrometry. However, this method is reliable only if the intact ossicular chain is stimulated. For other stimulation modes an alternative method is needed. The differential intracochlear sound pressure between scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) is assumed to correlate with excitation. Using a custom-made pressure sensor it has been successfully measured and used to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation. To make this method generally accessible, an off-the-shelf pressure sensor (Samba Preclin 420 LP, Samba Sensors) was tested here for intracochlear sound pressure measurements. During acoustic stimulation, intracochlear sound pressures were simultaneously measurable in SV and ST between 0.1 and 8 kHz with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios with this sensor. The pressure differences were comparable to results obtained with custom-made sensors. Our results demonstrated that the pressure sensor Samba Preclin 420 LP is usable for measurements of intracochlear sound pressures in SV and ST and for the determination of differential intracochlear sound pressures. PMID:27610377

  2. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones with an Off-the-Shelf Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salcher, Rolf; Püschel, Klaus; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The standard method to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation to the inner ear is measurement of vibration response of the stapes in human cadaveric temporal bones (TBs) by laser Doppler vibrometry. However, this method is reliable only if the intact ossicular chain is stimulated. For other stimulation modes an alternative method is needed. The differential intracochlear sound pressure between scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) is assumed to correlate with excitation. Using a custom-made pressure sensor it has been successfully measured and used to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation. To make this method generally accessible, an off-the-shelf pressure sensor (Samba Preclin 420 LP, Samba Sensors) was tested here for intracochlear sound pressure measurements. During acoustic stimulation, intracochlear sound pressures were simultaneously measurable in SV and ST between 0.1 and 8 kHz with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios with this sensor. The pressure differences were comparable to results obtained with custom-made sensors. Our results demonstrated that the pressure sensor Samba Preclin 420 LP is usable for measurements of intracochlear sound pressures in SV and ST and for the determination of differential intracochlear sound pressures.

  3. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones with an Off-the-Shelf Sensor.

    PubMed

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Püschel, Klaus; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The standard method to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation to the inner ear is measurement of vibration response of the stapes in human cadaveric temporal bones (TBs) by laser Doppler vibrometry. However, this method is reliable only if the intact ossicular chain is stimulated. For other stimulation modes an alternative method is needed. The differential intracochlear sound pressure between scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) is assumed to correlate with excitation. Using a custom-made pressure sensor it has been successfully measured and used to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation. To make this method generally accessible, an off-the-shelf pressure sensor (Samba Preclin 420 LP, Samba Sensors) was tested here for intracochlear sound pressure measurements. During acoustic stimulation, intracochlear sound pressures were simultaneously measurable in SV and ST between 0.1 and 8 kHz with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios with this sensor. The pressure differences were comparable to results obtained with custom-made sensors. Our results demonstrated that the pressure sensor Samba Preclin 420 LP is usable for measurements of intracochlear sound pressures in SV and ST and for the determination of differential intracochlear sound pressures.

  4. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones with an Off-the-Shelf Sensor.

    PubMed

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Püschel, Klaus; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The standard method to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation to the inner ear is measurement of vibration response of the stapes in human cadaveric temporal bones (TBs) by laser Doppler vibrometry. However, this method is reliable only if the intact ossicular chain is stimulated. For other stimulation modes an alternative method is needed. The differential intracochlear sound pressure between scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) is assumed to correlate with excitation. Using a custom-made pressure sensor it has been successfully measured and used to determine the output level of acoustic and mechanical stimulation. To make this method generally accessible, an off-the-shelf pressure sensor (Samba Preclin 420 LP, Samba Sensors) was tested here for intracochlear sound pressure measurements. During acoustic stimulation, intracochlear sound pressures were simultaneously measurable in SV and ST between 0.1 and 8 kHz with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios with this sensor. The pressure differences were comparable to results obtained with custom-made sensors. Our results demonstrated that the pressure sensor Samba Preclin 420 LP is usable for measurements of intracochlear sound pressures in SV and ST and for the determination of differential intracochlear sound pressures. PMID:27610377

  5. The Effect of Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence on Intracochlear Sound Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Pisano, Dominic V.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Rosowski, John J.

    2011-11-01

    Semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) is a pathological opening in the bony wall of the inner ear that can result in conductive hearing loss. The hearing loss is variable across patients, and the precise mechanism and source of variability is not fully understood. We use intracochlear sound pressure measurements in cadaveric preparations to study the effects of SCD size. Simultaneous measurement of basal intracochlear sound pressures in scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) quantifies the complex differential pressure across the cochlear partition, the stimulus that excites the partition. Sound-induced pressures in SV and ST, as well as stapes velocity and ear-canal pressure are measured simultaneously for various sizes of SCD followed by SCD patching. At low frequencies (<600 Hz) our results show that SCD decreases the pressure in both SV and ST, as well as differential pressure, and these effects become more pronounced as dehiscence size is increased. For frequencies above 1 kHz, the smallest pinpoint dehiscence can have the larger effect on the differential pressure in some ears. These effects due to SCD are reversible by patching the dehiscence.

  6. The Effect of Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence on Intracochlear Sound Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Dominic V.; Niesten, Marlien E.F.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) is a pathological opening in the bony wall of the inner ear that can result in conductive hearing loss. The hearing loss is variable across patients, and the precise mechanism and source of variability are not fully understood. Simultaneous measurements of basal intracochlear sound pressures in scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) enable quantification of the differential pressure across the cochlear partition, the stimulus that excites the cochlear partition. We used intracochlear sound pressure measurements in cadaveric preparations to study the effects of SCD size. Sound-induced pressures in SV and ST, as well as stapes velocity and ear-canal pressure were measured simultaneously for various sizes of SCD followed by SCD patching. Our results showed that at low frequencies (<600 Hz), SCD decreased the pressure in both SV and ST, as well as differential pressure, and these effects became more pronounced as dehiscence size was increased. Near 100 Hz, SV decreased about 10 dB for a 0.5 mm dehiscence and 20 dB for a 2 mm dehiscence, while ST decreased about 8 dB for a 0.5 mm dehiscence and 18 dB for a 2mm dehiscence. Differential pressure decreased about 10 dB for a 0.5 mm dehiscence and about 20 dB for a 2 mm dehiscense at 100 Hz. In some ears, for frequencies above 1 kHz, the smallest pinpoint dehiscence had bigger effects on the differential pressure (10 dB decrease) than larger dehiscenses (less than 10 dB decrease), suggesting larger hearing losses in this frequency range. These effects due to SCD were reversible by patching the dehiscence. We also showed that under certain circumstances such as SCD, stapes velocity is not related to how the ear can transduce sound across the cochlear partition because it is not directly related to the differential pressure, emphasizing that certain pathologies cannot be fully assessed by measurements such as stapes velocity. PMID:22814034

  7. Assessment of the effects of superior canal dehiscence location and size on intracochlear sound pressures

    PubMed Central

    Niesten, Marlien E.F.; Stieger, Christof; Lee, Daniel J.; Merchant, Julie P.; Grolman, Wilko; Rosowski, John J.; Nakajima, Hideko H.

    2014-01-01

    Superior canal dehiscence (SCD) is a defect in the bony covering of the superior semicircular canal. Patients with SCD present with a wide range of symptoms, including hearing loss, yet it is unknown whether hearing is affected by parameters such as the location of the SCD. Our previous human cadaveric temporal bone study, utilizing intracochlear pressure measurements, generally showed that an increase in dehiscence size caused a low-frequency monotonic decrease in the cochlear drive across the partition, consistent with increased hearing loss. This previous study was limited to SCD sizes including and smaller than 2 mm long and 0.7 mm wide. However, the effects of larger SCDs (>2 mm long) were not studied, although larger SCDs are seen in many patients. Therefore, to answer the effect of parameters that have not been studied, this present study assessed the effect of SCD location and the effect of large-sized SCD (>2 mm long) on intracochlear pressures. We used simultaneous measurements of sound pressures in scala vestibuli and scala tympani at the base of the cochlea to determine the sound-pressure difference across the cochlear partition – a measure of the cochlear drive in a temporal bone preparation – allowing for assessment of hearing loss. We measured the cochlear drive before and after SCDs were made at different locations (e.g., closer to the ampulla of the superior semicircular canal or closer to the common crus), and for different dehiscence sizes (including larger than 2 mm long and 0.7 mm wide). Our measurements suggest that: 1) Different SCD locations result in similar cochlear drive; 2) Larger SCDs produce larger decreases in cochlear drive at low frequencies. However, the effect of SCD size seems to saturate as the size increases above 2–3 mm long and 0.7 mm wide. Although the monotonic effect was generally consistent across ears, the quantitative amount of change in cochlear drive due to dehiscence size varied across ears. Additionally, the

  8. A simple electrical lumped-element model simulates intra-cochlear sound pressures and cochlear impedance below 2 kHz.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Torsten; Hensel, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    Low-frequency sounds displace large parts of the basilar membrane (BM) and can have a modulating and possibly disturbing effect on hearing at other frequencies. A better understanding of the transfer of such sounds onto the BM is therefore desirable. Lumped-element models have previously been employed to determine the low-frequency acoustic properties of the cochlea. Although helpful in illustrating schematically the role of the helicotrema, BM compliance, and the round window on low-frequency hearing, these models, when applied quantitatively, have not been able to explain experimental data in detail. Building on these models, an extended electrical analog requires just 13 lumped elements to capture, in surprising detail, the physiologically determined frequency-dependence of intra-cochlear pressure and cochlear impedance between 10 Hz and 2 kHz. The model's verification is based on data from cat, guinea pig, and humans, who differ principally in their low-frequency cochlear acoustics. The modeling data suggest that damping within the helicotrema plays a less prominent role than previously assumed. A resonance feature, which is often observed experimentally near 150 Hz in these animals and near 50 Hz in humans, is presumably a phenomenon local to the apex and not the result of a standing wave between stapes and helicotrema. PMID:24180783

  9. Intracochlear Scala Media Pressure Measurement: Implications for Models of Cochlear Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sushrut S; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2015-12-15

    Models of the active cochlea build upon the underlying passive mechanics. Passive cochlear mechanics is based on physical and geometrical properties of the cochlea and the fluid-tissue interaction between the cochlear partition and the surrounding fluid. Although the fluid-tissue interaction between the basilar membrane and the fluid in scala tympani (ST) has been explored in both active and passive cochleae, there was no experimental data on the fluid-tissue interaction on the scala media (SM) side of the partition. To this aim, we measured sound-evoked intracochlear pressure in SM close to the partition using micropressure sensors. All the SM pressure data are from passive cochleae, likely because the SM cochleostomy led to loss of endocochlear potential. Thus, these experiments are studies of passive cochlear mechanics. SM pressure close to the tissue showed a pattern of peaks and notches, which could be explained as an interaction between fast and slow (i.e., traveling wave) pressure modes. In several animals SM and ST pressure were measured in the same cochlea. Similar to previous studies, ST-pressure was dominated by a slow, traveling wave mode at stimulus frequencies in the vicinity of the best frequency of the measurement location, and by a fast mode above best frequency. Antisymmetric pressure between SM and ST supported the classic single-partition cochlear models, or a dual-partition model with tight coupling between partitions. From the SM and ST pressure we calculated slow and fast modes, and from active ST pressure we extrapolated the passive findings to the active case. The passive slow mode estimated from SM and ST data was low-pass in nature, as predicted by cochlear models.

  10. A family of fiber-optic based pressure sensors for intracochlear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Elizabeth S.; Nakajima, Hideko H.

    2015-02-01

    Fiber-optic pressure sensors have been developed for measurements of intracochlear pressure. The present family of transducers includes an 81 μm diameter sensor employing a SLED light source and single-mode optic fiber, and LED/multi-mode sensors with 126 and 202 μm diameter. The 126 μm diameter pressure sensor also has been constructed with an electrode adhered to its side, for coincident pressure and voltage measurements. These sensors have been used for quantifying cochlear mechanical impedances, informing our understanding of conductive hearing loss and its remediation, and probing the operation of the cochlear amplifier.

  11. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance between the equivalent sources and measurement surfaces and for the difference in magnitude between pressure and velocity. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to examine the methods. The double layer velocity method seems to be more robust to noise and flanking sound than the combined pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward.

  12. Program Computes Sound Pressures at Rocket Launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogg, Gary; Heyman, Roy; White, Michael; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Launch Vehicle External Sound Pressure is a computer program that predicts the ignition overpressure and the acoustic pressure on the surfaces and in the vicinity of a rocket and launch pad during launch. The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) that gathers input data from the user. These data include the critical dimensions of the rocket and of any launch-pad structures that may act as acoustic reflectors, the size and shape of the exhaust duct or flame deflector, and geometrical and operational parameters of the rocket engine. For the ignition-overpressure calculations, histories of the chamber pressure and mass flow rate also are required. Once the GUI has gathered the input data, it feeds them to ignition-overpressure and launch-acoustics routines, which are based on several approximate mathematical models of distributed sources, transmission, and reflection of acoustic waves. The output of the program includes ignition overpressures and acoustic pressures at specified locations.

  13. Intracochlear schwannoma: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Ikari, Liliane Satomi; Burke, Patrick Rademaker; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Santiago; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve are benign tumors that usually occur in the internal auditory canal or the cerebellopontine angle cistern. Rarely, these tumors may originate from the neural elements within the vestibule, cochlea, or semicircular canals and are called intralabyrinthine schwannomas. Intracochlear schwannomas (ICSs) represent a small percentage of these tumors, and their diagnosis is based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objectives To report the clinical and radiologic features and audiometric testing results of an ICS in a 48-year-old man after a 22-month follow-up period. Resumed Report A patient with an 8-year history of persistent tinnitus in his right ear, combined with ipsilateral progressive hearing loss and aural fullness. Audiometry revealed normal hearing in the left ear and a moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear, with decreased speech reception threshold and word recognition score, compared with the exam performed 5 years previously. MRI showed a small intracochlear nodular lesion in the modiolus, isointense on T1 with a high contrast enhancement on T1 postgadolinium images. During the follow-up period, there were no radiologic changes on imaging studies. Thus, a wait-and-scan policy was chosen as the lesion remained stable with no considerable growth and the patient still presents with residual hearing. Conclusions Once diagnosed, not all ICS patients require surgery. Treatment options for ICS include stereotactic radiotherapy and rescanning policy, depending on the tumor's size, evidence of the tumor's growth, degree of hearing loss, intractable vestibular symptoms, concern about the pathologic diagnosis, and the patient's other medical conditions. PMID:25992114

  14. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  15. Sound pressure level in a municipal preschool

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Adriana Aparecida Tahara; Delecrode, Camila Ribas; Guida, Heraldo Lorena; Ribeiro, André Knap; Cardoso, Ana Claúdia Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: To evaluate the sound pressure level to which preschool students are exposed. Method: This was a prospective, quantitative, nonexperimental, and descriptive study. To achieve the aim of the study we used an audio dosimeter. The sound pressure level (SPL) measurements were obtained for 2 age based classrooms. Preschool I and II. The measurements were obtained over 4 days in 8-hour sessions, totaling 1920 minutes. Results: Compared with established standards, the SPL measured ranged from 40.6 dB (A) to 105.8 dB (A). The frequency spectrum of the SPL was concentrated in the frequency range between 500 Hz and 4000 Hz. The older children produced higher SPLs than the younger ones, and the levels varied according to the activity performed. Painting and writing were the quietest activities, while free activities period and games were the noisiest. Conclusion: The SPLs measured at the preschool were higher and exceeded the maximum permitted level according to the reference standards. Therefore, the implementation of actions that aim to minimize the negative impact of noise in this environment is essential. PMID:25992013

  16. Automated analysis of blood pressure measurements (Korotkov sound)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. P.; Hoffler, G. W.; Wolthuis, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic system for noninvasive measurements of arterial blood pressure is described. System uses Korotkov sound processor logic ratios to identify Korotkov sounds. Schematic diagram of system is provided to show components and method of operation.

  17. The sound velocity measurement in diacylglycerol oil under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostocki, A. J.; Malanowski, A.; Tarakowski, R.; Szlachta, K.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Balcerzak, A.; Ptasznik, S.

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the influence of high pressure on sound velocity at 293 K has been presented. The investigated diacylglycerol oil (DAG - [D82T18]AG) was composed of 82% DAGs and 18% triacylglycerols. The variation of sound velocity with hydrostatic pressure for DAG was evaluated up to 400 MPa. The phase transformation in DAG has been observed as a discontinuity of the dependence of sound velocity on pressure. The sound velocity during the phase transition has shown distinct increment. Also the volume changes have been measured. It has shown the rapid drop of the volume at the phase transformation pressure due to the possible crystallization of DAG oil.

  18. Environmental correction factors for predicting room sound pressure levels

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, A.C.C.

    1998-10-01

    ARI Standard 885 provides a method for calculating sound pressure levels in room below plenums containing air-handling devices. An important step in the calculation is the correction of the sound power for the device from values provided by the manufacturer to values appropriate for use in occupied spaces. This correction is called the environmental adjustment factor. It compensates for the fact that sound power measured for a source placed outdoors or in a hemi-free field has been found to be greater at low frequencies than the sound power measured for the same source in a reverberation room. When making predictions of sound pressure level in a room using such sound power levels, one has to estimate the reduction in sound power caused by the room. Estimated reductions provided in ARI 885 were examined during ASHRAE research project RP-755 and found to be too large. Lower values are suggested in this paper.

  19. Automatic segmentation of intra-cochlear anatomy in post-implantation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Fitsum A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; McRackan, Theodore R.; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2013-03-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a neural prosthetic device that restores hearing by directly stimulating the auditory nerve with an electrode array. In CI surgery, the surgeon threads the electrode array into the cochlea, blind to internal structures. We have recently developed algorithms for determining the position of CI electrodes relative to intra-cochlear anatomy using pre- and post-implantation CT. We are currently using this approach to develop a CI programming assistance system that uses knowledge of electrode position to determine a patient-customized CI sound processing strategy. However, this approach cannot be used for the majority of CI users because the cochlea is obscured by image artifacts produced by CI electrodes and acquisition of pre-implantation CT is not universal. In this study we propose an approach that extends our techniques so that intra-cochlear anatomy can be segmented for CI users for which pre-implantation CT was not acquired. The approach achieves automatic segmentation of intra-cochlear anatomy in post-implantation CT by exploiting intra-subject symmetry in cochlear anatomy across ears. We validated our approach on a dataset of 10 ears in which both pre- and post-implantation CTs were available. Our approach results in mean and maximum segmentation errors of 0.27 and 0.62 mm, respectively. This result suggests that our automatic segmentation approach is accurate enough for developing customized CI sound processing strategies for unilateral CI patients based solely on postimplantation CT scans.

  20. Tinnitus Suppression by Intracochlear Electrical Stimulation in Single Sided Deafness – A Prospective Clinical Trial: Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Remo A. G. J.; George, Erwin L. J.; Janssen, Miranda; Griessner, Andreas; Zierhofer, Clemens; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Earlier studies show that a Cochlear Implant (CI), capable of providing intracochlear electrical stimulation independent of environmental sounds, appears to suppress tinnitus at least for minutes. The current main objective is to compare the long-term suppressive effects of looped (i.e. repeated) electrical stimulation (without environmental sound perception) with the standard stimulation pattern of a CI (with environmental sound perception). This could open new possibilities for the development of a “Tinnitus Implant” (TI), an intracochlear pulse generator for the suppression of tinnitus. Materials and Methods Ten patients with single sided deafness suffering from unilateral tinnitus in the deaf ear are fitted with a CI (MED-EL Corporation, Innsbruck, Austria). Stimulation patterns are optimized for each individual patient, after which they are compared using a randomized crossover design, with a follow-up of six months, followed by a 3 month period using the modality of patient’s choice. Results Results show that tinnitus can be suppressed with intracochlear electrical stimulation independent of environmental sounds, even long term. No significant difference in tinnitus suppression was found between the standard clinical CI and the TI. Conclusion It can be concluded that coding of environmental sounds is no requirement for tinnitus suppression with intracochlear electrical stimulation. It is therefore plausible that tinnitus suppression by CI is not solely caused by an attention shift from the tinnitus to environmental sounds. Both the standard clinical CI and the experimental TI are potential treatment options for tinnitus. These findings offer perspectives for a successful clinical application of the TI, possibly even in patients with significant residual hearing. Trial Registration TrialRegister.nl NTR3374 PMID:27111333

  1. Determination of sound power levels of some pyrotechnic devices using sound pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weixiong

    2001-05-01

    A noise measurement study was conducted at five reservoirs in New York State during the winter and summer of 2003 to determine the sound power levels generated by some specific pyrotechnic devices (bangers, screamers, and CAPAs) using sound pressure techniques. The study was performed in support of an environmental impact statement (EIS) that defined the areas around each of these reservoirs where any significant impacts would occur as a result of the pyrotechnic operations. Sound characteristic data for each pyrotechnic device was collected at short distances with a direct line of sight to the pyrotechnic sources. The sound pressure levels for each pyrotechnic device were measured in two conditions (winter and summer) to examine the accuracy of measured data. The sound power levels, including both A-weighted and C-weighted 1/1 octave band values, were calculated based upon the measured sound pressure levels. With the absence of literature and manufacturing data supports, the values of this study were believed to be the most comprehensive emission data for the EIS noise analysis.

  2. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  3. Sound pressure in insert earphone couplers and real ears.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, M D; Sachs, R M

    1977-12-01

    It is known that sound pressure, measured in couplers via a probe-tube microphone, often shows a pressure vs frequency response that drops sharply at a single frequency. In this study sound pressure was theoretically determined at various locations within a hard-walled cylindrical cavity, driven by a constant-volume velocity source with circular symmetry. At each location in the volume, a transfer impedance was defined as the ratio of pressure to inlet-volume velocity. In the region around the inlet, the transfer impedance passes through zero as it changes from negative to positive reactance with increasing frequency. Two hard-walled cavity examples were examined in detail (1) the main cavity of a 2-cm3 HA-2 coupler, and (2) a cavity having dimensions approximately equal to the occluded ear canal between an ear-mold tip and the eardrum. Contours of constant minimum sound pressure vs frequency are given for these two cylindrical volumes with experimental verification. Implications for probe microphone calibration and measurement of sound pressure in ears are discussed. PMID:604691

  4. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  5. Device enables calibration of microphones at high sound pressure levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillen, A.

    1967-01-01

    Coupling device accurately calibrates microphones at high sound pressure intensities. The system which uses a liquid as the coupling medium can operate in an automatic mode by using a standard microphone as a control sensor. Feedback from the standard microphone controls the calibration signal level.

  6. [Peak sound pressure levels of gunshots from starter's pistols].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, M A; Dieker, L; Prante, H; Maschke, C

    1998-12-01

    Starter's pistols are often bought for self-defense, but can also be used for criminal activities (e.g. assaults, etc.). When a starter's pistol is loaded with blank cartridges and is fired, a powerful shooting noise results. The level of the noise produced is high enough to cause acoustic trauma. For legal examinations and giving an expert opinion further information is needed about the power of such noise. We examined how high peak sound pressure levels were of the gunshots of blank cartridges and whether there existed any directional characteristics from the noise emissions. In all, 15 different models of starter's pistols of 8 different calibres were examined. In addition to blank cartridges, 8 mm tear gas cartridges were also examined. Four transducers were situated in the horizontal plane around the muzzle: 0 degree (shooting direction), 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees (towards the firer). The distances between the transducers and the muzzle were 25 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm, and 200 cm. At a distance of 1 m and in the 0 degree shooting direction the peak sound pressure levels of nearly all weapons tested exceeded 160 dB. At a shooting distance of 25 cm the peak sound pressure levels reached 181 dB. In addition, we observed a directional characteristic concerning the emission of noise: pistols produced higher peak sound pressure levels to the front than backwards towards the firer. PMID:10023593

  7. Wind turbine sound pressure level calculations at dwellings.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Leroux, Tony; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides calculations of outdoor sound pressure levels (SPLs) at dwellings for 10 wind turbine models, to support Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study. Manufacturer supplied and measured wind turbine sound power levels were used to calculate outdoor SPL at 1238 dwellings using ISO [(1996). ISO 9613-2-Acoustics] and a Swedish noise propagation method. Both methods yielded statistically equivalent results. The A- and C-weighted results were highly correlated over the 1238 dwellings (Pearson's linear correlation coefficient r > 0.8). Calculated wind turbine SPLs were compared to ambient SPLs from other sources, estimated using guidance documents from the United States and Alberta, Canada.

  8. Wind turbine sound pressure level calculations at dwellings.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Leroux, Tony; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides calculations of outdoor sound pressure levels (SPLs) at dwellings for 10 wind turbine models, to support Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study. Manufacturer supplied and measured wind turbine sound power levels were used to calculate outdoor SPL at 1238 dwellings using ISO [(1996). ISO 9613-2-Acoustics] and a Swedish noise propagation method. Both methods yielded statistically equivalent results. The A- and C-weighted results were highly correlated over the 1238 dwellings (Pearson's linear correlation coefficient r > 0.8). Calculated wind turbine SPLs were compared to ambient SPLs from other sources, estimated using guidance documents from the United States and Alberta, Canada. PMID:27036282

  9. Modiolus-hugging intracochlear electrode array with shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyou Sik; Jun, Sang Beom; Lim, Yoon Seob; Park, Se-Ik; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear implant system, the distance between spiral ganglia and the electrodes within the volume of the scala tympani cavity significantly affects the efficiency of the electrical stimulation in terms of the threshold current level and spatial selectivity. Because the spiral ganglia are situated inside the modiolus, the central axis of the cochlea, it is desirable that the electrode array hugs the modiolus to minimize the distance between the electrodes and the ganglia. In the present study, we propose a shape-memory-alloy-(SMA-) embedded intracochlear electrode which gives a straight electrode a curved modiolus-hugging shape using the restoration force of the SMA as triggered by resistive heating after insertion into the cochlea. An eight-channel ball-type electrode array is fabricated with an embedded titanium-nickel SMA backbone wire. It is demonstrated that the electrode array changes its shape in a transparent plastic human cochlear model. To verify the safe insertion of the electrode array into the human cochlea, the contact pressures during insertion at the electrode tip and the contact pressures over the electrode length after insertion were calculated using a 3D finite element analysis. The results indicate that the SMA-embedded electrode is functionally and mechanically feasible for clinical applications. PMID:23762181

  10. Prediction of light aircraft interior sound pressure level from the measured sound power flowing in to the cabin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Heitman, Karen E.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1986-01-01

    The validity of the room equation of Crocker and Price (1982) for predicting the cabin interior sound pressure level was experimentally tested using a specially constructed setup for simultaneous measurements of transmitted sound intensity and interior sound pressure levels. Using measured values of the reverberation time and transmitted intensities, the equation was used to predict the space-averaged interior sound pressure level for three different fuselage conditions. The general agreement between the room equation and experimental test data is considered good enough for this equation to be used for preliminary design studies.

  11. Peak sound pressure and sound exposure level from underwater explosions in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Alexander G; Dahl, Peter H

    2014-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the peak pressure and sound exposure level (SEL) from underwater explosions collected 7 km off the coast of Virginia Beach, Virginia are presented. The peak pressures are compared to results from previous studies and a semi-empirical equation that is a function of measurement range and charge weight, and are found to be in good agreement. An empirical equation for SEL that similarly employs a scaling approach involving charge weight and range is also presented and shows promise for the prediction of SEL in shallow water.

  12. 16 CFR 1500.47 - Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method for determining the sound pressure... ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.47 Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps. (a... of the explosive. Measure the peak sound pressure level at each of the six designated orientations...

  13. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  14. Sound-driven fluid dynamics in pressurized carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Maikel M; Mettin, Robert; Benes, Nieck E; Schwarzer, Dirk; Keurentjes, Jos T F

    2010-07-28

    Using high-speed visualization we demonstrate that ultrasound irradiation of pressurized carbon dioxide (CO(2)) induces phenomena that do not occur in ordinary liquids at ambient conditions. For a near-critical mixture of CO(2) and argon, sonication leads to extremely fast local phase separation, in which the system enters and leaves the two-phase region with the frequency of the imposed sound field. This phase transition can propagate with the speed of sound, but can also be located at fixed positions in the case of a standing sound wave. Sonication of a vapor-liquid interface creates a fine dispersion of liquid and vapor, irrespective whether the ultrasound horn is placed in the liquid or the vapor phase. In the absence of an interface, sonication of the liquid leads to ejection of a macroscopic vapor phase from the ultrasound horn with a velocity of several meters per second in the direction of wave propagation. The findings reported here potentially provide a tunable and noninvasive means for enhancing mass and heat transfer in high-pressure fluids. PMID:20687647

  15. Sound pressure gain produced by the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, H; Goode, R L

    1995-10-01

    The acoustic function of the middle ear is to match sound passing from the low impedance of air to the high impedance of cochlear fluid. Little information is available on the actual middle ear pressure gain in human beings. This article describes experiments on middle ear pressure gain in six fresh human temporal bones. Stapes footplate displacement and phase were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer before and after removal of the tympanic membrane, malleus, and incus. Acoustic insulation of the round window with clay was performed. Umbo displacement was also measured before tympanic membrane removal to assess baseline tympanic membrane function. The middle ear has its major gain in the lower frequencies, with a peak near 0.9 kHz. The mean gain was 23.0 dB below 1.0 kHz, the resonant frequency of the middle ear; the mean peak gain was 26.6 dB. Above 1.0 kHz, the second pressure gain decreased at a rate of -8.6 dB/octave, with a mean gain of 6.5 dB at 4.0 kHz. Only a small amount of gain was present above 7.0 kHz. Significant individual differences in pressure gain were found between ears that appeared related to variations in tympanic membrane function and not to variations in cochlear impedance. PMID:7567003

  16. Prediction of light aircraft interior sound pressure level using the room equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The room equation is investigated for predicting interior sound level. The method makes use of an acoustic power balance, by equating net power flow into the cabin volume to power dissipated within the cabin using the room equation. The sound power level transmitted through the panels was calculated by multiplying the measured space averaged transmitted intensity for each panel by its surface area. The sound pressure level was obtained by summing the mean square sound pressures radiated from each panel. The data obtained supported the room equation model in predicting the cabin interior sound pressure level.

  17. Generalization of low pressure, gas-liquid, metastable sound speed to high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is developed for isentropic metastable sound propagation in high pressure gas-liquid mixtures. Without simplification, it also correctly predicts the minimum speed for low pressure air-water measurements where other authors are forced to postulate isothermal propagation. This is accomplished by a mixture heat capacity ratio which automatically adjusts from its single phase values to approximately the isothermal value of unity needed for the minimum speed. Computations are made for the pure components parahydrogen and nitrogen, with emphasis on the latter. With simplifying assumptions, the theory reduces to a well known approximate formula limited to low pressure.

  18. Estimation of vehicle speed using wayside sound pressure onset rate.

    PubMed

    Zapfe, Jeffrey A; Wood, Eric W; Newmark, Marc S

    2009-12-01

    Transportation-related environmental noise studies, particularly those associated with rail traffic, often require long term measurements near existing rights of way. In addition to the sound produced by passing vehicles, it is also useful to know their speed. Previously, speed measurements have generally required an additional piece of instrumentation, such as a second microphone, video camera, or a radar gun--resulting in added measurement cost and complexity. The present study shows how estimations of vehicle speed can be obtained using a single wayside microphone. The method is based on the rate of pressure rise as the vehicle approaches, specifically the maximum onset rate. This paper shows how the maximum onset rate depends only on the vehicle speed, the microphone distance, and the speed of sound. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach field test data are presented for train passages ranging in speed from 33.5 to 55.6 m/s, as measured by a microphone located 28.65 m from the tracks. Speed estimates derived from the onset rate were generally accurate to within 8% of the independently measured speed of the train. PMID:20000912

  19. Intracochlear Bleeding Enhances Cochlear Fibrosis and Ossification: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Kyeung A.; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Park, Heesung; Choi, Jin Woong; Hur, Gang Min; Park, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracochlear bleeding during cochleostomy on cochlear inflammatory response and residual hearing in a guinea pig animal model. Auditory brainstem response threshold shifts were greater in blood injected ears (p<0.05). Interleukin-1β, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide synthase 2, cytokines that are related to early stage inflammation, were significantly increased in blood injected ears compared to normal and cochleostomy only ears at 1 day after surgery; with the increased IL-1β being sustained until 3 days after the surgery (p<0.05). Hair cells were more severely damaged in blood injected ears than in cochleostomy only ears. Histopathologic examination revealed more extensive fibrosis and ossification in blood injected ears than cochleostomy only ears. These results show that intracochlear bleeding enhanced cochlear inflammation resulting in increased fibrosis and ossification in an experimental animal model. PMID:26308864

  20. The origin of Korotkoff sounds and the accuracy of auscultatory blood pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Babbs, Charles F

    2015-12-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that the sharper, high frequency Korotkoff sounds come from resonant motion of the arterial wall, which begins after the artery transitions from a buckled state to an expanding state. The motions of one mass, two nonlinear springs, and one damper, driven by transmural pressure under the cuff, are used to model and compute the Korotkoff sounds according to principles of classical Newtonian physics. The natural resonance of this spring-mass-damper system provides a concise, yet rigorous, explanation for the origin of Korotkoff sounds. Fundamentally, wall stretching in expansion requires more force than wall bending in buckling. At cuff pressures between systolic and diastolic arterial pressure, audible vibrations (> 40 Hz) occur during early expansion of the artery wall beyond its zero pressure radius after the outward moving mass of tissue experiences sudden deceleration, caused by the discontinuity in stiffness between bucked and expanded states. The idealized spring-mass-damper model faithfully reproduces the time-domain waveforms of actual Korotkoff sounds in humans. Appearance of arterial sounds occurs at or just above the level of systolic pressure. Disappearance of arterial sounds occurs at or just above the level of diastolic pressure. Muffling of the sounds is explained by increased resistance of the artery to collapse, caused by downstream venous engorgement. A simple analytical model can define the physical origin of Korotkoff sounds, suggesting improved mechanical or electronic filters for their selective detection and confirming the disappearance of the Korotkoff sounds as the optimal diastolic end point.

  1. Sound Pressure Level Gain in an Acoustic Metamaterial Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyungjun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kwak, Jun-Hyuk; Park, Jihyun; Yoon, Jong Rak; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The inherent attenuation of a homogeneous viscous medium limits radiation propagation, thereby restricting the use of many high-frequency acoustic devices to only short-range applications. Here, we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic metamaterial localization cavity which is used for sound pressure level (SPL) gain using double coiled up space like structures thereby increasing the range of detection. This unique behavior occurs within a subwavelength cavity that is 1/10th of the wavelength of the incident acoustic wave, which provides up to a 13 dB SPL gain. We show that the amplification results from the Fabry-Perot resonance of the cavity, which has a simultaneously high effective refractive index and effective impedance. We also experimentally verify the SPL amplification in an underwater environment at higher frequencies using a sample with an identical unit cell size. The versatile scalability of the design shows promising applications in many areas, especially in acoustic imaging and underwater communication. PMID:25502279

  2. Global sound modes in mirror traps with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodin, D. I.; Zaytsev, K. V.; Beklemishev, A. D.

    2013-10-15

    Global oscillations of inhomogeneous plasma with frequencies close to the bounce frequency of ions in mirror traps have been studied. It has been shown that, in some cases, the sound can be reflected from the axial plasma inhomogeneity. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model with Chew-Goldberger-Low approximation has been utilized to determine conditions of existence of the standing waves in the mirror-confined plasma. Linearized wave equation for the longitudinal plasma oscillations in thin anisotropic inhomogeneous plasma with finite β has been derived. The wave equation has been treated numerically. The oscillations are studied for the case of the trap with partially filled loss-cone and the trap with sloshing ions. It has been shown that in cells of the multiple-mirror trap standing waves can exist. The frequency of the wave is of the order of the mean bounce-frequency of ions. In the trap with sloshing ions, the mode supported by the pressure of fast ions could exist. The results of oscillations observation in the experiment on the Gas Dynamic Trap have been presented.

  3. How male sound pressure level influences phonotaxis in virgin female Jamaican field crickets (Gryllus assimilis)

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Understanding female mate preference is important for determining the strength and direction of sexual trait evolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) acoustic signalers use is often an important predictor of mating success because higher sound pressure levels are detectable at greater distances. If females are more attracted to signals produced at higher sound pressure levels, then the potential fitness impacts of signalling at higher sound pressure levels should be elevated beyond what would be expected from detection distance alone. Here we manipulated the sound pressure level of cricket mate attraction signals to determine how female phonotaxis was influenced. We examined female phonotaxis using two common experimental methods: spherical treadmills and open arenas. Both methods showed similar results, with females exhibiting greatest phonotaxis towards loud sound pressure levels relative to the standard signal (69 vs. 60 dB SPL) but showing reduced phonotaxis towards very loud sound pressure level signals relative to the standard (77 vs. 60 dB SPL). Reduced female phonotaxis towards supernormal stimuli may signify an acoustic startle response, an absence of other required sensory cues, or perceived increases in predation risk. PMID:24949249

  4. Sound pressure distribution within natural and artificial human ear canals: forward stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Tao Cheng, Jeffrey; Rosowski, John J

    2014-12-01

    This work is part of a study of the interaction of sound pressure in the ear canal (EC) with tympanic membrane (TM) surface displacement. Sound pressures were measured with 0.5-2 mm spacing at three locations within the shortened natural EC or an artificial EC in human temporal bones: near the TM surface, within the tympanic ring plane, and in a plane transverse to the long axis of the EC. Sound pressure was also measured at 2-mm intervals along the long EC axis. The sound field is described well by the size and direction of planar sound pressure gradients, the location and orientation of standing-wave nodal lines, and the location of longitudinal standing waves along the EC axis. Standing-wave nodal lines perpendicular to the long EC axis are present on the TM surface >11-16 kHz in the natural or artificial EC. The range of sound pressures was larger in the tympanic ring plane than at the TM surface or in the transverse EC plane. Longitudinal standing-wave patterns were stretched. The tympanic-ring sound field is a useful approximation of the TM sound field, and the artificial EC approximates the natural EC.

  5. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  6. Differential intracochlear recordings of ensemble background activity (EBA) (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianxun; Durrant, John D.; Balaban, Carey

    2004-11-01

    The ensemble background activity (EBA) recorded from the round window has a spectral peak near 900 Hz that is generally attributed to spontaneous eighth-nerve activity, but other frequency regions are less well understood, including the issue of contribution of hair cell (HC) potentials. To further investigate the EBA, an intracochlear electrode pair was employed to record from the basal turn in guinea pig, applying the principles of differential recording. Results confirmed 900 Hz to be the dominant feature of the EBA power spectrum in/near quiet, wherein this peak was more robust in the average derivation and readily suppressed by kainic acid, consistent with its presumptive neural origin. Another broad spectral prominence, centered around 3000 Hz, was more prominent in the difference derivation, dominated the spectrum with increasing external (white) noise, and was much less sensitive to kainic acid, implying a predominantly HC origin. The findings demonstrate efficacy of intracochlear EBA recording, potentially extend EBA utility via the differential recording method, and further validate the EBA for monitoring spontaneous activity of the eighth nerve. .

  7. Highly Flexible Silicone Coated Neural Array for Intracochlear Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, P.; Van Beek-King, J.; Sharpe, A.; Crawford, J.; Tridandapani, S.; McKinnon, B.; Blake, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective method for tailoring the flexibility of a commercial thin-film polymer electrode array for intracochlear electrical stimulation. Using a pneumatically driven dispensing system, an average 232 ± 64 μm (mean ± SD) thickness layer of silicone adhesive coating was applied to stiffen the underside of polyimide multisite arrays. Additional silicone was applied to the tip to protect neural tissue during insertion and along the array to improve surgical handling. Each array supported 20 platinum sites (180 μm dia., 250 μm pitch), spanning nearly 28 mm in length and 400 μm in width. We report an average intracochlear stimulating current threshold of 170 ± 93 μA to evoke an auditory brainstem response in 7 acutely deafened felines. A total of 10 arrays were each inserted through a round window approach into the cochlea's basal turn of eight felines with one delamination occurring upon insertion (preliminary results of the in vivo data presented at the 48th Annual Meeting American Neurotology Society, Orlando, FL, April 2013, and reported in Van Beek-King 2014). Using microcomputed tomography imaging (50 μm resolution), distances ranging from 100 to 565 μm from the cochlea's central modiolus were measured. Our method combines the utility of readily available commercial devices with a straightforward postprocessing step on the order of 24 hours. PMID:26236714

  8. Inner-ear sound pressures near the base of the cochlea in chinchilla: Further investigation

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The middle-ear pressure gain GMEP, the ratio of sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV to sound pressure at the tympanic membrane PTM, is a descriptor of middle-ear sound transfer and the cochlear input for a given stimulus in the ear canal. GMEP and the cochlear partition differential pressure near the cochlear base ΔPCP, which determines the stimulus for cochlear partition motion and has been linked to hearing ability, were computed from simultaneous measurements of PV, PTM, and the sound pressure in scala tympani near the round window PST in chinchilla. GMEP magnitude was approximately 30 dB between 0.1 and 10 kHz and decreased sharply above 20 kHz, which is not consistent with an ideal transformer or a lossless transmission line. The GMEP phase was consistent with a roughly 50-μs delay between PV and PTM. GMEP was little affected by the inner-ear modifications necessary to measure PST. GMEP is a good predictor of ΔPCP at low and moderate frequencies where PV ⪢ PST but overestimates ΔPCP above a few kilohertz where PV ≈ PST. The ratio of PST to PV provides insight into the distribution of sound pressure within the cochlear scalae. PMID:23556590

  9. Inner-ear sound pressures near the base of the cochlea in chinchilla: further investigation.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2013-04-01

    The middle-ear pressure gain GMEP, the ratio of sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV to sound pressure at the tympanic membrane PTM, is a descriptor of middle-ear sound transfer and the cochlear input for a given stimulus in the ear canal. GMEP and the cochlear partition differential pressure near the cochlear base ΔPCP, which determines the stimulus for cochlear partition motion and has been linked to hearing ability, were computed from simultaneous measurements of PV, PTM, and the sound pressure in scala tympani near the round window PST in chinchilla. GMEP magnitude was approximately 30 dB between 0.1 and 10 kHz and decreased sharply above 20 kHz, which is not consistent with an ideal transformer or a lossless transmission line. The GMEP phase was consistent with a roughly 50-μs delay between PV and PTM. GMEP was little affected by the inner-ear modifications necessary to measure PST. GMEP is a good predictor of ΔPCP at low and moderate frequencies where PV > PST but overestimates ΔPCP above a few kilohertz where PV ≈ PST. The ratio of PST to PV provides insight into the distribution of sound pressure within the cochlear scalae.

  10. Apparatus and method for processing Korotkov sounds. [for blood pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. P., Jr.; Hoffler, G. W.; Wolthuis, R. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A Korotkov sound processor, used in a noninvasive automatic blood measuring system where the brachial artery is occluded by an inflatable cuff, is disclosed. The Korotkoff sound associated with the systolic event is determined when the ratio of the absolute value of a voltage signal, representing Korotkov sounds in the range of 18 to 26 Hz to a maximum absolute peak value of the unfiltered signals, first equals or exceeds a value of 0.45. Korotkov sound associated with the diastolic event is determined when a ratio of the voltage signal of the Korotkov sounds in the range of 40 to 60 Hz to the absolute peak value of such signals within a single measurement cycle first falls below a value of 0.17. The processor signals the occurrence of the systolic and diastolic events and these signals can be used to control a recorder to record pressure values for these events.

  11. Simulating cartilage conduction sound to estimate the sound pressure level in the external auditory canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Iwakura, Takashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    When the aural cartilage is made to vibrate it generates sound directly into the external auditory canal which can be clearly heard. Although the concept of cartilage conduction can be applied to various speech communication and music industrial devices (e.g. smartphones, music players and hearing aids), the conductive performance of such devices has not yet been defined because the calibration methods are different from those currently used for air and bone conduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to simulate the cartilage conduction sound (CCS) using a head and torso simulator (HATS) and a model of aural cartilage (polyurethane resin pipe) and compare the results with experimental ones. Using the HATS, we found the simulated CCS at frequencies above 2 kHz corresponded to the average measured CCS from seven subjects. Using a model of skull bone and aural cartilage, we found that the simulated CCS at frequencies lower than 1.5 kHz agreed with the measured CCS. Therefore, a combination of these two methods can be used to estimate the CCS with high accuracy.

  12. Separation and reconstruction of high pressure water-jet reflective sound signal based on ICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongtao; Sun, Yuling; Li, Meng; Zhang, Dongsu; Wu, Tianfeng

    2011-12-01

    The impact of high pressure water-jet on the different materials target will produce different reflective mixed sound. In order to reconstruct the reflective sound signals distribution on the linear detecting line accurately and to separate the environment noise effectively, the mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were processed by ICA. The basic principle of ICA and algorithm of FASTICA were described in detail. The emulation experiment was designed. The environment noise signal was simulated by using band-limited white noise and the reflective sound signal was simulated by using pulse signal. The reflective sound signal attenuation produced by the different distance transmission was simulated by weighting the sound signal with different contingencies. The mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were synthesized by using the above simulated signals and were whitened and separated by ICA. The final results verified that the environment noise separation and the reconstruction of the detecting-line sound distribution can be realized effectively.

  13. Experimental and numerical characterization of the sound pressure in standing wave acoustic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stindt, A.; Andrade, M. A. B.; Albrecht, M.; Adamowski, J. C.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for predictions of the sound pressure distribution in acoustic levitators is based on a matrix representation of the Rayleigh integral. This method allows for a fast calculation of the acoustic field within the resonator. To make sure that the underlying assumptions and simplifications are justified, this approach was tested by a direct comparison to experimental data. The experimental sound pressure distributions were recorded by high spatially resolved frequency selective microphone scanning. To emphasize the general applicability of the two approaches, the comparative studies were conducted for four different resonator geometries. In all cases, the results show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the accuracy of the matrix method.

  14. Hearing with an atympanic ear: good vibration and poor sound-pressure detection in the royal python, Python regius.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Brandt, Christian; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2012-01-15

    Snakes lack both an outer ear and a tympanic middle ear, which in most tetrapods provide impedance matching between the air and inner ear fluids and hence improve pressure hearing in air. Snakes would therefore be expected to have very poor pressure hearing and generally be insensitive to airborne sound, whereas the connection of the middle ear bone to the jaw bones in snakes should confer acute sensitivity to substrate vibrations. Some studies have nevertheless claimed that snakes are quite sensitive to both vibration and sound pressure. Here we test the two hypotheses that: (1) snakes are sensitive to sound pressure and (2) snakes are sensitive to vibrations, but cannot hear the sound pressure per se. Vibration and sound-pressure sensitivities were quantified by measuring brainstem evoked potentials in 11 royal pythons, Python regius. Vibrograms and audiograms showed greatest sensitivity at low frequencies of 80-160 Hz, with sensitivities of -54 dB re. 1 m s(-2) and 78 dB re. 20 μPa, respectively. To investigate whether pythons detect sound pressure or sound-induced head vibrations, we measured the sound-induced head vibrations in three dimensions when snakes were exposed to sound pressure at threshold levels. In general, head vibrations induced by threshold-level sound pressure were equal to or greater than those induced by threshold-level vibrations, and therefore sound-pressure sensitivity can be explained by sound-induced head vibration. From this we conclude that pythons, and possibly all snakes, lost effective pressure hearing with the complete reduction of a functional outer and middle ear, but have an acute vibration sensitivity that may be used for communication and detection of predators and prey.

  15. Pressures in the human cochlea during bone conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, Christof; Farahmand, Rosemary B.; Page, Brent F.; Roushan, Kourosh; Merchant, Julie P.; Abur, Defne; Rosowski, John J.; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms of bone conduction (BC) hearing, which is important in diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss, are poorly understood, thus limiting use of BC. Recently, information gained by intracochlear pressure measurements has revealed that the mechanisms of sound transmission that drive pressure differences across the cochlear partition are different for air conduction (AC) than for round-window stimulation. Presently we are utilizing these pressure measurement techniques in fresh human cadaveric preparations to improve our understanding of sound transmission during BC. We have modified our technique of intracochlear pressure measurements for the special requirements of studying BC, as bone vibration poses challenges for making these measurements. Fiberoptic pressure sensors were inserted through cochleostomies in both scalae at the base of the cochlea. The cochleostomies were then tightly sealed with the sensors in place to prevent air and fluid leaks, and the sensors were firmly secured to ensure uniform vibrations of the sensors and surrounding bone of the cochlea. The velocity of the stapes, round window and cochlear promontory were each measured with laser Doppler vibrometry simultaneous to the intracochlear pressure measurements. To understand the contribution of middle-ear inertia, the incudo-stapedial joint was severed. Subsequently, the stapes footplate was fixed (similar to the consequence of otosclerosis) to determine the effect of removing the mobility of the oval window. BC stimulation resulted in pressure in scala vestibuli that was significantly higher than in scala tympani, such that the differential pressure across the partition - the cochlear drive input - was similar to scala vestibuli pressure (and overall, similar to the relationship found during AC but different than during round-window stimulation). After removing the inertial mass of the middle ear, with only the stapes attached to the flexible oval window, all pressures dropped

  16. External and middle ear sound pressure distribution and acoustic coupling to the tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bergevin, Christopher; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Sound energy is conveyed to the inner ear by the diaphanous, cone-shaped tympanic membrane (TM). The TM moves in a complex manner and transmits sound signals to the inner ear with high fidelity, pressure gain, and a short delay. Miniaturized sensors allowing high spatial resolution in small spaces and sensitivity to high frequencies were used to explore how pressure drives the TM. Salient findings are: (1) A substantial pressure drop exists across the TM, and varies in frequency from ∼10 to 30 dB. It thus appears reasonable to approximate the drive to the TM as being defined solely by the pressure in the ear canal (EC) close to the TM. (2) Within the middle ear cavity (MEC), spatial variations in sound pressure could vary by more than 20 dB, and the MEC pressure at certain locations/frequencies was as large as in the EC. (3) Spatial variations in pressure along the TM surface on the EC-side were typically less than 5 dB up to 50 kHz. Larger surface variations were observed on the MEC-side. PMID:24606269

  17. External and middle ear sound pressure distribution and acoustic coupling to the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Bergevin, Christopher; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2014-03-01

    Sound energy is conveyed to the inner ear by the diaphanous, cone-shaped tympanic membrane (TM). The TM moves in a complex manner and transmits sound signals to the inner ear with high fidelity, pressure gain, and a short delay. Miniaturized sensors allowing high spatial resolution in small spaces and sensitivity to high frequencies were used to explore how pressure drives the TM. Salient findings are: (1) A substantial pressure drop exists across the TM, and varies in frequency from ∼10 to 30 dB. It thus appears reasonable to approximate the drive to the TM as being defined solely by the pressure in the ear canal (EC) close to the TM. (2) Within the middle ear cavity (MEC), spatial variations in sound pressure could vary by more than 20 dB, and the MEC pressure at certain locations/frequencies was as large as in the EC. (3) Spatial variations in pressure along the TM surface on the EC-side were typically less than 5 dB up to 50 kHz. Larger surface variations were observed on the MEC-side.

  18. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  19. Comparing Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions to Intracochlear Distortion Products Inferred from a Noninvasive Assay.

    PubMed

    Martin, Glen K; Stagner, Barden B; Dong, Wei; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L

    2016-08-01

    The behavior of intracochlear distortion products (iDPs) was inferred by interacting a probe tone (f3) with the iDP of interest to produce a "secondary" distortion product otoacoustic emission termed DPOAE(2ry). Measures of the DPOAE(2ry) were then used to deduce the properties of the iDP. This approach was used in alert rabbits and anesthetized gerbils to compare ear-canal 2f1-f2 and 2f2-f1 DPOAE f2/f1 ratio functions, level/phase (L/P) maps, and interference-response areas (IRAs) to their simultaneously collected DPOAE(2ry) counterparts. These same measures were also collected in a human volunteer to demonstrate similarities with their laboratory animal counterparts and their potential applicability to humans. Results showed that DPOAEs and inferred iDPs evidenced distinct behaviors and properties. That is, DPOAE ratio functions elicited by low-level primaries peaked around an f2/f1 = 1.21 or 1.25, depending on species, while the corresponding inferred iDP ratio functions peaked at f2/f1 ratios of ~1. Additionally, L/P maps showed rapid phase variation with DPOAE frequency (fdp) for the narrow-ratio 2f1-f2 and all 2f2-f1 DPOAEs, while the corresponding DPOAE(2ry) measures evidenced relatively constant phases. Common features of narrow-ratio DPOAE IRAs, such as large enhancements for interference tones (ITs) presented above f2, were not present in DPOAE(2ry) IRAs. Finally, based on prior experiments in gerbils, the behavior of the iDP directly measured in intracochlear pressure was compared to the iDP inferred from the DPOAE(2ry) and found to be similar. Together, these findings are consistent with the notion that under certain conditions, ear-canal DPOAEs provide poor representations of iDPs and thus support a "beamforming" hypothesis. According to this concept, distributed emission components directed toward the ear canal from the f2 and basal to f2 regions can be of differing phases and thus cancel, while these same components directed toward fdp add in

  20. 16 CFR 1500.47 - Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... level produced by toy caps. 1500.47 Section 1500.47 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY... ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.47 Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps. (a... decibels from 50 hertz to 70 kilohertz or beyond and a dynamic range covering the interval 70 to...

  1. A tomographic visualization of electric discharge sound fields in atmospheric pressure plasma using laser diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Yoichiro; Ikegami, Tomoaki; Tsuda, Ryoichi; Sonoda, Yoshito; Danuta Stryczewska, Henryka

    2013-02-01

    The phase modulation of transparent gas can be detected using Fraunhofer diffraction technique, which we call optical wave microphone (OWM). The OWM is suitable for the detection of sonic wave from audible sound to ultrasonic wave. Because this technique has no influence on sound field or electric field during the measurement, we have applied it to the sound detection for the electric discharges. There is almost no research paper that uses the discharge sound to examine the electrical discharge phenomenon. Two-dimensional visualization of the sound field using the OWM is also possible when the computerized tomography (CT) is combined. In this work, coplanar dielectric barrier discharge sin different gases of Ar, N2, He were characterized via the OWM as well as applied voltage and discharge current. This is the first report to investigate the influence of the type of the atmospheric gas on the two-dimensional sound field distribution for the coplanar dielectric barrier discharge using the OWM with CT. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  2. Speed of sound in nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagermann, Axel; Zarnecki, John C.

    2005-09-01

    Speed of sound measurements in nitrogen by Younglove and McCarty [J. Chem. Thermodynam. 12, 1121-1128 (1980)] are revisited and an empirical polynomial equation for the speed of sound is derived. The polynomial coefficients differ from those given by Wong and Wu [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 650-651 (1997)] with the result that discrepancies between predicted and measured values at low temperatures are reduced. The maximal error over the complete temperature and pressure range from 80 to 350 K and 0.031 to 0.709 MPa is reduced from 5.38% to 0.78%.

  3. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Intracochlear Schwannoma Removal and Simultaneous Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Mello Santiago; Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos; Pereira, Larissa Vilela; Fonseca, Anna Carolina de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Hearing preservation has not yet been reported in patients undergoing resection of intracochlear schwannomas. This study describes a minimally invasive procedure for intracochlear schwannoma resection with simultaneous cochlear implantation that resulted in good hearing. Objective  This study aims to describe a minimally invasive procedure for intracochlear schwannoma resection with simultaneous cochlear implantation. Data Synthesis  The technique described in this study was developed for a 55-year-old male with a 20-year history of bilateral progressive hearing loss and tinnitus that had a mass in the left apical turn of the cochlea measuring 0.3 cm. Surgery accessed the apical turn of the cochlea. We performed mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy and removed incus and tensor tympani muscle to expose the cochlear apex. The tumor was identified and completely resected. After the cochlea was anatomically preserved, it was implanted with a straight electrode via round window insertion. The histopathological examination confirmed intracochlear schwannoma. Speech perception test revealed 100% speech recognition with closed sentences and the average audiometric threshold (500 to 2000 Hz) was 23 dB. Conclusion  Our technique led to rehabilitation of the patient and improved hearing without damaging the intracochlear structure, making it possible to perform CI in the same procedure with good results. PMID:27413411

  4. Interpretation of Helioseismic Travel Times. Sensitivity to Sound Speed, Pressure, Density, and Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2015-12-01

    Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localised perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that has sufficient resolution to resolve the longest lived modes. The typical kernel calculations used in this paper are computer intensive and require on the order of 600 CPU hours per kernel. Kernels are validated by computing the travel-time perturbation that results from horizontally-invariant perturbations using two independent approaches. At fixed sound-speed, the density and pressure kernels are approximately related through a negative multiplicative factor, therefore implying that perturbations in density and pressure are difficult to disentangle. Mean travel-times are not only sensitive to sound-speed, density and pressure perturbations, but also to flows, especially vertical flows. Accurate sensitivity kernels are needed to interpret complex flow patterns such as convection.

  5. Direct Intracochlear Acoustic Stimulation Using a PZT Microactuator.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Manson, Robert; Robbins, Carol; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Cao, Guo Zhong; Shen, I Y; Hume, Clifford R

    2015-01-01

    Combined electric and acoustic stimulation has proven to be an effective strategy to improve hearing in some cochlear implant users. We describe an acoustic microactuator to directly deliver stimuli to the perilymph in the scala tympani. The 800 µm by 800 µm actuator has a silicon diaphragm driven by a piezoelectric thin film (e.g., lead-zirconium-titanium oxide or PZT). This device could also be used as a component of a bimodal acoustic-electric electrode array. In the current study, we established a guinea pig model to test the actuator for its ability to deliver auditory signals to the cochlea in vivo. The actuator was placed through the round window of the cochlea. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds, peak latencies, and amplitude growth were calculated for an ear canal speaker versus the intracochlear actuator for tone burst stimuli at 4, 8, 16, and 24 kHz. An ABR was obtained after removal of the probe to assess loss of hearing related to the procedure. In some animals, the temporal bone was harvested for histologic analysis of cochlear damage. We show that the device is capable of stimulating ABRs in vivo with latencies and growth functions comparable to stimulation in the ear canal. Further experiments will be necessary to evaluate the efficiency and safety of this modality in long-term auditory stimulation and its ability to be integrated with conventional cochlear implant arrays. PMID:26631107

  6. Direct Intracochlear Acoustic Stimulation Using a PZT Microactuator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Manson, Robert; Robbins, Carol; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Cao, Guo Zhong; Hume, Clifford R.

    2015-01-01

    Combined electric and acoustic stimulation has proven to be an effective strategy to improve hearing in some cochlear implant users. We describe an acoustic microactuator to directly deliver stimuli to the perilymph in the scala tympani. The 800 µm by 800 µm actuator has a silicon diaphragm driven by a piezoelectric thin film (e.g., lead-zirconium-titanium oxide or PZT). This device could also be used as a component of a bimodal acoustic-electric electrode array. In the current study, we established a guinea pig model to test the actuator for its ability to deliver auditory signals to the cochlea in vivo. The actuator was placed through the round window of the cochlea. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds, peak latencies, and amplitude growth were calculated for an ear canal speaker versus the intracochlear actuator for tone burst stimuli at 4, 8, 16, and 24 kHz. An ABR was obtained after removal of the probe to assess loss of hearing related to the procedure. In some animals, the temporal bone was harvested for histologic analysis of cochlear damage. We show that the device is capable of stimulating ABRs in vivo with latencies and growth functions comparable to stimulation in the ear canal. Further experiments will be necessary to evaluate the efficiency and safety of this modality in long-term auditory stimulation and its ability to be integrated with conventional cochlear implant arrays. PMID:26631107

  7. Sound pressure enhances the hearing sensitivity of Chaetodon butterflyfishes on noisy coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Tricas, Timothy C; Boyle, Kelly S

    2015-05-15

    Butterflyfishes are conspicuous members of coral reefs that communicate with acoustic signals during social interactions with mates and other conspecifics. Members of the genus Chaetodon have a laterophysic connection (LC) - a unique association of anterior swim bladder horns and the cranial lateral line - but the action of the LC system on auditory sensitivity is unexplored. Here, we show in baseline auditory evoked potential threshold experiments that Forcipiger flavissimus (which lacks swim bladder horns and LC) is sensitive to sound tones from 100 Hz up to 1000 Hz, and that thresholds for three species of Chaetodon are 10-15 dB lower, with extended hearing ranges up to 1700-2000 Hz. The relatively high thresholds to sound pressure and low pass response near 500 Hz for all four species are consistent with a primary sensitivity to hydrodynamic particle acceleration rather than sound pressure. Deflation of the swim bladder in F. flavissimus had no measurable effect on auditory sensitivity. In contrast, displacement of gas from the swim bladder horns in Chaetodon multicinctus and Chaetodon auriga increased thresholds (decreased sensitivity) by 5-20 dB, with the greatest effect at 600 Hz. The evolution of swim bladder horns associated with the LC system in Chaetodon species has increased hearing sensitivity through sound pressure transduction in the frequency bands used for social acoustic communication. The close affiliative behaviors that are common in Chaetodon species and other butterflyfish facilitate sound perception and acoustic communication at close distances relative to the high background noise levels found in their natural reef environment. PMID:25722003

  8. Sound pressure enhances the hearing sensitivity of Chaetodon butterflyfishes on noisy coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Tricas, Timothy C; Boyle, Kelly S

    2015-05-15

    Butterflyfishes are conspicuous members of coral reefs that communicate with acoustic signals during social interactions with mates and other conspecifics. Members of the genus Chaetodon have a laterophysic connection (LC) - a unique association of anterior swim bladder horns and the cranial lateral line - but the action of the LC system on auditory sensitivity is unexplored. Here, we show in baseline auditory evoked potential threshold experiments that Forcipiger flavissimus (which lacks swim bladder horns and LC) is sensitive to sound tones from 100 Hz up to 1000 Hz, and that thresholds for three species of Chaetodon are 10-15 dB lower, with extended hearing ranges up to 1700-2000 Hz. The relatively high thresholds to sound pressure and low pass response near 500 Hz for all four species are consistent with a primary sensitivity to hydrodynamic particle acceleration rather than sound pressure. Deflation of the swim bladder in F. flavissimus had no measurable effect on auditory sensitivity. In contrast, displacement of gas from the swim bladder horns in Chaetodon multicinctus and Chaetodon auriga increased thresholds (decreased sensitivity) by 5-20 dB, with the greatest effect at 600 Hz. The evolution of swim bladder horns associated with the LC system in Chaetodon species has increased hearing sensitivity through sound pressure transduction in the frequency bands used for social acoustic communication. The close affiliative behaviors that are common in Chaetodon species and other butterflyfish facilitate sound perception and acoustic communication at close distances relative to the high background noise levels found in their natural reef environment.

  9. Diversity in sound pressure levels and estimated active space of resident killer whale vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O

    2006-05-01

    Signal source intensity and detection range, which integrates source intensity with propagation loss, background noise and receiver hearing abilities, are important characteristics of communication signals. Apparent source levels were calculated for 819 pulsed calls and 24 whistles produced by free-ranging resident killer whales by triangulating the angles-of-arrival of sounds on two beamforming arrays towed in series. Levels in the 1-20 kHz band ranged from 131 to 168 dB re 1 microPa at 1 m, with differences in the means of different sound classes (whistles: 140.2+/-4.1 dB; variable calls: 146.6+/-6.6 dB; stereotyped calls: 152.6+/-5.9 dB), and among stereotyped call types. Repertoire diversity carried through to estimates of active space, with "long-range" stereotyped calls all containing overlapping, independently-modulated high-frequency components (mean estimated active space of 10-16 km in sea state zero) and "short-range" sounds (5-9 km) included all stereotyped calls without a high-frequency component, whistles, and variable calls. Short-range sounds are reported to be more common during social and resting behaviors, while long-range stereotyped calls predominate in dispersed travel and foraging behaviors. These results suggest that variability in sound pressure levels may reflect diverse social and ecological functions of the acoustic repertoire of killer whales.

  10. Prediction of pressure fluctuation in sounding rockets and manifolded recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudadio, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The determination of altitude by means of barometric sensors in sounding rocket applications is discussed. A method for predicting the performance of such sensing systems is needed. A method is developed for predicting the pressure-time response of a volume subjected to subsonic air flow through from one to four passages. The pressure calculation is based on one-dimensional gas flow with friction. A computed program has been developed which solves the differential equations using a self-starting predictor-corrector integration technique. The input data required are the pressure sensing system dimensions, pressure forcing function(s) at the inlet port(s), and a trajectory over the time of analysis (altitude-velocity-time), if the forcing function is trajectory dependent. The program then computes the pressure-temperature history of the gas in the manifold over the time interval specified.

  11. Separation of non-stationary sound fields with single layer pressure-velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of extracting the non-stationary sound field generated by a target source in the presence of disturbing source from single layer pressure-velocity measurements. Unlike the method described in a previous paper [Bi, Geng, and Zhang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(6), 3474-3482 (2014)], the proposed method allows measurements of pressure and particle velocity signals on a single plane instead of pressure signals on two planes, and the time-dependent pressure generated by the target source is extracted by a simple superposition of the measured pressure and the convolution between the measured particle velocity and the corresponding impulse response function. Because the particle velocity here is measured directly, the error caused by the finite difference approximation can be avoided, which makes it possible to perform the separation better than the previous method. In this paper, a Microflown pressure-velocity probe is used to perform the experimental measurements, and the calibration procedure of the probe in the time domain is given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in extracting the desired non-stationary sound field generated by the target source from the mixed one in both time and space domains, and it obtains more accurate results than the previous method. PMID:26936560

  12. Separation of non-stationary sound fields with single layer pressure-velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of extracting the non-stationary sound field generated by a target source in the presence of disturbing source from single layer pressure-velocity measurements. Unlike the method described in a previous paper [Bi, Geng, and Zhang, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(6), 3474-3482 (2014)], the proposed method allows measurements of pressure and particle velocity signals on a single plane instead of pressure signals on two planes, and the time-dependent pressure generated by the target source is extracted by a simple superposition of the measured pressure and the convolution between the measured particle velocity and the corresponding impulse response function. Because the particle velocity here is measured directly, the error caused by the finite difference approximation can be avoided, which makes it possible to perform the separation better than the previous method. In this paper, a Microflown pressure-velocity probe is used to perform the experimental measurements, and the calibration procedure of the probe in the time domain is given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in extracting the desired non-stationary sound field generated by the target source from the mixed one in both time and space domains, and it obtains more accurate results than the previous method.

  13. Time domain holography: Forward projection of simulated and measured sound pressure fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rochefoucauld, Ombeline; Melon, Manuel; Garcia, Alexandre

    2004-07-01

    In this article, the fundamental principles of forward projecting time domain acoustic pressure fields are summarized. Four different numerical approaches are presented and compared both with simulated and measured signals. The approaches differ in their definition domain: Frequency/time and space/wave vector domains. The simulated source is a planar baffled piston excited with a Gaussian pulsed velocity. The pressure radiated by two different real sources has been measured: The first source is made up of two baffled loudspeakers (a Gaussian white noise can be radiated by a third loudspeaker). The second one is a baffled aluminum plate excited by a short impact at its center. The influence of parameters such as the sound source radius, the array size, the number of microphones and the propagation distance is studied. Finally, results concerning the optimization of the sampling of the sound field are presented.

  14. Comparison of measured and calculated sound pressure levels around a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Willshire, William L., Jr.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a large number of simultaneous acoustic measurements around a large horizontal axis downwind configuration wind turbine generator. In addition, comparisons are made between measurements and calculations of both the discrete frequency rotational harmonics and the broad band noise components. Sound pressure time histories and noise radiation patterns as well as narrow band and broadband noise spectra are presented for a range of operating conditions. The data are useful for purposes of environmental impact assessment.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of density and sound velocity of liquid Fe-C at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, Y.; Terasaki, H. G.; Urakawa, S.; Kuwabara, S.; Takubo, Y.; Katayama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Seismological and experimental studies show that the Earth's outer core is approximately 10% less dense than molten iron at the core pressure and temperature conditions, implying that some light elements exist in the core. The effect of light elements on density and bulk modulus of liquid iron is necessary for estimating of these core compositions. Sound velocity of liquid iron alloys is also important for identifying light elements in the core by comparison with observed seismic data. In this study, we have measured density and sound velocity of liquid Fe-C at SPring-8 beamline BL22XU using a DIA-type cubic anvil press (SMAP-I). Density was measured using X-ray absorption method (Katayama et al., 1993). We newly installed sound velocity measurement system using pulse-echo overlapping method (Higo et al., 2009) in this beamline. P-wave signals with a frequency of 35-37 MHz were generated and received by LiNbO3 transducer. Buffer rod and backing plated were adopted single-crystal sapphire. The sample length at high pressure and high temperature were measured from absorption contrast between sample and sapphire. We measured velocity and density of liquid Fe-C between 1.1-2.8 GPa and 1480-1740 K. Obtained density and velocity of Fe-C was found to increase with pressure. In contrast, the effect of temperature on density and velocity was negative. The relationship between these two properties will be discussed.

  16. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen; Xiang, Shikai Chen, Haiyan; Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin; Kuang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-14

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  17. Comparison of forward (ear-canal) and reverse (round-window) sound stimulation of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Christof; Rosowski, John J; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi

    2013-07-01

    The cochlea is normally driven with "forward" stimulation, in which sound is introduced to the ear canal. Alternatively, the cochlea can be stimulated at the round window (RW) using an actuator. During RW "reverse" stimulation, the acoustic flow starting at the RW does not necessarily take the same path as during forward stimulation. To understand the differences between forward and reverse stimulation, we measured ear-canal pressure, stapes velocity, RW velocity, and intracochlear pressures in scala vestibuli (SV) and scala tympani (ST) of fresh human temporal bones. During forward stimulation, the cochlear drive (differential pressure across the partition) results from the large difference in magnitude between the pressures of SV and ST, which occurs due to the high compliance of the RW. During reverse stimulation, the relatively high impedance of the middle ear causes the pressures of SV and ST to have similar magnitudes, and the differential pressure results primarily from the difference in phase of the pressures. Furthermore, the sound path differs between forward and reverse stimulation, such that motion through a third window is more significant during reverse stimulation. Additionally, we determined that although stapes velocity is a good estimate of cochlear drive during forward stimulation, it is not a good measure during reverse stimulation. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  18. Round window membrane intracochlear drug delivery enhanced by induced advection.

    PubMed

    Borkholder, David A; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2014-01-28

    Delivery of therapeutic compounds to the inner ear via absorption through the round window membrane (RWM) has advantages over direct intracochlear infusions; specifically, minimizing impact upon functional hearing measures. However, previous reports show that significant basal-to-apical concentration gradients occur, with the potential to impact treatment efficacy. Here we present a new approach to inner ear drug delivery with induced advection aiding distribution of compounds throughout the inner ear in the murine cochlea. Polyimide microtubing was placed near the RWM niche through a bullaostomy into the middle ear cavity allowing directed delivery of compounds to the RWM. We hypothesized that a posterior semicircular canalostomy would induce apical flow from the patent cochlear aqueduct to the canalostomy due to influx of cerebral spinal fluid. To test this hypothesis, young adult CBA/CaJ mice were divided into two groups: bullaostomy approach only (BA) and bullaostomy+canalostomy (B+C). Cochlear function was evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds during and after middle ear infusion of salicylate in artificial perilymph (AP), applied near the RWM. The mice recovered for 1week, and were re-tested. The results demonstrate there was no significant impact on auditory function utilizing the RWM surgical procedure with or without the canalostomy, and DPOAE thresholds were elevated reversibly during the salicylate infusion. Comparing the threshold shifts for both methods, the B+C approach had more of a physiological effect than the BA approach, including at lower frequencies representing more apical cochlear locations. Unlike mouse cochleostomies, there was no deleterious auditory functional impact after 1week recovery from surgery. The B+C approach had more drug efficacy at lower frequencies, underscoring potential benefits for more precise control of delivery of inner ear therapeutic compounds

  19. Round window membrane intracochlear drug delivery enhanced by induced advection.

    PubMed

    Borkholder, David A; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2014-01-28

    Delivery of therapeutic compounds to the inner ear via absorption through the round window membrane (RWM) has advantages over direct intracochlear infusions; specifically, minimizing impact upon functional hearing measures. However, previous reports show that significant basal-to-apical concentration gradients occur, with the potential to impact treatment efficacy. Here we present a new approach to inner ear drug delivery with induced advection aiding distribution of compounds throughout the inner ear in the murine cochlea. Polyimide microtubing was placed near the RWM niche through a bullaostomy into the middle ear cavity allowing directed delivery of compounds to the RWM. We hypothesized that a posterior semicircular canalostomy would induce apical flow from the patent cochlear aqueduct to the canalostomy due to influx of cerebral spinal fluid. To test this hypothesis, young adult CBA/CaJ mice were divided into two groups: bullaostomy approach only (BA) and bullaostomy+canalostomy (B+C). Cochlear function was evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds during and after middle ear infusion of salicylate in artificial perilymph (AP), applied near the RWM. The mice recovered for 1week, and were re-tested. The results demonstrate there was no significant impact on auditory function utilizing the RWM surgical procedure with or without the canalostomy, and DPOAE thresholds were elevated reversibly during the salicylate infusion. Comparing the threshold shifts for both methods, the B+C approach had more of a physiological effect than the BA approach, including at lower frequencies representing more apical cochlear locations. Unlike mouse cochleostomies, there was no deleterious auditory functional impact after 1week recovery from surgery. The B+C approach had more drug efficacy at lower frequencies, underscoring potential benefits for more precise control of delivery of inner ear therapeutic compounds.

  20. Round Window Membrane Intracochlear Drug Delivery Enhanced by Induced Advection

    PubMed Central

    Borkholder, David A.; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic compounds to the inner ear via absorption through the round window membrane (RWM) has advantages over direct intracochlear infusions; specifically, minimizing impact upon functional hearing measures. However, previous reports show that significant basal-to-apical concentration gradients occur, with the potential to impact treatment efficacy. Here we present a new approach to inner ear drug delivery with induced advection aiding distribution of compounds throughout the inner ear in the murine cochlea. Polyimide microtubing was placed near the RWM niche through a bullaostomy into the middle ear cavity allowing directed delivery of compounds to the RWM. We hypothesized that a posterior semicircular canalostomy would induce apical flow from the patent cochlear aqueduct to the canalostomy due to influx of cerebral spinal fluid. To test this hypothesis, young adult CBA/CaJ mice were divided into two groups: bullaostomy approach only (BA) and bullaostomy + canalostomy (B+C). Cochlear function was evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds during and after middle ear infusion of salicylate in artificial perilymph (AP), applied near the RWM. The mice recovered for 1 week, and were re-tested. The results demonstrate there was no significant impact on auditory function utilizing the RWM surgical procedure with or without the canalostomy, and DPOAE thresholds were elevated reversibly during the salicylate infusion. Comparing the threshold shifts for both methods, the B+C approach had more of a physiological effect than the BA approach, including at lower frequencies representing more apical cochlear locations. Unlike mouse cochleostomies, there was no deleterious auditory functional impact after 1 week recovery from surgery. The B+C approach had more drug efficacy at lower frequencies, underscoring potential benefits for more precise control of delivery of inner ear therapeutic compounds

  1. Sound Pressure Levels Measured in a University Concert Band: A Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Nicholas V., III

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have reported public school band directors as experiencing noise-induced hearing loss. Little research has focused on collegiate band directors and university student musicians. The present study measures the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and compares sound levels with the criteria set by the…

  2. Effects of coordination and pressure on sound attenuation, boson peak and elasticity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGiuli, Eric; Laversanne-Finot, Adrien; Düring, Gustavo; Lerner, Edan; Wyart, Matthieu

    2014-07-01

    Connectedness and applied stress strongly affect elasticity in solids. In various amorphous solids, mechanical stability can be lost either by reducing connectedness or by increasing pressure. We present an effective medium theory of elasticity that extends previous approaches by incorporating the effect of compression, of amplitude $e$, allowing one to describe quantitative features of sound propagation, transport, the boson peak, and elastic moduli near the elastic instability occurring at a compression $e_c$. The theory disentangles several frequencies characterizing the vibrational spectrum: the onset frequency $\\omega_0\\sim \\sqrt{e_c-e}$ where strongly-scattered modes appear in the vibrational spectrum, the pressure-independent frequency $\\omega_*$ where the density of states displays a plateau, the boson peak frequency $\\omega_{BP}$, and the Ioffe-Regel frequency $\\omega_{IR}$ where scattering length and wavelength become equal. We predict that sound attenuation crosses over from $\\omega^4$ to $\\omega^2$ behaviour at $\\omega_0$. We predict that a frequency-dependent length scale $l_s(\\omega)$ and speed of sound $\

  3. A geospatial model of ambient sound pressure levels in the contiguous United States.

    PubMed

    Mennitt, Daniel; Sherrill, Kirk; Fristrup, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a model that predicts measured sound pressure levels using geospatial features such as topography, climate, hydrology, and anthropogenic activity. The model utilizes random forest, a tree-based machine learning algorithm, which does not incorporate a priori knowledge of source characteristics or propagation mechanics. The response data encompasses 270 000 h of acoustical measurements from 190 sites located in National Parks across the contiguous United States. The explanatory variables were derived from national geospatial data layers and cross validation procedures were used to evaluate model performance and identify variables with predictive power. Using the model, the effects of individual explanatory variables on sound pressure level were isolated and quantified to reveal systematic trends across environmental gradients. Model performance varies by the acoustical metric of interest; the seasonal L50 can be predicted with a median absolute deviation of approximately 3 dB. The primary application for this model is to generalize point measurements to maps expressing spatial variation in ambient sound levels. An example of this mapping capability is presented for Zion National Park and Cedar Breaks National Monument in southwestern Utah.

  4. Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 2). [rawinsondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 54 stations participating in the AVE 2 pilot experiment. Soundings were taken at three-hour intervals from stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data reduction and estimates of data accuracy are discussed. Examples of the data records produced are shown. The AVE 2 pilot experiment was conducted as part of NASA's program to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales-of-motion interrelationships.

  5. Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

  6. Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Sakamaki, T.; Yu, T.; Kono, Y.; Wang, Y.; Park, C.; Shen, G.

    2011-12-01

    Liquid iron is the dominant component in the Earth's outer core and possibly the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets like Moon, Mars, and Mercury. Seismological and geochemical observations suggest that light elements such as S, C, O, Si, H, etc may be present in the liquid cores. In order to constrain the abundances of light elements and understand their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-S liquids by measuring the density of liquid iron with 19wt% sulfur and 27wt% sulfur using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. Ion chambers and 2D X-ray radiographic images were used to measure intensities of the incident and transmitted monochromatic X-rays, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The density was then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients. We have also developed techniques to directly measure the ultrasonic sound velocities in these liquids up to 5 GPa and 1773 K using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The sound velocity was determined by measuring the travel time difference between the sample echo and the buffer rod echo using a waveform generator and a digital oscilloscope and by measuring the sample thickness using X-ray radiographic images. The combination of density and sound velocity data can provide tight constraints on the equation of

  7. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  8. Broadband Sound Pressure Field Characteristics of Marine Seismic Sources Used by R/V Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Boebel, O.; El Naggar, S.; Jokat, W.; Kuhn, G.; Niessen, F.; Schenke, H.; Werner, B.; Diebold, J.

    2006-05-01

    Single airguns and airgun arrays of different size and volume are used as sound sources for scientific marine seismic reflection and refraction surveys conducted by R/V Polarstern in the Arctic and Antarctic Ocean. To ensure that these research activities do not affect marine wildlife and particularly marine mammals in the Antarctic Treaty Area south of 60°S knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broadband marine seismic source characterization study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range in the Herdlefjord, Norway in October 2003. The objectives were (1) to determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels emitted by Polarstern's seismic sources, (2) to compute the source levels assuming a spherical amplitude decay, (3) to determine mitigation radii, within which at least some species of marine mammals might possibly experience behavioral or physiological disturbance due to the received sound pressure levels. The thresholds currently in use to determine mitigation radii are 160 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential behavioral disturbance and 180 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential physiological and hearing effects like temporary threshold shifts. To determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels each airgun (array) was shot along a line of 2- 3 km length running between 2 hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 267 m depth. A GI-Gun (2.4 l), a G-Gun (8.5 l) and a Bolt PAR CT800 (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, and 3 GI-Guns (7.4 l), 3 G-Guns (25.6 l) and 8 VLF-Guns (24 l) as arrays. The measurements are complemented by a modeling approach for an 8 G-Gun (68.2 l) and 8 G-Gun+1 Bolt PAR CT800 array (100.1 l). The data analysis includes a determination of peak-peak, zero-peak and RMS-amplitudes, sound exposure levels and amplitude spectra as function of source-receiver distance. The amplitude vs distance graphs, analyzed for the 4 hydrophone depths, show the typical

  9. Sound Pressures and Correlations of Noise on the Fuselage of a Jet Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shattuck, Russell D.

    1961-01-01

    Tests were conducted at altitudes of 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 feet at speeds of Mach 0.4, 0.6, and O.8. It was found that the sound pressure levels on the aft fuselage of a jet aircraft in flight can be estimated using an equation involving the true airspeed and the free air density. The cross-correlation coefficient over a spacing of 2.5 feet was generalized with Strouhal number. The spectrum of the noise in flight is comparatively flat up to 10,000 cycles per second.

  10. Sound Velocities of Iron-Nickel and Iron-Nickel-Silicon Alloys at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Murphy, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismological and cosmochemical studies suggest Earth's core is primarily composed of iron with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements [e.g. 1]. To date, the concentration of nickel and the amount and identity of light elements remain poorly constrained due in part to the difficulty of conducting experimental measurements at core conditions. The vibrational properties of a variety iron alloys paired with seismic observations can help better constrain the composition of the core. We directly measured the partial phonon density of states of bcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe0.85Ni0.1Si0.05 at high pressures. The samples were compressed using a panoramic diamond anvil cell. A subset of the experiments were conducted using neon as a pressure transmitting medium. Measurements of high statistical quality were performed with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) at sector 3-ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source [2, 3, 4]. The unit cell volume of each sample was determined at each compression point with in-situ x-ray diffraction at sector 3-ID-B before and after each NRIXS measurement. The Debye, compressional, and shear sound velocities were determined from the low energy region of the partial phonon density of states paired with the volume measurements. We will present partial phonon density of states and sound velocities for Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe0.85Ni0.1Si0.05 at high-pressure and compare with those of pure iron. References: [1] McDonough, W.F. (2004): Compositional Model for the Earth's Core. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford. [2] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2011.07.001. [3] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Grüneisen parameter of hcp-Fe to 171 GPa, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL049531. [4] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, and W. Sturhahn (2013): Experimental constraints on the

  11. Effects of mean flow convection, quadrupole sources and vortex shedding on airfoil overall sound pressure level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, William R.; Azevedo, João L. F.; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a further analysis of results of airfoil self-noise prediction obtained in the previous work using large eddy simulation and acoustic analogy. The physical mechanisms responsible for airfoil noise generation in the aerodynamic flows analyzed are a combination of turbulent and laminar boundary layers, as well as vortex shedding (VS) originated due to trailing edge bluntness. The primary interest here consists of evaluating the effects of mean flow convection, quadrupole sources and vortex shedding tonal noise on the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of a NACA0012 airfoil at low and moderate freestream Mach numbers. The overall sound pressure level is the measured quantity which eventually would be the main concern in terms of noise generation for aircraft and wind energy companies, and regulating agencies. The Reynolds number based on the airfoil chord is fixed at Rec=408,000 for all flow configurations studied. The results demonstrate that, for moderate Mach numbers, mean flow effects and quadrupole sources considerably increase OASPL and, therefore, should be taken into account in the acoustic prediction. For a low Mach number flow with vortex shedding, it is observed that OASPL is higher when laminar boundary layer separation is the VS driving mechanism compared to trailing edge bluntness.

  12. Study on mechanics of bodies under the action of sound pollution in industrial halls. Part II: Analysis of sound pressure inside the hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arghir, M.; Lăpuşan, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, it is taking into account all these phenomena of sounds propagation in given space. Within the framework of the given research is a study in industrial park "Teraplast" from Bistriţa-Năsăud county. This is industrial products for pvc constructions. From the submissions made to the workshops of processing industrial park "Teraplast" has been found, that noise is produced mainly in the power pumps hall. The registrations were made during a normal working days. The recorders made, for one minute, with recorder (NL32, Japanese society RION) in the pump's hall 12 positions were introduced in a high- capacity computer. This second part of the paper contains a natural continuation of the study conducted in the first part. Through the composition of sound waves for each pump in part according to the construction of the hall, gives the sound field generated by sources of power pumps during simultaneous operation. Field of noise sources inside the hall of power pumps determines an acoustic pressure on the walls of the hall. Taking into consideration the frequencies that are threatening the construction of the hall, will be presented successively acoustic pressure what special expertise to the hall walls the pressures of 230Hz, 350Hz, 800Hz and 1400Hz. This study is important for the acoustic pressure made from the "Teraplast" enterprise inside, and outside the halls.

  13. Towards a consensus on the pressure and composition dependence of sound velocity in the liquid Fe-S system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Akio; Terasaki, Hidenori; Shibazaki, Yuki; Higo, Yuji; Kuwabara, Souma; Shimoyama, Yuta; Sakurai, Moe; Ushioda, Masashi; Takahashi, Eiichi; Kikegawa, Takumi; Wakabayashi, Daisuke; Funamori, Nobumasa

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in techniques for high-pressure and high-temperature experiments enable us to measure the velocity of sound in liquid Fe alloys. However, reported velocities in liquid Fe-S differ among research groups (e.g., by >10% at 5 GPa), even when similar methods are used (i.e., the ultrasonic pulse-echo overlap method combined with a large volume press). To identify the causes of the discrepancies, we reanalyzed previous data and conducted additional sound velocity measurements for liquid Fe-S at 2-7 GPa, and evaluated the potential error sources. We found that the discrepancy cannot be explained by errors in the sound velocity measurements themselves, but by inaccuracies in determining the temperature, pressure, and chemical composition in each experiment. Of particular note are the significant errors introduced when determining pressures from the unit-cell volume of MgO, which is a temperature-sensitive pressure standard, using inaccurate temperatures. To solve the problem, we additionally used h-BN as a pressure standard, which is less sensitive to temperature. The pressure dependence of the sound velocity became smaller than that of the original data because of the revised pressure values. Our best estimate for the seismic velocity of the Moon's liquid outer core is 4.0 ± 0.1 km/s, given a chemical composition Fe83S17.

  14. Sound velocity of hcp-Fe at high pressure: experimental constraints, extrapolations and comparison with seismic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Ohtani, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Determining the sound velocity of iron under extreme thermodynamic conditions is essential for a proper interpretation of seismic observations of the Earth's core but is experimentally challenging. Here, we review techniques and methodologies used to measure sound velocities in metals at megabar pressures, with specific focus on the compressional sound velocity of hexagonal close-packed iron. A critical comparison of literature results, coherently analyzed using consistent metrology (pressure scale, equation of state), allows us to propose reference relations for the pressure and density dependence of the compressional velocity of hexagonal close-packed iron at ambient temperature. This provides a key base line upon which to add complexity, including high-temperature effects, pre-melting effects, effects of nickel and/or light element incorporation, necessary for an accurate comparison with seismic models, and ultimately to constrain Earth's inner core composition.

  15. So small, so loud: extremely high sound pressure level from a pygmy aquatic insect (Corixidae, Micronectinae).

    PubMed

    Sueur, Jérôme; Mackie, David; Windmill, James F C

    2011-01-01

    To communicate at long range, animals have to produce intense but intelligible signals. This task might be difficult to achieve due to mechanical constraints, in particular relating to body size. Whilst the acoustic behaviour of large marine and terrestrial animals has been thoroughly studied, very little is known about the sound produced by small arthropods living in freshwater habitats. Here we analyse for the first time the calling song produced by the male of a small insect, the water boatman Micronecta scholtzi. The song is made of three distinct parts differing in their temporal and amplitude parameters, but not in their frequency content. Sound is produced at 78.9 (63.6-82.2) SPL rms re 2.10(-5) Pa with a peak at 99.2 (85.7-104.6) SPL re 2.10(-5) Pa estimated at a distance of one metre. This energy output is significant considering the small size of the insect. When scaled to body length and compared to 227 other acoustic species, the acoustic energy produced by M. scholtzi appears as an extreme value, outperforming marine and terrestrial mammal vocalisations. Such an extreme display may be interpreted as an exaggerated secondary sexual trait resulting from a runaway sexual selection without predation pressure.

  16. Postnatal development of sound pressure transformations by the head and pinnae of the cat: Monaural characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Tollin, Daniel J.; Koka, Kanthaiah

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been many anatomical, physiological, and psychophysical studies of auditory development in cat, there have been no comparable studies of the development of the sound pressured transformations by the cat head and pinnae. Because the physical dimensions of the head and pinnae determine the spectral and temporal transformations of sound, as head and pinnae size increase during development, the magnitude and frequency ranges of these transformations are hypothesized to systematically change. This hypothesis was tested by measuring directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of head-related transfer functions, and the linear dimensions of the head and pinnae in cats from the onset of hearing (∼1.5 weeks) through adulthood. Head and pinnae dimensions increased by factors of ∼2 and ∼2.5, respectively, reaching adult values by ∼23 and ∼16 weeks, respectively. The development of the spectral notch cues to source location, the spatial- and frequency-dependent distributions of DTF amplitude gain (acoustic directionality), maximum gain, and the acoustic axis, and the resonance frequency and associated gain of the ear canal and concha were systematically related to the dimensions of the head and pinnae. These monaural acoustical properties of the head and pinnae in the cat are mature by 16 weeks. PMID:19206874

  17. Sound Transmission through Cylindrical Shell Structures Excited by Boundary Layer Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines sound transmission into two concentric cylindrical sandwich shells subject to turbulent flow on the exterior surface of the outer shell. The interior of the shells is filled with fluid medium and there is an airgap between the shells in the annular space. The description of the pressure field is based on the cross-spectral density formulation of Corcos, Maestrello, and Efimtsov models of the turbulent boundary layer. The classical thin shell theory and the first-order shear deformation theory are applied for the inner and outer shells, respectively. Modal expansion and the Galerkin approach are used to obtain closed-form solutions for the shell displacements and the radiation and transmission pressures in the cavities including both the annular space and the interior. The average spectral density of the structural responses and the transmitted interior pressures are expressed explicitly in terms of the summation of the cross-spectral density of generalized force induced by the boundary layer turbulence. The effects of acoustic and hydrodynamic coincidences on the spectral density are observed. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method for both subsonic and supersonic flows.

  18. Study on osteogenesis promoted by low sound pressure level infrasound in vivo and some underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Long, Hua; Zheng, Liheng; Gomes, Fernando Cardoso; Zhang, Jinhui; Mou, Xiang; Yuan, Hua

    2013-09-01

    To clarify the effects of low sound pressure level (LSPL) infrasound on local bone turnover and explore its underlying mechanisms, femoral defected rats were stabilized with a single-side external fixator. After exposure to LSPL infrasound for 30min twice everyday for 6 weeks, the pertinent features of bone healing were assessed by radiography, peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT), histology and immunofluorescence assay. Infrasound group showed a more consecutive and smoother process of fracture healing and modeling in radiographs and histomorphology. It also showed significantly higher average bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). Immunofluorescence showed increased expression of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and decreased Neuropeptide Y (NPY) innervation in microenvironment. The results suggested the osteogenesis promotion effects of LSPL infrasound in vivo. Neuro-osteogenic network in local microenvironment was probably one target mediating infrasonic osteogenesis, which might provide new strategy to accelerate bone healing and remodeling. PMID:23770453

  19. Effect of water vapor on sound absorption in nitrogen at low frequency/pressure ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    Sound absorption measurements were made in N2-H2O binary mixtures at 297 K over the frequency/pressure range f/P of 0.1-2500 Hz/atm to investigate the vibrational relaxation peak of N2 and its location on f/P axis as a function of humidity. At low humidities the best fit to a linear relationship between the f/P(max) and humidity yields an intercept of 0.013 Hz/atm and a slope of 20,000 Hz/atm-mole fraction. The reaction rate constants derived from this model are lower than those obtained from the extrapolation of previous high-temperature data.

  20. Intracochlear assessment of electrode position after cochlear implant surgery by means of multislice computer tomography.

    PubMed

    van Wermeskerken, Gijs K A; Prokop, Mathias; van Olphen, Adriaan F; Albers, Frans W J

    2007-12-01

    The development of electrode arrays, the past years, has focused on modiolus-hugging cochlear implant electrodes. Besides, atraumatic implantation of electrodes is of importance for the use in hearing preservation, in cases of combined electric and acoustic stimulation. Intracochlear positioning of the individual electrodes by means of multislice computer tomography (CT) has not yet been shown. In this study we formulated and tested a CT imaging protocol for postoperative scanning of the temporal bone in cochlear implant subjects. Both a fresh human temporal bone and a fresh human cadaver head were implanted with a cochlear implant. Multislice CT was performed for adequate depiction of the cochlear implant. All scans were analyzed on a viewing workstation. After mid-modiolar reconstruction we were able to identify the intracochlear electrode position relative to the scala tympani and scala vestibuli. This was possible in both the implanted isolated temporal bone and the fresh human cadaver head. The feasibility of imaging the electrode position of the cochlear implant within the intracochlear spaces is shown with multislice CT. An imaging protocol is suggested. PMID:17632730

  1. PROPOSAL OF PREDICTIVE EQUATIONS FOR THE SOUND PRESSURE SPECTRUM LEVEL OF THE BLAST NOISE IN THE TUNNEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Shigeki; Kakigi, Hiroya; Shinji, Masato

    The noise reduction effect of a sound insulation door installed in a tunnel under construction can be analyzed practically by the numerical analysis using the SEA method. However there was a problem that the prediction analysis is quite difficult at the planning stage because there was not the predictive technique of the sound pressure spectrum level(SPSL) of blast noise to be necessary as input data. In this Study, We analyzed relationship between gunpowder quantity and frequency domain damping characteristic of the sound pressure level in the tunnel based on field measurement results. And based on this analysis, we propose a predictive equation for the SPSL of the blast noise in the tunnel, and discuss its applicability.

  2. Motor control of sound frequency in birdsong involves the interaction between air sac pressure and labial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency modulation is a salient acoustic feature of birdsong. Its control is usually attributed to the activity of syringeal muscles, which affect the tension of the labia responsible for sound production. We use experimental and theoretical tools to test the hypothesis that for birds producing tonal sounds such as domestic canaries (Serinus canaria), frequency modulation is determined by both the syringeal tension and the air sac pressure. For different models, we describe the structure of the isofrequency curves, which are sets of parameters leading to sounds presenting the same fundamental frequencies. We show how their shapes determine the relative roles of syringeal tension and air sac pressure in frequency modulation. Finally, we report experiments that allow us to unveil the features of the isofrequency curves.

  3. The Influence of Fundamental Frequency and Sound Pressure Level Range on Breathing Patterns in Female Classical Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, Sally; Thorpe, C. William; Callaghan, Jean; Davis, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) range on respiratory behavior in classical singing. Method: Five trained female singers performed an 8-s messa di voce (a crescendo and decrescendo on one F0) across their musical F0 range. Lung volume (LV) change was estimated, and…

  4. Estimation of bone conduction skull transmission by hearing thresholds and ear-canal sound pressure.

    PubMed

    Reinfeldt, Sabine; Stenfelt, Stefan; Håkansson, Bo

    2013-05-01

    Bone conduction sound transmission in the human skull and the occlusion effect were estimated from hearing thresholds and ear-canal sound pressure (ECSP) measured by a probe tube microphone when stimulation was at three positions on the skull (ipsilateral mastoid, contralateral mastoid, and forehead). The measurements were done with the ear-canal open as well as occluded by an ear-plug. Depending on the estimation method, transcranial transmission at frequencies below 1 kHz was between -8 and 5 dB, around 0 dB at 1 kHz that decreased with frequency to between -17 and -7 dB at 8 kHz. The forehead transmission was, except at frequencies between 1 and 2 kHz, similar to that proposed in the standard ISO:389-3 (1994) when the threshold measurements were conducted with open ear-canals. Compared with the same measurements using hearing thresholds, the ECSP gave similar transmission results at most frequencies, but differed at 0.5, 0.75, 2 and 3 kHz. One probable reason for the differences between thresholds and ECSP might be a significant perception improvement (lower thresholds) when the stimulation was at the ipsilateral mastoid that was not found at the other positions. This improvement, which also was present in the occlusion effect data, was hypothesized to originate in greater sensitivity of the cochlea for vibration in line with the ipsilateral stimulation direction than from other directions.

  5. Contrasting sound velocity and intermediate-range structural order between polymerized and depolymerized silicate glasses under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Kono, Yoshio; Wang, Yanbin; Park, Changyong; Yu, Tony; Jing, Zhicheng; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction and ultrasonic velocity measurements of three silicate glasses (in jadeite, albite, and diopside compositions) show a sharp contrast in pressure-induced changes in structure and elasticity. With increasing pressure to around 6 GPa, polymerized glasses (jadeite and albite) display large shift in the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) in the structure factor, S(Q), to higher-Q values, indicating rapid shrinkage in the intermediate-range ordered (IRO) structure. Above 6 GPa, the shift of FSDP decelerates, suggesting that shrinkage in the IRO structure has been largely completed and the structure evolution is now dominated by the diminution of the interstitial volume in a more densely packed arrangement. Associated with this structural change, sound velocities increase with pressure above 6 GPa. In contrast, the depolymerized diopside glass exhibits smaller changes in the pressure dependence for both sound velocities and FSDP positions. Compared to the polymerized glasses, the velocities are faster and the positions of FSDP appear at higher-Q under the same experimental conditions. The results suggest that the depolymerized diopside glass has an initially denser IRO structure compared to that of the polymerized glasses, and there are no sufficient interstitial voids to shrink. The different behaviors between polymerized and depolymerized glasses are apparently related to the initial linkage of tetrahedra and the pressure-induced structural reactions. These results suggest that under compression up to 10 GPa, the degree of polymerization is a major factor affecting the IRO network structure and the sound velocity of silicate glasses.

  6. Estimation of sound pressure levels of voiced speech from skin vibration of the neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.; Popolo, Peter S.

    2005-03-01

    How accurately can sound pressure levels (SPLs) of speech be estimated from skin vibration of the neck? Measurements using a small accelerometer were carried out in 27 subjects (10 males and 17 females) who read Rainbow and Marvin Williams passages in soft, comfortable, and loud voice, while skin acceleration levels (SALs) and SPLs were simultaneously registered and analyzed every 30 ms. The results indicate that the mean SPL of voiced speech can be estimated with accuracy better than +/-2.8 dB in 95% of the cases when the subjects are individually calibrated. This makes the accelerometer an interesting sensor for SPL measurement of speech when microphones are problematic to use (e.g., noisy environments or in voice dosimetry). The estimates of equivalent SPL, which is the logarithm of averaged relative energy of voiced speech, were found to be up to 1.5 dB less accurate than the mean SPL. The estimation accuracy for instantaneous SPLs was worse than for the mean and equivalent SPLs (on average +/-6 and +/-5 dB for males and females, respectively). .

  7. Behavioral responses of deafened guinea pigs to intracochlear electrical stimulation: a new rapid psychophysical procedure.

    PubMed

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Versnel, Huib

    2014-07-01

    In auditory research the guinea pig is often preferred above rats and mice because of the easily accessible cochlea and because the frequency range of its hearing is more comparable to that of humans. Studies of the guinea-pig auditory system primarily apply histological and electrophysiological measures. Behavioral animal paradigms, in particular in combination with these histological and electrophysiological methods, are necessary in the development of new therapeutic interventions. However, the guinea pig is not considered an attractive animal for behavioral experiments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a behavioral task suitable for guinea pigs, that can be utilized in cochlear-implant related research. Guinea pigs were trained in a modified shuttle-box in which a stream of air was used as unconditioned stimulus (UCS). A stream of air was preferred over conventionally used methods as electric foot-shocks since it produces less stress, which is a confounding factor in behavioral experiments. Hearing guinea pigs were trained to respond to acoustic stimuli. They responded correctly within only five sessions of ten minutes. The animals maintained their performance four weeks after the right cochlea was implanted with an electrode array. After systemic deafening, the animals responded in the first session immediately to intracochlear electrical stimulation. These responses were not affected by daily chronic electrical stimulation (CES). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that guinea pigs can be trained relatively fast to respond to acoustic stimuli, and that the training has a lasting effect, which generalizes to intracochlear electrical stimulation after deafening. Furthermore, it demonstrates that bilaterally deafened guinea pigs with substantial (∼50%) loss of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs), detect intracochlear electrical stimulation.

  8. Investigation of the Sound Pressure Level (SPL) of earphones during music listening with the use of physical ear canal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aying, K. P.; Otadoy, R. E.; Violanda, R.

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates on the sound pressure level (SPL) of insert-type earphones that are commonly used for music listening of the general populace. Measurements of SPL from earphones of different respondents were measured by plugging the earphone to a physical ear canal model. Durations of the earphone used for music listening were also gathered through short interviews. Results show that 21% of the respondents exceed the standard loudness/duration relation recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO).

  9. Exposure to classroom sound pressure level among dance teachers in Porto Alegre (RS)

    PubMed Central

    Nehring, Cristiane; Bauer, Magda Aline; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Dance teachers are exposed to high sound intensities. Aim: To verify the sound intensity of music used by dance teachers during classes. Method: This was a transversal and prospective study. Dance teachers were evaluated with a sociodemographic questionnaire, and sound intensity level measurements were taken at the beginning, middle, and end of dance classes. Results: The sample comprised 35 teachers (average age, 31.8 years). The duration of their career as dance teachers was 1–37 years; they worked daily for approximately 1–10 h. Among the classes followed, there were 15 (42.85%) classical ballet classes, 4 (11.42%) tap dancing lessons, 5 (14.28%) jazz dance classes, 2 (5.71) Arab dance lessons, 6 (17.14%) street dance classes, and 3 (8.57%) ballroom dancing lessons. The average values observed at the beginning, middle, and end of the classes were 80.91 dB (A), 83.22 dB (A), and 85.19 dB (A), respectively. The music played in the street dance classes exposed teachers to the highest sound intensity. Conclusion: The average level of sound intensity of the dance classes in this study was either below or equal to the limit considered harmful for hearing health. Analysis of different class types showed that the sound densities of street, ballroom, and tap dance classes were above the recommended limits. PMID:25991989

  10. Density and Sound Velocity of Iron-Sulfur Alloying Liquids at High Pressures and Implications to Planetary Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.

    2012-04-30

    Liquid Fe-light element alloys are likely present in the Earth's outer core and the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets such as Moon, Mercury, and Mars, suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations. In order to determine the abundances of light elements and their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making rough corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we determine the density and sound velocity for Fe-S liquids with different sulfur contents at high pressure and temperature conditions up to 8 GPa and 2173 K using synchrotron X-ray techniques.

  11. Laboratory measurement of elastic anisotropy on spherical rock samples by longitudinal and transverse sounding under confining pressure.

    PubMed

    Lokajíček, Tomáš; Svitek, Tomáš

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of shear wave velocities in loaded rocks is important in describing elastic anisotropy. A new high-pressure measuring head was designed and constructed for longitudinal and traversal ultrasonic sounding of spherical rock samples in 132 independent directions under hydrostatic pressure up to 60 MPa. The velocity is measured using a pair of P-wave sensors and two pairs of S-wave sensors (TV/RV and TH/RH) with perpendicular polarization. An isotropic glass sphere was used to calibrate the experimental setup. A fine-grained anisotropic quartzite sample was examined using the P- and S-wave ultrasonic sounding. Waveforms are recorded by pairs of TP/RP, TV/RV and TH/RH transducers in a range of confining pressure between 0.1 and 60 MPa. The recorded data showed a shear wave splitting in three basic structural directions of the sample. The measurements proved to be useful in investigating oriented micro-cracks, lattice (LPO) and shape-preferred orientation (SPO) for the bulk elastic anisotropy of anisotropic rocks subjected to hydrostatic pressure.

  12. Comparison of f2/f1 ratio functions in rabbit and gerbil: Ear-canal DPOAEs vs noninvasively inferred intracochlear DPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Glen K.; Stagner, Barden B.; Dong, Wei; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L.

    2015-12-01

    intracochlear pressure in that as the f2/f1 ratio decreased toward 1, the iDP continued to grow. However, at low levels, 2f1-f2 DPOAE-ratio functions showed the opposite behavior in that they decreased in level at narrow f2/f1 ratios. It is hypothesized that this contrasting behavior occurred, because distributed 2f1-f2 DPOAE components directed basally toward the ear canal are largely in cancellation at narrow ratios, while iDP components directed apically toward the 2f1-f2 DP frequency place add in phase.

  13. Making Sound Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  14. Attenuation of peak sound pressure levels of shooting noise by hearing protective earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Lenzuni, Paolo; Sangiorgi, Tommaso; Cerini, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Transmission losses (TL) to highly impulsive signals generated by three firearms have been measured for two ear muffs, using both a head and torso simulator and a miniature microphone located at the ear canal entrance (MIRE technique). Peak SPL TL have been found to be well approximated by 40 ms short-L eq TL. This has allowed the use of transmissibilities and correction factors for bone conduction and physiological masking appropriate for continuous noise, for the calculation of REAT-type peak insertion losses (IL). Results indicate that peak IL can be well predicted by estimates based on one-third octave band 40 ms short L eq and manufacturer-declared (nominal) IL measured for continuous noise according to test standards. Such predictions tend to be more accurate at the high end of the range, while they are less reliable when the attenuation is lower. A user-friendly simplified prediction algorithm has also been developed, which only requires nominal IL and one-third octave sound exposure level spectra. Separate predictions are possible for IL in direct and diffuse sound fields, albeit with higher uncertainties, due to the smaller number of experimental data comprising the two separate datasets on which such predictions are based.

  15. Sound measurement in flows: Determination of the noise level due to turbulent pressure variations by comparing the measurements with a nose cone and with a slotted tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neise, W.

    A method for the separation of sound and noise signals in flow channels is described. The two signals as a function of frequency are compared. It is assumed that sound and turbulent noise signals are statistically independent, and that the microphone noise levels are different when using a nose cone or a slotted tube. The use of comparative measurement is simple in the frequency domain of plane waves, the wave propagation being parallel to the channel axis and the sound pressure being constant in a cross section. The case of higher modes in the channel is considerably more problematic and requires laborious measurements and treatments.

  16. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos; Piper, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  17. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos Piper, Ben

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  18. Sound quality assessment of Diesel combustion noise using in-cylinder pressure components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payri, F.; Broatch, A.; Margot, X.; Monelletta, L.

    2009-01-01

    The combustion process in direct injection (DI) Diesel engines is an important source of noise, and it is thus the main reason why end-users could be reluctant to drive vehicles powered with this type of engine. This means that the great potential of Diesel engines for environment preservation—due to their lower consumption and the subsequent reduction of CO2 emissions—may be lost. Moreover, the advanced combustion concepts—e.g. the HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition)—developed to comply with forthcoming emissions legislation, while maintaining the efficiency of current engines, are expected to be noisier because they are characterized by a higher amount of premixed combustion. For this reason many efforts have been dedicated by car manufacturers in recent years to reduce the overall level and improve the sound quality of engine noise. Evaluation procedures are required, both for noise levels and sound quality, that may be integrated in the global engine development process in a timely and cost-effective manner. In previous published work, the authors proposed a novel method for the assessment of engine noise level. A similar procedure is applied in this paper to demonstrate the suitability of combustion indicators for the evaluation of engine noise quality. These indicators, which are representative of the peak velocity of fuel burning and the resonance in the combustion chamber, are well correlated with the combustion noise mark obtained from jury testing. Quite good accuracy in the prediction of the engine noise quality has been obtained with the definition of a two-component regression, which also permits the identification of the combustion process features related to the resulting noise quality, so that corrective actions may be proposed.

  19. Method of and apparatus for measuring temperature and pressure. [atmospheric sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Laser beams are transmitted through gas to a reflecting target, which may be either a solid surface or particulate matter in gas or the gas molecules. The return beams are measured to determine the amount of energy absorbed by the gas. For temperature measurements, the laser beam has a wavelength at which the gas exhibits a relatively temperature sensitive and pressure insensitive absorption characteristic for pressure measurements, the laser beam has a wavelength at which the gas has a relatively pressure sensitive and temperature insensitive absorption characteristic. To reduce the effects of scattering on the absorption measurements a reference laser beam with a weak absorption characteristic is transmitted colinearly with the data beam having a strong absorption characteristic. The two signals are processed as a ratio to eliminate back scattering. Embodiments of transmitters and receivers described include a sequential laser pulse transmitter and receiver, a simultaneous laser pulse transmitter and receiver.

  20. Sound velocity of Fe-S liquids at high pressure: Implications for the Moon's molten outer core

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Zhicheng; Wang, Yanbin; Kono, Yoshio; Yu, Tony; Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Park, Changyong; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-07-21

    Sound velocities of Fe and Fe–S liquids were determined by combining the ultrasonic measurements and synchrotron X-ray techniques under high pressure–temperature conditions from 1 to 8 GPa and 1573 K to 1973 K. Four different liquid compositions were studied including Fe, Fe–10 wt% S, Fe–20 wt% S, and Fe–27 wt% S. Our data show that the velocity of Fe-rich liquids increases upon compression and decreases with increasing sulfur content, whereas temperature has negligible effect on the velocity of Fe–S liquids. The sound velocity data were combined with ambient-pressure densities to fit the Murnaghan equation of state (EOS). Compared to the lunar seismic model, our velocity data constrain the sulfur content at 4±3 wt%, indicating a significantly denser (6.5±0.5 g/cm3) and hotter (1870-70+100 K) outer core than previously estimated. A new lunar structure model incorporating available geophysical observations points to a smaller core radius. Our model suggests a top–down solidification scenario for the evolution of the lunar core. Such “iron snow” process may have been an important mechanism for the growth of the inner core.

  1. [Hearing loss by continuous exposure to high sound pressure among maintenance workers at a Brazilian Air Force helicopters unity].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Maria Dutra; Câmara, Volney de M

    2006-06-01

    Continuous exposure to high sound pressure in aeronautical workers can be associated with inner ear hearing loss. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of deafness among all maintenance workers from a Brazilian Air Force helicopter unit. The methods included the application of individual questionnaires and audiometric tests. The results showed a high prevalence (32.4%) of hearing loss related to time on the job (p < 0.05; RP = 2.11; 95%CI: 1.03-4.32) and the 41-50-year age bracket (p = 0.00; RP < 3.94; 95%CI: 2.04-7.62). No influence was found from selected variables that might result in bias. Finally, a program to prevent hearing loss was recommended.

  2. 16 CFR 1500.47 - Method for determining the sound pressure level produced by toy caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accurate to within ±1 decibel. If the calibration is of the pressure type or of the piston-phone plus electrostatic actuator type, it shall be corrected to free-field conditions in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. (2) The oscilloscope shall be the storage type or one equipped with a camera....

  3. Iterated intracochlear reflection shapes the envelopes of basilar-membrane click responses.

    PubMed

    Shera, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Multiple internal reflection of cochlear traveling waves has been argued to provide a plausible explanation for the waxing and waning and other temporal structures often exhibited by the envelopes of basilar-membrane (BM) and auditory-nerve responses to acoustic clicks. However, a recent theoretical analysis of a BM click response measured in chinchilla concludes that the waveform cannot have arisen via any equal, repetitive process, such as iterated intracochlear reflection [Wit and Bell (2015), J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 94-96]. Reanalysis of the waveform contradicts this conclusion. The measured BM click response is used to derive the frequency-domain transfer function characterizing every iteration of the loop. The selfsame transfer function that yields waxing and waning of the BM click response also captures the spectral features of ear-canal stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions measured in the same animal, consistent with the predictions of multiple internal reflection. Small shifts in transfer-function phase simulate results at different measurement locations and reproduce the heterogeneity of BM click response envelopes observed experimentally. PMID:26723327

  4. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li,B.; Liebermann, R.

    2007-01-01

    The adiabatic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations.

  5. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth's interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Baosheng; Liebermann, Robert C

    2007-05-29

    The adiabatic bulk (K(S)) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations.

  6. The blood pressure-salt sensitivity paradigm: pathophysiologically sound yet of no practical value.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Ferruccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale

    2016-09-01

    Sodium plays an important pathophysiological role in blood pressure (BP) values and in the development of hypertension, and epidemiological studies such as the Intersalt Study have shown that the increase in BP occurring with age is determined by salt intake. Recently, a meta-analysis of 13 prospective studies has also shown the close relationship between excess sodium intake and higher risk of stroke and total cardiovascular events. However, the BP response to changing salt intake displayed a marked variability, as first suggested by Kawasaki et al. (The effect of high-sodium and low-sodium intakes on blood pressure and other related variables in human subjects with idiopathic hypertension. Am J Med 1978; 64: 193-198) and later by Weinberger et al. (Definitions and characteristics of sodium sensitivity and blood pressure resistance. Hypertension 1986; 8: II127-II134), who recognized the heterogeneity of the BP response to salt and developed the concept of salt sensitivity. We have a large body of evidence in favour of a major role of metabolic and neuro-hormonal factors in determining BP salt sensitivity in association with the effect of genetic variation. There is evidence that salt sensitivity influences the development of organ damage, even independently-at least in part-of BP levels and the occurrence of hypertension. In addition, several observational studies indicate that salt sensitivity is clearly associated with a higher rate of cardiovascular events and mortality, independently of BP levels and hypertension. A cluster of factors with well-known atherogenic potential such as hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia and microalbuminuria-all known to be prevalent in salt-sensitive hypertension-might at least partially explain the increased cardiovascular risk observed in salt sensitive individuals. The gold standard for the evaluation of BP salt sensitivity is the BP response to a moderate reduction of salt intake for several weeks; nevertheless, these protocols

  7. Sound velocity and elastic properties of Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-C liquids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, Soma; Terasaki, Hidenori; Nishida, Keisuke; Shimoyama, Yuta; Takubo, Yusaku; Higo, Yuji; Shibazaki, Yuki; Urakawa, Satoru; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-03-01

    The sound velocity ( V P) of liquid Fe-10 wt% Ni and Fe-10 wt% Ni-4 wt% C up to 6.6 GPa was studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo method combined with synchrotron X-ray techniques. The obtained V P of liquid Fe-Ni is insensitive to temperature, whereas that of liquid Fe-Ni-C tends to decrease with increasing temperature. The V P values of both liquid Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-C increase with pressure. Alloying with 10 wt% of Ni slightly reduces the V P of liquid Fe, whereas alloying with C is likely to increase the V P. However, a difference in V P between liquid Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-C becomes to be smaller at higher temperature. By fitting the measured V P data with the Murnaghan equation of state, the adiabatic bulk modulus ( K S0) and its pressure derivative ( K S ' ) were obtained to be K S0 = 103 GPa and K S ' = 5.7 for liquid Fe-Ni and K S0 = 110 GPa and K S ' = 7.6 for liquid Fe-Ni-C. The calculated density of liquid Fe-Ni-C using the obtained elastic parameters was consistent with the density values measured directly using the X-ray computed tomography technique. In the relation between the density ( ρ) and sound velocity ( V P) at 5 GPa (the lunar core condition), it was found that the effect of alloying Fe with Ni was that ρ increased mildly and V P decreased, whereas the effect of C dissolution was to decrease ρ but increase V P. In contrast, alloying with S significantly reduces both ρ and V P. Therefore, the effects of light elements (C and S) and Ni on the ρ and V P of liquid Fe are quite different under the lunar core conditions, providing a clue to constrain the light element in the lunar core by comparing with lunar seismic data.

  8. Measurements of Speed of Sound in Lean and Rich Natural Gas Mixtures at Pressures up to 37 MPa Using a Specialized Rupture Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botros, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the speed of sound in 42 different compositions of lean, medium, and rich natural-gas mixtures using a specialized high-pressure rupture tube have been conducted. The rupture tube is made of stainless steel (internal diameter = 38.1 mm and length = 42 m), and is instrumented with 13 high-frequency-response dynamic pressure transducers (Endevco) mounted very close to the rupture end and along the length of the tube to capture the pressure-time traces of the decompression wave. Tests were conducted for initial pressures ranging from 10 MPa to 37 MPa and a temperature range from -25°C to+68°C. Gas mixture compositions were controlled by mixing conventional natural-gas mixtures from an adjacent gas pipeline with richer components of alkanes. Temperature control is achieved by a heat tracer along the tube with a set point at the desired gas temperature of the particular test. Uncertainty analysis indicated that the uncertainty in the experimentally determined speed of sound in the undisturbed gas mixture at the initial pressure and temperature is on the order of 0.306 %. The measured speeds of sound were compared to predictions by five equations of state, namely; the Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling (BWRS), AGA-8, Peng-Robinson (PR), Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RK-Soave), and Groupe Européen de Recherches Gaziéres (GERG-2004) equations.

  9. Control of tonal noise from subsonic axial fan. Part 1: reconstruction of aeroacoustic sources from far-field sound pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Anthony; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2005-12-01

    An inverse method is investigated to evaluate the unsteady rotating forces (dipole strength distribution) acting by the fan on the fluid from far-field acoustic pressure measurements. A development based on the tonal noise generated by a propeller is used to derive a discretized form of the direct problem. The inversion of this direct problem is ill-posed and requires optimization technique to stabilize the solution for small perturbations in the measured acoustic input data. The reconstruction reveals that the conditioning of the inverse model depends on the aeroacoustic source and far-field sensor locations as well as on the frequency under investigation. Simulations show that an adequate choice of a regularization parameter leads to a satisfactory reconstruction of imposed unsteady rotating forces in the presence of measurement noise, and a correct localization of acoustic "hot spots" on the radiation surface. Preliminary experimental results also show the ability to extrapolate the radiated sound field at blade passage frequency (BPF), and harmonics, from the reconstructed forces. These data are exploited in the second part of this paper to evaluate various active control strategies for tonal fan noise.

  10. On the efficacy of spatial sampling using manual scanning paths to determine the spatial average sound pressure level in rooms.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Carl

    2011-05-01

    In architectural acoustics, noise control and environmental noise, there are often steady-state signals for which it is necessary to measure the spatial average, sound pressure level inside rooms. This requires using fixed microphone positions, mechanical scanning devices, or manual scanning. In comparison with mechanical scanning devices, the human body allows manual scanning to trace out complex geometrical paths in three-dimensional space. To determine the efficacy of manual scanning paths in terms of an equivalent number of uncorrelated samples, an analytical approach is solved numerically. The benchmark used to assess these paths is a minimum of five uncorrelated fixed microphone positions at frequencies above 200 Hz. For paths involving an operator walking across the room, potential problems exist with walking noise and non-uniform scanning speeds. Hence, paths are considered based on a fixed standing position or rotation of the body about a fixed point. In empty rooms, it is shown that a circle, helix, or cylindrical-type path satisfy the benchmark requirement with the latter two paths being highly efficient at generating large number of uncorrelated samples. In furnished rooms where there is limited space for the operator to move, an efficient path comprises three semicircles with 45°-60° separations.

  11. Birch's Law for high-pressure metals and ionic solids: Sound velocity data comparison between shock wave experiments and recent diamond anvil cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, David; Ware, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    Sound velocity-density systematics has long been a fruitful way to take shock wave measurements on elements, alloys, oxides, rocks, and other materials, and allow reasonable extrapolation to densities found deep in the Earth. Recent detection of super-Earths has expanded interest in terrestrial planetary interiors to an even greater range of materials and pressures. Recent published DAC experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron and iron alloys, relevant to planetary cores, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law, a linear relation between sound velocity and density. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several shocked metallic elements, including iron, and shocked ionic solids and make comparisons to the recent DAC data.

  12. EFFECTS OF NEONATAL PARTIAL DEAFNESS AND CHRONIC INTRACOCHLEAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON AUDITORY AND ELECTRICAL RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS IN PRIMARY AUDITORY CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K.; Brown, Mel; Irvine, Dexter, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in patients with severe hearing losses but residual low-frequency hearing raises questions concerning the effects of chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation(ICES) on cortical responses to auditory and electrical stimuli. We investigated these questions by studying responses to tonal and electrical stimuli in primary auditory cortex (AI) of two groups of neonatally-deafened cats with residual high-threshold, low-frequency hearing. One group were implanted with a multi-channel intracochlear electrode at eight weeks of age, and received chronic ICES for up to nine months before cortical recording. Cats in the other group were implanted immediately prior to cortical recording as adults. In all cats in both groups, multi-neuron responses throughout the rostro-caudal extent of AI had low characteristic frequencies (CFs), in the frequency range of the residual hearing, and high-thresholds. Threshold and minimum latency at CF did not differ between the groups, but in the chronic ICES animals there was a higher proportion of electrically but not acoustically excited recording sites. Electrical response thresholds were higher and latencies shorter in the chronically stimulated animals. Thus, chronic implantation and ICES affected the extent of AI that could be activated by acoustic stimuli and resulted in changes in electrical response characteristics. PMID:19703532

  13. Background sound pressure fluctuations (5 DB) from overhead ventilation systems increase subjective fatigue of university students during three-hour lectures.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; Tiller, S G; Koren, S A

    1999-04-01

    During each of four successive sessions (once per week), 21 university students attended 3-hr. lectures. During alternative weeks the fans of the room's ventilation system were either on or off. When operating, they generated an average sound pressure that varied continuously between 60 and 65 dB. The dominant frequency of this 5-dB amplitude modulation of sound pressure was within the electroencephalographic range (5 Hz to 25 Hz). At the end of each hour of the lecture for each session each student estimated on 7-point summated rating scales fatigue (none to maximum) and concentration (poor to excellent). As a group, the students reported more fatigue during lectures when the fans were operating relative to lectures when the fans were not operating. This environmental effect explained about 30% of the variance in fatigue ratings and may be sufficient to affect adversely the attention of students within these settings.

  14. Liquid alkali metals - Equation of state and reduced-pressure, bulk-modulus, sound-velocity, and specific-heat functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    The previous work of Schlosser and Ferrante (1988) on universality in solids is extended to the study of liquid metals. As in the case of solids, to a good approximation, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the reduced-pressure function H, of the reduced-isothermal-bulk-modulus function b, and of the reduced-sound-velocity function v are all linear in 1-X. Finally, it is demonstrated that ln(Cp/C/v) is also linear in 1-X, where X = (V/V/0/)exp 1/3), and V(0) is the volume at zero pressure.

  15. Experimental measurement of speeds of sound in dense supercritical carbon monoxide and development of a high-pressure, high-temperature equation of state.

    PubMed

    Zaug, Joseph M; Carter, Jeffrey A; Bastea, Sorin; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Fried, Laurence E

    2013-05-01

    We report the adiabatic sound speeds for supercritical fluid carbon monoxide along two isotherms, from 0.17 to 2.13 GPa at 297 K and from 0.31 to 3.2 GPa at 600 K. The carbon monoxide was confined in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell, and the sound speed measurements were conducted in situ using a recently reported variant of the photoacoustic light scattering effect. The measured sound speeds were then used to parametrize a single site dipolar exponential-6 intermolecular potential for carbon monoxide. PρT thermodynamic states, sound speeds, and shock Hugoniots were calculated using the newly parametrized intermolecular potential and compared to previously reported experimental results. Additionally, we generated an analytical equation of state for carbon monoxide by fitting to a grid of calculated PρT states over a range of 0.1-10 GPa and 150-2000 K. A 2% mean variation was found between computed high-pressure solid-phase densities and measured data-a surprising result for a spherical interaction potential. We further computed a rotationally dependent fluid to β-solid phase boundary; results signal the relative magnitude of short-range rotational disorder under conditions that span existing phase boundary measurements. PMID:23586650

  16. A new developed velocity of sound measurement device for characterization of multi-component gas mixtures under elevated temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Seibel, C; Suedmeyer, J; Fieback, T M

    2014-07-01

    Inline process control by measurement of velocity of sound of fluids is a direct and comprehensive technique [J. D. N. Cheeke and Z. Wang, "Acoustic wave gas sensors," Sens. Actuators B 59, 146-153 (1999); J. W. Grate, S. J. Martin, and R. M. White, "Acoustic wave microsensors," Anal. Chem. 65, 1868 (1993)]. Depending on the varying conditions of measuring fluid(s), temperatures and pressures, it is a challenging task to find the best possible acoustic setup. Taking this background into account, a velocity of sound measurement device for temperatures up to 475 K and pressures up to 24 MPa was designed and assembled that is to be used for testing different resonator types. Two bulk acoustic wave resonators out of the commonly used lead zirconatetitanate compound (PZT) were tested at different test fluids under temperatures up to 423.15 K and pressures up to 24 MPa [S. Gebhardt, L. Seffner, F. Schlenkirch, and A. Schönecker, "PZT thick films for sensor and actuator applications," J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. 27, 4177-4180 (2007)]. Initially the pure gases methane, ethane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and helium were measured, followed by multi-component gas mixtures. Beside methane-based binary and ternary gas mixtures, a quaternary gas mixture comprising methane, ethane, carbon dioxide, and helium was analyzed. Results for all measurement fluids in a broad temperature and pressure range show a relative deviation to theoretical values derived from GERG-2008 smaller than 0.5%.

  17. Assessment and evaluation of noise controls on roof bolting equipment and a method for predicting sound pressure levels in underground coal mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matetic, Rudy J.

    Over-exposure to noise remains a widespread and serious health hazard in the U.S. mining industries despite 25 years of regulation. Every day, 80% of the nation's miners go to work in an environment where the time weighted average (TWA) noise level exceeds 85 dBA and more than 25% of the miners are exposed to a TWA noise level that exceeds 90 dBA, the permissible exposure limit (PEL). Additionally, MSHA coal noise sample data collected from 2000 to 2002 show that 65% of the equipment whose operators exceeded 100% noise dosage comprise only seven different types of machines; auger miners, bulldozers, continuous miners, front end loaders, roof bolters, shuttle cars (electric), and trucks. In addition, the MSHA data indicate that the roof bolter is third among all the equipment and second among equipment in underground coal whose operators exceed 100% dosage. A research program was implemented to: (1) determine, characterize and to measure sound power levels radiated by a roof bolting machine during differing drilling configurations (thrust, rotational speed, penetration rate, etc.) and utilizing differing types of drilling methods in high compressive strength rock media (>20,000 psi). The research approach characterized the sound power level results from laboratory testing and provided the mining industry with empirical data relative to utilizing differing noise control technologies (drilling configurations and types of drilling methods) in reducing sound power level emissions on a roof bolting machine; (2) distinguish and correlate the empirical data into one, statistically valid, equation, in which, provided the mining industry with a tool to predict overall sound power levels of a roof bolting machine given any type of drilling configuration and drilling method utilized in industry; (3) provided the mining industry with several approaches to predict or determine sound pressure levels in an underground coal mine utilizing laboratory test results from a roof bolting

  18. Speed of Sound in Aqueous Solutions at sub-GPa Pressures: a New Experiment to Unveil the Properties of Extra-Terrestrial Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollengier, O.; Brown, J. M.; Vance, S.; Shaw, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data from the Galileo and Cassini-Huygens missions are consistent with the presence of aqueous subsurface oceans in Ganymede, Callisto and Titan, the largest icy satellites of the solar system. To understand the history and present state of these moons, the next generation of evolution models will require an accurate description of the properties of these liquid layers to predict the phase boundaries, heat transports and chemical exchanges within them. Sound speed measurements in pressure and temperature allow for the reconstruction of the Gibbs free energy surface of a phase, which in turn gives access to the desired properties (chemical potential, density, heat capacity...). However, such data are still scarce for aqueous solutions bearing Na+, Mg2+, Cl- and SO42- ions (major ions expected in extra-terrestrial oceans) at the high pressures and low temperatures expected for water inside these moons (up to 1.5 GPa for Ganymede, down to freezing temperatures). For pure water, IAPWS accuracy for sound speeds is given to 0.3% above 0.4 GPa. MgSO4aqueous solutions have been explored to 0.7 GPa with a precision limited to about 0.5%. Most other aqueous solutions bearing any combination of these four ions have not been explored at all above a few hundreds MPa. To acquire new high-precision sound speeds in aqueous solutions of various compositions, we set up a new experimental system working in the 0 - 0.7 GPa pressure range and 240 - 350 K temperature range. The device consists in an oil-pressurized steel vessel enclosing a titanium alloy rod supporting the sample and a sealing bellows. A transducer at the top end of the titanium rod generates ultrasonic waves and collects the series of subsequent reflections. Preliminary tests with pure water illustrate a precision of 0.02% and an accuracy within 0.1% of IAPWS on our whole pressure range. Revision of the properties of pure water and H2O-MgSO4 solutions up to 0.7 GPa along with the first data in the H2O-MgCl2

  19. Pressure Sounding of the Middle Atmosphere from ATMOS Solar Occultation Measurements of Atmospheric CO(sub 2) Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Rinsland, C.; Zander, R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(sub 2) lines with temperature-insensitive intensities. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of 1-3%, corresponding to a tangent point height precision, depending on the scale height, of 70-210 meters.

  20. Signal and response properties indicate an optoacoustic effect underlying the intra-cochlear laser-optical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallweit, Nicole; Baumhoff, Peter; Krueger, Alexander; Tinne, Nadine; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Kral, Andrej; Maier, Hannes; Ripken, Tammo

    2016-02-01

    Optical cochlea stimulation is under investigation as a potential alternative to conventional electric cochlea implants in treatment of sensorineural hearing loss. If direct optical stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) would be feasible, a smaller stimulation volume and, therefore, an improved frequency resolution could be achieved. However, it is unclear whether the mechanism of optical stimulation is based on direct neuronal stimulation or on optoacoustics. Animal studies on hearing vs. deafened guinea pigs already identified the optoacoustic effect as potential mechanism for intra-cochlear optical stimulation. In order to characterize the optoacoustic stimulus more thoroughly the acoustic signal along the beam path of a pulsed laser in water was quantified and compared to the neuronal response properties of hearing guinea pigs stimulated with the same laser parameters. Two pulsed laser systems were used for analyzing the influence of variable pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse peak power and absorption coefficient. Preliminary results of the experiments in water and in vivo suggesta similar dependency of response signals on the applied laser parameters: Both datasets show an onset and offset signal at the beginning and the end of the laser pulse. Further, the resulting signal amplitude depends on the pulse peak power as well as the temporal development of the applied laser pulse. The data indicates the maximum of the first derivative of power as the decisive factor. In conclusion our findings strengthen the hypothesis of optoacoustics as the underlying mechanism for optical stimulation of the cochlea.

  1. Characterization of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression Water in the Space Launch System Mobile Launcher Using Volume of Fluid Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle consists of a Core Stage with four RS-25 engines and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This vehicle is launched from the Launchpad using a Mobile Launcher (ML) which supports the SLS vehicle until its liftoff from the ML under its own power. The combination of the four RS-25 engines and two SRBs generate a significant Ignition Over-Pressure (IOP) and Acoustic Sound environment. One of the mitigations of these environments is the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression (IOP/SS) subsystem installed on the ML. This system consists of six water nozzles located parallel to and 24 inches downstream of each SRB nozzle exit plane as well as 16 water nozzles located parallel to and 53 inches downstream of the RS-25 nozzle exit plane. During launch of the SLS vehicle, water is ejected through each water nozzle to reduce the intensity of the transient pressure environment imposed upon the SLS vehicle. While required for the mitigation of the transient pressure environment on the SLS vehicle, the IOP/SS subsystem interacts (possibly adversely) with other systems located on the Launch Pad. One of the other systems that the IOP/SS water is anticipated to interact with is the Hydrogen Burn-Off Igniter System (HBOI). The HBOI system's purpose is to ignite the unburned hydrogen/air mixture that develops in and around the nozzle of the RS-25 engines during engine start. Due to the close proximity of the water system to the HBOI system, the presence of the IOP/SS may degrade the effectiveness of the HBOI system. Another system that the IOP/SS water may interact with adversely is the RS-25 engine nozzles and the SRB nozzles. The adverse interaction anticipated is the wetting, to a significant degree, of the RS-25 nozzles resulting in substantial weight of ice forming and water present to a significant degree upstream of the SRB nozzle exit plane inside the nozzle itself, posing significant additional blockage of the effluent that exits the nozzle

  2. Low-Frequency Sound Pressure and Transtympanic Endoscopy of the Middle Ear in Assessment of “Spontaneous” Perilymphatic Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkö, Ilmari; Selmani, Ziane; Zou, Jing

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to verify an eventual perilymphatic fistula (PLF) in 264 patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and/or vertigo. The patients were exposed to a low-frequency sound stimulation (LFS) on posturography to objectively test Tullio's phenomenon and Hennebert's sign. Endoscopes with 5 degree and 25 degree of visual angle and an outer diameter of 1.7 mm were used. The round window niche, with its foldings, oval window with stapes superstructure, a part of the facial recess and the area in the fissula ante fenestram were examined and video recorded. In one patient, we endoscopically verified a fistula in the round window membrane (resulting from a diving accident) that was covered with a fibrinous layer. In 4 cases, there was abnormal mucosal shining in the round window but without PLF. In 7 cases, the tympanic cavity could not be visualized because of the adhesive middle ear process, the abnormal anatomy, or the prominent exostoses of the ear canal prohibited vision. In 34 patients, LFS provoked unsteadiness on posturography without PLF. In 6 cases, a postoperative middle ear infection was recorded. No permanent tympanic membrane perforation occurred. It is unlikely that disease entity of “spontaneous PLF” exists. Tympanoscopy should be regarded as the first choice when a PLF is suspected. PMID:23724265

  3. Korotkoff Sounds.

    PubMed

    Shennan; Halligan

    1996-12-01

    We were interested in the historical perspective that Arabidze et al. [1] brought to the subject of Korotkoff's auscultatory method of measuring blood pressure. The original description by the Reverend Stephen Hales performing the very first blood pressure measurement (which was actually published in 1733) does not make reference to a column of water as the authors suggest [2]. Hales wrote: 'Then untying the Ligature on the Artery, the Blood rose in the Tube eight Feet three Inches.'. He goes on to state that, 'When it was at its full Height, it would rise and fall at and after each Pulse two, three, or four Inches, and sometimes it would fall twelve or fourteen Inches, and have there for a time the same vibrations up and down at and after each Pulse, as it had, when it was at its full Height; to which it would rise again, after forty or fifty Pulses'. We believe this fall of '12 or 14 in' to have been the first description of blood pressure variability, which has wrongly been attributed to respirations by subsequent authors [3]. The mare's pulse rate was described to be about 50 beats per minute; therefore an unanaesthetized horse would not be likely to have a respiration rate of once per minute. One further important point of error concerning the Korotkoff sounds is their reproducibility. We have demonstrated recently that phase IV is reproduced or identified poorly, both in adults and even during pregnancy, when it has been recommended to be used in favour of phase V. We have also demonstrated that phase I (systolic blood pressure) is perceived to be significantly clearer than phase V [4]. PMID:10226281

  4. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  5. Acoustoelasticity. [sound-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sound or pressure variations inside bounded enclosures are investigated. Mathematical models are given for determining: (1) the interaction between the sound pressure field and the flexible wall of a Helmholtz resonator; (2) coupled fluid-structural motion of an acoustic cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall; (3) acoustic natural modes in multiple connected cavities; and (4) the forced response of a cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall. Numerical results are discussed.

  6. Chronic exposure to broadband noise at moderate sound pressure levels spatially shifts tone-evoked responses in the rat auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Lau, Condon; Pienkowski, Martin; Zhang, Jevin W; McPherson, Bradley; Wu, Ed X

    2015-11-15

    Noise-induced hearing disorders are a significant public health concern. One cause of such disorders is exposure to high sound pressure levels (SPLs) above 85 dBA for eight hours/day. High SPL exposures occur in occupational and recreational settings and affect a substantial proportion of the population. However, an even larger proportion is exposed to more moderate SPLs for longer durations. Therefore, there is significant need to better understand the impact of chronic, moderate SPL exposures on auditory processing, especially in the absence of hearing loss. In this study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with tonal acoustic stimulation on an established broadband rat exposure model (65 dB SPL, 30 kHz low-pass, 60 days). The auditory midbrain response of exposed subjects to 7 kHz stimulation (within exposure bandwidth) shifts dorsolaterally to regions that typically respond to lower stimulation frequencies. This shift is quantified by a region of interest analysis that shows that fMRI signals are higher in the dorsolateral midbrain of exposed subjects and in the ventromedial midbrain of control subjects (p<0.05). Also, the center of the responsive region in exposed subjects shifts dorsally relative to that of controls (p<0.05). A similar statistically significant shift (p<0.01) is observed using 40 kHz stimulation (above exposure bandwidth). The results suggest that high frequency midbrain regions above the exposure bandwidth spatially expand due to exposure. This expansion shifts lower frequency regions dorsolaterally. Similar observations have previously been made in the rat auditory cortex. Therefore, moderate SPL exposures affect auditory processing at multiple levels, from the auditory cortex to the midbrain. PMID:26232718

  7. Evaluating The Relation of Trace Fracture Inclination and Sound Pressure Level and Time-of-flight QUS Parameters Using Computational Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, P. T.; Fontes-Pereira, A. J.; Matusin, D. P.; von Krüger, M. A.; Pereira, W. C. A.

    Bone healing is a complex process that stars after the occurrence of a fracture to restore bone optimal conditions. The gold standards for bone status evaluation are the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and the computerized tomography. Ultrasound-based technologies have some advantages as compared to X-ray technologies: nonionizing radiation, portability and lower cost among others. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) has been proposed in literature as a new tool to follow up the fracture healing process. QUS relates the ultrasound propagation with the bone tissue condition (normal or pathological), so, a change in wave propagation may indicate a variation in tissue properties. The most used QUS parameters are time-of-flight (TOF) and sound pressure level (SPL) of the first arriving signal (FAS). In this work, the FAS is the well known lateral wave. The aim of this work is to evaluate the relation of the TOF and SPL of the FAS and fracture inclination trace in two stages of bone healing using computational simulations. Four fracture geometries were used: normal and oblique with 30, 45 and 60 degrees. The TOF average values were 63.23 μs, 63.14 μs, 63.03 μs 62.94 μs for normal, 30, 45 and 60 degrees respectively and average SPL values were -3.83 dB -4.32 dB, -4.78 dB, -6.19 dB for normal, 30, 45 and 60 degrees respectively. The results show an inverse pattern between the amplitude and time-of-flight. These values seem to be sensible to fracture inclination trace, and in future, can be used to characterize it.

  8. Chronic exposure to broadband noise at moderate sound pressure levels spatially shifts tone-evoked responses in the rat auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Lau, Condon; Pienkowski, Martin; Zhang, Jevin W; McPherson, Bradley; Wu, Ed X

    2015-11-15

    Noise-induced hearing disorders are a significant public health concern. One cause of such disorders is exposure to high sound pressure levels (SPLs) above 85 dBA for eight hours/day. High SPL exposures occur in occupational and recreational settings and affect a substantial proportion of the population. However, an even larger proportion is exposed to more moderate SPLs for longer durations. Therefore, there is significant need to better understand the impact of chronic, moderate SPL exposures on auditory processing, especially in the absence of hearing loss. In this study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with tonal acoustic stimulation on an established broadband rat exposure model (65 dB SPL, 30 kHz low-pass, 60 days). The auditory midbrain response of exposed subjects to 7 kHz stimulation (within exposure bandwidth) shifts dorsolaterally to regions that typically respond to lower stimulation frequencies. This shift is quantified by a region of interest analysis that shows that fMRI signals are higher in the dorsolateral midbrain of exposed subjects and in the ventromedial midbrain of control subjects (p<0.05). Also, the center of the responsive region in exposed subjects shifts dorsally relative to that of controls (p<0.05). A similar statistically significant shift (p<0.01) is observed using 40 kHz stimulation (above exposure bandwidth). The results suggest that high frequency midbrain regions above the exposure bandwidth spatially expand due to exposure. This expansion shifts lower frequency regions dorsolaterally. Similar observations have previously been made in the rat auditory cortex. Therefore, moderate SPL exposures affect auditory processing at multiple levels, from the auditory cortex to the midbrain.

  9. Constraints on the Properties of the Moon's Outer Core from High-Pressure Sound Velocity Measurements on Fe-S Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Kono, Y.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Park, C.; Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.; Shen, G.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical observations based on lunar seismology and laser ranging strongly suggest that the Moon's iron core is partially molten. Similar to Earth and other terrestrial planets, light elements, such as sulfur, silicon, carbon, and oxygen, are likely present in the lunar core. Determining the light element concentration in the outer core is of vital importance to the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and chemical evolution of the Moon, as well as the enigmatic history of the lunar dynamo. Among the candidate elements, sulfur is the preferred major light element in the lunar outer due to its high abundance in the parent bodies of iron meteorites, its high solubility in liquid Fe at the lunar core pressure (~5 GPa), and its strong effects on reducing the density, velocity, and freezing temperature of the core. In this study, we conducted in-situ sound velocity measurements on liquid samples of four different compositions, including pure Fe, Fe-10wt%S, Fe-20wt%S, and Fe-27wt%S, at pressure and temperature conditions up to 8 GPa and 1973 K (encompassing the entire lunar depth range), using the Kawai-type multi-anvil device at the GSECARS beamline 13-ID-D and the Paris-Edinburgh cell at HPCAT beamline 16-BM-B. Our results show that the velocity of Fe-rich liquids increases upon compression, decreases with increasing sulfur content, and is nearly independent of temperature. Compared to the seismic velocity of the outer core, our velocity data constrain the sulfur content at 4×2 wt%, indicating a significantly denser (6.4×0.4 g/cm3) and hotter (1860×60 K) outer core than previously estimated. A new lunar structure model incorporating available geophysical observations points to a smaller core radius. Our model also suggests a top-down solidification scenario for the evolution of the lunar core. Such an 'iron snow' process may have been an important mechanism for the growth of the inner core.

  10. Intracochlear microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bone, R.C.; Ryan, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) or microprobe analysis provides cochlear physiologists with a means of accurately assessing relative ionic concentrations in selected portions of the auditory mechanism. Rapid freezing followed by lyophilization allows the recovery of fluid samples in crystalline form not only from perilymphatic and endolymphatic spaces, but also from much smaller subregions of the cochlea. Because samples are examined in a solid state, there is no risk of diffusion into surrounding or juxtaposed fluids. Samples of cochlear tissues may also be evaluated without the danger of intercellular ionic diffusion. During direct visualization by scanning electron microscopy, determination of the biochemical makeup of the material being examined can be simultaneously, assuring the source of the data collected. Other potential advantages and disadvantages of EDXA are reviewed. Initial findings as they relate to endolymph, perilymph, stria vascularis, and the undersurface of the tectorial membrane are presented.

  11. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  12. Laser detection of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.

    1991-05-01

    A prototype laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system has been constructed to detect and measure underwater sound. The technique is based on measuring the Doppler shift of laser light scattered from small particles in colloidal suspension in water. These particles move with the sound wave and thus a measure of their velocity is a measure of the acoustic particle velocity. Experiments have been conducted using this system to measure the acoustic particle displacements in a standing wave tube. A study has been made from both theoretical and experimental perspectives of the performance characteristics and practical limitations of making such measurements. A computer simulation was used to study the effects of physical parameters of the prototype system such as laser power, system geometry, and particle size. Because several authors have suggested that Brownian motion of the scattering particle might limit the system's ability to make such measurements, particular interest has been focused on this question. It has been shown both experimentally and theoretically that Brownian motion does not limit the ability to measure acoustic particle velocity. The emphasis on practical consideration will lead to the development of a laboratory tool that can be used to make non-invasive measurements that can not be made with conventional types of pressure sensors such as a conventional microscope or hydroplane. Examples of such situations are the sound field in the vicinity of a radiating body where there is no simple relationship between acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity and sound velocity measurements near an air-water interface.

  13. Laser Detection of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.

    1991-02-01

    A prototype laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system has been constructed to detect and measure underwater sound. The technique is based on measuring the Doppler shift of laser light scattered from small particles in colloidal suspension in water. These particles move with the sound wave and thus a measure of their velocity is a measure of the acoustic particle velocity. Experiments have been conducted using this system to measure acoustic particle displacements in a standing wave tube. A study has been made from both theoretical and experimental perspectives of the performance characteristics and practical limitations of making such measurements. A computer simulation was used to study the effects of physical parameters of the prototype system such as the laser power, system geometry and particle size. Because several authors have suggested that Brownian motion of the scattering particle might limit the system's ability to make such measurements, particular interest has been focused on this question. It has been shown both experimentally and theoretically that Brownian motion does not limit the ability to measure acoustic particle velocity. The emphasis on practical consideration will lead to the development of a laboratory tool that can be used to make non-invasive measurements that can not be made with conventional types of pressure sensors such as a conventional microscope or hydroplane. Examples of such situations are the sound field in the vicinity of a radiating body where there is no simple relationship between acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity and sound velocity measurements near an air-water interface.

  14. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  15. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  16. Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Starting in the early 1960s, spacecraft-borne plasma wave instruments revealed that space is filled with an astonishing variety of radio and plasma wave sounds, which have come to be called "sounds of space." For over forty years these sounds have been collected and played to a wide variety of audiences, often as the result of press conferences or press releases involving various NASA projects for which the University of Iowa has provided plasma wave instruments. This activity has led to many interviews on local and national radio programs, and occasionally on programs haviang world-wide coverage, such as the BBC. As a result of this media coverage, we have been approached many times by composers requesting copies of our space sounds for use in their various projects, many of which involve electronic synthesis of music. One of these collaborations led to "Sun Rings," which is a musical event produced by the Kronos Quartet that has played to large audiences all over the world. With the availability of modern computer graphic techniques we have recently been attempting to integrate some of these sound of space into an educational audio/video web site that illustrates the scientific principles involved in the origin of space plasma waves. Typically I try to emphasize that a substantial gas pressure exists everywhere in space in the form of an ionized gas called a plasma, and that this plasma can lead to a wide variety of wave phenomenon. Examples of some of this audio/video material will be presented.

  17. Chasing Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Neiworth, Julie J

    2012-01-01

    Prior work with Wright and others demonstrated that rhesus monkeys recognized the relative relationships of notes in common melodies. As an extension of tests of pattern similarities, tamarins were habituated to 3-sound unit patterns in an AAB or ABB form that were human phonemes, piano notes, or monkey calls. The subjects were tested with novel sounds in each category constructed either to match the prior pattern or to violate the prior habituated pattern. The monkeys attended significantly more to a violation of their habituated pattern to a new pattern when human phonemes were used, and there was a trend difference in attention toward pattern violations with melodies. Monkey call patterns generated a variety of behavioral responses, were less likely to show habituation, and did not generate a strong attention reaction to changes in the patterns. Monkeys can extract abstract rules and patterns from auditory stimuli but the stimuli, by their nature, may generate competing responses which block processing of abstract regularities. PMID:23219981

  18. Resolution enhanced sound detecting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus is described for enhancing the resolution of a sound detector of the type which includes an acoustic mirror for focusing sound from an object onto a microphone to enable the determination of the location from which the sound arises. The enhancement apparatus includes an enclosure which surrounds the space between the mirror and microphone, and contains a gas heavier than air, such as Freon, through which sound moves slower and therefore with a shorter wavelength than in air, so that a mirror of given size has greater resolving power. An acoustically transparent front wall of the enclosure which lies forward of the mirror, can include a pair of thin sheets with pressured air between them, to form an end of the region of heavy gas into a concave shape.

  19. Bubble dynamics in a standing sound field: the bubble habitat.

    PubMed

    Koch, P; Kurz, T; Parlitz, U; Lauterborn, W

    2011-11-01

    Bubble dynamics is investigated numerically with special emphasis on the static pressure and the positional stability of the bubble in a standing sound field. The bubble habitat, made up of not dissolving, positionally and spherically stable bubbles, is calculated in the parameter space of the bubble radius at rest and sound pressure amplitude for different sound field frequencies, static pressures, and gas concentrations of the liquid. The bubble habitat grows with static pressure and shrinks with sound field frequency. The range of diffusionally stable bubble oscillations, found at positive slopes of the habitat-diffusion border, can be increased substantially with static pressure. PMID:22088010

  20. Sound velocities of δ-AlOOH up to core-mantle boundary pressures with implications for the seismic anomalies in the deep mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashino, Izumi; Murakami, Motohiko; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies show that δ-AlOOH is stable up to the base of the mantle. This phase is, therefore, a possible carrier and host of water in the deep mantle. To uncover the physical properties of δ-AlOOH under deep mantle pressure conditions, we have conducted high-pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of δ-AlOOH by using Brillouin spectroscopy combined with high-pressure Raman spectroscopic measurements in a diamond anvil cell up to pressures of 134 GPa. There is a precipitous increase by ~14% in the acoustic velocities of δ-AlOOH from 6 to 15 GPa, which suggests that pressure-induced O-H bond symmetrization occurs in this pressure range. The best fit values for the high-pressure form of δ-AlOOH of K0 = 190 (2) (GPa), G0 = 160.0 (9) (GPa), (∂K/∂P)0 = K0' = 3.7 (1), and (∂G/∂P)0 = G0' = 1.32 (1) indicate that δ-AlOOH has a 20-30% higher VS value compared to those of the major constituent minerals in the mantle transition zone, such as wadsleyite, ringwoodite, and majorite. On the other hand, the VS of δ-AlOOH is ~7% lower than that of Mg-bridgmanite under lowermost mantle pressure conditions because of the significantly lower value of the pressure derivative of the shear modulus. By comparing our results with seismic observations, we can infer that δ-AlOOH could be one of the potential causes of a positive VS anomaly observed at ~600 km depth beneath the Korean peninsula and a negative VS jump near 2800 km depth near the northern margin of the large low-shear-velocity province beneath the Pacific.

  1. Sound in low velocity ventilation ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-07-01

    This Data Item is available as part of the ESDU Sub-series on Fluid Mechanics Internal Flow. Essential data for estimating the change in acoustical energy as sound propagates through a ventilating system is provided. From a knowledge of this sound energy, the sound pressure level which results on any room served by the system may be estimated. From consideration of the estimated sound pressure levels in the most sensitive areas of the building the amount of silencing required in the system to achieve acceptable sound levels can be assessed. Data are provided in either graphical or tabular form for the estimation of the attenuation of sound in ducts and duct fittings and for the estimation of the sound generated as air flows through standard duct fittings. A means of estimating the octave band sound pressure levels due to the air-conditioning system in a room is also given. Other factors which effect sound in ventilation ducts (e.g., breakout) are discussed.

  2. Is Sound Exposure Level a Convenient Metric to Characterize Fatiguing Sounds? A Study in Beluga Whales.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander; Popov, Vladimir; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    Both the level and duration of fatiguing sounds influence temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) in odontocetes. These two parameters were combined into a sound exposure level (SEL). In the beluga whale Delphinapterus leucas, TTSs were investigated at various sound pressure level (SPL)-to-duration ratios at a specific SEL. At low SPL-to-duration ratios, the dependence was positive: shorter high-level sounds produced greater TTSs than long low-level sounds of the same SEL. At high SPL-to-duration ratios, the dependence was negative: long low-level sounds produced greater TTSs than short high-level sounds of the same SEL. Thus, the validity of SEL as a metric for fatiguing sound efficiency is limited.

  3. Is Sound Exposure Level a Convenient Metric to Characterize Fatiguing Sounds? A Study in Beluga Whales.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander; Popov, Vladimir; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    Both the level and duration of fatiguing sounds influence temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) in odontocetes. These two parameters were combined into a sound exposure level (SEL). In the beluga whale Delphinapterus leucas, TTSs were investigated at various sound pressure level (SPL)-to-duration ratios at a specific SEL. At low SPL-to-duration ratios, the dependence was positive: shorter high-level sounds produced greater TTSs than long low-level sounds of the same SEL. At high SPL-to-duration ratios, the dependence was negative: long low-level sounds produced greater TTSs than short high-level sounds of the same SEL. Thus, the validity of SEL as a metric for fatiguing sound efficiency is limited. PMID:26611076

  4. Method of sound synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  5. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals.

  6. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals. PMID:25261361

  7. Distress sounds of thorny catfishes emitted underwater and in air: characteristics and potential significance.

    PubMed

    Knight, Lisa; Ladich, Friedrich

    2014-11-15

    Thorny catfishes produce stridulation (SR) sounds using their pectoral fins and drumming (DR) sounds via a swimbladder mechanism in distress situations when hand held in water and in air. It has been argued that SR and DR sounds are aimed at different receivers (predators) in different media. The aim of this study was to analyse and compare sounds emitted in both air and water in order to test different hypotheses on the functional significance of distress sounds. Five representatives of the family Doradidae were investigated. Fish were hand held and sounds emitted in air and underwater were recorded (number of sounds, sound duration, dominant and fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and peak-to-peak amplitudes). All species produced SR sounds in both media, but DR sounds could not be recorded in air for two species. Differences in sound characteristics between media were small and mainly limited to spectral differences in SR. The number of sounds emitted decreased over time, whereas the duration of SR sounds increased. The dominant frequency of SR and the fundamental frequency of DR decreased and sound pressure level of SR increased with body size across species. The hypothesis that catfish produce more SR sounds in air and more DR sounds in water as a result of different predation pressure (birds versus fish) could not be confirmed. It is assumed that SR sounds serve as distress sounds in both media, whereas DR sounds might primarily be used as intraspecific communication signals in water in species possessing both mechanisms.

  8. Sound velocity of δ-AlOOH up to core-mantle boundary pressures: Implications for the seismic anomalies induced by hydrated sediment in subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashino, I.; Murakami, M.; Ohtani, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent seismic tomography studies indicate that some of the subducting slabs stagnate at the mantle transition zone. Subducting slabs generally comprise lithological layers of sediments, mid-ocean ridge basalt and peridotite. Some amount of water is believed to exist as hydrous minerals in sediments. Therefore, it is essential to understand the effect of hydrous minerals in sediments on global circulation of hydrogen in deep earth. Many hydrous minerals are not stable under the pressure-temperature conditions of the lower mantle. However, recent studies show that δ-AlOOH, which exists in a sediment layer of subducting slabs below 600 km depth, is stable up to the base of the lowermost mantle. This phase is a possible carrier and reservoir of water in cold slabs subducting into the deep mantle. We have conducted high pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of δ-AlOOH using Brillouin spectroscopy and also we explored the chemical bonding of δ-AlOOH by Raman spectroscopy at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell up to 134 GPa. The result shows that δ-AlOOH becomes harder at pressures above 6 GPa due to the hydrogen bonding symmetrization and has a higher VS compared to those of the major minerals in the transition zone, such as wadsleyite, ringwoodite, and majorite. Therefore, the existence of δ-AlOOH phase might account for the positive Vs anomaly at 600 km depth beneath northwest Pacific subduction zone. In some stagnated slabs, VS at 600 km depth is 2 % faster than that of PREM. If sediments stagnate in the transition zone, the positive Vs anomaly at 600 km depth would be accounted for by the stagnated sediments containing δ-AlOOH in the transition zone.

  9. Improving the Sound Pressure Level of Two-Dimensional Audio Actuators by Coating Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Piezoelectric Films.

    PubMed

    Um, Keehong

    2015-10-01

    As devices for amplifying or transforming electronic signals into audible signals through electromechanical operations, acoustic actuators in the form of loudspeakers are usually solid structures in three dimensional space. Recently there has been increasing demand for mobile electronic devices, such as mobile phones, to become smaller, thinner, and lighter. In contrast to a three dimensional audio system with magnets, we have invented a new type of flexible two dimensional device by utilizing the reverse piezoelectric effect in certain piezoelectric materials. Crystalline piezoelectric materials show electromechanical interaction between the mechanical state and the electrically-charged state. The piezoelectric effect is a reversible process in that materials exhibiting the direct piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of electrical charge resulting from an applied mechanical force) also exhibit the reverse piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of a mechanical strain resulting from an applied electrical field). We have adopted the plasma surface treatment in order to put coating materials on the surface of piezoelectric film. We compared two kinds of coating material, indium tin oxide and single-walled carbon nanotube, and found that single-walled carbon nanotube shows better performance. The results showed improvement of output power in a wider range of operating frequency; for the surface resistance of 0.5 kΩ/square, the single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.75-17.5 kHz, but ITO shows 2.5-13.4 kHz. For the surface resistance of 1 kΩ/square, single-walled CNT shows the range of operating frequency to be 0.81-17 kHz, but ITO shows it cannot generate audible sound.

  10. Sound velocities of bcc-Fe and Fe0.85Si0.15 alloy at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu; Alatas, Ahmet; Bi, Wenli

    2014-08-01

    Studying the velocity-density profiles of iron and iron-silicon alloy at high pressures and temperatures is critical for understanding the Earth’s core as well as the interiors of other planetary bodies. Here we have investigated the compressional wave velocity (VP) and density (ρ) profiles of polycrystalline bcc-Fe and Fe0.85Si0.15 alloy (8 wt.% Si) using in situ high-energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (HERIX) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction spectroscopies in an externally-heated diamond anvil cell (EHDAC) up to 15 GPa and 700 K. Based on the measured velocity-density (VP-ρ) and velocity-pressure (VP-P) relations of bcc-Fe at simultaneous high pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions, our results show a strong VP reduction at elevated temperatures at a constant density. Comparison of the VP-ρ profiles between the bcc-Fe and bcc-Fe0.85Si0.15 alloy indicates that the alloying effect of additional 8 wt.% Si on the VP-ρ relationship of bcc-Fe is predominant via a constant density decrease of approximately 0.6 g/cm3 (7%). Compared with the literature velocity results for bcc and hcp Fe-Si alloys, the bcc-Fe and Fe-Si alloys exhibit higher VP than their hcp phase counterparts at the given bcc-hcp transition pressures. Our results here strongly support the notion that high temperature has a strong effect on the VP of Fe and that the VP-ρ profile of Fe can be affected by structural and magnetic transitions. Analyses on literature elastic constants of the bcc Fe-Si alloys, as a function of P-T and Si content, show that the bcc phase displays extremely high VP anisotropy of 16-30% and VS splitting anisotropy of 40-90% at high temperatures, while the addition of Si further enhances the anisotropy. Due to the extremely high elastic anisotropy of the bcc Fe-Si alloy, a certain portion of the bcc Fe-Si alloy with the lattice-preferred orientation may produce VP and VS anisotropies to potentially account for the observed seismic anisotropy in the inner core.

  11. Sound localization in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Hilary S; Carr, Catherine E

    2015-11-01

    In early tetrapods, it is assumed that the tympana were acoustically coupled through the pharynx and therefore inherently directional, acting as pressure difference receivers. The later closure of the middle ear cavity in turtles, archosaurs, and mammals is a derived condition, and would have changed the ear by decoupling the tympana. Isolation of the middle ears would then have led to selection for structural and neural strategies to compute sound source localization in both archosaurs and mammalian ancestors. In the archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) the presence of air spaces in the skull provided connections between the ears that have been exploited to improve directional hearing, while neural circuits mediating sound localization are well developed. In this review, we will focus primarily on directional hearing in crocodilians, where vocalization and sound localization are thought to be ecologically important, and indicate important issues still awaiting resolution. PMID:26048335

  12. The Sound of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  13. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  14. Meteorological effects on long-range outdoor sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, Helmut

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of sound propagation over distances up to 1000 m were carried out with an impulse sound source offering reproducible, short time signals. Temperature and wind speed at several heights were monitored simultaneously; the meteorological data are used to determine the sound speed gradients according to the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The sound speed profile is compared to a corresponding prediction, gained through the measured travel time difference between direct and ground reflected pulse (which depends on the sound speed gradient). Positive sound speed gradients cause bending of the sound rays towards the ground yielding enhanced sound pressure levels. The measured meteorological effects on sound propagation are discussed and illustrated by ray tracing methods.

  15. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  16. Laser Schlieren System Detects Sounds Of Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy P.; Alwar, A. Vijayaragavan

    1990-01-01

    Hostile environments monitored safely and noninvasively. Modified laser schlieren system acts as microphone to detect sounds of leaks remotely. Sensitive to acoustical frequencies above audible range and especially suited for monitoring leaks of high-pressure steam from boilers or chemical vapors from processing equipment. Does not require placement of delicate equipment in harsh environment monitored, and no contact needed with boiler or other unit being monitored. Detects sound waves via variation of index of refraction of air at acoustical frequencies. Used to monitor sound frequencies beyond range of human hearing.

  17. Possibilities of psychoacoustics to determine sound quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genuit, Klaus

    For some years, acoustic engineers have increasingly become aware of the importance of analyzing and minimizing noise problems not only with regard to the A-weighted sound pressure level, but to design sound quality. It is relatively easy to determine the A-weighted SPL according to international standards. However, the objective evaluation to describe subjectively perceived sound quality - taking into account psychoacoustic parameters such as loudness, roughness, fluctuation strength, sharpness and so forth - is more difficult. On the one hand, the psychoacoustic measurement procedures which are known so far have yet not been standardized. On the other hand, they have only been tested in laboratories by means of listening tests in the free-field and one sound source and simple signals. Therefore, the results achieved cannot be transferred to complex sound situations with several spatially distributed sound sources without difficulty. Due to the directional hearing and selectivity of human hearing, individual sound events can be selected among many. Already in the late seventies a new binaural Artificial Head Measurement System was developed which met the requirements of the automobile industry in terms of measurement technology. The first industrial application of the Artificial Head Measurement System was in 1981. Since that time the system was further developed, particularly by the cooperation between HEAD acoustics and Mercedes-Benz. In addition to a calibratable Artificial Head Measurement System which is compatible with standard measurement technologies and has transfer characteristics comparable to human hearing, a Binaural Analysis System is now also available. This system permits the analysis of binaural signals regarding physical and psychoacoustic procedures. Moreover, the signals to be analyzed can be simultaneously monitored through headphones and manipulated in the time and frequency domain so that those signal components being responsible for noise

  18. The AVE/VAS 2: The 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS II experiment is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals, was an 18 hour period. An additional sounding was taken at the normal synoptic observation time. The processing soundings method is discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  19. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  20. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  1. Sound field inside acoustically levitated spherical drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2007-05-01

    The sound field inside an acoustically levitated small spherical water drop (radius of 1mm) is studied under different incident sound pressures (amplitude p0=2735-5643Pa). The transmitted pressure ptr in the drop shows a plane standing wave, which varies mainly in the vertical direction, and distributes almost uniformly in the horizontal direction. The maximum of ptr is always located at the lowermost point of the levitated drop. Whereas the secondary maximum appears at the uppermost point if the incident pressure amplitude p0 is higher than an intermediate value (3044Pa), in which there exists a pressure nodal surface in the drop interior. The value of the maximum ptr lies in a narrow range of 2489-3173Pa, which has a lower limit of 2489Pa when p0=3044Pa. The secondary maximum of ptr is rather small and only remarkable at high incident pressures.

  2. Loudness of steady sounds - A new theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A new mathematical theory for calculating the loudness of steady sounds from power summation and frequency interaction, based on psychoacoustic and physiological information, assuems that loudness is a subjective measure of the electrical energy transmitted along the auditory nerve to the central nervous system. The auditory system consists of the mechanical part modeled by a bandpass filter with a transfer function dependent on the sound pressure, and the electrical part where the signal is transformed into a half-wave reproduction represented by the electrical power in impulsive discharges transmitted along neurons comprising the auditory nerve. In the electrical part the neurons are distributed among artificial parallel channels with frequency bandwidths equal to 'critical bandwidths for loudness', within which loudness is constant for constant sound pressure. The total energy transmitted to the central nervous system is the sum of the energy transmitted in all channels, and the loudness is proportional to the square root of the total filtered sound energy distributed over all channels. The theory explains many psychoacoustic phenomena such as audible beats resulting from closely spaced tones, interaction of sound stimuli which affect the same neurons affecting loudness, and of individually subliminal sounds becoming audible if they lie within the same critical band.

  3. Virtual Reality of Sound Generated from Vibrating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S. J.; SONG, J. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The advancement of virtual reality (VR) technology in cyberspace is amazing, but its development is mainly concentrated on the visual part. In this paper, the development of VR technology to produce sound based on the exact physics is studied. Our main concern is on the sound generated from vibrating structures. This may be useful, for example, in apprehending sound field characteristics of an aircraft cabin in design stage. To calculate sound pressure from curved surface of a structure, a new integration scheme is developed in boundary element method. Several example problems are solved to confirm our integration scheme. The pressure distributions on a uniformly driven sphere and cylinders are computed and compared with analytic solutions, and radiation efficiency of a vibrating plate under one-dimensional flow is also calculated. Also, to realize sound through computer simulation, two concepts, "structure-oriented analysis" and "human-oriented analysis", are proposed. Using these concepts, virtual sound field of an aircraft cabin is created.

  4. Brief report: sound output of infant humidifiers.

    PubMed

    Royer, Allison K; Wilson, Paul F; Royer, Mark C; Miyamoto, Richard T

    2015-06-01

    The sound pressure levels (SPLs) of common infant humidifiers were determined to identify the likely sound exposure to infants and young children. This primary investigative research study was completed at a tertiary-level academic medical center otolaryngology and audiology laboratory. Five commercially available humidifiers were obtained from brick-and-mortar infant supply stores. Sound levels were measured at 20-, 100-, and 150-cm distances at all available humidifier settings. Two of 5 (40%) humidifiers tested had SPL readings greater than the recommended hospital infant nursery levels (50 dB) at distances up to 100 cm. In this preliminary study, it was demonstrated that humidifiers marketed for infant nurseries may produce appreciably high decibel levels. Further characterization of the effect of humidifier design on SPLs and further elucidation of ambient sound levels associated with hearing risk are necessary before definitive conclusions and recommendations can be made.

  5. High-speed imaging of sound using parallel phase-shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Kohei; Chitanont, Nachanant; Ikeda, Yusuke; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Onuma, Takashi; Niwa, Hayato; Yoshii, Minoru

    2016-06-13

    Sound-field imaging, the visualization of spatial and temporal distribution of acoustical properties such as sound pressure, is useful for understanding acoustical phenomena. This study investigated the use of parallel phase-shifting interferometry (PPSI) with a high-speed polarization camera for imaging a sound field, particularly high-speed imaging of propagating sound waves. The experimental results showed that the instantaneous sound field, which was generated by ultrasonic transducers driven by a pure tone of 40 kHz, was quantitatively imaged. Hence, PPSI can be used in acoustical applications requiring spatial information of sound pressure. PMID:27410311

  6. High-speed imaging of sound using parallel phase-shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Kohei; Chitanont, Nachanant; Ikeda, Yusuke; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Onuma, Takashi; Niwa, Hayato; Yoshii, Minoru

    2016-06-13

    Sound-field imaging, the visualization of spatial and temporal distribution of acoustical properties such as sound pressure, is useful for understanding acoustical phenomena. This study investigated the use of parallel phase-shifting interferometry (PPSI) with a high-speed polarization camera for imaging a sound field, particularly high-speed imaging of propagating sound waves. The experimental results showed that the instantaneous sound field, which was generated by ultrasonic transducers driven by a pure tone of 40 kHz, was quantitatively imaged. Hence, PPSI can be used in acoustical applications requiring spatial information of sound pressure.

  7. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  8. Hazardous sound levels produced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, R.P.; Tyler, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Sound emitted from the Dornier system GmbH lithotriptor was found to be of sufficient intensity to warrant concern about noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss. The patients were exposed to impulses of 112 dB. peak sound pressure level. Operating room personnel were exposed to sounds of less intensity, although the number of impulses they were exposed to was much greater, thereby increasing the risk of hearing loss. Hearing protection is recommended for patients and operating room personnel.

  9. Aeroacoustics production of fricative speech sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael; Gary, Settles

    2001-05-01

    The aeroacoustic production of fricative speech sounds is studied using schlieren imaging and acoustic measurements. The focus is the structure of the turbulent jets formed during fricative speech sound production, and how interaction of the jet with articulators affects the acoustic nature of the speech sound. Patterns of the jets formed during the articulation of both voiced and unvoiced fricatives (s and z) are shown using schlieren images. In particular, the interaction of the jet with articulators such as teeth and lips are clearly seen, and demonstrated by varying articulator positions. Pressure measurements were made in conjunction with the images using a microphone placed near the teeth and one in the farfield. The pressure measurements show the acoustic consequences of the various jet/articulator interactions, further clarifying which articulators are most important in determining the aeroacoustic source characteristics.

  10. A mechanism study of sound wave-trapping barriers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Pan, Jie; Cheng, Li

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a sound barrier is usually degraded if a large reflecting surface is placed on the source side. A wave-trapping barrier (WTB), with its inner surface covered by wedge-shaped structures, has been proposed to confine waves within the area between the barrier and the reflecting surface, and thus improve the performance. In this paper, the deterioration in performance of a conventional sound barrier due to the reflecting surface is first explained in terms of the resonance effect of the trapped modes. At each resonance frequency, a strong and mode-controlled sound field is generated by the noise source both within and in the vicinity outside the region bounded by the sound barrier and the reflecting surface. It is found that the peak sound pressures in the barrier's shadow zone, which correspond to the minimum values in the barrier's insertion loss, are largely determined by the resonance frequencies and by the shapes and losses of the trapped modes. These peak pressures usually result in high sound intensity component impinging normal to the barrier surface near the top. The WTB can alter the sound wave diffraction at the top of the barrier if the wavelengths of the sound wave are comparable or smaller than the dimensions of the wedge. In this case, the modified barrier profile is capable of re-organizing the pressure distribution within the bounded domain and altering the acoustic properties near the top of the sound barrier.

  11. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  12. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  13. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  14. Sounding rocket lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Maybee, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Programmatic, applicatory, developmental, and operational aspects of sounding rocket utilization for materials processing studies are discussed. Lessons learned through the experience of 10 sounding rocket missions are described. Particular attention is given to missions from the SPAR, Consort, and Joust programs. Successful experiments on Consort include the study of polymer membranes and resins, biological processes, demixing of immiscible liquids, and electrodeposition.

  15. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  16. The Bosstown Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Based on the argument that (contrary to critical opinion) the musicians in the various bands associated with Bosstown Sound were indeed talented, cohesive individuals and that the bands' lack of renown was partially a result of ill-treatment by record companies and the press, this paper traces the development of the Bosstown Sound from its…

  17. Spatial resolution limits for the localization of noise sources using direct sound mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Comesaña, D.; Holland, K. R.; Fernandez-Grande, E.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main challenges arising from noise and vibration problems is how to identify the areas of a device, machine or structure that produce significant acoustic excitation, i.e. the localization of main noise sources. The direct visualization of sound, in particular sound intensity, has extensively been used for many years to locate sound sources. However, it is not yet well defined when two sources should be regarded as resolved by means of direct sound mapping. This paper derives the limits of the direct representation of sound pressure, particle velocity and sound intensity by exploring the relationship between spatial resolution, noise level and geometry. The proposed expressions are validated via simulations and experiments. It is shown that particle velocity mapping yields better results for identifying closely spaced sound sources than sound pressure or sound intensity, especially in the acoustic near-field.

  18. The sound field in a finite cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junger, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The sound field excited by vibrating boundaries in a finite cylindrical space, e.g., in a cylindrical shell, differs from the pressure distribution in an infinite cylindrical shell of comparable structural wavelength by the pressure diffracted by the end caps. The latter pressure component is comparable in magnitude to the pressure generated by the vibrating cylindrical boundary, but does not introduce additional resonances or antiresonances. Finally, a third pressure component associated with end cap vibrations is formulated.

  19. The sound manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; Bisnovatyi, Ilia

    2000-11-01

    Computing practice today depends on visual output to drive almost all user interaction. Other senses, such as audition, may be totally neglected, or used tangentially, or used in highly restricted specialized ways. We have excellent audio rendering through D-A conversion, but we lack rich general facilities for modeling and manipulating sound comparable in quality and flexibility to graphics. We need coordinated research in several disciplines to improve the use of sound as an interactive information channel. Incremental and separate improvements in synthesis, analysis, speech processing, audiology, acoustics, music, etc. will not alone produce the radical progress that we seek in sonic practice. We also need to create a new central topic of study in digital audio research. The new topic will assimilate the contributions of different disciplines on a common foundation. The key central concept that we lack is sound as a general-purpose information channel. We must investigate the structure of this information channel, which is driven by the cooperative development of auditory perception and physical sound production. Particular audible encodings, such as speech and music, illuminate sonic information by example, but they are no more sufficient for a characterization than typography is sufficient for characterization of visual information. To develop this new conceptual topic of sonic information structure, we need to integrate insights from a number of different disciplines that deal with sound. In particular, we need to coordinate central and foundational studies of the representational models of sound with specific applications that illuminate the good and bad qualities of these models. Each natural or artificial process that generates informative sound, and each perceptual mechanism that derives information from sound, will teach us something about the right structure to attribute to the sound itself. The new Sound topic will combine the work of computer

  20. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing.

  1. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing. PMID:27475167

  2. AVE/VAS 1: 25 mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS I (shakedown) experiment is described. Tabulated data at 25-mb intervals for the 13 special rawinsonde stations and 1 National Weather Service station participating in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 1200 and 1800 GMT on February 6, 1982, and at 0000 GMT on February 7, 1982. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  3. Experimental studies of sound field suppression at discrete frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiks, I. Sh.; Korotin, P. I.; Potapov, O. A.; Fiks, G. E.

    2016-03-01

    Practical implementation of an active sound control system ensuring sound suppression in outer space is described as applied to sound insulation problems for equipment whose total noise level is mainly due to low-frequency discrete spectral components. The operational principle of the proposed system is based on inverse field generation with respect to the field of the initial source of quasi-monochromatic signals. The inverse field is formed by a set of radiators, which are controlled by the signals of pressure receivers positioned in the near field of the source. Experimental studies carried out with the proposed sound control system demonstrate its efficiency and testify to the stability of its operation.

  4. AVE/VAS 5: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program is described and tabulated data at 25 mb intervals for the 24 and 14 special stations participation in the experiment are presented. Soundings were taken at 3 hr intervals. The method of processing soundings is discussed briefly, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the meso beta scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  5. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  6. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  7. Sound attenuation by liners in a blown flap environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Vijayaraghavan, A.

    1980-01-01

    Sound propagation through a hot wall-jet flow over an absorbing wall is studied. The radiated sound field subject to the influence of flow convection and refraction is evaluated, and the nature of acoustic attenuation attributable to a sound absorbing liner is determined. Using a two-dimensional model, the noise field under the aircraft is also determined, and a slug-flow model is used to describe the influence of flow, density, and temperature on acoustic sources in jets. Results show significant changes in the radiated source due to the interference phenomenon, and a good absorber has the potential of changing the sound pressure range of variation to unity. A liner is also found to increase or decrease sound pressure, depending on the frequency.

  8. AVE/VAS 3: 25-mb sounding data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The rawinsonde sounding program for the AVE/VAS 3 experiment is described. Tabulated data are presented at 25-mb intervals for the 24 National Weather Service stations and 14 special stations participating in the experiment. Soundings were taken at 3-hr intervals, beginning at 1200 GMT on March 27, 1982, and ending at 0600 GMT on March 28, 1982 (7 sounding times). An additional sounding was taken at the National Weather Service stations at 1200 GMT on March 28, 1982, at the normal synoptic observation time. The method of processing soundings is briefly discussed, estimates of the RMS errors in the data are presented, and an example of contact data is given. Termination pressures of soundings taken in the mesos-beta-scale network are tabulated, as are observations of ground temperature at a depth of 2 cm.

  9. Model Experiment on the Generation of the Korotkoff Sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Mieko

    1980-07-01

    The mechanism of the genesis of the Korotkoff sounds is investigated by model experiment using latex tubes and a segment of isolated blood vessel of dogs. The tube compliance is much reduced when the transmural (internal minus external) pressure is very high or very low, and increases radically for intermediate states. It can be concluded that there are two different mechanisms by which the sounds are emitted. One is durable sounds caused by self-excited vibration in the process of collapse of the tube, and the other is impulsive sounds emitted transiently when the tube compliance is abruptly decreased. It is possible to explain qualitatively the change of sound phases over a wide range from systole to diastole as an appropriate mixture of durable and impulsive sounds.

  10. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  11. Sound Visualization and Holography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  12. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    The second part of a three-part series, this article describes sound measurement, effects, and indoor learning activities. Thirty elementary school activities are described with appropriate grade levels specified. (Author/CS)

  13. Sound source measurement by using a passive sound insulation and a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Di Filippo, Sabato; Mercogliano, Francesco; Romano, Rosario A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a measurement technique developed by the authors that allows carrying out acoustic measurements inside noisy environments reducing background noise effects. The proposed method is based on the integration of a traditional passive noise insulation system with a statistical approach. The latter is applied to signals picked up by usual sensors (microphones and accelerometers) equipping the passive sound insulation system. The statistical approach allows improving of the sound insulation given only by the passive sound insulation system at low frequency. The developed measurement technique has been validated by means of numerical simulations and measurements carried out inside a real noisy environment. For the case-studies here reported, an average improvement of about 10 dB has been obtained in a frequency range up to about 250 Hz. Considerations on the lower sound pressure level that can be measured by applying the proposed method and the measurement error related to its application are reported as well.

  14. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed. PMID:27473463

  15. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed.

  16. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a comfortable sound

  17. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a comfortable sound

  18. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: “metallic and unpleasant” and “powerful”. LAeq had a strong relationship with “powerful impression”, calculated sharpness was positively related to “metallic impression”, and “unpleasant impression” was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating

  19. Radiation properties and sound quality characteristics of refrigerator noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Jeong, Jeong Ho; You, Jin

    2005-09-01

    The characteristics of refrigerator noise in an anechoic chamber and in an actual environment were investigated. In order to predict the noise propagation in real apartment house, room acoustic simulations and measurements using different types of refrigerators were conducted. The sound-pressure level of the refrigerator noise in the real living room was much higher than in the anechoic chamber. In addition, an allowable sound-pressure level for refrigerator noise was determined by auditory experiments. For the stimuli of auditory experiments, the dry source of refrigerator noise was presented using a loud speaker at the position of the refrigerator. When the result of the subjective evaluation was at the level 2 (the noise rarely aware but comfortable), in which sound pressure level was about 25 dB(A), 95% of people were satisfied with the refrigerator noise. A semantic differential test using various adjectives was also conducted to evaluate the sound quality of refrigerator noise.

  20. Sound modes in holographic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos

    2009-11-15

    Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

  1. On categorizing sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhead, Gregory R.

    1991-08-01

    Context is important when people judge sounds, or attributes of sounds, or other stimuli. It is shown how judgments depend on what sounds recently occurred (sequence effects), on how those sounds differ from one another (range effects), on the distribution of those differences (set effects), on what subjects are told about the situation (task effects), and on what subjects are told about their performance (feedback effects). Each of these factors determines the overall mean and variability of response times and response choices, which are the standard measures, when people judge attribute amounts. Trial-by-trial analysis of the data show these factors also determine performance on individual trials. Moreover, these momentary data cannot be predicted from the overall data. The opposite is not true; the averaged data can be predicted from the momentary details. These results are consistent with a model having two simple assumptions: successive sounds (not just their attributes) assimilate toward one another in memory, and judgments are based on comparisons of these remembered events. It is suggested that relations between attributes, rather than the magnitudes of the attributes themselves, are the basis for judgment.

  2. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  3. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  4. Generating the sounds of silence

    SciTech Connect

    O'Conner, L.

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how digital-signal processors and repetitive- and random-noise algorithms have been linked to spur production of active control mufflers and headsets. Active and passive quieting systems are being developed to reduce noise from aircraft and other sources. High-level noise not only affects hearing, it can drive up blood pressure, disrupt sleep, and compromise the ability to work and learn. Although noise gets less attention than more conspicuous pollutants, public awareness over the unhealthy repercussions of loud noise is higher than ever. Recognizing public sensitivity over this topic, companies have begun producing active noise-control systems to reduce low-frequency sound--usually lower than 600 Hz--that often escapes established methods of passive quieting.

  5. Spectral Characteristics of Wake Vortex Sound During Roll-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr. (Technical Monitor); Zhang, Yan; Wang, Frank Y.; Hardin, Jay C.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of the sound spectra generated by a trailing aircraft vortex during its rolling-up process. The study demonstrates that a rolling-up vortex could produce low frequency (less than 100 Hz) sound with very high intensity (60 dB above threshold of human hearing) at a distance of 200 ft from the vortex core. The spectrum then drops o rapidly thereafter. A rigorous analytical approach has been adopted in this report to derive the spectrum of vortex sound. First, the sound pressure was solved from an alternative treatment of the Lighthill s acoustic analogy approach [1]. After the application of Green s function for free space, a tensor analysis was applied to permit the removal of the source term singularity of the wave equation in the far field. Consequently, the sound pressure is expressed in terms of the retarded time that indicates the time history and spacial distribution of the sound source. The Fourier transformation is then applied to the sound pressure to compute its spectrum. As a result, the Fourier transformation greatly simplifies the expression of the vortex sound pressure involving the retarded time, so that the numerical computation is applicable with ease for axisymmetric line vortices during the rolling-up process. The vortex model assumes that the vortex circulation is proportional to the time and the core radius is a constant. In addition, the velocity profile is assumed to be self-similar along the aircraft flight path, so that a benchmark vortex velocity profile can be devised to obtain a closed form solution, which is then used to validate the numerical calculations for other more realistic vortex profiles for which no closed form solutions are available. The study suggests that acoustic sensors operating at low frequency band could be profitably deployed for detecting the vortex sound during the rolling-up process.

  6. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  7. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  8. Eliciting Sound Memories.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Sensory experiences are often considered triggers of memory, most famously a little French cake dipped in lime blossom tea. Sense memory can also be evoked in public history research through techniques of elicitation. In this article I reflect on different social science methods for eliciting sound memories such as the use of sonic prompts, emplaced interviewing, and sound walks. I include examples from my research on medical listening. The article considers the relevance of this work for the conduct of oral histories, arguing that such methods "break the frame," allowing room for collaborative research connections and insights into the otherwise unarticulatable.

  9. Effects of sounds of locomotion on speech perception.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Matz; Ekström, Seth Reino; Ranjbar, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Human locomotion typically creates noise, a possible consequence of which is the masking of sound signals originating in the surroundings. When walking side by side, people often subconsciously synchronize their steps. The neurophysiological and evolutionary background of this behavior is unclear. The present study investigated the potential of sound created by walking to mask perception of speech and compared the masking produced by walking in step with that produced by unsynchronized walking. The masking sound (footsteps on gravel) and the target sound (speech) were presented through the same speaker to 15 normal-hearing subjects. The original recorded walking sound was modified to mimic the sound of two individuals walking in pace or walking out of synchrony. The participants were instructed to adjust the sound level of the target sound until they could just comprehend the speech signal ("just follow conversation" or JFC level) when presented simultaneously with synchronized or unsynchronized walking sound at 40 dBA, 50 dBA, 60 dBA, or 70 dBA. Synchronized walking sounds produced slightly less masking of speech than did unsynchronized sound. The median JFC threshold in the synchronized condition was 38.5 dBA, while the corresponding value for the unsynchronized condition was 41.2 dBA. Combined results at all sound pressure levels showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for synchronized footsteps; the median difference was 2.7 dB and the mean difference was 1.2 dB [P < 0.001, repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA)]. The difference was significant for masker levels of 50 dBA and 60 dBA, but not for 40 dBA or 70 dBA. This study provides evidence that synchronized walking may reduce the masking potential of footsteps. PMID:26168953

  10. Effects of sounds of locomotion on speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Matz; Ekström, Seth Reino; Ranjbar, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Human locomotion typically creates noise, a possible consequence of which is the masking of sound signals originating in the surroundings. When walking side by side, people often subconsciously synchronize their steps. The neurophysiological and evolutionary background of this behavior is unclear. The present study investigated the potential of sound created by walking to mask perception of speech and compared the masking produced by walking in step with that produced by unsynchronized walking. The masking sound (footsteps on gravel) and the target sound (speech) were presented through the same speaker to 15 normal-hearing subjects. The original recorded walking sound was modified to mimic the sound of two individuals walking in pace or walking out of synchrony. The participants were instructed to adjust the sound level of the target sound until they could just comprehend the speech signal (“just follow conversation” or JFC level) when presented simultaneously with synchronized or unsynchronized walking sound at 40 dBA, 50 dBA, 60 dBA, or 70 dBA. Synchronized walking sounds produced slightly less masking of speech than did unsynchronized sound. The median JFC threshold in the synchronized condition was 38.5 dBA, while the corresponding value for the unsynchronized condition was 41.2 dBA. Combined results at all sound pressure levels showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for synchronized footsteps; the median difference was 2.7 dB and the mean difference was 1.2 dB [P < 0.001, repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA)]. The difference was significant for masker levels of 50 dBA and 60 dBA, but not for 40 dBA or 70 dBA. This study provides evidence that synchronized walking may reduce the masking potential of footsteps. PMID:26168953

  11. Aeroacoustic mechanisms of voiced sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The focus of this study is to quantify the order of magnitude of the direct effects of (1) vocal-fold wall motion and (2) glottal flow separation point movement on the production of voiced speech sounds. A solution for the sound-pressure field shows three source mechanisms: (1) a volume source due to unsteady glottal air flow; (2) a quadrupole source representing interaction of the glottal jet with the pharynx walls; and (3) an octupole due to direct sound radiation by the glottal jet itself. A relation is derived expressing glottal volume flow in terms of transglottal pressure difference, vocal-fold wall motion, and separation point motion. Using scaling analysis, the transglottal pressure difference is shown to be the dominant effect on glottal volume flow, while vocal-fold wall motion is shown to have a negligible effect. However, separation point motion is shown to have a measurable effect during the closure phase of the vibration cycle. Using these results, the acoustic effect of separation point motion is shown to be measurable, while the effect of vocal-fold wall vibration is shown to be negligible. Relative contributions of these effects across age, gender, and degree of glottal closure are discussed.

  12. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This article is the last of a three-part series dealing with sound measurement, effects, pollution, and indoor/door learning activities. This section focuses on outdoor activities and equipment that students can make to assist them in data collection. (Author/SA)

  13. Exploring Sound with Insects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  14. Creative Sound Dramatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Rebecca; Eick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sound propagation is not easy for children to understand because of its abstract nature, often best represented by models such as wave drawings and particle dots. Teachers Rebecca Hendrix and Charles Eick wondered how science inquiry, when combined with an unlikely discipline like drama, could produce a better understanding among their…

  15. Sounds Like Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Linda M.

    1991-01-01

    Presents hands-on science activities that help students learn the concepts of hearing and sound while allowing students to practice science process skills. Students investigate the use of alternative phonograph speakers and needles and apply the knowledge learned to the construction of one-string banjos. (MDH)

  16. Guidelines for sound power level measurements for compressor station equipment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, M.J.; Raju, P.K.; Yang, S.B.

    1994-12-01

    These guidelines describe a method for in-situ determination of the sound power level of the noise sources in indoor or outdoor environments for gas compressor station equipment using sound intensity measurements. The guidelines contain information on instrumentation, installation and operation of the source, procedures for the selection of a measurement surface, procedures for the sampling of sound intensity on the measurement surface, procedures for the calculation of sound power level, and techniques that can be used to qualify the measurement environment. Typical results obtained for different types of equipment in a gas compressor station using these guidelines are summarized. Appendix A gives procedures to calculate A-weighted sound power level from octave or one-third octave band sound power levels. Appendix B gives descriptions about data quality indicators which are useful in making validity judgments for the sound power measurements. Appendix C describes sound power measurements using the sound pressure method. Appendix D describes sound power measurements at low frequency. Appendix E gives descriptions about sound power measurements on exhaust stacks with air flow. The Addendum to this report includes examples of the application of the guideline document to real field sound power measurements and examples of calculations of data quality indicators. It serves as a convenient and quick reference document with procedures and examples which are easy to follow in real field sound power measurement problems. Readers of the Addendum are assumed to be familiar with the detailed descriptions of the sound power measurement procedures contained in the main guideline document.

  17. Radiometric sounding system

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Vertical profiles of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes are key research needs for global climate change research. These fluxes are expected to change as radiatively active trace gases are emitted to the earth`s atmosphere as a consequence of energy production and industrial and other human activities. Models suggest that changes in the concentration of such gases will lead to radiative flux divergences that will produce global warming of the earth`s atmosphere. Direct measurements of the vertical variation of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes that lead to these flux divergences have been largely unavailable because of the expense of making such measurements from airplanes. These measurements are needed to improve existing atmospheric radiative transfer models, especially under the cloudy conditions where the models have not been adequately tested. A tethered-balloon-borne Radiometric Sounding System has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide an inexpensive means of making routine vertical soundings of radiative fluxes in the earth`s atmospheric boundary layer to altitudes up to 1500 m above ground level. Such vertical soundings would supplement measurements being made from aircraft and towers. The key technical challenge in the design of the Radiometric Sounding System is to develop a means of keeping the radiometers horizontal while the balloon ascends and descends in a turbulent atmospheric environment. This problem has been addressed by stabilizing a triangular radiometer-carrying platform that is carried on the tetherline of a balloon sounding system. The platform, carried 30 m or more below the balloon to reduce the balloon`s effect on the radiometric measurements, is leveled by two automatic control loops that activate motors, gears and pulleys when the platform is off-level. The sensitivity of the automatic control loops to oscillatory motions of various frequencies and amplitudes can be adjusted using filters.

  18. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  19. Sound velocities in liquid lead at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; Winkler, M.A.; Shaner, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    A dynamic technique, the isobaric expansion experiment (IEX) is used to reach high temperature and pressure states in liquid lead. A unique technique is described for making sound speed measurements once a final equilibrium end state is obtained. Data over an extended density range are presented. The sound speed in liquid lead over this range appears to vary linearly with density, and has no dependence on temperature within our experimental precision.

  20. Modeling the Transmission of Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a functional model of sound transmission through solids and gases. Describes procedures of an activity to model how sound travels faster through solid materials than gases. Use dominoes to represent the particles of solids and gases. (KHR)

  1. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz. PMID:25920885

  2. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.

  3. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  4. Sounds Alive: A Noise Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna McCord

    Sarah Screech, Danny Decibel, Sweetie Sound and Neil Noisy describe their experiences in the world of sound and noise to elementary students. Presented are their reports, games and charts which address sound measurement, the effects of noise on people, methods of noise control, and related areas. The workbook is intended to stimulate students'…

  5. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  6. Sound exposure during outdoor music festivals.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, Tron V; Gelderblom, Femke B

    2016-01-01

    Most countries have guidelines to regulate sound exposure at concerts and music festivals. These guidelines limit the allowed sound pressure levels and the concert/festival's duration. In Norway, where there is such a guideline, it is up to the local authorities to impose the regulations. The need to prevent hearing-loss among festival participants is self-explanatory, but knowledge of the actual dose received by visitors is extremely scarce. This study looks at two Norwegian music festivals where only one was regulated by the Norwegian guideline for concert and music festivals. At each festival the sound exposure of four participants was monitored with noise dose meters. This study compared the exposures experienced at the two festivals, and tested them against the Norwegian guideline and the World Health Organization's recommendations. Sound levels during the concerts were higher at the festival not regulated by any guideline, and levels there exceeded both the national and the Worlds Health Organization's recommendations. The results also show that front-of-house measurements reliably predict participant exposure. PMID:27569410

  7. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  8. Environmentally sound manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    The NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. They have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and to reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this problem. As our ability to gather data on the state of the Earth's environmental health increases, environmentally sound manufacturing must become an integral part of the business decision making process.

  9. Blood Pressure Checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An estimated 30 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension. But a great many of them are unaware of it because hypertension, in its initial stages, displays no symptoms. Thus, the simply-operated blood pressure checking devices now widely located in public places are useful health aids. The one pictured above, called -Medimax 30, is a direct spinoff from NASA technology developed to monitor astronauts in space. For manned space flights, NASA wanted a compact, highly-reliable, extremely accurate method of checking astronauts' blood pressure without the need for a physician's interpretive skill. NASA's Johnson Space Center and Technology, Inc., a contractor, developed an electronic sound processor that automatically analyzes blood flow sounds to get both systolic (contracting arteries) and diastolic (expanding arteries) blood pressure measurements. NASA granted a patent license for this technology to Advanced Life Sciences, Inc., New York City, manufacturers of Medimax 30.

  10. The Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, Donald

    2009-11-01

    The popular concept of space is that it is a vacuum, with nothing of interest between the stars, planets, moons and other astronomical objects. In fact most of space is permeated by plasma, sometimes quite dense, as in the solar corona and planetary ionospheres, and sometimes quite tenuous, as is in planetary radiation belts. Even less well known is that these space plasmas support and produce an astonishing large variety of waves, the ``sounds of space.'' In this talk I will give you a tour of these space sounds, starting with the very early discovery of ``whistlers'' nearly a century ago, and proceeding through my nearly fifty years of research on space plasma waves using spacecraft-borne instrumentation. In addition to being of scientific interest, some of these sounds can even be described as ``musical,'' and have served as the basis for various musical compositions, including a production called ``Sun Rings,'' written by the well-known composer Terry Riley, that has been performed by the Kronos Quartet to audiences all around the world.

  11. On the sound attenuation in fluid due to the thermal diffusion and viscous dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hanping; Wang, Yandong; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-09-01

    We review the sound attenuation in fluid due to the thermal diffusion and viscous dissipation and derive the formula of the sound attenuation coefficient in fluid by solving a fully thermally-mechanically coupled equation set. Problem occurring in Stokes-Kirchhoff relation, the well-known and widely used classical formula for sound attenuation coefficient, is therefore found and pointed out. The reason for its generation is analyzed and verified. An improved formula to replace Stokes-Kirchhoff relation is suggested and the typical case for the error in calculating sound pressure level (SPL) of attenuated sound wave in fluid between the two formulas is also given.

  12. Cochlear Implant Electrode Effect on Sound Energy Transfer within the Cochlea during Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nathaniel T.; Mattingly, Jameson K.; Jenkins, Herman A.; Tollin, Daniel J.; Easter, James R.; Cass, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Cochlear implants (CI) designed for hearing preservation will not alter mechanical properties of the middle and inner ear as measured by intracochlear pressure (PIC) and stapes velocity (Vstap). Background CIs designed to provide combined electrical and acoustic stimulation (EAS) are now available. To maintain functional acoustic hearing, it is important to know if a CI electrode can alter middle or inner ear mechanics, as any alteration could contribute to elevated low-frequency thresholds in EAS patients. Methods Seven human cadaveric temporal bones were prepared, and pure-tone stimuli from 120Hz–10kHz were presented at a range of intensities up to 110 dB SPL. PIC in the scala vestibuli (PSV) and tympani (PST) were measured with fiber-optic pressure sensors concurrently with VStap using laser Doppler vibrometry. Five CI electrodes from two different manufacturers, with varying dimensions were inserted via a round window approach at six different depths (16–25 mm). Results The responses of PIC and VStap to acoustic stimulation were assessed as a function of stimulus frequency, normalized to SPL in the external auditory canal (EAC), in baseline and electrode inserted conditions. Responses measured with electrodes inserted were generally within ~5 dB of baseline, indicating little effect of cochlear implant electrode insertion on PIC and VStap. Overall, mean differences across conditions were small for all responses, and no substantial differences were consistently visible across electrode types. Conclusions Results suggest that the influence of a CI electrode on middle and inner ear mechanics is minimal, despite variation in electrode lengths and configurations. PMID:26333018

  13. [Normal and Adventitious Breath Sounds].

    PubMed

    Koehler, U; Hildebrandt, O; Kerzel, S; Urban, C; Hoehle, L; Weissflog, A; Nikolaizik, W; Koehler, J; Sohrabi, K; Gross, V

    2016-06-01

    Auscultation of the lung is an inexpensive, noninvasive and easy-to-perform tool. It is an important part of the physical examination and is help ful to distinguish physiological respiratory sounds from pathophysiological events. Computerized lung sound analysis is a powerful tool for optimizing and quantifying electronic auscultation based on the specific lung sound spectral characteristics. The automatic analysis of respiratory sounds assumes that physiological and pathological sounds are reliably analyzed based on special algorithms. The development of automated long-term lungsound monitors enables objective assessment of different respiratory symptoms.

  14. Experimental study on HVAC sound parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujoreanu, C.; Benchea, M.

    2016-08-01

    HVAC system represent major source of buildings internal noise and therefore they are designed to provide a human acoustic comfort besides the thermal and air quality requirements. The paper experimentally investigates three types of commercial air handler units (AHU) with different ducts cross-section sizes and inlet-outlet configuration. The measurements are performed in an anechoic room. The measurements are carried out at different fan's speeds, ranging the power-charge from 30-100% while the duct air flow is slowly adjusted from full open to full closed, between 0-500 Pa. The sound pressure levels of the radiant units are rated using NR curves. Also, the supply and the outdoor ducts sound levels are compared in order to point the frequencies where the noise must be reduced. Third-octave band analysis of random noise of an air handling unit from a HVAC system is realized, using measurement procedures that agrees the requirements of the ISO 3744:2011 and ISO 5136:2010 standards. The comparatively results highlight the effects of the geometry, air flow pressure and power-charging dependencies upon the sound level. This is the start for a noise reduction strategy.

  15. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. (a) A line drawn from Chatham Light to latitude...

  16. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  17. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  18. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  19. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  20. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process.

  1. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process. PMID:26627802

  2. Feedback control of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  3. Sound from apollo rockets in space.

    PubMed

    Cotten, D; Donn, W L

    1971-02-12

    Low-frequency sound has been recorded on at least two occasions in Bermuda with the passage of Apollo rocket vehicles 188 kilometers aloft. The signals, which are reminiscent of N-waves from sonic booms, are (i) horizontally coherent; (ii) have extremely high (supersonic) trace velocities across the tripartite arrays; (iii) have nearly identical appearance and frequencies; (iv) have essentially identical arrival times after rocket launch; and (v) are the only coherent signals recorded over many hours. These observations seem to establish that the recorded sound comes from the rockets at high elevation. Despite this high elevation, the values of surface pressure appear to be explainable on the basis of a combination of a kinetic theory approach to shock formation in rarefied atmospheres with established gas-dynamics shock theory. PMID:17734781

  4. Method of fan sound mode structure determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, G. F.; Sofrin, T. G.; Wells, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the determination of fan sound mode structure in the Inlet of turbofan engines using in-duct acoustic pressure measurements is presented. The method is based on the simultaneous solution of a set of equations whose unknowns are modal amplitude and phase. A computer program for the solution of the equation set was developed. An additional computer program was developed which calculates microphone locations the use of which results in an equation set that does not give rise to numerical instabilities. In addition to the development of a method for determination of coherent modal structure, experimental and analytical approaches are developed for the determination of the amplitude frequency spectrum of randomly generated sound models for use in narrow annulus ducts. Two approaches are defined: one based on the use of cross-spectral techniques and the other based on the use of an array of microphones.

  5. Popcorn: critical temperature, jump and sound

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emmanuel; Ponomarenko, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Popcorn bursts open, jumps and emits a ‘pop’ sound in some hundredths of a second. The physical origin of these three observations remains unclear in the literature. We show that the critical temperature 180°C at which almost all of popcorn pops is consistent with an elementary pressure vessel scenario. We observe that popcorn jumps with a ‘leg’ of starch which is compressed on the ground. As a result, popcorn is midway between two categories of moving systems: explosive plants using fracture mechanisms and jumping animals using muscles. By synchronizing video recordings with acoustic recordings, we propose that the familiar ‘pop’ sound of the popcorn is caused by the release of water vapour. PMID:25673298

  6. Popcorn: critical temperature, jump and sound.

    PubMed

    Virot, Emmanuel; Ponomarenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Popcorn bursts open, jumps and emits a 'pop' sound in some hundredths of a second. The physical origin of these three observations remains unclear in the literature. We show that the critical temperature 180°C at which almost all of popcorn pops is consistent with an elementary pressure vessel scenario. We observe that popcorn jumps with a 'leg' of starch which is compressed on the ground. As a result, popcorn is midway between two categories of moving systems: explosive plants using fracture mechanisms and jumping animals using muscles. By synchronizing video recordings with acoustic recordings, we propose that the familiar 'pop' sound of the popcorn is caused by the release of water vapour. PMID:25673298

  7. Responses of free-living coastal pelagic fish to impulsive sounds.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Anthony D; Roberts, Louise; Cheesman, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of wild, pelagic fish in response to sound playback was observed with a sonar/echo sounder. Schools of sprat Sprattus sprattus and mackerel Scomber scombrus were examined at a quiet coastal location. The fish were exposed to a short sequence of repeated impulsive sounds, simulating the strikes from a pile driver, at different sound pressure levels. The incidence of behavioral responses increased with increasing sound level. Sprat schools were more likely to disperse and mackerel schools more likely to change depth. The sound pressure levels to which the fish schools responded on 50% of presentations were 163.2 and 163.3 dB re 1 μPa peak-to-peak, and the single strike sound exposure levels were 135.0 and 142.0 dB re 1 μPa(2) s, for sprat and mackerel, respectively, estimated from dose response curves. For sounds leading to mackerel responses, particle velocity levels were also estimated. The method of observation by means of a sonar/echo sounder proved successful in examining the behavior of unrestrained fish exposed to different sound levels. The technique may allow further testing of the relationship between responsiveness, sound level, and sound characteristics for different types of man-made sound, for a variety of fish species under varied conditions. PMID:24926505

  8. Responses of free-living coastal pelagic fish to impulsive sounds.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Anthony D; Roberts, Louise; Cheesman, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of wild, pelagic fish in response to sound playback was observed with a sonar/echo sounder. Schools of sprat Sprattus sprattus and mackerel Scomber scombrus were examined at a quiet coastal location. The fish were exposed to a short sequence of repeated impulsive sounds, simulating the strikes from a pile driver, at different sound pressure levels. The incidence of behavioral responses increased with increasing sound level. Sprat schools were more likely to disperse and mackerel schools more likely to change depth. The sound pressure levels to which the fish schools responded on 50% of presentations were 163.2 and 163.3 dB re 1 μPa peak-to-peak, and the single strike sound exposure levels were 135.0 and 142.0 dB re 1 μPa(2) s, for sprat and mackerel, respectively, estimated from dose response curves. For sounds leading to mackerel responses, particle velocity levels were also estimated. The method of observation by means of a sonar/echo sounder proved successful in examining the behavior of unrestrained fish exposed to different sound levels. The technique may allow further testing of the relationship between responsiveness, sound level, and sound characteristics for different types of man-made sound, for a variety of fish species under varied conditions.

  9. Auditory Evaluation of Sound Signals Radiated by a Vibrating Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MEUNIER, S.; HABAULT, D.; CANÉVET, G.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents a combination of vibroacoustic and psychoacoustic studies of sounds radiated by a vibrating structure. The calculated sound field is the sound pressure radiated by a baffled thin-plate structure immersed in a fluid, on the surface of which the acceleration is given. Various configurations are selected for the time and space functions of the acceleration variable, each configuration leading to a particular acoustic signal (a low-frequency tone complex in our case). These signals are then transformed into sound files, which are used as test signals in psychoacoustic experiments for assessing their perceptual attributes and quality. Two experiments were run. In the first one, the unpleasantness of a series of signals at different levels was measured by direct estimation and compared with their calculated loudness and sharpness using Zwicker's model. The same measurements were repeated with the signals set to the same maximum amplitude. In the second experiment, the pleasantness of another series of sounds at equal loudness was measured, as well as dissimilarity and preference on pairs of these sounds. An MDS analysis was run to extract auditory attributes that could account for the perceived differences between sounds and correlate with the estimated pleasantness. The results from the first experiment show that pleasantness is always highly (and negatively) correlated with loudness. The same holds for sharpness, when sounds are played at the same maximum amplitude. The second experiment shows that the perceptual attributes revealed by the MDS analysis are related to pitch and timbre, the latter being highly correlated with pleasantness. Overall, this study confirms the interest of extending vibroacoustic studies to a more complete “psychomechanical” investigation of the whole process of sound generation. It is suggested that such investigations may apply to product sound quality and to active or passive noise control, by providing

  10. Confrontation naming of environmental sounds.

    PubMed

    Marcell, M M; Borella, D; Greene, M; Kerr, E; Rogers, S

    2000-12-01

    The development of a set of everyday, nonverbal, digitized sounds for use in auditory confrontation naming applications is described. Normative data are reported for 120 sounds of varying lengths representing a wide variety of acoustic events such as sounds produced by animals, people, musical instruments, tools, signals, and liquids. In Study 1, criteria for scoring naming accuracy were developed and rating data were gathered on degree of confidence in sound identification and the perceived familiarity, complexity, and pleasantness of the sounds. In Study 2, the previously developed criteria for scoring naming accuracy were applied to the naming responses of a new sample of subjects, and oral naming times were measured. In Study 3 data were gathered on how subjects categorized the sounds: In the first categorization task - free classification - subjects generated category descriptions for the sounds; in the second task - constrained classification - a different sample of subjects selected the most appropriate category label for each sound from a list of 27 labels generated in the first task. Tables are provided in which the 120 stimuli are sorted by familiarity, complexity, pleasantness, duration, naming accuracy, speed of identification, and category placement. The. WAV sound files are freely available to researchers and clinicians via a sound archive on the World Wide Web; the URL is http://www.cofc.edu/~marcellm/confront.htm.

  11. Drexhage's Experiment for Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langguth, Lutz; Fleury, Romain; Alò, Andrea; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2016-06-01

    Drexhage's seminal observation that spontaneous emission rates of fluorophores vary with distance from a mirror uncovered the fundamental notion that a source's environment determines radiative linewidths and shifts. Further, this observation established a powerful tool to determine fluorescence quantum yields. We present the direct analogue for sound. We demonstrate that a Chinese gong at a hard wall experiences radiative corrections to linewidth and line shift, and extract its intrinsic radiation efficiency. Beyond acoustics, our experiment opens new ideas to extend the Drexhage experiment to metamaterials, nanoantennas, and multipolar transitions.

  12. Safe N’ Sound

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janice; Nansel, Tonja R.; Weaver, Nancy L.; Tse, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Safe N’ Sound is a computer-based tool that prioritizes key injury risks for toddlers and infants and provides tailored feedback. The program was implemented in 5 pediatric sites. Caregiver risk behaviors were analyzed and compared with corresponding national and state morbidity and mortality data. The priority risks identified were generally consistent with the incidence of injury. Frequencies of several risk behaviors varied across sites and differences were observed across ages. Use of a prioritization scheme may facilitate risk behavior counseling and reasonably result in a decrease in injury mortality or morbidity. PMID:22617412

  13. Sound generation by steady flow through glottis-shaped orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H.; Thomson, Scott; Park, Jong Beom

    2004-09-01

    Although the signature of human voice is mostly tonal, it also includes a significant broadband component. Quadrupolelike sources due to turbulence in the region downstream of the glottis, and dipolelike sources due to the force applied by the vocal folds onto the surrounding fluid are the two primary broadband sound generating mechanisms. In this study, experiments were conducted to characterize the broadband sound emissions of confined stationary jets through rubber orifices formed to imitate the approximate shape of the human glottis at different stages during one cycle of vocal fold vibrations. The radiated sound pressure spectra downstream of the orifices were measured for varying flow rates, orifice shapes, and gas mixtures. The nondimensional sound pressure spectra were decomposed into the product of three functions: a source function F, a radiation efficiency function M, and an acoustic response function G. The results show that, as for circular jets, the quadrupole source contributions dominated for straight and convergent orifices. For divergent jets, whistling tonal sounds were emitted at low flow rates. At high flow rates for the same geometry, dipole contributions dominated the sound radiated by free jets. However, possible source-load acoustic feedback may have hampered accurate source identification in confined flows.

  14. Sound Levels and Risk Perceptions of Music Students During Classes.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Matilde A; Amorim, Marta; Silva, Manuela V; Neves, Paula; Sousa, Aida; Inácio, Octávio

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that professional musicians are at risk of hearing damage due to the exposure to high sound pressure levels during music playing. However, it is important to recognize that the musicians' exposure may start early in the course of their training as students in the classroom and at home. Studies regarding sound exposure of music students and their hearing disorders are scarce and do not take into account important influencing variables. Therefore, this study aimed to describe sound level exposures of music students at different music styles, classes, and according to the instrument played. Further, this investigation attempted to analyze the perceptions of students in relation to exposure to loud music and consequent health risks, as well as to characterize preventive behaviors. The results showed that music students are exposed to high sound levels in the course of their academic activity. This exposure is potentiated by practice outside the school and other external activities. Differences were found between music style, instruments, and classes. Tinnitus, hyperacusis, diplacusis, and sound distortion were reported by the students. However, students were not entirely aware of the health risks related to exposure to high sound pressure levels. These findings reflect the importance of starting intervention in relation to noise risk reduction at an early stage, when musicians are commencing their activity as students.

  15. Sound field reconstruction using a spherical microphone array.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren

    2016-03-01

    A method is presented that makes it possible to reconstruct an arbitrary sound field based on measurements with a spherical microphone array. The proposed method (spherical equivalent source method) makes use of a point source expansion to describe the sound field on the rigid spherical array, from which it is possible to reconstruct the sound field over a three-dimensional domain, inferring all acoustic quantities: sound pressure, particle velocity, and sound intensity. The problem is formulated using a Neumann Green's function that accounts for the presence of the rigid sphere in the medium. One can reconstruct the total sound field, or only the incident part, i.e., the scattering introduced by the sphere can be removed, making the array virtually transparent. The method makes it possible to use sequential measurements: different measurement positions can be combined, providing an extended measurement area consisting of an array of spheres, and the sound field at any point of the source-free domain can be estimated, not being restricted to spherical surfaces. Because it is formulated as an elementary wave model, it allows for diverse solution strategies (least squares, ℓ1-norm minimization, etc.), revealing an interesting perspective for further work.

  16. Sound field reconstruction using a spherical microphone array.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren

    2016-03-01

    A method is presented that makes it possible to reconstruct an arbitrary sound field based on measurements with a spherical microphone array. The proposed method (spherical equivalent source method) makes use of a point source expansion to describe the sound field on the rigid spherical array, from which it is possible to reconstruct the sound field over a three-dimensional domain, inferring all acoustic quantities: sound pressure, particle velocity, and sound intensity. The problem is formulated using a Neumann Green's function that accounts for the presence of the rigid sphere in the medium. One can reconstruct the total sound field, or only the incident part, i.e., the scattering introduced by the sphere can be removed, making the array virtually transparent. The method makes it possible to use sequential measurements: different measurement positions can be combined, providing an extended measurement area consisting of an array of spheres, and the sound field at any point of the source-free domain can be estimated, not being restricted to spherical surfaces. Because it is formulated as an elementary wave model, it allows for diverse solution strategies (least squares, ℓ1-norm minimization, etc.), revealing an interesting perspective for further work. PMID:27036253

  17. Characteristics of the audio sound generated by ultrasound imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James F.

    2005-03-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners use high-energy pulses to probe the human body. The radiation force resulting from the impact of such pulses on an object can vibrate the object, producing a localized high-intensity sound in the audible range. Here, a theoretical model for the audio sound generated by ultrasound scanners is presented. This model describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the sound. It has been shown that the sound has rich frequency components at the pulse repetition frequency and its harmonics. Experiments have been conducted in a water tank to measure the sound generated by a clinical ultrasound scanner in various operational modes. Results are in general agreement with the theory. It is shown that a typical ultrasound scanner with a typical spatial-peak pulse-average intensity value at 2 MHz may generate a localized sound-pressure level close to 100 dB relative to 20 μPa in the audible (<20 kHz) range under laboratory conditions. These findings suggest that fetuses may become exposed to a high-intensity audio sound during maternal ultrasound examinations. Therefore, contrary to common beliefs, ultrasound may not be considered a passive tool in fetal imaging..

  18. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Rohrer, John S.; Caviggia, Kurt A.

    2011-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to design and build two versions of an underwater sound recording device. The device designed is referred to as the Underwater Sound Recorder (USR), which can be connected to one or two hydrophones or other underwater sound sensors. The URS contains a 26 dB preamplifier and a user selectable gain that permits additional amplification of input to the system from 26 dB to 46 dB. Signals within the frequency range up to 15 kHz may be recorded using the USR. Examples of USR applications are monitoring underwater processes that have the potential to create large pressure waves that could potentially harm fish or other aquatic life, such as underwater explosions or pile driving. Additional applications are recording sound generated by vessels or the vocalizations of some marine mammals, such as the calls from many species of whales.

  19. Sounds like Team Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  20. Sound generated by vortex ring impingement on a heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsari, E. Giannos; Howe, M. S.

    2009-11-01

    An analysis is made of the sound generated when a vortex ring impinges normally on a heated section of a plane wall. The unsteady convective diffusion occurring when the vortex is close to the wall causes a rapid increase in heat transfer and the emission of sound of monopole type. The approximate dependence on vortex Reynolds number of the enhancement of heat transfer is deduced from recent experiments reported by Arévalo et al. [Vortex ring head-on collision with a heated vertical plate, Physics of Fluids 19 (2007) 083603-1-083603-9], and is used to derive a scaling law for the acoustic pressure. The sound pressure signature is dominated by a large amplitude pulse associated with an explosive, but brief increase in the rate of heat transfer at the start of the vortex-wall interaction. The quadrupole sound pressure also produced during impingement on the wall is found to be smaller than the thermally induced sound by a factor proportional to M2T0/(Tw-T0) where M, Tw, T0 respectively denote the Mach number of the vortex motion, the mean wall temperature and the fluid temperature at large distances from the wall.

  1. Overall loudness of steady sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.; Canright, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    Loudness (in sones) and loudness level (in phons) of any sound that is steady for tenths of second can be calculated using computer program derived from new operational theory of loudness. Theory is constructed from psychoacoustic and physiological data on mammalian (monkey) auditory systems. Computer program permits prediction of loudness of any steady sound including, for example, transportation noises, machinery noises, and other environmental noises, with possible additional applications to broadcasting, sound reproduction, establishment and enforcement of noise laws.

  2. Sound Naming in Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Maggie L; Brambati, Simona M; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Johnson, Julene K

    2010-01-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two neurodegenerative diseases associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Subjects were presented with 56 environmental sounds: 28 of objects that required manipulation when producing the sound, and 28 that required no manipulation. Subjects were asked to provide the name of the object that produced the sound and also complete a sound-picture matching condition. Subjects included 33 individuals from four groups: CBD/PSP, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, and normal controls. We hypothesized that CBD/PSP patients would exhibit impaired naming performance compared with controls, but the impairment would be most apparent when naming sounds associated with actions. We also explored neural correlates of naming environmental sounds using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain MRI. As expected, CBD/PSP patients scored lower on environmental sounds naming (p<0.007) compared with the controls. In particular, the CBD/PSP patients scored the lowest when naming sounds of manipulable objects (p<0.05), but did not show deficits in naming sounds of non-manipulable objects. VBM analysis across all groups showed that performance in naming sounds of manipulable objects correlated with atrophy in the left premotor region, extending from area 6 to the middle and superior frontal gyrus. These results indicate an association between impairment in the retrieval of action-related names and the motor system, and suggest that difficulty in naming manipulable sounds may be related to atrophy in the premotor cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that retrieval of action-related semantic knowledge involves motor regions in the brain. PMID:20089342

  3. Application of a finite-element model to low-frequency sound insulation in dwellings.

    PubMed

    Maluski, S P; Gibbs, B M

    2000-10-01

    The sound transmission between adjacent rooms has been modeled using a finite-element method. Predicted sound-level difference gave good agreement with experimental data using a full-scale and a quarter-scale model. Results show that the sound insulation characteristics of a party wall at low frequencies strongly depend on the modal characteristics of the sound field of both rooms and of the partition. The effect of three edge conditions of the separating wall on the sound-level difference at low frequencies was examined: simply supported, clamped, and a combination of clamped and simply supported. It is demonstrated that a clamped partition provides greater sound-level difference at low frequencies than a simply supported. It also is confirmed that the sound-pressure level difference is lower in equal room than in unequal room configurations. PMID:11051501

  4. Common Sole Larvae Survive High Levels of Pile-Driving Sound in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, Loes J.; de Jong, Christ A. F.; Bierman, Stijn M.; van Beek, Pieter J. G.; van Keeken, Olvin A.; Wessels, Peter W.; van Damme, Cindy J. G.; Winter, Hendrik V.; de Haan, Dick; Dekeling, René P. A.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the rapid extension of offshore wind farms, there is an urgent need to improve our knowledge on possible adverse effects of underwater sound generated by pile-driving. Mortality and injuries have been observed in fish exposed to loud impulse sounds, but knowledge on the sound levels at which (sub-)lethal effects occur is limited for juvenile and adult fish, and virtually non-existent for fish eggs and larvae. A device was developed in which fish larvae can be exposed to underwater sound. It consists of a rigid-walled cylindrical chamber driven by an electro-dynamical sound projector. Samples of up to 100 larvae can be exposed simultaneously to a homogeneously distributed sound pressure and particle velocity field. Recorded pile-driving sounds could be reproduced accurately in the frequency range between 50 and 1000 Hz, at zero to peak pressure levels up to 210 dB re 1µPa2 (zero to peak pressures up to 32 kPa) and single pulse sound exposure levels up to 186 dB re 1µPa2s. The device was used to examine lethal effects of sound exposure in common sole (Solea solea) larvae. Different developmental stages were exposed to various levels and durations of pile-driving sound. The highest cumulative sound exposure level applied was 206 dB re 1µPa2s, which corresponds to 100 strikes at a distance of 100 m from a typical North Sea pile-driving site. The results showed no statistically significant differences in mortality between exposure and control groups at sound exposure levels which were well above the US interim criteria for non-auditory tissue damage in fish. Although our findings cannot be extrapolated to fish larvae in general, as interspecific differences in vulnerability to sound exposure may occur, they do indicate that previous assumptions and criteria may need to be revised. PMID:22431996

  5. Sound generation by a stenosis in a pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a computational aeroacoustics study of sound generated by low Mach number flow through a closure (stenosis) in a circular pipe. The time-dependent incompressible flowfield in the pipe is first computed utilizing a vorticity/stream function formulation. The known velocity field is then utilized to determine the incompressible fluctuating pressure in the pipe. This hydrodynamic pressure field is then utilized to compute a hydrodynamic density perturbation to the constant incompressible density through the equation of state. Knowledge of this complete hydrodynamic field is then employed as the source of the resulting sound radiation. This tripartite technique allows separation of the compressible fluctuations from the purely hydrodynamic fluctuations. Results of the analysis are compared with experimental measurements of sound radiated by such a flow.

  6. Cochlear and cerebrospinal fluid pressure: their inter-relationship and control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marchbanks, R J; Reid, A

    1990-06-01

    The patency of the cochlear aqueduct is a key factor in intra-cochlear hydromechanics. If patent, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides the reference pressure for the perilymph and also to a large extent the endolymph, since Reissner's membrane can only withstand a relatively small pressure differential. The aqueduct often becomes sealed as a natural process of ageing. In this instance the reference pressure is from a source, its position unknown, within the boundaries of the cochlea itself. Relatively large and rapid changes in the cerebrospinal fluid pressure may result from everyday events such as coughing (ca. 175 mm saline) and sneezing (ca. 250 mm saline). The resistive nature of the cochlear aqueduct and the mechanical compliance of the cochlear windows are probably important factors in limiting the amount of stress, and therefore possible damage, which may occur to the cochlea and cochlear windows for a given pressure change within the CSF system. A narrow aqueduct and compliant cochlear windows reduce the risk of structural damage. In practice, this should mean that the risk of structural damage will be increased by any process which reduces the compliance of one or both of the cochlear windows, for example, extremes of middle ear pressure perhaps brought about by Eustachian tube dysfunction or rapid barometric pressure changes. Techniques are now available which provide non-invasive indirect measures of perilymphatic pressure and CSF-perilymphatic pressure transfer. The tympanic membrane displacement measurement technique has been used to provide reliable measures of perilymphatic pressure and CSF-perilymphatic pressure transfer on an individual subject basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2194603

  7. Codes for sound-source location in nontonotopic auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Middlebrooks, J C; Xu, L; Eddins, A C; Green, D M

    1998-08-01

    We evaluated two hypothetical codes for sound-source location in the auditory cortex. The topographical code assumed that single neurons are selective for particular locations and that sound-source locations are coded by the cortical location of small populations of maximally activated neurons. The distributed code assumed that the responses of individual neurons can carry information about locations throughout 360 degrees of azimuth and that accurate sound localization derives from information that is distributed across large populations of such panoramic neurons. We recorded from single units in the anterior ectosylvian sulcus area (area AES) and in area A2 of alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats. Results obtained in the two areas were essentially equivalent. Noise bursts were presented from loudspeakers spaced in 20 degrees intervals of azimuth throughout 360 degrees of the horizontal plane. Spike counts of the majority of units were modulated >50% by changes in sound-source azimuth. Nevertheless, sound-source locations that produced greater than half-maximal spike counts often spanned >180 degrees of azimuth. The spatial selectivity of units tended to broaden and, often, to shift in azimuth as sound pressure levels (SPLs) were increased to a moderate level. We sometimes saw systematic changes in spatial tuning along segments of electrode tracks as long as 1.5 mm but such progressions were not evident at higher sound levels. Moderate-level sounds presented anywhere in the contralateral hemifield produced greater than half-maximal activation of nearly all units. These results are not consistent with the hypothesis of a topographic code. We used an artificial-neural-network algorithm to recognize spike patterns and, thereby, infer the locations of sound sources. Network input consisted of spike density functions formed by averages of responses to eight stimulus repetitions. Information carried in the responses of single units permitted reasonable estimates of sound

  8. The Sounds of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Flying board Voyagers 1 and 2 are identical 'golden' records, carrying the story of Earth far into deep space. The 12 inch gold-plated copper discs contain greetings in 60 languages, samples of music from different cultures and eras, and natural and man-made sounds from Earth. They also contain electronic information that an advanced technological civilization could convert into diagrams and photographs. The cover of each gold plated aluminum jacket, designed to protect the record from micrometeorite bombardment, also serves a double purpose in providing the finder a key to playing the record. The explanatory diagram appears on both the inner and outer surfaces of the cover, as the outer diagram will be eroded in time. Currently, both Voyager probes are sailing adrift in the black sea of interplanetary space, having left our solar system years ago.

  9. Sounds Clear Enough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Alan

    2004-01-01

    I'm a vice president at Line6, where we produce electronics for musical instruments. My company recently developed a guitar that can be programmed to sound like twenty-five different classic guitars - everything from a 1928 National 'Tricone' to a 1970 Martin. It is quite an amazing piece of technology. The guitar started as a research project because we needed to know if the technology was going to be viable and if the guitar design was going to be practical. I've been in this business for about twenty years now, and I still enjoy starting up projects whenever the opportunity presents itself. During the research phase, I headed up the project myself. Once we completed our preliminary research and made the decision to move into development, that's when I handed the project off - and that's where this story really begins.

  10. The sounds of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    As scientists carefully study some aspects of the ocean environment, are they unintentionally distressing others? That is a question to be answered by Robert Benson and his colleagues in the Center for Bioacoustics at Texas A&M University.With help from a 3-year, $316,000 grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Benson will study how underwater noise produced by naval operations and other sources may affect marine mammals. In Benson's study, researchers will generate random sequences of low-frequency, high-intensity (180-decibel) sounds in the Gulf of Mexico, working at an approximate distance of 1 km from sperm whale herds. Using an array of hydrophones, the scientists will listen to the characteristic clicks and whistles of the sperm whales to detect changes in the animals' direction, speed, and depth, as derived from fluctuations in their calls.

  11. Sounding out science

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, M.

    1996-10-01

    The Exxon Valdez catastrophe, which soiled Alaska`s Prince William Sound in 1989, was the most studied oil spill in history. But because of how they framed their inquiries, investigators have learned less than they could about how nature heals itself. The studies of Exxon and the state of Alaska - including the departments of Fish and Game and of Environmental Conservation - conducted to prove their respective points, were kept largely secret untill legal settlements were reached. This secrecy reduced most of the pillars of science to rubble: out went scientific dialog, data sharing, and for some parties, peer view. Millions of dollars were shelled out in duplicate studies that reached opposite conclusions. Beyond the quality of science lies the public interpretation of science. Even though NOAA has shown that cleaning up can do more harm than good, demands to clean up persist. 7 figs.

  12. Sound and computer information presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bly, S

    1982-03-01

    This thesis examines the use of sound to present data. Computer graphics currently offers a vast array of techniques for communicating data to analysts. Graphics is limited, however, by the number of dimensions that can be perceived at one time, by the types of data that lend themselves to visual representation, and by the necessary eye focus on the output. Sound offers an enhancement and an alternative to graphic tools. Multivariate, logarithmic, and time-varying data provide examples for aural representation. For each of these three types of data, the thesis suggests a method of encoding the information into sound and presents various applications. Data values were mapped to sound characteristics such as pitch and volume so that information was presented as sets or sequences of notes. In all cases, the resulting sounds conveyed information in a manner consistent with prior knowledge of the data. Experiments showed that sound does convey information accurately and that sound can enhance graphic presentations. Subjects were tested on their ability to distinguish between two sources of test items. In the first phase of the experiments, subjects discriminated between two 6-dimensional data sets represented in sound. In the second phase of the experiment, 75 subjects were selected and assigned to one of three groups. The first group of 25 heard test items, the second group saw test items, and the third group both heard and saw the test items. The average percentage correct was 64.5% for the sound-only group, 62% for the graphics-only group, and 69% for the sound and graphics group. In the third phase, additional experiments focused on the mapping between data values and sound characteristics and on the training methods.

  13. Nonlinear behavior of the tarka flute's distinctive sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Arnaud; Yapu-Quispe, Luis; Sakuma, Sachiko; Ghezzi, Flavio; Ramírez-Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo

    2016-09-01

    The Andean tarka flute generates multiphonic sounds. Using spectral techniques, we verify two distinctive musical behaviors and the nonlinear nature of the tarka. Through nonlinear time series analysis, we determine chaotic and hyperchaotic behavior. Experimentally, we observe that by increasing the blow pressure on different fingerings, peculiar changes from linear to nonlinear patterns are produced, leading ultimately to quenching.

  14. Advanced Systems for Monitoring Underwater Sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Michael; Van Meter, Steven; Gilmore, Richard Grant; Sommer, Keith

    2007-01-01

    data acquired by instrumentation systems other than PAMS. A PAMS is packaged as a battery-powered unit, mated with external sensors, that can operate in the ocean at any depth from 2 m to 1 km. A PAMS includes a pressure housing, a deep-sea battery, a hydrophone (which is one of the mating external sensors), and an external monitor and keyboard box. In addition to acoustic transducers, external sensors can include temperature probes and, potentially, underwater cameras. The pressure housing contains a computer that includes a hard drive, DC-to- DC power converters, a post-amplifier board, a sound card, and a universal serial bus (USB) 4-port hub.

  15. Applications of Sound Spectrum Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The physics of sound is often studied in introductory physics class experiments involving a tube of resonating air. In typical setups, pistons control the length of a cylindrical space or a microphone is moved within a tube. While these activities are useful and can be made very quantitative, they don't directly demonstrate the sounds that are…

  16. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  17. Sound absorption in metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T. J.; Hess, Audrey; Ashby, M. F.

    1999-06-01

    The sound absorption capacity of one type of aluminum alloy foams—trade name Alporas—is studied experimentally. The foam in its as-received cast form contains closed porosities, and hence does not absorb sound well. To make the foam more transparent to air motion, techniques based on either rolling or hole drilling are used. Under rolling, the faces of some of the cells break to form small sharp-edged cracks as observed from a scanning electronic microscope. These cracks become passage ways for the in-and-out movement of air particles, resulting in sound absorption improvement. The best performance is nevertheless achieved via hole drilling where nearly all of the sound can be absorbed at selected frequencies. Combining rolling with hole drilling does not appear to lend additional benefits for sound absorption. Image analysis is carried out to characterize the changes in cell morphologies due to rolling/compression, and the drop in elastic modulus due to the formation of cracks is recorded. The effects of varying the relative foam density and panel thickness on sound absorption are measured, and optimal relative density and thickness of the panel are identified. Analytical models are used to explain the measured increase in sound absorption due to rolling and/or drilling. Sound absorbed by viscous flow across small cracks appears to dominate over that dissipated via other mechanisms.

  18. Sound Standards for Schools "Unsound."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Don

    2002-01-01

    Criticizes new classroom sound standard proposed by the American National Standards Institute that sets maximum background sound level at 35 decibels (described as "a whisper at 2 meters"). Argues that new standard is too costly for schools to implement, is not recommended by the medical community, and cannot be achieved by construction industry.…

  19. Acoustical and perceptual assessment of water sounds and their use over road traffic noise.

    PubMed

    Galbrun, Laurent; Ali, Tahrir T

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines physical and perceptual properties of water sounds generated by small to medium sized water features that have applications for road traffic noise masking. A large variety of water sounds were produced in the laboratory by varying design parameters. Analysis showed that estimations can be made on how these parameters affect sound pressure levels, frequency content, and psychoacoustic properties. Comparisons with road traffic noise showed that there is a mismatch between the frequency responses of traffic noise and water sounds, with the exception of waterfalls with high flow rates, which can generate large low frequency levels comparable to traffic noise. Perceptual assessments were carried out in the context of peacefulness and relaxation, where both water sounds and noise from dense road traffic were audible. Results showed that water sounds should be similar or not less than 3 dB below the road traffic noise level (confirming previous research), and that stream sounds tend to be preferred to fountain sounds, which are in turn preferred to waterfall sounds. Analysis made on groups of sounds also indicated that low sharpness and large temporal variations were preferred on average, although no acoustical or psychoacoustical parameter correlated well with the individual sound preferences. PMID:23297897

  20. Static behavior of a graphene-based sound-emitting device.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Xie, Dan; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling; Wang, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Peng, Ping-Gang; Wang, Li-Gang; Liu, Li-Tian

    2012-06-01

    Due to the extremely high thermal conductivity and low heat capacity per unit area of graphene, it is possible to fabricate an efficient sound-emitting device based on the thermoacoustic effect with no mechanical vibration. In this paper, the fundamental performance of this new graphene sound-emitting device (G-SED) is investigated in terms of its static behavior. The sound amplitude mapping shows that the G-SED has good sound performance under 0.01 W. The sound frequency spectra measured at different distances and angles show that the G-SED has good sound directivity. It is possible to realize sound wave manipulation by using an array of G-SEDs. The relationship between the temperature of graphene and the sound frequency was investigated by a thermal imaging instrument. The fast transient sound response in real time was recorded by applying 60 μs short time multi-pulses and single-pulse. The stable sound emission at a constant sound pressure amplitude with low noise was observed for continuous operation under a fixed frequency over several hours. Such significant performances in this G-SED indicate broad applications, and shed light on the use of graphene in the field of acoustics.

  1. Acoustical and perceptual assessment of water sounds and their use over road traffic noise.

    PubMed

    Galbrun, Laurent; Ali, Tahrir T

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines physical and perceptual properties of water sounds generated by small to medium sized water features that have applications for road traffic noise masking. A large variety of water sounds were produced in the laboratory by varying design parameters. Analysis showed that estimations can be made on how these parameters affect sound pressure levels, frequency content, and psychoacoustic properties. Comparisons with road traffic noise showed that there is a mismatch between the frequency responses of traffic noise and water sounds, with the exception of waterfalls with high flow rates, which can generate large low frequency levels comparable to traffic noise. Perceptual assessments were carried out in the context of peacefulness and relaxation, where both water sounds and noise from dense road traffic were audible. Results showed that water sounds should be similar or not less than 3 dB below the road traffic noise level (confirming previous research), and that stream sounds tend to be preferred to fountain sounds, which are in turn preferred to waterfall sounds. Analysis made on groups of sounds also indicated that low sharpness and large temporal variations were preferred on average, although no acoustical or psychoacoustical parameter correlated well with the individual sound preferences.

  2. Hearing thresholds of two harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) for playbacks of multiple pile driving strike sounds.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; Gransier, Robin; Jennings, Nancy

    2013-09-01

    Pile driving, which creates high amplitude sounds with potentially negative impacts on the marine environment, is used to attach wind turbines to the sea bed. To quantify the distance at which pile driving sounds can be detected by harbor seals, unmasked hearing thresholds were obtained for series of five pile driving sounds recorded at 100 and 800 m from a pile driving location. The played back spectra resembled the spectra of sounds recorded under certain conditions 10-50 km from an offshore pile driving site. The lower the received level, the later within the series of sounds the harbor seals responded. The mean 50% detection threshold sound exposure levels for any sound in the series were: 40 (seal 01, 100 m), 39 (seal 01, 800 m), 43 (seal 02, 100 m), and 43 (seal 02, 800 m) dB re 1 μPa(2)s (add 9 dB for sound pressure level, dB re 1 μPa). The mean 50% detection thresholds based on detection of only the first sound of the series were ca. 5 dB higher. Detection at sea depends on the actual propagation conditions and on the degree of masking of the sounds by ambient noise, but the present study suggests that pile driving sounds are audible to harbor seals up to hundreds of kilometers from pile driving sites. PMID:23967961

  3. Offshore Dredger Sounds: Source Levels, Sound Maps, and Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Christ A F; Ainslie, Michael A; Heinis, Floor; Janmaat, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The underwater sound produced during construction of the Port of Rotterdam harbor extension (Maasvlakte 2) was measured, with emphasis on the contribution of the trailing suction hopper dredgers during their various activities: dredging, transport, and discharge of sediment. Measured source levels of the dredgers, estimated source levels of other shipping, and time-dependent position data from a vessel-tracking system were used as input for a propagation model to generate dynamic sound maps. Various scenarios were studied to assess the risk of possible effects of the sound from dredging activities on marine fauna, specifically on porpoises, seals, and fish.

  4. Perfect sound insulation property of reclaimed waste tire rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaidillah, Harjana, Yahya, Iwan; Kristiani, Restu; Muqowi, Eki; Mazlan, Saiful Amri

    2016-03-01

    This article reports an experimental investigation of sound insulation and absorption performance of a materials made of reclaimed ground tire rubber which is known as un-recyclable thermoset. The bulk waste tire is processed using single step recycling methods namely high-pressure high-temperature sintering (HPHTS). The bulk waste tire is simply placed into a mold and then a pressure load of 3 tons and a heating temperature of 200°C are applied to the mold. The HPHTS conducted for an hour and then it is cooled in room temperature. The resulted product is then evaluated the acoustical properties namely sound transmission loss (STL) and sound absorption coefficient using B&K Tube Kit Type 4206-T based on ISO 10534-2, ASTM E1050 and ASTM E2611. The sound absorption coefficient is found about 0.04 until 0.08 while STL value ranges between 50 to 60 dB. The sound absorption values are found to be very low (<0.1), while the average STL is higher than other elastomeric matrix found in previous work. The reclaimed tire rubber through HPHTS technique gives good soundproof characteristic.

  5. Airborne sound propagation over sea during offshore wind farm piling.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, T; Botteldooren, D; Dekoninck, L

    2014-02-01

    Offshore piling for wind farm construction has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the extremely high noise emission levels associated with such operations. While underwater noise levels were shown to be harmful for the marine biology, the propagation of airborne piling noise over sea has not been studied in detail before. In this study, detailed numerical calculations have been performed with the Green's Function Parabolic Equation (GFPE) method to estimate noise levels up to a distance of 10 km. Measured noise emission levels during piling of pinpiles for a jacket-foundation wind turbine were assessed and used together with combinations of the sea surface state and idealized vertical sound speed profiles (downwind sound propagation). Effective impedances were found and used to represent non-flat sea surfaces at low-wind sea states 2, 3, and 4. Calculations show that scattering by a rough sea surface, which decreases sound pressure levels, exceeds refractive effects, which increase sound pressure levels under downwind conditions. This suggests that the presence of wind, even when blowing downwind to potential receivers, is beneficial to increase the attenuation of piling sound over the sea. A fully flat sea surface therefore represents a worst-case scenario. PMID:25234870

  6. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... when the sounds disappear. When a blood pressure reading is taken, the higher number represents the systolic ...

  7. On the sound radiation of a rolling tyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropp, Wolfgang; Sabiniarz, Patrick; Brick, Haike; Beckenbauer, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The sound radiation from rolling tyres is still not very well understood. Although details such as horn effect or directivity during rolling have been investigated, it is not clear which vibrational modes of the tyre structure are responsible for the radiated sound power. In this work an advanced tyre model based on Wave Guide Finite Elements is used in connection with a contact model validated in previous work. With these tools the tyre vibrations during rolling on an ISO surface are simulated. Starting from the calculated contact forces in time the amplitudes of the modes excited during rolling are determined as function of frequency. A boundary element model also validated in previous work is applied to predict the sound pressure level on a reference surface around a tyre placed on rigid ground as function of the modal composition of the tyre vibrations. Taking into account different modes when calculating the vibrational field as input into the boundary element calculations, it is possible to identify individual modes or groups of modes of special relevance for the radiated sound power. The results show that mainly low-order modes with relative low amplitudes but high radiation efficiency in the frequency range around 1 kHz are responsible for the radiated sound power at these frequencies, while those modes which are most strongly excited in that frequency range during rolling are irrelevant for the radiated sound power. This fact is very essential when focusing on the design of quieter tyres.

  8. The isolation of low frequency impact sounds in hotel construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, John J.; Dong, David W.

    2002-11-01

    One of the design challenges in the acoustical design of hotels is reducing low frequency sounds from footfalls occurring on both carpeted and hard-surfaced floors. Research on low frequency impact noise [W. Blazier and R. DuPree, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1521-1532 (1994)] resulted in a conclusion that in wood construction low frequency impact sounds were clearly audible and that feasible control methods were not available. The results of numerous FIIC (Field Impact Insulation Class) measurements performed in accordance with ASTM E1007 indicate the lack of correlation between FIIC ratings and the reaction of occupants in the room below. The measurements presented include FIIC ratings and sound pressure level measurements below the ASTM E1007 low frequency limit of 100 Hertz, and reveal that excessive sound levels in the frequency range of 63 to 100 Hertz correlate with occupant complaints. Based upon this history, a tentative criterion for maximum impact sound level in the low frequency range is presented. The results presented of modifying existing constructions to reduce the transmission of impact sounds at low frequencies indicate that there may be practical solutions to this longstanding problem.

  9. Relations among pure-tone sound stimuli, neural activity, and the loudness sensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Both the physiological and psychological responses to pure-tone sound stimuli are used to derive formulas which: (1) relate the loudness, loudness level, and sound-pressure level of pure tones; (2) apply continuously over most of the acoustic regime, including the loudness threshold; and (3) contain no undetermined coefficients. Some of the formulas are fundamental for calculating the loudness of any sound. Power-law formulas relating the pure-tone sound stimulus, neural activity, and loudness are derived from published data.

  10. Nonlinear interactions in superfluid dynamics: Nonstationary heat transfer due to second sound shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound techniques were used to study superfluid helium. Second sound shock waves produced relative velocities in the bulk fluid. Maximum counterflow velocities produced in this way are found to follow the Langer-Fischer prediction for the fundamental critical velocity in its functional dependence on temperature and pressure. Comparison of successive shock and rotating experiments provides strong evidence that breakdown results in vorticity production in the flow behind the shock. Schlieren pictures have verified the planar nature of second sound shocks even after multiple reflections. The nonlinear theory of second sound was repeatedly verified in its prediction of double shocks and other nonlinear phenomena.

  11. EUVS Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Alan S.

    1996-01-01

    During the first half of this year (CY 1996), the EUVS project began preparations of the EUVS payload for the upcoming NASA sounding rocket flight 36.148CL, slated for launch on July 26, 1996 to observe and record a high-resolution (approx. 2 A FWHM) EUV spectrum of the planet Venus. These preparations were designed to improve the spectral resolution and sensitivity performance of the EUVS payload as well as prepare the payload for this upcoming mission. The following is a list of the EUVS project activities that have taken place since the beginning of this CY: (1) Applied a fresh, new SiC optical coating to our existing 2400 groove/mm grating to boost its reflectivity; (2) modified the Ranicon science detector to boost its detective quantum efficiency with the addition of a repeller grid; (3) constructed a new entrance slit plane to achieve 2 A FWHM spectral resolution; (4) prepared and held the Payload Initiation Conference (PIC) with the assigned NASA support team from Wallops Island for the upcoming 36.148CL flight (PIC held on March 8, 1996; see Attachment A); (5) began wavelength calibration activities of EUVS in the laboratory; (6) made arrangements for travel to WSMR to begin integration activities in preparation for the July 1996 launch; (7) paper detailing our previous EUVS Venus mission (NASA flight 36.117CL) published in Icarus (see Attachment B); and (8) continued data analysis of the previous EUVS mission 36.137CL (Spica occultation flight).

  12. Pitch features of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Kang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    A number of soundscape studies have suggested the need for suitable parameters for soundscape measurement, in addition to the conventional acoustic parameters. This paper explores the applicability of pitch features that are often used in music analysis and their algorithms to environmental sounds. Based on the existing alternative pitch algorithms for simulating the perception of the auditory system and simplified algorithms for practical applications in the areas of music and speech, the applicable algorithms have been determined, considering common types of sound in everyday soundscapes. Considering a number of pitch parameters, including pitch value, pitch strength, and percentage of audible pitches over time, different pitch characteristics of various environmental sounds have been shown. Among the four sound categories, i.e. water, wind, birdsongs, and urban sounds, generally speaking, both water and wind sounds have low pitch values and pitch strengths; birdsongs have high pitch values and pitch strengths; and urban sounds have low pitch values and a relatively wide range of pitch strengths.

  13. Sound localization and occupational noise

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos Menezes, Pedro; de Andrade, Kelly Cristina Lira; Tenório Lins Carnaúba, Aline; Cabral, Frantänia B.; de Carvalho Leal, Mariana; Desgualdo Pereira, Liliane

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of occupational noise on sound localization in different spatial planes and frequencies among normal hearing firefighters. METHOD: A total of 29 adults with pure-tone hearing thresholds below 25 dB took part in the study. The participants were divided into a group of 19 firefighters exposed to occupational noise and a control group of 10 adults who were not exposed to such noise. All subjects were assigned a sound localization task involving 117 stimuli from 13 sound sources that were spatially distributed in horizontal, vertical, midsagittal and transverse planes. The three stimuli, which were square waves with fundamental frequencies of 500, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, were presented at a sound level of 70 dB and were randomly repeated three times from each sound source. The angle between the speaker's axis in the same plane was 45°, and the distance to the subject was 1 m. RESULT: The results demonstrate that the sound localization ability of the firefighters was significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: Exposure to occupational noise, even when not resulting in hearing loss, may lead to a diminished ability to locate a sound source. PMID:24519197

  14. Sound source identification and sound radiation modeling in a moving medium using the time-domain equivalent source method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2015-05-01

    Planar near-field acoustic holography has been successfully extended to reconstruct the sound field in a moving medium, however, the reconstructed field still contains the convection effect that might lead to the wrong identification of sound sources. In order to accurately identify sound sources in a moving medium, a time-domain equivalent source method is developed. In the method, the real source is replaced by a series of time-domain equivalent sources whose strengths are solved iteratively by utilizing the measured pressure and the known convective time-domain Green's function, and time averaging is used to reduce the instability in the iterative solving process. Since these solved equivalent source strengths are independent of the convection effect, they can be used not only to identify sound sources but also to model sound radiations in both moving and static media. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the influence of noise on the solved equivalent source strengths and the effect of time averaging on reducing the instability, and to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method on the source identification and sound radiation modeling.

  15. Sound velocities of hot dense iron: Birch's law revisited.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2005-06-24

    Sound velocities of hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) were measured at pressures up to 73 gigapascals and at temperatures up to 1700 kelvin with nuclear inelastic x-ray scattering in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The compressional-wave velocities (VP) and shear-wave velocities (VS) of hcp-Fe decreased significantly with increasing temperature under moderately high pressures. VP and VS under high pressures and temperatures thus cannot be fitted to a linear relation, Birch's law, which has been used to extrapolate measured sound velocities to densities of iron in Earth's interior. This result means that there are more light elements in Earth's core than have been inferred from linear extrapolation at room temperature.

  16. Sound velocities of hot dense iron: Birch's law revisited.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2005-06-24

    Sound velocities of hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) were measured at pressures up to 73 gigapascals and at temperatures up to 1700 kelvin with nuclear inelastic x-ray scattering in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The compressional-wave velocities (VP) and shear-wave velocities (VS) of hcp-Fe decreased significantly with increasing temperature under moderately high pressures. VP and VS under high pressures and temperatures thus cannot be fitted to a linear relation, Birch's law, which has been used to extrapolate measured sound velocities to densities of iron in Earth's interior. This result means that there are more light elements in Earth's core than have been inferred from linear extrapolation at room temperature. PMID:15976298

  17. The influence of crowd density on the sound environment of commercial pedestrian streets.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qi; Kang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Commercial pedestrian streets are very common in China and Europe, with many situated in historic or cultural centres. The environments of these streets are important, including their sound environments. The objective of this study is to explore the relationships between the crowd density and the sound environments of commercial pedestrian streets. On-site measurements were performed at the case study site in Harbin, China, and a questionnaire was administered. The sound pressure measurements showed that the crowd density has an insignificant effect on sound pressure below 0.05 persons/m2, whereas when the crowd density is greater than 0.05 persons/m2, the sound pressure increases with crowd density. The sound sources were analysed, showing that several typical sound sources, such as traffic noise, can be masked by the sounds resulting from dense crowds. The acoustic analysis showed that crowd densities outside the range of 0.10 to 0.25 persons/m2 exhibited lower acoustic comfort evaluation scores. In terms of audiovisual characteristics, the subjective loudness increases with greater crowd density, while the acoustic comfort decreases. The results for an indoor underground shopping street are also presented for comparison.

  18. Measurement of sound power and absorption in reverberation chambers using energy density.

    PubMed

    Nutter, David B; Leishman, Timothy W; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2007-05-01

    Reverberation chamber measurements typically rely upon spatially averaged squared pressure for the calculation of sound absorption, sound power, and other acoustic values. While a reverberation chamber can provide an approximately diffuse sound field, variations in sound pressure consistently produce uncertainty in measurement results. This paper explores the benefits of using total energy density or squared particle velocity magnitude (kinetic energy density) instead of squared pressure (potential energy density) for sound absorption and sound power measurements. The approaches are based on methods outlined in current ISO standards. The standards require a sufficient number of source-receiver locations to obtain suitable measurement results. The total and kinetic energy densities exhibit greater spatial uniformity at most frequencies than potential energy density, thus requiring fewer source-receiver positions to produce effective results. Because the total energy density is typically the most uniform of the three quantities at low frequencies, its use could also impact the usable low-frequency ranges of reverberation chambers. In order to employ total and kinetic energy densities for sound absorption measurements, relevant energy-based impulse responses were developed as part of the work for the assessment of sound field decays.

  19. Behavioral responses of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to playbacks of broadband pile driving sounds.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; van Heerden, Dorianne; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2013-12-01

    The high under-water sound pressure levels (SPLs) produced during pile driving to build offshore wind turbines may affect harbor porpoises. To estimate the discomfort threshold of pile driving sounds, a porpoise in a quiet pool was exposed to playbacks (46 strikes/min) at five SPLs (6 dB steps: 130-154 dB re 1 μPa). The spectrum of the impulsive sound resembled the spectrum of pile driving sound at tens of kilometers from the pile driving location in shallow water such as that found in the North Sea. The animal's behavior during test and baseline periods was compared. At and above a received broadband SPL of 136 dB re 1 μPa [zero-peak sound pressure level: 151 dB re 1 μPa; t90: 126 ms; sound exposure level of a single strike (SELss): 127 dB re 1 μPa(2) s] the porpoise's respiration rate increased in response to the pile driving sounds. At higher levels, he also jumped out of the water more often. Wild porpoises are expected to move tens of kilometers away from offshore pile driving locations; response distances will vary with context, the sounds' source level, parameters influencing sound propagation, and background noise levels. PMID:24144856

  20. Air-borne sound generated by sea waves.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Karl; Åbom, Mats

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a semi-empiric model and measurements of air-borne sound generated by breaking sea waves. Measurements have been performed at the Baltic Sea. Shores with different slopes and sediment types have been investigated. Results showed that the sound pressure level increased from 60 dB at 0.4 m wave height to 78 dB at 2.0 m wave height. The 1/3 octave spectrum was dependent on the surf type. A scaling model based on the dissipated wave power and a surf similarity parameter is proposed and compared to measurements. The predictions show satisfactory agreement to the measurements.

  1. Dynamic Pressure Microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, E.

    In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell described his first telephone with a microphone using magnetic induction to convert the voice input into an electric output signal. The basic principle led to a variety of designs optimized for different needs, from hearing impaired users to singers or broadcast announcers. From the various sound pressure versions, only the moving coil design is still in mass production for speech and music application.

  2. Cognitive Bias for Learning Speech Sounds From a Continuous Signal Space Seems Nonlinguistic

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    When learning language, humans have a tendency to produce more extreme distributions of speech sounds than those observed most frequently: In rapid, casual speech, vowel sounds are centralized, yet cross-linguistically, peripheral vowels occur almost universally. We investigate whether adults’ generalization behavior reveals selective pressure for communication when they learn skewed distributions of speech-like sounds from a continuous signal space. The domain-specific hypothesis predicts that the emergence of sound categories is driven by a cognitive bias to make these categories maximally distinct, resulting in more skewed distributions in participants’ reproductions. However, our participants showed more centered distributions, which goes against this hypothesis, indicating that there are no strong innate linguistic biases that affect learning these speech-like sounds. The centralization behavior can be explained by a lack of communicative pressure to maintain categories. PMID:27648212

  3. Evaluation of sound exposure and risk of hearing impairment in orchestral musicians.

    PubMed

    Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska, Małgorzata; Dudarewicz, Adam; Zamojska, Małgorzata; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess exposure to sound and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in orchestral musicians. Sound pressure level was measured in 1 opera and 3 symphony orchestras; questionnaires were filled in. On the basis of that data, the risk of NIHL was assessed according to Standard No. ISO 1999:1990. Classical orchestral musicians are usually exposed to sound at equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels of 81?90 dB (10th?90th percentiles), for 20?45 h (10th?90th percentiles) per week. Occupational exposure to such sound levels over 40 years of employment might cause hearing loss (expressed as a mean hearing threshold level at 2, 3, 4 kHz exceeding 35 dB) of up to 26%. Playing the horn, trumpet, tuba and percussion carries the highest risk (over 20%).

  4. Cognitive Bias for Learning Speech Sounds From a Continuous Signal Space Seems Nonlinguistic

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    When learning language, humans have a tendency to produce more extreme distributions of speech sounds than those observed most frequently: In rapid, casual speech, vowel sounds are centralized, yet cross-linguistically, peripheral vowels occur almost universally. We investigate whether adults’ generalization behavior reveals selective pressure for communication when they learn skewed distributions of speech-like sounds from a continuous signal space. The domain-specific hypothesis predicts that the emergence of sound categories is driven by a cognitive bias to make these categories maximally distinct, resulting in more skewed distributions in participants’ reproductions. However, our participants showed more centered distributions, which goes against this hypothesis, indicating that there are no strong innate linguistic biases that affect learning these speech-like sounds. The centralization behavior can be explained by a lack of communicative pressure to maintain categories.

  5. Cognitive Bias for Learning Speech Sounds From a Continuous Signal Space Seems Nonlinguistic.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, Sabine; de Boer, Bart

    2015-10-01

    When learning language, humans have a tendency to produce more extreme distributions of speech sounds than those observed most frequently: In rapid, casual speech, vowel sounds are centralized, yet cross-linguistically, peripheral vowels occur almost universally. We investigate whether adults' generalization behavior reveals selective pressure for communication when they learn skewed distributions of speech-like sounds from a continuous signal space. The domain-specific hypothesis predicts that the emergence of sound categories is driven by a cognitive bias to make these categories maximally distinct, resulting in more skewed distributions in participants' reproductions. However, our participants showed more centered distributions, which goes against this hypothesis, indicating that there are no strong innate linguistic biases that affect learning these speech-like sounds. The centralization behavior can be explained by a lack of communicative pressure to maintain categories. PMID:27648212

  6. Experimental study of the speed of sound in liquid and gaseous refrigerant R-407C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, S. G.; Stankus, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The speed of sound in liquid and gaseous refrigerant R-407C was measured by the method of ultrasonic interferometer in the temperature range from 293 to 373 K and pressure from 0.05 to 0.5 to 3.7 MPa. The experimental uncertainties of the temperature, pressure, and speed of sound measurements were estimated to be within ±20 mK, ±4 kPa, and ±(0.1-0.3) %, respectively. The obtained results are compared with the calculated speed of sound from the fundamental state equation for the Helmholtz free energy.

  7. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    PubMed

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  8. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing–most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon’s characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops. PMID:27388276

  9. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    PubMed

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops. PMID:27388276

  10. Energetics of the Ocean's Infrasonic Sound Field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Spain, Gerald Lynden

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of infrasonic (0.5-20 Hz) particle velocity and pressure made by the Marine Physical Laboratory's freely drifting, independent, and neutrally buoyant Swallow floats are analyzed in terms of the energetics of acoustic fields. The theory of acoustic field energetics is presented and compared to standard data analysis techniques. The properties of the potential and kinetic energy density spectra, and the active and reactive intensity spectra from two deep ocean deployments are discussed. Results indicate that for most of the background sound field data in the midwater column above 1.7 Hz, the potential and kinetic energy density spectra are approximately equal. In one experiment, this is a consequence of the fact that, away from the ocean boundaries, the sound field is locally spatially homogeneous. Spatial homogeneity also implies that the particle velocity cross spectral density matrix is purely real. Near the ocean bottom, the vertical spatial inhomogeneity is statistically significant between 0.6 Hz to 1.4 Hz and 7 Hz to 20 Hz. In the lower band, the pressure autospectrum decreases with increasing distance from the ocean bottom, whereas in the upper band, it increases due to the deep sound channel's ability to trap acoustic energy at the higher infrasonic frequencies. For ship signals, the signal-to-noise ratio in the active intensity magnitude spectrum is 3 to 6 dB greater than in either of the two energy density spectra due to the vector nature of acoustic intensity. Although smaller than the net horizontal flux density above a few hertz, a statistically significant net vertical flux density of energy occurs across the whole frequency band, from the ocean surface into the bottom. The net horizontal flux density for various discrete sources, e.g., a magnitude 4.1 earthquake, a blue whale, and ship -generated harmonic line sets, is discussed. The net horizontal flux density of the background sound field between 5 and 12 Hz may have been

  11. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. ||; Papp, A.L. III |

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one`s application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  12. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Cancer Center, Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Davis, CA ); Papp, A.L. III Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one's application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  13. Velocity of Sound in Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Michael T.; Kluk, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Presents experiments to measure the velocity of sound through metals and other amorphous materials. Describes the equipment used to make the measurements and the possibility of interfacing with a microcomputer. (MDH)

  14. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  15. Wind turbine sound power measurements.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides experimental validation of the sound power level data obtained from manufacturers for the ten wind turbine models examined in Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS). Within measurement uncertainty, the wind turbine sound power levels measured using IEC 61400-11 [(2002). (International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva)] were consistent with the sound power level data provided by manufacturers. Based on measurements, the sound power level data were also extended to 16 Hz for calculation of C-weighted levels. The C-weighted levels were 11.5 dB higher than the A-weighted levels (standard deviation 1.7 dB). The simple relationship between A- and C- weighted levels suggests that there is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference between analysis based on either C- or A-weighted data.

  16. Wind turbine sound power measurements.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides experimental validation of the sound power level data obtained from manufacturers for the ten wind turbine models examined in Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS). Within measurement uncertainty, the wind turbine sound power levels measured using IEC 61400-11 [(2002). (International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva)] were consistent with the sound power level data provided by manufacturers. Based on measurements, the sound power level data were also extended to 16 Hz for calculation of C-weighted levels. The C-weighted levels were 11.5 dB higher than the A-weighted levels (standard deviation 1.7 dB). The simple relationship between A- and C- weighted levels suggests that there is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference between analysis based on either C- or A-weighted data. PMID:27036281

  17. Concerns of the Institute of Transport Study and Research for reducing the sound level inside completely repaired buses. [noise and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groza, A.; Calciu, J.; Nicola, I.; Ionasek, A.

    1974-01-01

    Sound level measurements on noise sources on buses are used to observe the effects of attenuating acoustic pressure levels inside the bus by sound-proofing during complete repair. A spectral analysis of the sound level as a function of motor speed, bus speed along the road, and the category of the road is reported.

  18. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  19. Second Sound in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Po-Hsien

    Second sound in nonmetallic crystals is often described by the relation, tau(theta)q _{t} + q = {-kappa}(theta) theta_{x}, in which q _{t} is the time-derivative of the heat flux q, and theta_{x } is the spatial derivative of the temperature theta. In earlier work, Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen showed that this relation implies a quadratic dependence of the internal energy density e on the magnitude of q, i.e., e = ~{e }(theta,q) = e_0(theta) + a(theta)q ^2, where 2a(theta) = { -theta}^2 d[ tau( theta)kappa(theta)^{-1} theta^{-2}] /dtheta. The resulting field equations for theta and q are nonlinear in q, and this nonlinearity influences the growth and decay of singularities. Exact expressions are derived here for the time-dependence of jumps in theta_{x} and theta_{t} as they propagate into regions in which there is a steady, but not necessarily zero, flux of heat. Such jumps become infinite in a finite time when they have appropriate signs and their magnitudes exceed critical values. The derived expressions for jumps in theta_{t } and theta_{x} are evaluated using available experimental data for crystals of sodium fluoride (NaF) and bismuth (Bi). Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen pointed out that the quadratic nonlinearity of e in q implies that the time it takes a singularity to traverse an interval with a underlying steady flux of heat is greater if it is traveling from a hot to a cold region than if it is traveling in the opposite direction. Coleman and Newman's numerical study of the phenomenon is here extended and refined and detailed results are given for NaF and Bi. An analysis is made here of the implications of the dependence of e on q for temporally sinusoidal waves perturbing a steady flux q^0 of heat. It is shown that when q^0 perturbed at the boundary of a crystal by sinusoidal thermal oscillations, the resulting temperature field can show a nonstationary, long wavelength interference pattern that propagates through the crystal in the direction of the

  20. Realization of an omnidirectional source of sound using parametric loudspeakers.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Umut; Artís, Pere; Guasch, Oriol

    2013-09-01

    Parametric loudspeakers are often used in beam forming applications where a high directivity is required. Withal, in this paper it is proposed to use such devices to build an omnidirectional source of sound. An initial prototype, the omnidirectional parametric loudspeaker (OPL), consisting of a sphere with hundreds of ultrasonic transducers placed on it has been constructed. The OPL emits audible sound thanks to the parametric acoustic array phenomenon, and the close proximity and the large number of transducers results in the generation of a highly omnidirectional sound field. Comparisons with conventional dodecahedron loudspeakers have been made in terms of directivity, frequency response, and in applications such as the generation of diffuse acoustic fields in reverberant chambers. The OPL prototype has performed better than the conventional loudspeaker especially for frequencies higher than 500 Hz, its main drawback being the difficulty to generate intense pressure levels at low frequencies.

  1. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  2. Sound speed measurements in liquid oxygen-liquid nitrogen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The sound speed in liquid oxygen (LOX), liquid nitrogen (LN2), and five LOX-LN2 mixtures was measured by an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique at temperatures in the vicinity of -195.8C, the boiling point of N2 at a pressure of I atm. Under these conditions, the measurements yield the following relationship between sound speed in meters per second and LN2 content M in mole percent: c = 1009.05-1.8275M+0.0026507 M squared. The second speeds of 1009.05 m/sec plus or minus 0.25 percent for pure LOX and 852.8 m/sec plus or minus 0.32 percent for pure LN2 are compared with those reported by past investigators. Measurement of sound speed should prove an effective means for monitoring the contamination of LOX by Ln2.

  3. Underwater sound scattering and absorption by a coated infinite plate with attached periodically located inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanni; Huang, Hai; Zheng, Jing; Pan, Jie

    2015-11-01

    This paper extends previous work of Zhang and Pan [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(4), 2082-2096 (2013)] on sound scattering and absorption by an underwater coated plate with a single attached distributed-inhomogeneity to that with periodically located distributed-inhomogeneities. A comparison is made among cases of a plate without inhomogeneities, a plate with inhomogeneities, and one with inhomogeneities ignoring the mutual coupling. Results show that coupling of the structural waves scattered by the inhomogeneities plays an important role in modifying the sound absorption and scattering of surface sound pressure, especially at low frequencies and/or the resonance frequencies of the trapped modes of the plate. The sound absorption of the plate is dependent on the distance between the adjacent inhomogeneities, the length of the inhomogeneity, and the angle of the incident sound. On the surface of the inhomogeneities, the scattered/total sound pressure is generally enhanced. On the surface in between the inhomogeneities, the pressure is also enhanced at low frequencies but is nearly unchanged at higher frequencies. Results also show that the coupling-induced variation of scattered/total pressure is significant only at the resonance frequencies of the global modes and trapped modes. The surface normal velocity is presented to explain the coupling-induced variations in the vibration and pressure fields.

  4. Underwater sound scattering and absorption by a coated infinite plate with attached periodically located inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanni; Huang, Hai; Zheng, Jing; Pan, Jie

    2015-11-01

    This paper extends previous work of Zhang and Pan [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(4), 2082-2096 (2013)] on sound scattering and absorption by an underwater coated plate with a single attached distributed-inhomogeneity to that with periodically located distributed-inhomogeneities. A comparison is made among cases of a plate without inhomogeneities, a plate with inhomogeneities, and one with inhomogeneities ignoring the mutual coupling. Results show that coupling of the structural waves scattered by the inhomogeneities plays an important role in modifying the sound absorption and scattering of surface sound pressure, especially at low frequencies and/or the resonance frequencies of the trapped modes of the plate. The sound absorption of the plate is dependent on the distance between the adjacent inhomogeneities, the length of the inhomogeneity, and the angle of the incident sound. On the surface of the inhomogeneities, the scattered/total sound pressure is generally enhanced. On the surface in between the inhomogeneities, the pressure is also enhanced at low frequencies but is nearly unchanged at higher frequencies. Results also show that the coupling-induced variation of scattered/total pressure is significant only at the resonance frequencies of the global modes and trapped modes. The surface normal velocity is presented to explain the coupling-induced variations in the vibration and pressure fields. PMID:26627747

  5. Sound Symbolic Word Learning in Written Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parault, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    Sound symbolism is the notion that the relation between word sounds and word meaning is not arbitrary for all words, but rather there is a subset of words in the world's languages for which sounds and their symbols have some degree of correspondence. This research investigates sound symbolism as a possible means of gaining semantic knowledge of…

  6. Young Children's Letter-Sound Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Barbara; Carr, Alex

    2003-01-01

    This study with 83 normally developing children (ages 4-6) compared three essential skills in early literacy, letter-sound recognition, letter-sound recall, and letter reproduction. Children performed better in letter-sound recognition than in letter-sound recall and letter reproduction. There were no performance differences due to sex or age.…

  7. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  8. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  9. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  10. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  12. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Bersain A.; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  13. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  14. Sounds of silence: How to animate virtual worlds with sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Sounds are an integral and sometimes annoying part of our daily life. Virtual worlds which imitate natural environments gain a lot of authenticity from fast, high quality visualization combined with sound effects. Sounds help to increase the degree of immersion for human dwellers in imaginary worlds significantly. The virtual reality toolkit of IGD (Institute for Computer Graphics) features a broad range of standard visual and advanced real-time audio components which interpret an object-oriented definition of the scene. The virtual reality system 'Virtual Design' realized with the toolkit enables the designer of virtual worlds to create a true audiovisual environment. Several examples on video demonstrate the usage of the audio features in Virtual Design.

  15. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    PubMed

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured.

  16. The sound speed anomaly of Baltic Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rohden, C.; Weinreben, S.; Fehres, F.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the anomalous chemical composition of Baltic seawater on the speed of sound relative to seawater with quasi-standard composition was quantified at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of 1 to 46 °C. Three modern oceanographic time-of-flight sensors were applied in a laboratory setup for measuring the speed-of-sound difference δ w in a pure water diluted sample of North Atlantic seawater and a sample of Baltic seawater of the same conductivity, i.e. the same Practical Salinity (SP=7.766). The average δ w amounts to 0.069 ± 0.014 m s-1, significantly larger than the resolution and reproducibility of the sensors and independent of temperature. This magnitude for the anomaly effect was verified with offshore measurements conducted at different sites in the Baltic Sea using one of the sensors. The results from both measurements show values up to one order of magnitude smaller than existing predictions based on chemical models.

  17. The sound speed anomaly of Baltic seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rohden, C.; Weinreben, S.; Fehres, F.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the anomalous chemical composition of Baltic seawater on the speed of sound relative to seawater with quasi-standard composition was quantified at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of 1 to 46 °C. Three modern oceanographic time-of-flight sensors were applied in a laboratory setup for measuring the speed-of-sound difference δw in a pure water diluted sample of North Atlantic seawater and a sample of Baltic seawater of the same conductivity, i.e., the same practical salinity (SP = 7.766). The average δw amounts to 0.069 ± 0.014 m s-1, which is significantly larger than the resolution and reproducibility of the sensors and independent of temperature. This magnitude for the anomaly effect was verified with offshore measurements conducted at different sites in the Baltic Sea using one of the sensors. The results from both measurements show values up to 1 order of magnitude smaller than existing predictions based on chemical models.

  18. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source.

  19. Measured sound speeds and acoustic nonlinearity parameter in liquid water up to 523 K and 14 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, Blake T.; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-07-01

    Sound speed in liquid water at temperatures between 275 and 523 K and pressures up to 14 MPa were experimentally determined using a high temperature/high pressure capable acoustic resonance cell. The measurements enabled the determination of the temperature and pressure dependence of sound speed and thus the parameter of acoustic nonlinearly, B/A, over this entire P-T space. Most of the sound speeds measured in this work were found to be within 0.4% of the IAPWS-IF97 formulation, an international standard for calculating sound speed in water as a function of temperature and pressure. The values for B/A determined at laboratory ambient pressure and at temperatures up to 356 K, were found to be in general agreement with values calculated from the IAPWS-IF97 formulation. Additionally, B/A at 293 K was found to be 4.6, in agreement with established literature values.

  20. Interaction of Sound from Supersonic Jets with Nearby Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenno, C. C., Jr.; Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of sound generated in an ideally expanded supersonic (Mach 2) jet is solved numerically. Two configurations are considered: (1) a free jet and (2) an installed jet with a nearby array of flexible aircraft type panels. In the later case the panels vibrate in response to loading by sound from the jet and the full coupling between the panels and the jet is considered, accounting for panel response and radiation. The long time behavior of the jet is considered. Results for near field and far field disturbance, the far field pressure and the vibration of and radiation from the panels are presented. Panel response crucially depends on the location of the panels. Panels located upstream of the Mach cone are subject to a low level, nearly continuous spectral excitation and consequently exhibit a low level, relatively continuous spectral response. In contrast, panels located within the Mach cone are subject to a significant loading due to the intense Mach wave radiation of sound and exhibit a large, relatively peaked spectral response centered around the peak frequency of sound radiation. The panels radiate in a similar fashion to the sound in the jet, in particular exhibiting a relatively peaked spectral response at approximately the Mach angle from the bounding wall.

  1. Indoor human response to blast sounds that generate rattles.

    PubMed

    Schomer, P D; Averbuch, A

    1989-08-01

    The two major noise sources that cause environmental problems for the U. S. Army are helicopters and large weapons such as artillery, tanks, and demolition. These large weapons produce blast sounds that contain little energy above 200 Hz and that are particularly troublesome to deal with because they excite rattles in structures. The purpose of this study was to systematically test subjective response to the presence or absence of rattles in otherwise similar blast sound environments. A second purpose of the study was to test if there were structural changes that could reduce annoyance within the indoor blast sound environment. This study was done using a specially constructed test house and highly repeatable shake table to generate the blast sounds. The data clearly show that no commonly used environmental noise measure adequately describes the indoor environment when the blast excites rattles. Although the indoor blast ASEL changes by only about a decibel or so (and the indoor blast CSEL changes by even less), the subjective response changes by up to 13 dB. At low blast levels, the increase in human annoyance response is largest, and this annoyance response offset decreases to about 6 dB when the outside, flat-weighted peak sound-pressure level of the blast increases from 112 to 122 dB. PMID:2768676

  2. Environmental quality of Long Island Sound: Assessment and management issues

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, D.A.; Farrow, D.R.G.; Robertson, A. ); Monahan, R. ); Stacey, P.E. )

    1991-09-01

    Estimated pollutant loadings to Long Island Sound (LIS) are presented and discussed in the context of current information on population trends and land-use characteristics within the drainage basin of the sound. For the conventional pollutants (BOD, N, and P) and for most of the metals examined, the fluxes to LIS from wastewater treatment plants approach or exceed the fluxes from riverine sources. Urban runoff is a significant source for only a few contaminants, such as lead and petroleum hydrocarbons. Atmospheric flux estimates made for other areas are extrapolated to LIS, and this source appears to be significant for lead, zinc, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated pesticides. Continued population growth is projected through 2010, both in the urban centers of the western sound and in the coastal counties surrounding the central and eastern portions of LIS. This growth will place increased pollution pressure on the sound and increased demands on already scarce coastal and estuarine land-use categories. Close interaction between environmental planners, managers, and scientists is required to identify effective control strategies for reducing existing pollutant stress to the sound and for minimizing the effects of future development.

  3. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  4. Sound source tracking device for telematic spatial sound field reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Bruno

    This research describes an algorithm that localizes sound sources for use in telematic applications. The localization algorithm is based on amplitude differences between various channels of a microphone array of directional shotgun microphones. The amplitude differences will be used to locate multiple performers and reproduce their voices, which were recorded at close distance with lavalier microphones, spatially corrected using a loudspeaker rendering system. In order to track multiple sound sources in parallel the information gained from the lavalier microphones will be utilized to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio between each performer and the concurrent performers.

  5. Conditioned sounds enhance visual processing.

    PubMed

    Leo, Fabrizio; Noppeney, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This psychophysics study investigated whether prior auditory conditioning influences how a sound interacts with visual perception. In the conditioning phase, subjects were presented with three pure tones ( =  conditioned stimuli, CS) that were paired with positive, negative or neutral unconditioned stimuli. As unconditioned reinforcers we employed pictures (highly pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) or monetary outcomes (+50 euro cents, -50 cents, 0 cents). In the subsequent visual selective attention paradigm, subjects were presented with near-threshold Gabors displayed in their left or right hemifield. Critically, the Gabors were presented in synchrony with one of the conditioned sounds. Subjects discriminated whether the Gabors were presented in their left or right hemifields. Participants determined the location more accurately when the Gabors were presented in synchrony with positive relative to neutral sounds irrespective of reinforcer type. Thus, previously rewarded relative to neutral sounds increased the bottom-up salience of the visual Gabors. Our results are the first demonstration that prior auditory conditioning is a potent mechanism to modulate the effect of sounds on visual perception.

  6. Conditioned Sounds Enhance Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Fabrizio; Noppeney, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This psychophysics study investigated whether prior auditory conditioning influences how a sound interacts with visual perception. In the conditioning phase, subjects were presented with three pure tones ( =  conditioned stimuli, CS) that were paired with positive, negative or neutral unconditioned stimuli. As unconditioned reinforcers we employed pictures (highly pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) or monetary outcomes (+50 euro cents, −50 cents, 0 cents). In the subsequent visual selective attention paradigm, subjects were presented with near-threshold Gabors displayed in their left or right hemifield. Critically, the Gabors were presented in synchrony with one of the conditioned sounds. Subjects discriminated whether the Gabors were presented in their left or right hemifields. Participants determined the location more accurately when the Gabors were presented in synchrony with positive relative to neutral sounds irrespective of reinforcer type. Thus, previously rewarded relative to neutral sounds increased the bottom-up salience of the visual Gabors. Our results are the first demonstration that prior auditory conditioning is a potent mechanism to modulate the effect of sounds on visual perception. PMID:25192387

  7. Controlled sound field with a dual layer loudspeaker array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mincheol; Fazi, Filippo M.; Nelson, Philip A.; Hirono, Fabio C.

    2014-08-01

    Controlled sound interference has been extensively investigated using a prototype dual layer loudspeaker array comprised of 16 loudspeakers. Results are presented for measures of array performance such as input signal power, directivity of sound radiation and accuracy of sound reproduction resulting from the application of conventional control methods such as minimization of error in mean squared pressure, maximization of energy difference and minimization of weighted pressure error and energy. Procedures for selecting the tuning parameters have also been introduced. With these conventional concepts aimed at the production of acoustically bright and dark zones, all the control methods used require a trade-off between radiation directivity and reproduction accuracy in the bright zone. An alternative solution is proposed which can achieve better performance based on the measures presented simultaneously by inserting a low priority zone named as the “gray” zone. This involves the weighted minimization of mean-squared errors in both bright and dark zones together with the gray zone in which the minimization error is given less importance. This results in the production of directional bright zone in which the accuracy of sound reproduction is maintained with less required input power. The results of simulations and experiments are shown to be in excellent agreement.

  8. Sound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J. F.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Sturhahn, W.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Yoo, C. S.; X-Ray Science Division

    2006-11-18

    Sound velocity measurements on candidate mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions are needed to interpret Earth's seismic structure in terms of model abundances, variable composition, and other potentially influential parameters such as electronic spin-pairing transitions. Here the sound velocities of the lower-mantle ferropericlase have been measured by nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering to 110 GPa. Compressional and shear wave velocities and their pressure derivatives rise dramatically across the spin-pairing transition of iron in (Mg0.75Fe0.25)O above 50 GPa. Effects of the transition on the sound velocities of (Mg, Fe)O at lower-mantle pressures yield values that are much greater than what is predicted by studying pure MgO and high-spin ferropericlase. Our results indicate that sound velocities of the low-spin ferropericlase need to be considered in future geophysical and geochemical models, which could offset the effect of the addition of iron in the lower-mantle minerals and affect the evaluation of the lower-mantle heterogeneities.

  9. Sound Transmission Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Numerical Models.

    PubMed

    Oberrecht, Steve P; Krysl, Petr; Cranford, Ted W

    2016-01-01

    In 1974, Norris and Harvey published an experimental study of sound transmission into the head of the bottlenose dolphin. We used this rare source of data to validate our Vibroacoustic Toolkit, an array of numerical modeling simulation tools. Norris and Harvey provided measurements of received sound pressure in various locations within the dolphin's head from a sound source that was moved around the outside of the head. Our toolkit was used to predict the curves of pressure with the best-guess input data (material properties, transducer and hydrophone locations, and geometry of the animal's head). In addition, we performed a series of sensitivity analyses (SAs). SA is concerned with understanding how input changes to the model influence the outputs. SA can enhance understanding of a complex model by finding and analyzing unexpected model behavior, discriminating which inputs have a dominant effect on particular outputs, exploring how inputs combine to affect outputs, and gaining insight as to what additional information improves the model's ability to predict. Even when a computational model does not adequately reproduce the behavior of a physical system, its sensitivities may be useful for developing inferences about key features of the physical system. Our findings may become a valuable source of information for modeling the interactions between sound and anatomy.

  10. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20 MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected.

  11. A fluidic sounding rocket motor ignition system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, V. P.; Rakowsky, E. L.; Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fluidic sounding rocket motor ignition has been found to be feasible using a system without stored energy and with the complete absence of electrical energy and wiring. The fluidic ignitor is based on a two component aerodynamic resonance heating device called the pneumatic match. Temperatures in excess of 600 C were generated in closed resonance tubes which were excited by a free air jet from a simple convergent nozzle. Using nitrocellulose interface material, ignition of boron potassium nitrate was accomplished with air supply pressures as low as 45 psi. This paper describes an analytical and experimental program which established a fluidic rocket motor ignition system concept incorporating a pneumatic match with a simple hand pump as the only energy source.

  12. Reduction of aerodynamic sound generated in a flow past an oscillating and a fixed cylinder in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    The aerodynamic sound generated in a two-dimensional flow past an oscillating and a fixed circular cylinder in tandem is studied. This flow can be regarded as a simplified model of the sound generation due to the interaction of rotating wings and a strut. The sound pressure is captured by direct numerical simulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using the volume penalization method modified by the author. It is shown that synchronization plays a crucial role in sound reduction. When the frequency of the oscillating cylinder is smaller than that of vortex shedding of the fixed cylinder, the sound is significantly reduced due to synchronization as the frequency of vortex shedding is decreased. Sound reduction also depends on the distance between the cylinders. There are distances at which the forces exerted on the cylinders are in anti-phase so that the total force and thereby the resulting sound are significantly reduced.

  13. Sound radiation in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Morfey, Christopher L.; Sandham, Neil D.

    2003-01-01

    Lighthill’s acoustic analogy is formulated for turbulent channel flow with pressure as the acoustic variable, and integrated over the channel width to produce a two-dimensional inhomogeneous wave equation. The equivalent sources consist of a dipole distribution related to the sum of the viscous shear stresses on the two walls, together with monopole and quadrupole distributions related to the unsteady turbulent dissipation and Reynolds stresses respectively. Using a rigid-boundary Green function, an expression is found for the power spectrum of the far-field pressure radiated per unit channel area. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent plane Poiseuille and Couette flow have been performed in large computational domains in order to obtain good resolution of the low-wavenumber source behaviour. Analysis of the DNS databases for all sound radiation sources shows that their wavenumber frequency spectra have non-zero limits at low wavenumber. The sound power per unit channel area radiated by the dipole distribution is proportional to Mach number squared, while the monopole and quadrupole contributions are proportional to the fourth power of Mach number. Below a particular Mach number determined by the frequency and radiation direction, the dipole radiation due to the wall shear stress dominates the far field. The quadrupole takes over at Mach numbers above about 0.1, while the monopole is always the smallest term. The resultant acoustic field at any point in the channel consists of a statistically diffuse assembly of plane waves, with spectrum limited by damping to a value that is independent of Mach number in the low-M limit.

  14. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved. xml:lang="fr"

  15. Dynamic sound localization in cats

    PubMed Central

    Ruhland, Janet L.; Jones, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Sound localization in cats and humans relies on head-centered acoustic cues. Studies have shown that humans are able to localize sounds during rapid head movements that are directed toward the target or other objects of interest. We studied whether cats are able to utilize similar dynamic acoustic cues to localize acoustic targets delivered during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. We trained cats with visual-auditory two-step tasks in which we presented a brief sound burst during saccadic eye-head gaze shifts toward a prior visual target. No consistent or significant differences in accuracy or precision were found between this dynamic task (2-step saccade) and the comparable static task (single saccade when the head is stable) in either horizontal or vertical direction. Cats appear to be able to process dynamic auditory cues and execute complex motor adjustments to accurately localize auditory targets during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. PMID:26063772

  16. Probing Topological Matter with Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeltzer, David

    We introduce a microscopic formulation to identify the stress in a quantum fluid to compute the stress viscosity with sound waves. The viscosity stress tensor is used to determine, e.g. the ultrasound attenuation in superconductors. When an Abrikosov lattice is formed on the surface of a Topological Insulator in a external magnetic field, Majorana modes form dispersive bands. We show that the ultrasound attenuation is modified by the Majorana modes offering a novel method to identify Topological Superconductors. Moreover we compute the stress tunneling which uses Majorana modes and represent the sound analogue of the Andreev crossed reflection. We check the violation of the sound momentum conservation of systems which only exists on the boundary of a higher dimensional system,e.g. a 1 D chiral fermion which can exist at the boundary of a 2 D Quantum Hall system. Doe-Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  17. Dynamic sound localization in cats.

    PubMed

    Ruhland, Janet L; Jones, Amy E; Yin, Tom C T

    2015-08-01

    Sound localization in cats and humans relies on head-centered acoustic cues. Studies have shown that humans are able to localize sounds during rapid head movements that are directed toward the target or other objects of interest. We studied whether cats are able to utilize similar dynamic acoustic cues to localize acoustic targets delivered during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. We trained cats with visual-auditory two-step tasks in which we presented a brief sound burst during saccadic eye-head gaze shifts toward a prior visual target. No consistent or significant differences in accuracy or precision were found between this dynamic task (2-step saccade) and the comparable static task (single saccade when the head is stable) in either horizontal or vertical direction. Cats appear to be able to process dynamic auditory cues and execute complex motor adjustments to accurately localize auditory targets during rapid eye-head gaze shifts. PMID:26063772

  18. Acoustic pathways revealed: simulated sound transmission and reception in Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris).

    PubMed

    Cranford, Ted W; Krysl, Petr; Hildebrand, John A

    2008-03-01

    The finite element modeling (FEM) space reported here contains the head of a simulated whale based on CT data sets as well as physical measurements of sound-propagation characteristics of actual tissue samples. Simulated sound sources placed inside and outside of an adult male Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) reveal likely sound propagation pathways into and out of the head. Two separate virtual sound sources that were located at the left and right phonic lips produced beams that converged just outside the head. This result supports the notion that dual sound sources can interfere constructively to form a biologically useful and, in fact, excellent sonar beam in front of the animal. The most intriguing FEM results concern pathways by which sounds reach the ears. The simulations reveal a previously undescribed 'gular pathway' for sound reception in Ziphius. Propagated sound pressure waves enter the head from below and between the lower jaws, pass through an opening created by the absence of the medial bony wall of the posterior mandibles, and continue toward the bony ear complexes through the internal mandibular fat bodies. This new pathway has implications for understanding the evolution of underwater hearing in odontocetes. Our model also provides evidence for receive beam directionality, off-axis acoustic shadowing and a plausible mechanism for the long-standing orthodox sound reception pathway in odontocetes. The techniques developed for this study can be used to study acoustic perturbation in a wide variety of marine organisms.

  19. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  20. Patterns of fish sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, David A.

    2003-04-01

    While vocalization and chorusing behavior has been intensively studied in frogs and birds, little has been done with fishes. This paper presents patterns of sound production in damselfish, toadfish, and spotted seatrout on seasonal, daily, and subdaily time scales. Chorus behavior ranges from highly coordinated behavior between neighboring toadfish to uncoordinated behavior in spotted seatrout. Differences in coordination of sound production (i.e., the degree of overlap in calls) can be related to differences in territoriality and modes of reproduction. Toadfish and damselfish are territorial fishes in which males guard benthic eggs laid in nests. Sciaenids (croakers and drums) spawn planktonic eggs, and form temporary aggregations of calling males.

  1. Structure, Movement, Sound, and Perception.

    PubMed

    Story, Brad H

    2014-08-01

    Models that take the form of artificial talkers and speech synthesis systems have long been used as a means of understanding both speech production and speech perception. The article begins with a brief history of two artificial speaking devices that exemplify the representation of speech production as a system of modulations. The development of a recent airway modulation model is then described that simulates the time-varying changes of the vocal tract and acoustic wave propagation. The result is a type of artificial talker that can be used to study various aspects of how sound is generated by humans and how that sound is perceived by a listener.

  2. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Jia, Han; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-08-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  3. German scientific sounding rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, O.

    The German scientific sounding rocket program covers four disciplines: astronomy, aeronomy, magnetosphere, material science. In each of these disciplines there are ongoing projects (e.g., INTERZODIAK, STRAFAM, MAP-WINE, CAESAR, TEXUS). The scientific and technical aspects of these projects will be described. Emphasis will be given to some late technical achievements of DFVLR's Mobile Rocket Base (MORABA) giving support to most of the rocket campaigns. DFVLR-PT is authorized to act as management agency in order to perform and to coordinate German space activities of which the sounding rocket program forms a small part. A brief description of the organization will be given.

  4. Structure, Movement, Sound, and Perception

    PubMed Central

    Story, Brad H.

    2014-01-01

    Models that take the form of artificial talkers and speech synthesis systems have long been used as a means of understanding both speech production and speech perception. The article begins with a brief history of two artificial speaking devices that exemplify the representation of speech production as a system of modulations. The development of a recent airway modulation model is then described that simulates the time-varying changes of the vocal tract and acoustic wave propagation. The result is a type of artificial talker that can be used to study various aspects of how sound is generated by humans and how that sound is perceived by a listener. PMID:25383138

  5. Sound radiation from Caribbean steelpans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Brian; Morrison, Andrew; Rossing, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Besides radiating sound from the note area being struck, a steelpan radiates from neighboring note areas that vibrate sympathetically, from the areas between notes, and from the skirt [Rossing et al., Phys. Today 49(3), 24-29 (1996)]. Measurements were taken in an anechoic chamber using a four-microphone intensity probe to visualize the acoustic radiation from selected notes on a double second and a low tenor steelpan. Swept sinusoidal excitation was effected using an electromagnet. Sound intensity maps were drawn for the first three harmonics. .

  6. The Multisensory Sound Lab: Sounds You Can See and Feel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Norman; Hendricks, Paula

    1994-01-01

    A multisensory sound lab has been developed at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (District of Columbia). A special floor allows vibrations to be felt, and a spectrum analyzer displays frequencies and harmonics visually. The lab is used for science education, auditory training, speech therapy, music and dance instruction, and relaxation…

  7. Save Our Sounds: America's Recorded Sound Heritage Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marian, Beth Ann, Ed.; Rosenberg, Jessica, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    The Fall 2002 Idea Book contains suggestions for enriched learning. "Save Our History; Save Our Sounds,""Eureka!" and "Lindbergh Flies Again" involve two or more disciplines of study and would work well for team-teaching projects . Lesson materials from the Arts and Entertainment Network teacher's guide are: "Biography 15: Eureka!"; "Pocahontas";…

  8. Velocity controlled sound field reproduction by non-uniformly spaced loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mincheol; Nelson, Philip A.; Fazi, Filippo M.; Seo, Jeongil

    2016-05-01

    One approach to the reproduction of a sound field is to ensure the reproduction of the acoustic pressure on the surface bounding the volume within which reproduction is sought. However, this approach suffers from technical limitations when the loudspeakers used for the reproduction of the surface acoustic pressures are unevenly spaced. It is shown in this paper that sound field reproduction with a spatially non-uniform loudspeaker arrangement can be considerably improved by changing the physical quantity to be controlled on the bounding surface from pressure to particle velocity. One of the main advantages of the velocity control method is the simplicity with which the inverse problem can be regularized, irrespective of the direction of arrival of the sound to be reproduced. In addition, the velocity controlled sound field shows better reproduction of the time averaged intensity flow in the reproduction region which in turn appears to be closely linked with better human perception of sound localization. Furthermore, the proposed method results in smoother "panning functions" that describe the variation of the source outputs as a function of the angle of incidence of the sound to be reproduced. The performance of the velocity matching method has been evaluated by comparison to the conventional pressure matching method and through simulations with several non-uniform loudspeaker layouts. The simulated results were also verified with experiments and subjective tests.

  9. Assessment on transient sound radiation of a vibrating steel bridge due to traffic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Xie, Xu; Jiang, Jiqing; Yamashita, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    Structure-borne noise induced by vehicle-bridge coupling vibration is harmful to human health and living environment. Investigating the sound pressure level and the radiation mechanism of structure-borne noise is of great significance for the assessment of environmental noise pollution and noise control. In this paper, the transient noise induced by vehicle-bridge coupling vibration is investigated by employing the hybrid finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM). The effect of local vibration of the bridge deck is taken into account and the sound responses of the structure-borne noise in time domain is obtained. The precision of the proposed method is validated by comparing numerical results to the on-site measurements of a steel girder-plate bridge in service. It implies that the sound pressure level and its distribution in both time and frequency domains may be predicted by the hybrid approach of FEM-BEM with satisfactory accuracy. Numerical results indicate that the vibrating steel bridge radiates high-level noise because of its extreme flexibility and large surface area for sound radiation. The impact effects of the vehicle on the sound pressure when leaving the bridge are observed. The shape of the contour lines in the area around the bridge deck could be explained by the mode shapes of the bridge. The moving speed of the vehicle only affects the sound pressure components with frequencies lower than 10 Hz.

  10. Effects of sounds generated by a dental turbine and a stream on regional cerebral blood flow and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Riho; Kudo, Takumu; Tsunetsugu, Yuko; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Yamamura, Chie; Yamada, Yoshiaki

    2004-09-01

    Effects of sound generated by a dental turbine and a small stream (murmur) and the effects of no sound (null, control) on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and hemodynamic changes (oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations) in the frontal cortex were measured in 18 young volunteers. Questionnaires completed by the volunteers were also evaluated. Near-infrared spectroscopy and the Finapres technique were employed to measure hemodynamic and vascular responses, respectively. The subjects assessed the murmur, null, and turbine sounds as "pleasant," "natural," and "unpleasant," respectively. Blood pressures changed in response to the murmur, null, and turbine sound stimuli as expected: lower than the control level, unchanged, and higher than the control level, respectively. Mean blood pressure values tended to increase gradually over the recording time even during the null sound stimulation, possibly because of the recording environment. Oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations decreased drastically in response to the dental turbine sound, while deoxygenated hemoglobin concentrations remained unchanged and thus total hemoglobin concentrations decreased (due to the decreased oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations). Hemodynamic responses to the murmuring sound and the null sound were slight or unchanged, respectively. Surprisingly, heart rate measurements remained fairly stable in response to the stimulatory noises. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that sound generated by a dental turbine may affect cerebral blood flow and metabolism as well as autonomic responses.

  11. Congruent sound can modulate odor pleasantness.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han-Seok; Lohse, Franziska; Luckett, Curtis R; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to determine 1) whether certain background sounds can be matched with specific odors and 2) whether the background sounds can increase pleasantness for their congruent odors. In Experiment 1, congruent sounds increased odor pleasantness, but not odor intensity, significantly more than incongruent sounds. Experiment 2 demonstrated that certain background sounds can be paired with specific odors. For example, cinnamon, clove, and orange odors were rated significantly more congruent with a Christmas carol compared with the sound of brushing teeth and/or the beach sound. The congruent sounds increased odor pleasantness significantly more than incongruent sounds. Similarly, the congruent sound-induced odor pleasantness was observed in Experiment 3. As participants judged the pair of odor and sound to be more congruent, they rated the odor significantly more pleasant. Congruent sound assisted participants in identifying and in being familiar with the odor, thereby leading to an increase in odor pleasantness. However, the congruent sound-induced odor pleasantness was not obtained in all odors. In conclusion, this study provides new empirical evidence that pleasantness ratings for odors can increase in the presence of their congruent sounds.

  12. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  13. Characteristics of the Nighttime Hospital Bedside Care Environment (Sound, Light, and Temperature) for Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Lauri A.; Christian, Becky J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Children with cancer must cope not only with their disease and its treatment but also the environment in which treatment is given. The intensities of sound and light levels required to perform necessary patient care may result in a disruptive nighttime care environment. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe nighttime patterns of environmental factors, sound light, and temperature levels, at the bedside of children with cancer receiving inpatient chemotherapy. Methods Participants were 15 school-age children receiving chemotherapy on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit. Sound, light, and temperature in the child’s room were measured continuously using a digital sound pressure level meter and an external channel data logger. Results Mean nighttime sound levels were 49.5 dB (SD=3.1; range 34.6–84.8 dB). Sound and light intensity were greatest early in the shift and decreased through the night. A basic mixed linear model identified significant main effects of time of night for both sound (F=50.42, p<.01) and light (F=12.43, p<.01). Conclusions Study findings identified a bedside care environment with persistently elevated sound levels and abrupt increases in sound intensity throughout the night. Such a disruptive nighttime environment is not conducive to restful nighttime sleep and may serve as an additional source of physiologic and psychologic stress for hospitalized children with cancer. Implications for Practice Efforts are needed to identify modifiable sources of nighttime sound and develop interventions to reduce nighttime sound. Collaborative efforts to organize clinical care to minimize nighttime disruptions may lead to to reduced bedside sound levels. PMID:21522058

  14. Adaptive near-field beamforming techniques for sound source imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Thung; Roan, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    Phased array signal processing techniques such as beamforming have a long history in applications such as sonar for detection and localization of far-field sound sources. Two sometimes competing challenges arise in any type of spatial processing; these are to minimize contributions from directions other than the look direction and minimize the width of the main lobe. To tackle this problem a large body of work has been devoted to the development of adaptive procedures that attempt to minimize side lobe contributions to the spatial processor output. In this paper, two adaptive beamforming procedures-minimum variance distorsionless response and weight optimization to minimize maximum side lobes--are modified for use in source visualization applications to estimate beamforming pressure and intensity using near-field pressure measurements. These adaptive techniques are compared to a fixed near-field focusing technique (both techniques use near-field beamforming weightings focusing at source locations estimated based on spherical wave array manifold vectors with spatial windows). Sound source resolution accuracies of near-field imaging procedures with different weighting strategies are compared using numerical simulations both in anechoic and reverberant environments with random measurement noise. Also, experimental results are given for near-field sound pressure measurements of an enclosed loudspeaker.

  15. Optical remote sensing of sound in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churnside, James H.; Naugolnykh, Konstantin; Marchbanks, Richard D.

    2014-05-01

    We are proposing a novel remote sensing technique to measure sound in the upper ocean. The objective is a system that can be flown on an aircraft. Conventional acoustic sensors are ineffective in this application, because almost none (~ 0.1 %) of the sound in the ocean is transmitted through the water/air interface. The technique is based on the acoustic modulation of bubbles near the sea surface. It is clear from the ideal gas law that the volume of a bubble will decrease if the pressure is increased, as long as the number of gas molecules and temperature remain constant. The pressure variations associated with the acoustic field will therefore induce proportional volume fluctuations of the insonified bubbles. The lidar return from a collection of bubbles has been shown to be proportional to the total void fraction, independent of the bubble size distribution. This implies that the lidar return from a collection of insonified bubbles will be modulated at the acoustic frequencies, independent of the bubble size distribution. Moreover, that modulation is linearly related to the sound pressure. The basic principles have been demonstrated in the laboratory, and these results will be presented. Estimates of signal-to-noise ratio suggest that the technique should work in the open ocean. Design considerations and signal-to-noise ratios will also be presented.

  16. [Dysphagia. Are swallowing sounds diagnostically useful?].

    PubMed

    Kley, C; Biniek, R

    2005-12-01

    The origin and importance of swallowing sounds in dysphagia have been discussed in previous research. Those studies report a general similarity in the sound patterns of different swallowing actions. The current paper confirms this. In addition, the origin of swallowing sound patterns is examined more closely. Finally, we simultaneously analyzed the swallowing sounds of healthy voluntary subjects and patients with swallowing disorders using X-ray cinematography. Videoendoscopy was also done. As expected, we found a variety of sound sequences differing from those of healthy subjects. Patients with tracheal tubes or cannulae constitute a special group whose swallowing sounds give additional information about the act of swallowing. PMID:16133430

  17. Making Sounds with Rubber Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This physical science activity module was designed to facilitate developing concepts related to sound. It is intended for use primarily in elementary grades but may be useful at higher grades. It provides students with hands-on experience and observational skill development. The package provides: (1) a teacher background sheet; (2) an activity…

  18. Sounding Off and Lighting Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Teaching about light and sound is to teach about the processes of hearing and seeing. In considering the kinds of leading questions that we might ask in teaching, I suggest that a rethinking of how we consider the contribution of the energetic descriptions to this area will probably help to make these questions more fruitful. A subtly changed…

  19. Newborn Infants Orient to Sounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Darwin; Field, Jeffrey

    1979-01-01

    In two experiments, the majority of 21 newborn infants who were maintained in an alert state consistently turned their heads toward a continuous sound source presented 90 degrees from midline. For most infants, this orientation response was rather slow, taking median latencies of 2.5 seconds to begin and 5.5 seconds to end. (JMB)

  20. Review of Sound Card Photogates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Zoltan; Mingesz, Robert; Makra, Peter; Mellar, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Photogates are probably the most commonly used electronic instruments to aid experiments in the field of mechanics. Although they are offered by many manufacturers, they can be too expensive to be widely used in all classrooms, in multiple experiments or even at home experimentation. Today all computers have a sound card--an interface for analogue…

  1. Attentive Tracking of Sound Sources.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kevin J P; McDermott, Josh H

    2015-08-31

    Auditory scenes often contain concurrent sound sources, but listeners are typically interested in just one of these and must somehow select it for further processing. One challenge is that real-world sounds such as speech vary over time and as a consequence often cannot be separated or selected based on particular values of their features (e.g., high pitch). Here we show that human listeners can circumvent this challenge by tracking sounds with a movable focus of attention. We synthesized pairs of voices that changed in pitch and timbre over random, intertwined trajectories, lacking distinguishing features or linguistic information. Listeners were cued beforehand to attend to one of the voices. We measured their ability to extract this cued voice from the mixture by subsequently presenting the ending portion of one voice and asking whether it came from the cued voice. We found that listeners could perform this task but that performance was mediated by attention-listeners who performed best were also more sensitive to perturbations in the cued voice than in the uncued voice. Moreover, the task was impossible if the source trajectories did not maintain sufficient separation in feature space. The results suggest a locus of attention that can follow a sound's trajectory through a feature space, likely aiding selection and segregation amid similar distractors. PMID:26279234

  2. Demonstrating Sound Impulses in Pipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, M. G.; Micklavzina, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple, direct method to demonstrate the effects of the boundary conditions on sound impulse reflections in pipes. A graphical display of the results can be made using a pipe, cork, small hammer, microphone, and fast recording electronics. Explains the principles involved. (LZ)

  3. Sound, Noise, and Vibration Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerges, Lyle F.

    This working guide on the principles and techniques of controlling acoustical environment is discussed in the light of human, environmental and building needs. The nature of sound and its variables are defined. The acoustical environment and its many materials, spaces and functional requirements are described, with specific methods for planning,…

  4. Sound Stories for General Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2013-01-01

    Language and music literacy share a similar process of understanding that progresses from sensory experience to symbolic representation. The author identifies Bruner’s modes of understanding as they relate to using narrative in the music classroom to enhance music reading at iconic and symbolic levels. Two sound stories are included for…

  5. Washington Commentary: Sound and Fury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne C.

    2005-01-01

    Policy makers really sounded off this spring about public education. State legislators derided No Child Left Behind (NCLB) for taking away state prerogatives in setting education policy and the National Governors Association essentially tell federal officials to stay away from repeating NCLB at the high school level. President Bush tried to move…

  6. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  7. The Sound of Cymbals Crashing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Sal

    1991-01-01

    Presents an outdoor experiment to measure the speed of sound as a classroom experience to begin the teaching year. Measures the delay time from seeing and hearing crashing cymbals across a field to calculate the speed. Exposes students to experimental uncertainties and limits of uncertainty in measurement. (MDH)

  8. Sound Assessment through Proper Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappuis, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Aligning a school board policy manual with the faculty handbook would be an excellent application of systems thinking in support of school district mission and goals. This article talks about changing sound assessment practice in accordance with the school's proper policy. One obstacle to changing assessment practice is the prevailing belief that…

  9. Sound Naming in Neurodegenerative Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Maggie L.; Brambati, Simona M.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L.; Johnson, Julene K.

    2010-01-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two…

  10. Baseline meteorological soundings for parametric environmental investigations at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.; Stephens, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Meteorological soundings representative of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, are presented. Synthetic meteorological soundings at Kennedy Space Center, including fall, spring, and a sea breeze, and at Vandenberg Air Force Base (sea breeze with low and high level inversion and stationary upper level troughs) are shown. Soundings of frontal passages are listed. The Titan launch soundings at Kennedy Space Center present a wide range of meteorological conditions, both seasonal and time of day variations. The meteorological data input of altitude, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and pressure may be used as meteorological inputs for the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model or other models to obtain quantitative estimates of effluent concentrations associated with the potential emission of major combustion products in the lower atmosphere to simulate actual launches of space vehicles. The Titan launch soundings are also of value in terms of rocket effluent measurements for analysis purposes.

  11. Sound velocity of tantalum under shock compression in the 18–142 GPa range

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Feng Jin, Ke; Cai, Lingcang Geng, Huayun; Tan, Ye; Li, Jun

    2015-05-14

    Dynamic compression experiments of tantalum (Ta) within a shock pressure range from 18–142 GPa were conducted driven by explosive, a two-stage light gas gun, and a powder gun, respectively. The time-resolved Ta/LiF (lithium fluoride) interface velocity profiles were recorded with a displacement interferometer system for any reflector. Sound velocities of Ta were obtained from the peak state time duration measurements with the step-sample technique and the direct-reverse impact technique. The uncertainty of measured sound velocities were analyzed carefully, which suggests that the symmetrical impact method with step-samples is more accurate for sound velocity measurement, and the most important parameter in this type experiment is the accurate sample/window particle velocity profile, especially the accurate peak state time duration. From these carefully analyzed sound velocity data, no evidence of a phase transition was found up to the shock melting pressure of Ta.

  12. Sound velocity in shock compressed molybdenum obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukinov, T.; Simak, S. I.; Belonoshko, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    The sound velocity of Mo along the Hugoniot adiabat is calculated from first principles using density-functional theory based molecular dynamics. These data are compared to the sound velocity as measured in recent experiments. The theoretical and experimental Hugoniot and sound velocities are in very good agreement up to pressures of 210 GPa and temperatures of 3700 K on the Hugoniot. However, above that point the experiment and theory diverge. This implies that Mo undergoes a phase transition at about the same point. Considering that the melting point of Mo is likely much higher at that pressure, the related change in the sound velocity in experiment can be ascribed to a solid-solid transition.

  13. Sound velocity in shock compressed molybdenum obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukinov, Tymofiy; Belonoshko, Anatoly; Simak, Sergey

    The sound velocity of Mo along the Hugoniot adiabat is calculated from first principles using density-functional theory based molecular dynamics. These data are compared to the sound velocity as measured in recent experiments. The theoretical and experimental Hugoniot and sound velocities are in very good agreement up to pressures of 210 GPa and temperatures of 3700 K on the Hugoniot. However, above that point the experiment and theory diverge. This implies that Mo undergoes a phase transition at about the same point. Considering that the melting point of Mo is likely much higher at that pressure, the related change in the sound velocity in experiment can be ascribed to a solid-solid transition.

  14. Geometric Constraints on Human Speech Sound Inventories.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Ewan; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the idea that the languages of the world have developed coherent sound systems in which having one sound increases or decreases the chances of having certain other sounds, depending on shared properties of those sounds. We investigate the geometries of sound systems that are defined by the inherent properties of sounds. We document three typological tendencies in sound system geometries: economy, a tendency for the differences between sounds in a system to be definable on a relatively small number of independent dimensions; local symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to have relatively large numbers of pairs of sounds that differ only on one dimension; and global symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to be relatively balanced. The finding of economy corroborates previous results; the two symmetry properties have not been previously documented. We also investigate the relation between the typology of inventory geometries and the typology of individual sounds, showing that the frequency distribution with which individual sounds occur across languages works in favor of both local and global symmetry. PMID:27462296

  15. Calibration of sound velocimeter in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baofeng; Li, Tao; Zhu, Junchao; Xie, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of sound speed is important to calibrate a sound velocity profiler which provides real-time sound velocity to the sonar equipment in oceanographic survey. The sound velocity profiler calculates the sound speed by measuring the time-of-flight of a 1 MHz single acoustic pulse to travel over about 300 mm path. A standard sound velocimeter instrument was invited to calibrate the sound velocity profiler in pure water at temperatures of 278,283, 288, 293, 298, 303 and 308K in a thermostatic vessel at one atmosphere. The sound velocity profiler was deployed in the thermostatic vessel alongside the standard sound velocimeter instrument and two platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) which were calibrated to 0.002k by comparison with a standard PRT. Time of flight circuit board was used to measure the time-of-flight to 22 picosecond precision. The sound speed which was measured by the sound velocity profiler was compared to the standard sound speed calculated by UNESCO to give the laboratory calibration coefficients and was demonstrated agreement with CTD-derived sound speed using Del Grosso's seawater equation after removing a bias.

  16. Geometric Constraints on Human Speech Sound Inventories

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Ewan; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the idea that the languages of the world have developed coherent sound systems in which having one sound increases or decreases the chances of having certain other sounds, depending on shared properties of those sounds. We investigate the geometries of sound systems that are defined by the inherent properties of sounds. We document three typological tendencies in sound system geometries: economy, a tendency for the differences between sounds in a system to be definable on a relatively small number of independent dimensions; local symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to have relatively large numbers of pairs of sounds that differ only on one dimension; and global symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to be relatively balanced. The finding of economy corroborates previous results; the two symmetry properties have not been previously documented. We also investigate the relation between the typology of inventory geometries and the typology of individual sounds, showing that the frequency distribution with which individual sounds occur across languages works in favor of both local and global symmetry. PMID:27462296

  17. Hugoniot and sound velocity of antigorite and evidence for sluggish decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youjun; Sekine, Toshimori; Yu, Yin; He, Hongliang; Meng, Chuanmin; Liu, Fusheng; Zhang, Mingjian

    2014-05-01

    Antigorite is one kind of hydrous serpentine that is present in meteorites and in the Earth mantle. In order to understand its dynamic behaviors, metastability and decomposition, shock experiments on antigorite have been conducted using a two-stage gas gun, and wave profiles of particle velocities have been measured to obtain the Hugoniot up to ~130 GPa and sound velocity at high pressures. The results show three regions of low-pressure phase below ~43 GPa and its metastable extension above a pressure of ~43 GPa for short durations of shock and high-pressure phase(s) above a pressure of ~43 GPa for long durations of shock. The dynamic behaviors of antigorite depend on not only the pressure but also the compression duration. Metastable extension state indicates that antigorite may survive beyond the stability depending on the shock conditions. Shock temperatures for antigorite are calculated along the Hugoniot. The pressure-density, sound velocity-pressure and shock temperature-pressure plots demonstrate that the decomposition reaction of antigorite into high-pressure phase(s) is accompanied by a volume expansion, sound velocity increase and temperature decrease, relative to the metastable extension phase above ~43 GPa. The decomposition should be sluggish and needs enough reaction time to complete and to overcome the activation energy. As a result of the high metastability of antigorite and possible decomposition assemblages, the hydrous serpentine (antigorite) may play a crucial role for the origin of water during the Earth accretion.

  18. Uncovering Spatial Variation in Acoustic Environments Using Sound Mapping.

    PubMed

    Job, Jacob R; Myers, Kyle; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gill, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Animals select and use habitats based on environmental features relevant to their ecology and behavior. For animals that use acoustic communication, the sound environment itself may be a critical feature, yet acoustic characteristics are not commonly measured when describing habitats and as a result, how habitats vary acoustically over space and time is poorly known. Such considerations are timely, given worldwide increases in anthropogenic noise combined with rapidly accumulating evidence that noise hampers the ability of animals to detect and interpret natural sounds. Here, we used microphone arrays to record the sound environment in three terrestrial habitats (forest, prairie, and urban) under ambient conditions and during experimental noise introductions. We mapped sound pressure levels (SPLs) over spatial scales relevant to diverse taxa to explore spatial variation in acoustic habitats and to evaluate the number of microphones needed within arrays to capture this variation under both ambient and noisy conditions. Even at small spatial scales and over relatively short time spans, SPLs varied considerably, especially in forest and urban habitats, suggesting that quantifying and mapping acoustic features could improve habitat descriptions. Subset maps based on input from 4, 8, 12 and 16 microphones differed slightly (< 2 dBA/pixel) from those based on full arrays of 24 microphones under ambient conditions across habitats. Map differences were more pronounced with noise introductions, particularly in forests; maps made from only 4-microphones differed more (> 4 dBA/pixel) from full maps than the remaining subset maps, but maps with input from eight microphones resulted in smaller differences. Thus, acoustic environments varied over small spatial scales and variation could be mapped with input from 4-8 microphones. Mapping sound in different environments will improve understanding of acoustic environments and allow us to explore the influence of spatial variation

  19. Uncovering Spatial Variation in Acoustic Environments Using Sound Mapping.

    PubMed

    Job, Jacob R; Myers, Kyle; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gill, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Animals select and use habitats based on environmental features relevant to their ecology and behavior. For animals that use acoustic communication, the sound environment itself may be a critical feature, yet acoustic characteristics are not commonly measured when describing habitats and as a result, how habitats vary acoustically over space and time is poorly known. Such considerations are timely, given worldwide increases in anthropogenic noise combined with rapidly accumulating evidence that noise hampers the ability of animals to detect and interpret natural sounds. Here, we used microphone arrays to record the sound environment in three terrestrial habitats (forest, prairie, and urban) under ambient conditions and during experimental noise introductions. We mapped sound pressure levels (SPLs) over spatial scales relevant to diverse taxa to explore spatial variation in acoustic habitats and to evaluate the number of microphones needed within arrays to capture this variation under both ambient and noisy conditions. Even at small spatial scales and over relatively short time spans, SPLs varied considerably, especially in forest and urban habitats, suggesting that quantifying and mapping acoustic features could improve habitat descriptions. Subset maps based on input from 4, 8, 12 and 16 microphones differed slightly (< 2 dBA/pixel) from those based on full arrays of 24 microphones under ambient conditions across habitats. Map differences were more pronounced with noise introductions, particularly in forests; maps made from only 4-microphones differed more (> 4 dBA/pixel) from full maps than the remaining subset maps, but maps with input from eight microphones resulted in smaller differences. Thus, acoustic environments varied over small spatial scales and variation could be mapped with input from 4-8 microphones. Mapping sound in different environments will improve understanding of acoustic environments and allow us to explore the influence of spatial variation

  20. Uncovering Spatial Variation in Acoustic Environments Using Sound Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Job, Jacob R.; Myers, Kyle; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gill, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Animals select and use habitats based on environmental features relevant to their ecology and behavior. For animals that use acoustic communication, the sound environment itself may be a critical feature, yet acoustic characteristics are not commonly measured when describing habitats and as a result, how habitats vary acoustically over space and time is poorly known. Such considerations are timely, given worldwide increases in anthropogenic noise combined with rapidly accumulating evidence that noise hampers the ability of animals to detect and interpret natural sounds. Here, we used microphone arrays to record the sound environment in three terrestrial habitats (forest, prairie, and urban) under ambient conditions and during experimental noise introductions. We mapped sound pressure levels (SPLs) over spatial scales relevant to diverse taxa to explore spatial variation in acoustic habitats and to evaluate the number of microphones needed within arrays to capture this variation under both ambient and noisy conditions. Even at small spatial scales and over relatively short time spans, SPLs varied considerably, especially in forest and urban habitats, suggesting that quantifying and mapping acoustic features could improve habitat descriptions. Subset maps based on input from 4, 8, 12 and 16 microphones differed slightly (< 2 dBA/pixel) from those based on full arrays of 24 microphones under ambient conditions across habitats. Map differences were more pronounced with noise introductions, particularly in forests; maps made from only 4-microphones differed more (> 4 dBA/pixel) from full maps than the remaining subset maps, but maps with input from eight microphones resulted in smaller differences. Thus, acoustic environments varied over small spatial scales and variation could be mapped with input from 4–8 microphones. Mapping sound in different environments will improve understanding of acoustic environments and allow us to explore the influence of spatial variation

  1. RF Sounding: A System for Generating Sounds from Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziosi, Fabio; Rinaldi, Claudia; Tarquini, Francesco

    In this paper we present RF Sounding, an open space installation which comprises both artistic and technological innovations. The aim of this project is to provide the user entering a specifically defined area, with awareness of radio frequency signals characterizing the cellular networks band. Indeed, radio signals are shifted, with proper elaboration, to the audible band and the result is spread all over the specific area through a certain number of loudspeakers. The system produces different reactions depending on the communication phase (e.g. initial handshake procedure, reception or initiation of a call, etc.). Moreover, the sound produced after translation of signals to the audible band, is assumed to be spatialized as a function of user movement; localization is indeed achieved through a wireless sensor network that is installed in the defined area.

  2. Hyperacusis: An Increased Sensitivity to Everyday Sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyperacusis, withdrawal, social isolation, and depression are common. Hearing Loss Hearing tests usually indicate normal hearing sensitivity and ... problem in the way the brain processes sound. Hearing loss coupled with low tolerance to sound is another ...

  3. Sound Analyzer as an Undergraduate Laboratory Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nave, C. R.; Garland, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes some undergraduate laboratory experiments in acoustics which involve the analysis of speech and musical instrument sounds and the general analysis of the frequency range of complex sounds. (HM)

  4. Speech Sound Disorders: Articulation and Phonological Processes

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Does Your Child Hear and Talk ? and Literacy and Communication: Expectations From Kindergarten Through Fifth Grade . ... sounds. Some speech sound errors can result from physical problems, such as: developmental disorders (e.g.,autism) ...

  5. 33 CFR 62.47 - Sound signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., sound signals are normally operated continuously. However, some are equipped with fog detectors which... their location. (3) Signals may not sound in cases where fog exists close to, but not at, the...

  6. 33 CFR 62.47 - Sound signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., sound signals are normally operated continuously. However, some are equipped with fog detectors which... their location. (3) Signals may not sound in cases where fog exists close to, but not at, the...

  7. 33 CFR 62.47 - Sound signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., sound signals are normally operated continuously. However, some are equipped with fog detectors which... their location. (3) Signals may not sound in cases where fog exists close to, but not at, the...

  8. 33 CFR 62.47 - Sound signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., sound signals are normally operated continuously. However, some are equipped with fog detectors which... their location. (3) Signals may not sound in cases where fog exists close to, but not at, the...

  9. 33 CFR 62.47 - Sound signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., sound signals are normally operated continuously. However, some are equipped with fog detectors which... their location. (3) Signals may not sound in cases where fog exists close to, but not at, the...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3056 - Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sound. 29.3056 Section 29.3056 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sound. Free of damage....

  11. 7 CFR 29.3056 - Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sound. 29.3056 Section 29.3056 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sound. Free of damage....

  12. 7 CFR 29.3056 - Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sound. 29.3056 Section 29.3056 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sound. Free of damage....

  13. 7 CFR 29.3056 - Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sound. 29.3056 Section 29.3056 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sound. Free of damage....

  14. 7 CFR 29.3056 - Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sound. 29.3056 Section 29.3056 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Sound. Free of damage....

  15. Cirrus cloud retrieval using infrared sounding data: Multilevel cloud errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study we perform an error analysis for cloud-top pressure retrieval using the High-Resolution Infrared Radiometric Sounder (HIRS/2) 15-microns CO2 channels for the two-layer case of transmissive cirrus overlying an overcast, opaque stratiform cloud. This analysis includes standard deviation and bias error due to instrument noise and the presence of two cloud layers, the lower of which is opaque. Instantaneous cloud pressure retrieval errors are determined for a range of cloud amounts (0.1-1.0) and cloud-top pressures (850-250 mb). Large cloud-top pressure retrieval errors are found to occur when a lower opaque layer is present underneath an upper transmissive cloud layer in the satellite field of view (FOV). Errors tend to increase with decreasing upper-cloud effective cloud amount and with decreasing cloud height (increasing pressure). Errors in retrieved upper-cloud pressure result in corresponding errors in derived effective cloud amount. For the case in which a HIRS FOV has two distinct cloud layers, the difference between the retrieved and actual cloud-top pressure is positive in all cases, meaning that the retrieved upper-cloud height is lower than the actual upper-cloud height. In addition, errors in retrieved cloud pressure are found to depend upon the lapse rate between the low-level cloud top and the surface. We examined which sounder channel combinations would minimize the total errors in derived cirrus cloud height caused by instrument noise and by the presence of a lower-level cloud. We find that while the sounding channels that peak between 700 and 1000 mb minimize random errors, the sounding channels that peak at 300-500 mb minimize bias errors. For a cloud climatology, the bias errors are most critical.

  16. MegaSound: Sound in Irish megalithic buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijs, Victor

    2002-11-01

    Stimulated by the studies done by Paul Deveraux and Robert Jahn, research has been conducted on the sound properties of two megalithic chambers is Ireland: Dowth South and Fourknocks I. As reference measurements two normal rooms (bed- and bathroom) have been studied. The following aspects will be covered in the presentation: some theoretical background on acoustical modes (within a passage, a chamber, and a combination of them: Helmholtz resonator); tips for doing sound experiments inside megalithic chambers (like: equipment, measurement software, power provisioning and calibrating); frequency response measurements (between 20 and 200 Hz) for the surveyed chambers/rooms; comparison of the results with other researchers' results; background on the pitch of the human (male, female, and child) voices in neolithic times and recommendations for future research. The presentation also provides insight in the aeralization (simulation) of sound in a megalithic chamber, covering: software that can do these simulations; issues in finding the basic information, e.g., acoustic absorption coefficients and provide examples of the results. I would like to thank all the people who have provided constructive feedback on my work (http://www.iol.ie/approxgeniet/eng/megasound.htm).

  17. Sound localization by echolocating bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, Murat

    Echolocating bats emit ultrasonic vocalizations and listen to echoes reflected back from objects in the path of the sound beam to build a spatial representation of their surroundings. Important to understanding the representation of space through echolocation are detailed studies of the cues used for localization, the sonar emission patterns and how this information is assembled. This thesis includes three studies, one on the directional properties of the sonar receiver, one on the directional properties of the sonar transmitter, and a model that demonstrates the role of action in building a representation of auditory space. The general importance of this work to a broader understanding of spatial localization is discussed. Investigations of the directional properties of the sonar receiver reveal that interaural level difference and monaural spectral notch cues are both dependent on sound source azimuth and elevation. This redundancy allows flexibility that an echolocating bat may need when coping with complex computational demands for sound localization. Using a novel method to measure bat sonar emission patterns from freely behaving bats, I show that the sonar beam shape varies between vocalizations. Consequently, the auditory system of a bat may need to adapt its computations to accurately localize objects using changing acoustic inputs. Extra-auditory signals that carry information about pinna position and beam shape are required for auditory localization of sound sources. The auditory system must learn associations between extra-auditory signals and acoustic spatial cues. Furthermore, the auditory system must adapt to changes in acoustic input that occur with changes in pinna position and vocalization parameters. These demands on the nervous system suggest that sound localization is achieved through the interaction of behavioral control and acoustic inputs. A sensorimotor model demonstrates how an organism can learn space through auditory-motor contingencies

  18. ECN Pressure Test

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-18

    This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of sound propagation through a blade row.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Qiao, Weiyang; Ji, Liang

    2012-10-01

    The propagation of sound waves through a blade row is investigated numerically. A wave splitting method in a two-dimensional duct with arbitrary mean flow is presented, based on which pressure amplitude of different wave mode can be extracted at an axial plane. The propagation of sound wave through a flat plate blade row has been simulated by solving the unsteady Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations (URANS). The transmission and reflection coefficients obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are compared with semi-analytical results. It indicates that the low order URANS scheme will cause large errors if the sound pressure level is lower than -100 dB (with as reference pressure the product of density, main flow velocity, and speed of sound). The CFD code has sufficient precision when solving the interaction of sound wave and blade row providing the boundary reflections have no substantial influence. Finally, the effects of flow Mach number, blade thickness, and blade turning angle on sound propagation are studied.

  20. Newborns' Head Orientation toward Sounds Within Hemifields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Kimberley; And Others

    This experiment examined the accuracy with which newborn infants orient their heads toward a sound positioned off midline within hemifields. The study also evaluated newborns' ability to update the angle of their head turn to match a change in localization of an ongoing sound. Alert newborns were held in a supine position and presented a sound at…

  1. Evaluating Warning Sound Urgency with Reaction Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suied, Clara; Susini, Patrick; McAdams, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    It is well-established that subjective judgments of perceived urgency of alarm sounds can be affected by acoustic parameters. In this study, the authors investigated an objective measurement, the reaction time (RT), to test the effectiveness of temporal parameters of sounds in the context of warning sounds. Three experiments were performed using a…

  2. The United States sounding rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The United States sounding rocket program is discussed. The program is concerned with the fields of solar physics, galactic astronomy, fields and particles, ionospheric physics, aeronomy, and meteorology. Sounding rockets are described with respect to propulsion systems, gross weight, and capabilities. Instruments used to conduct ionospheric probing missions are examined. Results of previously conducted sounding rocket missions are included.

  3. Bubbles That Change the Speed of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    The influence of bubbles on sound has long attracted the attention of physicists. In his 1920 book Sir William Bragg described sound absorption caused by foam in a glass of beer tapped by a spoon. Frank S. Crawford described and analyzed the change in the pitch of sound in a similar experiment and named the phenomenon the "hot chocolate effect."…

  4. The Early Years: Becoming Attuned to Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Exploration of making and changing sounds is part of the first-grade performance expectation 1-PS4-1, "Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate" (NGSS Lead States 2013, p. 10; see Internet Resource). Early learning experiences build toward…

  5. Sound-Symbolism Boosts Novel Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Gwilym; Dingemanse, Mark; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The existence of sound-symbolism (or a non-arbitrary link between form and meaning) is well-attested. However, sound-symbolism has mostly been investigated with nonwords in forced choice tasks, neither of which are representative of natural language. This study uses ideophones, which are naturally occurring sound-symbolic words that depict sensory…

  6. 47 CFR 74.603 - Sound channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sound channels. 74.603 Section 74.603... Stations § 74.603 Sound channels. (a) The frequencies listed in § 74.602(a) may be used for the simultaneous transmission of the picture and sound portions of TV broadcast programs and for cue and...

  7. 47 CFR 74.603 - Sound channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sound channels. 74.603 Section 74.603... Stations § 74.603 Sound channels. (a) The frequencies listed in § 74.602(a) may be used for the simultaneous transmission of the picture and sound portions of TV broadcast programs and for cue and...

  8. 47 CFR 74.603 - Sound channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sound channels. 74.603 Section 74.603... Stations § 74.603 Sound channels. (a) The frequencies listed in § 74.602(a) may be used for the simultaneous transmission of the picture and sound portions of TV broadcast programs and for cue and...

  9. 47 CFR 74.603 - Sound channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sound channels. 74.603 Section 74.603... Stations § 74.603 Sound channels. (a) The frequencies listed in § 74.602(a) may be used for the simultaneous transmission of the picture and sound portions of TV broadcast programs and for cue and...

  10. 47 CFR 74.603 - Sound channels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sound channels. 74.603 Section 74.603... Stations § 74.603 Sound channels. (a) The frequencies listed in § 74.602(a) may be used for the simultaneous transmission of the picture and sound portions of TV broadcast programs and for cue and...

  11. A Lexical Analysis of Environmental Sound Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houix, Olivier; Lemaitre, Guillaume; Misdariis, Nicolas; Susini, Patrick; Urdapilleta, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In this article we report on listener categorization of meaningful environmental sounds. A starting point for this study was the phenomenological taxonomy proposed by Gaver (1993b). In the first experimental study, 15 participants classified 60 environmental sounds and indicated the properties shared by the sounds in each class. In a second…

  12. Ontogenetic development of auditory sensitivity and sound production in the squeaker catfish Synodontis schoutedeni

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Surveys of ontogenetic development of hearing and sound production in fish are scarce, and the ontogenetic development of acoustic communication has been investigated in only two fish species so far. Studies on the labyrinth fish Trichopsis vittata and the toadfish Halobatrachus didactylus show that the ability to detect conspecific sounds develops during growth. In otophysine fish, which are characterized by Weberian ossicles and improved hearing sensitivities, the ontogenetic development of sound communication has never been investigated. We analysed the ontogeny of the auditory sensitivity and vocalizations in the mochokid catfish Synodontis schoutedeni. Mochokid catfishes of the genus Synodontis are commonly called squeakers because they produce broadband stridulation sounds during abduction and adduction of pectoral fin spines. Fish from six different size groups - from 22 mm standard length to 126 mm - were studied. Hearing thresholds were measured between 50 Hz and 6 kHz using the auditory evoked potentials recording technique; stridulation sounds were recorded and their sound pressure levels determined. Finally, absolute sound power spectra were compared to auditory sensitivity curves within each size group. Results The smallest juveniles showed the poorest hearing abilities of all size groups between 50 and 1,000 Hz and highest hearing sensitivity at 5 and 6 kHz. The duration of abduction and adduction sounds and the pulse period increased and sound pressure level (in animals smaller than 58 mm) increased, while the dominant frequency of sounds decreased with size in animals larger than 37 mm. Comparisons between audiograms and sound spectra revealed that the most sensitive frequencies correlate with the dominant frequencies of stridulation sounds in all S. schoutedeni size groups and that all specimens are able to detect sounds of all size groups. Conclusions This study on the squeaker catfish S. schoutedeni is the first to demonstrate that

  13. Rainforests as concert halls for birds: are reverberations improving sound transmission of long song elements?

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Erwin; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pedersen, Simon Boel; Winkler, Hans

    2006-01-01

    In forests reverberations have probably detrimental and beneficial effects on avian communication. They constrain signal discrimination by masking fast repetitive sounds and they improve signal detection by elongating sounds. This ambivalence of reflections for animal signals in forests is similar to the influence of reverberations on speech or music in indoor sound transmission. Since comparisons of sound fields of forests and concert halls have demonstrated that reflections can contribute in both environments a considerable part to the energy of a received sound, it is here assumed that reverberations enforce also birdsong in forests. Song elements have to be long enough to be superimposed by reflections and therefore longer signals should be louder than shorter ones. An analysis of the influence of signal length on pure tones and on song elements of two sympatric rainforest thrush species demonstrates that longer sounds are less attenuated. The results indicate that higher sound pressure level is caused by superimposing reflections. It is suggested that this beneficial effect of reverberations explains interspecific birdsong differences in element length. Transmission paths with stronger reverberations in relation to direct sound should favor the use of longer signals for better propagation.

  14. Sound quality indicators for urban places in Paris cross-validated by Milan data.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Paola; Delaitre, Pauline; Lavandier, Catherine; Torchia, Francesca; Aumond, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    A specific smartphone application was developed to collect perceptive and acoustic data in Paris. About 3400 questionnaires were analyzed, regarding the global sound environment characterization, the perceived loudness of some emergent sources and the presence time ratio of sources that do not emerge from the background. Sound pressure level was recorded each second from the mobile phone's microphone during a 10-min period. The aim of this study is to propose indicators of urban sound quality based on linear regressions with perceptive variables. A cross validation of the quality models extracted from Paris data was carried out by conducting the same survey in Milan. The proposed sound quality general model is correlated with the real perceived sound quality (72%). Another model without visual amenity and familiarity is 58% correlated with perceived sound quality. In order to improve the sound quality indicator, a site classification was performed by Kohonen's Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and seven specific class models were developed. These specific models attribute more importance on source events and are slightly closer to the individual data than the global model. In general, the Parisian models underestimate the sound quality of Milan environments assessed by Italian people.

  15. A quasi two-dimensional model for sound attenuation by the sonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Lim, K M; Chew, C H

    2012-10-01

    Sound propagation in the sonic crystal (SC) along the symmetry direction is modeled by sound propagation through a variable cross-sectional area waveguide. A one-dimensional (1D) model based on the Webster horn equation is used to obtain sound attenuation through the SC. This model is compared with two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulation and experiment. The 1D model prediction of frequency band for sound attenuation is found to be shifted by around 500 Hz with respect to the finite element simulation. The reason for this shift is due to the assumption involved in the 1D model. A quasi 2D model is developed for sound propagation through the waveguide. Sound pressure profiles from the quasi 2D model are compared with the finite element simulation and the 1D model. The result shows significant improvement over the 1D model and is in good agreement with the 2D finite element simulation. Finally, sound attenuation through the SC is computed based on the quasi 2D model and is found to be in good agreement with the finite element simulation. The quasi 2D model provides an improved method to calculate sound attenuation through the SC.

  16. Visualization of Heart Sounds and Motion Using Multichannel Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogata, Fumio; Yokota, Yasunari; Kawamura, Yoko

    2010-06-01

    As there are various difficulties associated with auscultation techniques, we have devised a technique for visualizing heart motion in order to assist in the understanding of heartbeat for both doctors and patients. Auscultatory sounds were first visualized using FFT and Wavelet analysis to visualize heart sounds. Next, to show global and simultaneous heart motions, a new technique for visualization was established. The visualization system consists of a 64-channel unit (63 acceleration sensors and one ECG sensor) and a signal/image analysis unit. The acceleration sensors were arranged in a square array (8×8) with a 20-mm pitch interval, which was adhered to the chest surface. The heart motion of one cycle was visualized at a sampling frequency of 3 kHz and quantization of 12 bits. The visualized results showed a typical waveform motion of the strong pressure shock due to closing tricuspid valve and mitral valve of the cardiac apex (first sound), and the closing aortic and pulmonic valve (second sound) in sequence. To overcome difficulties in auscultation, the system can be applied to the detection of heart disease and to the digital database management of the auscultation examination in medical areas.

  17. Sound absorption by subwavelength membrane structures: A geometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Li, Yong; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Mei, Jun; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Decorated membranes comprising a thin layer of elastic film with small rigid platelets fixed on top have been found to be efficient absorbers of low-frequency sound. In this work we consider the problem of sound absorption from a perspective aimed at deriving upper bounds under different scenarios, i.e., whether the sound is incident from one side only or from both sides, and whether there is a reflecting surface on the back side of the membrane. By considering the negligible thickness of the membrane, usually on the order of a fraction of one millimeter, we derive a relation showing that the sum of the incoming sound waves' (complex) pressure amplitudes, averaged over the area of the membrane, must be equal to that of the outgoing waves. By using this relation, and without going to any details of the wave solutions, it is shown that the maximum absorption achievable from one-sided incidence is 50%, while the maximum absorption with a back-reflecting surface can reach 100%. The latter was attained by the hybridized resonances. All the results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. This generalized perspective, when used together with the Green function's formalism, can be useful in gaining insights into the constraints on what are achievable in scatterings and absorption by thin film structures and delineating them.

  18. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. Evaluation of sound field systems in elementary school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Kruger, Kelly

    2003-10-01

    Our primary purpose in this study was to determine the relevant ergonomic issues associated with daily use of sound field systems in elementary school classrooms, in order to develop a purchasing guideline and technical specification. The secondary purpose was to evaluate these systems to identify if one or more acoustical parameters could be used to determine the quality and effectiveness of a system. Six sound field systems, with varying numbers and types of speakers, were chosen as a cross-section of available systems on the market. Six representative classrooms, currently in use, were selected based on a range of reverberation times and background noise levels. All systems were installed for two weeks in each classroom. Student speech intelligibility (SI) tests using phonetically balanced word lists were conducted, as well as teacher interviews. The acoustical parameters measured were clarity ratios C50 and C80, speech transmission indices STI and R(rapid)STI, sound pressure level (SPL) uniformity and frequency response. An improvement in SI was found for all systems. Only SPL uniformity and frequency response were found to be useful distinguishing performance parameters between systems. Ergonomic design aspects of sound field systems had a significant influence on the acceptance and usage in the classroom.

  20. Unified modeling of turbulence effects on sound propagation.

    PubMed

    Cheinet, Sylvain; Ehrhardt, Loic; Juvé, Daniel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Many aspects of outdoor sound propagation depend on the scattering effects induced by atmospheric turbulence. Standard analytical and numerical assessments of these effects make an a priori distinction between the scattering effects at large versus small angles. The present study evaluates the ability of a numerical model in overcoming this distinction. The model solves a set of two coupled equations for the sound pressure and vector acoustic velocity, with the finite-difference time domain approach. It is first introduced and evaluated. The numerical predictions are compared to well-known analytical solutions in the case of two-dimensional plane wave propagation through turbulence. They are found to agree in the investigated scenarios. Hence, the finite-difference, time domain solution of the two coupled equations provides a unified, versatile numerical approach to investigating the effects of atmospheric turbulence on sound propagation. The comparison also provides original insights on the applicability and limitations of various methods used to investigate sound propagation through turbulence.

  1. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST....1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William...

  2. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST....1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William...

  3. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST....1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William...

  4. Listener Expertise and Sound Identification Influence the Categorization of Environmental Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Houix, Olivier; Misdariis, Nicolas; Susini, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The influence of listener's expertise and sound identification on the categorization of environmental sounds is reported in three studies. In Study 1, the causal uncertainty of 96 sounds was measured by counting the different causes described by 29 participants. In Study 2, 15 experts and 15 nonexperts classified a selection of 60 sounds and…

  5. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST....1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William...

  6. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST....1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William...

  7. Sound attenuation in magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, J.; Elvira, L.; Resa, P.; Montero de Espinosa, F.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the attenuation of ultrasonic elastic waves propagating through magnetorheological (MR) fluids is analysed as a function of the particle volume fraction and the magnetic field intensity. Non-commercial MR fluids made with iron ferromagnetic particles and two different solvents (an olive oil based solution and an Araldite-epoxy) were used. Particle volume fractions of up to 0.25 were analysed. It is shown that the attenuation of sound depends strongly on the solvent used and the volume fraction. The influence of a magnetic field up to 212 mT was studied and it was found that the sound attenuation increases with the magnetic intensity until saturation is reached. A hysteretic effect is evident once the magnetic field is removed.

  8. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-05-29

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs.

  9. Models of ancient sound vases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruel, Per V.

    2002-11-01

    Models were made of vases described by Vitruvius in Rome in about the year 70 A.D. and of sound vases (lydpotter) placed in Danish churches from 1100-1300 A.D. Measurements of vase's resonant frequencies and damping (reradiation) verified that the model vases obeyed expected physical rules. It was concluded that the excellent acoustical quality of many ancient Greek and Roman theaters cannot be ascribed to the vases placed under their seats. This study also found that sound vases placed in Nordic churches could not have shortened the reverberation time because there are far too few of them. Moreover, they could not have covered a broad frequency range. It remains a mystery why vases were installed under the seats of ancient Greek theaters and why, 1000 years later, Danes placed vases in their churches.

  10. Reusable sounding-rocket design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dick L. Y.; Martin, James A.

    1995-03-01

    As a result of the reduction of budgets for flights, the ideas of reusability and cost-effectiveness in launch vehicles are becoming more and more important. One class of rockets, in particular the sounding rockets operating in a less demanding environment, has many potentials for many more flights. By augmenting the basic rocket configuration with wings, landing gear, flight controls and guidance systems, the vehicle can be made to glide and land back at the launch site or at a specific recovery site. In this paper, the design of such a reusable rocket is presented. This design can be extended and adapted to larger vehicles, thus attaining higher altitudes required in some of the applications of sounding rockets.

  11. Sediment transport in Norton Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, D.E.; Cacchione, D.A.; Muench, R.D.; Nelson, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Yukon River, the largest single source of Bering Sea sediment, delivers >95% of its sediment load at the southwest corner of Norton Sound during the ice-free months of late May through October. During this period, surface winds in the northern Bering Sea area are generally light from the south and southwest, and surface waves are not significant. Although wind stress may cause some transport of low-density turbid surface water into the head of Norton Sound, the most significant transport of Yukon River suspended matter occurs within advective currents flowing north across the outer part of the sound. The thickest accumulations of modern Yukon silt and very fine sand occur beneath this persistent current. We monitored temporal variations in bottom currents, pressure, and suspended-matter concentrations within this major transport pathway for 80 days in the summer of 1977 using a Geological Processes Bottom Environmental (GEOPROBE) tripod system. The record reveals two distinctive periods of bottom flow and sediment transport: an initial 59 days (July 8-September 5) of fair-weather conditions, characterized by tidally dominated currents and relatively low, stable suspended-matter concentrations; and a 21-day period (September 5-September 26) during which several storms traversed the northern Bering Sea, mean suspended-matter concentrations near the bottom increased by a factor of five, and the earlier tidal dominance was overshadowed by wind-driven and oscillatory wave-generated currents. Friction velocities (u*) at the GEOPROBE site were generally subcritical during the initial fair-weather period. In contrast, the 21-day stormy period was characterized by u* values that exceeded the critical level of 1.3 cm/s more than 60% of the time. The GEPROBE data suggest that the very fine sand constituting about 50% of the sediment on the outer part of the Yukon prodelta is transported during a few late-summer and fall storms each year. A conservative estimate shows that

  12. Proper orthogonal decomposition and cluster weighted modeling for sensitivity analysis of sound propagation in the atmospheric surface layer.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Chris L; Wilson, D Keith

    2007-09-01

    Outdoor sound propagation predictions are compromised by uncertainty and error in the atmosphere and terrain representations, and sometimes also by simplified or incorrect physics. A model's predictive power, i.e., its accurate representation of the sound propagation, cannot be assessed without first quantifying the ensemble sound pressure variability and sensitivity to uncertainties in the model's governing parameters. This paper describes fundamental steps toward this goal for a single-frequency point source. The atmospheric surface layer is represented through Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and the acoustic ground properties with a relaxation model. Sound propagation is predicted with the parabolic equation method. Governing parameters are modeled as independent random variables across physically reasonable ranges. Latin hypercube sampling and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are employed in conjunction with cluster-weighted models to develop compact representations of the sound pressure random field. Full-field sensitivity of the sound pressure field is computed via the sensitivities of the POD mode coefficients to the system parameters. Ensemble statistics of the full-field sensitivities are computed to illustrate their relative importance at every down range location. The central role of sensitivity analysis in uncertainty quantification of outdoor sound propagation is discussed and pitfalls of sampling-based sensitivity analysis for outdoor sound propagation are described. PMID:17927400

  13. Light aircraft sound transmission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; David, J.; Heitman, K.; Crocker, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The revived interest in the design of propeller driven aircraft is based on increasing fuel prices as well as on the need for bigger short haul and commuter aircraft. A major problem encountered with propeller driven aircraft is propeller and exhaust noise that is transmitted through the fuselage sidewall structure. Part of the work which was conducted during the period April 1 to August 31, 1983, on the studies of sound transmission through light aircraft walls is presented.

  14. Sound Transmission at Pipe Joints.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servis, Dimitris C.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A model was developed using beam and plane wave theory to describe the sound transmission at pipe joints. This approach greatly simplifies the modelling of the pipe joint and the solution is presented in a manner which can be applied in both the Frequency and the Time domain, for the solution of acoustic and fluid dynamics problems related to pipe joint transmission. This form of modelling can be extended to describe a wide range of pipe joints and discontinuities and lend itself to the study of piping networks by incorporating its solution in existing models used to describe the performance of large systems. A variety of experimental techniques have been explored and applied for the measurement of the sound transmission at pipe joints. The model predictions were found to be in good agreement with experimental data and form the basis of a simple and effective method for the study of sound transmission at pipe joints.

  15. Sound radiation from railway sleepers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianying; Thompson, David J.; Squicciarini, Giacomo

    2016-05-01

    The sleepers supporting the rails of a railway track are an important source of noise at low frequencies. The sound radiation from the sleepers has been calculated using a three-dimensional boundary element model including the effect of both reflective and partially absorptive ground. When the sleeper flexibility and support stiffness are taken into account, it is found that the radiation ratio of the sleeper can be approximated by that of a rigid half-sleeper. When multiple sleepers are excited through the rail, their sound radiation is increased. This effect has been calculated for cases where the sleeper is embedded in a rigid or partially absorptive ground. It is shown that it is sufficient to consider only three sleepers in determining their radiation ratio when installed in track. At low frequencies the vibration of the track is localised to the three sleepers nearest the excitation point whereas at higher frequencies the distance between the sleepers is large enough for them to be treated independently. Consequently the sound radiation increases by up to 5 dB below 100 Hz compared with the result for a single sleeper whereas above 300 Hz the result can be approximated by that for a single sleeper. Measurements on a 1/5 scale model railway track are used to verify the numerical predictions with good agreement being found for all configurations.

  16. Acoustic analysis of trill sounds.

    PubMed

    Dhananjaya, N; Yegnanarayana, B; Bhaskararao, Peri

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the acoustic-phonetic characteristics of steady apical trills--trill sounds produced by the periodic vibration of the apex of the tongue--are studied. Signal processing methods, namely, zero-frequency filtering and zero-time liftering of speech signals, are used to analyze the excitation source and the resonance characteristics of the vocal tract system, respectively. Although it is natural to expect the effect of trilling on the resonances of the vocal tract system, it is interesting to note that trilling influences the glottal source of excitation as well. The excitation characteristics derived using zero-frequency filtering of speech signals are glottal epochs, strength of impulses at the glottal epochs, and instantaneous fundamental frequency of the glottal vibration. Analysis based on zero-time liftering of speech signals is used to study the dynamic resonance characteristics of vocal tract system during the production of trill sounds. Qualitative analysis of trill sounds in different vowel contexts, and the acoustic cues that may help spotting trills in continuous speech are discussed. PMID:22501086

  17. Cumulative Effects of Exposure to Continuous and Intermittent Sounds on Temporary Hearing Threshold Shifts Induced in a Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2016-01-01

    The effects of exposure to continuous and intermittent anthropogenic sounds on temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) in a harbor porpoise were investigated by testing hearing before and after exposure to 1- to 2-kHz downsweeps of 1 s, without harmonics, presented as paired-intermittent and continuous-exposure combinations with identical cumulative sound exposure levels (SEL(cum)). Exposure to intermittent sounds resulted in lower TTSs than exposure to continuous sounds with the same SEL(cum). Therefore, the hearing of marine mammals is at less risk from intermittent anthropogenic noises than from continuous ones at the same received sound pressure level and duration. PMID:26611000

  18. Cumulative Effects of Exposure to Continuous and Intermittent Sounds on Temporary Hearing Threshold Shifts Induced in a Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2016-01-01

    The effects of exposure to continuous and intermittent anthropogenic sounds on temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) in a harbor porpoise were investigated by testing hearing before and after exposure to 1- to 2-kHz downsweeps of 1 s, without harmonics, presented as paired-intermittent and continuous-exposure combinations with identical cumulative sound exposure levels (SEL(cum)). Exposure to intermittent sounds resulted in lower TTSs than exposure to continuous sounds with the same SEL(cum). Therefore, the hearing of marine mammals is at less risk from intermittent anthropogenic noises than from continuous ones at the same received sound pressure level and duration.

  19. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    PubMed

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  20. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jayson J; Myers, Josh R; Carlson, Thomas J; Deng, Z Daniel; Rohrer, John S; Caviggia, Kurt A; Woodley, Christa M; Weiland, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR) allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements.

  1. Design and Implementation of an Underwater Sound Recording Device

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Jayson J.; Myers, Josh R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Rohrer, John S.; Caviggia, Kurt A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR) allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements. PMID:22164089

  2. Design and implementation of an underwater sound recording device.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jayson J; Myers, Josh R; Carlson, Thomas J; Deng, Z Daniel; Rohrer, John S; Caviggia, Kurt A; Woodley, Christa M; Weiland, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    To monitor the underwater sound and pressure waves generated by anthropogenic activities such as underwater blasting and pile driving, an autonomous system was designed to record underwater acoustic signals. The underwater sound recording device (USR) allows for connections of two hydrophones or other dynamic pressure sensors, filters high frequency noise out of the collected signals, has a gain that can be independently set for each sensor, and allows for 2 h of data collection. Two versions of the USR were created: a submersible model deployable to a maximum depth of 300 m, and a watertight but not fully submersible model. Tests were performed on the USR in the laboratory using a data acquisition system to send single-frequency sinusoidal voltages directly to each component. These tests verified that the device operates as designed and performs as well as larger commercially available data acquisition systems, which are not suited for field use. On average, the designed gain values differed from the actual measured gain values by about 0.35 dB. A prototype of the device was used in a case study to measure blast pressures while investigating the effect of underwater rock blasting on juvenile Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. In the case study, maximum positive pressure from the blast was found to be significantly correlated with frequency of injury for individual fish. The case study also demonstrated that the device withstood operation in harsh environments, making it a valuable tool for collecting field measurements. PMID:22164089

  3. [Assessment of telephone operators' exposure to sound through headphones].

    PubMed

    Kawanami, Shoko; Inoue, Jinro; Takahashi, Koko; Horie, Seichi

    2011-09-01

    We estimated the level of noise that telephone operators were exposed to through headphones by a two-step method using an artificial ear technique and a manikin technique. In the artificial ear technique, the sound pressure level (Leq) of the total work hours was 81.5 dB, whereas the Leq of the total duration of phone calls was 89.3 dB. Therefore, we conducted a more accurate measurement by the manikin technique (ISO11904-2). By this method, we could simulate the headphone-wearing condition of the workers and convert the measurements to a diffuse-field related L(Aeq). By this manikin technique, the corrected L(Aeq) of the total work hours was 68.3 dB, whereas the corrected L(Aeq) of the total duration of call was 76.6 dB, which was below the standard of the Occupational Exposure Limits of the Japan Society of Occupational Health. We confirmed that in a workplace where the background noise is low (51.3 dBA), a good signal-noise ratio is maintained so that operators don't have to listen to loud sounds through headphones. Neither the gender nor the type of the telephone equipment of the callers affected the sound pressure levels.

  4. Elastic Instability and Sound Dispersion in Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiuli, Eric; Laversanne-Finot, Adrien; During, Gustavo; Lerner, Edan; Wyart, Matthieu

    2014-03-01

    Connectedness and applied stress are key characteristics of amorphous solids at zero temperature. Rigidity can be lost either through unjamming as connectedness is decreased, or buckling as stress is increased. We present an effective medium theory which describes elastic behaviour in proximity to both unjamming and buckling. The theory successfully predicts (i) the dependence of the boson peak on pressure and coordination, (ii) negative sound dispersion and a kink in sound attenuation near the boson peak, as observed experimentally in molecular glasses, (iii) a characteristic frequency ω0 that vanishes at a critical pressure, and (iv) the previously derived stability diagram for T = 0 amorphous solids. Our predictions for sound dispersion are similar to disorder-based approaches to the boson peak, however we resolve two inconsistencies of these approaches: (i) since disorder is secondary to connectedness and stress in our theory, we explain why some crystals and glasses have similar elasticity, and (ii) we explain the natural emergence of a mesoscopic length scale visible in response, which is absent in static structure.

  5. Category 5: Sound Generation In Viscous Problems. Problem 2: Sound Generation By Flow Over a Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.

    2004-01-01

    The discrete frequency sound produced by the flow of air at low subsonic speeds over a deep cavity was investigated. A long aspect ratio rectangular cavity with a leading edge overhang that cut off of the cavity opening was placed flush with the top surface of a wind tunnel. The approach flow velocity was maintained at 50 m/s for the benchmark problem although results are also presented for other conditions. Boundary layer measurements conducted with a single element hotwire anemometer indicated that the boundary layer thickness just upstream of the cavity was equal to 17 mm. Sound pressure level measurements were made at three locations in the cavity: the center of the leading edge wall, the center of the cavity floor, and the center of the trailing edge wall. Three discrete tones were measured at all three locations with corresponding Strouhal numbers (based on cavity opening length and approach flow velocity) equal to 0.24, 0.26, and 0.41. The amplitudes of each tone were approximately equal at each measurement location in the cavity. Measurements made at other approach flow conditions indicated that the approach flow velocity and the boundary layer thickness affected the frequency characteristics of the discrete tones.

  6. Effects of sound level fluctuations on annoyance caused by aircraft-flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effects of variations in the rate and magnitude of sound level fluctuations on the annoyance caused by aircraft-flyover noise. The effects of tonal content, noise duration, and sound pressure level on annoyance were also studied. An aircraft-noise synthesis system was used to synthesize 32 aircraft-flyover noise stimuli representing the factorial combinations of 2 tone conditions, 2 noise durations, 2 sound pressure levels, 2 level fluctuation rates, and 2 level fluctuation magnitudes. Thirty-two test subjects made annoyance judgements on a total of 64 stimuli in a subjective listening test facility simulating an outdoor acoustic environment. Variations in the rate and magnitude of level fluctuations were found to have little, if any, effect on annoyance. Tonal content, noise duration, sound pressure level, and the interaction of tonal content with sound pressure level were found to affect the judged annoyance significantly. The addition of tone corrections and/or duration corrections significantly improved the annoyance prediction ability of noise rating scales.

  7. Identifying, rating, and remembering environmental sound events.

    PubMed

    Marcell, Michael; Malatanos, Maria; Leahy, Connie; Comeaux, Cadie

    2007-08-01

    Sound events are sequences of closely grouped and temporally related environmental sounds that tell a story or establish a sense of place. The goal of our project was to create a set of sound events depicting various scenarios (such as a car accident, cooking breakfast, and walking outdoors) and to gather normative data about how people understand them. Samples of college students listened to 22 sound events over headphones in three self-paced, computer-based studies. In the Identification Task, 43 participants used text boxes to type descriptions of what was happening in the sound events. In the Rating Task, 39 participants used Likert scales to rate the sound events on the attributes of familiarity, complexity, and pleasantness. In the Memory Task, 42 participants answered two multiple-choice questions immediately after listening to each sound event. Detailed tables are provided for the following: (1) Description of the sound events and their components; (2) accuracy and response time measurements for each of the 22 sound events across the three studies; and (3) rank-orderings of the sound events by ease of identification, recognition of details, and rated familiarity, complexity, and pleasantness. Digital files of the stimuli, which may be of interest to auditory cognition researchers and clinical neuropsychologists, may be downloaded from either www.psychonomic.org/archive or www.cofc.edu/-marcellm/sound event studies/sndevent.htm. PMID:17958168

  8. Sound symbolism facilitates early verb learning.

    PubMed

    Imai, Mutsumi; Kita, Sotaro; Nagumo, Miho; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    Some words are sound-symbolic in that they involve a non-arbitrary relationship between sound and meaning. Here, we report that 25-month-old children are sensitive to cross-linguistically valid sound-symbolic matches in the domain of action and that this sound symbolism facilitates verb learning in young children. We constructed a set of novel sound-symbolic verbs whose sounds were judged to match certain actions better than others, as confirmed by adult Japanese- as well as English speakers, and by 2- and 3-year-old Japanese-speaking children. These sound-symbolic verbs, together with other novel non-sound-symbolic verbs, were used in a verb learning task with 3-year-old Japanese children. In line with the previous literature, 3-year-olds could not generalize the meaning of novel non-sound-symbolic verbs on the basis of the sameness of action. However, 3-year-olds could correctly generalize the meaning of novel sound-symbolic verbs. These results suggest that iconic scaffolding by means of sound symbolism plays an important role in early verb learning.

  9. Material sound source localization through headphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunai, Larisa; Peris-Fajarnes, Guillermo; Lengua, Ismael Lengua; Montaña, Ignacio Tortajada

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper a study of sound localization is carried out, considering two different sounds emitted from different hit materials (wood and bongo) as well as a Delta sound. The motivation of this research is to study how humans localize sounds coming from different materials, with the purpose of a future implementation of the acoustic sounds with better localization features in navigation aid systems or training audio-games suited for blind people. Wood and bongo sounds are recorded after hitting two objects made of these materials. Afterwards, they are analysed and processed. On the other hand, the Delta sound (click) is generated by using the Adobe Audition software, considering a frequency of 44.1 kHz. All sounds are analysed and convolved with previously measured non-individual Head-Related Transfer Functions both for an anechoic environment and for an environment with reverberation. The First Choice method is used in this experiment. Subjects are asked to localize the source position of the sound listened through the headphones, by using a graphic user interface. The analyses of the recorded data reveal that no significant differences are obtained either when considering the nature of the sounds (wood, bongo, Delta) or their environmental context (with or without reverberation). The localization accuracies for the anechoic sounds are: wood 90.19%, bongo 92.96% and Delta sound 89.59%, whereas for the sounds with reverberation the results are: wood 90.59%, bongo 92.63% and Delta sound 90.91%. According to these data, we can conclude that even when considering the reverberation effect, the localization accuracy does not significantly increase.

  10. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Sound generation by flow over relatively deep cylindrical cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    To develop a system for acoustic coding of moving objects containing drilled cylindrical cavities, the production of high-intensity tones by deep cylindrical cavities in a flat surface at low (0.12-0.24) Mach numbers was investigated. The sound intensity and frequency have been determined as functions of flow velocity, diameter, and depth of the cavities. It is shown that whistles can be designed for a given frequency (in the range of 5-17 kHz) and flow, and the sound pressure levels can be calculated by the equations given. Using these equations a whistle producing 106 dB at a 30.5-cm distance from a cylindrical cavity of 0.508 cm in diameter and 1.32 cm in depth with an airflow of 57.7 m/s past the cavity was designed.

  12. Zero Sound Mode in Normal Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Albergamo, F.; Verbeni, R.; Huotari, S.; Vanko, G.; Monaco, G.

    2007-11-16

    Inelastic x-ray scattering has been utilized to study the elementary excitations of normal liquid {sup 3}He at the temperature T=1.10{+-}0.05 K and saturated vapor pressure in the wave vector range 0.15{<=}Q{<=}3.15 A{sup -1}. The present data provide direct information on the zero-sound mode in the mesoscopic wave vector range where it was expected to decay into particle-hole excitations. The obtained results show no evidence of such a decay: the zero-sound mode remains well defined in the whole explored wave number range, thus witnessing a continuous transition of the atom dynamics from the collective to the single particle regime similarly to what is usually found in simple liquids.

  13. An experimental evaluation of the application of the Kirchhoff formulation for sound radiation from an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Kirchhoff integral formulation is evaluated for its effectiveness in quantitatively predicting the sound radiated from an oscillating airfoil whose chord length is comparable with the acoustic wavelength. A rigid airfoil section was oscillated at samll amplitude in a medium at rest to produce the sound field. Simultaneous amplitude and phase measurements were made of surface pressure and surface velocity distributions and the acoustic free field. Measured surface pressure and motion are used in applying the theory, and airfoil thickness and contour are taken into account. The result was that the theory overpredicted the sound pressure level by 2 to 5, depending on direction. Differences are also noted in the sound field phase behavior.

  14. Sound insulation and energy harvesting based on acoustic metamaterial plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of artificially designed sub-wavelength acoustic materials, denoted acoustic metamaterials (AMM), has significantly broadened the range of materials responses found in nature. These engineered materials can indeed manipulate sound/vibration in surprising ways, which include vibration/sound insulation, focusing, cloaking, acoustic energy harvesting …. In this work, we report both on the analysis of the airborne sound transmission loss (STL) through a thin metamaterial plate and on the possibility of acoustic energy harvesting. We first provide a theoretical study of the airborne STL and confronted them to the structure-borne dispersion of a metamaterial plate. Second, we propose to investigate the acoustic energy harvesting capability of the plate-type AMM. We have developed semi-analytical and numerical methods to investigate the STL performances of a plate-type AMM with an airborne sound excitation having different incident angles. The AMM is made of silicone rubber stubs squarely arranged in a thin aluminum plate, and the STL is calculated at low-frequency range [100Hz to 3kHz] for an incoming incident sound pressure wave. The obtained analytical and numerical STL present a very good agreement confirming the reliability of developed approaches. A comparison between computed STL and the band structure of the considered AMM shows an excellent agreement and gives a physical understanding of the observed behavior. On another hand, the acoustic energy confinement in AMM with created defects with suitable geometry was investigated. The first results give a general view for assessing the acoustic energy harvesting performances making use of AMM.

  15. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  16. Graded behavioral responses and habituation to sound in the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Samson, Julia E; Mooney, T Aran; Gussekloo, Sander W S; Hanlon, Roger T

    2014-12-15

    Sound is a widely available and vital cue in aquatic environments, yet most bioacoustic research has focused on marine vertebrates, leaving sound detection in invertebrates poorly understood. Cephalopods are an ecologically key taxon that likely use sound and may be impacted by increasing anthropogenic ocean noise, but little is known regarding their behavioral responses or adaptations to sound stimuli. These experiments identify the acoustic range and levels that elicit a wide range of secondary defense behaviors such as inking, jetting and rapid coloration change. Secondarily, it was found that cuttlefish habituate to certain sound stimuli. The present study examined the behavioral responses of 22 cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) to pure-tone pips ranging from 80 to 1000 Hz with sound pressure levels of 85-188 dB re. 1 μPa rms and particle accelerations of 0-17.1 m s(-2). Cuttlefish escape responses (inking, jetting) were observed between frequencies of 80 and 300 Hz and at sound levels above 140 dB re. 1 μPa rms and 0.01 m s(-2) (0.74 m s(-2) for inking responses). Body patterning changes and fin movements were observed at all frequencies and sound levels. Response intensity was dependent upon stimulus amplitude and frequency, suggesting that cuttlefish also possess loudness perception with a maximum sensitivity around 150 Hz. Cuttlefish habituated to repeated 200 Hz tone pips, at two sound intensities. Total response inhibition was not reached, however, and a basal response remained present in most animals. The graded responses provide a loudness sensitivity curve and suggest an ecological function for sound use in cephalopods.

  17. Enhanced awakening probability of repetitive impulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joos; Houben, Mark M J

    2013-09-01

    In the present study relations between the level of impulse sounds and the observed proportion of behaviorally confirmed awakening reactions were determined. The sounds (shooting sounds, bangs produced by door slamming or by container transshipment, aircraft landings) were presented by means of loudspeakers in the bedrooms of 50 volunteers. The fragments for the impulse sounds consisted of single or multiple events. The sounds were presented during a 6-h period that started 75 min after the subjects wanted to sleep. In order to take account of habituation, each subject participated during 18 nights. At equal indoor A-weighted sound exposure levels, the proportion of awakening for the single impulse sounds was equal to that for the aircraft sounds. The proportion of awakening induced by the multiple impulse sounds, however, was significantly higher. For obtaining the same rate of awakening, the sound level of each of the successive impulses in a fragment had to be about 15-25 dB lower than the level of one single impulse. This level difference was largely independent of the degree of habituation. Various explanations for the enhanced awakening probability are discussed. PMID:23967934

  18. Slow-sound photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    We propose to enhance the axial resolution of photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) by reducing the speed of sound within the imaging region of interest. With silicone oil immersion, we have achieved a finest axial resolution of 5.8 μm for PAM, as validated by phantom experiments. The axial resolution was also enhanced in vivo when mouse ears injected with silicone oil were imaged. When tissue-compatible low-speed liquid becomes available, this approach may find broad applications in PAM as well as in other imaging modalities, such as photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound imaging. PMID:23696693

  19. Consort 1 sounding rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Maybee, George W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a payload of six experiments developed for a 7-min microgravity flight aboard a sounding rocket Consort 1, in order to investigate the effects of low gravity on certain material processes. The experiments in question were designed to test the effect of microgravity on the demixing of aqueous polymer two-phase systems, the electrodeposition process, the production of elastomer-modified epoxy resins, the foam formation process and the characteristics of foam, the material dispersion, and metal sintering. The apparatuses designed for these experiments are examined, and the rocket-payload integration and operations are discussed.

  20. Rudolph Koenig's workshop of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantalony, David A.

    2001-05-01

    Rudolph Koenig's workshop was a busy meeting place for instruments, ideas, experiments, demonstrations, craft traditions, and business. Starting around 1860 it was also the place in Paris where people discovered the new science of sound emerging from the studies of Hermann von Helmholtz in Germany. Koenig built Helmholtz's ideas into apparatus, created new instruments, and spread them throughout the scientific and musical world. Through his own research, he also became Helmholtz's strongest critic. This paper looks at the activities of this unique space, and, in particular, how it contributed to the protracted disputes over an elusive acoustical phenomenon called the combination tone. Many of these instruments became standard teaching and demonstration apparatus.