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Sample records for intraconal orbital cavernous

  1. Surgical Outcomes of Transconjunctival Anterior Orbitotomy for Intraconal Orbital Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyong Jin; Paik, Ji-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe surgical outcomes for transconjunctival anterior orbitotomy for intraconal cavernous hemangiomas. Methods The medical records of 9 consecutive patients with intraconal cavernous hemangiomas who underwent surgical removal by transconjunctival anterior orbitotomy were retrospectively reviewed. The conjunctiva was incised and retracted with a traction suture. For large tumors, a rectus muscle was temporarily disinserted. Tenon's capsule was separated and the tumor was removed with a cryoprobe or clamp. Surgical outcomes, positions of the tumors, methods of approach, and intra- and post-operative complications were evaluated. Results The mean follow-up period was 33 ± 6.8 months. No bony orbitotomy was used in this technique and the cosmetic results were very satisfactory. All tumors were removed intact. In 4 patients, tumors were extirpated with the aid of a cryoprobe. No patients had residual proptosis or limitation of ocular movement. No signs of recurrence were noted in any cases at 33 months follow-up. No serious or permanent complications were observed during or after the operation. Conclusions Transconjunctival anterior orbitotomy is an important surgical procedure in the treatment of intraconal cavernous hemangiomas. It can produce an excellent result, even if the posterior border of the tumor abuts the orbital apex. PMID:21052506

  2. Concomitant orbital cavernous haemangioma and schwannoma in a patient.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shweta; Kaliki, Swathi; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata

    2017-01-12

    A woman aged 39 years presented with right eye painless proptosis and decreased vision since 5 months. Right fundus examination revealed optic disc oedema. CT of the orbit revealed a well-defined homogeneous mass in the intraconal space in both orbits. Surgical excisional biopsy of the orbital lesions was performed. Histopathological examination of the right orbital lesion was suggestive of cavernous haemangioma and the left orbital lesion revealed schwannoma. The patient had an unremarkable postoperative course with improved visual acuity. This case illustrates benign orbital masses of 2 different tissues of origin in a single patient, which has not been described in the literature.

  3. Cavernous hemangioma of the orbit: an unusual acute presentation

    PubMed Central

    Louisraj, Sophia; Ponnudurai, Thendral; Rodriguez, Dominic; Thomas, Philip A; Nelson Jesudasan, Christadoss Arul

    2017-01-01

    We report an unusual presentation of an orbital cavernous hemangioma in a 26-year-old female, who noted sudden redness and swelling of the left eye (LE) on waking up. At presentation, upper eyelid edema with periorbital ecchymosis and subconjunctival hemorrhage were noted in the LE. Although there was transient symptomatic relief with topical medications, blurring of vision developed in the LE. When seen 10 days later, the patient’s LE showed axial proptosis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intraconal soft tissue mass in the superomedial quadrant of the left orbit. Superior orbitotomy with mass excision was done; histopathological examination of the excised mass revealed a cavernous hemangioma. The patient had complete visual recovery following surgery. To our knowledge, an acute presentation of an orbital cavernous hemangioma with subconjunctival hemorrhage and periorbital ecchymosis has not previously been reported. PMID:28769595

  4. The anatomical location and laterality of orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

    PubMed

    McNab, Alan A; Selva, Dinesh; Hardy, Thomas G; O'Donnell, Brett

    2014-10-01

    To determine the anatomical location and laterality of orbital cavernous haemangiomas (OCH). Retrospective case series. The records of 104 patients with OCH were analyzed. The anatomical location of each OCH defined by the location of a point at the centre of the lesion, and its laterality. There were 104 patients included in the study. No patient had more than one lesion. Sixteen (15.4%) were located in the anterior third of the orbit, 74 (71.2%) were in the middle third, and 14 (13.5%) in the posterior third. In the middle third, 10 of 74 (13.5%) were extraconal and 64 intraconal (86.5%), with 30 of 64 (46.9%) middle third intraconal lesions lying lateral to the optic nerve. Of 104 lesions, 56 (53.8%) were left sided, showing a trend towards a predilection for the left side (p = 0.065). If data from other published series which included data on laterality is added to our own data and analysed, 270 of 468 (57.7%) OCH occurred in the left orbit (p < 0.005). OCH may occur at almost any location within the orbit. The commonest location is the middle third of the orbit, in the intraconal space lateral to the optic nerve. This may reflect an origin of these lesions from the arterial side of the circulation, as there are more small arteries in the intraconal space lateral to the optic nerve than in other locations. A predilection for the left orbit remains unexplained.

  5. Endoscopic transconjunctival surgical approach to intraconal space of the orbit: first clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lyson, Tomasz; Sieskiewicz, Andrzej; Rogowski, Marek; Proniewska-Skretek, Ewa; Mariak, Zofia; Turek, Grzegorz; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a transconjunctival, endoscope-assisted (TEA) approach to the medial intra-orbital space was developed based on cadaver preparations, with an ultimate goal of minimizing disturbances of the anatomic structures of the orbit. However, no report on clinical validation of this promising technique was published thus far. We present our experiences with the TEA approach in two patients. In emergency conditions, we approached the lateral retrobulbar space of a 42-year-old male through a 180° incision close to the corneal limbus; a scrap of metal, which had perforated the globe and resided at its posterior wall, was removed endoscopically. Moreover, we used the TEA approach to remove a tumor from the upper intraconal space in a 63-year-old woman. In both patients the surgical goal was achieved with no muscle transection and without additional morbidity and complications. Our experiences with TEA approach suggest that the procedure is clinically feasible, produces no co-morbidity and yields good functional and cosmetic results. As a result, the whole circumference of the retrobulbar space can be conveniently explored. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. [Giant cavernous hemangioma of the orbit (case report)].

    PubMed

    Grusha, Ia O; Ismailova, D S; Eksarenko, O V; Fedorov, A A; Kharlap, S I

    2014-01-01

    The following case demonstrates a successful en bloc removal of a massive cavernous hemangioma of the orbit via vertical transpalpebral approach with postoperative improvement of optic nerve condition and optimal cosmetic result.

  7. An Unusual Differential Diagnosis of Orbital Cavernous Hemangioma: Ancient Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Sara Filipa Teixeira; Queirós, Tatiana; Amorim, José M.; Ferreira, Ana M.; Sales-Sanz, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Schwannomas are rare lesions of the orbit that can be confused with cavernous hemangioma on imaging studies. We report the case of an 84-year-old woman with a 9-year history of a tumoral lesion in the inferolateral left orbit. The imaging studies did not reveal specific characteristics, only bone remodeling due to the long evolution of the tumor. The patient underwent complete excision of the tumor by anterior orbitotomy via the inferior conjunctival fornix. The histopathological examination revealed an ancient schwannoma, a variant of schwannoma with uncommon histological features. The follow-up was uneventful. The present case emphasizes the importance of considering neural tumors in the differential diagnosis of orbital masses with bone changes and degenerative alterations such as hemorrhagic areas, cysts, and/or calcifications. PMID:28626414

  8. Embolization of a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with Onyx via Direct Puncture of the Cavernous Sinus through the Superior Orbital Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Amiridze, N.; Zoarski, G.; Darwish, R.; Obuchowski, A.; Soloveychic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Treatment of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) may be challenging. We describe a patient who had presented with progressive ocular symptoms due to CSDAVF requiring urgent interventional therapy. Initial attempts to embolize the fistula utilizing a transvenous approach through the inferior petrosal sinus failed because of difficult anatomy. Successful occlusion of the fistula was subsequently achieved with injection of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx (EV3 Neurovascular, Irvine, CA, USA), via direct percutaneous puncture of the cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure. A brief period of asystole during the initial injection of Onyx may be the result of the trigeminocardiac reflex. PMID:20465896

  9. [A case of primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma extending from the orbital rim to the sphenoid wing: a case report].

    PubMed

    Inaka, Yasufumi; Otani, Naoki; Nishida, Sho; Kumagai, Kohsuke; Fujii, Kazuya; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomiyama, Arata; Tomura, Satoshi; Osada, Hideo; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-11-01

    A primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma located at the sphenoid bone with extensive involvement of the orbital roof and the lateral wall of the orbit is very rare. A 48-year-old woman presented with progressive right exophthalmos and diplopia. CT showed a bony mass lesion in the right sphenoid bone extending to the orbital bone. MRI showed an abnormal lesion in the sphenoid bone, which was heterogeneously enhanced with gadolinium. All of the abnormal bone was surgically removed, and histological examination confirmed a cavernous angioma. We also present a brief clinical and radiological review of seven previously reported cases.

  10. The transconjunctival approach to a large retrobulbar cavernous hemangioma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong Hoon; Baek, Sun Hee; Choi, Woong Chul

    2002-06-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas are one of the most common benign tumors of the orbit in adults. We report a case of a longstanding retrobulbar hemangioma that was removed successfully through a temporal transconjunctival approach combined with lateral canthotomy. A 45-year-old female patient, with a 15-year history of slowly progressive proptosis and decreased visual acuity of the left eye, had a corrected visual acuity of finger count at 50 cm OS, compared with 1.0 OD. Exophthalmometry by the Nagle's method measured 15 mm OD by 26 mm OS. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a well-encapsulated retrobulbar main mass, 2.3 x 3.0 x 3.7 cm in size along with multiple small satellite nodules that were displacing the optic nerve and globe superiorly. The tumors were removed through a superotemporal transconjunctival approach combined with lateral canthotomy. Pathological examination revealed an intraorbital cavernous hemangioma. The patient was free of visible scars, proptosis and any other noticeable complications at her last follow-up, 6 months after surgery.

  11. [Cranio-orbital zygomatic extradural approach for cavernous sinus or Meckel's cave tumors].

    PubMed

    Kinjo, T; Mukawa, J; Mekaru, S; Koga, H

    1996-06-01

    Direct surgery to cavernous sinus (CS) lesions has become one of the optimal treatments based on advancement in microsurgical anatomy and imaging modality, and the progress of microsurgical techniques. We have removed the CS or Meckel's cave tumors extradurally when they do not extend intradurally, using modified Al-Mefty's cranio-orbital zygomatic craniotomy. Three CS tumors; trigeminal neurofibroma, squamous cell carcinoma and chondrosarcoma, and a Meckel's cave meningioma were reported. Total removal was achieved in all but one (case 4). Postoperative complications were permanent ophthalmoplegia in one, transient ophthalmoplegia in one, subcutaneous CSF accumulation in two and trigeminal dysfunction in one. The extradural approach can be the first choice of methods for total removal of tumors when they are confined to the CS or Meckel's cave.

  12. Technetium tc 99m-labeled red blood cells in the preoperative diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma and other vascular orbital tumors.

    PubMed

    Polito, Ennio; Burroni, Luca; Pichierri, Patrizia; Loffredo, Antonio; Vattimo, Angelo G

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) red blood cell scintigraphy as a diagnostic tool for orbital cavernous hemangioma and to differentiate between orbital masses on the basis of their vascularization. We performed 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy on 23 patients (8 female and 15 male; mean age, 47 years) affected by an orbital mass previously revealed with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and suggesting cavernous hemangioma. In our diagnosis, we considered the orbital increase delayed uptake with the typical scintigraphic pattern known as perfusion blood pool mismatch. The patients underwent biopsy or surgical treatment with transconjunctival cryosurgical extraction when possible. Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) showed intense focal uptake in the orbit corresponding to radiologic findings in 11 patients who underwent surgical treatment and pathologic evaluation (9 cavernous hemangiomas, 1 hemangiopericytoma, and 1 lymphangioma). Clinical or histologic examination of the remaining 22 patients revealed the presence of 5 lymphoid pseudotumors, 2 lymphomas, 2 pleomorphic adenomas of the lacrimal gland, 1 astrocytoma, 1 ophthalmic vein thrombosis, and 1 orbital varix. The confirmation of the preoperative diagnosis by 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy shows that this technique is a reliable tool for differentiating cavernous hemangiomas from other orbital masses (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 86%) when ultrasound, CT, and MRI are not diagnostic. Unfortunately, 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy results were positive in 1 patient with hemangiopericytoma and 1 patient with lymphangioma, which showed increased uptake in the lesion on SPET images because of the vascular nature of these tumors. Therefore, in these cases, the SPET images have to be integrated with data regarding clinical preoperative evaluation and CT scans or MRI studies. On the basis of our study, a complete diagnostic picture, CT scans or MRI studies, and

  13. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  14. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  15. Inflammation of the Orbit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors of the Orbit Any or all of ... Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors of the Orbit NOTE: This ...

  16. Surgical Simulation of Extradural Anterior Clinoidectomy through the Trans-superior Orbital Fissure Approach Using a Dissectable Three-dimensional Skull Base Model with Artificial Cavernous Sinus.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakao, Yasuaki; Esaki, Takanori

    2010-07-01

    Extradural anterior clinoidectomy via the trans-superior orbital fissure (SOF) approach can provide extensive exposure of the anterior clinoid process and safe drilling under direct view. This technique requires peeling of the dura propria of the temporal lobe from the lateral wall of the SOF. Therefore, cadaveric dissection is mandatory to acquire surgical technique. However, chances for cadaveric dissection are limited. We propose modification of our three-dimensional (3-D) skull base model made from surgically dissectable artificial bone with artificial cavernous sinus including multiple membranous layers and neurovascular structures to simulate extradural anterior clinoidectomy via the trans-SOF approach. The 3-D skull base model precisely reproduced the dura propria of the temporal lobe, periosteal bridge, and inner reticular layer in the cavernous sinus and SOF using silicone and varnish. The cranial nerves and blood vessels were made from rubber fibers and vinyl tube. Simulation of extradural anterior clinoidectomy via the trans-SOF approach could be performed on the model using a high-speed drill under the operating microscope. The steps of reconstruction of the skull base model and dissection promote clear understanding of the 3-D anatomy and techniques of extradural anterior clinoidectomy via the trans-SOF approach.

  17. Removal of a chopstick out of the cavernous sinus, pons, and cerebellar vermis through the superior orbital fissure.

    PubMed

    Mitilian, Delphine; Charon, Brigitte; Brunelle, Francis; Di Rocco, Federico

    2009-10-01

    Penetrating non-missile orbito cranial injuries are rare in a civilian pediatric setting. We describe a case of a trans-orbital penetration by a wooden chopstick deep down into the cerebellar vermis detected at neuroradiological examination in a child presenting for head injury. The foreign body was successfully pulled out in one piece surgically.

  18. [Penetrating air gun pellet into the orbital apex].

    PubMed

    Belmonte-Caro, Rodolfo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Romero-Arce, Jose; Infante-Cossio, Pedro

    2017-04-14

    A foreign body penetrating into the intraconal orbital compartment poses a surgical challenge because of its deep location behind the globe and near the optic nerve. We present a case of an air gun pellet lodged into the orbital apex, which was removed via superolateral orbitotomy through coronal incision. This additional craniofacial technique is a safe procedure to access the lateral aspect of the intraconal compartment in the unusual event of having to remove an orbital foreign body. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. A Rare Case of An Atypical Solitary Fibrous Tumour of Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Ingole, Avinash Babarao; Gharat, Anuja Mihir; Murade, Sujit Mardansingh; Nicholson, Anjali Darius

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours are of mesenchymal origin and comprise of uncommon spindle cell neoplasias. Most commonly the lesions arise from pleura but other rarer sites include lungs, peritoneum, pericardium, nasal cavities, thyroid, parotid gland and orbit. We report the case of a 41-year-old male patient who presented to us with a painless, progressive growth of a mass in the superior part of left orbit with proptosis and inferotemporal displacement of the left eye. Computed Tomography (CT) scan revealed homogeneous enhancing lesion in the superior compartment of left orbit in the extraconal region, extending intraconally and distorting the globe. Upon imaging, the differential diagnosis were lacrimal gland tumour, atypical cavernous haemangioma and nerve sheath tumour. Surgical treatment included complete excision of the mass with the intraoperative finding of mass extending upto the superior oblique tendon, a part of which was excised. Histopathological examination revealed CD34 positive, Bcl-2 and MIC-2 positive tumour with the diagnosis of a solitary fibrous tumour with atypical features but no malignant features. After a follow-up of 18 months, no recurrence was detected. PMID:28050416

  20. IgG4-related disease with cavernous sinus and intra-orbital lesions diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Ruka; Yoshimura, Shunsuke; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tsujino, Akira; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Hara, Minoru

    2016-09-29

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disease characterized by lesions with IgG4 positive plasma cell infiltration in the involved organs and a raised serum IgG4 level. We report a patient of 70-year-old male presented orbital inflammation of IgG4-related disease. The patient developed right eye pain, double vision, and reduced eye sight. MRI image revealed mild right ocular proptosis and swelling of right carvenous sinus, bilateral intraorbital extraocular muscles and right optic nerve. Right optic nerve showed ring-like enhancement. IgG4-related disease was suspected with increased serum IgG4 level of 355 mg/dl, mediastinal lymphadenopathy and prostate enlargement. Transbronchial lung biopsy and prostate needle biopsy were administered with negative results. The eye related symptoms resolved with time, but serum IgG4 continuously increased. IgG4-related disease was diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy, which showed IgG4 positive plasma cells within the inflammatory infiltrate. This report emphasizes the usefulness of nasal mucosa biopsy for the diagnosis of IgG4 related disease with lesions difficult to approach.

  1. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions comprised of clusters of tightly packed, abnormally thin-walled small blood ... cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions comprised of clusters of tightly packed, abnormally thin-walled small blood ...

  2. Cavernous sinus thrombosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Santamarta, Elena; Martínez, Patricia; Sáiz-Ayala, Antonio; Llorente, José L

    2017-04-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) represents a rare but devastating disease process that may be associated with significant long-term patient morbidity or mortality. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical management are imperative for patients with CST. We present the case of a 24-year-old pregnant woman with intraorbital abscess and CST secondary to Streptococcus milleri. Surgical intervention included orbital abscess drainage and dental extraction, medical therapy included intravenous antibiotic, heparin, and methylprednisolone and an elective cesarean section was performed. The latter was the key point to resolution the disease.

  3. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  4. Orbital liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Borbolla-Pertierra, A M; Morales-Baños, D R; Martínez-Nava, L R; Garrido-Sánchez, G A; López-Hernández, C M; Velasco-Ramos, P

    2017-02-01

    The case is presented of a 46-year-old male with right eye proptosis and conjunctival hyperaemia, of 18 months onset. A well-defined intraconal mass was found in the computed tomography. In magnetic resonance this was hypo-intense on T1, enhanced with gadolinium and hyperintense on T2. Excisional biopsy was performed, which was reported as a well-differentiated liposarcoma in the histopathology study. Liposarcoma is a malignant adipose tissue tumour. It is very rare in the orbit, with 5 histological types, the most common being myxoid. The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision and may be accompanied with radiotherapy. As it is an infiltrative tumour, It has a high rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Registry Interest Form Contact Us | Login Disorder Definitions Learn More > Disorder Definitions Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM) ... until it is too late to salvage vision. Routine screening is very important, even if there are ...

  6. Giant calvarial cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Satish Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Garg, Kanwaljeet; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sharma, Mehar C.; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Though hemangiomas of the bone are quite common, calvarial (skull) cavernous hemangiomas are relatively rare pathologies. Calvarial hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. However, they may occasionally grow in size to achieve large sizes and can present as a palpable swelling. We present a child with massive temporo-parieto-occipital calvarial cavernous hemangioma, who was managed with a multimodal approach with excellent cosmetic and neurologic outcome. PMID:25878743

  7. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T.; Giles, H.N.

    1995-12-01

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  8. Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Mahdieh; Kamali, Azadeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Arashnia, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a rare condition that can result in high mortality and morbidity rates if not treated immediately. CST may be aseptic or septic. Less common primary sites of infection include the tonsils, soft palate, middle ear, and orbit. Reported cases of middle ear infection are very rare, and response to treatment is poor. Case Presentation The present study is a case report of acute otitis media which led to septic cavernous sinus thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman in Bojnord city, North Khorasan, Iran. Conclusions Findings of laboratory tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Clinical-based medical care led to successful management of the patient with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics that prevented serious complications. PMID:27781123

  9. Posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula: Pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnostic management and proper treatment. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; Román-Ramos, María; Fernandez-Solis, José; Martínez-Lara, Ildefonso

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas are an uncommon diseases characterized by abnormal communications between arteries and veins located in the cavernous sinus. According with Barrow´s classification they could be divided in two groups: direct and indirect. The typical symptoms showed by theses pathologies are: pulsating exophthalmos and orbital blow. The present study describes a case of direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula in a 26 years old man. Furthermore, we present the images that we used to make the diagnosis. In this light, we decided to treat this case with endovascular approach after considering several therapeutic options. The aim of the present report is twofold. First, we examine the importance of the proper management of the direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula. Second, we describe this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Carotid cavernous fistulas, pulsating exophthalmos, orbital blow, endovascular approach, Barrow´s classification. PMID:27034767

  10. [Diagnosis of orbital cysticercosis -- a challenge for ophthalmologist].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Popescu, Livia; Szabo, I; Opincariu, I

    2012-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a cause of serious ocular/orbital morbidity. Ocular cysticercosis can involve the anterior segment, posterior segment or adnexa. The cysticercus parasite has a predilection for subconjunctival, subretinal and intravitreal structures. Orbital involvement, in which the parasite localises within the extraocular muscle is rare. Orbital cysticercosis commonly presents with signs of inflammation, diplopia, restricted extraocular motility and proptosis. This report is of a 43-year-old woman with orbital cysticercus lying in the intraconal space, in relation with lateral rectus muscle, near to the apex of the orbit, presenting as a diplopia and painless movements of the eyeball.

  11. Cardiac cavernous hemangioma and multiple pulmonary cavernous hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Dai, Jun; Xiao, Ying; Cheng, Henghui; Ruan, Qiurong

    2014-02-01

    We describe for the first time a rare coexistence of a cardiac cavernous hemangioma with multiple pulmonary cavernous hemangiomas. Computed tomography revealed bilateral pulmonary nodules, left pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion. Positron emission tomography showed a pericardial neoplasm. Pathologically, multiple large dilated vascular spaces, lined by a single layer of endothelial cells and filled with blood, were revealed in both the cardiac tumor and the pulmonary nodules. Immunohistochemical examination of the lining cells showed positivity for CD31, FLI1, FVIII, and CD34. Taken together, these findings led to the diagnosis of cardiac cavernous hemangioma and multiple pulmonary cavernous hemangiomas.

  12. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  13. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  14. The transmaxillary endoscopic approach to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Schultheiß, Saskia; Petridis, Athanasios K; El Habony, Rashad; Maurer, Peter; Scholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this surgical-anatomical cadaveric study we investigate the feasibility of the transmaxillary endoscopic approach to the intraorbital space. Anatomical landmarks are defined, the endoscopic view in the orbital space is studied and complications that can occur are discussed. Nine formalin-fixed heads were used to study the transmaxillary endoscopic approach to the orbit. The approach was used twice on each head (once for each maxilla). Therefore, we report our results on 18 transmaxillary intraorbital approaches. For better differentiation of anatomical structures, the veins and arteries were injected with blue and red plastic respectively in six cadaveric heads. The transmaxillary approach enables viewing the inferior intraconal structures without endangering the infraorbital nerve and its artery and without diversion of the inferior rectus muscle. The optic nerve was visualised more easily through the approach medial to the inferior rectus muscle instead of lateral to the muscle since the ciliary nerves are in the way in the lateral approach. The combination of the approaches medial and lateral to the inferior rectus muscle allows very good identification of all important anatomical structures in the inferior intraconal space. The transmaxillary endoscopic approach to the orbit is a useful new approach in the surgical armamentarium for orbital lesions. The overview of the inferior part of the orbit is excellent, and the lateral part of the optic nerve can be visualised. Careful anatomical dissection allows visualisation of important anatomical structures in the orbit without damaging nerves or arteries.

  15. [Orbital leiomyoma. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Emilio; Robla Costales, Javier; Fernández Fernández, Javier; Viñuela Lobo, Jesús; Santamarta, David; Lomas García, Jesús; Iglesias, Elena; Ribas Ariño, Teresa; García-Cosamalón, José

    2014-01-01

    Leiomyoma are slowly growing lesions arising from smooth muscle. Orbital location has been reported in 25 cases. Histological findings and no recurrence after total resection support their benign behaviour. We report an intraconal orbital haemangioleiomyoma in a 55-year-old female treated by total resection through fronto-orbital craniotomy, with no recurrence after 15 months of follow-up. Radiological and pathological features are discussed, emphasising the prognostic role of the surgery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. [Clinical features and management of cavernous and venous angiomas in the head].

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Koji; Date, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous angiomas consist of well-circumscribed collections of thin-walled sinusoidal vascular channels lacking the intervening brain tissue. They are present in 0.4-0.8% of the population, and can occur in a sporadic or familial form. Most common symptoms are seizures, hemorrhage, and focal neurological deficits. The annual bleeding rate of the patient is reported to be 0.25%-20%. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful diagnostic tool with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Microsurgical excision of the lesion is a good treatment choice for cavernous angiomas in the brain, even in the brainstem. Although stereotactic radiosurgery may reduce the incidence of rebleeding and the frequency of seizures, its indication should be carefully investigated because of the relatively high rate of radiation-induced side effects. Less frequently, cavernous angiomas can be located at the extra-axial regions of the head, which include the cavernous sinus, the orbit, and the cranial nerves. Cavernous angiomas in the cavernous sinus pose a neurosurgical challenge due to the high vascularity and involvement of the neurovascular structures, and stereotactic radiosurgery is considered as an additional option. Surgical resection is recommended for symptomatic cavernous angiomas in the orbit; however, the rate of complications after resection is not necessarily low for cavernous angiomas within the apex. Venous angiomas are anomalies of normal venous drainage, which show characteristic appearance of the drainage system in the late phase of angiography (caput medusae). They are found either alone or in combination with other vascular malformations. Conservative treatment is recommended except for patients with a large hematoma or with a coexisting cavernous angioma.

  17. Bilateral septic cavernous sinus thrombosis following the masticator and parapharyngeal space infection from the odontogenic origin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiddee, Weerawat; Preechawai, Passorn; Hirunpat, Siriporn

    2010-09-01

    Neglect of odontogenic infections can have serious consequences. If they spread through fascial planes and intracranially they can cause an abscess, orbital cellulitis, and eventually cavernous sinus thrombosis. The authors report a case of rapid progressive bilateral orbital cellulitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis that originated from dental caries. Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a medical emergency. Early recognition and prompt treatments direct to the underlying sources of infection are crucial. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality from this lethal condition. Management should be based on early diagnosis and prompt management with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics and surgical intervention.

  18. Orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Robert M.

    2003-06-01

    ORBITAL requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime Plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL).

  19. Bladder cavernous hemangioma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Collar, Tomás Lázaro; Casa de Valle Castro, Midalys; Báez Sarría, Felix; Trujillo Fernández, Reinerio

    2014-07-01

    To report a case of a bladder cavernous hemangioma, as well as the main features of its diagnosis and treatment. A 74 year old patient, regular smoker, presented with total macroscopic hematuria of moderate intensity with large rounded clots. On physical examination the patient's mucous membranes color was normal, and digital rectal examination showed a normal size prostate with fibroelastic consistency. An abdominal ultrasound was performed showing a slight bladder bottom thickening in addition to free clots and a homogeneous and normal prostate. Cystoscopy confirmed the presence of a sessile violet-colored rounded retrotrigonal tumor, 2 cm in diameter and 0.5 in height; it was immediately resected. The pathological study reported cavernous hemangioma. Patient's evolution has been satisfactory. Bladder cavernous hemangioma is a rare cause of hematuria, and transurethral resection of the small size lesions constitutes an effective option as a definitive surgical treatment.

  20. Bilateral Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas: An Uncommon Cause of Pituitary Enlargement and Hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Lechan, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are rare, pathologic communications of the carotid artery and the venous plexus of the cavernous sinus. They can develop spontaneously in certain at risk individuals or following traumatic head injury. Typical clinical manifestations include headache, proptosis, orbital pain, and diplopia. We report a case of bilateral carotid-cavernous fistulas associated with these symptoms and also with pituitary enlargement and hypopituitarism, which improved following surgical intervention. Arterialization of the cavernous sinus and elevated portal pressure may interfere with normal venous drainage and the conveyance of inhibiting and releasing hormones from the hypothalamus, resulting in pituitary enlargement and hypopituitarism. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypopituitarism associated with anterior pituitary enlargement. PMID:27651959

  1. Secondary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit

    PubMed Central

    Siuw, Chin Pei; Tan, Siow W; Abdul Wahid, Adrena B; Vasudevan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with right eye axial proptosis and ophthalmoplegia for 3 months. Imaging study showed a right intraconal mass with the erosion of the orbital floor. Incisional biopsy revealed mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Nasal endoscopy was normal and systemic tumor screening was negative for a primary source. The patient underwent right orbital exenteration, uncinectomy, nasal and maxillary mucosal biopsy. Malignant cells were found present in the mucosa of maxillary sinus roof and uncinate bone. The postoperative positron emission tomography scan showed residual active lesion in right orbital apex and maxilla but no primary lesion elsewhere. The patient subsequently underwent 35 cycles of postoperative radiotherapy. Primary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit is rare and typically arises from the lacrimal gland or sac. Those tumors not arising from lacrimal apparatus should be presumed metastatic in origin, and the thorough systemic survey should be undertaken in the search for the primary tumor. PMID:27146939

  2. Secondary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Siuw, Chin Pei; Tan, Siow W; Abdul Wahid, Adrena B; Vasudevan, Suresh

    2016-03-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with right eye axial proptosis and ophthalmoplegia for 3 months. Imaging study showed a right intraconal mass with the erosion of the orbital floor. Incisional biopsy revealed mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Nasal endoscopy was normal and systemic tumor screening was negative for a primary source. The patient underwent right orbital exenteration, uncinectomy, nasal and maxillary mucosal biopsy. Malignant cells were found present in the mucosa of maxillary sinus roof and uncinate bone. The postoperative positron emission tomography scan showed residual active lesion in right orbital apex and maxilla but no primary lesion elsewhere. The patient subsequently underwent 35 cycles of postoperative radiotherapy. Primary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit is rare and typically arises from the lacrimal gland or sac. Those tumors not arising from lacrimal apparatus should be presumed metastatic in origin, and the thorough systemic survey should be undertaken in the search for the primary tumor.

  3. Extra-Axial Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Imad; Jallu, Ashraf; Alwatban, Jehad; Patay, Zoltan; Hessler, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Two patients with extra-axial cavernous hemangioma who presented with headache and oculovisual disturbances were investigated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions masqueraded as basal meningioma, but this diagnosis was not supported by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in one patient. Cerebral angiography with embolization was indicated in one patient, but embolization was not justified in the other. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy. The lesions were extradural and highly vascular, necessitating excessive transfusion in one patient in whom gross total resection was achieved, and precluding satisfactory removal in the other. There was no mortality. Transient ophthalmoplegia, the only complication in one patient, was due to surgical manipulation of the cavernous sinus; it resolved progressively over 3 months. Extra-axial skull base cavernous hemangiomas are distinct entities with clinical and radiological characteristics that differ from those of intraparenchymal cavernous malformations. They can mimic meningiomas or pituitary tumors. In some cases, magnetic resonance spectroscopy may narrow the differential diagnoses. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice, facilitated by preoperative embolization to reduce intraoperative bleeding and by the application of the principles of skull base surgery. Fractionated radiotherapy is an alternative in partial or difficult resections and in high-risk and elderly patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17167631

  4. Cavernous Hemangioma in the Breast.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Oğuz Uğur; Soylu, Lütfi; Ercan, Aydan İlkme; Bilezikçi, Banu; Özbaş, Serdar

    2015-10-01

    Although the observation of breast vascular tumors is rare, the most common tumor is hemangıoma in the benign group, and these tumors are observed incidentally in lumpectomy or mastectomy specimens during histological examinations. They are classified into capillary, cavernous, and venous hemangıomas. Cavernous hemangıoma is the most common subtype. Cavernous hemangıomas are benign vascular tumors, which malformatıon from mature blood vessels. Hemangıomas ın the benıgn group may show a suspicion of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in mammographic analysis. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance ımagıng (MRI) are the most useful imaging methods for analyzing the structure of breast vessels. In this case, a 54-year-old female who have any complaint. Scanning mammography (MG) detected the tumor, but physıcal examınatıon and US could not identify the mass. According to the MG analysis, the lesion was evaluated as BIRADS 4b, and the patient underwent excisional biopsy after wire localization. Pathological analysis revealed cavernous hemangıoma.

  5. Effects of cavern spacing on the performance and stability of gas-filled storage caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1993-04-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses of gas-filled storage caverns in domal salt were performed to investigate the effects of cavern spacing on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability. The finite element model used for this study models a seven cavern storage field with one center cavern and six hexagonally spaced surrounding caverns. Cavern spacing is described in terms of the P/D ratio which is the pillar thickness (the width between two caverns) divided by the cavern diameter. With the stratigraphy and cavern size held constant, simulations were performed for P/D ratios of 6.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5. Ten year simulations were performed modeling a constant 400 psi gas pressure applied to the cavern lining. The calculations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. For the range of P/D ratios studied, cavern deformation and storage volume were relatively insensitive to P/D ratio, while subsidence volume increased with increasing P/D ratio. A stability criterion which describes stability in terms of a limiting creep strain was used to investigate cavern stability. The stability criterion indicated that through-pillar instability was possible for the cases of P/D = 0.5 and 1.0.

  6. New public information resources on salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-08-25

    For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has fi.mded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

  7. New public information resources on salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-08-25

    For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has funded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

  8. [Bilateral cavernous sinus non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as the presenting sign of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Barreira Junior, Alan Kardec; Moura, Frederico Castelo; Monteiro, Mario Luiz Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Case report of bilateral cavernous sinus syndrome due to primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the central nervous system in a patient infected by the human immunodeficiency virus. A 51-year-old male patient infected by the human immunodeficiency virus but without antiretroviral treatment developed paralysis of the V and VI cranial nerves. Imaging studies were obtained to investigate an orbital apex and a cavernous sinus syndrome. A computerized tomography scan of the orbit was normal but a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated bilateral enlargement of the cavernous sinus. Although primary lymphoma of the central nervous system is a rare condition, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in immunocompromised patients who develop ocular motility abnormalities and imaging signs suggestive of infiltrative cavernous sinus lesions.

  9. Natural gas cavern storage regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heneman, H.

    1995-09-01

    Investigation of an incident at an LPG storage facility in Texas by U.S. Department of Transportation resulted in recommendation that state regulation of natural gas cavern storage might be improved. Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission has established a subcommittee to analyze the benefits and risks associated with natural gas cavern storage, and to draft a regulation model which will suggest engineering and performance specifications. The resulting analysis and regulatory language will be reviewed by I.O.G.C.C., and if approved, distributed to member states (including New York) for consideration. Should the states desire assistance in modifying the language to reflect local variables, such as policy and geology, I.O.G.C.C. may offer assistance. The proposed presentation will review the I.O.G.C.C. product (if published at that date), and discuss implications of its application in New York.

  10. Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

    2000-07-01

    Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

  11. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  12. An interesting case of angiogenesis in cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipankar; Bhattacharjee, Kasturi; Deka, Panna; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Misra, Diva Kant; Koul, Akanksha; Kapoor, Deepika; Deka, Apurba

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is the most common orbital tumor in adult. There is lot of literatures for clinicopathological features of this tumor. These tumors had been studied for the model of angiogenesis in many of the experimental setups. We present a case of 34-year-old male with this tumor in the left eye with computerized tomography evidence. Postsurgical laboratory findings gave interesting evidence of tumor angiogenesis with tumor endothelial cells and sprouting of the small vessels endothelial cells. Podosome rosette could be conceptualized from the characteristic patterns seen in the tumor. PMID:27905347

  13. Extradural cavernous haemangioma simulating a disc protrusion.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, J P; Fowler, S; Sage, M R; Brophy, B P

    1999-02-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas confined to the epidural space are rare and are therefore infrequently considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural masses. In order to draw attention to this diagnosis, a case in which an epidural cavernous haemangioma simulates a lateral/foraminal disc protrusion is presented.

  14. Giant Cavernous Haemangioma of the Anterior Mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancılar, Ozgur; Usluer, Ozan; Acar, Tuba; Yener, Ali Galip

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the anterior mediastinum is rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old male patient with a giant cavernous hemangioma of the anterior mediastinum, 18 cm in diameters, approached by left posterolateral thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, such a unique case has not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:26644773

  15. Primary extraosseous Ewing sarcoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Alio, Jorge L; Sales-Sanz, Marco; Vaz, Maria A; Barrancos, Constanza; Reguero, Maria E; Diamantopoulus, Jorge; Poveda, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with painless, progressive vision loss and mild proptosis of the OD. CT revealed a right intraconal mass with slight penetration of the optic canal not contiguous with any bony structure. Incisional biopsy through a transfrontal orbitotomy revealed a diffuse growth of homogeneous, small, round cells. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for vimentin and MIC2 (CD99), and the translocation at EWS gene (22q12) was detected. Metastatic workup and a full-body bone scan were negative, confirming primary orbital extraosseous Ewing sarcoma. The patient received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and an orbital exenteration with preservation of eyelids and conjunctiva. He also received adjuvant chemotherapy and local radiotherapy, and he has remained disease-free for almost 3 years.

  16. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  17. Noncavernous arteriovenous shunts mimicking carotid cavernous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Kobkitsuksakul, Chai; Jiarakongmun, Pakorn; Chanthanaphak, Ekachat; Singhara Na Ayudya, Sirintara (Pongpech)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The classic symptoms and signs of carotid cavernous sinus fistula or cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) consist of eye redness, exophthalmos, and gaze abnormality. The angiography findings typically consist of arteriovenous shunt at cavernous sinus with ophthalmic venous drainage with or without cortical venous reflux. In rare circumstances, the shunts are localized outside the cavernous sinus, but mimic symptoms and radiography of the cavernous shunt. We would like to present the other locations of the arteriovenous shunt, which mimic the clinical presentation of carotid cavernous fistulae, and analyze venous drainages. METHODS We retrospectively examined the records of 350 patients who were given provisional diagnoses of carotid cavernous sinus fistulae or cavernous sinus dural AVF in the division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok between 2008 and 2014. Any patient with cavernous arteriovenous shunt was excluded. RESULTS Of those 350 patients, 10 patients (2.85%) were identified as having noncavernous sinus AVF. The angiographic diagnoses consisted of three anterior condylar (hypoglossal) dural AVF, two traumatic middle meningeal AVF, one lesser sphenoid wing dural AVF, one vertebro-vertebral fistula (VVF), one intraorbital AVF, one direct dural artery to cortical vein dural AVF, and one transverse-sigmoid dural AVF. Six cases (60%) were found to have venous efferent obstruction. CONCLUSION Arteriovenous shunts mimicking the cavernous AVF are rare, with a prevalence of only 2.85% in this series. The clinical presentation mainly depends on venous outflow. The venous outlet of the arteriovenous shunts is influenced by venous afferent-efferent patterns according to the venous anatomy of the central nervous system and the skull base, as well as by architectural disturbance, specifically, obstruction of the venous outflow. PMID:27767958

  18. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    PubMed

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling.

  19. Transvenous embolization in spontaneous direct carotid-cavernous fistula in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Glenna B.; Irie, Keiko; Negoro, Makoto; Moriya, Shigeta; Tanaka, Teppei; Ohmura, Masahiro; Sadato, Akiyo; Hayakawa, Motuharu; Sano, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous communication in the cavernous sinus. Direct CCF results from a tear in the intracavernous carotid artery. Typically, it has a high flow and usually presents with oculo-orbital venous congestive features such as exophthalmos, chemosis, and sometimes oculomotor or abducens cranial nerve palsy. Indirect CCF generally occurs spontaneously with subtle signs. We report a rare case of spontaneous direct CCF in childhood who did not have the usual history of craniofacial trauma or connective tissue disorder but presented with progressive chemosis and exophthalmos of the right eye. This report aims also to describe the safety and success of transvenous embolization with coils of the superior ophthalmic vein and cavernous sinus through the inferior petrosal sinus. PMID:22059104

  20. [Treatment of carotid cavernous fistulas].

    PubMed

    Solymosi, L

    2004-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) is an interdisciplinary challenge for both ophthalmologists and interventional neuroradiologists. According to the clinical signs and symptoms the tentative diagnosis is made by the ophthalmologist. It is the task of the neuroradiologist to ascertain this diagnosis by intra-arterial angiography. If a fistula is suspected this invasive diagnostic procedure is indispensable, not only to establish the diagnosis but also to classify those types of fistula with an unfavourable spontaneous course possibly resulting in intracranial haemorrhage. The indication for therapy is based on the clinical symptoms and the angiographic findings. In a number of cases no therapy is required. Since a fistula may change over time, these patients have to be under close ophthalmological surveillance. In many patients a conservative therapeutic approach with manual compression of the carotid artery is sufficient as a fIrst step. Invasive treatment is performed via the endovascular approach in almost all cases. Direct CCF are predominantly treated transarterially with detachable balloons and/or coils. Recently, intracranial stents have been used increasingly. The embolisation of indirect CCF is most effective using the transvenous access with coils. There are several approaches to the cavernous sinus. The interventional occlusion of CCF is nowadays a very effective treatment associated with a comparatively high cure rate and low incidence of complications. By close cooperation between ophthalmologists and neuroradiologists the patients can be protected against visual loss, the development of a secondary glaucoma, and, most importantly, against intracranial haemorrhage.

  1. Nine-year-old girl with a respiratory epithelial cyst of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Weegerink, N; Van Goethem, J; De Schepper, S; Van de Velde, T; Schmelzer, B

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a nine-year-old girl with an intraorbital mass of the left orbit, and review the relevant literature. Imaging data and surgical biopsy revealed an intraconal cystic lesion in the medial-inferior quadrant of the left orbit. The cyst was lined with ciliated pseudostratified epithelium, consistent with a respiratory epithelial cyst of the orbit. Cyst marsupialisation and partial mass removal alleviated symptoms, and no cyst recurrence was observed during follow-up. The literature suggests that this is an uncommon cause of a cystic orbital mass. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraorbital masses. Surgical excision of such a lesion should be limited to avoid damaging orbital structures. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit generally follow a benign course, and recurrence of ocular symptoms is rare.

  2. Multiple cavernous malformations with supravermian arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation are congenital vascular abnormalities that have been reported in 0.4% of the population; they represent 5-13% of all cerebrovascular malformations. Onset of cerebral cavernous malformations may be associated with seizures, intracranial hemorrhages, focal neurological deficit or migraine-type headaches. Some patients may require surgical intervention due to hemorrhage. Multiple cavernomas in childhood have been reported in the literature, but they are rare. This manuscript presents a 12-year-old girl with multiple cavernomas accompanied by supravermian arachnoid cyst detected by neuroimaging techniques. This is the first report that demonstrates a case of pediatric multiple cavernous malformation coexisting with arachnoid cyst of the supravermian cistern.

  3. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  4. Site tests validate benefits of cavern probes

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1997-03-10

    More than 5 years` experience with downhole probes has allowed TransGas Ltd., Regina, to monitor and evaluate cavern integrity. The devices access natural-gas storage caverns` pressures and temperatures. Acquired data have helped determine gas-in-place inventory volumes, confirm spatial volumes, and assess changes in spatial volumes that may have resulted from cavern creep (shrinkage or closure) or downhole abnormality such as fluid infill or collapse of the side walls or roof areas. This conclusion of two articles presents details and results of a specific storage-site. The first article presented background and many of the details and lessons of TransGas` cavern gas-storage probe program.

  5. Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

  6. Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 web analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1993-01-01

    The relatively thin web of salt that separates Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 was evaluated using the finite-element method. The stability calculations provided insight as to whether or not any operationrestrictions or recommendations are necessary. Because of the uncertainty in the exact dimensions of the salt web, various web thicknesses were examined under different operating scenarios that included individual cavern workovers and drawdowns. Cavern workovers were defined by a sudden drop in the oil side pressure at the wellhead to atmospheric. Workovers represent periods of low cavern pressure. Cavern drawdowns were simulated by enlargening the cavern diameters, thus decreasing the thickness of the web. The calculations predict that Cavern 15 dominates the behavior of the web because of its larger diameter. Thus, giventhe choice of caverns, Cavern 17 should be used for oil withdrawal in order to minimize the adverse impacts on web resulting from pressure drops or cavern enlargement. From a stability point of view, maintaining normal pressures in Cavern 15 was found to be more important than operating the caverns as a gallery where both caverns are maintained at the same pressure. However, during a workover, it may be prudent to operate the caverns under similar pressures to avoid the possibility of a sudden pressure surge at the wellhead should the web fail.

  7. Deformation behaviour of a large underground cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukoshi, Tatsuo; Mimaki, Youichi

    1985-10-01

    The Imaichi underground power station, with a cross sectional area of 1420 m2, which is now under construction by Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., is one of the largest underground caverns in the world. Due to the considerable depth of the over-burden of 400 m, the horseshoe-shaped section was adopted for the first time in Japan to minimize excesive stress concentration on the surrounding bedrock and keep loosened zones to a minimum. The bedrock consists of sandstone, slate, siliceous sandstone and breccia. The rock is generally hard and compact, with few fractured zones which may have an adverse influence on the excavation of the cavern. The supporting system of the cavern consists of prestressed rock anchors, rock bolts and shotcrete. Approximately 800 instruments, mainly multiple stage extensometers, were used to monitor behaviour of the surrounding rock during excavation of the cavern. With the exception of some cracks which occurred in a portion of the shotcrete when about half the height of the cavern had been excavated, excavation work was completed without any major trouble. In spite of the symmetrical shape of the cavern, the deformation behaviour of the surrounding rock during excavation was remarkedly asymmetric. The reason for this was concluded to be the peculiar deformation behaviour exhibited by Breccia during stress relief, as shown by in-situ rock tests, etc., and analysis of deformation data after completion of the excavation work.

  8. Unilateral Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula Causing Bilateral Ocular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Demartini Jr., Zeferino; Liebert, Fernando; Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Jung, Thiago Simiano; Rocha Jr., Carlos; Santos, Alex Marques Borges; Koppe, Gelson Luis

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral carotid cavernous fistula presents with ipsilateral ocular findings. Bilateral presentation is only seen in bilateral fistulas, usually associated with indirect (dural) carotid cavernous fistulas. Direct carotid cavernous fistulas are an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. They typically begin with a traumatic disruption in the artery wall into the cavernous sinus, presenting with a classic triad of unilateral pulsatile exophthalmos, cranial bruit and episcleral venous engorgement. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with traumatic right carotid cavernous sinus fistula and bilateral ocular presentation successfully treated by interventional neuroradiology. PMID:26955353

  9. Multimodality treatment approach in management of primary peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the orbit

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Usha R; Arora, Vipul; Devanand, J; Khazei, Hadi M

    2009-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumor is a small round cell malignancy which rarely involves the orbit. We report a case of a two-year old male child presenting as unilateral eccentric proptosis with extraconal and intraconal mass, diagnosed as primary peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPPNET) on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. There is no defined consensus in the management of these tumors due to its rare presentation. We describe its distinguishing features with emphasis on multimodal and aggressive treatment approach which ensures appropriate management of these cases. PMID:19700883

  10. Cavernous malformation of the optic chiasm: Neuro-endoscopic removal.

    PubMed

    Venkataramana, N K; Rao, Shailesh A V; Arun, L N; Krishna, C

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) arising from the optic nerve and chiasm are extremely rare. In large autopsy series, CMs were estimated to range from 0.02 to 0.13% in the general population. However, with introduction of MRI, these lesions were found more often than previously thought, ranging from 0.2% to 0.4%. Only 29 cases have been reported according to our knowledge. Most patients present with drop in visual acuity and visual field. Although MRI findings of cavernous malformations have been reported, they may not be diagnostic enough. Among the 29 reported, 16 underwent total resection with good results. In some, resection was complicated by damage to the surrounding neural tissue. Surgical removal is the recommended treatment to restore or preserve vision and to eliminate the risk of future hemorrhage. However, the anatomical location and eloquence of nearby neural structures can make these lesions difficult to access and remove. CMs appear to occur in every age group (range 4 months to 84 years mean-34.6 years) ith an approximately equal male to female ratio. They typically present with chiasmal apoplexy, characterized by sudden visual loss, acute headaches, retro orbital pain, and nausea.

  11. Cavernous malformation of the optic chiasm: Neuro-endoscopic removal

    PubMed Central

    Venkataramana, N. K.; Rao, Shailesh A. V.; Arun, L. N.; Krishna, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) arising from the optic nerve and chiasm are extremely rare. In large autopsy series, CMs were estimated to range from 0.02 to 0.13% in the general population. However, with introduction of MRI, these lesions were found more often than previously thought, ranging from 0.2% to 0.4%. Only 29 cases have been reported according to our knowledge. Most patients present with drop in visual acuity and visual field. Although MRI findings of cavernous malformations have been reported, they may not be diagnostic enough. Among the 29 reported, 16 underwent total resection with good results. In some, resection was complicated by damage to the surrounding neural tissue. Surgical removal is the recommended treatment to restore or preserve vision and to eliminate the risk of future hemorrhage. However, the anatomical location and eloquence of nearby neural structures can make these lesions difficult to access and remove. CMs appear to occur in every age group (range 4 months to 84 years mean-34.6 years) ith an approximately equal male to female ratio. They typically present with chiasmal apoplexy, characterized by sudden visual loss, acute headaches, retro orbital pain, and nausea PMID:26889286

  12. Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-05-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is

  13. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-07-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  14. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-01-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas. PMID:21572634

  15. Experience in testing of a solution mined storage cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Goin, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recertification tests were made of the U.S. Department of Energy/Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage cavern No. 6 in the West Hackberry, LA, salt dome. The cavern has a volume of 8,600,000 bbl. Tests included hydrostatic tests of the brine filled cavern and nitrogen leak tests of the 3 wells entering the cavern. Test procedures are described and test results are discussed.

  16. Pineal Cavernous Malformations: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Seok; Shim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Tae-Gon; Chang, Jong-Hee; Park, Yong-Gou

    2005-01-01

    Pineal hemorrhage only occurs in rare cases, and this known to have several different causes such as germ cell tumors, pineal cysts and vascular malformations, including the cavernous malformations. Pineal cavernous malformations are extremely rare: to date only fifteen cases have been reported worldwide. Although the diagnosis of pineal cavernous malformation is not easy because of the extreme rareness of this condition, the presence of this lesion can be suspected based on its typical radiological findings. Case 1. A 42-year- old man presented with a limitation in his upward gazing. Radiologic examinations showed acute hemorrhage in the pineal region. He underwent ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunting but the patient's condition deteriorated after the shunting surgery. We operated and totally removed the tumor and the hemorrhages via an occipital-transtentorial approach. Case 2. A 37-year-old man presented with diplopia. Radiologic examinations showed acute hemorrhage in the third ventricle. He underwent VP shunting, and after this procedure the diplopia was aggravated. We operated and totally removed the tumor and the hemorrhages via an occipital-transtentorial approach. If there is no doubt about the pineal cavernous malformation on MR imaging, we strongly recommend early surgical intervention without performing a risky biopsy. In this study, we describe our experiences for the diagnosis of cavernous malformations in the pineal region with special emphasis on the radiological aspects and the clinical course of this disease. PMID:16385664

  17. [A case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Hase, Tomomi; Kurita, Hideharu; Matsumoto, Eiji; Kuroda, Hajime; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Shinoda, Souji

    2013-10-01

    We reported a case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis. A 62-year-old man complained of trigeminal neuralgia in the right V1 region. Neurological examination on admission showed ptosis, loss of light reflex and ophthalmoplegia externa in the right side. MRI enhanced with gadolinium demonstrated sphenoid sinusitis and mass lesion in the right cavernous sinus. MRA revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion. An open biopsy using the extradural temporopolar approach was performed. Pus discharge was observed from the cavernous sinus and histological examination showed hypha of Aspergillus. With early voriconazole treatment, the patient had improvement in headache, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia externa. Cavernous sinus aspergillosis is often found after sphenoiditis. It results in invasion to an internal carotid artery and worsens the patient's prognosis by cerebral infarction, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. We should consider aspergillosis as one of the differential diagnoses of a mass in the cavernous sinus. The epidural approach to this lesion was available to obviate aspergillus dissemination into the medullary cavity.

  18. Arteriovenous malformation in temporal lobe presenting as contralateral ocular symptoms mimicking carotid-cavernous fistula.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Tahir, Fadzillah; Siti-Raihan, Ishak; Wan Hazabbah, W H

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To report a rare case of arteriovenous malformation in temporal lobe presenting as contralateral orbital symptoms mimicking carotid-cavernous fistula. Method. Interventional case report. Results. A 31-year-old Malay gentleman presented with 2-month history of painful progressive exophthalmos of his left eye associated with recurrent headache, diplopia, and reduced vision. Ocular examination revealed congestive nonpulsating 7 mm exophthalmos of the left eye with no restriction of movements in all direction. There was diplopia in left lateral gaze. Left IOP was elevated at 29 mmHg. Left eye retinal vessels were slightly dilated and tortuous. CT scan was performed and showed right temporal arteriovenous malformation with a nidus of 3.8 cm × 2.5 cm with right middle cerebral artery as feeding artery. There was dilated left superior ophthalmic vein of 0.9 mm in diameter with enlarged left cavernous sinus. MRA and carotid angiogram confirmed right temporal arteriovenous malformation with no carotid-cavernous fistula. Most of the intracranial drainage was via left cavernous sinus. His signs and symptoms dramatically improved following successful embolisation, completely resolved after one year. Conclusion. Intracranial arteriovenous malformation is rarely presented with primary ocular presentation. Early intervention would salvage the eyes and prevent patients from more disaster morbidity or fatality commonly due to intracranial haemorrhage.

  19. Convexity dural cavernous haemangioma mimicking meningioma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Jian-Ping; You, Chao; Mao, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Dural cavernous haemangiomas are rare, and they do not display a classical ring of haemosiderin on MRI as parenchymal cavernous haemangiomas. Sometimes, they are misinterpreted as meningiomas with a dural tail sign. In this short report, a 37-year-old woman was diagnosed with a convexity cavernous haemangioma, and the tumour was totally resected.

  20. Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma: A Rare Presentation in Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Işılgan, Servet Elçin; Çerkez, Cem; Otrakçı, Volkan; Serel, Savaş

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hemangiomas are benign vascular lesions mostly arising from soft tissues. However, intraosseous hemangioma is a rare entity, comprising only 1% of benign bone tumors. We describe here the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of a 42-year-old woman with a painless hard swelling—diagnosed to be intraosseous hemangioma via orbital magnetic resonance imaging—localized on the left infraorbital margin. Methods: After en bloc excision of the mass with safety margins through a subciliary incision, the defect was reconstructed via Medpor, which was fixed to the drilled bones with polypropylene sutures. Results: Histopathological diagnosis of the specimen revealed intraosseous cavernous hemangioma. There seems to be no recurrence or any cosmetic deformity 3 months postoperatively. Conclusion: Total surgical excision is the preferred method of treatment for intraosseous hemangiomas with reconstruction. In this patient, we used Medpor for reconstruction of orbital floor, the infraorbital orbital rim and anterior wall of maxillary sinus. We think that Medpor is a good option since a natural smooth malar contour and adequate orbital rim can be achieved and there is no any other scar. PMID:25328568

  1. Analysis of cavern stability at the Bryan Mound SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-04-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound site. The cavern field comprises 20 caverns. Five caverns (1, 2, 4, and 5; 3 was later plugged and abandoned) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 16 caverns (101-116) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a 3-D geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios due to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant result in this report is relevant to caverns 1, 2, and 5. The caverns have non-cylindrical shapes and have potential regions where the surrounding salt may be damaged during workover procedures. During a workover the normal cavern operating pressure is lowered to service a well. At this point the wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension and large deviatoric stresses at several locations. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state due to salt creep. However, the potential for salt damage and fracturing exists. The analyses predict tensile stresses at locations with sharp-edges in the wall geometry, or in the case of cavern 5, in the neck region between the upper and lower lobes of the cavern. The effects do not appear to be large-scale, however, so the only major impact is the potential for stress-induced salt falls in cavern 5, potentially leading to

  2. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Accompanying Orbital Grease Gun Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hyun; Jang, Jae Woo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of traumatic optic neuropathy accompanying a grease gun injury to the orbit. A 48-year-old man with a grease gun injury visited our clinic with decreased visual acuity, proptosis and limited extraocular movement (EOM). Orbital CT revealed a crescent mass of fat in the medial intraconal space. The grease was exuded from a lacerated conjunctival wound. The visual evoked potential (VEP) test demonstrated a decreased response in the left eye. Proptosis and EOM were improved after surgical removal of the grease. Systemic high-dose corticosteroid therapy was administered for suspected traumatic optic neuropathy, after which VEP nearly recovered, while visual acuity was slightly improved. A second surgery for traumatic cataract did not further improve visual acuity. PMID:20379466

  3. Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma Coexisting With Pulmonary Cavernous Hemangiomas and Giant Hepatic Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunping; Chen, Hao; Sun, Lin; Mei, Yunqing

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of cardiac cavernous hemangioma with coexisting pulmonary cavernous hemangiomas and hepatic hemangioma. A 35-year-old woman who had previously received a living donor liver transplant to cure giant hepatic hemangioma was seen because of chest pain. A cardiac neoplasm and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected. The tumor was surgically removed, and biopsy specimens were taken from the lung nodules. Histopathologic examination confirmed that both lesions were cavernous hemangiomas. The patient was discharged without adverse events postoperatively. Cardiac hemangioma is an extremely rare entity; the present case is unique for its multiorgan involvement. Suspicion of this entity should be aroused if the imaging manifestation suggests a vascular nature.

  4. Overfilling of cavern blamed for LPG blasts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    Three explosions and a fire Apr. 7 at an LPG salt dome storage cavern near Brenham, Tex., were triggered when the cavern was overfilled, the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC) has reported. This paper reports that a TRC investigation found that LPG escaped to the surface at the Brenham site through brine injection tubing after excessive fill from an LPG line forced the cavern's water level below the brine tubing's bottom. At the surface, LPG was released into a brine storage pit where it turned into a dense, explosive vapor. At 7:08 a.m., the vapor was ignited by an unknown source. The resulting blast killed three persons and injured 19 and brought operations at the site to a halt.

  5. Mucosal cavernous hemangioma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mainak; Kundu, Sohag; Barik, Sabyasachi; Banerjee, Shoham; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-01

    Mucosal cavernous hemangiomas of maxillary sinus and the lateral nasal wall are seldom encountered and difficult to diagnose with misleading radiologic features like bone erosion and heterogeneity due to patchy contrast uptake. The overall picture mimicking sinonasal malignancy, it is unclear whether there is true breach in the bone or remodeling due to the lesion's chronicity. Interestingly, it often does not bleed as expected during surgery, questioning the use of therapeutic embolization and pre-intervention vascular shrinkage. The clinical presentation and management protocol of sinonasal cavernous hemangiomas seem greatly individualized. We here present a patient with cavernous hemangioma of maxillary sinus and discuss the distinguishing clinical, histologic and imaging characteristics and subsequent management options, and attempt to establish the findings as the basis of considering it as an important differential diagnosis of radiologically heterogeneous sinonasal mass with suspected bone erosions presenting with nasal obstruction and epistaxis, mostly in young women.

  6. Epileptic Seizures Induced by a Spontaneous Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department with complaints of fainting and loss of consciousness three times during the past month. She was diagnosed with epilepsy and started to be treated with antiepileptic drug. Physical examination showed, in the left eye, chemosis, limited eye movements in all directions, and minimal exophthalmos as unexisting symptoms on admission developed on the sixth day. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging revealed a carotid cavernous fistula (CCF). Epileptic attacks and ophthalmic findings previously present but diagnosed during our examinations were determined to ameliorate completely after performing the coil embolization. Based on literature, we present the first case with nontraumatic CCF manifesting with epileptic seizures and intermittent eye symptoms in the present report. PMID:28077946

  7. Analysis of cavern shapes for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2006-07-01

    This report presents computational analyses to determine the structural integrity of different salt cavern shapes. Three characteristic shapes for increasing cavern volumes are evaluated and compared to the baseline shape of a cylindrical cavern. Caverns with enlarged tops, bottoms, and mid-sections are modeled. The results address pillar to diameter ratios of some existing caverns in the system and will represent the final shape of other caverns if they are repeatedly drawn down. This deliverable is performed in support of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Several three-dimensional models using a close-packed arrangement of 19 caverns have been built and analyzed using a simplified symmetry involving a 30-degree wedge portion of the model. This approach has been used previously for West Hackberry (Ehgartner and Sobolik, 2002) and Big Hill (Park et al., 2005) analyses. A stratigraphy based on the Big Hill site has been incorporated into the model. The caverns are modeled without wells and casing to simplify the calculations. These calculations have been made using the power law creep model. The four cavern shapes were evaluated at several different cavern radii against four design factors. These factors included the dilatant damage safety factor in salt, the cavern volume closure, axial well strain in the caprock, and surface subsidence. The relative performance of each of the cavern shapes varies for the different design factors, although it is apparent that the enlarged bottom design provides the worst overall performance. The results of the calculations are put in the context of the history of cavern analyses assuming cylindrical caverns, and how these results affect previous understanding of cavern behavior in a salt dome.

  8. Orbital schwannomatosis in the absence of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Koktekir, Bengu Ekinci; Kim, H Jane; Geske, Mike; Bloomer, Michelle; Vagefi, Reza; Kersten, Robert C

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe 3 cases of primary orbital schwannomatosis without associated systemic neurofibromatosis. This is a retrospective interventional study of 3 patients who presented with multiple, distinct masses in the orbit (n = 3) as well as in the hemiface (n = 1). The clinical presentation, imaging features, surgical procedures, and outcomes were defined. Two women and a man presented with of exophthalmos and diplopia. Pain was the most prominent complaint in 2 patients. None of the patients had associated systemic neurofibromatosis by history or examination. Radiologic evaluation with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of orbit revealed multiple well-demarcated intraconal and extraconal masses. Masses were excised, and histopathology confirmed all masses to be schwannomas. Postoperative follow-up was uneventful with alleviation of primary complaints in all patients. Multiple orbital schwannomas (primary orbital schwannomatosis) may be observed in patients without systemic association of neurofibromatosis. Management includes surgical excision of the tumors to achieve relief from their mass effects.

  9. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  10. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daniela; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:25741093

  11. Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1998-05-04

    Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

  12. Cavernous hemangioma of Meckel's cave. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, M G; Tucker, W S

    1988-04-01

    A case of a cavernous hemangioma located within Meckel's cave and involving the gasserian ganglion is described in a patient presenting with facial pain and a trigeminal nerve deficit. Although these lesions have been reported to occur in the middle fossa, this is believed to be the first case of such a vascular malformation arising solely from within Meckel's cave.

  13. [Ptosis secondary to cavernous sinus meningioma].

    PubMed

    Louis, M; Goga, D; François, P; Laure, B

    2013-12-01

    Meningiomas of the cavernous sinus are often the cause of neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations. Fifty percent of affected patients present with ptosis. We report a case of ptosis acquired during the first year of life due to oculomotor nerve palsy secondary to a cavernous sinus meningioma. We then discuss the causes of third cranial nerve palsy and treatment options for ptosis associated with CN III palsy. A fifteen-year-old female patient presented with ptosis due to a third cranial nerve palsy appearing within the first year of life. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cavernous sinus meningioma. The ptosis was treated by frontalis suspension using autologous temporalis fascia. The meningioma required regular follow-up. Ptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy is rare in children. The most common etiologies are congenital and represent 33 to 40% of cases in various studies. Other etiologies are traumatic, tumoral, vascular and infectious. The cause needs to be found by imaging over the entire course of the nerve. Cavernous sinus meningioma is one cause of third cranial nerve palsy. The surgical treatment of ptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy is levator resection or frontalis suspension with a strip of fascia lata or temporalis fascia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Transverse and Sigmoid Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Mimicking Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Spitze, Arielle; Gersztenkorn, David; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Diaz, Orlando; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) can produce a variety of symptoms depending on fistula location, size, and venous drainage. Although cavernous sinus fistulas (CCFs) classically present with symptoms of orbital venous congestion due to retrograde venous drainage into the superior ophthalmic vein (i.e. an arterialised "red eye") (Miller NR. Neurosurg Focus 2007;23:1--15), dAVFs not localised to the cavernous sinus rarely present with a "red eye" and instead produce increased intracranial pressure, which can mimic idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The authors present a unique case of an intracranial dAVF with clinical features suggestive of both CCF and IIH. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility to avoid delayed diagnosis of the intracranial dAVF.

  15. Crater Formation Above Salt Caverns: Piston vs Hour-glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berest, P.

    2016-12-01

    Conditions leading to crater formation above salt caverns are discussed. In most cases, at the end of leaching, the cavern roof had reached the top of the salt formation, allowing direct contact between brine and marl (or argillite) layers that compose the overburden of the salt formation. These layers are prone to weathering when in contact with saturated brine. Stoping takes place, and the cavern roof rises through the overburden. This process may be several years or dozens of years long. In Lorraine salt formations, stoping stops when the rising cavern top reaches a competent layer, the Beaumont Dolomite. Operators then lower cavern-brine pressure to trigger collapse. A rigid cylinder of rock (a "piston") drops into the cavern, and a crater whose initial edges are vertical is created. Cavern drop is more abrupt when the cavern top is filled partly with air. The contour of the piston is circular, as a circle is the shape such that the ratio between perimeter and area is minimal. In other cases, for instance in Kansas, the cavern rises until the uppermost keystone in the bedrock at shallow depth is breached, permitting loose materials to flow into the cavern through a relatively narrow hole at the bottom of the sink hole, as in an hour glass.

  16. Paraclinoid and cavernous sinus regions: measurement of critical structures relevant for surgical procedure.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Frederic; Link, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Determination of the safest distance the falciform ligament can be incised from its origin to the orbital apex. Measurement of the distance between the oculomotor foramen and the IV nerve in the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. Evaluation of the optic strut as an accurate landmark between the intradural (subarachnoid) and extradural segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Ten fixed human cadaver heads were examined for a total of 20 sides. A frontotemporal craniotomy, an orbito-optic osteotomy, and extradural anterior clinoidectomy were carried out followed by opening the falciform ligament, circumferentially releasing the distal dural ring and dissection of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus under the operating microscope. We measured: 1) the distance between the entry of the III nerve and the point where the IV nerve crosses over it into the cavernous sinus; 2) the distance the falciform ligament can be incised along the optic nerve laterally until the IV nerve is encountered at the orbital apex; 3) the distance between the optic strut and the lateral part of the distal dural ring; and 4) the distance between the optic strut and the ophthalmic artery. All measurements were made in millimeters, using small calipers. The distance between the optic strut and the lateral part of the distal dural ring ranges from 3-7.5 mm (mean=5.47 mm). In all our specimens, the ophthalmic artery was found distally from the optic strut in the intradural space at a distance ranging from 0.5-7 mm (mean=3.35 mm). The distance between the entry of the third nerve and the IV nerve into the cavernous sinus ranged from 7-15 mm (mean=10.9 mm). The distance between the origin of the falciform ligament and the IV nerve at the level of the orbital apex ranged from 9-15 mm (mean=10.75 mm). The falciform ligament and the optic sheath should not be opened longer than 9 mm along the lateral optic nerve or injury to the IV nerve can occur. Starting at the oculomotor foramen, the

  17. Cavernous sinus syndrome: need for early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Jaime; Burbano, Lisseth Estefania; Reyes, Saúl; Barreras, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) is a rare condition characterised by ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, ocular and conjunctival congestion, trigeminal sensory loss and Horner’s syndrome. These signs and symptoms result from the involvement of the cranial nerves passing through the cavernous sinus. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of daily stabbing headache associated with dizziness, progressive blurred vision, right ocular pain, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. After working up the patient, a meningioma was identified as the cause of the CSS. Despite advances in neuroimaging techniques, in some cases, the aetiology of CSS remains difficult to determine. We highlight the clinical and radiological features of a meningioma, one of the causes of CSS. Early diagnosis and treatment of CSS play a key role in a better prognosis. PMID:25819816

  18. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented as cavernous sinus tumour.

    PubMed

    Moona, Mohammad Shafi; Mehdi, Itrat

    2011-12-01

    A 32 year Libyan male presented with the complaints of headache and diplopia. He was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma on the basis of MRI findings but no initial biopsy was taken. Depending on the radiologic diagnosis the patient was treated with gamma knife surgery twice, abroad. During follow up he developed left ear deafness and left cervical lymph adenopathy. An ENT evaluation with biopsy from the nasopharynx and cervical lymph node was taken. The histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumour showed a nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis (poorly differentiated lympho-epithelial carcinoma). The cavernous sinus tumour which was initially treated as a meningioma was in fact metastasis from the nasopharyngeal carcinoma, making this an interesting and rare occurrence.

  19. Primary carcinoid tumor of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian; Bray, Eric; Bregy, Amade; Norenberg, Michael; Weed, Donald; Morcos, Jacques J

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial carcinoid tumors belong to the class of neuroendocrine tumors and their incidence is extremely rare. The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of carcinoid tumors of the skull base are outlined in this case report. A 61-year-old multimorbid woman presented with transient memory loss. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain demonstrated a left cavernous sinus mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. The lesion was biopsied using the Caldwell-Luc approach, and histology showed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor. The tumor was subtotally resected with a neurosurgery/head and neck combined preauricular infratemporal and subtemporal extradural approaches to the cavernous sinus. Further histologic evaluation revealed that the tumor was of carcinoid differentiation with no other primary or metastatic sites detectable. Primary intracranial carcinoid tumors, though rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of extradural and dural-based lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cavernous hemangioma of the right atrium.

    PubMed

    Contrafouris, Constantinos; Kanakis, Meletios; Milonakis, Michael; Azariadis, Prodromos; Chatzis, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman was diagnosed during the 3rd month of pregnancy with a large right atrial tumor. Three weeks after successful completion of a full-term pregnancy, she was admitted and underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Postoperative course was uneventful and pathology showed cavernous hemangioma. These neoplasms should be removed in order to prevent severe arrhythmias as also potential malignant transformation.

  1. Maxillary sinus cavernous hemangioma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jammal, H; Barakat, F; Hadi, U

    2004-04-01

    Vascular lesions of the sinonasal tract are rare. These lesions do not have typical signs or symptoms. They may present insidiously with minimal symptoms. A high index of suspicion and a good preoperative evaluation are needed for diagnosis. No standard surgical approach is indicated. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma of the maxillary sinus in an adult male. We present the diagnostic work-up and discuss the differential diagnosis and potential therapeutic approaches.

  2. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  3. Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR): oil-storage cavern, Sulphur Mines 6 certification tests and analysis. [Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-04-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure test were conducted in June and July 1981 and indicated that oil leakage from the cavern is unlikely to exceed the DOE criterion if oil is stored at near atmospheric wellhead brine pressures and higher pressures are only used for short periods of oil fill and withdrawal. The data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely and that there was no leakage from cavern 6 to the adjacent cavern 7. Because of the proximity of cavern 6 to cavern 7, it is recommended that a similar type of oil be stored in these two caverns.

  4. Cavernous sinus syndrome. Analysis of 151 cases.

    PubMed

    Keane, J R

    1996-10-01

    To characterize lesions causing cavernous sinus syndrome. Review of 26 years of personal experience in a large city hospital. Among 151 patients, tumors (45 patients, 30%) were the most frequent cause of cavernous sinus syndrome. However, when surgical causes (17 patients, 11%) were included, trauma (36 patients, 24%) became most common. Self-limited inflammation was the third frequent cause (34 patients, 23%), while carotid aneurysms and fistulas, infection, and other causes composed the remaining 12%. The age at onset varied with the cause, and patients with aneurysms (average age, 52 years) and patients with tumors (average age, 47 years) were older than those with self-limited inflammation (average age, 35 years) and trauma (average age, 29 years). Spontaneous remissions defined "self-limited inflammation" but were also seen following an acute onset of symptoms due to aneurysms and pituitary apoplexy. In an unselected series from a city hospital, tumor, trauma, and self-limited inflammation were the predominant causes of cavernous sinus syndrome, and classic causes such as aneurysm, meningioma, and bacterial infection were uncommon. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and watchful waiting proved the most effective diagnostic procedures.

  5. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for cavernous sinus meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Matthew M; Friedman, William A; Foote, Kelly D; Bova, Frank J; Chi, Yueh-Yun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review the results of a single-center experience using linear accelerator (LINAC) radiosurgery for the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. This is a retrospective analysis with a median follow-up of 50 months. All patients were treated on an outpatient basis. Fifty-five patients were treated and 6 patients were lost to follow-up. Changes in preradiosurgery cranial nerve deficits and symptoms as well as actuarial local tumor control were evaluated. The actuarial local tumor control was 100% at 5 years and 98% at 10 years. One patient had enlargement of tumor. Sixty-five percent had improvement in preradiosurgery cranial nerve deficits, 31% were unchanged and 1 patient (3.5%) was worse. Only 1 patient developed a new neurologic deficit. This is the largest LINAC radiosurgery experience for cavernous sinus meningiomas reported to date. Radiosurgery appears to offer greatly superior tumor control and much lower morbidity than surgical resection of cavernous sinus meningiomas. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. A retrospective review of cases preoperatively diagnosed by radiologic imaging as cavernous venous malformations.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Anupam; Cohen, Liza M; Lissner, Gary S; Karagianis, Achilles G

    2017-04-03

    The purpose of this study is to examine orbital lesions identified on preoperative radiologic imaging as cavernous venous malformations (CVMs), identify their imaging characteristics, and determine if these may help differentiate CVMs from other intraorbital masses. An IRB-approved retrospective chart review over 30 years was undertaken identifying lesions "consistent with cavernous hemangioma" on radiologic studies, which were subsequently surgically resected with a tissue diagnosis. All radiologic images (CT and MRI) obtained preoperatively were re-reviewed by a single masked neuroradiologist. The pattern of contrast enhancement on sequential MRI views was used to determine whether the enhancing characteristics helped identify CVMs compared to other intraorbital masses. Fifty-seven orbital lesions consistent with a CVM were identified on imaging. Fourteen (25%) of them were resected, of which nine (64%) were found to be CVMs on pathologic examination. Five (36%) were found to be a different lesion, most commonly schwannoma (21%). On imaging, CVMs tended to display heterogeneous progressive enhancement, whereas other tumors, in particular schwannomas, enhanced at their maximum level immediately. Based on these characteristics, on re-review, the masked neuroradiologist was able to differentiate a CVM versus other tumors for all 14 imaging cases. This study suggests that examining the pattern of contrast enhancement may help to correctly differentiate a CVM from other isolated, encapsulated orbital lesions on CT/MR imaging.

  7. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (a...

  8. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (a...

  9. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (a...

  10. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (a...

  11. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (a...

  12. Cavernous hemangioma. Why is peripheral filling at scintigraphy so rare

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Weatherby, E. III

    1987-10-01

    Peripheral filling at dynamic CT occurs frequently with cavernous hemangiomas, yet this phenomenon is a rare finding on Tc-99m RBC imaging. A case of peripheral filling of a cavernous hemangioma with scintigraphy is reported and the rationale for its infrequent occurrence is discussed.

  13. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  14. Postpartum Regression of a Presumed Cavernous Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Phang, See Yung; Whitfield, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are known to be more common in females than males. They are also known in rare cases to grow in size during pregnancy, which can complicate its management. We describe a 31-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with blurring of her vision and diplopia during the third trimester of her pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small left cavernous sinus meningioma. The patient was treated conservatively until her uncomplicated delivery. A postpartum MRI scan showed complete regression of the suspected meningioma. Currently the patient is contemplating a further pregnancy. PMID:27066285

  15. Meningioma and cavernous angioma following childhood radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Akshay D; Mahore, Amit S; Zade, Bhooshan P; Jalali, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation has been a part of multimodality management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). With optimum treatment and the resultant long-term cure rates, long-term side effects of radiation including radiation-induced neoplasms have been increasingly unearthed. We report a rare case of development of both a meningioma and a cavernous angioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation as a part of treatment of ALL. Regular follow-up and high index of suspicion for late radiation sequelae after treatment are therefore justifiable in leukemia survivors with history of prophylactic cranial irradiation.

  16. Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Skull

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Guan, Jian; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are benign vascular tumors that may involve any part of the body. PICH occurs more frequently in the spine and less commonly in skull. The earliest description in the English literature was in 1845 by Toynbee, who reported a vascular tumor arising in the confines of the parietal bone. Skull PICHs do not always have typical radiologic features and should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant skull lesions. We now reviewed and analyzed related literatures in detail with reporting a rare case of PICH in the left front bone that was surgically resected. PMID:26986133

  17. Primary cavernous hemangioma of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulos, Nikolaos V; Markogiannakis, Haridimos; Kekis, Panagiotis B; Papadima, Artemisia; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Manouras, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    A 78-year-old euthyroid patient presented for evaluation of a symptomatic, slowly growing neck mass. Ultrasound scan revealed a multinodular goiter and a hypoechoic nodule of the right thyroid lobe. Total thyroidectomy was performed and the lesion was completely excised. Definite diagnosis was obtained after histological examination of the surgical specimen. Cavernous hemangiomas of the thyroid gland are infrequent lesions which may escape diagnosis preoperatively. An effort should be made not to rupture these lesions in order to ensure a bloodless procedure.

  18. Pathognomonic scintigraphic finding of hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Yang, S.L.; Rosato, F.

    1987-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common benign tumor of the liver. An accurate diagnosis of such tumor is essential for proper management of patients with hepatic cavernous hemangioma (HCH). Noninvasive diagnosis of HCH can be made using sequential Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy by demonstrating a perfusion-blood pool mismatch. In addition, a case of HCH was observed which demonstrated peripheral enhancement with subsequent central enhancement on a sequential Tc-99m RBC blood pool scintigraphy. It is felt that this scintigraphic finding is pathognomonic for HCH.

  19. Unusual case of traumatic neuroma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Simone; Muscas, Giovanni; Miracco, Clelia; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Galluzzi, Paolo; Giorgio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic or amputation neuromas are neoformations developing after damage to a peripheral nerve. They are not proper tumors but rather a reactive process or a frustrated attempt of nerve regeneration. Traumatic neuromas are potentially found in every sensory peripheral nerve and often at the site of past surgical intervention, including orbital surgery. A 29-year-old Northern African migrant presented progressive exophthalmos and progressive loss of acuity in left eye, which had started about 6 months before after a cranio-facial trauma caused by a violent assault. MRI of the orbits showed a massive intra-orbital, intra-conical lesion, clearly compressing and dislocating the optic nerve and extending posteriorly to the orbital apex. Surgery was performed through lateral approach of Kroenlein and led to complete excision of the lesion. Histology revealed fibrotic, adipose and striated muscle tissues, a disordered, non-neoplastic overgrowth of small and large fascicles of nerves, inflammatory infiltrates, and fibrosis with sparse calcifications were diffusely observed in a background of fat, scar and striated muscle tissued. Patient was discharged on the fifth day in good health condition, without deficit of eye motion but without recovery of visual acuity. In conclusion, this case demonstrates that traumatic neuromas may arise in the orbit in patients with minor direct trauma to nerves and without previous surgical treatment.

  20. Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

  1. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  2. Giant cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland

    PubMed Central

    Quildrian, Sergio Damián; Silberman, Ezequiel Aníbal; Vigovich, Felix Alberto; Porto, Eduardo Agustín

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland is a rare non-functioning benign neoplasm. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 62-year-old woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was diagnosed as having an incidental non-functioning adrenal tumor. Because of the impossibility of ruling out the presence of malignancy, conventional surgical resection was carried out. The histopathology revealed a 12.5 cm × 11.5 cm × 8 cm adrenal mass with large and lacunae vascular spaces lined with mature endothelial cells. These findings were compatible with cavernous hemangioma. DISCUSSION The majority of patients in the literature underwent surgical resection due to the impossibility of excluding malignancy, because of related symptoms in patients with large masses, or because of the risk of spontaneous tumoral rupture. CONCLUSION These tumors are quite infrequent. Due to the low frequency and the lack of specific symptoms, most adrenal hemangiomas are diagnosed postoperatively. PMID:23287064

  3. Molecular diagnosis in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mondejar, R; Lucas, M

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs; OMIM 116860) are enlarged vascular cavities without intervening brain parenchyma whose estimated prevalence in the general population is between 0.1% and 0.5%. Familial CCM is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete clinical and radiological penetrance. Three genes have been linked to development of the lesions: CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10. The aetiological mutation is not detected in a large percentage of cases and new approaches are therefore needed. The aim of this review is to analyse current molecular techniques and the possible mutations or variations which can be detected in a molecular genetics or molecular biology laboratory. Likewise, we will analyse other alternatives that may help detect mutations in those patients showing negative results. A molecular diagnosis of cerebral cavernous malformations should provide at least the copy number variation and sequencing of CCM genes. In addition, appropriate genetic counselling is a crucial source of information and support for patients and their relatives. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating the effects of the number of caverns on the performance of underground oil storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional finite element calculations were performed to investigate the effect field size, in terms of the number of caverns, on the performance of SPR oil storage caverns leached in domal salt (interms of surface subsidence, storage losses, and cavern integrity). The calculations were performed for cavern fields containing 1, 7, 19, and an infinite number of caverns. The magnitude and volume of subsidence was significantly affected by increasing the number of caverns (nearly an order of magnitude increase was predicted for each increase in field size), while the extent of subsidence (approximately 2000 m fromthe center of the field) and storage loss were not. Furthermore, the percentage of storage loss volume manifested as surface subsidence increased as the cavern field was enlarged. This was attributed to elasticvolumetric dilatation of overlying strata. The multiple cavern calculations demonstrate that storage losses are greater for caverns farther from the center of the caverns field. Based on an accumulated strain stability criteria, the larger cavern fields are predicted to have a shorter life. This criteria also indicates that caverns on the periphery of a field may show signs of instability before the inner caverns. The West Hackberry site (containing 22 caverns) subsidence data closely agrees with the 19 cavern model subsidence predictions, providing confidence in the calculations. Even a 19 cavern field, substantially large by SPR standards, does not approach the behavior predicted by infinite cavern models (which are frequently used because they are economical). This demonstrates that 3D modeling is required to accurately investigate the performance of a multi-cavern array. Although based on a typical SPR cavern design, the results of this study describe mechanics common to all multi-cavern fields and should, in general, be useful tocavern engineers and architects.

  5. CaveMan Version 3.0: A Software System for SPR Cavern Pressure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    BALLARD,SANFORD; EHGARTNER,BRIAN L.

    2000-07-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve currently has approximately 500 million barrels of crude oil stored in 62 caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. One of the challenges of operating these caverns is ensuring that none of the fluids in the caverns are leaking into the environment. The current approach is to test the mechanical integrity of all the wells entering each cavern approximately once every five years. An alternative approach to detecting cavern leaks is to monitor the cavern pressure, since leaking fluid would act to reduce cavern pressure. Leak detection by pressure monitoring is complicated by other factors that influence cavern pressure, the most important of which are thermal expansion and contraction of the fluids in the cavern as they come into thermal equilibrium with the host salt, and cavern volume reduction due to salt creep. Cavern pressure is also influenced by cavern enlargement resulting from salt dissolution following introduction of raw water or unsaturated brine into the cavern. However, this effect only lasts for a month or two following a fluid injection. In order to implement a cavern pressure monitoring program, a software program called CaveMan has been developed. It includes thermal, creep and salt dissolution models and is able to predict the cavern pressurization rate based on the operational history of the cavern. Many of the numerous thermal and mechanical parameters in the model have been optimized to produce the best match between the historical data and the model predictions. Future measurements of cavern pressure are compared to the model predictions, and significant differences in cavern pressure set program flags that notify cavern operators of a potential problem. Measured cavern pressures that are significantly less than those predicted by the model may indicate the existence of a leak.

  6. CD105 expression in oral capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Tsuchiya, Motomi; Nomoto, Shouta; Matsue, Yasuyoshi; Nishikawa, Yohichi; Takamura, Tsuyoshi; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Capillary hemangioma (capillary lobular hemangioma) and cavernous hemangioma (venous malformation) are relatively common oral tumors/malformations and are characterized by increased numbers of normal and abnormal blood vessels. However, the causes of these lesions are not well understood. CD105 (endoglin) is predominantly expressed in proliferating blood endothelial cells (ECs). We analyzed expressions of CD105, CD34, von Willebrand factor, Ki-67, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in 31 capillary hemangiomas and 34 cavernous hemangiomas. Staining scores were calculated as the product of the proportion score and intensity score. Morphologically normal oral mucosa specimens (n = 10) were simultaneously evaluated as normal controls. As compared with cavernous hemangiomas and normal controls, capillary hemangiomas had higher staining scores for CD105, VEGF-A, and COX-2. The Ki-67 labeling index was significantly higher in capillary hemangiomas than in cavernous hemangiomas and normal controls (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that the biological characteristics of capillary and cavernous hemangiomas are quite different. The ECs of capillary hemangiomas actively proliferated and were generally regulated by VEGF-A. In contrast, the ECs of cavernous hemangiomas lacked proliferative activity. These results suggest that angiogenesis and vasodilatation of pre-existing blood vessels are important in the development of capillary hemangioma and cavernous hemangioma, respectively.

  7. Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

  8. MR imaging of cavernous sinus lesions: Pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Chandrashekhara, Sheragaru Hanumanthappa; Kumar, Atin; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The main purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight the important MR imaging findings of various conditions involving the cavernous sinus in addition to brief description of normal anatomy. The pathological conditions that can involve the cavernous sinus can be categorized into infective, inflammatory, granulomatous, vascular and neoplastic causes. Imaging, especially with MRI, plays an important role not only in detection but also in definition of disease extent and in characterization of the pathology. Currently, high-resolution MR images clearly show various components of cavernous sinus which help in making a proper diagnosis and thus appropriate further management.

  9. Diagnosis and management of cavernous hemangioma of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors of the liver, which are now seen more often thanks to common use of newer imaging techniques. A review of the literature on cavernous hemangiomas of the liver, including the author's experience with 14 cases, provides data as a touchstone for discussion of the incidence, etiology, symptoms, pathology, diagnosis including ultrasound, radionuclide imaging, computed tomography and angiography, management including resection, hepatic artery ligation, radiation and corticosteroid, and the natural history of these lesions. The author concludes that surgical resection of cavernous hemangiomas should be undertaken with due concern for the relation between the severity of symptoms and the operative risks involved.

  10. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease of the Orbit: Clinical Features of 8 Cases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeffrey J; Narang, Sherry; Purewal, Baljeet; Langer, Paul D; Blaydon, Sean; Schwarcz, Robert M; McCormick, Steven A; Kim, Joon Y; Walrath, Joseph D; Burt, Benjamin O; Shinder, Roman

    To report on the presentation, radiography, histology, and treatment of 8 cases of extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease involving the orbit. Multicenter retrospective case series. Five males and 3 females had a median age of 10 years (range 2-78 years). Presenting signs and symptoms included proptosis, periorbital pain, palpable mass, blepharoptosis, decreased vision, diplopia, impaired extraocular motility, and afferent pupillary defect. Four patients had bilateral orbital disease, while 4 had unilateral disease. Six cases were extraconal, 1 was intraconal, and 1 was both intra- and extra-conal. Four cases had only extranodal disease without lymphadenopathy (3 of which had localized orbital disease). Diagnosis was confirmed by exam, orbital, and/or systemic radiography, and biopsy in all cases. Treatment strategies included excision or debulking, systemic corticosteroids, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, observation or a combination thereof. At last follow up, 4 patients were disease free, while 4 had residual improved disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease of the orbit is a rare clinical entity. Purely extranodal disease is rare, with isolated orbital disease being exceedingly rare. This study is unique in that 4 of 8 patients had strictly isolated extranodal disease of the orbit. A large majority of the cases had disease in the extraconal space, contrasting with previous reports. In addition, lacrimal gland disease, particularly bilateral involvement, was prominent in the current study. Although there is no consensus on treatment, surgical excision should be attempted if plausible in symptomatic patients especially if the orbit represents a localized site of disease.

  11. Multiple cerebrospinal cavernous angiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kodeeswaran, M.; Udesh, Reshmi; Ramya, L.; Jothi Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous angiomas represent 5–12% of all spinal vascular lesions and 1% of all intramedullary lesions in pediatric patients. Intramedullary spinal cavernomas are relatively rare with only 24 cases reported till date to the best of our knowledge. A 15 -year-old boy presented to the clinic with acute onset motor weakness in all four limbs. He was diagnosed with multiple cerebral cavernomas and an acutely bleeding spinal cavernoma. Complete surgical excision of the spinal cavernoma was done. Postoperatively the patient's weakness gradually improved to a power of 4/5 in all his limbs over a period of 10 days. Only 24 cases of pediatric spinal cavernomas have been reported in the current literature. Current consensus on management of these rare lesions is based on previously published case reports/series and surgery appears to be the only definitive treatment. Further studies regarding any non-surgical expectant management appears warranted. PMID:27651109

  12. Radiological evaluation of hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, W.E.; Floyd, J.L.; Jackson, D.E.; Gilliland, J.D.

    1987-05-08

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the liver are sufficiently common that they will often be incidentally discovered during hepatic imaging by ultrasound, computed tomography, or radiocolloid scintigraphy. The differentiation of these benign tumors from primary or metastatic hepatic malignancy is mandatory, but often it is not possible on the study in which the lesion was originally detected. There are several routes by which to arrive at the correct diagnosis, but the optimum study or sequence of studies may elude the physician caring for the patient. Knowledge of the imaging options, and the strengths and weaknesses of each of these options, will facilitate a rapid diagnosis and ensure proper treatment, with maximum patient safety and minimum expenditure of resources. This article examines these radiological options.

  13. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding.

  14. Cavernous sinus syndrome secondary to intracranial lymphoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Guevar, Julien; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Peplinski, George; Helm, Jenny R; Penderis, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is characterised by internal and external ophthalmoplegia and sensory deficits over the head due to combined deficits of the three cranial nerves (CNs) responsible for the eye movements and pupil function (CN III, IV, VI) and at least one branch of the trigeminal nerve (CN V). It has rarely been described in cats and may occur secondarily to inflammatory, infectious or neoplastic lesions within the region of the cavernous sinus on the ventral aspect of the calvarium. This report describes the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in a 14-year-old domestic shorthair cat with neurological deficits compatible with cavernous sinus syndrome caused by presumptive extranodal lymphoma. Treatment with chemotherapy resulted in clinical and imaging remission. Identification of the neurological deficits in cavernous sinus syndrome allows accurate neuroanatomical localisation in order to target diagnostic imaging studies.

  15. Reference value developed for mechanical integrity of storage caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Crotogino, F.

    1996-10-28

    A reference value to verify the mechanical integrity of salt-cavern wells used in hydrocarbon storage has been developed. Salt caverns play important roles in large-scale storage of hydrocarbon gases and liquids. Required for safe and economical operation of these storage caverns is verification of the external mechanical integrity of the access (injection and withdrawal) wells. This study had the following goals: Provision of an overview of current practice; and Development of a reference for external well mechanical-integrity testing with respect to performance, data evaluation, and assessment. The storage cavern operators expected to gain the following: Comparability between method and assessments; Aid in influencing the movement towards standardization by regulators; and A firm technical base for use in litigation between the operator and other parties.

  16. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  17. Penetrating Orbital Injury From a Needlefish.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kyle E; Coan, Erin B

    2016-08-01

    Orbital penetrating injuries are an unfortunately common occurrence; however, those from marine animals are rare. Injuries from marine animals can be quite profound and there are no known reports of complete visual recovery after an orbital penetrating injury. Complications range from secondary infection to a carotid-cavernous fistula, which can complicate the management of these patients. We report a case of penetrating orbital injury from a needlefish with complete return of visual function after surgical removal of foreign debris and an extended course of antibiotics. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. [Cavernous haemangiomas: hearing and vestibular inaugural symptoms].

    PubMed

    Dumas, G; Schmerber, S

    2004-11-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas (cavernomas)(CH) are relatively rare (2% of cranial tumoral pathology) vascular malformations mostly observed in the central nervous system. Their most common topographical site in brain stem is midline in the pons, for which clinical course may mimic symptoms of peripheral origin (sudden deafness, fluctuating hearing loss, Meniere-like vertigo). To establish the correlation between the clinical manifestations of hearing and balance disturbance and the anatomical site within the pons of cavernous haemangiomas, and to describe their clinical features, and the findings on auditory brainstem response (ABR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To propose a literature review about CH and its implications. We made a retrospective review of the histories of three patients aged 24, 44 and 45 years, diagnosed as having cavernomas of the brainstem in which audiometric evaluation, videonystagmography (VNG), ABR and imaging techniques lead to the diagnosis of intracranial cavernoma. The clinical and radiological files were reviewed and a direct relationship between symptoms and localization was found in all 3 patients, especially in relation to our understanding of the auditory and vestibular pathways within the brainstem. The literature regarding cavernomas of the pons is reviewed and the clinical, neuroimage, pathological, natural course and management aspects of the disease are discussed. We recommend the use of cerebral MRI for initial diagnosis which shows a typical rosette-like appearance with a heterogeneous signal on T2-weighted images, along with follow-up and investigation into similar profiles among family members. At present there is no consensus about the treatment to follow when cavernomas are located in the brain stem. There is no specific medical treatment for this condition, and surgery is indicated only exceptionally. Anticoagulant therapy, platelet-dispersing medication and violent sports activities are contraindicated.

  19. Oil field waste disposal in salt caverns: An information website

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-12-10

    Argonne National Laboratory has completed the construction of a Website for the US Department of Energy (DOE) that provides detailed information on salt caverns and their use for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Specific topics in the Website include the following: descriptions of salt deposits and salt caverns within the US, salt cavern construction methods, potential types of wastes, waste emplacement, regulatory issues, costs, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic human health risks associated with postulated cavern release scenarios, new information on cavern disposal (e.g., upcoming meetings, regulatory issues, etc.), other studies supported by the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) (e.g., considerations of site location, cavern stability, development issues, and bedded salt characterization in the Midland Basin), and links to other associated Web sites. In addition, the Website allows downloadable access to reports prepared on the topic that were funded by DOE. Because of the large quantities of NOW and NORM wastes generated annually by the oil industry, information presented on this Website is particularly interesting and valuable to project managers, regulators, and concerned citizens.

  20. A review of cavernous malformations with trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kazuhide; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Takuro; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hirose, Yuichi

    2014-10-01

    Cavernous malformation with trigeminal neuralgia is relatively rare; only 10 cases have been reported. In deciding treatment strategies, it is helpful to classify cavernous malformation according to its origin, as follows: in the Gasserian ganglion (Type G); between the cisternal and intra-axial portions of the trigeminal nerve root (Type C); in the intra-axial trigeminal nerve root in the pons (Type P); or in the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve root (Type S). A 62-year-old male presented with left trigeminal neuralgia (V2 area) and left facial hypoesthesia. Imaging studies revealed a cerebellopontine angle mass lesion with characteristics of a cavernous malformation and evidence of hemorrhage. The lesion was completely removed via a left anterior transpetrosal approach. The mass was attached to the trigeminal nerve root; it was located between the cisternal and intra-axial portions of the nerve root, and feeding off microvessels from the trigeminal nerve vascular plexus. Histological examination confirmed a cavernous malformation. In this case, the cavernous malformation was Type C. We review cases of cavernous malformation with trigeminal neuralgia and discuss therapeutic strategies according to the area of origin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Perineural Invasion of the Orbit by Neurotropic Nondesmoplastic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chua, Su Jen; Sun, Michelle T; James, Craig; Huilgol, Shyamala C; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-01-18

    The authors report a case of neurotropic nondesmoplastic melanoma involving the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve and the cavernous sinus in a patient with recurrent scalp melanoma. This case highlights the importance of earlier diagnosis of local recurrence of melanoma and the rare association of neurotropic melanoma and orbital metastasis.

  2. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for hemangioma of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chia; Sheehan, Jason P; Kano, Hideyuki; Akpinar, Berkcan; Martinez-Alvarez, Roberto; Martinez-Moreno, Nuria; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Lunsford, L Dade; Liu, Kang-Du

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus hemangiomas (CSHs) are rare vascular tumors. A direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage and incomplete tumor resection. Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a therapeutic alternative to microsurgery, outcome studies are few. Authors of the present study evaluated the role of SRS for CSH. METHODS An international multicenter study was conducted to review outcome data in 31 patients with CSH. Eleven patients had initial microsurgery before SRS, and the other 20 patients (64.5%) underwent Gamma Knife SRS as the primary management for their CSH. Median age at the time of radiosurgery was 47 years, and 77.4% of patients had cranial nerve dysfunction before SRS. Patients received a median tumor margin dose of 12.6 Gy (range 12-19 Gy) at a median isodose of 55%. RESULTS Tumor regression was confirmed by imaging in all 31 patients, and all patients had greater than 50% reduction in tumor volume at 6 months post-SRS. No patient had delayed tumor growth, new cranial neuropathy, visual function deterioration, adverse radiation effects, or hypopituitarism after SRS. Twenty-four patients had presented with cranial nerve disorders before SRS, and 6 (25%) of them had gradual improvement. Four (66.7%) of the 6 patients with orbital symptoms had symptomatic relief at the last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Stereotactic radiosurgery was effective in reducing the volume of CSH and attaining long-term tumor control in all patients at a median of 40 months. The authors' experience suggests that SRS is a reasonable primary and adjuvant treatment modality for patients in whom a CSH is diagnosed.

  3. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered

  4. Urgent treatment of severe symptomatic direct carotid cavernous fistula caused by ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm using high-flow bypass, proximal ligation, and direct distal clipping: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hirotaka; Inoue, Tomohiro; Tamura, Akira; Saito, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) secondary to ruptured carotid cavernous aneurysms (CCAs) is rare, but patients with this condition who develop acutely worsening and severe neuro-ophthalmic symptoms require urgent treatment. Endovascular methods are the first-line option, but this modality may not be available on an urgent basis. Case Description: In this article, we report a 45-year-old female with severe direct CCF due to rupture of the CCA. She presented with intractable headache and acute worsening of double vision and visual acuity. Emergent radiographic study revealed high-flow fistula tracked from the CCA toward the contralateral cavernous sinus and drained into the engorged left superior orbital vein. To prevent permanent devastating neuro-ophthalmic damages, urgent high-flow bypass with placement of a radial artery graft was performed followed by right cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) ligation and the clipping of the ICA at the C3 portion, proximal to the ophthalmic artery. In the immediate postoperative period, her symptoms resolved and angiography confirmed patency of the high-flow bypass and complete occlusion of the CCF. Conclusion: With due consideration of strategy and techniques to secure safety, open surgical intervention with trapping and bypass is a good treatment option for direct severe CCF when the endovascular method is not available, not possible, or is unsuccessful. PMID:24818056

  5. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  6. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Clinical Correlations.

    PubMed

    Tan, H; Zhang, L; Mikati, A G; Girard, R; Khanna, O; Fam, M D; Liu, T; Wang, Y; Edelman, R R; Christoforidis, G; Awad, I A

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping has been shown to assess iron content in cerebral cavernous malformations. In this study, our aim was to correlate lesional iron deposition assessed by quantitative susceptibility mapping with clinical and disease features in patients with cerebral cavernous malformations. Patients underwent routine clinical scans in addition to quantitative susceptibility mapping on 3T systems. Data from 105 patients met the inclusion criteria. Cerebral cavernous malformation lesions identified on susceptibility maps were cross-verified by T2-weighted images and differentiated on the basis of prior overt hemorrhage. Mean susceptibility per cerebral cavernous malformation lesion (χ̄lesion) was measured to correlate with lesion volume, age at scanning, and hemorrhagic history. Temporal rates of change in χ̄lesion were evaluated in 33 patients. Average χ̄lesion per patient was positively correlated with patient age at scanning (P < .05, 4.1% change with each decade of life). Cerebral cavernous malformation lesions with prior overt hemorrhages exhibited higher χ̄lesion than those without (P < .05). Changes in χ̄lesion during 3- to 15-month follow-up were small in patients without new hemorrhage between the 2 scans (bias = -0.0003; 95% CI, -0.06-0.06). The study revealed a positive correlation between mean quantitative susceptibility mapping signal and patient age in cerebral cavernous malformation lesions, higher mean quantitative susceptibility mapping signal in hemorrhagic lesions, and minimum longitudinal quantitative susceptibility mapping signal change in clinically stable lesions. Quantitative susceptibility mapping has the potential to be a novel imaging biomarker supplementing conventional imaging in cerebral cavernous malformations. The clinical significance of such measures merits further study. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. Anatomical study of the cavernous sinus emphasizing operative approaches and related vascular and neural reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Burgess, J; Akin, O

    1987-12-01

    The efficacy of three operative approaches to the cavernous sinus (CS) and the possibilities of vascular and cranial nerve reconstruction in and around the CS were studied in 50 cadaver specimens (25 heads). The lateral operative approach was through the lateral wall, between Cranial Nerves V1 and IV, or between Cranial Nerves V1 and V2. The superior approach was through the superior wall of the CS after removing the anterior clinoid process and unroofing the optic canal. The inferior approach followed the petrous internal carotid artery (ICA) into the CS after an extradural subtemporal exposure or after a combined subtemporal and infratemporal fossa exposure. The different exposures of the spaces of the CS and of the intracavernous structures provided by the superior and the lateral approaches were complementary. The exposure provided by the inferior approach was minimal; however, the junction of the petrous and cavernous ICA was best exposed by this route. The combined subtemporal and infratemporal fossa approach exposed the petrous ICA (for proximal control or for reconstruction) with the greatest ease and with the least temporal lobe retraction. The combination of the superior and lateral approaches and the complete mobilization of the intracavernous ICA facilitated its repair after experimental lacerations. Lacerations of either the inferior and the inferomedial aspects of any portion of the cavernous ICA or of the anterior surface of the posterior vertical segment of the artery were the most difficult to repair. End-to-end anastomosis was more difficult with the posterior third of the artery than with the anterior two-thirds. A vein graft with an average length of 3.5 cm could be sutured from the petrous to the supraclinoid ICA to bypass the cavernous ICA, with an average occlusion time of 45 minutes. End-to-end technique was judged better for the proximal anastomosis, but end (graft)-to-side anastomosis was easier to perform at the distal end because of the

  8. Lunar Holes and Their Associating Subsurface Caverns: From SELENE (Kaguya) to UZUME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Nishibori, T.; Iwata, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimada, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Hasenaka, T.; Morota, T.; Nishino, M. N.; Hashizume, K.; Shirao, M.; Komatsu, G.; Hasebe, N.; Shimizu, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yokobori, S.; Miyake, Y.; Michikawa, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Shinoda, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a summary of lunar holes and associated caverns. Furthermore, we also introduce the project Unprecedented Zipangu Underworld of the Moon/Mars Exploration (UZUME) to explore the holes and caverns.

  9. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  10. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  11. Experience in testing of a solution mined storage cavern. [Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Goin, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recertification tests were made of the Department of Energy/Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage cavern number 6 in the West Hackberry, Louisiana Salt Dome. The cavern has a volume of 8,600,000 barrels. Tests included hydrostatic tests of the brine filled cavern and nitrogen leak tests of the three wells entering the cavern. Test procedures are described and test results are discussed.

  12. Propranolol Treatment of Cavernous Malformations with Symptomatic Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zabramski, Joseph M; Kalani, M Yashar S; Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are more common than generally thought, affecting approximately 1 in every 250 adults. Most of these lesions are asymptomatic or have a relatively benign course, but a small minority behave aggressively and present with recurrent episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage. A safe and effective medical treatment option for the management of this latter group would be useful. Propranolol has recently been shown to be effective in the treatment of infantile hemangioma, a close pathologic counterpart of cavernous malformations. These results suggest a potential role for propranolol treatment in the management of patients with symptomatic cavernous malformations. Low-dose propranolol (20 mg, three times daily) was used to treat 2 adult female patients in their mid- to late fifties, both of whom had symptomatic cavernous malformations and a history of repeated hemorrhage. Serial magnetic resonance imaging studies after the initiation of propranolol demonstrated regression of the lesions and no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. Propranolol may offer a safe and effective treatment for patients who have cavernous malformations with symptomatic hemorrhage. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  14. Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K.; Magorian, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

  15. Brainstem cavernous malformations: Natural history versus surgical management.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Choudhri, Omar; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-10-01

    While brainstem cavernous malformations were once considered inoperable, improvements in patient selection, surgical exposures, intraoperative MRI-guidance, MR tractography, and neurophysiologic monitoring have resulted in good outcomes in the majority of operated patients. In a consecutive series of 104 patients with brainstem cavernous malformations, only 14% of patients experienced cranial nerve or motor dysfunction that was worse at late follow-up, relative to their preoperative condition. Outcomes were predicted by several factors, including larger lesion size, lesions that crossed the midline, the presence of a developmental venous anomaly, older age, and greater time interval from lesion hemorrhage to surgery. The 14% of patients who experienced a persistent neurological deficit as a result of surgery, while substantial from any perspective, compares favorably with the risks of observation based on a recent meta-analysis. Curative resection is a safe and effective treatment for brainstem cavernous malformations that will prevent re-hemorrhage in symptomatic patients.

  16. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Seizure risk from cavernous or arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Josephson, C.B.; Leach, J.-P.; Duncan, R.; Roberts, R.C.; Counsell, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the risk of epileptic seizures due to a brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or cavernous malformation (CM). Methods: In a prospective population-based study of new diagnoses of AVMs (n = 229) or CMs (n = 139) in adults in Scotland in 1999–2003, we used annual medical records surveillance, general practitioner follow-up, and patient questionnaires to quantify the risk of seizures between clinical presentation and AVM/CM treatment, last follow-up, or death. Results: The 5-year risk of first-ever seizure after presentation was higher for AVMs presenting with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit (ICH/FND: n = 119; 23%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9%–37%) than for incidental AVMs (n = 40; 8%, 95% CI 0%–20%), CMs presenting with ICH/FND (n = 38; 6%, 95% CI 0%–14%), or incidental CMs (n = 57; 4%, 95% CI 0%–10%). For adults who had never experienced ICH/FND, the 5-year risk of epilepsy after first-ever seizure was higher for CMs (n = 23; 94%, 95% CI 84%–100%) than AVMs (n = 37; 58%, 95% CI 40%–76%; p = 0.02). Among adults who never experienced ICH/FND and presented with or developed epilepsy, there was no difference in the proportions achieving 2-year seizure freedom over 5 years between AVMs (n = 43; 45%, 95% CI 20%–70%) and CMs (n = 35; 47%, 95% CI 27%–67%). Conclusions: AVM-related ICH confers a significantly higher risk of a first-ever seizure compared to CMs or incidental AVMs. Adults with a CM have a high risk of epilepsy after a first-ever seizure but achieve seizure freedom as frequently as those with epilepsy due to an AVM. PMID:21536634

  18. Giant cavernous haemangioma of the wandering spleen.

    PubMed

    Misra, Aditya P; Misra, Ritu; Kumar, Abhay

    2013-02-01

    Cavernous haemangioma is a rare disorder of the spleen with fewer than 100 cases reported [1]. Spleen may have an unusual degree of mobility and occupy an atypical location in less than 0.2 % of all the patients [2] Wandering spleen has been associated with incomplete fusion or even absence of gastrosplenic and lienorenal ligaments [3]. A 36-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of pain in the left hypochondrium and a massive splenomegaly. Ultrasonography, Doppler studies, and computed tomography were performed. Ultrasonography showed a large heterogeneous solid cystic mass, measuring 11.2 cm × 10.6 cm, located in the pelvis. Thin soft tissue connecting this mass to spleen noticed. Spleen was malrotated & in left lumbar fossa. Doppler studies shows prominent vessels at the periphery of the mass with high velocity external flow and scanty vascularity at the centre, probably suggesting haemangioma. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of the abdomen showed spleen in left lumbar region with a large heterogeneous, predominantly cystic mass lesion measuring 11.2 x 10.6 cm seen arising from diaphragmatic surface of lower pole of the spleen (Fig. 1), findings were suggestive of wandering spleen with a haemangioma or a hydatid cyst. The patient was explored by a left para-median incision under general anaesthesia. Peroperatively, there was a malrotated enlarged spleen with a large solid lesion confined to the lower half of the spleen (Fig. 2). Gastrosplenic ligament was not visualized. Total splenectomy was done after ligating the splenic artery as the main splenic artery was supplying the mass.

  19. Cavernous sinus meningiomas: imaging and surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Sindou, Marc; Nebbal, Mustapha; Guclu, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas which are by definition those meningiomas which originate from the parasellar region are difficult skull base tumors to deal with. For deciding the most appropriate surgical strategy, surgeons need detailed preoperative neuroimaging. The vicinity of the tumor with the vital and highly functional neurovascular structures, tumor extensions into the basal cisterns and skull base structures, and the arterial vascularization and venous drainage pathways, as they shape operative strategy, are important preoperative data to take into account. Thin section CT scan with bone windows, 3D spiral CT reconstruction, MRI, MR angiography, and DSA performed with selective arteriography including late venous phases give those required detailed informations about the tumor and its relation with neurovascular and bony structures. The type of craniotomy and complementary osteotomy and the usefulness of an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with unroofing the optic canal can be decided from preoperative neuroimaging. Data collected also help in determining whether extensive exposure of the middle cranial fossa is necessary to ensure substantial devascularization of the tumor and whether proximal control of the internal carotid artery (ICA) at its intrapetrosal portion might be useful. Study of the capacity of blood supply of the Willis circle is wise for deciding the need and way of performing an extra-intracranial bypass together with tumor removal. Currently the concept of operating only the tumors with extracavernous extensions and to limit resection to only their extracavernous portions is the most accepted way of treating these tumors. It was that strategy that was adopted in the senior author's 220-patient series.Radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy may complement surgery or can be only reserved for growing remnants.

  20. Genetic Screening of Pediatric Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Merello, Elisa; Pavanello, Marco; Consales, Alessandro; Mascelli, Samantha; Raso, Alessandro; Accogli, Andrea; Cama, Armando; Valeria, Capra; De Marco, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations mostly located within the central nervous system. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10 genes are identified in about 90 % of familial cases of CCMs and two thirds of sporadic cases with multiple lesions. In this study, we performed genetic screening of a cohort of 31 patients, mainly pediatric. We analyzed the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing of exons and intronic boundaries. A total of 9 typical pathogenic loss-of-function mutations were identified in 10 out 31 patients (32 %). The 75 % of familial cases were mutated and the percentage reached to 85 % when we consider only pediatric cases. Detection rate in sporadic cases with multiple lesions was considerably lower (16 %). We identified a novel variant of CCM3, the c.130-131insT (p.R45Efs*8), in 1 pediatric sporadic case with multiple lesions that introduced a premature termination codon into the messenger RNA (mRNA), most likely leading to mRNA decay. Similar to other CCM pediatric series, the main symptoms associated to clinical debut consisted of cerebral hemorrhage. In conclusion, the penetrance of CCM mutations in familial pediatric cases is high (85 %). The genetic workup could improve clinical and genetic counseling in CCM patients. Moreover, we confirmed the high risk of hemorrhage in children with CCMs.

  1. Immune Response in Human Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Du, Hongyan; Duckworth, Edward; Raja, Harish; Batjer, H. Hunt; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preliminary observations suggesting the presence of B and plasma cells and oligoclonality of immunoglobulin (Ig) G in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) have motivated a systematic study correlating the infiltration of the immune cells with clinical activity and antigen-triggered immune response in surgically excised lesions. Methods Infiltration of plasma, B, T and HLA-DR expressing cells and macrophages within 23 excised CCMs was related to clinical activity. Relative amounts of Ig isotypes were determined. IgG clonality of mRNA from CCMs was assessed by spectratyping, cloning and sequencing. Results Infiltration of the immune cells ranged widely within CCM lesions and cells were generally co-expressed with each other. Immune cell infiltration did not associate with recent bleeding and lesion growth. Significantly more B lymphocytes in CCM lesions were associated with venous anomaly. More T cells were present in solitary lesions. More T cells and less macrophages were present in CCMs from younger subjects. IgG isotype was present in all CCM lesions. Most lesions also expressed IgM and IgA, with IgM predominance over IgA correlating with recent CCM growth. Oligoclonality was shown in IgG mRNA from CCMs, but not from peripheral blood lymphocytes, with only eight CDR3 sequences observed among 134 clones from two CCM lesions. Conclusions An antigen-directed oligoclonal IgG immune response is present within CCM lesions regardless of recent clinical activity. Apparent differences in immune response in younger patients and in lesions with recent growth will need confirmation in other series. The pathogenicity of oligoclonal immune response will require systematic hypothesis testing in recently available CCM murine models. PMID:19286587

  2. Spontaneous Healing of Iatrogenic Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, H-J.; Jin, S-C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Direct carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) by selective navigation using a microcatheter or microwire is a rare complication, and its timing of treatment has not been elucidated. We report two cases of direct CCFs resulting from injury to the cavernous posterior segment of the internal carotid artery during selective navigation. We did not plan to perform emergent endovascular treatment for these direct CCFs because no symptoms related to direct CCFs developed. Follow-up angiography revealed spontaneous healing of both direct CCFs. Close observation rather than emergent treatment may represent another option for direct CCF by selective navigation during the endovascular procedure. PMID:22681734

  3. [Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangioma in anterior clinoid process].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Taro; Mikami, Takeshi; Minamida, Yoshihiro; Baba, Takeo; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2006-08-01

    Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are rare tumors, and there are no previous reports of cases with a tumor at the anterior clinoid process. We report a case of a PICH at the anterior clinoid process in a 66-year-old female presenting with headaches and visual impairment. CT and MR imaging showed a mass in the anterior clinoid process. The lesion showed hyperintensity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, and gadolinium was homogenously enhanced. The lesion was removed surgically, and histologically confirmed as a cavernous hemangioma. Preoperative examinations could not provide a definitive diagnosis. A brief clinical and radiological review of the literature is presented.

  4. Multiple spinal cavernous malformations in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Göksu, Ethem; Alpsoy, Erkan; Uçar, Tanju; Tuncer, Recai

    2012-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare, congenital vascular disorder characterized by cutaneous haemangiomas, venous varicosities, and hypertrophy of the osseous and soft tissue. Various vascular anomalies of the central nervous system have been described in this syndrome. Two previous associations between KTWS and spinal cord cavernous malformations have been reported in the English literature. In this report, we present a patient in whom multiple cavernous malformations located in the conus medullaris region and cauda equina were associated with KTWS. General physical examination as well as neuroradiological and operative findings are described.

  5. Massive Intracerebral Hemorrhage Caused by a Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Soo; Lee, Jae Il; Choi, Chang Hwa

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of massive intracerebral hemorrhage resulting from a small, superficially-located supratentorial cavernous malformation, or cavernoma. These lesions rarely lead to massive, life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhages. A 17-year-old female presented with a 3-week history of declining mental status. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sizable intracranial hemorrhage, within the right occipital region, associated with a small nodule at the hematoma's posterior margin. An emergency operation removed the entire hematoma and nodule. Histological examination of the nodule was compatible with a diagnosis of cavernous malformation. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful. PMID:22396841

  6. Optical coherence tomography imaging of optic disc cavernous haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Katta, Mohamed; Mehta, Hemal; Ho, Ivan; Garrick, Ray; Chong, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Optic disc cavernous haemangiomas are either found incidentally or after presentation with vitreous haemorrhage. They are characterised by a cluster of grapes appearance to the multiple vascular saccules that make up the tumour. They are more often found in the retinal periphery but rarely occur at the optic disc. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging may be a useful non-invasive imaging modality to follow-up these lesions. We present the case of an asymptomatic 60-year-old lady referred from her optometrist with a lesion overlying the optic disc and the ensuing diagnosis of cavernous haemangioma using fundus fluorescein angiography and OCT.

  7. Disposal of oil field wastes and NORM wastes into salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1999-01-27

    Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), the risk to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne's research indicates that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and, in most cases, would not be prohibited by state agencies (although those agencies may need to revise their wastes management regulations). A risk analysis of several cavern leakage scenarios suggests that the risk from cavern disposal of NOW and NORM wastes is below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

  8. Converting LPG caverns to natural-gas storage permits fast response to market

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1996-02-19

    Deregulation of Canada`s natural-gas industry in the late 1980s led to a very competitive North American natural-gas storage market. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., began looking for method for developing cost-effective storage while at the same time responding to new market-development opportunities and incentives. Conversion of existing LPG-storage salt caverns to natural-gas storage is one method of providing new storage. To supply SaskEnergy Inc., the province`s local distribution company, and Saskatchewan customers, TransGas previously had developed solution-mined salt storage caverns from start to finish. Two Regina North case histories illustrate TransGas` experiences with conversion of LPG salt caverns to gas storage. This paper provides the testing procedures for the various caverns, cross-sectional diagrams of each cavern, and outlines for cavern conversion. It also lists storage capacities of these caverns.

  9. Evaluation of hard-rock-cavern construction methods for compressed-air energy storage: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, J.E.; Lange, R.B.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the results of construction cost and schedule estimates for caverns mined in hard rock for 100-MW and 220-MW compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants with 10 hours storage capacity and using either water-compensated cavern operation with constant turbine-inlet pressure operation on uncompensated cavern operation with sliding turbine-inlet pressure operation. The estimates are made for caverns mined by large-parallel-tunnel methods and by room-and-pillar methods. The results indicate that, for the cavern sizes involved, the room-and-pillar method is cost-competitive with the large-parallel-tunnel methods, but the method requires marginally more construction time. The largest cavern size in the estimates may, however, be approaching the size where the room-and-pillar method may no longer be competitive. The technical feasibility of water curtains for preventing or minimizing leakage of air from CAES hard-rock caverns is evaluated, and construction cost and schedule estimates are made for uncompensated caverns. It is concluded that the performance of water curtains is dependent upon the accuracy of the values of site specific variables and assumptions utilized in the design. A method is presented for assessing if a water curtain may be economical for a compensated CAES cavern. Such an assessment for a water curtain for an uncompensated CAES cavern is more complex and beyond the scope of this study. Also, a program for testing the operation of a water curtain in conjunction with an air-storage cavern operation is proposed. For the specific cavern sizes considered in this report, the estimated water-curtain construction costs and times for the uncompensated room-and-pillar caverns are found to be greater than for the uncompensated large-parallel-tunnel caverns. 11 refs., 18 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Cavernous hemangioma of rhinopharynx: our experience and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Domenico; Motta, Sergio; Massimilla, Eva Aurora; Tafuri, Domenico; Russo, Daniela; Russo, Anna; Landolfo, Pasquale Gianluca; Mesolella, Massimo; Motta, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Hemangiomas are benign tumors originating in the vascular tissues of skin, mucosa, muscles, glands, and bones. Although these tumors are common lesions of the head and neck, they rarely occur in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Cavernous haemangioma of the lateral wall of the nasopharynx has not previously been reported. We examined the clinical, radiological and therapeutic management of cavernous haemangioma of nasopharynx starting from a clinical case of a 26-year-old woman with a history of recurrent and conspicuous epistaxis and left-sided nasal associated severe obstruction. Nasopharynx examination, by flexible endoscopy, showed a cystic mass borne by the left side wall of the nasopharynx, in contact with the soft palate, covered by intact and regular mucosa. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan, confirmed these findings and showed contextual lamellar calcifications and inhomogeneous enhancement. The nasal endoscopic approach (FESS), under general anesthesia, allowed removal of the mass, without complications, after careful hemostasis of arterial branches. It was possible to establish the precise site of origin of the tumor only during the surgical procedure. Histopathological study showed mucosa with extensive vascular proliferation, with framework of lacunar/cavernous haemangioma, also present at lamellar bone tissue level. An unusual site and an unspecific clinical appearance can make diagnosis and treatment of a cavernous hemangioma of the nasopharynx difficult. The nasal endoscopic technique proved to be reliable in terms of adequate exposure and visualization of the lesion, control of bleeding, and complete removal of the mass. PMID:28352748

  11. Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith

    2013-09-01

    The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

  12. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  13. Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Russo, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

  14. Carotid-cavernous fistula after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emin; Isildak, Huseyin; Haciyev, Yusuf; Kaytaz, Asim; Enver, Ozgun

    2009-03-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are anomalous communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus. They can arise because of spontaneous or trauma causes. Most caroticocavernous fistulas are of spontaneous origin and unknown etiology. Spontaneous CCF may also be associated with cavernous sinus pathology such as arteriosclerotic changes of the arterial wall, fibromuscular dysplasia, or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Traumatic CCFs may occur after either blunt or penetrating head trauma. Their clinical presentation is related to their size and to the type of venous drainage, which can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as visual loss, proptosis, bruit, chemosis, cranial nerve impairment, intracranial hemorrhage (rare), and so on. Treatment by endovascular transarterial embolization with electrolytically detachable coils is a very effective method for CCF with good outcomes. Carotid-cavernous fistulas have been rarely reported after craniofacial surgery and are uncommon pathologies in otolaryngology practice. In this study, we report a 40-year-old woman with CCF secondary to blunt trauma of functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

  15. Simulation of Cavern Formation and Karst Development Using Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Douglas C.; Ross, Alex R.

    1975-01-01

    A salt model was developed as a teaching tool to demonstrate the development of caverns and karst topography. Salt slabs are placed in a watertight box to represent fractured limestone. Erosion resulting from water flow can be photographed in time-lapse sequence or demonstrated in the laboratory. (Author/CP)

  16. Fat deposition in the cavernous sinus in Cushing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bachow, T.B.; Hesselink, J.R.; Aaron, J.O.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    Fat density in the cavernous sinus on computed tomography (CT) is described in 6 out of 16 (37.5%) patients with Cushing disease. This finding may aid in making a specific diagnosis in patients with a pituitary mass. It was not seen in 30 random CT studies of the sella; however, supra seller fat was incidentally noted in the patient with acromegaly.

  17. [Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous hemangiomas: clinical features and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya

    2011-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous hemangiomas (angiomas) are occult vascular malformations characterized by rare lesions consisting of closely packed capillary-like vessels. In general, patients with this disease become symptomatic because of hemorrhage leads to progressive neurological deficits. Therefore, surgical tumor resection should be considered for symptomatic patients should be considered a surgical tumor resection.

  18. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with cavernous sinus involvement - An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Namdarian, Dinaz; Hiranandani, N L; Hathiram, Bachi; Rajeevan, C P; Agarwal, Ritu

    2003-10-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibrama (JNA) is a benign vascular tumour which is locally aggressive and occasionally extends intracranially. It occurs mainly in adolescent males. We report an interesting case of a targe JNA with intracranial extention encroaching on the cavernous sinus which we treated surgically by the conventional lateral rhinotomy and transpalatal approach.

  19. Simulation of Cavern Formation and Karst Development Using Salt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Douglas C.; Ross, Alex R.

    1975-01-01

    A salt model was developed as a teaching tool to demonstrate the development of caverns and karst topography. Salt slabs are placed in a watertight box to represent fractured limestone. Erosion resulting from water flow can be photographed in time-lapse sequence or demonstrated in the laboratory. (Author/CP)

  20. Cavernous hemangioma of the dura mater mimicking meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Ricci, Alessandro; Marzi, Sara; Dehcordi, Soheila Raysi; Galzio, Renato Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cavernomas are benign lesions that most commonly occur intra-parenchymally, but occasionally they have been described as arising from the dura mater. Extra-axial cavernous angiomas (or hemangiomas) account for 0.4–2% of all intracranial vascular malformations, and they usually occur in the middle cranial fossa, associated with the cavernous sinus. Other possible localizations (e.g. tentorium, convexity, anterior cranial fossa, cerebellopontine angle, Meckel's cave, sella turcica and internal auditory meatus) are rare, and they account only for 0.2–0.5%. Case Description: We report a case of a 30-year-old female presenting with a 2 years history of headache unresponsive to drug therapy. The magnetic resonance imaging showed a dural-based lesion in the left frontal region; the lesion size was: 1.5 cm × 3.5 cm. The appearance suggested a convexity meningioma. A left frontal craniotomy was performed, and the histopathological diagnosis deposed for a cavernous hemangioma of the dura mater. The follow-up at 1-year was good without any neurologic deficit. Conclusions: Dural-based cavernous hemangiomas of the convexity are uncommon lesions. Up to now, only 13 cases have been described in the literature. The authors have discussed clinical aspects, radiological features, surgical treatment, and operative findings. PMID:26421218

  1. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  2. Analogue of Caldera Dynamics: the Controlled Salt Cavern Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, P. G.; Rohmer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Caldera collapse (or pit-crater) dynamics are inferred from geological observations and laboratory experiments. Here, we present an analogue of caldera collapse at field scale and possible analogy with large scale caldera dynamics. Through an original exploitation technique in sedimentary environment, a salt layer is emptied, leaving a brine-filled cavern, which eventually collapses after overburden falls into the cavern. Such a collapse was monitored in East France by many instruments (including GPS, extensometers, geophones, broadband seismological sensors, tiltmeter, gravity meter, … ), which allowed us to describe mechanisms of the collapse. Micro-seismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered micro-seismicity observed in the vicinity of this underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M~7.2 earthquake, which occurred ~12000 kilometres away. High-dynamic broadband records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency micro-seismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. Stress oscillations due to the seismic waves may have exceeded the strength required for the rupture of the complex media made of brine and rock triggering micro-earthquakes and leading to damage of the overburden and eventually collapse of the salt cavern. The increment of stress necessary for the failure of a Dolomite layer is of the same order or magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude

  3. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2

  4. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Somatic Mutations in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Judith; Awad, Issam A.; Recksiek, Peter; Shenkar, Robert; Breeze, Robert; Handler, Michael; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette Kay

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Germline mutations in three genes have been found in familial cases of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). We previously discovered somatic and germline truncating mutations in the KRIT1 gene supporting the “two-hit” mechanism of CCM lesion formation in a single lesion. The purpose of this study was to screen for somatic, nonheritable, mutations in three more lesions from different patients and identify the cell type(s) in which somatic mutations occur. METHODS Somatic mutations were sought in DNA from three surgically excised, fresh-frozen CCM lesions by cloning and screening PCR products generated from KRIT1 or PDCD10 coding regions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolated endothelial and nonendothelial cells in order to determine if somatic mutations were found in endothelial cells. RESULTS A CCM lesion harbored somatic and germline KRIT1 mutations on different chromosomes and are therefore biallelic. Both mutations are predicted to truncate the protein. The KRIT1 somatic mutations (novel c.1800delG mutation and previously identified 34 nucleotide deletion) in CCMs from two different patients were only found in the vascular endothelial cells lining caverns. No obvious somatic mutations were identified in the two other lesions; however, the results were inconclusive possibly due to the technical limitations or the fact that these specimens had a small proportion of vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. CONCLUSION The “two-hit” mechanism occurs in vascular endothelial cells lining CCM caverns from two patients with somatic and Hispanic-American KRIT1 germline mutations. Methods for somatic mutation detection should focus on vascular endothelial cells lining pristine caverns. PMID:19574835

  5. Long-term sealing analyses for US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1994-02-01

    It is inevitable that sealing and abandonment will someday occur in a SPR cavern or caverns. To gain insight into the long-term behavior of a typical SPR cavern following sealing and abandonment, a suite of mechanical finite-element calculations was performed. The initial analyses predict how quickly and to what extent a cavern pressurizes after it is plugged. The analyses also examine the stability of the cavern as it changes shape due to the excessive pressures generated as the salt creeps and the brine in the cavern thermally expands. These large-scale analyses do not include the details of the plug but assume a good seal is established in the cavern wells. In another series of analyses, the potential for forming a leak at the plug is evaluated. A cement plug, emplaced in the casing seat of a cavern well, is loaded using the predicted brine pressures from the cavern analyses. The plugged casing analyses examine the potential for forming a leak path in and along the interfaces of salt, casing, and cement plug. In the last set of analysis, the dimensional scale of the problem is further reduced to examine a preexisting crack along a casing/salt interface. The cracked interface is assumed to be fluid filled and fully pressurized by the cavern fluids. The analyses address the potential for the fluid path to extend upwards along a plugged casing should an open microannulus surround the casing after it is plugged.

  6. Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

    1996-06-01

    Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

  7. Tumor pathology of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Héran, F; Bergès, O; Blustajn, J; Boucenna, M; Charbonneau, F; Koskas, P; Lafitte, F; Nau, E; Roux, P; Sadik, J C; Savatovsky, J; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    The term orbital tumor covers a wide range of benign and malignant diseases affecting specific component of the orbit or developing in contact with them. They are found incidentally or may be investigated as part of the assessment of a systemic disorder or because of orbital signs (exophthalmos, pain, etc.). Computed tomography, MRI and Color Doppler Ultrasound (CDU), play a varying role depending on the clinical presentation and the disease being investigated. This article reflects long experience in a reference center but does not claim to be exhaustive. We have chosen to consider these tumors from the perspective of their usual presentation, emphasizing the most common causes and suggestive radiological and clinical presentations (progressive or sudden-onset exophthalmos, children or adults, lacrimal gland lesions, periorbital lesions and enophthalmos). We will describe in particular muscle involvement (thyrotoxicosis and tumors), vascular lesions (cavernous sinus hemangioma, orbital varix, cystic lymphangioma), childhood lesions and orbital hematomas. We offer straightforward useful protocols for simple investigation and differential diagnosis. Readers who wish to go further to extend their knowledge in this fascinating area can refer to the references in the bibliography.

  8. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  9. Regulatory, technical pressures prompt more U. S. salt-cavern gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.F. )

    1994-09-12

    Natural-gas storage in US salt caverns is meeting the need for flexible, high delivery and injection storage following implementation Nov. 1, 1993, of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Order 636. This ruling has opened the US underground natural-gas storage market to more participants and created a demand for a variety of storage previously provided by pipelines as part of their bundled sales services. Many of these new services such as no-notice and supply balancing center on use of high-delivery natural gas storage from salt caverns. Unlike reservoir storage, nothing restricts flow in a cavern. The paper discusses the unique properties of salt that make it ideal for gas storage, choosing a location for the storage facility, cavern depth and shape, cavern size, spacing, pressures, construction, conversion or brine or LPG storage caverns to natural gas, and operation.

  10. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  11. Beta electron fluxes inside a magnetic plasma cavern: Calculation and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupitskii, E. L.; Smirnov, E. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    We study the possibility of electrostatic blanking of beta electrons in the expanding spherical blob of a radioactive plasma in a rarefied ionosphere. From numerical studies on the dynamics of beta electrons departing a cavern, we obtain the form of a function that determines the portion of departing electrons and calculate the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern in relation to the Starfish Prime nuclear blast. We show that the flux density of electrons in geomagnetic flux tubes and inside the cavern depend on a correct allowance for the quantity of beta electrons returning to the cavern. On the basis of a physical analysis, we determine the approximate criterion for the return of electrons from a geomagnetic flux tube to the cavern. We compare calculation results in terms of the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern with the recently published experimental results from operation Starfish Prime.

  12. STORAGE OF CHILLED NATURAL GAS IN BEDDED SALT STORAGE CAVERNS

    SciTech Connect

    JOel D. Dieland; Kirby D. Mellegard

    2001-11-01

    This report provides the results of a two-phase study that examines the economic and technical feasibility of converting a conventional natural gas storage facility in bedded salt into a refrigerated natural gas storage facility for the purpose of increasing the working gas capacity of the facility. The conceptual design used to evaluate this conversion is based on the design that was developed for the planned Avoca facility in Steuben County, New York. By decreasing the cavern storage temperature from 43 C to -29 C (110 F to -20 F), the working gas capacity of the facility can be increased by about 70 percent (from 1.2 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 4.4 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 2.0 x 10{sup 8} Nm{sup 3} or 7.5 Bcf) while maintaining the original design minimum and maximum cavern pressures. In Phase I of the study, laboratory tests were conducted to determine the thermal conductivity of salt at low temperatures. Finite element heat transfer calculations were then made to determine the refrigeration loads required to maintain the caverns at a temperature of -29 C (-20 F). This was followed by a preliminary equipment design and a cost analysis for the converted facility. The capital cost of additional equipment and its installation required for refrigerated storage is estimated to be about $13,310,000 or $160 per thousand Nm{sup 3} ($4.29 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf)) of additional working gas capacity. The additional operating costs include maintenance refrigeration costs to maintain the cavern at -29 C (-20 F) and processing costs to condition the gas during injection and withdrawal. The maintenance refrigeration cost, based on the current energy cost of about $13.65 per megawatt-hour (MW-hr) ($4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu)), is expected to be about $316,000 after the first year and to decrease as the rock surrounding the cavern is cooled. After 10 years, the cost of maintenance refrigeration based on the $13.65 per MW-hr ($4 per MMBtu) energy cost is

  13. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula.

    PubMed

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Praveen, Smita Vittal; Noronha, Veena Olma

    2014-09-01

    A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF.

  14. Orthostatic hypotension associated with dorsal medullary cavernous angioma.

    PubMed

    Idiaquez, J; Araya, P; Benarroch, E

    2009-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a rare manifestation of medulla oblongata lesions that may be because of interruption of descending sympathoexcitatory axons. To illustrate the location of a medullary lesion that produced OH following resection in relationship to the location of putative sympathoexcitatory pathways. A case with dorsal medullary cavernous angioma presenting with OH is described. The possible localization of lesion was compared with distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive axons in a comparable section of the medulla of a control brain. The patient had marked OH after partial removal of the cavernous angioma. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The magnetic resonance imaging location of the lesion overlapped that of TH-immunoreactive axons of the medullary transtegmental tract. A restricted lesion of medullary lesion interrupting the catecholaminergic transtegmental tract arising from the sympathoexcitatory C1 neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla could result in severe OH.

  15. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Praveen, Smita Vittal; Noronha, Veena Olma

    2014-01-01

    A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF. PMID:25370401

  16. [Recurrent neurosensory macular detachment in carotid-cavernous fistula].

    PubMed

    de Dompablo, E; Díez-Álvarez, L; Ruiz-Casas, D; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, V; Ciancas, E; González-López, J J

    2015-07-01

    A 46 year-old man was seen in the emergency department complaining of vision loss and exophthalmos in his right eye. He also complained of headache, diplopia of 4 months onset, and neurosensory detachment that resolved spontaneously the month before. The study revealed tortuous conjunctival and episcleral vessels and neurosensory macular detachment in his right eye. A carotid-cavernous fistula was confirmed by computed tomography angiography. The fistula closed spontaneously during the hospitalization. One month later, the neurosensory detachment disappeared again. Carotid-cavernous fistula should be included in the differential diagnosis of neurosensory macular detachments. These neurosensory detachments can resolve spontaneously 11 the fistula is closed. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Red blood cell scan in cavernous hemangioma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, D.M.; Noyek, A.M.; Kirsh, J.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Cavernous hemangioma of the larynx is an uncommon, difficult-to-diagnose vascular tumor for which there is no significant imaging literature to date. The possibility of improved diagnosis through RBC scanning might obviate injudicious biopsy and potential hemorrhage within the airway. Utilizing the radionuclide RBC scan, which labels the patient's own RBCs initially with cold pyrophosphate, and subsequently with technetium 99m as pertechnetate, we have identified successfully four patients with cavernous hemangioma of the larynx. All presented with a supraglottic mass involving at least the aryepiglottic fold and arytenoid region unilaterally. This report describes our satisfactory diagnostic imaging experience with the radionuclide RBC scan and suggests both its imaging specificity and its role in the management of this lesion.

  18. Supratentorial high convexity intradural extramedullary cavernous angioma: case report.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yohtaro; Matsumori, Takashi; Taguchi, Yoshio; Koizumi, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of numbness in the lower left side of the face and upper left extremity. Axial T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a wedge-shaped mass measuring 3 x 2.5 cm in the right frontoparietal high convexity area that was heterogeneously enhanced after administration of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid. Right frontoparietal craniotomy was performed and a bluish soft mass was found under the arachnoid membrane. The mass could be dissected free from the arachnoid membrane and the brain surface. Histological examination revealed the typical findings of cavernous angioma. Cavernous angioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of supratentorial high convexity intradural extramedullary tumor, especially appearing as a heterogeneously enhanced mass adjacent to the brain parenchyma causing mass effect.

  19. Cavernous Hemangioma of Tongue: Management of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Niharika; Deshmukh, Sudhanwa N; B, Jagadesh; S, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Hemangiomas are benign tumours of infancy and childhood, most commonly located in the head and neck region and occur more frequently in the lips, tongue and palate. The treatment depends upon lesion location, size and evolution stage and the patient’s age. This paper describes the management of cavernous hemangioma in a 2 -year -old child and 14 -year -old child using different approaches. PMID:25478463

  20. Asymptotic solution of the problem for a thin axisymmetric cavern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serebriakov, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    The boundary value problem which describes the axisymmetric separation of the flow around a body by a stationary infinite stream is considered. It is understood that the cavitation number varies over the length of the cavern. Using the asymptotic expansions for the potential of a thin body, the orders of magnitude of terms in the equations of the problem are estimated. Neglecting small quantities, a simplified boundary value problem is obtained.

  1. Relative Evaluation of the Independent Volume Measures of Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-08-01

    Throughout the construction and operation of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), three types of cavern volume measurements have been maintained. These are: (1) the calculated solution volume determined during initial construction by solution mining and any subsequent solutioning during oil transfers, (2) the calculated sonar volume determined through sonar surveys of the cavern dimensions, and (3) the direct metering of oil to determine the volume of the cavern occupied by the oil. The objective of this study is to compare these measurements to each other and determine, if possible, the uncertainties associated with a given type of measurement. Over time, each type of measurement has acquired a customary, or an industry accepted, stated uncertainty. This uncertainty is not necessarily the result of a technical analysis. Ultimately there is one definitive quantity, the oil volume measure by the oil custody transfer meters, taken by all parties to the transfer as the correct ledger amount and for which the SPR Project is accountable. However, subsequent transfers within a site may not be with meters of the same accuracy. In this study, a very simple theory of the perfect relationship is used to evaluate the correlation (deviation) of the various measures. This theory permits separation of uncertainty and bias. Each of the four SPR sites are examined, first with comparisons between the calculated solution volumes and the sonar volumes determined during construction, then with comparisons of the oil inventories and the sonar volumes obtained either by surveying through brine prior to oil filling or through the oil directly.

  2. Long term storage of finished gasolines in large salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.W.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strategic oil stocking requires large low cost storage facilities. Crude oil has been held in very large salt mines and/or artificially made salt caverns for many years, notably in Europe and the USA. Following crude oil, gasoils and refinery light feed stocks have been tried also. Military organisations tried jet fuel and early cases of underground aviation gasoline storage in steel tanks have been reported.

  3. A Ruptured Dermoid Cyst of the Cavernous Sinus Extending into the Posterior Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-01-01

    Supratentorial dermoid cysts are uncommon to develop in the cavernous sinus. We present a ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. The patient was a 32-year-old female who complained occipital headache, blurred vision, and tinnitus over 4 years. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an enhanced tumor in the right cavernous sinus extending into the right temporal base and the posterior fossa with findings of ruptured cyst. Surgical resection was performed, and pathological findings were confirmed to be a dermoid cyst. We report a second case with ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. PMID:26113964

  4. A Ruptured Dermoid Cyst of the Cavernous Sinus Extending into the Posterior Fossa.

    PubMed

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Kim, Choong-Hyun; Cheong, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-05-01

    Supratentorial dermoid cysts are uncommon to develop in the cavernous sinus. We present a ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa. The patient was a 32-year-old female who complained occipital headache, blurred vision, and tinnitus over 4 years. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an enhanced tumor in the right cavernous sinus extending into the right temporal base and the posterior fossa with findings of ruptured cyst. Surgical resection was performed, and pathological findings were confirmed to be a dermoid cyst. We report a second case with ruptured dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus extending into the posterior fossa.

  5. Geotechnical issues and guidelines for storage of compressed air in excavated hard rock caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Fossum, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    The results of a literature survey on the stability of excavated hard rock caverns are presented. The objective of the study was to develop geotechnical criteria for the design of compressed air energy storage (CAES) caverns in hard rock formations. These criteria involve geologic, hydrological, geochemical, geothermal, and in situ stress state characteristics of generic rock masses. Their relevance to CAES caverns, and the identification of required research areas, are identified throughout the text. This literature survey and analysis strongly suggests that the chief geotechnical issues for the development and operation of CAES caverns in hard rock are impermeability for containment, stability for sound openings, and hydrostatic balance.

  6. [Condition of cavernous tissue of the penis after unilateral incomplete proximal intracavernous falloprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Taurashvili, G I; Medvedev, V L; Chilov, S A; Kochov, V N; Taruashvili, I G

    2011-01-01

    Unilateral incomplete proximal intracavernous falloprosthesis (UIPIF) was followed by US-dopplerography of the intact penis and penis in medical erection induced by E1 prostoglandin introduction into the intact cavernous body. UIPIF preserves 89-90% of functionally active cavernous tissue with effective blood flow. Investigation 2 months and more after operation demonstrated that systolic blood flow rate in the cavernous artery of the cavernous tissue around the endoprosthersis can reach values registered in normal erection. The conclusion is made that after UIPIF quality of sexual life of the patient improves due to creation of additional density and axial stability of the trunk of the penis.

  7. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Isolated Gastric Cavernous Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinlong; Sao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Isolated gastric cavernous haemangioma is extremely rare in the stomach. Historically, endoscopy, computed tomography and MRI had been used to diagnose gastric cavernous haemangioma. Biopsy, is not an option due to its vascular nature and submucosal location. We report an isolated gastric cavernous haemangioma that was diagnosed by end-oscopic ultrasound in a 25-year-old male and treated by laparotomy. The final diagnosis of cavernous haemagioma was confirmed by post-operative pathology. There was no recurrence during 3-month follow-up period. PMID:27790564

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Two Symptomatic Giant Cavernous Hemangiomas of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, Sandra; Ashdown, Boyd; Coldwell, Douglas; Helton, W. Scott; Freeny, Patrick C.

    1996-09-15

    Cavernous hemangiomas are usually asymptomatic; however, a small percentage may cause symptoms. This case report discusses palliation by transcatheter arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  9. Structural analysis of the West Hackbery No. 6 SPR storage cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Benzley, S.E.

    1980-08-01

    Four separate structural analyses of the West Hackberry No. 6 SPR storage cavern are presented. One analysis covers the creep response of the cavern beginning shortly before the time when an accidental fire occurred and proceeding through the cavern recertification pressure test. The second analysis models the surface uplife that is expected during the same pressure test. The third and fourth numerical studies investigate the structural response of West Hackberry No. 6 to slabbing and a rapid pressure drop. All analyses indicate that this cavern should be structurally stable for the conditions assumed.

  10. New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

  11. Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

  12. Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-09-22

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  13. [Orbital tumors treated at the University Hospital Otolaryngology Clinic in Kraków between 1997 and 2011].

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Agnieszka; Składzień, Jacek; Gawlik, Jolanta; Oleś, Krzysztof; Szaleniec, Joanna; Leszczyńska, Joanna; Bojanowska, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to establish the frequency of orbital tumor occurrence in the patients of the University Hospital Otolaryngology Clinic in Kraków as well as to analyze the clinical features, location in the orbit and to identify the group of patients with the highest risk of orbital tumor. The authors retrospectively analyzed 46 patients (29 women and 17 men) between the ages of 23 and 87. This group of patients was compared to a group of 80 patients who were surgically treated at the same clinic 10 years ago and to a group of 70 patients treated 15 years ago. We established that the tumors localized in the orbit were mainly benign. A variety of histological types of tumors arises in the orbit but it was significant that inflammatory pseudotumors were the most common cases in all three groups of patients treated in our clinic now, about 10 and about 15 years ago. Referring to the group of patients at the highest risk, we established that orbital tumors are definitely most common in women than men. It has turned out to be statistically significant that benign tumors were most common in younger patients and malignant in older people. That suggests the conclusion that being female is a risk factor for orbital tumors and age is a risk factor for them being malignant. Comparing different approaches for the resection of orbital tumors, we established that the lateral orbitotomy provides access to orbital tumors in the most common locations (intraconal and in the top corner of the orbit). Malignant and extensive tumors have to be treated by orbital exenteration.

  14. VIIIth nerve cavernous hemangioma mimicking a stage 1 acoustic schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Bonfort, G; Veillon, F; Debry, C; Kehrli, P; Chibbaro, S

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of VIIIth nerve cavernous hemangioma, a very rare differential diagnosis among the various pathologies presenting as small enhancing entities into the internal auditory canal. It is one of the most challenging when imaging is not able to differentiate it from an intrameatal vestibular schwannoma. We report a cavernous hemangioma extruding from the internal auditory canal, diagnosed after a left translabyrinthine resection in a 45-year-old man complaining of profound sensorineural hearing loss, with no facial paresis or dizziness. The preoperative differential diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma was impossible, due to the absence of calcifications that usually characterize temporal bone hemangiomas. Clinical presentation, radiological features and treatment considerations are discussed along with up-to-date review of pertinent literature. When considering an apparent small intra-auditory canal schwannoma, otoneurologists should be aware of the rare possibility of a cavernous hemangioma. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment may improve the functional outcome, possibly preserving neural integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Avoca, New York Salt Cavern Gas Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Morrill, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    The first salt cavern natural gas storage facility in the northeastern United States designed to serve the interstate gas market is being developed by J Makowski Associates and partners at Avoca in Steuben County, New York. Multiple caverns will be leached at a depth of about 3800 ft from an approximately 100 ft interval of salt within the F unit of the Syracuse Formation of the Upper Silurian Salina Group. The facility is designed to provide 5 Bcf of working gas capacity and 500 MMcfd of deliverability within an operating cavern pressure range between 760 psi and 2850 psi. Fresh water for leaching will be obtained from the Cohocton River aquifer at a maximum rate of 3 million gallons per day and produced brine will be injected into deep permeable Cambrian age sandstones and dolostones. Gas storage service is anticipated to commence in the Fall of 1997 with 2 Bcf of working gas capacity and the full 5 Bcf or storage service is scheduled to be available in the Fall of 1999.

  16. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudeen, David Keith; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  17. Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Mandible: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Elif, Bilgir; Derya, Yildirim; Gulperi, Kocer; Sevgi, Bozova

    2017-01-01

    Intraosseous vascular lesions are rare conditions. They are most commonly seen in the vertebral column and skull; nevertheless, the mandible is a quite rare location. In this report, we present a case of intraosseous cavernous hemangioma in the mandible and discuss the clinical and radiological features. A 28-year-old male patient attended to our clinic with a complaint of painless swelling of mandible. Clinical evaluation revealed a bone-hard, smooth-surfaced, immobile mass in the left mandibular lingual area. The patient was evaluated with panoramic and occlusal radiography and computed tomography. The lesion surgically excised and pathological examination revealed an intraosseous cavernous hemangioma. Follow-up imaging 1 year later with cone beam computed tomography revealed recurrence of the lesion. The conclusion of this paper; when a bone hard, well-shaped mass was seen in the mandible, the possibility of intraosseous hemangioma must be remembered and before surgical procedure detailed radiographic evaluation should be performed. Key words:Hemangioma, intraosseous, mandible, cavernous, cbct.

  18. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  19. Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Mandible: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Derya, Yildirim; Gulperi, Kocer; Sevgi, Bozova

    2017-01-01

    Intraosseous vascular lesions are rare conditions. They are most commonly seen in the vertebral column and skull; nevertheless, the mandible is a quite rare location. In this report, we present a case of intraosseous cavernous hemangioma in the mandible and discuss the clinical and radiological features. A 28-year-old male patient attended to our clinic with a complaint of painless swelling of mandible. Clinical evaluation revealed a bone-hard, smooth-surfaced, immobile mass in the left mandibular lingual area. The patient was evaluated with panoramic and occlusal radiography and computed tomography. The lesion surgically excised and pathological examination revealed an intraosseous cavernous hemangioma. Follow-up imaging 1 year later with cone beam computed tomography revealed recurrence of the lesion. The conclusion of this paper; when a bone hard, well-shaped mass was seen in the mandible, the possibility of intraosseous hemangioma must be remembered and before surgical procedure detailed radiographic evaluation should be performed. Key words:Hemangioma, intraosseous, mandible, cavernous, cbct. PMID:28149481

  20. Fractionated proton radiotherapy for benign cavernous sinus meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Slater, Jerry D; Loredo, Lilia N; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D; Hsu, Frank P K; Slater, James M

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm(3); mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm(3). Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. More actors, different play: sphenoethmoid cell intimately related to the maxillary nerve canal and cavernous sinus apex.

    PubMed

    Săndulescu, M; Rusu, M C; Ciobanu, Iulia Camelia; Ilie, Angela; Jianu, Adelina Maria

    2011-01-01

    The sphenoid sinus is one of the most morphologically variable and surgically important structures of the skull base. Located below the sella turcica, neighbored by parasellar regions, such as the orbital apex, pterygopalatine fossa and lateral sellar region (cavernous sinus), it is clinically related to these and surgically relevant as corridor for various approaches. Moreover, at the sphenoethmoidal junction, important variations occur, most of these related to the presence of the Onodi cells and the intrasinusal protrusions of the optic nerve. That is why any identified and previously undescribed morphological variation at that level must be added to the well-established protocols, clinical and surgical. During a retrospective CT study of the sphenoid sinus anatomical features a previously unreported morphology was encountered and is reported here. It refers to a unilateral sphenoethmoid cell (SEC), Onodi-positive, not only overriding the superior aspect of the sphenoid but also its lateral side to get intimately related to the maxillary nerve. As that SEC expanded medially to the cavernous sinus apex, it altered the usual endosinusal morphological correlations and also added itself within the limits of the Mullan's triangle. It appears so that such postero-infero-lateral extended pneumatization of an Onodi cell alters the surgical landmarks and also can blur clinical pictures, by adding maxillary and pterygopalatine signs and symptoms.

  2. Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-06-15

    The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two

  3. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-05

    In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  4. Analysis of cavern and well stability at the West Hackberry SPR site using a full-dome model.

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, Steven R.

    2015-08-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressurization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 feet of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage

  5. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors.

  6. Orbital arteriovenous fistula with symptoms contralateral to the arterial supply. A case report.

    PubMed

    Frankefort, N; Salu, P; Van Tussenbroek, F

    2005-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas presenting signs and symptoms contralateral to the arterial supply of the fistulas are not uncommon. We describe a thoroughly documented case of an orbital arteriovenous fistula with symptoms exclusively contralateral to the arterial source, a rarer entity. A carotid angiography performed on a patient who presented a red chemotic and proptotic left eye showed a shunt between the meningeal branches of the right internal carotid artery and a left orbital vein.

  7. Features of West Hackberry SPR Caverns and Internal Structure Of the Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2006-09-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the internal structure of the West Hackberry salt dome utilizing the information from the geometric configuration of the internal cavern surfaces obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data. In a general sense, the caverns of West Hackberry are remarkable in the symmetry of their shapes. There are only rather moderate deviations from what would be considered an ideal cylindrical solution mining geometry in these caverns. This finding is in marked contrast to the directional solutioning found in the elliptical cross sectioned, sometimes winged, caverns of Big Hill. None of the persistent lineaments prevalent in Big Hill caverns are evident in West Hackberry caverns. Irregularities of the West Hackberry caverns are restricted to preferential solution formed pits and protuberances with moderate dimensions. In fact, the principal characteristic of West Hackberry caverns is the often large sections of smooth and cylindrical cavern wall. Differences in the cavern characteristics between West Hackberry and Big Hill suggest that the former dome is quite homogeneous, while the latter still retains strong remnants of the interbeds of the original bedded Louann salt. One possible explanation is that the source of the two domes, while both from the Louann mother salt, differs. While the source of the Big Hill dome is directly from the mother salt bed, it appears that the West Hackberry arises from a laterally extruded sill of the mother salt. Consequently, the amount of deformation, and hence, mixing of the salt and interbed material in the extruded sill is significantly greater than would be the case for the directly formed diapir. In West Hackberry, remnants of interbeds apparently no longer exist. An important aspect of the construction of the West Hackberry caverns is the evidence of an attempt to use a uniform solutioning construction practice. This uniformity involved the utilization of single well solutioning and

  8. Costs for Off-Site Disposal of Nonhazardous Oil Field Wastes: Salt Caverns Versus other Disposal Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    May. IOGCC, 1995, Natural Gas Storage in Salt Caverns - A Guide for State Regulators, Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, Oklahoma City...Idealized Cavern in a Salt Dome Formation -- Incoming wastem I Displaced brine Fia aigSurface casing Top of salt formation Overlying formations...Major U.S. Rock Salt Deposits ................................... 15 2 Idealized Cavern in a Salt Dome Formation

  9. Large cavernous hemangioma in the cecum treated by laparoscopic ileocecal resection

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Wook; Cho, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Hyeong Rok

    2009-01-01

    A cavernous hemangioma of the cecum is a rare vascular malformation but is clinically important because of the possibility of massive bleeding. We report a case of a large cavernous hemangioma with pericolic infiltration in the cecum which was removed successfully using minimally invasive surgery. PMID:19598312

  10. Tuberculoma of the Cavernous Sinus and Meckel's Cave in a Child.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V R Roopesh; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Verma, Surendra Kumar; Barathi, S Deepak; Yadav, Awdhesh Kumar; Bidkar, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculous infection of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave is extremely rare. In this report, we describe a patient with tuberculoma of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave, extending to the petrous apex. The patient underwent microsurgical excision of the lesion and antitubercular chemotherapy resulting in a good outcome. We describe the diagnostic difficulties and review the relevant literature.

  11. Increased number of white matter lesions in patients with familial cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Golden, M J; Morrison, L A; Kim, H; Hart, B L

    2015-05-01

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations, an autosomal dominant disorder, result in excess morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The disorder is most prevalent in the Southwest United States, where the affected families are most often carriers of the CCM1-KRIT1 Common Hispanic Mutation. The brain and spinal cord parenchyma in these individuals is usually affected by multiple cavernous malformations. Previous studies have shown abnormalities of endothelial cell junctions and the blood-brain barrier in cerebral cavernous malformations. Endothelial cell abnormalities have also been described in pathologic studies of white matter hyperintensities. We compared the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities in a population with known familial cerebral cavernous malformations. We examined 191 subjects with familial cerebral cavernous malformations who were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved study. All carry the same Common Hispanic Mutation in the CCM1 gene. Each subject underwent 3T MR imaging, including gradient recalled-echo, SWI, and FLAIR sequences. The number of cavernous malformations and the number of nonhemorrhagic white matter hyperintensities were counted. Subjects older than 60 years of age were excluded due to the high prevalence of white matter lesions in this population, and children younger than 6 were excluded due to potential sedation requirements. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the prevalence of abnormal white matter hyperintensities in those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations compared with healthy controls or those with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation within the familial cerebral cavernous malformations group; it was also performed to evaluate the associations between abnormal white matter hyperintensities and age, sex, headaches, thyroid disease, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, seizure history, or modified Rankin Scale score. Familial CCM1 carriers have a higher

  12. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-10

    Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined

  13. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-06-08

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus.

  14. Radar logging of storage cavern walls at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve: A feasibility estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.G.

    1989-07-01

    The feasibility of using a radar logging tool to map the salt walls in the caverns storing crude oil at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is examined. The tool design has dimensions small enough to permit entry into every SPR cavern at Big Hill, Bayou Choctaw, West Hackberry, and Bryan Mound, is able to resolve wall features as small as five feet, and can measure the range to the cavern wall with an uncertainty less than one foot. Usable radar echoes are predicted if the walls are very rough in 37 of the 45 storage caverns during operation at 1 GHz. Dependence on frequency and wall roughness is presented. Very strong echoes are to be expected in most caverns at 1 GHz. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Operative management of tumors involving the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Møller, A R

    1986-06-01

    In the past, neurosurgeons have been reluctant to operate on tumors involving the cavernous sinus because of the possibility of bleeding from the venous plexus or injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) or the third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves. The authors describe techniques for a more aggressive surgical approach to neoplasms in this area that are either benign or locally confined malignant lesions. During the last 2 years, seven tumors involving the cavernous sinus have been resected: six totally and one subtotally. The preoperative evaluation included axial and coronal computerized tomography, cerebral angiography, and a balloon-occlusion test of the ICA. Intraoperative monitoring of the third, fourth, sixth, and seventh cranial nerves was used to assist in locating the nerves and in avoiding injury to them. The first major step in the operative procedure was to obtain proximal control of the ICA at the petrous apex and distal control in the supraclinoid segment. The cavernous sinus was then opened by a lateral, superior, or inferior approach for tumor resection. Temporary clipping and suture of the ICA was necessary in one patient. None of the patients died or suffered a stroke postoperatively. Permanent trigeminal nerve injury occurred in three patients; in two, this was the result of tumor invasion. One patient suffered temporary paralysis of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerves, and in another the sixth cranial nerve was temporarily paralyzed. Preoperative cranial nerve deficits were improved postoperatively in three patients. Radiation therapy was administered postoperatively to four patients. These seven patients have been followed for 6 to 18 months to date and none has shown evidence of recurrence of the intracavernous tumor.

  16. A coculture system of cavernous endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, H; Lin, G; Lue, T F; Lin, C-S

    2013-01-01

    In erectile dysfunction (ED) research, monocultures of cavernous endothelial cells (CECs) and smooth muscle cells (CSMCs) have been reported, but a CEC-CSMC coculture system is still lacking. In the present study, we wished to investigate the feasibility of setting up such a system and test whether it can be used for diabetic ED research. Cavernous tissues were obtained from patients undergoing surgery for penile prosthesis. CSMCs were isolated by explant culture and verified by calponin staining. CECs were isolated by binding to CD31 antibody, followed by magnetic capture. These CECs were nearly 100% pure endothelial cells as determined by flow cytometric analysis for endothelial markers CD31, vWF and eNOS. Functional analyses, that is, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and capillary tube formation, also confirmed their endothelial phenotype. When cocultured with CSMCs, CECs formed capillary-like structures, and based on the extent of this capillary-like network, it was determined that a ratio of 1:4 in cell number between CECs and CSMCs was better than ratios of 1:1 and 1:9. It was also found that direct contact between CECs and CSMCs was necessary and a coculture period of 3 weeks was optimal. Autologous CSMCs were better than allogeneic CSMCs, and fibroblasts were completely incompetent. When treated with high glucose (25 mM), the CEC-CSMC coculture expressed significantly lower level of CD31 but significantly higher level of collagen-IV (Col-IV), and the diameter of the capillaries increased significantly, when compared with normal glucose (5 mM)-treated cocultures. These data are consistent with previously observed changes in the cavernous tissues of diabetic patients and thus suggest that the coculture system could be utilized for diabetic ED research.

  17. Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting storage

  18. Mechanical Behavior of Salt Caverns: Closed-Form Solutions vs Numerical Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Bérest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Creep closure and structural stability of a cylindrical elongated cavern leached out from a salt formation are discussed. The Norton-Hoff creep law, or "power law", is used to capture the main features of salt rheological behavior. Two failure criteria are considered: (1) shear stresses must not be larger than a certain fraction of the mean stress (dilation criterion); and (2) the effective stress at the cavern wall (actual stress plus cavern fluid pressure) must not be tensile. The case of a brine-filled cavern whose pressure is kept constant is discussed first. It is proved that creep closure reaches a steady state such that stresses in the rock mass remain constant. However, decades are needed to reach such a state. During the transient phase that results from the slow redistribution of stresses in the rock mass, deviatoric stresses decrease at the vicinity of the cavern wall, and onset of dilation is less and less likely. At this point, the case of a rapid brine pressure increase, typical of a tightness test, is considered. It is proved that during such a swift pressure increase, cavern behavior is almost perfectly elastic; there is no risk of dilation onset. However, even when cavern pressure remains significantly smaller than geostatic, the effective stress at cavern wall can become tensile. These results, obtained through numerical computations, are confirmed by closed-form solutions obtained in the case of an idealized perfectly cylindrical cavern; these solutions provide a better insight into the main structural features of the behavior of the cavern.

  19. Cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum presenting with acute psychosis.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, Giacomo; Causin, Francesco; Feletti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms may occasionally be related to anatomic alterations of brain structures. Particularly, corpus callosum lesions seem to play a role in the change of patients' behavior. We present a case of a sudden psychotic attack presumably due to a hemorrhagic cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum, which was surgically removed with complete resolution of symptoms. Although a developmental defect like agenesis or lipoma is present in the majority of these cases, a growing lesion of the corpus callosum can rarely be the primary cause. Since it is potentially possible to cure these patients, clinicians should be aware of this association.

  20. [Pontine cavernous angioma (cavernoma) with initial ENT manifestations].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Trinidad Ruíz, G; Marqués Rebollo, L; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a 22 years old female who consulted us for facial parestesias, hearing loss in right ear and sudden tinnitus. Her audiometry showed an unilateral discreet sensorineural hipoacusia and the cranial IRM, a mass of 20 mm diameter in right pontine region and bulbus informed as cavernous angioma with signs of recent bleeding. The patient was sent to Neurosurgery but she refused the intervention. The risk of hemorrhage in the cavernomas is estimated at 0.25% to 1.6% per year and represents the main reason to advise a surgical treatment.

  1. A Giant Cavernous Hemangioma of the Left Atrioventricular Groove

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chengming; Tan, Changming; Kong, Demiao; Yuan, Shuwen; Wu, Sijie

    2017-01-01

    A 10-year-old Chinese female diagnosed with an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma was reported. The patient originally tended to observation because this unusual cardiac tumoral mass was discovered incidentally during routine health examination of transthoracic echocardiography. Over 5 years of follow-up, the mass had enlarged obviously, and the patient visited our outpatient clinic and was prone to excision. Subsequently, a total resection surgery of the tumor was performed, and the tumor was found to be located on the left atrioventricular groove with complete packing membrane. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 and remains asymptomatic on last follow-up. PMID:28409047

  2. Interdural cavernous sinus dermoid cyst in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Flavio; Peri, Giacomo; Bacci, Giacomo M; Basile, Massimo; Guerra, Azzurra; Bergonzini, Patrizia; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Spacca, Barbara; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Donati, PierArturo; Genitori, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Interdural dermoid cysts (DCs) of the cavernous sinus (CS), located between the outer (dural) and inner layer (membranous) of the CS lateral wall, are rare lesions in children. The authors report on a 5-year-old boy with third cranial nerve palsy and exophthalmos who underwent gross-total removal of an interdural DC of the right CS via a frontotemporal approach. The patient had a good outcome and no recurrence at the 12-month follow-up. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the second pediatric case of interdural DC described in the literature.

  3. Thyrotrophin (TSH)-secreting pituitary macroadenoma with cavernous sinus invasion.

    PubMed

    Kon, Y C; Loh, K C; Tambyah, J A; Lim, L H; Marshall, J C

    2001-09-01

    Thyrotrophin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas, although rare, should be recognised as a possible cause of normal or elevated serum TSH in the presence of elevated serum free thyroid hormone levels. Clinical hyperthyroidism may be mild or absent. Early recognition provides the best chance for surgical cure. We report a patient with a TSH-secreting pituitary tumour with cavernous sinus invasion. This case illustrates that multiple modalities of treatment are often necessary and complementary in achieving control of tumour growth and hormonal hypersecretion when these tumours are diagnosed late.

  4. Electrical properties of air in the Carlsbad Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, M.; Romero, V.

    1980-01-01

    Radon 222 and its daughter product concentrations in the Carlsbad Caverns are higher than in outdoor air by a factor of several hundred. The effects of the radiation from these substances on the electrical properties of air in the cave have been studied. The rate of ion-pair production, the ion density, and the electrical conductivity are much higher in the Cave than in outdoor air. The mobility of the ions is less than outdoors due to the high humidity and low condensation nuclei concentration. A small net space charge produces a barely detectable electric field of the order of one percent of the earth's fair weather field.

  5. Neodymium YAG laser for treatment of oral cavernous hemangiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Paul F.

    1999-02-01

    Oral cavernous haemangiomas are common lesions which may require treatment due to episodes of bleeding when bitten or deformity particularly when involving the lips and/or cheeks. Surgery can be hazardous due to haemorrhage while cryosurgery tends to be tedious for large lesions and be accompanied by major oedema. Sclerosants produce hard bulky masses. Embolization is seldom helpful due to lack of arterial feeders. The Nd:YAG laser is proving a useful modality in the oro-facial region and appeared worth investigating for these lesions in a laboratory animal model, by thermography and in the clinical situation.

  6. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from CCM genes to endothelial cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; Zalvide, Juan; Faurobert, Eva; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2013-05-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions that can occur sporadically or as a consequence of inherited loss-of-function mutations, predominantly in the genes CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607, OSM, Malcavernin), or CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15). Inherited, familial CCM is characterized by the development of multiple lesions throughout a patient's life leading to recurrent cerebral hemorrhages. Recently, roles for the CCM proteins in maintaining vascular barrier functions and quiescence have been elucidated, and in this review we summarize the genetics and pathophysiology of this disease and discuss the molecular mechanisms through which CCM proteins may act within blood vessels.

  7. Intramuscular Cavernous Hemangioma of Medial Rectus Muscle in Paediatric Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anuj; Butola, Shalini; Abrol, Sangeeta; Kumari, Anju

    2017-01-01

    An 11-year-old male child presented with a mass on the nasal aspect of the right eye that has been there for the last 2 years. Extraocular movements were decreased in the right eye on levoversion, levoelevation, and levodepression. Local examination revealed a bluish mass with irregular surface and ill-defined margins located in the medial rectus muscle. The mass was 10 × 20 mm in size, firm, nodular, nontender, nonpulsatile, noncompressible, and nonreducible. MRI of the orbit revealed a well-defined mass of approximately 23 × 13 mm along the medial rectus (MR) muscle. It was hyperintense on T2W images with very minimal contrast enhancement. A provisional diagnosis of hemangioma or lymphangioma with intralesional haemorrhage was made. During surgical excision, the mass was found to be encapsulated by MR fibres. The MR fibres were separated, and the mass measuring 20 × 8 × 6.5 mm was removed and sent for histopathology. The histopathological examination revealed an intramuscular cavernous hemangioma. PMID:28386496

  8. Kepler's Orbit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Kepler does not orbit the Earth, rather it orbits the Sun in concert with the Earth, slowly drifting away from Earth. Every 61 Earth years, Kepler and Earth will pass by each other. Throughout the ...

  9. Orbital cellulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001012.htm Orbital cellulitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Orbital cellulitis is an infection of the fat and muscles ...

  10. Effects of cavern spacing and pressure on subsidence and storage losses for the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1992-03-01

    The effects of cavern spacing and operating pressure on surface subsidence and cavern storage losses were evaluated using the finite- element method. The base case for the two sensitivity studies was a typical SPR cavern. The predicted responses of the base case and those from the pressurization study compared quite closely to measured surface subsidence and oil pressurization rates. This provided credibility for the analyses and constitutive models used. Subsidence and cavern storage losses were found to be strongly influenced by cavern spacing and pressurization. The relationship between subsidence volume and losses in storage volume varied as cavern spacing and operating pressure deviated from the base case. However, for a typical SPR cavern subsidence volume is proportional to storage loss and when expressed in ft., subsidence is equal to the percentage of storage loss.

  11. New concept in cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: correlation with presenting symptom and venous drainage patterns.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Sun Ju; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Chang Jin; Kook, Michael; Ahn, Hyo-Sook; Kwon, Sun Uck; Kim, Jong Sung

    2005-06-01

    An extradurally located cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) exhibits different clinical behavior from other dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) located between 2 dural leaves. The aim of this study is to define angiographic types of CSDAVF associated with presenting symptom (Sx) and venous drainage patterns. CSDAVFs during a mean of 23-month follow-up period of 58 patients (17 to 73 years, male:female ratio=8:50) were retrospectively analyzed. The 3 types of CSDAF, ie, proliferative (PT), restrictive (RT), and late restrictive (LRT) types, were categorized by the degrees and patterns of prominent arteriovenous shunt as well as venous flow. The status of the venous connection with CS and the presenting Sx patterns classified as orbital (OrbSxP), ocular (OcuSxP), cavernous (CavSxP), and cerebral (CerSxP) were associated with angiographic types as well as symptom onset, age, and gender. Correlations of discrete and categorical variables were statistically analyzed using the chi2 or Fisher exact test. PT (n=23) and RT (n=23) of CSDAVF were more common than LRT (n=12) (P=0.016) in patients with younger than 65 years and were related to OrbSxP (P=0.015) and CavSxP (P=0.038) in contrast to LRT to OcuSxP (P=0.004). Early onset of Sxs was related to the OrbSxP (P=0.08) and CavSxP (P<0.001). CerSxP (5%) was noted in RT or LRT. OrbSxP was related to the superior ophthalmic venous drainage (P=0.026) and CavSxP to the inferior petrosal sinus (P=0.046) and posterior fossa venous drainages (P=0.014). Seven patients revealed chronological progression of CSDAVF from PT to LRT and even to complete healing. CSDAVF presents as 3 distinctive angiographic types and is associated with presenting Sxs and venous drainage patterns.

  12. Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Tumors with Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steven D.; Doty, James R.; Martin, David P.; Hancock, Steven L.; Adler, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, 79 patients with benign or malignant cavernous sinus tumors, have been treated at Stanford University with linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has been used as (1) a planned second-stage procedure for residual tumor following surgery, (2) primary treatment for patients whose medical conditions preclude surgery, (3) palliation of malignant lesions, and (4) definitive treatment for small, well-localized, poorly accessible tumors. Mean patient age was 52 years (range, 18 to 88); there were 28 males and 51 females. Sixty-one patients had benign tumors; 18 had malignant tumors. Mean tumor volume was 6.8 cm3 (range 0.5 to 22.5 cm3) covered with an average of 2.3 isocenter (range, 1 to 5). Radiation dose averaged 17.1 Gy. Mean follow-up was 46 months. Tumor control or shrinkage, or both, varied with pathology. Radiographic tumor improvement was most pronounced in malignant lesions, with greater than 85% showing reduction in tumor size; benign tumors (meningiomas and schwannomas) had a 63% control rate and 37% shrinkage rate, with none enlarging. We concluded that stereotactic radiosurgery is a valuable tool in managing cavernous sinus tumors. There was excellent control and stabilization of benign tumors and palliation of malignant lesions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171089

  13. Cavernous hemangioma of the parotid gland in adults

    PubMed Central

    Peral-Cagigal, Beatriz; Madrigal-Rubiales, Beatriz; Verrier-Hernández, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Hemangiomas account for 0.4-0.6% of all tumors of the parotid gland and most of them occur in children, nevertheless in adults hemangiomas are very rare. We report the case of a 62 year old woman with a mass in the parotid right tail associated with fluctuating swelling episodes unrelated to meals and with a slowly progressive growth. The provisional diagnosis was a pleomorphic adenoma, so a right superficial parotidectomy was performed. During surgery, the macroscopic appearance makes suspect a vascular lesion. The histopathological result was a cavernous hemangioma. The classic clinical presentation of a parotid hemangioma is an intraglandular mass associated or not with skin lesions characterized by reddish macules and/or papules, and a vibration or pulsation when palpating the parotid region. In imaging tests, phleboliths could be observed which are very suggestive of a hemangioma or a vascular malformation. In the absence of these signs, the diagnosis could be difficult, particularly in an adult due to its low prevalence, with about 50 cases reported worldwide. However a hemangioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of parotid tumors in adults. Key words:Cavernous hemangioma, parotid gland, superficial parotidectomy, pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:25674332

  14. Nitrogen Monitoring of West Hackberry 117 Cavern Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David L.

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern West Hackberry 117 was tested under extended nitrogen monitoring following a successful mechanical integrity test in order to validate a newly developed hydrostatic column model to be used to differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen. High resolution wireline pressure and temperature data were collected during the test period and used in conjunction with the hydrostatic column model to predict the nitrogen/oil interface and the pressure along the entire fluid column from the bradenhead flange nominally at ground surface to bottom of brine pool. Results here and for other SPR caverns have shown that wells under long term nitrogen monitoring do not necessarily pressurize with a relative rate (P N2 /P brine) of 1. The theoretical relative pressure rate depends on the well configuration, pressure and the location of the nitrogen-oil interface and varies from well to well. For the case of WH117 the predicted rates were 0.73 for well A and 0.92 for well B. The measured relative pressurization rate for well B was consistent with the model prediction, while well A rate was found to be between 0.58-0.68. A number of possible reasons for the discrepancy between the model and measured rates of well A are possible. These include modeling inaccuracy, measurement inaccuracy or the possibility of the presence of a very small leak (below the latest calculated minimum detectable leak rate).

  15. Cavernous sinus hemangioma: a fourteen year single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Sumit; Suri, Ashish; Singh, Manmohan; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Agarwal, Deepak; Sharma, Manish Singh; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-06-01

    Cavernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) is a rare extra-axial vascular neoplasm that accounts for 2% to 3% of all cavernous sinus tumors. Their location, propensity for profuse bleeding during surgery, and relationship to complex neurovascular structures are factors which present difficulty in excising these lesions. The authors describe their experience of 22 patients with CSH over 14 years at a tertiary care center. Patients were managed with microsurgical resection using a purely extradural transcavernous approach (13 patients) and with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS; Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) (nine patients). Retrospective data analysis found headache and visual impairment were the most common presenting complaints, followed by facial hypesthesia and diplopia. All but one patient had complete tumor excision in the surgical series. Transient ophthalmoparesis (complete resolution in 6-8 weeks) was the most common surgical complication. In the GKRS group, marked tumor shrinkage (>50% tumor volume reduction) was achieved in two patients, slight shrinkage in five and no change in two patients, with symptom improvement in the majority of patients. To our knowledge, we describe one of the largest series of CSH managed at a single center. Although microsurgical resection using an extradural transcavernous approach is considered the treatment of choice in CSH and allows complete excision with minimal mortality and long-term morbidity, GKRS is an additional tool for treating residual symptomatic lesions or in patients with associated comorbidities making surgical resection unsuitable.

  16. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  17. Role of Delta-Notch signaling in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Kar, Souvik; Baisantry, Arpita; Nabavi, Arya; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) commonly known as cavernous hemangioma are associated with abnormally enlarged thin-walled blood vessels. As a result, these dilated capillaries are prone to leakage and result in hemorrhages. Clinically, such hemorrhages lead to severe headaches, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. CCM is caused by loss of function mutations in one of the three well-known CCM genes: Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1), OSM, and programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). Loss of CCM genes have been shown to be synergistically related to decreased Notch signaling and excessive angiogenesis. Despite recent evidences indicating that Notch signaling plays a pivotal role in regulating angiogenesis, the role of Notch in CCM development and progression is still not clear. Here, we provide an update literature review on the current knowledge of the structure of Notch receptor and its ligands, its relevance to angiogenesis and more precisely to CCM pathogenesis. In addition to reviewing the current literatures, this review will also focus on the cross talk between Delta-Notch and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in angiogenesis and in CCM pathogenesis. Understanding the role of Notch signaling in CCM development and progression might help provide a better insight for novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  18. Risk analyses for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed of in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing the contaminants` toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks have been found to be within the US EPA target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  19. Literature Survey Concerning the Feasibility of Remedial Leach for Select Phase I Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Paula D.; Flores, Karen A.; Lord, David L.

    2015-09-01

    Bryan Mound 5 ( BM5 ) and West Hackberry 9 ( WH9 ) have the potential to create a significant amount of new storage space should the caverns be deemed "leach - ready". This study discusses the original drilling history of the caverns, surrounding geology, current stability, and, based on this culmination of data, makes a preliminary assessment of the leach potential for the cavern. The risks associated with leaching BM5 present substantial problems for the SPR . The odd shape and large amount of insoluble material make it difficult to de termine whether a targeted leach would have the desired effect and create useable ullage or further distort the shape with preferential leaching . T he likelihood of salt falls and damaged or severed casing string is significant . In addition, a targeted le ach would require the relocation of approximately 27 MMB of oil . Due to the abundance of unknown factors associated with this cavern, a targeted leach of BM5 is not recommended. A targeted leaching of the neck of WH 9 could potentially eliminate or diminis h the mid - cavern ledge result ing in a more stable cavern with a more favorable shape. A better understanding of the composition of the surrounding salt and a less complicated leaching history yields more confidence in the ability to successfully leach this region. A targeted leach of WH9 can be recommended upon the completion of a full leach plan with consideration of the impacts upon nearby caverns .

  20. Simulation of production and injection performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagoort, J. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of injection and production performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations. The model predicts the pressure and temperature of the gas in the cavern and at the wellhead for an arbitrary sequence of production and injection cycles. The model incorporates nonideal gas properties, thermodynamic heat effects associated with gas expansion and compression in the cavern and tubing, heat exchange with the surrounding salt formation, and non-uniform initial temperatures but does not include rock-mechanical effects. The model is based on a mass and energy balance for the gas-filled cavern and on the Bernoulli equation and energy balance for flow in the wellbore. Cavern equations are solved iteratively at successive timesteps, and wellbore equations are solved within an iteration cycle of the cavern equations. Gas properties are calculated internally with generally accepted correlations and basic thermodynamic relations. Example calculations show that the initial temperature distribution has a strong effect on production performance of a typical gas storage cavern. The primary application of the model is in the design, planning, and operation of gas storage projects.

  1. Estimate of the risks of disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Assuming a single, generic salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, the best-estimate excess cancer risks ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} and hazard indices (referring to noncancer health effects) ranged from 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. Under worse-case conditions in which the probability of cavern failure is 1.0, excess cancer risks ranged from 4.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and hazard indices ranged from 7.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 0.07. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks are within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can, therefore, provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.

  2. Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, B.J. . Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. . Geological Survey)

    1993-02-01

    Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

  3. Microsurgical thromboendarterectomy of the cavernous carotid artery--case report and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Fujitsu, K; Fujii, S; Tanaka, N; Kuwabara, T

    1990-10-01

    A 53-year-old male suffered a transient right hemiparesis and left monocular blindness. Angiography revealed 80% stenosis of the cavernous carotid artery. Microsurgical thromboendarterectomy was performed by a direct approach through Parkinson's triangle. During surgery, the carotid circulation was transiently trapped between the cervical and the supraclinoid segment and the trapped arterial lumen was irrigated with heparinized saline. Soft elastic lesion was easily removed. Cavernous carotid thromboendarterectomy through a direct approach is considered as a suitable operation for the solitary and localized stenotic lesions of the cavernous carotid artery, although this operation has not yet been reported to date.

  4. Retroperitoneal tumor: giant cavernous hemangioma – case presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaworski, Radoslaw; Peksa, Rafal; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Jaskiewicz, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemangiomas are very rare. This paper presents the case of a 71-year-old female patient with giant cavernous hemangioma of the retroperitoneum who underwent surgical treatment for abdominal pain and left lower limb edema. Interventional staged treatment with percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization prior to surgery was considered. Radical resection of the tumor was performed, which caused the symptoms to abate. Additionally a literature review of cases involving cavernous hemangioma in the retroperitoneal space is presented. No description of retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma originating from the bowel was found in the analyzed reports. PMID:28096841

  5. Cavernous antioxidant effect of green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate with/without sildenafil citrate intake in aged diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, T; Sabry, D; Abdelaal, A M; Mostafa, I; Taymour, M

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the cavernous antioxidant effect of green tea (GT), epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) with/without sildenafil citrate intake in aged diabetic rats. One hundred and four aged male white albino rat were divided into controls that received ordinary chow, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced aged diabetic rats, STZ-induced diabetic rats on infused green tea, induced diabetic rats on epigallocatechin-3-gallate and STZ-induced diabetic rats on sildenafil citrate added to EGCG. After 8 weeks, dissected cavernous tissues were assessed for gene expression of eNOS, cavernous malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and serum testosterone (T). STZ-induced diabetic rats on GT demonstrated significant increase in cavernous eNOS, cGMP, GPx and significant decrease in cavernous MDA compared with diabetic rats. Diabetic rats on EGCG demonstrated significant increase in cavernous eNOS, cGMP, GPx and significant decrease in cavernous MDA compared with diabetic rats or diabetic rats on GT. Diabetic rats on EGCG added to sildenafil showed significant increase in cavernous eNOS, cGMP and significant decrease in cavernous MDA compared with other groups. Serum T demonstrated nonsignificant difference between the investigated groups. It is concluded that GT and EGCG have significant cavernous antioxidant effects that are increased if sildenafil is added.

  6. Cavernous Hemangioma of the Rib: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Young Park, Joon; Gyoon Park, Jin; Jin Lee, Seung

    2016-07-01

    Hemangioma of the rib is a rare benign vascular tumor. Herein, we report a 63-year-old man presenting with hemangioma of the left sixth rib. An osteolytic eccentric expansive mass with calcification and focal cortical disruption was detected on chest computed tomography (CT). The mass showed low 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) avidity on positron emission tomography. The patient underwent resection of the left sixth rib. Based on the histopathology findings, a diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma was made. Rib hemangiomas and malignant lesions appear similar on CT scans; therefore, most cases of rib hemangiomas reported in the literature were treated with rib resection. However, rib hemangiomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of an asymptomatic patient if an osteolytic expansive lesion containing sunburst calcifications with low 18F-FDG avidity is observed on a CT scan.

  7. Cavernous sinus syndrome due to osteochondromatosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Perazzi, Anna; Bernardini, Marco; Mandara, Maria T; De Benedictis, Giulia M; De Strobel, Francesca; Zotti, Alessandro

    2013-12-01

    A 1-year-old sexually intact male Korat cat was referred for ophthalmological consultation due to anisocoria. Mydriasis with external ophthalmoplegia and absence of pupillary light responses in the right eye and nasofacial hypalgesia were seen. Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) was suspected. Bilateral deformities of the jaw and phalangeal bones, severe spinal pain and abnormal conformation of the lumbar spine were also present. Radiographic examination revealed several mineralised masses in the appendicular and axial skeleton, indicative of multiple cartilaginous exostoses. For further investigation of the CSS-related neurological deficits, the cat underwent computed tomography (CT) examination of the skull. CT images revealed a non-vascularised, calcified, amorphous mass originating from the right lateral skull base and superimposing on the sella turcica. Based on the severity of diffuse lesions and owing to the clinical signs of extreme pain, the cat was euthanased. A diffuse skeletal and intracranial osteochondromatosis was diagnosed histologically.

  8. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01

    The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is

  9. Brainstem Hemorrhage Caused by Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Fook-How; Shen, Chao-Yu; Liu, Jung-Tung; Li, Cho-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 34-year-old woman presented with a history of persisting headache for years, and a newly developed dizziness, left facial palsy and right hemiparesis two days prior to this admission. Initial computed tomographic angiography of the head demonstrated an area of increased density in the left middle and posterior fossae. Multiple aneurysmally dilated venous ectasias with contrast enhancement at the left pre-pontine cistern causing a massive mass effect to the brainstem were also noted, suggesting a huge vascular abnormality. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an abnormal vascular lesion surrounding the brainstem, which indicated a left direct carotid-cavernous fistula with posterior drainage. As her consciousness deteriorated the next day, a follow-up computed tomography scan was done which revealed a pontine hemorrhage. Subsequently, endovascular closure of the fistula with sacrifice of the left ICA was performed, which successfully eliminated the imaging abnormalities. PMID:25207913

  10. CNS cavernous haemangioma: "popcorn" in the brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hegde, A N; Mohan, S; Lim, C C T

    2012-04-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas (CH) are relatively uncommon non-shunting vascular malformations of the central nervous system and can present with seizures or with neurological deficits due to haemorrhage. Radiologists can often suggest the diagnosis of CH based on characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features, thus avoiding further invasive procedures such as digital subtraction angiography or surgical biopsy. Although typical MRI appearance combined with the presence of multiple focal low signal lesions on T2*-weighted images or the presence of one or more developmental venous anomaly within the brain can improve the diagnostic confidence, serial imaging studies are often required if a solitary CH presents at a time when the imaging appearances had not yet matured to the typical "popcorn" appearance. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Computed tomography and sonography of cavernous hemangioma of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Ohtomo, K.; Araki, T.; Furui, S.; Iio, M.; Atomi, Y.

    1983-08-01

    Accuracy and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and sonography in the detection and diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of the liver were analyzed in 39 cases. In 35 of 38 lesions examined by CT before and after bolus contrast enhancement, findings were dense contrast enhancement spreading in all directions on subsequent scans and/or density (other than capsule or septa) higher than normal hepatic parenchyma after 2 min. Lesions smaller than 1 cm were not detected. Misregistration in sequential scane prevented diagnosis of three of nine lesions smaller than 2 cm. Sonography revealed various patterns of mass, but in the smaller lesions, an extremely hyperechoic pattern was dominant. The contributions of CT and sonography depend on the size of the lesions.

  12. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2014-10-29

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Direct carotid cavernous fistula after submucous resection of the nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Bizri, A R; al-Ajam, M; Zaytoun, G; al-Kutoubi, A

    2000-01-01

    A carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal arteriovenous anastomosis between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Etiologies of this condition reported in the literature so far include facial trauma, rupture of an intracavernous aneurysm of the carotid artery, Ehler-Danlos syndrome and fibromuscular dysplasia of the cerebral arteries. Such fistulae were reported as complications of rhinoplasty, transsphenoidal surgery, embolization of cavernous sinus meningioma, and rhinocerebral mucormycosis. CCF may also occur spontaneously in children or as a congenital malformation. However, to our knowledge, submucous resection of the nasal septum has not been reported before to cause direct carotid-cavernous fistula. CT and angiographic findings are presented and a review of the literature for reported causes of CCF is made as well as a brief discussion of the possible pathophysiology.

  15. Varied appearances of hepatic cavernous hemangiomas with sonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, R.L.; Schwab, R.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1987-11-01

    The incidental detection of an hepatic cavernous hemangioma may create a problem in differential diagnosis. The authors here review the characteristics of hemangiomas as recorded by various types of imaging.

  16. Surgical treatment of cavernous malformations involving medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Lin, Sen; Hui, Xuhui; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-03-01

    Surgical treatment of cavernous malformations (CMs) involving medulla oblongata is more difficult than the CMs in other sites because of the surrounding vital structures. However, the distinctive features and treatment strategies have not been well illustrated. Therefore, we enrolled a total of 19 patients underwent surgical treatment of CMs involving medulla oblongata in our hospital from August 2008 to August 2014. The clinical features, surgical management and clinical outcome of these patients were retrospectively analyzed, while our institutional surgical indications, approaches and microsurgical techniques were discussed. In our study, gross total resection was achieved in 17 patients and subtotal resection in 2. Two patients underwent emergency surgeries due to severe and progressive neurological deficits. The postoperative new-onset or worsened neurological deficits occurred in 6 patients. After a mean follow-up of 45.8±22.2months, the neurological status was improved in 10 patients and remained stable in 7. The mean modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was 2.58±1.26 preoperatively, 3.11±0.99 postoperatively and 1.84±1.42 at the recent follow-up, respectively. During the follow-up period, no rehemorrhage and recurrence occurred, and the residual lesions remained stable. We recommended surgical resection of symptomatic CMs involving medulla oblongata via optimal approaches, feasible entry zones and meticulous microsurgical techniques in attempting to achieve safe resection and favorable outcome. The clinical features, surgical indications, timing and microsurgical techniques of this special entity should be distinctive from the brainstem cavernous malformations in other sites.

  17. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  18. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3-0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions.

  19. Numerical evaluation of the groundwater drainage system for underground storage caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eui Seob; Chae, Byung Gon

    2015-04-01

    A novel concept storing cryogenic liquefied natural gas in a hard rock lined cavern has been developed and tested for several years as an alternative. In this concept, groundwater in rock mass around cavern has to be fully drained until the early stage of construction and operation to avoid possible adverse effect of groundwater near cavern. And then rock mass should be re-saturated to form an ice ring, which is the zone around cavern including ice instead of water in several joints within the frozen rock mass. The drainage system is composed of the drainage tunnel excavated beneath the cavern and drain holes drilled on rock surface of the drainage tunnel. In order to de-saturate sufficiently rock mass around the cavern, the position and horizontal spacing of drain holes should be designed efficiently. In this paper, a series of numerical study results related to the drainage system of the full-scale cavern are presented. The rock type in the study area consists mainly of banded gneiss and mica schist. Gneiss is in slightly weathered state and contains a little joint and fractures. Schist contains several well-developed schistosities that mainly stand vertically, so that vertical joints are better developed than the horizontals in the area. Lugeon tests revealed that upper aquifer and bedrock are divided in the depth of 40-50m under the surface. Groundwater level was observed in twenty monitoring wells and interpolated in the whole area. Numerical study using Visual Modflow and Seep/W has been performed to evaluate the efficiency of drainage system for underground liquefied natural gas storage cavern in two hypothetically designed layouts and determine the design parameters. In Modflow analysis, groundwater flow change in an unconfined aquifer was simulated during excavation of cavern and operation of drainage system. In Seep/W analysis, amount of seepage and drainage was also estimated in a representative vertical section of each cavern. From the results

  20. EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

    2003-04-24

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals

  1. Preoperative diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma presenting with melena using wireless capsule endoscopy of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Yu; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Kazuto; Naito, Tatsushi; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Masahiro; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akio; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Primary neoplasms of the small intestine are relatively rare in all age groups, accounting for about 5 % of all gastrointestinal tumors 1. Cavernous hemangiomas of the small intestine are also rare, can cause gastrointestinal bleeding, and are extremely difficult to diagnose preoperatively 2. We present a patient who presented with melena and iron deficiency anemia, for whom wireless capsule endoscopy and single-balloon enteroscopy facilitated the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:27004239

  2. Endoscopic endonasal biopsy for a tumor at the cavernous sinus and pons.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Qiuhang, Zhang; Hongchuan, Guo; Zhenlin, Wang

    2015-03-01

    Lesions at the cavernous sinus and brainstem can be detected by radiologic studies, but a definitive diagnosis depends on histopathologic analysis. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman with symptoms including cranial nerve palsy, hydrocephalus,seizures, and long-term coma caused by squamous cell carcinoma at the cavernous sinus and ventral pons, which was confirmed by an endoscopic endonasal biopsy.

  3. Flow diversion in the treatment of carotid injury and carotid-cavernous fistula after transsphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Cheemum; Ahmed, Muhammad E; Glikstein, Rafael; dos Santos, Marlise P; Lesiuk, Howard; Labib, Mohamed; Kassam, Amin B

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of iatrogenic carotid injury with secondary carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) treated with a silk flow diverter stent placed within the injured internal carotid artery and coils placed within the cavernous sinus. Flow diverters may offer a simple and potentially safe vessel-sparing option in this rare complication of transsphenoidal surgery. The management options are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:26015526

  4. Endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of a ventral pontine cavernous malformation: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis; Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Palacios-Ortíz, Isaac Jair; Perdomo-Pantoja, Alexander; Nares-López, Felipe Eduardo; Vega-Alarcón, Alfredo

    2016-10-21

    Brainstem cavernous malformations are challenging due to the critical anatomy and potential surgical risks. Anterolateral, lateral, and dorsal surgical approaches provide limited ventral exposure of the brainstem. The authors present a case of a midline ventral pontine cavernous malformation resected through an endoscopic endonasal transclival approach based on minimal brainstem transection, negligible cranial nerve manipulation, and a straightforward trajectory. Technical and reconstruction technique advances in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery provide a direct, safe, and effective corridor to the brainstem.

  5. Mixed capillary-cavernous extramedullary intradural hemangioma of the spinal cord mimicking meningioma: Case report.

    PubMed

    Alobaid, Abdullah; Bennardo, Michael Ross; Cenic, Aleksa; Lach, Boleslaw

    2015-06-01

    Hemangiomas are customarily described as low-grade vascular tumors most often located in the head and neck, but on rare occasions occurring in the intradural space of the spine. The different subtypes of hemangiomas can be distinguished histologically as capillary, cavernous, or mixed types. We describe a rare case of a mixed capillary-cavernous extramedullary intradural hemangioma of the thoracic spinal cord, mimicking meningioma radiologically.

  6. Endovascular Treatment in an Unusual Case of Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rajendra Gajanan; Kamble, Ravindra Bhimrao; Bonde, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a unique and unusual case of post-traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) with occluded proximal internal carotid artery and CCF filling from the contralateral side with retrograde cortical venous reflux. A male patient presented with intracranial haemorrhage due to cortical venous reflux. He was treated endovascularly through a contralateral approach by coiling the cavernous sinus and occluding the distal internal carotid artery at the fistulous site with glue. PMID:24750711

  7. [Embolization with cyanoacrylate glue as a treatment method in giant direct carotid cavernous fistula].

    PubMed

    Sprezak, Kamila; Brzegowy, Paweł; Szajner, Maciej; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    A case of 21-year-old woman with postraumatic giant direct carotid-cavernous fistula, successfully treated by endovascular embilisation with cyanoacrylate glue, is presented. Stent-assisted coils placement is the method of choice for the treatment of patients with carotid-cavernous fistulas, but closure of direct fistula with cyanoacrylate glue can be alternative, safety and efficient technique especially in cases in which standard interventions offer increased risk or in which other methods have failed.

  8. [Embolization as a treatment method in traumatic bilateral direct carotid cavernous fistula].

    PubMed

    Sprezak, Kamila; Brzegowy, Paweł; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    A case of 42-year-old man with rare posttraumatic bilateral direct carotid. cavernous fistulas, who was three times treated by endovascular management via trans-arterial route with stent-assisted microcoil placement, is reported. Presented technique might be method of choice for the intervention in cases of bilateral traumatic ca. rotid-cavernous fistulas. Stent-as sisted microcoil placement may in crease ability to successfully treat fistulas with preservation of the parent artery.

  9. Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, D.L.; Elcock, D.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Viel, J.A.; and Williams, G.P.

    1999-01-21

    In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste

  10. Cavernous portion of the trochlear nerve with special reference to its site of entrance.

    PubMed Central

    Bisaria, K K

    1988-01-01

    In a study of 80 cavernous sinuses in 40 cadavers, the trochlear nerve entered the cavernous sinus in 87.5% of cases before the crossing, in 7.5% at the crossing and in 5.0% after the crossing of the free and the attached margins of the tentorium cerebelli. In 77.5% of specimens the trochlear nerve showed a marked bend with flattening at the site of its entrance into the cavernous sinus. The nerve ran between the superficial and deep layers of dura, partly between them, in the thickness of the deeper layer, or deep to the deep layer but adherent to it. These findings do not conform with the description of its course by other workers in the past. In 72.5% of specimens the size of the trochlear nerve was larger during its course in the cavernous sinuses but in 20.0% of specimens such an increase in thickness was noted even in the posterior cranial fossa. Only in one specimen was the trochlear nerve adherent to the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve. Cases showing the trochlear nerve entering the cavernous sinus after the crossing of the two margins of tentorium cerebelli and the splitting and branching of the trochlear nerve in the cavernous sinus have not hitherto been reported. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3248970

  11. Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

    1997-12-01

    Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

  12. Probabilistic Analysis of a Rock Salt Cavern with Application to Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; Miro, Shorash; König, Diethard; Schanz, Tom

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the failure probability of storing renewable energy in the form of hydrogen or compressed air in rock salt caverns. The validation of the short- and long-term integrity and stability of rock salt cavern is a prerequisite in their design process. The present paper provides a reliability-based analysis of a typical renewable energy storage cavern in rock salt. An elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is implemented into a numerical model of rock salt cavern to assess its behavior under different operation conditions. Sensitivity measures of different variables involved in the mechanical response of cavern are computed by elementary effect global sensitivity method. Subset simulation methodology is conducted to measure the failure probability of the system with a low computational cost. This methodology is further validated by a comparison with a Monte Carlo-based probabilistic analysis. The propagation of parameter uncertainties and the failure probability against different failure criteria are evaluated by utilizing a Monte Carlo-based analysis. In this stage, the original finite element model is substituted by a surrogate model to further reduce the computational effort. Finally, a reliability analysis approach is employed to obtain the minimum admissible internal pressure in a cavern.

  13. Spindletop salt-cavern points way for future natural-gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Shotts, S.A.; Neal, J.R.; Solis, R.J. ); Oldham, C. )

    1994-09-12

    Spindletop underground natural-gas storage complex began operating in 1993, providing 1.7 bcf of working-gas capacity in its first cavern. The cavern and related facilities exemplify the importance and advantages of natural-gas storage in leached salt caverns. Development of a second cavern, along with continued leaching of the initial cavern, target 5 bcf of available working-gas capacity in both caverns by the end of this year. The facilities that currently make up the Spindletop complex include two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 24,000-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Sabine Gas; two salt dome gas-storage wells and a 15,900-hp compression and dehydration facility owned by Centana; a 7,000-hp leaching plant; and three jointly owned brine-disposal wells. The paper discusses the development of the storage facility, design goals, leaching plant and wells, piping and compressors, dehydration and heaters, control systems, safety and monitoring, construction, first years operation, and customer base.

  14. A new endoscopic surgical classification and invasion criteria for pituitary adenomas involving the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Savas; Anik, Ihsan; Koc, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    There are two major problems for the pituitary adenomas invading the Cavernous Sinus (CS); differentiation of extension and invasion and inability to demonstrate the medial wall via preoperative imaging methods. Two important corridors are defined in endoscopic cavernous sinus approaches; the lateral and medial corridor. A retrospective analysis was performed in 400 endoscopic transphenoidal approaches and 360 pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transphenoidal surgery in our department between September 1997 and December 2010. 48 patients affected by the tumours involving the cavernous sinus were included in this study. We performed an intraoperative evaluation of cavernous sinus invasion considering visualization of the medial wall defect, intracavernous ICA segments, minor tumour extensions through small focal pit holes of the medial wall of CS or confirming carotid segments of CS by micro-doppler. Cavernous sinus involvement was classified into three types according to the medial and lateral corridor extension of the tumor as 25 isolated medial corridor involvement (Type I), 5 isolated lateral corridor involvement (Type II) and 18 total involvement (Type III). Our classification depends on fully surgical endoscopic approach supported by neuroimaging techniques and anatomical studies and shows a good predictive value for all cavernous sinus involvement.

  15. Hazard assessment of the stability of a cavern roof along the coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, A.; Lollino, P.

    2009-04-01

    This work concerns the hazard assessment about the stability of a large shallow depth cavern, located along the coastline rocky sector of Polignano town (Apulia, Southern Italy) under an intensely urbanised area. This cavern, which lies at the sea level, has been created by a prolonged process of sea erosion within a rock mass formed of a lower stratified limestone mass and an upper Gravina Calcarenite mass. The thickness of the cavern roof, which has a dome shape, is less than 10 metres in the centre. Important buildings, as hotels and private houses, are located just above the top of the roof. Erosion processes have been observed to be still active along the whole cavern due to climate factors and, in particular, to sea salt weathering and sea spray effects. In 2007 a large calcarenite block, 3 m large, fell down from the cavern roof and consequently a field investigation campaign was carried out for a rational stabilization plan in order to understand the current stability conditions of the roof and the potential failure mechanism. Therefore, a thorough geo-structural survey has firstly been carried out, together with laboratory and in-situ testing for measuring the physical and mechanical properties of the calcarenite rock and of the corresponding joints. A monitoring system has also been planned and installed in order to measure the erosional rate and the block displacements in the cavern.

  16. Japan's exploration of vertical holes and subsurface caverns on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Kubota, T.; Yoshida, K.; Kawakatsu, Y.; Kato, H.; Otsuki, M.; Watanabe, K.; Nishibori, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Iwata, T.; Ishigami, G.; Yamada, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, gigantic vertical holes exceeding several tens of meters in diameter and depth were discovered on the Moon and Mars. Based on high-resolution image data, lunar holes and some Martian pits (called 'holes' hereafter) are probably skylights of subsurface caverns such as lava tubes or magma chambers. We are starting preparations for exploring the caverns through the vertical holes. The holes and subsurface caverns have high potential as resources for scientific studies. Various important geological and mineralogical processes could be uniquely and effectively observed inside these holes and subsurface caverns. The exposed fresh lava layers on the vertical walls of the lunar and Martian holes would provide information on volcanic eruption histories. The lava layers may also provide information on past magnetic fields of the celestial bodies. The regolith layers may be sandwiched between lava layers and may preserve volatile elements including solar wind protons that could be a clue to understanding past solar activities. Water molecules from solar winds or cometary/meteorite impacts may be stored inside the caverns because of mild temperatures there. The fresh lava materials forming the walls and floors of caverns might trap endogenic volatiles from magma eruptions that will be key materials for revealing the formation and early evolution of the Moon and Mars. Furthermore, the Martian subsurface caverns are highly expected to be life cradles where the temperatures are probably stable and that are free from ultra-violet and other cosmic rays that break chemical bonds, thus avoiding polymerization of molecules. Discovering extraterrestrial life and its varieties is one of our ultimate scientific purposes for exploring the lunar and Martian subsurface caverns. In addition to scientific interests, lunar and Martian subsurface caverns are excellent candidates for future lunar bases. We expect such caverns to have high potential due to stable temperatures; absence

  17. MR Imaging of Orbital Inflammatory Pseudotumors with Extraorbital Extension

    PubMed Central

    Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Young Joo; Jung, Ae Kyung; Park, Chan Sub; Song, Soon-Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Kim, Mi Sung

    2005-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate a variety of MR imaging findings of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors with extraorbital extension. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the MR features of five patients, who were diagnosed clinically and radiologically as having an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor with extraorbital extension. Results The types of orbital pseudotumors were a mass in the orbital apex (n = 3), diffuse form (n = 2), and myositis (n = 1). The extraorbital extension of the orbital pseudotumor passed through the superior orbital fissure in all cases, through the inferior orbital fissure in two cases, and through the optic canal in one case. The orbital lesions extended into the following areas: the cavernous sinus (n = 4), the middle cranial fossa (n = 4), Meckel's cave (n = 2), the petrous apex (n = 2), the clivus (n = 2), the pterygopalatine fossa and infratemporal fossa (n = 2), the foramen rotundum (n = 1), the paranasal sinus (n = 1), and the infraorbital foramen (n = 1). On MR imaging, the lesions appeared as an isosignal intensity with gray matter on the T1-weighted images, as a low signal intensity on the T2-weighted images and showed a marked enhancement on the post-gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (post-Gd-DTPA) T1-sequences. The symptoms of all of the patients improved when they were given high doses of steroids. Three of the five patients experienced a recurrence. Conclusion MR imaging is useful for demonstrating the presence of a variety of extraorbital extensions of orbital inflammatory pseudotumors. PMID:15968146

  18. The Hot Orbit: Orbital Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Imtiaz A.; Al-Rashed, Waleed; Arat, Yonca O.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital cellulitis is an uncommon condition previously associated with severe complications. If untreated, orbital cellulitis can be potentially sight and life threatening. It can affect both adults and children but has a greater tendency to occur in the pediatric age group. The infection most commonly originates from sinuses, eyelids or face, retained foreign bodies, or distant soources by hematogenous spread. It is characterized by eyelid edema, erythema, chemosis, proptosis, blurred vision, fever, headache, and double vision. A history of upper respiratory tract infection prior to the onset is very common especially in children. In the era prior to antibiotics, vision loss from orbital cellulitis was a dreaded complication. Currently, imaging studies for detection of orbital abcess, the use of antibiotics and early drainage have mitigated visual morbidity significantly. The purpose of this review is to describe current investigative strategies and management options in the treatment of orbital cellulitis, establish their effectiveness and possible complications due to late intervention. PMID:22346113

  19. Construction of the bridge in the cavern in the Vrata tunnel (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Sasa Kovacevic, Meho; Juric-Kacunic, Danijela

    2010-05-01

    In the Dinaric karst system in Croatia some 11500 speleological objects have been explored so far, more than 1000 of which were discovered during construction works. Such speleological objects without natural entrance on the terrain surface (which are called "caverns") have been discovered on the construction sites of the highways. Over the past twenty years they have been systematically investigated and treated. A special kind of remediation was conducted in the cavern's large hall of the "Vrata" tunnel on the Zagreb - Rijeka highway. Due to size, shape, cavern's position and hydrogeological parameters (fissured and karstified aquifers) within the karst system it was necessary to design and construct a 58 m bridge over the cavern. In addition, the cavern's vault had to be reinforced and stabilized, as the overburden was very thin. The beam-and -stringer grid with special anchors was used. The cavern's rehabilitation in the "Vrata" tunnel was a unique undertaking, and the bridge (without piers) is the cavern's longest bridge in the world. A speleological object of large dimensions was discovered in the "Vrata"tunnel's right tube on the Rijeka-Zagreb highway. Speleological, geotechnical, engineering geological and hydrogeological investigation works were carried out for the purpose of preservation the speleological object (cavern). On the basis of classification results of rock masses and conducted numerical analyses the support system for the cavern's vault stabilization was selected. The support system's elements include the beam-and-stringer grid constructed on the terrain's surface above the cavern, tendons and geotechnical anchors. To ensure stability of the speleological object, and to conduct the backward numerical analyses the measurement of vertical deformations from the terrain's surface along the rock's mass by means of sliding micrometers was undertaken. Backward numerical analyses combined with geotechnical measurements enable safer and more rational

  20. Orbital pseudotumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman ... 423. Review Date 8/20/2016 Updated by: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La ...

  1. Orbital Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Khataminia, Gholamreza; Aghajanzadeh, Roja; Vazirianzadeh, Babak; Rahdar, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To present a case of massive orbital myiasis. Case Report An 87-year-old debilitated woman suffering from left ocular pain of four days’ duration presented with a severely necrotized left orbit and several attached live larvae. The upper and lower eyelids and the eyeball were completely destroyed. She had history of eyelid surgery in the same eye due to a skin lesion, apparently some type of skin cancer, 15 years before. The larvae were identified as Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae) or old world screwworm fly. Conclusion Infestation of ocular and orbital tissues by fly larvae (ophthalmomyiasis) progresses rapidly and can completely destroy orbital tissues within days, especially in patients with poor general health. Treatment consists of removal of the larvae and surgical debridement. PMID:22454736

  2. Orbiter's Skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft is constructed from composite panels of carbon layers over aluminum honeycomb, lightweight yet strong. This forms a basic structure or skeleton on which the instruments, electronics, propulsion and power systems can be mounted. The propellant tank is contained in the center of the orbiter's structure. This photo was taken at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, during construction of the spacecraft.

  3. Thermo-mechanical modelling of salt caverns due to fluctuating loading conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work summarizes the development and application of a numerical model for the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. Artificial salt caverns are used for short term energy storage, such as power-to-gas or compressed air energy storage. Those applications are characterized by highly fluctuating operation pressures due to the unsteady power levels of power plants based on renewable energy. Compression and expansion of the storage gases during loading and unloading stages lead to rapidly changing temperatures in the host rock of the caverns. This affects the material behaviour of the host rock within a zone that extends several meters into the rock mass adjacent to the cavern wall, and induces thermo-mechanical stresses and alters the creep response.The proposed model features the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage medium, conductive heat transport in the host rock, as well as temperature dependent material properties of rock salt using different thermo-viscoplastic material models. The utilized constitutive models are well known and state-of-the-art in various salt mechanics applications. The model has been implemented into the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, coupled via a staggered coupling scheme. The simulation results allow the conclusion, that the cavern convergence rate (and thus the efficiency of the cavern) is highly influenced by the loading cycle frequency and the resulting gas temperatures. The model therefore allows to analyse the influence of operation modes on the cavern host rock or on neighbouring facilities.

  4. Operative surgical nuances of modified extradural temporopolar approach with mini-peeling of dura propria based on cadaveric anatomical study of lateral cavernous structures

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Toyooka, Terushige; Fujii, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural temporopolar approach (ETA) has been modified as less invasive manner and named as trans-superior orbital fissure (SOF) approach with mini-peeling technique. The present study discusses the operative nuances of this modified technique on the basis of cadaveric study of lateral cavernous structures. Methods: In five consecutive cadaveric specimens, we performed an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with mini-peeling of the dura propria to expose the anterior clinoid process entirely. We also investigated the histological characteristics of the lateral cavernous sinus (CS) between the dura propria and periosteal dura at the SOF, foramen rotundum (FR), and foramen ovale (FO) levels, and of each trigeminal nerve division. Results: Coronal histological examination of the lateral wall of the CS showed invagination of the dura propria and periosteal dura into the SOF. In contrast, no such invagination was observed at the levels of the FR and FO. This finding supports the technical rationale of the only skeletonization of the SOF for peeling of the dura propria but not FR. In addition, our modified ETA method needs only minimal dural incision between the SOF and FR where no cranial nerves are present. Conclusion: Our technical modification of ETA may be recommended for surgical treatment of paraclinoid lesions to reduce the risk of intraoperative neurovascular injury. PMID:27500005

  5. Lifting the Orbiter Discovery into vertical position in the VAB

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-05-22

    S95-10529 (3 May 1995) --- Inside the cavernous Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), workers carry out the meticulous process of lifting the Orbiter Discovery from a horizontal to a vertical position. Once upright, Discovery will be transferred into a high bay for mating with the external tank and solid rocket booster assembly already mounted on the mobile launcher platform. Completing the assembly process takes about five working days. Discovery?s next destination is Launch Pad 39B, and final preparations for liftoff on mission STS-70 scheduled for June 1995.

  6. Adult xanthogranulomatous disease of the orbit and ocular adnexa: new immunohistochemical findings and clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Sivak‐Callcott, J A; Rootman, J; Rasmussen, S L; Nugent, R A; White, V A; Paridaens, D; Currie, Z; Rose, G; Clark, B; McNab, A A; Buffam, F V; Neigel, J M; Kazim, M

    2006-01-01

    Background/aims Adult xanthogranulomatous disease involving the ocular tissues is rare and poorly understood. Adult onset xanthogranuloma (AOX), adult onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma (AAPOX), necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NBX), and Erdheim‐Chester disease (ECD) are the four syndromes within this disorder, which is diagnosed by characteristic histopathology. Experience with eight cases prompted a multi‐institutional effort to study the histopathology, immunohistochemistry, clinical findings, and systemic associations in this disorder. Methods 22 cases, including histopathological slides, were compiled. Published reports were identified by an English language Medline search (1966–2005) and review of reference citations. Each case in this series and the literature was classified as one of four syndromes and then analysed for age onset, sex, skin xanthoma, orbital location, immune dysfunction, internal organ and bone lesions, treatment, and outcome. The histopathology in each of these cases was reviewed by two pathologists. Immunhistochemical stains (CD3, CD4, CD8, L26) were performed in 14 cases where unstained slides were available. Results 137 cases were compiled. There was no sex or age difference between syndromes. AOX, AAPOX, NBX affect the anterior orbit, ECD tends to be diffuse and intraconal. Skin lesions are found in all the syndromes. Immune dysfunction was noted in all cases of AAPOX and NBX; 11% of NBX and all ECD patients had internal organ disease. Treatment included surgery, corticosteroids, other chemotherapeutic agents, radiotherapy, and combinations of these. No AOX or AAPOX deaths occurred; 66% of ECD patients died. All 22 cases had xanthoma cells; most had Touton giant cells. Lymphocytes were present in all cases and occurred as aggregates (mostly in AAPOX) or diffuse populations mixed with fibroblasts (mostly in ECD). Immunohistochemistry revealed the majority of these to be CD8+. Necrosis was most marked in NBX. Conclusion Adult

  7. Recent Advances in Orbital Tumors--A Review of Publications from 2014-2016.

    PubMed

    Honavar, Santosh G; Manjandavida, Fairooz P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to provide an update of the current literature on orbital tumors. The authors conducted a PubMed literature search of English language articles published between January 2014 and December 2016 using the following search items: orbit, tumors, lacrimal gland, lymphoma, hemangioma, lymphangioma. The authors included reviews, original articles, case series, and case reports with relevant new information. There is new information about the clinical spectrum of orbital tumors, capillary hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma, lymphangioma, orbital venous malformation, lacrimal gland tumors, and orbital lymphoma. This review highlights the current understanding, practice, and guidelines in the diagnosis and management of common tumors of the orbit. Copyright 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  8. Cerebral cavernous malformations: clinical insights from genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Mindea, Stefan A; Yang, Benson P; Shenkar, Robert; Bendok, Bernard; Batjer, H Hunt; Awad, Issam A

    2006-07-15

    Familial disease is responsible for one third to one half of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) cases presenting to clinical attention. Much has been learned in the past decade about the genetics of these cases, which are all inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, at three known chromosome loci. Unique features of inherited CCMs in Hispanic-Americans of Mexican descent have been described. The respective genes for each locus have been identified and preliminary observations on disease pathways and mechanisms are coming to light, including possible explanations for selectivity of neural milieu and relationships to endothelial layer abnormalities. Mechanisms of lesion genesis in cases of genetic predisposition are being investigated, with evidence to support a two-hit model emerging from somatic mutation screening of the lesions themselves and from lesion formation in transgenic murine models of the disease. Other information on potential inflammatory factors has emerged from differential gene expression studies. Unique phenotypic features of solitary versus familial cases have emerged: different associations with venous developmental anomaly and the exceptionally high penetrance rates that are found in inherited cases when high-sensitivity screening is performed with gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging. This information has changed the landscape of screening and counseling for patients and their families, and promises to lead to the development of new tools for predicting, explaining, and modifying disease behavior.

  9. Cerebral cavernous malformation: new molecular and clinical insights

    PubMed Central

    Revencu, N; Vikkula, M

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a vascular malformation causing neurological problems, such as headaches, seizures, focal neurological deficits, and cerebral haemorrhages. CCMs can occur sporadically or as an autosomal dominant condition with variable expression and incomplete penetrance. Familial forms have been linked to three chromosomal loci, and loss of function mutations have been identified in the KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3 genes. Recently, many new pieces of data have been added to the CCM puzzle. It has been shown that the three CCM genes are expressed in neurones rather than in blood vessels. The interaction between CCM1 and CCM2, which was expected on the basis of their structure, has also been proven, suggesting a common functional pathway. Finally, in a large series of KRIT1 mutation carriers, clinical and neuroradiological features have been characterised. These data should lead to more appropriate follow up, treatment, and genetic counselling. The recent developments will also help to elucidate the precise pathogenic mechanisms leading to CCM, contributing to a better understanding of normal and pathological angiogenesis and to the development of targeted treatment. PMID:16571644

  10. Interesting case of base of skull mass infiltrating cavernous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Achintya Dinesh; Soneja, Manish; Memon, Saba Samad; Vyas, Surabhi

    2016-11-16

    A man aged 35 years presented with chronic headache and earache of 1-year duration. He had progressive vision loss and diplopia since last 9 months. He also had pain over the face and episodic profuse epistaxis. On examination, perception of light was absent in the right eye and hand movements were detected at 4 m distance in the left eye. Imaging revealed a lobulated mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral cavernous sinuses and sphenoid sinus with bony erosions. Biopsy of the nasopharyngeal mass revealed pathological features which are characteristic of IgG4 disease. His serum IgG4 levels and acute inflammatory markers were also elevated. The patient was started on oral corticosteroid therapy. Fever, headache and earache resolved early and there was gradual improvement in the vision of the left eye. After 6 months, visual acuity in the left eye was 6/9, but right eye visual acuity had no change. Follow-up imaging revealed a significant reduction in the size of the mass.

  11. Chlorophyll f-driven photosynthesis in a cavernous cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Lars; Brejnrod, Asker; Schliep, Martin; Sørensen, Søren J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) f is the most recently discovered chlorophyll and has only been found in cyanobacteria from wet environments. Although its structure and biophysical properties are resolved, the importance of Chl f as an accessory pigment in photosynthesis remains unresolved. We found Chl f in a cyanobacterium enriched from a cavernous environment and report the first example of Chl f-supported oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria from such habitats. Pigment extraction, hyperspectral microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of Chl a and f in unicellular cyanobacteria found in enrichment cultures. Amplicon sequencing indicated that all oxygenic phototrophs were related to KC1, a Chl f-containing cyanobacterium previously isolated from an aquatic environment. Microsensor measurements on aggregates demonstrated oxygenic photosynthesis at 742 nm and less efficient photosynthesis under 768- and 777-nm light probably because of diminished overlap with the absorption spectrum of Chl f and other far-red absorbing pigments. Our findings suggest the importance of Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in terrestrial habitats.

  12. Management of supratentorial cavernous malformations: craniotomy versus gammaknife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-Hsin; Pan, David Hung-Chi

    2005-02-01

    Although craniotomy is the preferred treatment for symptomatic solitary supratentorial cavernous malformation (CM), radiosurgery is also an option. Our aim was to see which of these strategies was the most effective and under what circumstances. Of the 46 patients with solitary supratentorial CM that we retrospectively studied, 24 presented with seizures, 16 with focal neurological deficits due to intracerebral hemorrhage, and 6 with both seizures and bleeding. Sixteen were treated with craniotomy and 30 with gammaknife radiosurgery (GKRS). The main outcome measures for comparing craniotomy with GKRS were the proportion of postoperative seizure-free patients and the proportion of patients in whom no rebleeding occurred. Of patients presenting with seizures with/without bleeding, a significantly higher proportion of the craniotomy group than the GKRS group became and remained seizure-free (11/14 [79%] versus 4/16 [25%]; P < 0.002), and of those presenting with bleeding with/without seizures, a somewhat (though nonsignificantly) higher proportion did not rebleed (4/4 [100%] versus 12/18 [67%]) after surgery. The remaining 2 of the 16 craniotomy patients did not rebleed and had no residual tumor at follow up. Twelve of the 30 GKRS patients had evidence of tumor regression at follow up. In the clinical management of solitary supratentorial CM, craniotomy for lesionectomy resulted in better seizure control and rebleeding avoidance than GKRS.

  13. PHACE syndrome is associated with intracranial cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kimberly A; Ares, William J; Tempel, Zachary J; McCormick, Andrew A; Panigrahy, Ashok; Grunwaldt, Lorelei J; Greene, Stephanie

    2016-08-01

    PHACE syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder involving large facial hemangiomas in association with posterior fossa abnormalities, cerebral arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities. A recent consensus statement has delineated criteria necessary for the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome. Extracutaneous manifestations of PHACE syndrome predominately affect the cerebrovascular system. To date, there are no reports of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) in children with PHACE syndrome. We reviewed the charts of children admitted to the Children''s Hospital of Pittsburgh who met criteria for PHACE syndrome, and evaluated neuroimaging for cerebrovascular abnormalities, including the finding of CCMs. Six children met criteria for PHACE syndrome at our institution over a 10-year period. All children were female. All children had cerebrovascular abnormalities sufficient to meet major criteria for diagnosis. Four children (66.7 %) were found incidentally to have CCMs; all lesions measured less than 5 mm at the time of diagnosis and were asymptomatic. At present, CCMs are not listed among the diagnostic criteria for PHACE syndrome, and they have not previously been reported in association with PHACE syndrome. Hypoxic injury in utero may be the common denominator in the pathogenesis of many of the abnormalities already accepted in the criteria for PHACE syndrome and the formation of CCMs. In the setting of PHACE syndrome, we encourage clinicians to evaluate children for CCMs, which are readily apparent on the already-recommended screening MRIs.

  14. Endoport-assisted microsurgical resection of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this case series is to describe the surgical technique and postoperative outcomes for endoport-assisted microsurgical resection (EAMR) of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). Significant manipulation of subcortical white matter tracts may be necessary for the successful resection of CCM located in deep brain regions. Minimally invasive neurosurgical devices such as endoport systems can decrease disruption of the cortex and white matter tracts overlying deep-seated CCM through small cranial and dural openings. The role of endoport technology in modern CCM surgery is incompletely understood. Three patients with symptomatic CCM underwent EAMR at our institution using the BrainPath endoport system (NICO Corporation, Indianapolis, IN, USA). Complete resection was achieved in two patients. One patient with a large 4.5cm callosal CCM was left with a small residual lesion. There were no postoperative complications and all patients were functionally independent (modified Rankin Scale score 2 or less) at follow-up. Based on our initial experience with EAMR for CCM we believe the endoport can be an effective alternative to traditional retractor systems. Due to the nature of the small craniotomy and durotomy performed for endoport placement EAMR has the potential to improve surgical outcomes by reducing postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and hospital stays. Therefore, EAMR may be considered for appropriately selected CCM patients, although additional experience is necessary to improve our understanding of its role in CCM management.

  15. Genetics of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, H.; Pawlikowska, L.; Lawton, M. T.; Kim, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular lesions which affect up to 0.5% of the general population, predisposing to headaches, seizures, cerebral hemorrhages and focal neurological deficits. CCM occurs in both sporadic and familial forms; familial cases follow an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance and are caused by mutations in CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), or CCM3 (PDCD10). Somatic mutations within the three CCM genes have been identified in CCM lesions from both sporadic and familial patients. We reviewed articles published in PubMed in English prior to March 2015 and provide an update on CCM mutations and the screening strategies used to identify them. Further, we summarize the specific clinical features related to CCM genotypes. As 5 to 15% of familial CCM cases remain genetically unexplained, we also discuss future approaches to expand understanding of the genetic architecture of CCM. Finally, we discuss possible genetic modifiers of CCM disease severity and progression. Understanding the genetic architecture of CCM is essential for an earlier diagnosis of the disease, predictive testing of at-risk patients, and design of targeted medical therapies of which there are currently none available. PMID:25900426

  16. Introduction to cerebral cavernous malformation: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong

    2016-01-01

    The disease known as cerebral cavernous malformations mostly occurs in the central nervous system, and their typical histological presentations are multiple lumen formation and vascular leakage at the brain capillary level, resulting in disruption of the blood-brain barrier. These abnormalities result in severe neurological symptoms such as seizures, focal neurological deficits and hemorrhagic strokes. CCM research has identified ‘loss of function’ mutations of three ccm genes responsible for the disease and also complex regulation of multiple signaling pathways including the WNT/β-catenin pathway, TGF-β and Notch signaling by the ccm genes. Although CCM research is a relatively new and small scientific field, as CCM research has the potential to regulate systemic blood vessel permeability and angiogenesis including that of the blood-brain barrier, this field is growing rapidly. In this review, I will provide a brief overview of CCM pathogenesis and function of ccm genes based on recent progress in CCM research. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 255-262] PMID:26923303

  17. Genetics of cerebral cavernous malformations: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Choquet, H; Pawlikowska, L; Lawton, M T; Kim, H

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular lesions which affect up to 0.5% of the general population, predisposing to headaches, seizures, cerebral hemorrhages and focal neurological deficits. CCM occurs in both sporadic and familial forms; familial cases follow an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance and are caused by mutations in CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), or CCM3 (PDCD10). Somatic mutations within the three CCM genes have been identified in CCM lesions from both sporadic and familial patients. We reviewed articles published in PubMed in English prior to March 2015 and provide an update on CCM mutations and the screening strategies used to identify them. Further, we summarize the specific clinical features related to CCM genotypes. As 5% to 15% of familial CCM cases remain genetically unexplained, we also discuss future approaches to expand understanding of the genetic architecture of CCM. Finally, we discuss possible genetic modifiers of CCM disease severity and progression. Understanding the genetic architecture of CCM is essential for an earlier diagnosis of the disease, predictive testing of at-risk patients, and design of targeted medical therapies of which there are currently none available.

  18. ADVANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Shi, Changbin; Akers, Amy; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Awad, Issam A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the appearance of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in murine Ccm1 and Ccm2 gene knockout models, and to develop a technique of lesion localization for correlative pathobiologic studies Methods Brains from eighteen CCM mutant mice (Ccm1+/-Trp53-/- and Ccm2+/-Trp53-/-) and 28 controls were imaged by gradient recalled echo (T2*)-weighted MR at 4.7 T and 14.1 T in vivo and/or ex vivo. After MR imaging, the brains were removed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and cells were laser microdissected for molecular biologic studies. Results T2*-weighted MR imaging of brains in vivo and ex vivo revealed lesions similar to human CCMs in mutant mice, but not in control animals. Stereotactic localization and hematoxylin and eosin-staining of correlative tissue sections confirmed lesion histology, and revealed other areas of dilated capillaries in the same brains. Some lesions were identified by MR imaging at 14.1 T, but not at 4.7 T. PCR amplification from Ccm1 and β-actin genes was demonstrated from nucleic acids extracted from laser microdissected lesional and perilesional cells. Conclusions The high field MR imaging techniques offer new opportunities for further investigation of disease pathogenesis in vivo, and the localization, staging and histobiologic dissection of lesions, including the presumed earliest stages of CCM lesion development. PMID:18981891

  19. Visualization of hydraulic connections using Borehole Array around LPG Underground Storage Cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Mashimo, H.; Maejima, T.; Aoki, K.

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to visualize the hydraulic connections within the fractured rock mass around the underground LPG storage caverns using array of water injection boreholes. By taking advantage that water injection boreholes are located so as to cover the storage caverns, a complete sketch of hydraulic conditions around the caverns, such as locations of water conducting fractures, hydraulic conductivity and groundwater pressure can be obtained. Applicability of the proposed techniques have been tested in an on-going construction project operated by JOGMEC, Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, at Namikata, Western part of Japan. Three 26m x 30m x 485m caverns, located at 150 - 200 m below the ground surface in a granitic rock, are under construction. By systematically monitoring the pressure responses between the neighboring boreholes during drilling of total 387 boreholes around the two propane caverns, a spatial profile of the hydraulic connections and hydraulic conductivity around the caverns has been successfully obtained. Locations of localized depressurized zones created during an arch excavation have been detected by monitoring pressure in each borehole after stopping water supply to that borehole temporarily. Measurement has been conducted using each one of the 302 boreholes, one at a time. Observation shows that there is a clear correlation between total pressure drop and pressure gradient versus time curve on semi-logarithmic plot, dH/log10t, as expected by the numerical prediction. Regions where dH/log10t is larger than a certain criteria, determined by a numerical simulation for flow around a cavern in a rock with uniform hydraulic conductivity, have been evaluated as a depressurized zone caused by insufficient water supply, possibly due to existence of the high permeable zones. Separate pore pressure measurement around the caverns also supports this interpretation that a low pressure is prevailing near the borehole

  20. [A case of cavernous sinus epidermoid: anatomical classification and surgical approach].

    PubMed

    Kuroi, Yasuhiro; Yoshimura, Chika; Yokosako, Suguru; Arai, Naoyuki; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Sasahara, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Shinji; Tani, Shigeru; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Kubo, Osami; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidermoid rarely appears in the cavernous sinus. We encountered a 41-year-old man with left abducens nerve palsy. A round-shaped, low-density lesion on CT was located lateral to the left cavernous sinus with a compressed and thinned lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. We could not identify cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus, which was found to be packed with a non-enhanced, high-intensity tumor on both T1 and T2 MRI. Part of the tumor capsule and its pearly contents were removed with an intradural subtemporal approach, and an inner membranous layer with cranial nerves and a tumor capsule were seen at the bottom of the tumor cavity. Postoperatively, complete cure was achieved. Reviewing similar cases, we found 18 cavernous sinus epidermoids:extracavernous type in 5;interdural in 10;and intracavernous in 3. The interdural type could be further divided into two subtypes:superficial cavernous sinus and inner membranous types. The present case belongs to the former. Frontotemporal and subtemporal procedures via both intra- and extradural approaches are relatively safe for lesions except for the intracavernous type, because cranial nerves are not located in the lateral wall of the tumor. MRI provides more useful information on cranial nerves and aid in choosing a better treatment strategy.

  1. Multiple cavernous malformations presenting in a patient with Poland syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; De Salles, Antonio Af

    2011-09-20

    Poland syndrome is a congenital disorder related to chest and hand anomalies on one side of the body. Its etiology remains unclear, with an ipsilateral vascular alteration (of unknown origin) to the subclavian artery in early embryogenesis being the currently accepted theory. Cavernous malformations are vascular hamartomas, which have been linked to a genetic etiology, particularly in familial cases, which commonly present with multiple lesions. Our case report is the first to describe multiple cavernous malformations associated with Poland syndrome, further supporting the vascular etiology theory, but pointing to a genetic rather than a mechanistic factor disrupting blood flow in the corresponding vessels. A 41-year-old Caucasian man with Poland syndrome on the right side of his body presented to our hospital with a secondary generalized seizure and was found to have multiple cavernous malformations distributed in his brain, cerebellum, and brain stem, with a predominance of lesions in the left hemisphere. The distribution of cavernous malformations in the left hemisphere and the right-sided Poland syndrome in our patient could not be explained by a mechanistic disruption of one of the subclavian arteries. A genetic alteration, as in familial cavernous malformations, would be a more appropriate etiologic diagnosis of Poland syndrome in our patient. Further genetic and pathological studies of the involved blood vessels in patients with Poland syndrome could lead to a better understanding of the disease.

  2. Endoscope-assisted resection of cavernous angioma at the foramen of Monro: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yousuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular cavernous angiomas are rare pathological entities, and those located at the foramen of Monro are even rarer. We herein present a case of cavernous angioma at the foramen of Monro that was successfully treated by neuroendoscope-assisted surgical removal, and review the relevant literature. A 65-year-old woman had experienced headache and vomiting for 10 days before admission to another hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a mass at the foramen of Monro, and obstructive hydrocephalus of both lateral ventricles. The patient was then referred to our hospital. Neurological examination on admission to our hospital showed memory disturbance (Mini-Mental State Examination 20/30) and wide-based gait. A cavernous angioma at the foramen of Monro was diagnosed based on the typical popcorn-like appearance of the lesion on MRI. The lesion was completely removed by neuroendoscope-assisted transcortical surgery with the Viewsite Brain Access System (Vycor Medical Inc., Boca Raton, FL), leading to a reduction in the size of the ventricles. The resected mass was histologically confirmed to be cavernous angioma. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately and there were no postoperative complications. Minimally invasive neuroendoscope-assisted surgery was used to successfully treat a cavernous angioma at the foramen of Monro.

  3. Association between trauma and acute hemorrhage of cavernous malformations in children: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Jowdy, Patrick K; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Balos, Lucia L; Li, Veetai

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous hemangiomas are benign congenital vascular abnormalities. Intracerebral cavernous hemangiomas have an appreciable risk of spontaneous hemorrhage. Little is known as to whether head trauma increases the risk of bleeding for these lesions. In this study, the authors present a case series of 3 patients with posttraumatic nonspontaneous hemorrhage of intracerebral cavernous malformations (CMs). For the first time, to the authors' knowledge, they propose that trauma might constitute a risk factor for acute hemorrhage in intracerebral cavernomas. METHODS The authors reviewed the charts of all patients with a new diagnosis of intracerebral cavernoma at their pediatric hospital between 2010 and 2014. Patients with a history of head trauma prior to presentation were subsequently studied to identify features common to these posttraumatic, hemorrhage-prone lesions. RESULTS A history of head trauma was identified in 3 of 19 cases. These 3 patients presented with seizures and/or headaches and were found to have acute hemorrhage within a cavernous hemangioma. None of these patients had any history of abnormal neurological symptoms. All 3 abnormal vascular lesions had associated developmental venous anomalies (DVAs). The 3 patients underwent resection of their respective vascular abnormalities, and the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma was confirmed with postsurgical tissue pathology. All 3 patients had complete resolution of symptoms following complete excision of their lesions. CONCLUSIONS Trauma may represent a risk factor for acute hemorrhage in patients with CMs. The presence of associated DVAs may represent a risk factor for posttraumatic hemorrhage of cavernomas. Excision should be considered in such cases, if feasible.

  4. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  5. 3D model of small-scale density cavern formation in the region of auroral field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Mizonova, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    A 3D problem of the formation of small-scale density caverns with a nonstationary electric field in the region of auroral electric currents and kinetic Alfvén wave currents is considered. It is shown that an excess of the electron current velocity over a certain critical value of their thermal velocity is a probable cause of cavern formation. Linear and nonlinear stages of the density cavern formation are considered, and their main parameters are estimated. In the case of comparatively strong magnetic fields, caverns can be formed with comparable longitudinal and transverse (with respect to the magnetic field) scales. The properties of parameters of small-scale density caverns and nonstationary electric field agree with well-known experimental data.

  6. Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  7. Contralateral transvenous approach and embolization with 360° guglielmi detachable coils for the treatment of cavernous sinus dural fistula

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Marco; Jorge, Santos-Franco; Rafael, Moscote-Salazar Luis; Raphael, AlvisMiranda Hernando; Gabriel, Alcala-Cerra; Ángel, Lee

    2015-01-01

    carotid-cavernous fistulas are spontaneours acquired connections between the carotid artery and the cavernous cavernous sinus, being classified as direct or indirect; being usually diagnosed in postmenopausal women, but are also associated with other pathoogies such as pregnancy, sinusitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis. They are clinically characterized by ophthalmological symptoms and pulsatile tinnitus. A 51-year-old woman who started her current condition about 4 years ago with pulsatile tinnitus, to which were added progressively: Pain, conjunctival erythema, right eye proptosis and the occasional headache of moderate intensity. Caotid-cavernous fistula wes diagnosed, for the technical difficulty inherent in the case was made a contralateral transvenous approach and embolization with 360° GDG coils, with successful evolution of the patient. The endovascular management of these lesions is currently possible with excellent results. PMID:25767589

  8. Surgical removal of cavernous angioma in the medulla oblongata. A case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Ogawa, A; Yoshida, Y; Hidaka, T; Suzuki, M; Takahashi, S

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroradiology have enabled us to approach cavernous angioma in the medulla oblongata, rather rare vascular lesion in the central nervous system. We describe a such surgical case without additional neurological symptoms and discuss surgical indications in this paper. A 61-year-old woman presented with vertigo and swallowing disturbance. T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed a low intensity mass in the dorsolateral portion of the medulla oblongata, and T2-weighted imaging revealed a hemosiderin rim surrounding the lesion. Angiography showed no abnormalities. Surgery using far lateral approach achieved complete removal of the mass and hematoma. Histological examination of the surgical specimen disclosed cavernous angioma. This case suggests that direct surgery can be recommended for cavernous angioma located in the dorsal or lateral medulla oblongata to remove the hematoma and angioma if bleeding clearly provokes neurological symptoms.

  9. Endovascular Occlusion of Dural Cavernous Fistulas through a Superior Ophthalmic Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Briganti, Francesco; Caranci, Ferdinando; Leone, Giuseppe; Napoli, Manuela; Cicala, Domenico; Briganti, Giuseppe; Tranfa, Fausto; Bonavolontà, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dural cavernous fistulas are low-flow vascular malformations with usually benign clinical course and a high rate of spontaneous resolution. Cases with symptom progression must be treated with an endovascular approach by arterial or venous route. We report 30 patients with dural cavernous fistulas treated by coil embolization using surgical exposure and retrograde catheterization of the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). The procedure resulted in closure of the fistula without other endovascular treatments in all 30 patients and clinical remission or improvement in 20 and eight patients, respectively. Embolization via a SOV approach is a safe and easy endovascular procedure, particularly indicated for dural cavernous fistulas with exclusive or prevalent internal carotid artery feeders and anterior venous drainage. PMID:24199817

  10. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis presenting as a cavernous sinus syndrome: Case report with review of existing literature

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Shashi; Patrawalla, Amee

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculoma involving the cavernous sinus is a rare presentation of CNS disease, with only twelve cases reported in previous literature. We report a case of a 48 year old woman who presented with a right cavernous sinus syndrome of 2 months duration. MRI showed a mass in the right cavernous sinus, and serologic workup revealed an elevated sedimentation rate and positive Quantiferon®-GOLD testing. 18-FDG PET-CT demonstrated a hypermetabolic 3 cm subcarinal lymph node, and lymph node biopsy showed caseating granuloma. Culture of lymphatic tissue grew drug-sensitive M. tuberculosis. The patient was treated with a non-standard 4-drug regimen and prednisone, with rapid improvement of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. Total length of treatment was 12 months. In addition, we review the 12 cases found in literature, and discuss clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas, and approaches to treatment. PMID:26839786

  11. Laser-Doppler flowmetry and Horner's syndrome in patients with complete unilateral damage to the parasellar sympathetic fibers during cavernous sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Benedicic, Mitja; Debevc, David; Dolenc, Vinko V; Bosnjak, Roman

    2006-04-01

    To determine ocular, sudomotor, and vasomotor components of Horner's syndrome resulting from complete unilateral intraoperative damage to the parasellar sympathetic fibers during cavernous sinus surgery. Complete damage to the parasellar sympathetic fibers was found in four patients operated for central skull base lesions. Pupilometry, eyelid fissure measurement, Hertel's exophthalmometry, starch iodine sweat test, and laser-Doppler perfusion assessment of bilaterally symmetrical forehead and cheek areas were performed. Pupil diameter was smaller and the eyelid fissure was >2 mm narrower on the affected side in all four patients. Exophthalmometry after the operation never revealed >1 mm difference. Anhydrosis was localized to the medial forehead in three and to the entire forehead in one patient. Average perfusion did not significantly differ between the affected and opposite side of the forehead or cheek. The parasellar sympathetic fibers exclusively innervate the orbit and variably innervate the forehead sweat glands. No conclusion regarding their contribution to the facial vasomotor control could be established.

  12. Nuclear orbiting

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear orbiting following collisions between sd and p shell nuclei is discussed. The dependence of this process on the real and imaginary parts of the nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed, as well as the evolution of the dinucleus toward a fully equilibrated fused system. 26 refs., 15 figs.

  13. The cavernous sinus in cluster headache - a quantitative structural magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Arkink, Enrico B; Schoonman, Guus G; van Vliet, Jorine A; Bakels, Hannah S; Sneeboer, Marjolein Am; Haan, Joost; van Buchem, Mark A; Ferrari, Michel D; Kruit, Mark C

    2017-03-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that a constitutionally narrow cavernous sinus might predispose individuals to cluster headache. Cavernous sinus dimensions, however, have never been assessed. Methods In this case-control study, we measured the dimensions of the cavernous sinus, skull base, internal carotid and pituitary gland with high-resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 25 episodic, 24 chronic and 13 probable cluster headache patients, 8 chronic paroxysmal hemicrania patients and 22 headache-free controls. Dimensions were compared between groups, correcting for age, sex and transcranial diameter. Results On qualitative inspection, no relevant pathology or anatomic variants that were previously associated with cluster headache or chronic paroxysmal hemicranias were observed in the cavernous sinus or paracavernous structures. The left-to-right transcranial diameter at the temporal fossa level (mean ± SD) was larger in the headache groups (episodic cluster headache: 147.5 ± 7.3 mm, p = 0.044; chronic cluster headache: 150.2 ± 7.3 mm, p < 0.001; probable cluster headache: 146.0 ± 5.3 mm, p = 0.012; and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania: 145.2 ± 9.4 mm, p = 0.044) compared with controls (140.2 ± 8.0 mm). After adjusting for transcranial diameter and correcting for multiple comparisons, there were no differences in the dimensions of the cavernous sinus and surrounding structures between headache patients and controls. Conclusion Patients with cluster headache or chronic paroxysmal hemicrania had wider skulls than headache-free controls, but the proportional dimensions of the cavernous sinus were similar.

  14. Cavernous hemangioma-like kaposi sarcoma: histomorphologic features and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Onak Kandemir, Nilüfer; Barut, Figen; Doğan Gün, Banu; Solak Tekin, Nilgün; Hallaç Keser, Sevinç; Oğuz Özdamar, Sükrü

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare morphologic type of Kaposi sarcoma. So far there are no cases in the literature defining the histological features of this morphologic spectrum in detail. In this study we presented two classical-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma cases with histologic findings resembling cavernous hemangioma in company with clinical and histopathological data. Cases. One hundred and eighty-five classical-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma lesions in 79 patients were assessed retrospectively in terms of histopathological features. Findings of two cases showing features of cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma whose clinical data could be accessed were presented in accompany with the literature data. Both cases were detected to have bluish-purple, protruded, irregularly bordered cutaneous lesions. Histopathological examination revealed a lesion formed by cavernous hemangioma-like vascular structures organized in a lobular pattern that became dilated and filled with blood. Typical histological findings of early-stage KS, consisting of mononuclear inflammation, extravasated erythrocytes, and a few immature vascular structures in superficial dermis, were observed. All cases were serologically HIV-1 negative. A positive reaction with HHV-8, CD31, CD34, and D2-40 monoclonal antibodies was identified at both cavernous hemangioma-like areas and in immature vascular structures. Results. Cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare Kaposi sarcoma variant presenting with diagnostic challenges, that may be confused with hemangioma. As characteristic morphological features may not be observed in every case, it is important for diagnostic purposes to show immunohistochemical HHV-8 positivity in this variant.

  15. Salinization of groundwater around underground LPG storage caverns, Korea : statistical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Chang, H.

    2001-12-01

    In this research, we investigate the reciprocal influence between groundwater flow and its salinization occurred in two underground cavern sites, using major ion chemistry, PCA for chemical analysis data, and cross-correlation for various hydraulic data. The study areas are two underground LPG storage facilities constructed in South Sea coast, Yosu, and West Sea coastal regions, Pyeongtaek, Korea. Considerably high concentration of major cations and anions of groundwaters at both sites showed brackish or saline water types. In Yosu site, some great chemical difference of groundwater samples between rainy and dry season was caused by temporal intrusion of high-saline water into propane and butane cavern zone, but not in Pyeongtaek site. Cl/Br ratios and δ 18O- δ D distribution for tracing of salinization source water in both sites revealed that two kind of saline water (seawater and halite-dissolved solution) could influence the groundwater salinization in Yosu site, whereas only seawater intrusion could affect the groundwater chemistry of the observation wells in Pyeongtaek site. PCA performed by 8 and 10 chemical ions as statistical variables in both sites showed that intensive intrusion of seawater through butane cavern was occurred at Yosu site while seawater-groundwater mixing was observed at some observation wells located in the marginal part of Pyeongtaek site. Cross-correlation results revealed that the positive relationship between hydraulic head and cavern operating pressure was far more conspicuous at propane cavern zone in both sites (65 ~90% of correlation coefficients). According to the cross-correlation results of Yosu site, small change of head could provoke massive influx of halite-dissolved solution from surface through vertically developed fracture networks. However in Pyeongtaek site, the pressure-sensitive observation wells are not completely consistent with seawater-mixed wells, and the hydraulic change of heads at these wells related to the

  16. Cavernous Hemangioma-Like Kaposi Sarcoma: Histomorphologic Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Onak Kandemir, Nilüfer; Barut, Figen; Doğan Gün, Banu; Solak Tekin, Nilgün; Hallaç Keser, Sevinç; Oğuz Özdamar, Şükrü

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare morphologic type of Kaposi sarcoma. So far there are no cases in the literature defining the histological features of this morphologic spectrum in detail. In this study we presented two classical-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma cases with histologic findings resembling cavernous hemangioma in company with clinical and histopathological data. Cases. One hundred and eighty-five classical-type cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma lesions in 79 patients were assessed retrospectively in terms of histopathological features. Findings of two cases showing features of cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma whose clinical data could be accessed were presented in accompany with the literature data. Both cases were detected to have bluish-purple, protruded, irregularly bordered cutaneous lesions. Histopathological examination revealed a lesion formed by cavernous hemangioma-like vascular structures organized in a lobular pattern that became dilated and filled with blood. Typical histological findings of early-stage KS, consisting of mononuclear inflammation, extravasated erythrocytes, and a few immature vascular structures in superficial dermis, were observed. All cases were serologically HIV-1 negative. A positive reaction with HHV-8, CD31, CD34, and D2-40 monoclonal antibodies was identified at both cavernous hemangioma-like areas and in immature vascular structures. Results. Cavernous hemangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare Kaposi sarcoma variant presenting with diagnostic challenges, that may be confused with hemangioma. As characteristic morphological features may not be observed in every case, it is important for diagnostic purposes to show immunohistochemical HHV-8 positivity in this variant. PMID:24187557

  17. Evaluation of Seawater Intrusion Potential into a Coastal Underground Oil Storage Cavern in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Lim, J.; Moon, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Underground oil storage caverns have been operated in Korea since 1990s, and the facility at Yeosu, south coast of Korea, is one of the largest underground oil storage facilities in Korea. Hydrologic and water quality monitoring of the facility has been performed to find out whether the facility maintains secure containment condition and long-term stability. Recently, seawater intrusion into the base of the storage cavern was suspected based on the long-term monitoring of water levels and chemical analyses of seepage water pumped out from cavern bottom. The sudden decrease of water pressure during the construction of storage tunnel seems to cause the inland movement of saline water. In this study, numerical analysis was performed to estimate the potential of seawater intrusion into underground oil storage cavern using a three dimensional groundwater simulation model, FEFLOW (Diersch, 2005). The geometry of the cavern and water curtain was represented by using the implemented functions. The groundwater flow field and seawater intrusion in response to construction activity was also estimated. The simulation results were validated by comparing EC and salinity of seepage water monitoring data. Sensitivity analyses on hydraulic conductivity and water pressure from the water curtain or injection well were also conducted. Relatively high groundwater level was observed at this site due to the low hydraulic conductivity of base rock and high altitude of the mountains. Therefore, the amount of intruded seawater does not seem to be significant. However, apparent decrease of water level was observed along the main fracture zone and seawater could be intruded along these paths. Simulation results show that the seawater intrusion to the cavern is mainly controlled by the fracture zone, which would be the main channel of groundwater movement. The injection of fresh water to the injection wells along the coast may retard the intrusion of seawater.

  18. Primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: clinical features and surgical outcome in 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Yu; Xu, Yu-Lun; Yang, Jun; Wang, James; Wang, Gui-Huai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, imaging features, differential diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis for primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas. Fourteen patients with pathologically diagnosed non-vertebral origin cavernous hemangiomas who had undergone surgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between 2003 and 2012 were identified in the hospital's database. The patients' clinical data, imaging characteristics, surgical treatment, and postoperative follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. There were 9 males and 5 females with an average age of 51.64 years. The primary epidural cavernous hemangiomas were located in the cervical spine (2 cases), cervicothoracic junction (2 cases), thoracic spine (8 cases), thoracolumbar junction (1 case), and lumbar spine (1 case). Hemorrhage was confirmed in 4 cases during surgery. Preoperatively 5 lesions were misdiagnosed as schwannoma, 1 was misdiagnosed as a meningioma, and 1 was misdiagnosed as an arachnoid cyst. Preoperative hemorrhages were identified in 2 cases. Three patients had recurrent cavernous hemangiomas. The initial presenting symptoms were local pain in 5 cases, radiculopathy in 6 cases, and myelopathy in 3 cases. Upon admission, 1 patient had radicular symptoms and 13 had myelopathic symptoms. The average symptom duration was 18 months. All patients underwent surgery; complete resection was achieved in 8 cases, subtotal resection in 4 cases, and partial resection in 2 cases. Postoperative follow-up was completed in 10 cases (average follow-up 34 months); 1 patient died, 5 patients showed clinical improvement, and 4 patients remained neurologically unchanged. Total surgical removal of spine epidural cavernous hemangiomas with a chronic course is the optimum treatment and carries a good prognosis. Secondary surgery for recurrent epidural cavernous hemangioma is technically more challenging. In patients with profound myelopathy from acute hemorrhage, even prompt surgical

  19. Direct Traumatic Carotid Cavernous Fistula: Angiographic Classification and Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Cuong Tran; Nguyen, Dang; Duc, Vo Tan; Chau, Huynh Hong; Son, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report our experience in treatment of traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) via endovascular intervention. We hereof recommend an additional classification system for type A CCF and suggest respective treatment strategies. Only type A CCF patients (Barrow's classification) would be recruited for the study. Based on the angiographic characteristics of the CCF, we classified type A CCF into three subtypes including small size, medium size and large size fistula depending on whether there was presence of the anterior carotid artery (ACA) and/or middle carotid artery (MCA). Angiograms with opacification of both ACA and MCA were categorized as small size fistula. Angiograms with opacification of either ACA or MCA were categorized as medium size fistula and those without opacification of neither ACA nor MCA were classified as large size fiatula. After the confirm angiogram, endovascular embolization would be performed impromptu using detachable balloon, coils or both. All cases were followed up for complication and effect after the embolization. A total of 172 direct traumatic CCF patients were enrolled. The small size fistula was accountant for 12.8% (22 cases), medium size 35.5% (61 cases) and large size fistula accountant for 51.7% (89 cases). The successful rate of fistula occlusion under endovascular embolization was 94% with preservation of the carotid artery in 70%. For the treatment of each subtype, a total of 21/22 cases of the small size fistulas were successfully treated using coils alone. The other single case of small fistula was defaulted. Most of the medium and large size fistulas were cured using detachable balloons. When the fistula sealing could not be obtained using detachable balloon, coils were added to affirm the embolization of the cavernous sinus via venous access. There were about 2.9% of patient experienced direct carotid artery puncture and 0.6% puncture after carotid artery cut-down exposure. About 30% of cases

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Evaluation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Hart, B. L.; Taheri, S.; Rosenberg, G. A.; Morrison, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22–76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E–6 to 9.63E–4 min−1, mean 3.55E–4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E–4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E–4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  2. A Promising Adjuvant to Detachable Coils for Cavernous Packing: Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Transvenous embolization of cavernous dural arteriovenous fistulae (CDAVFs) with Onyx has recently been reported. This study was undertaken to assess the value of Onyx in transvenous treatment of CDAVFs. We retrospectively reviewed 18 patients who underwent transvenous embolization for CDAVFs of Barrow Type D with detachable coils and Onyx at our institution over five years. Patients were divided into two groups: group A, patients who had been treated with detachable coils; group B, patients who had been treated with a combination of detachable coils and Onyx. The approach routes, angiographic results, complications and clinical outcome were assessed for both groups. Eighteen patients with CDAVFs of Barrow Type D were treated: nine women and nine men; mean age was 41.9 years. Eleven patients treated by 19 procedures of transvenous coiling belonged to group A. Seven patients treated by eight procedures of transvenous Onyx injection belonged to group B. The periprocedural complication rate associated with coiling for both groups was 18.2% vs 16.7% with Onyx. The duration of the procedure in both groups was 6.77±2.49 hours vs 3.75±1.63 hours with coiling vs Onyx, and the cost of Onyx was cheaper than coils. An excellent outcome was achieved in both groups: 90.9% vs 100% (group A vs group B). Our results associated with both modalities of CDAVFs treatment with clinical outcome show that transvenous embolization with Onyx is a safe alternative to detachable coils in the treatment of CDAVFs. However, more cases need to be evaluated. PMID:20465891

  3. Cavernous sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Till; Flitsch, Jörg; van Leyen, Philine; Sauer, Nina; Aberle, Jens; Grzyska, Ulrich; Lüdecke, Dieter K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Correct diagnosis and precise localization of adenomas in patients with Cushing's disease are essential for avoiding unsuccessful transsphenoidal pituitary exploration. In addition to the well-established inferior petrosal sinus sampling, preoperative cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) was introduced as a potentially improved way to predict adenoma lateralization. The authors present their results with CSS in a consecutive series of patients with Cushing's disease. METHODS During 1999-2014, transsphenoidal surgeries were consecutively performed in 510 patients with Cushing's disease. For most patients, suppression of cortisol in high-dose dexamethasone tests and stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol after administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone were sufficient to prove the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent hypercortisolism. Of the 510 patients, 67 (13%) were referred to the department of neuroradiology for CSS according to the technique of Teramoto. The indications for CSS were unclear endocrine test results or negative MRI results. Data for all patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS A central/peripheral gradient was found in 59 patients; lateralization to the left or right side was found in 51. For 8 patients with a central/peripheral gradient, no left/right gradient could be determined. For another 8 patients with equivocal test results, no central/peripheral gradient was found. No severe CSS-associated complications were encountered. Of the 51 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, the predicted lateralization was proven correct for 42 (82%). CONCLUSIONS As MRI techniques have improved, the number of potential candidates for this invasive method has decreased in the past decade. However, because detecting minute adenomas remains problematic, CSS remains a useful diagnostic tool for patients with Cushing's disease.

  4. Involvement of PTEN promoter methylation in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Wloch, Andreas; Wu, Qun; Peters, Christian; Pagenstecher, Axel; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Sure, Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent cerebral vascular lesions involving aberrant angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor, is frequently deficient in various pathologies due to mutation or epigenetic alterations. PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism leading to activation of angiogenesis in tumors. The present study aimed to investigate whether PTEN promoter methylation was involved in CCMs. PTEN promoter methylation was detected in surgical specimens of CCMs (n=69) by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The methylation status was correlated to the clinical manifestations and to PTEN expression, which was analyzed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. To investigate the endothelial proliferation and the potential signaling pathways affected by PTEN methylation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen as well as phosphor-Akt and phosphor-Erk1,2 were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot, respectively, in CCM specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed PTEN promoter methylation in 15.9% CCMs. Strikingly, 5 of 6 familial CCMs showed PTEN promoter methylation (83.3%), which was significantly higher than in sporadic cases (9.4%; P<0.001). In addition, PTEN promoter methylation appeared more frequently in multiple CCMs, including familial cases (46.7%), than that in single-lesioned CCMs (11.8%; P<0.05). Immunostaining and Western blot revealed a more significant PTEN downregulation in PTEN-methylated CCMs in comparison to PTEN-unmethylated CCMs. Reduced PTEN expression was inversely correlated to the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and to the activation of Erk1,2, but not of Akt. We reported here for the first time the involvement of PTEN promoter methylation in CCMs, particularly in familial CCMs, suggesting this epigenetic alteration as a

  5. Beyond the lesion: the epileptogenic networks around cavernous angiomas.

    PubMed

    Sevy, Amandine; Gavaret, Martine; Trebuchon, Agnès; Vaugier, Lisa; Wendling, Fabrice; Carron, Romain; Regis, Jean; Chauvel, Patrick; Gonigal, Aileen Mc; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between epileptogenic lesions and the extension of epileptogenicity is a major challenge in presurgical evaluation of drug resistant epilepsies. In this study, we aimed at quantifying the epileptogenic properties of brain structures explored by depth electrodes in patients investigated by stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) and suffering from focal drug-resistant epilepsy associated with cavernous angioma (CA). Epileptogenicity of the perilesional region and distant brain areas was calculated according to the "epileptogenicity index" (EI), a technique that allows mathematical quantification of rapid discharges at seizure onset taking into account the time at which the discharge occurs. Thirteen seizures from 6 patients were studied. Localization of the cavernoma was the frontal lobe (two cases), the temporal lobe (three cases) or the anterior insula (one case). Visual inspection of the ictal discharge showed that in the majority of cases (5/6) the perilesional region was either not involved or involved with other distant sites. Using EI quantification, complex patterns of epileptogenicity were observed in five patients. A large number of brain regions out of the lesional region disclosed higher values than the lesion site. Mean values in the perilesional region and in the extralesional sites were not significantly different (p=0.34). Complex organization of the epileptogenic zone may be found in drug-resistant CA associated epilepsy. Thus, this result should be borne in mind when patients with CA and drug resistant epilepsy are investigated. If there is a suspicion of a larger epileptogenic zone than the lesion, intra-cerebral exploration by SEEG may be required before surgery that may be guided by the definition of the EZ.

  6. Proteomic identification of the cerebral cavernous malformation signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Hilder, Thomas L; Malone, Michael H; Bencharit, Sompop; Colicelli, John; Haystead, Timothy A; Johnson, Gary L; Wu, Christine C

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are sporadic or inherited vascular lesions of the central nervous system characterized by dilated, thin-walled, leaky vessels. Linkage studies have mapped autosomal dominant mutations to three loci: ccm1 (KRIT1), ccm2 (OSM), and ccm3 (PDCD10). All three proteins appear to be scaffolds or adaptor proteins, as no enzymatic function can be attributed to them. Our previous results demonstrated that OSM is a scaffold for the assembly of the GTPase Rac and the MAPK kinase kinase MEKK3, for the hyperosmotic stress-dependent activation of p38 MAPK. Herein, we show that the three CCM proteins are members of a larger signaling complex. To define this complex, epitope-tagged wild type OSM or OSM harboring the mutation of F217-->A, which renders the OSM phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain unable to bind KRIT1, were stably introduced into RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. FLAG-OSM or FLAG-OSMF217A and the associated complex members were purified by immunoprecipitation using anti-FLAG antibody. OSM binding partners were identified by gel-based methods combined with electrospray ionization-MS or by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Previously identified proteins that associate with OSM including KRIT1, MEKK3, Rac, and the KRIT1-binding protein ICAP-1 were found in the immunoprecipitates. In addition, we show for the first time that PDCD10 binds to OSM and is found in cellular CCM complexes. Other prominent proteins that bound the CCM complex include EF1A1, RIN2, and tubulin, with each interaction disrupted with the OSMF217A mutant protein. We further show that PDCD10 binds phosphatidylinositol di- and triphosphates and OSM binds phosphatidylinositol monophosphates. The findings define the targeting of the CCM complex to membranes and to proteins regulating trafficking and the cytoskeleton.

  7. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Clinical Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huan; Zhang, Lingjiao; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Girard, Romuald; Khanna, Omaditya; Fam, Maged D.; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Edelman, Robert R.; Christoforidis, Gregory; Awad, Issam A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To correlate lesional iron deposition assessed by quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) with clinical and disease features in patients with cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local Institutional Review Boards, and informed consent was obtained from each participant. Patients underwent routine clinical scan in addition to QSM on 3 Tesla systems. Data from 105 patients met inclusion criteria. CCM lesions identified on susceptibility maps were cross-verified by T2 weighted images and differentiated based on prior overt hemorrhage. Mean susceptibility per CCM lesion (χ̄lesion) was measured to correlate with lesion volume, age at scan, and hemorrhagic history. Temporal rates of change in χ̄lesion was evaluated in 33 patients. Results Average χ̄lesion per patient was positively correlated with patient age at scan (p < 0.05, 4.1% change with each decade of life). CCM lesions with prior overt hemorrhages exhibited higher χ̄lesion than those without (p < 0.05). Changes in χ̄lesion during 3 – 15 months follow-up period were small in patients without new hemorrhage between the two scans [bias = −0.0003, 95% CI = [−0.06, 0.06]). Conclusion The study revealed a positive correlation between mean QSM signal and patient age in CCM lesions, higher mean QSM signal in hemorrhagic lesions, and minimum longitudinal QSM signal change in clinically stable lesions. QSM has the potential to be a novel imaging biomarker supplementing conventional imaging in CCM. The clinical significance of such measures merits further study. PMID:26965464

  8. Modeling deformation processes of salt caverns for gas storage due to fluctuating operation pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, N.; Nagel, T.; Goerke, U.; Khaledi, K.; Lins, Y.; König, D.; Schanz, T.; Köhn, D.; Attia, S.; Rabbel, W.; Bauer, S.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    In the course of the Energy Transition in Germany, the focus of the country's energy sources is shifting from fossil to renewable and sustainable energy carriers. Since renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, are subjected to annual, seasonal, and diurnal fluctuations, the development and extension of energy storage capacities is a priority in German R&D programs. Common methods of energy storage are the utilization of subsurface caverns as a reservoir for natural or artificial fuel gases, such as hydrogen, methane, or the storage of compressed air. The construction of caverns in salt rock is inexpensive in comparison to solid rock formations due to the possibility of solution mining. Another advantage of evaporite as a host material is the self-healing capacity of salt rock. Gas caverns are capable of short-term energy storage (hours to days), so the operating pressures inside the caverns are fluctuating periodically with a high number of cycles. This work investigates the influence of fluctuating operation pressures on the stability of the host rock of gas storage caverns utilizing numerical models. Therefore, we developed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) model based on the finite element method utilizing the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. Our simulations include the thermodynamic behaviour of the gas during the loading/ unloading of the cavern. This provides information on the transient pressure and temperature distribution on the cavern boundary to calculate the deformation of its geometry. Non-linear material models are used for the mechanical analysis, which describe the creep and self-healing behavior of the salt rock under fluctuating loading pressures. In order to identify the necessary material parameters, we perform experimental studies on the mechanical behaviour of salt rock under varying pressure and temperature conditions. Based on the numerical results, we further derive concepts for monitoring THM quantities in the

  9. Simulation of Mechanical Processes in Gas Storage Caverns for Short-Term Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Nagel, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, Germany's energy management has started to be transferred from fossil fuels to renewable and sustainable energy carriers. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power are subjected by fluctuations, thus the development and extension of energy storage capacities is a priority in German R&D programs. This work is a part of the ANGUS+ Project, funded by the federal ministry of education and research, which investigates the influence of subsurface energy storage on the underground. The utilization of subsurface salt caverns as a long-term storage reservoir for fossil fuels is a common method, since the construction of caverns in salt rock is inexpensive in comparison to solid rock formations due to solution mining. Another advantage of evaporate as host material is the self-healing behaviour of salt rock, thus the cavity can be assumed to be impermeable. In the framework of short-term energy storage (hours to days), caverns can be used as gas storage reservoirs for natural or artificial fuel gases, such as hydrogen, methane, or compressed air, where the operation pressures inside the caverns will fluctuate more frequently. This work investigates the influence of changing operation pressures at high frequencies on the stability of the host rock of gas storage caverns utilizing numerical models. Therefore, we developed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) model based on the finite element method utilizing the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. The salt behaviour is described by well-known constitutive material models which are capable of predicting creep, self-healing, and dilatancy processes. Our simulations include the thermodynamic behaviour of gas storage process, temperature development and distribution on the cavern boundary, the deformation of the cavern geometry, and the prediction of the dilatancy zone. Based on the numerical results, optimal operation modes can be found for individual caverns, so the risk of host rock damage

  10. Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by a dental infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis not only presents with constitutional symptoms including fever, pain and swelling but also with specific findings such as proptosis, chemosis, periorbital swelling, and cranial nerve palsies. It is known to occur secondary to the spread of paranasal sinus infections in the nose, ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. However, paranasal sinus infection of dental origin is rare. The following is a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis due to the spread of an abscess in the buccal and pterygomandibular spaces via buccal mucosal laceration. PMID:25247150

  11. [Experimental study of magnetic pingyangmycine-bearing microspheres in the treatment of cavernous hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Han-jiang; Ling, Tian-you

    2003-02-28

    To investigate the probability and mechanism magnetic pingyangmycine-bearing microspheres(MPMs) in the treatment of cavernous hemangioma. Twenty rabbits were divided into four groups. MPMs, pingyangmycine and magnetic nonpingyangmycine-bearing microspheres were injected into marginal ear veins respectively. All animals were killed after 21 days and histological varations of the veins were observed under the light microscope and transmission electron microscope. The occlusion of the veins in the group of MPMs with the external magnetic field was more prominent than that in the other groups. MPMs can occlude veins by means of its embolized effect and PYM drug effect. MPMs may be better used in the therapy of cavernous hemangioma.

  12. Nitrogen leak test of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Cavern Bayou Choctaw 2

    SciTech Connect

    Goin, K.L.

    1983-10-01

    A nitrogen leak test was made of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bayou Choctaw Cavern 2. Results of the test are inadequate for estimating the cavern leak rate with a high level of confidence. The interpretation of test results believed to be the most reasonable indicates an average nitrogen loss rate of 300 bbls/yr with an 84-percent probability the loss rate does not exceed 1950 bbls/yr. With maximum oil loss rates estimated at one third of nitrogen volume loss rates, corresponding oil loss rates are 100 and 650 bbls/yr. 3 references, 8 figures.

  13. Analysis of the Massive Salt Fall in Big Hill Cavern 103

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON, DARRELL E.; BAUER, STEPHEN J.; RAUTMAN, CHRISTOPHER A.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SATTLER, ALLAN R.

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes recent reviews, observations, and analyses believed to be imperative to our understanding of the recent two million cubic feet salt fall event in Big Hill Cavern 103, one of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The fall was the result of one or more stress driven mechanical instabilities, the origins of which are discussed in the report. The work has lead to important conclusions concerning the engineering and operations of the caverns at Big Hill. Specifically, Big Hill, being the youngest SPR site, was subjected to state-of-the-art solutioning methods to develop nominally well-formed, right-circular cylindrical caverns. Examination of the pressure history records indicate that operationally all Big Hill SPR caverns have been treated similarly. Significantly, new three-dimensional (3-D) imaging methods, applied to old (original) and more recent sonar survey data, have provided much more detailed views of cavern walls, roofs, and floors. This has made possible documentation of the presence of localized deviations from ''smooth'' cylindrical cavern walls. These deviations are now recognized as isolated, linear and/or planar features in the original sonar data (circa early 1990s), which persist to the present time. These elements represent either sites of preferential leaching, localized spalling, or a combination of the two. Understanding the precise origin of these phenomena remains a challenge, especially considering, in a historical sense, the domal salt at Big Hill was believed to be well-characterized. However, significant inhomogeneities in the domal salt that may imply abnormalities in leaching were not noted. Indeed, any inhomogeneities were judged inconsequential to the solution-engineering methods at the time, and, by the same token, to the approaches to modeling the rock mass geomechanical response. The rock mass was treated as isotropic and homogeneous, which in retrospect, appears to have been an over

  14. Complementary role of SPECT in the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; English, R.J.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-12-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors of the liver. Although their clinical course is usually uncomplicated, an accurate diagnosis may be important to exclude conditions that need treatment, (or to avoid an unnecessarily risky percutaneous biopsy). Although blood pool scintigraphy using planar gamma camera imaging is a reliable examination for the diagnosis of liver hemangiomas, it may fail to depict small, deeply seated lesions, and hence miss the diagnosis. Two cases are reported in which SPECT demonstrated delayed pooling in small, deep, space-occupying lesions, which were poorly seen on planar images, and therefore made a cavernous hemangioma the most likely diagnosis.

  15. Fibrin Glue Injection for Cavernous Sinus Hemostasis Associated with Cranial Nerve Deficit: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavanaiepour, Daryoush; Jernigan, Sarah; Abolfotoh, Mohamad; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin glue injection has been used to control intraoperative cavernous sinus (CS) venous bleeding. There have been no reported complications related to this maneuver. We present a case where a patient developed a sensory trigeminal nerve deficit after injection of fibrin glue into the posterior CS during resection of a petrosal meningioma. We believe that this deficit was due to the compression of the trigeminal ganglion similar to balloon compression procedures. Although fibrin glue injection may achieve satisfactory cavernous sinus homeostasis, the volume and rate of injection should be kept in mind to avoid a compressive lesion on traversing cranial nerves and surrounding structures, or retrograde filling of the venous tributaries. PMID:26251815

  16. Cavernous Hemangioma of the External Canal, Tympanic Membrane, and Middle Ear Cleft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Odat, Haitham; Al-Qudah, Mohannad; Al-Qudah, Mohammad A

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous hemangioma involving the external canal, tympanic membrane, and middle ear cavity is extremely rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old woman who had progressive right sided decreased hearing, pulsatile tinnitus, and aural fullness of 7 months duration. Microscopic examination, imaging studies, surgical treatment, and histological evaluation are reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of cavernous hemangioma with simultaneous involvement of the external ear, tympanic membrane, middle ear, and attic reported in English literature.

  17. A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG

    SciTech Connect

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

    2005-05-31

    This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher

  18. Computed tomographic findings in orbital Mucor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.R.; Lippman, S.M.; Grinnell, V.S.; Colman, M.F.; Edwards, J.E. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important infection in immunocompromised patients; knowledge regarding the variability of its clinical manifestations is expanding steadily. The infection is of paranasal sinus origin and may involve the orbit secondarily via freely communicating foramina and venous channels. Death often ensues when the infection spreads either into the cavernous sinus or the central nervous system. Early diagnosis of rhinocerebral mucormycosis is crucial for a successful outcome. Computed tomographic (CT) scanning is used to visualize many intraorbital pathologic abnormalities. The patient discussed in this paper had extensive orbital Mucor that appeared minimal on a CT scan. This inability of the scan to reflect the severity of infection prompted a review of the literature describing the use of CT scans for detecting this potentially fatal, opportunistic infection. The search showed that a disparity between scan findings and the severity of the disease is the rule rather than the exception. Recognition of this disparity has significant implications for appropriate diagnosis and management of orbital Mucor.

  19. Orbital masses: CT and MRI of common vascular lesions, benign tumors, and malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sarah N.; Sepahdari, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of space occupying lesions may be encountered in the orbit. CT and MR imaging frequently help confirm the presence of a mass and define its extent. Characteristic imaging features may help distinguish among lesions that have overlapping clinical presentations. This review focuses on some of the common orbital masses. Common vascular lesions that are reviewed include: capillary (infantile) hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma (solitary encapsulated venous-lymphatic malformation), and lymphangioma (venous-lymphatic malformation). Benign tumors that are reviewed include: optic nerve sheath meningioma, schwannoma, and neurofibroma. Malignancies that are reviewed include: lymphoma, metastasis, rhabdomyosarcoma, and optic glioma. Key imaging features that guide radiological diagnosis are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23961022

  20. 4D flow preliminary investigation of a direct carotid cavernous fistula due to a ruptured intracavernous aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Murai, Yasuo; Wada, Takeshi; Tateyama, Kojiro

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate information is available about the cerebral blood flow and surgical strategies of a direct aneurysmal carotid cavernous fistula (daCCF). We report a quantitative analysis of flow velocity and volume using preoperative time-resolved phase-contrast MRI (four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI) in a daCCF. This is the first report of 4D flow findings with a daCCF. A 55-year-old woman developed a sudden headache and bruit of the right orbit, and MRI suggested the presence of a daCCF. Quantitative analysis using preoperative 4D flow MRI revealed the flow volume of the right internal carotid artery. The daCCF was successfully treated by high-flow bypass using a radial artery graft and internal carotid artery trapping. Postoperative angiography showed a complete obliteration of the daCCF. Studies to collect data from additional cases are required so that 4D flow findings can be further used in the management of daCCFs. PMID:25612750

  1. 4D flow preliminary investigation of a direct carotid cavernous fistula due to a ruptured intracavernous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Murai, Yasuo; Wada, Takeshi; Tateyama, Kojiro

    2015-01-22

    Inadequate information is available about the cerebral blood flow and surgical strategies of a direct aneurysmal carotid cavernous fistula (daCCF). We report a quantitative analysis of flow velocity and volume using preoperative time-resolved phase-contrast MRI (four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI) in a daCCF. This is the first report of 4D flow findings with a daCCF. A 55-year-old woman developed a sudden headache and bruit of the right orbit, and MRI suggested the presence of a daCCF. Quantitative analysis using preoperative 4D flow MRI revealed the flow volume of the right internal carotid artery. The daCCF was successfully treated by high-flow bypass using a radial artery graft and internal carotid artery trapping. Postoperative angiography showed a complete obliteration of the daCCF. Studies to collect data from additional cases are required so that 4D flow findings can be further used in the management of daCCFs. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  3. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  4. Immunohistochemical study of the cavernous nerves in the periprostatic region.

    PubMed

    Costello, Anthony J; Dowdle, Benjamin W; Namdarian, Benjamin; Pedersen, John; Murphy, Declan G

    2011-04-01

    , respectively. • Sympathetic nerves found above the 3 to 9 o'clock level represented ≈15% of the total number of nerves. • When staining the periprostatic fascia, the classical NVB exhibited a distinct fascial architecture with three separate compartments. • A tiny minority of nerves in the anterior periprostatic region are functionally significant parasympathetic nerves. • There is little anatomical evidence to support higher incisions in the lateral prostatic fascia to spare cavernous nerve fibres, although such approaches may reduce the risk of traction injury on the more posterolaterally located NVB. • The presence of distinct fascial compartments in the NVB is also confirmed.

  5. Cavernous malformations isolated from cranial nerves: Unexpected diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Rotondo, Michele; Natale, Massimo; D'Avanzo, Raffaele; Pascale, Michela; Scuotto, Assunta

    2014-11-01

    Cranial nerves (CN) cavernous malformations (CMs) are lesions that are isolated from the CNs. The authors present three cases of CN CMs, for which MR was demonstrated to be critical for management, and surgical resection produced good outcomes for the patients. Surgical removal is the recommended course of action to restore or preserve neurological function and to eliminate the risk of future haemorrhage. However, the anatomical location and the complexity of nearby neural structures can make these lesions difficult to access and remove. In this study, the authors review the literature of reported cases of CN CMs to analyse the clinical and radiographic presentations, surgical approaches and neurological outcomes. A MEDLINE/Pub Med search was performed and revealed 86 cases of CN CMs. The authors report three additional cases in this study for a total of 89 cases. CMs affecting the optic nerve (CN II), oculomotor nerve (CN III), facial/vestibule-cochlear nerves (CN VII, CN VIII) have been described. The records of three patients were reviewed with respect to the lesion locations, symptoms, surgical approaches and therapeutic considerations. Clinical and radiological follow-up results are reported. Three patients (2 females, 1 male; age range 21-37 year) presented with three CN lesions. One lesion involved CN III, one lesion involved CN VII-CN VIII, and one involved CN II. The patient with the CN III lesion had a one-month history of mild right ptosis and diplopia. The patient with the CN VII-CN VIII lesion exhibited acute hearing loss and on the left and left facial paresis. The patient with the opticchiasmatic lesion presented with acute visual deterioration on the right and a left temporal field deficit in the left eye. Pterional and orbitozygomatic craniotomies were performed for the CN III lesion and the CN II lesion, and retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed for the cerebello-pontine angle lesion. All patients experienced symptom improvement after surgery. On

  6. Thermo-mechanical modelling of cyclic gas storage applications in salt caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Watanabe, Norihiro; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing importance of renewable energy sources it becomes more and more necessary to investigate energy storage potentials. One major way to store energy is the power-to-gas concept. Excessive electrical energy can be used either to produce hydrogen or methane by electrolysis or methanation or to compress air, respectively. Those produced gases can then be stored in artificial salt caverns, which are constructed in large salt formations by solution mining. In combination with renewable energy sources, the power-to-gas concept is subjected to fluctuations. Compression and expansion of the storage gases lead to temperature differences within the salt rock. The variations can advance several metres into the host rock, influencing its material behaviour, inducing thermal stresses and altering the creep response. To investigate the temperature influence on the cavern capacity, we have developed a numerical model to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. The model considers the thermodynamic behaviour of the stored gases as well as the heat transport and the temperature dependent material properties of the host rock. Therefore, we utilized well-known constitutive thermo-visco-plastic material models, implemented into the open source-scientific software OpenGeoSys. Both thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, connected via a staggered coupling scheme. The model allows the assessment of the structural safety as well as the convergence of the salt caverns.

  7. Artificial embolization of carotid-cavernous fistula with post-operative patency of internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Isamat, Fabian; Salleras, V.; Miranda, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    This report deals with a patient of 86 who developed a carotid-cavernous fistula. Artificial embolization alone was considered the safest treatment for this patient and proved to be adequate. Post-operative preservation of the patency of the internal carotid artery was demonstrated by angiography. We believe this method is particularly appropriate for carotid-cavernous fistulas if it is demonstrated by angiography that the major blood flow of the carotid artery pours into the fistula. A soft-iron clip attached to the muscle can be used for external and forceful guidance of the embolus into the fistula with the help of an electromagnet, hence the patency of the internal carotid artery can be preserved. The embolus should be introduced through the external carotid artery. This is the only case known to us in which patency of the internal carotid artery was post-operatively maintained. We have reviewed 545 reported cases of surgically treated carotid-cavernous fistulas and analysed the results from simple cervical carotid ligation to the more sophisticated methods of artificial embolizations. The results obtained by artificial embolization have been consistently good, while the other techniques have failed in large percentages. Artificial embolization should be used as the primary treatment for carotid-cavernous fistula, since ligation of the internal carotid artery precludes its embolization at a later date. Images PMID:5478949

  8. Multiparameter monitoring of a salt cavern collapse (Cerville-Buissoncourt site, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daupley, Xavier; Fabriol, Robert; Contrucci, Isabelle; Bernardie, Séverine; Cao, Ngoc-Tuyen; Jousset, Philippe; Klein, Emmanuelle; Lebert, François; Behrooz, Bazargan

    2010-05-01

    Since 2004, in the framework of GISOS (Scientific Interest Group on the Impact and Safety of Underground Structures), INERIS and BRGM participated in a monitoring experiment of a salt cavern located in the Lorrain salt basin, few kilometers away from Nancy (France). The site is located in the mining concession of Cerville Buissoncourt, owned by SOLVAY. The mining method used consists in extracting the full salt formation by solution mining until the collapse of the overburden. Thereby, the opportunity offered by this collapse was taken to test various monitoring techniques to detect its early warning signs and to improve scientific and technical knowledge of salt caverns mechanical behavior and evolution. Several geotechnical and geophysical methods have been further implemented on site in addition to the monitoring carried out by the operator, which are : microseismic, hydroacoustic, broadband seismology, surface measurements (tacheometer and RTK GPS), drilling extensometry, hydro-chemistry. In early 2009, after several significant changes in the cavity behavior, and as it had reached its critical dimensions, the operator decided to trigger its collapse. For this, pumping operations in the cavern were carried out to reduce brine level and hydrostatic pressure that contributed previously to the cavern stability. These operations, conducted during 4 days, were monitored in real time. They led to the collapse of the cavity on February 13th, 2009. Comparative analysis of the measurements acquired by the several monitoring techniques allows describing in detail the different evolution stages of the cavity and the early warning signs of its collapse.

  9. Spall formation in solution mined storage caverns based on a creep and fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-02-02

    Because of limited direct observation, understanding of the interior conditions of the massive storage caverns constructed in Gulf Coast salt domes is realizable only through predictions of salt response. Determination of the potential for formation of salt spans, leading to eventual salt falls, is based on salt creep and fracture using the Multimechanism-Deformation Coupled Fracture (MCDF) model. This is a continuum model for creep, coupled to continuum damage evolution. The model has been successfully tested against underground results of damage around several test rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Model simulations, here, evaluate observations made in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage caverns, namely, the accumulation of material on cavern floors and evidence of salt falls. A simulation of a smooth cavern wall indicates damage is maximum at the surface but diminishes monotonically into the salt, which suggests the source of salt accumulation is surface sluffing. If a protuberance occurs on the wall, fracture damage can form beneath the protuberance, which will eventually cause fracture, and lead to a salt fall.

  10. A rare case of malignant glioma suspected to have arisen from a cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Taomoto, Katsushi; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Kamada, Yoshitaka; Kuga, Yoshihiro; Kohaya, Norimasa; Nakashima, Kazuya; Ichioka, Tsugumichi; Tominaga, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with a right trigeminal dysfunction (dysesthesia) initially, followed by right oculomotor and abducens paresis lasting 1 month. Neuroimaging studies showed an enhanced mass in the right cavernous sinus extending to the trigeminal ganglion. The extraparenchymal tumor located around the right trigeminal ganglion was totally removed, except for an intracavernous lesion, by the orbitozygomatic approach. The solid tumor was completely separated from the brainstem and seemed to be a trigeminal schwannoma arising from the trigeminal ganglion or cavernous sinus at surgery. A histological examination, however, found a typical malignant glioma that consisted primarily of astrocytic tumor cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed the tumor cells stained intensely for GFAP, S-100 protein, and vimentin, but not for NFP, Schwann/2E, CD34, and CD68. The mean MIB-1 index was 12.4%. The tumor recurred after a short time, and then it rapidly disseminated into the subarachnoid space and left the cerebral hemisphere. The patient died 1 year after the initial symptoms in spite of aggressive surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy with temozolomide. There are no previous reports of a malignant glioma arising from either the cavernous sinus or the trigeminal ganglion. From the pathogenetic point of view, this malignant glioma is an extremely rare case that developed clinically and neuroradiologically from the cavernous sinus and was suspected be being derived from ectopic glial tissue.

  11. Bone erosion caused by sinonasal cavernous hemangioma: CT findings in two patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Hwang, E G

    1995-05-01

    We report two cases of cavernous hemangioma originating in the sinonasal cavity. Although CT showed some enhancing areas within both tumors, the substantial bone destruction caused by these tumors made it difficult to differentiate them from the more common malignant epithelial tumors. Angiography was performed in one patient and showed characteristic pooling of contrast material.

  12. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from molecular pathogenesis to genetic counselling and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Haasdijk, Remco A; Cheng, Caroline; Maat-Kievit, Anneke J; Duckers, Henricus J

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral cavernous (or capillary-venous) malformations (CCM) have a prevalence of about 0.1-0.5% in the general population. Genes mutated in CCM encode proteins that modulate junction formation between vascular endothelial cells. Mutations lead to the development of abnormal vascular structures.In this article, we review the clinical features, molecular and genetic basis of the disease, and management.

  13. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma with intralesional hemorrhage: a rare cause of thoracic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Donghwan; Kim, Choonghyo; Lee, Seung Jin; Ryu, Young-Joon; Kim, Jiha

    2014-06-01

    Although cavernous hemangiomas occur frequently in the intracranial structures, they are rare in the spine. Most of spinal hemangiomas are vertebral origin and "pure" epidural hemangiomas not originating from the vertebral bone are very rare. Our spinal hemangioma case is extremely rare because of its "pure" epidural involvement and intralesional hemorrhage. A 64-year-old man presented with progressive paraparesis from two months ago. His motor weakness was rated as grade 4/5 in bilateral lower extremities. He also complained of decreased sensation below the T4 sensory dermatome, which continuously progressed to the higher dermatome level. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated thoracic spinal tumor at T3-T4 level. The tumor was located epidural space compressing thoracic spinal cord ventrally. The tumor was not involved with the thoracic vertebral bone. We performed T3-5 laminectomy and removed the tumor completely. The tumor was not infiltrating into intradural space or vertebral bone. The histopathologic study confirmed the epidural tumor as cavernous hemangioma. Postoperatively, his weakness improved gradually. Four months later, his paraparesis recovered completely. Here, we present a case of pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma, which has intralesional hemorrhage. We believe cavernous hemangioma should be included in the differential diagnosis of the spinal epidural tumors.

  14. Antioxidative mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes repair and regeneration following cavernous nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhan-kui; Yu, Hong-lian; Liu, Bo; Wang, Hui; Luo, Qiong; Ding, Xie-gang

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides extracted from Lycium barbarum exhibit antioxidant properties. We hypothesized that these polysaccharides resist oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage following cavernous nerve injury. In this study, rat models were intragastrically administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides for 2 weeks at 1, 7, and 14 days after cavernous nerve injury. Serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks post-injury. Serum malondialdehyde levels decreased at 2 and 4 weeks. At 12 weeks, peak intracavernous pressure, the number of myelinated axons and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers, levels of phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein and 3-nitrotyrosine were higher in rats administered at 1 day post-injury compared with rats administered at 7 and 14 days post-injury. These findings suggest that application of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides following cavernous nerve crush injury effectively promotes nerve regeneration and erectile functional recovery. This neuroregenerative effect was most effective in rats orally administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides at 1 day after cavernous nerve crush injury. PMID:27651780

  15. Segmentation of optical coherence tomography images for differentiation of the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2009-01-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. Two-dimensional (2-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. To detect these nerves, three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The Gabor feature was applied with different standard deviations in the x and y directions. In the Daubechies wavelet feature, an 8-tap Daubechies orthonormal wavelet was implemented, and the low-pass sub-band was chosen as the filtered image. Last, Laws feature extraction was applied to the images. The features were segmented using a nearest-neighbor classifier. N-ary morphological postprocessing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058+/-0.019. This algorithm may be useful for implementation in clinical endoscopic OCT systems currently being studied for potential intraoperative diagnostic use in laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  16. Environmental change at Kartchner Caverns: trying to separate natural and anthropogenic changes

    Treesearch

    Rickard S. Toomey; Ginger Nolan

    2005-01-01

    Cave temperature and moisture levels are important factors in the environmental health of Kartchner Caverns. Monitoring indicates the cave has warmed and moisture levels have fallen over the past 14 years. Timing and patterns of change within the cave suggest that changes are due to development as a show cave. However, changes in other caves, surface temperature and...

  17. /sup 222/Rn and atmospheric electrical parameters in the Carlsbad Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, M.; Romero, V.

    1981-10-20

    Atmospheric electrical parameters have been investigated in the Carlsbad Caverns. /sup 222/Rn concentrations of the order of 65 pCi/l in the Caverns during the summer maximum results in a high rate of ion-pair production estimated to be about 2300 x 10/sup 6/ ion pairs m/sup -3/ s/sup -1/. This leads to ion densities of about a thousand times that of the free atmosphere. Electrical conductivity values of approximately 150 x 10/sup -14/ (..cap omega.. m)/sup -1/ were measured which exceed those of outdoor air by a factor of the order of 100. Mobilities for positive and negative small-ion populations in the Caverns during the summer, appear to be less than mobilities reported for small ions in the free atmosphere. The lower mobility of the cave ions relative to outdoor fair-weather conditions is attributed to a combination of high humidity and low condensation nuclei concentration in the cave enviroment. An electric field of approximately 1 V m/sup -1/ was measured near the floor of a tunnel in the Caverns. This suggests the presence of net negative space charge equivalent to about 0.4 x 10/sup 8/ ion m/sup -3/.

  18. Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

    1999-01-21

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

  19. Segmental cavernous carotid ectasia in a patient with cluster-like headache.

    PubMed

    Semnic, Robert; Kozić, Duško; Semnic, Marija; Trifunović, Jasna; Simić, Svetlana; Radojičić, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache with severe, unilateral periorbital or temporal pain lasting 15-180 min, accompanied with various cranial autonomic features. A diagnosis of cluster-like headache can be made whenever underlying cause of CLH is present. We report a case where an ectatic cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery triggered CHL, most probably due to compression of the ophthalmic nerve within cavernous sinus. The pathological substrate of a vessel ectasia is degeneration of the tunica intima as a consequence of atherosclerosis and hypertension. On the other hand, cavernous sinus is unique space where parasympathetic, sympathetic and nociceptive fibers are in intimate relationship which is of great importance for understanding of CH pathophysiology. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR angiography are mandatory imaging tools used for precise localization of pathological changes in the cavernous sinus, especially in the group of secondary headaches attributed to vascular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of Actuator-Driven Pulsed Water Jet in Brain and Spinal Cord Cavernous Malformations Resection.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiki; Takahashi, Yoko; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    A piezo actuator-driven pulsed water jet (ADPJ) system is a novel surgical instrument that enables dissection of tissue without thermal damage. It can potentially resect intra-axial lesions while preserving neurological function. To report our first experience of applying an ADPJ system to brain and spinal cord cavernous malformations. Four patients (2 women and 2 men, mean age 44.5 years) with brain (n = 3) and spinal cord (n = 1) cavernous malformations were enrolled in the study. All surgeries were performed with the aid of the ADPJ system. Postoperative neurological function and radiological findings were evaluated. The ADPJ system was useful in dissecting boundaries between the lesion and surrounding brain/spinal cord tissues. The pulsed water jet provided a clear surgical view and helped surgeons follow the margins. Water jet dissection peeled off the brain and spinal cord tissues from the lesion wall. Surrounding gliotic tissue was preserved. As a consequence, the cavernous malformations were successfully removed. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed total removal of lesions in all cases. Preoperative neurological symptoms completely resolved in 2 patients. The others experienced partial recovery. No patients developed new postoperative neurological deficits; facial palsy temporarily worsened in 1 patient who underwent a suprafacial colliculus approach for the brainstem lesion. The ADPJ provided a clear surgical field and enabled surgeons to dissect boundaries between lesions and surrounding brain and spinal cord gliotic tissue. The ADPJ system is a feasible option for cavernous malformation surgery, enabling successful tumor removal and preservation of neurological function.

  1. Cure of a direct carotid cavernous fistula by endovascular stent deployment.

    PubMed

    Weber, W; Henkes, H; Berg-Dammer, E; Esser, J; Kühne, D

    2001-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman underwent surgical thrombendarterectomy for treatment of artherosclerotic stenoses of her left internal carotid artery (ICA). A Fogarty catheter was used during this operation. The postoperative course was complicated by the development of a sixth cranial nerve palsy, protrusio, chemosis and ciliar injection of both eyes. Digital subtraction angiography showed a direct fistula between the cavernous segment of the left ICA and the cavernous sinus, with early and retrograde opacification of both superior ophthalmic veins. Endovascular occlusion of the fistula was achieved with preservation of the ICA by stent deployment over the rupture site of the ICA, as two detachable balloons could not obliterate the fistula while preserving the ICA patent. Follow-up angiography 7 months after the endovascular treatment confirmed persisting occlusion of the fistula with a patent ICA. Highly flexible porous coronary stents can easily be introduced into tortuous vessels, including the distal ICA. The haemodynamic effects achieved by stent deployment together with two balloons detached in the cavernous sinus may be sufficient to interrupt a direct carotid cavernous fistula.

  2. Detection of an ileal cavernous hemangioma by technetium-99m red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, H.; Johnson, J.; Sandler, M.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with arteriovenous malformations of the bowel may have multiple symptoms secondary to chronic blood loss. A case of ileal cavernous hemangioma detected by Tc-99m labeled red blood cell imaging in the absence of active gastrointestinal bleeding is presented.

  3. Cellular processes underlying cerebral cavernous malformations: Autophagy as another point of view

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A growing amount of evidence indicates that autophagy plays a pivotal role in a plethora of human pathological conditions. We have recently broadened the list of the so-called autophagy-related diseases, describing the involvement of defective autophagy in the pathogenesis of cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26902587

  4. Review of familial cerebral cavernous malformations and report of seven additional families.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Ivo J H M; Vreeburg, Maaike; Koek, Ger H; van Steensel, Maurice A M

    2017-02-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are vascular anomalies of the central nervous system characterized by clusters of enlarged, leaky capillaries. They are caused by loss-of-function mutations in KRIT1, CCM2, or PDCD10. The proteins encoded by these genes are involved in four partially interconnected signaling pathways that control angiogenesis and endothelial permeability. Cerebral cavernous malformations can occur sporadically, or as a familial autosomal dominant disorder (FCCM) with incomplete clinical and neuroradiological penetrance and great inter-individual variability. Although the clinical course is unpredictable, symptoms typically present during adult life and include headaches, focal neurological deficits, seizures, and potentially fatal stroke. In addition to neural lesions, extraneural cavernous malformations have been described in familial disease in several tissues, in particular the skin. We here present seven novel FCCM families with neurologic and cutaneous lesions. We review histopathological and clinical features and provide an update on the pathophysiology of cerebral cavernous malformations and associated cutaneous vascular lesions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pontine glioma extending to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave: MR appearance.

    PubMed

    Yuh, W T; Nguyen, H D; Mayr, N A; Follett, K A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe an exophytic glioma of the pons that grew into the Meckel's cave and cavernous sinus in a 75-year-old man. Pontine gliomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of a hyperintense, complex cystic mass seen along the distribution of cranial nerve V.

  6. Treatment of Orbital Complications Following Acute Rhinosinusitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuzhu; Shi, Guanggang; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The orbital complications account for about 80% of all complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. If the treatment is not correct and in time, orbital complications could progress rapidly, leading to optic neuritis, cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis or life-threatening intracranial complications. Aims: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of conservative therapy for the patients with orbital cellulitis and endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) performed on patients with subperiosteal abscess (SPA) secondary to acute rhinosinusitis in children. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: The retrospective study included 31 pediatric patients with orbital complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of oral or intravenous antibiotics, glucocorticoid and gelomyrtol forte after admission. ESS was performed if an improvement in the condition of patients did not occur after 48 hours. However, the patients with orbital SPA, motility disorders of eyeball or decreased vision received ESS immediately within 24 hours. Results: Sixteen patients were cured by conservative therapy and 15 patients by ESS. All of the signs and symptoms disappeared after conservative therapy or ESS. There were no recurrences within the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years. Conclusion: Conservative therapy is an effective method for patients with inflammatory edema and most cases of orbital cellulitis in children. SPA can be cured by ESS. PMID:27606135

  7. Orbit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  8. The Role of Palliative Radiosurgery When Cancer Invades the Cavernous Sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Involvement of the cavernous sinus by direct invasion from skull base cancer or from metastatic spread of cancers is a challenging problem. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of patients who developed cavernous sinus metastases or direct invasion. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 37 patients who had cavernous sinus metastases or had cavernous sinus invasion from adjacent skull base cancers and who underwent SRS between 1992 and 2006 at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The median patient age was 57.8 years. Previous adjuvant management included fractionated radiotherapy in 8, chemotherapy in 16, and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 5. The primary sites of metastases or invasion were nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 7), parotid gland carcinoma (n = 7), and metastases from systemic cancer (n = 23). The median target volume was 6.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.3-33.6), and the median margin dose was 14 Gy (range, 12-20). Results: At a mean of 12.9 months (range, 0.8-63.9), 32 patients had died and 5 were living. The overall survival rate after SRS was 36.6% and 19.4% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Progression-free survival was related to a greater marginal dose. After SRS, 12 (35.3%) of 34 patients with neurologic symptoms exhibited improvement. SRS early after diagnosis was significantly associated with improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction. Conclusion: SRS is a minimally invasive palliative option for patients whose cancer has invaded the cavernous sinus. The benefits for cranial nerve deficits are best when SRS is performed early.

  9. Compilation of gas intrusion measurements, variations, and consequence modeling for SPR caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, Thomas E.

    2003-03-01

    The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H2S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

  10. Effect of chronic low-dose tadalafil on penile cavernous tissues in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Mohamed E; Senbel, Amira M; Mostafa, Taymour

    2013-06-01

    To assess the effect of chronic low-dose administration of tadalafil (Td) on penile cavernous tissue in induced diabetic rats. The study investigaged 48 adult male albino rats, comprising a control group, sham controls, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and induced diabetic rats that received Td low-dose daily (0.09 mg/200 g weight) for 2 months. The rats were euthanized 1 day after the last dose. Cavernous tissues were subjected to histologic, immunohistochemical, morphometric studies, and measurement of intracavernosal pressure and mean arterial pressure in anesthetized rats. Diabetic rats demonstrated dilated cavernous spaces, smooth muscles with heterochromatic nuclei, degenerated mitochondria, vacuolated cytoplasm, and negative smooth muscle immunoreactivity. Nerve fibers demonstrated a thick myelin sheath and intra-axonal edema, where blood capillaries exhibited thick basement membrane. Diabetic rats on Td showed improved cavernous organization with significant morphometric increases in the area percentage of smooth muscles and elastic tissue and a significant decrease of fibrous tissue. The Td-treated group showed enhanced erectile function (intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure) at 0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 Hz compared with diabetic group values at the respective frequencies (P <.05) that approached control values. Chronic low-dose administration of Td in diabetic rats is associated with substantial improvement of the structure of penile cavernous tissue, with increased smooth muscles and elastic tissue, decreased fibrous tissue, and functional enhancement of the erectile function. This raises the idea that the change in penile architecture with Td treatment improves erectile function beyond its half-life and its direct pharmacologic action on phosphodiesterase type 5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ADVANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS: I. HIGH FIELD IMAGING OF EXCISED HUMAN LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N.; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Batjer, H. Hunt; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Awad, Issam A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that structural details would be revealed in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) through the use of high field magnetic resonance (MR) and confocal microscopy, which have not been described previously. The structural details of CCMs excised from human patients were sought by examination with high field MR imaging, and correlated with confocal microscopy of the same specimens. Novel features of CCM structure are outlined, including methodological limitations, venues for future research and possible clinical implications. Methods CCM lesions excised from four patients were fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde and subjected to high resolution MR imaging at 9.4 or 14.1 Tesla by spin-echo and gradient recalled echo methods. Histological validation of angioarchitecture was conducted on thick sections of CCM lesions using fluorescent probes to endothelium under confocal microscopy. Results Images of excised human CCM lesions were acquired with proton density-weighted, T1-weighted, T2-weighted spin echo and T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo MR. These images revealed large “bland” regions with thin walled caverns, and “honeycombed” regions with notable capillary proliferation and smaller caverns surrounding larger caverns. Proliferating capillaries and caverns of various sizes were also associated with the wall of apparent larger blood vessels in the lesions. Similar features were confirmed within thick sections of CCMs by confocal microscopy. MR relaxation times in different regions of interest suggested the presence of different states of blood breakdown products in areas with apparent angiogenic proliferative activity. Conclusions The high field MR imaging techniques demonstrate novel features of CCM angioarchitecture, visible at near histological resolution, including regions with apparently different biologic activity. These preliminary observations will motivate future research, correlating lesion biologic and clinical activity with

  12. Orbital Winch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Robert (Inventor); Slostad, Jeffrey T. (Inventor); Frank, Scott (Inventor); Barnes, Ian M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Orbital winch having: lower and upper frames; spool having upper and lower flanges with lower flange attached to lower frame; axial tether guide mounted to upper frame; secondary slewing ring coaxial with spool and rotatably mounted to upper frame, wherein secondary slewing ring's outer surface has gearing; upper tether guide mounted to inner surface of secondary slewing ring; linear translation means having upper end mounted to upper frame and lower end mounted on lower frame; primary slewing ring rotatably mounted within linear translation means allowing translation axially between flanges, wherein primary slewing ring's outer surface has gearing; lower tether guide mounted on primary slewing ring's inner surface; pinion rod having upper end mounted to upper frame and lower end mounted to lower frame, wherein pinion rod's teeth engage primary and secondary slewing rings' outer surface teeth; and tether passing through axial, upper, and lower tether guides and winding around spool.

  13. Failure Analysis of Overhanging Blocks in the Walls of a Gas Storage Salt Cavern: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongtao; Yang, Chunhe; Li, Jianjun; Li, Jinlong; Shi, Xilin; Ma, Hongling

    2017-01-01

    Most of the rock salt of China is bedded, in which non-salt layers and rock salt layers alternate. Due to the poor solubility of the non-salt layers, many blocks overhang on the walls of the caverns used for gas storage, constructed by water leaching. These overhanging blocks may collapse at any time, which may damage the tubing and casing string, and even cause instability of the cavern. They are one of the main factors threatening the safety of caverns excavated in bedded rock salt formations. In this paper, a geomechanical model of the JJKK-D salt cavern, located in Jintan salt district, Jintan city, Jiangsu province, China, is established to evaluate the stability of the overhanging blocks on its walls. The characters of the target formation, property parameters of the rock mass, and actual working conditions are considered in the geomechanical model. An index system composed of stress, displacement, plastic zone, safety factor, and equivalent strain is used to predict the collapse length of the overhanging blocks, the moment the collapse will take place, and the main factors causing the collapse. The sonar survey data of the JJKK-D salt cavern are used to verify the reliability and accuracy of the proposed geomechanical model. The results show that the proposed geomechanical model has a good reliability and accuracy, and can be used for the collapse prediction of the overhanging blocks on the wall of the JJKK-D salt cavern. The collapse length of the overhanging block is about 8 m. We conclude that the collapse takes place during the debrining. The reason behind the collapse is the sudden decrease of the fluid density, leading to the increase of the self-weight of the overhanging blocks. This study provides a basis for the collapse prediction method of the overhanging blocks of Jintan salt cavern gas storage, and can also serve as a reference for salt cavern gas storage with similar conditions to deal with overhanging blocks.

  14. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied

  15. Nanoparticle Improved Stem Cell Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haocheng; Dhanani, Nadeem; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R; Wang, Grace; Cao, Yanna; Ko, Tien C; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Run

    2016-03-01

    Recently intracavernous injection of stem cells has garnered great interest as a potential treatment of erectile dysfunction. However, most stem cells are washed out immediately after intracavernous injection. The goal of this study was to investigate using NanoShuttle™ magnetic nanoparticles to maintain stem cells in the corpus cavernosum after intracavernous injection, thereby improving stem cell therapy of erectile dysfunction in an animal model. Adipose derived stem cells were magnetized with NanoShuttle magnetic nanoparticles to create Nano-adipose derived stem cells. A total of 24 rats underwent bilateral cavernous nerve crush and were randomly assigned to 3 groups, including adipose derived stem cells, Nano-adipose derived stem cells and Nano-adipose derived stem cells plus magnet. Cells were tracked at days 1, 3, 5 and 9 after intracavernous injection. Another 40 rats with bilateral cavernous nerve crush were randomly assigned to 4 groups, including bilateral cavernous nerve crush, bilateral cavernous nerve crush plus adipose derived stem cell intracavernous injection, bilateral cavernous nerve crush plus Nano-adipose derived stem cell intracavernous injection and bilateral cavernous nerve crush plus Nano-adipose derived stem cell intracavernous injection plus magnet. Functional testing and histological analysis were performed 4 weeks after intracavernous injection. In the in vitro study 1) NanoShuttle magnetic nanoparticles were successfully bound to adipose derived stem cells and 2) Nano-adipose derived stem cells migrated toward the magnet. In the in vivo study 1) cell tracking showed that Nano-adipose derived stem cells were successfully retained in the corpus cavernosum using the magnet for up to 3 days while most adipose derived stem cells were washed out in other groups by day 1 after intracavernous injection, and 2) intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure, and αSMA (α-smooth muscle actin) and PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion

  16. NON-NEWTONIAN FLUID CAVERN AND NEWTONIAN CLOUD HEIGHT TESTS TO CHARACTERIZE PULSE JET MIXER OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, Carl W.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Nigl, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Pulse jet mixing systems are being developed for use in the Waste Treatment Plant in Washington State. To assist with system development, scaled tests were conducted to obtain experimental measurements of the cloud height for Newtonian slurries and cavern heights for a Non-Newtonian yield stress material. The measurements were required to assess the effective mixing and material mobilization produced during pulse jet mixer operation. The cloud height measurements were obtained for a single steady-state jet directed downward in a spherical-bottom tank. The cloud tests used glass beads in water to evaluate the height of the suspended slurry as a function of jet velocity. Cloud testing revealed that the glass bead material was suspended in the tank quickly and developed a distinctive height for each combination of flow rate and particulate size tested. The solids loading had minimal impact on the cloud height for a given particle size. During all cloud tests, the surface of the tank remained relatively calm, indicating that the slurry was dissipating the mixing energy of the relatively high velocity jet. Cavern tests were conducted to obtain experimental data of non-Newtonian fluid mixing for fluid properties similar to those of certain tank wastes. A transparent material that exhibited a yield stress and shear thinning behavior was used to obtain measurements of steady-state cavern heights as a function of jet velocity. For the non-Newtonian fluid cavern tests, distinct cavern volumes were readily developed for the four velocities tested. A linear relationship was observed to exist between cavern height and nozzle velocity. Since the experimental work detailed in this paper was completed, additional scaled tests have been conducted with pneumatic drive systems and direct drive systems similar to that described for this effort. Data from both types of measurements are shown to be linear; however, effects from the reciprocating drive systems that are not yet

  17. Orbital Metastasis of Breast Cancer Mimicking Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hazboun, Igor Moreira; Sakuma, Emerson Taro Inoue; Sampaio, Marcelo Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A range of traumatic, vascular, inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic processes can affect the orbit and its structures. In the area of otolaryngology, the rhino-orbital-cerebral involvement of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis can affect the orbit, which may look like initially a rhinosinusitis or even mimic malignancy. Case Presentation. Female patient, 32 years old, with headache and ocular proptosis. She was using prednisone in immunosuppressive doses for a year and had breast cancer treated three years earlier. The initial CT scan showed opacification of the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, left intraorbital involvement and contrast impregnation in the cavernous sinus. The biopsy resulted positive for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Discussion. The initial CT scan of our patient showed both signs of early changes of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFR) and possible metastatic involvement. The intracranial extension and ocular involvement are usually the most common signs of IFR (first hypothesis). Among metastases at the orbit and the eye, breast and lung carcinomas are the most frequent. Conclusion. Although several studies on the differential diagnosis of orbital lesions exist, especially when it concerns the involvement of the nasal cavity, the diagnosis by imaging is still a challenge. PMID:27563478

  18. Abnormal blood vessels formed by human liver cavernous hemangioma endothelial cells in nude mice are suitable for drug evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-jian; Wu, Lian-qiu; Liu, Hong-lin; Ye, Li-ya; Xin, Yu-ling; Grau, Georges E; Lou, Jin-ning

    2009-12-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is vascular malformation with developmental aberrations. It was assumed that the abnormality of endothelial cells contributed greatly to the occurrence of cavernous hemangioma. In our previous study, we have found distinct characteristics of endothelial cells derived from human liver cavernous hemangioma (HCHEC). Here, we reported the abnormal vascular vessels formed by primary HCHEC in nude mice and that the drug podophyllotoxin can destroy HCHEC in vitro and in vivo. HCHEC was isolated from a human liver cavernous hemangioma specimen, and the HCHEC generated a red hemangioma-like mass 7 days after subcutaneously co-inoculating HCHEC and human liver cancer cells (Bel-7402) in nude mice. Lentiviral expression of GFP and immunohistochemistry for human CD31 was used to confirm that the HCHEC formed the blood vessels in nude mice. And the pathological features of vascular vessels formed by HCHEC were very similar to clinical cavernous hemangioma. In addition, by MTT assay, the drug podophyllotoxin was found inhibiting HCHEC viability, and by TUNEL and DNA ladder assays, podophyllotoxin was found inducing apoptosis of HCHEC. Moreover, podophyllotoxin was also effective for destroying the abnormal vascular vessels in the hemangioma-like mass in nude mice. In summary, the HCHEC can form abnormal blood vessels in nude mice, and we can evaluate drugs for cavernous hemangioma by using HCHEC in vitro and in vivo.

  19. [Interesting radiological and pathological findings of the internal carotid artery observed in a case of cavernous sinusitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, T; Fujita, Y; Ono, H; Mori, K

    1977-06-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to the neurosurgical department of Nagasaki University Hospital with complaints of high fever, deteriorated conciousness and nonpulsating exophthalmus on the left side. The first carotid angiography which had been done 2 days prior to admission, showed only an irregular narrowing in the cavernous portion of the left carotid artery. The right carotid angiogram did not show any recognizable abnormality. The second angiography which was performed 4 days after the admission, revealed an cylindrical aneurysmal opacification about 0.8 cm in diameter in the left intracavernous portion. The right angiography could not be done at that time. On the 47th hospital day, the third angiogram was performed. There noted again, the aneurysmal opacification in the left carotid artery and furthermore, the right carotid artery was occluded completely at its entrance into the cavernous sinus. On post-mortem examination, the cavernous sinus was filled with coagulated blood which drived from the ruptured left internal carotid artery. Microscopic examination revealed marked invasion of leucocytes to the wall of the internal carotid artery at the cavernous portion in both sides. These findings suggested that a mycotic aneurysm which resulted from the cavernous sinusitis ruptured into the left cavernous sinus and spelled blood compressed the opposite (right) carotid artery within the carvernous sinus which resulted in occlusion of the artery.

  20. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 3, Bryan Mound Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 3 focuses on the Bryan Mound SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 2, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  1. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  2. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 4, West Hackberry site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 4 focuses on the West Hackberry SPR site, located in southwestern Louisiana. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  3. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li; Wang Enmin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  4. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1, Bayou Choctaw site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-10-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 1 focuses on the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, located in southern Louisiana. Volumes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  5. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

  6. An unusual variant of the abducens nerve duplication with two nerve trunks merging within the orbit: a case report with comments on developmental background.

    PubMed

    Wysiadecki, Grzegorz; Polguj, Michał; Topol, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the first case of abducens nerve duplication along its entire intracranial course, ending within the orbit. A distinct abducens nerve duplication reaching the common tendinous ring (annulus of Zinn), as well as another split within the intraconal segment of the nerve have been revealed. Additionally, two groups (superior and inferior) of abducens nerve sub-branches to the lateral rectus muscle were visualised using Sihler's stain. The analysed anatomical variation has never been reported before and it seems to be in the middle of the spectrum between the cases of duplication occurring only within the intracranial segments of the abducens nerve found in the literature and those continuing throughout the whole course of the nerve. Abducens nerve duplication may be treated as a relic of early stages of ontogenesis. Such a variant might result from alternative developmental pathways in which axons of the abducens nerve, specific for a given segment of the lateral rectus muscle, run separately at some stage, instead of forming a single stem.

  7. Conus medullaris hematomyelia associated with an intradural-extramedullary cavernous angioma.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, L; Frondizi, D; Guiducci, A; Nardi, M; Maira, G

    1999-01-01

    A unique case of a 50-year-old woman with a conus medullaris hematomyelia associated with a low thoracic intradural-extramedullary cavernous angioma localized 2 cm above is reported. The patient had a 2-month history of progressive paraparesis, hypoesthesia of legs, and bowel and bladder disturbances. The symptoms worsened acutely during the last days before admission. A thoraco-lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion at T10-T11 (vertebral interspace associated with a hematomyelia localized about 2 cm below. A T10-L1 laminectomy was performed and complete removal of both lesions was obtained with microsurgical technique. A non-traumatic hematomyelia should always prompt the suspicion of a spinal AVM or, more rarely, of a cavernous angioma. The possible anatomical and clinical correlations of this unusual association are discussed.

  8. Cavernous hemangioma of adult pancreas: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Henkes, David; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic hemangioma is a rare type of benign vascular tumor. Low clinical suspicion and inability of current cross sectional imaging techniques to differentiate it from other pancreatic lesions, contribute to the difficulty in making the correct diagnosis. Without a definitive diagnosis, and due to concern for malignancy, in many instances, surgery is performed. We report a case of pancreas cavernous hemangioma in an 18-year-old female. The patient presented with three-month history of epigastric pain. Physical examination and routine blood tests were normal. Abdominal Computed Tomography scan revealed a 5 cm × 6 cm complex non-enhancing cystic mass in the head of pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS guided fine needle aspiration cytology were non-diagnostic. Because of uncontrolled symptoms, the patient underwent surgical resection. Histopathology and Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of pancreas. PMID:26361427

  9. Direct approach to the ventrolateral medulla for cavernous malformation--case report.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Shinya; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takeo

    2002-10-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with symptomatic cavernous malformation in the ventrolateral portion of the medulla oblongata manifesting as left-sided numbness and gait disturbance. Neurological examination disclosed sensory disturbance on the left, cerebellar ataxia, nystagmus, dysphagia, and right hypoglossal nerve paresis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cavernous malformation with hemorrhage occupying the right paramedian field of the medulla oblongata. The patient underwent complete removal of the lesion through vertical incision of the bulging surface of the ventrolateral medulla, anatomically coinciding with the inferior olive. The neurological deficits improved without additional postoperative deficits. This unusual microsurgical approach through a ventrolateral medullary incision permits direct resection of a subpial intrinsic lesion, even on the ventral medulla.

  10. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Middle Cranial Fossa through the Cavernous Sinus Triangles: Anatomical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, Fuminari; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; IMAI, Masaaki; SHIGEMATSU, Hideaki; KOMATSU, Mika; TSCHABITSCHER, Manfred; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Access from the sphenoid sinus to the middle cranial fossa through the cavernous sinus triangles was evaluated by cadaver dissection. Anatomical analysis demonstrated that the medial temporal dura mater was exposed through the anterior area of the clinoidal triangle, anteromedial triangle, and superior area of the anterolateral triangle, indicating potential corridors to the middle cranial fossa. This study suggests that the cavernous sinus triangles are applicable in selected cases to manage middle cranial fossa lesions by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:25446385

  11. Light and scanning electron microscopical study of the cavernous sinus of the monkey, Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, K; Ling, E A

    1985-01-01

    The cavernous sinus of Macaca fascicularis is in many respects similar to the human sinus. It consists predominantly of one main venous channel that, together with the internal carotid artery, occupies a meningo-endocranial compartment lateral to the pituitary gland. Trabeculae are few and do not in any way cause the sinus to appear cavernous. They are mostly flattened in the direction of the main venous channel. Cranial nerves three, four, six and the ophthalmic division of five are all located in the lateral wall of the meningo-endocranial compartment with cranial nerve six located most medially adjacent to the internal carotid artery. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:4077687

  12. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-09-25

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary.

  13. An Unusual Case of a Thrombosed Giant Distal PICA Aneurysm Simulating a Large Cavernous Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dong-Ho; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2008-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a one-month history of progressive headache. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hemorrhagic mass adjacent to the left inferior cerebellar hemisphere associated with a peripheral rim of signal void. Angiography demonstrated an avascular mass and the provisional diagnosis was a large cavernous angioma in the cerebellum. Intraoperative findings revealed a thrombosed giant aneurysm of the left distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We report an unusual case of a completely thrombosed giant aneurysm simulating a large cavernous angioma in the cerebellum. The cerebellar cisternal location of the mass may be a clue for the pre-operative diagnosis of an aneurysm. PMID:19096624

  14. Resolution of Trigeminal Neuralgia After Transvenous Embolization of a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Kenji; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Park, Hun Soo; Wada, Takeshi; Motoyama, Yasushi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) resulting from a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are rare. A case of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) in a patient with TN that resolved immediately after transvenous embolization (TVE) is described. A 75-year-old woman presented with continuous facial pain. On time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), a CSDAVF was suspected, and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed a CSDAVF. The TN completely resolved immediately after TVE, with no recurrence. Follow-up MRA showed complete obliteration of the fistula 13 months after TVE. The pulsatile flow at the posteromedial part of the cavernous sinus might have compressed the upper aspect of the Gasserian ganglion, causing TN. Disappearance of pulsatile flow after TVE might result in complete resolution of TN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cavernous haemangioma of the testis mimicking testicular malignancy in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Naveed, S; Quari, H; Sharma, H

    2013-11-01

    Haemangioma of the testis is a rare condition. This benign vascular neoplasm may arise either within the testicular parenchyma (intratesticular) as in this case or from adnexal structures of the testis (extratesticular). Intratesticular haemangioma is rarer than extratesticular form. Intratesticular vascular neoplasms are extremely rare tumours and mostly seen in children or young adults. There are 21 reported testicular haemangioma cases in the literature as indexed in PubMed. Since 2007, only 19 cases of cavernous haemangioma have been reported in the literature in PubMed and other indexed sites. We report a case of cavernous haemangioma of the testis to attract attention to testicular haemangioma and also to prevent invasive surgery of the testis.

  16. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Review of the Genetic and Protein-Protein Interactions Resulting in Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, Jacob F; Kalani, M Yashar S; Przybylowski, Colin J; Zabramski, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 are known to result in the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). CCMs are intracranial lesions composed of aberrantly enlarged "cavernous" endothelial channels that can result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizures, and neurologic deficits. Although these genes have been known to be associated with CCMs since the 1990s, numerous discoveries have been made that better elucidate how they and their subsequent protein products are involved in CCM pathogenesis. Since our last review of the molecular genetics of CCM pathogenesis in 2012, breakthroughs include a more thorough understanding of the protein structures of the gene products, involvement with integrin proteins, and MEKK3 signaling pathways, and the importance of CCM2-PDCD10 interactions. In this review, we highlight the advances that further our understanding of the "gene to protein to disease" relationships of CCMs.

  17. Detection of Novel Mutation in Ccm3 Causes Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Scimone, Concetta; Bramanti, Placido; Ruggeri, Alessia; Katsarou, Zoe; Donato, Luigi; Sidoti, Antonina; D'Angelo, Rosalia

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are vascular lesions that usually involve brain micro-vessels. They can occur both in a sporadic form and familial one. Causes of familial forms are mutations at three loci: CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10. Here, we describe a novel CCM3 missense mutation (c.422T>G) detected in two Greek brothers showing multiple lesions at magnetic resonance imaging; to date, only the youngest is symptomatic. Bioinformatics tools showed this novel variant causes a loss of function in Pdcd10 protein due to its localization in the eighth helix and, particularly, affects Leu141, a highly conserved amino acid. Roles of Pdcd10 in angiogenesis regulation and its association with early development of cerebral cavernous malformations were also considered.

  18. Recent insights into cerebral cavernous malformations: animal models of CCM and the human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aubrey C.; Li, Dean Y.; Berg, Michel J.; Whitehead, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations are common vascular lesions of the central nervous system that predispose to seizures, focal neurologic deficits and potentially fatal hemorrhagic stroke. Human genetic studies have identified three genes associated with the disease and biochemical studies of these proteins have identified interaction partners and possible signaling pathways. A variety of animal models of CCM have been described to help translate the cellular and biochemical insights into a better understanding of disease mechanism. In this minireview, we discuss the contributions of animal models to our growing understanding of the biology of cavernous malformations, including the elucidation of the cellular context of CCM protein actions and the in vivo confirmation of abnormal endothelial cell–cell interactions. Challenges and progress towards developing a faithful model of CCM biology are reviewed. PMID:20096037

  19. Prediction of subsidence resulting from creep closure of solutioned-mined caverns in salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of subsidence rates over a range of areal configurations of solution-mined caverns in salt domes is possible, based on some fifty years of history in solution mining. Several approaches contribute to predictions: site-specific observations obtained from subsidence monitoring; numerical modeling, now becoming more practicable and credible; salt-creep data from testing; and rule-of-thumb methods, based on experience. All of these approaches contribute to understanding subsidence but none are totally reliable alone. The example of subsidence occurring at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites demonstrates several principles of cavern creep closure, the main cause of the subsidence, and shows that reliable projections of future subsidence are possible. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Orbiter/launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, L. R.; Weidner, J. P.; Small, W. J.; Martin, J. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The system includes reusable turbojet propelled booster vehicles releasably connected to a reusable rocket powered orbit vehicle. The coupled orbiter-booster combination takes off horizontally and ascends to staging altitude and speed under booster power with both orbiter and booster wings providing lift. After staging, the booster vehicles fly back to Earth for horizontal landing and the orbiter vehicle continues ascending to orbit.

  1. Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.

  2. Prevalence of cerebral cavernous malformations associated with developmental venous anomalies increases with age.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; El-Masri, Ali El-Rida; Wald, John T; Flemming, Kelly D; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2017-06-22

    To test the hypothesis that the prevalence of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) associated with developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) increases with age, we studied the age-related prevalence of DVA-associated CCM among patients with DVAs. Patients with DVAs on contrast-enhanced MRI exams performed over a 2-year period were included in this study. A single neuroradiologist reviewed all imaging exams for the presence of CCMs. Baseline demographic data collected included age, gender, presence of CNS neoplasm, history of cranial radiation, and history of seizure. Patients were divided into age groups based on decade of life. Cochran-Armitage trend tests were performed to determine if increasing age was associated with CCM prevalence. A total of 1689 patients with DVAs identified on contrast-enhanced MRI were included. Of these patients, 116 (6.9%) had a cavernous malformation associated with the DVA. There was a significant positive association between age and the prevalence of DVA-associated CCM (P = 0.002). The prevalence of DVA-associated CCM was 0.8% for the 0-10 age group, 1.6% for the 11-20 age group, 7.5% for the 21-30 age group, 9.5% for the 31-40 age group, 6.1% for the 41-50 age group, 6.3% for the 51-60 age group, 7.4% for the 61-70 age group, and 11.6% for the >70 age group (P < .0001). Our study demonstrated an age-related increase in prevalence of DVA-associated cavernous malformations among patients with DVAs. These findings suggest that DVA-associated cavernous malformations are acquired lesions.

  3. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  4. Endoscopic approaches to brainstem cavernous malformations: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Thawani, Jayesh P.; Sanborn, Matthew R.; Storm, Phillip B.; Lee, John Y.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic cavernous malformations involving the brainstem are frequently difficult to access via traditional methods. Conventional skull-base approaches require significant brain retraction or bone removal to provide an adequate operative corridor. While there has been a trend toward limited employment of the most invasive surgical approaches, recent advances in endoscopic technology may complement existing methods to access these difficult to reach areas. Case Descriptions: Four consecutive patients were treated for symptomatic, hemorrhagic brainstem cavernous malformations via fully endoscopic approaches (endonasal, transclival; retrosigmoid; lateral supracerebellar, infratentorial; endonasal, transclival). Together, these lesions encompassed all three segments of the brainstem. Three of the patients had complete resection of the cavernous malformation, while one patient had stable residual at long-term follow up. Associated developmental venous anomalies were preserved in the two patients where one was identified preoperatively. Three of the four patients maintained stable or improved neurological examinations following surgery, while one patient experienced ipsilateral palsies of cranial nerves VII and VIII. The first transclival approach resulted in a symptomatic cerebrospinal fluid leak requiring re-operation, but the second did not. Although there are challenges associated with endoscopic approaches, relative to our prior microsurgical experience with similar cases, visualization and illumination of the surgical corridors were superior without significant limitations on operative mobility. Conclusion: The endoscope is a promising adjunct to the neurosurgeon's ability to approach difficult to access brainstem cavernous malformations. It allows the surgeon to achieve well-illuminated, panoramic views, and by combining approaches, can provide minimally invasive access to most regions of the brainstem. PMID:25984383

  5. Cerebellar Hemorrhage due to a Direct Carotid–Cavernous Fistula after Surgery for Maxillary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamio, Yoshinobu; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Kamiya, Mika; Yamashita, Shuhei; Namba, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Infratentorial cerebral hemorrhage due to a direct carotid–cavernous fistula (CCF) is very rare. To our knowledge, only four such cases have been reported. Cerebellar hemorrhage due to a direct CCF has not been reported. We describe a 63-year-old female who presented with reduced consciousness 3 days after undergoing a maxillectomy for maxillary cancer. Computed tomography showed a cerebellar hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a left-sided direct CCF draining into the left petrosal and cerebellar veins through the left superior petrosal sinus (SPS). Her previous surgery had sacrificed the pterygoid plexus and facial vein. Increased blood flow and reduced drainage could have led to increased venous pressure in infratentorial veins, including the petrosal and cerebellar veins. The cavernous sinus has several drainage routes, but the SPS is one of the most important routes for infratentorial venous drainage. Stenosis or absence of the posterior segment of the SPS can also result in increased pressure in the cerebellar and pontine veins. We emphasize that a direct CCF with cortical venous reflux should be precisely evaluated to determine the hemodynamic status and venous drainage from the cavernous sinus. PMID:28061497

  6. DDT and the decline of free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) at Carlsbad Cavern, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Clark, D R

    2001-05-01

    DDT is believed to have caused the population of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) at Carlsbad Cavern to decline severely after 1936. Nevertheless, previous data supporting this hypothesis are limited to a single study from 1974, which indicated that 20% of young free-tails from the cavern may have died of DDE poisoning during their first southward migration. In this study I compared organochlorine residues among samples of free-tails collected in Carlsbad Cavern in 1930, 1956, 1965, 1973, and 1988. Samples of skin cut from dry museum specimens were chemically analyzed, except for the 1973 data, which were derived from analyses of whole bats minus gastrointestinal tracts. Accumulated residue levels of DDT compounds in bats from 1965 and 1956 exceeded those in 1973 bats by approximately 4.8 times and approximately 2.7 times, respectively. This suggests that lethal effects of DDT compounds were substantially greater in the 1950s and 1960s than in the 1970s. Residues in 1988 bats resembled those for 1973 bats. It is concluded that DDT played a major role in this severe population decline. These results can be applied by management personnel in evaluating the present and future status of this population regarding persisting organochlorine insecticides as well as other agricultural chemicals now in use. The case of the Carlsbad colony is discussed relative to the general issue of other bat population declines.

  7. Hydatid liver cyst causing portal vein thrombosis and cavernous transformation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kirmizi, Serdar; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with abdominal distention after meals was admitted to the hospital. He had a history of surgery for hydatid liver cyst. The cyst was located at the liver hilum and there were portal venous thrombosis and cavernous transformation. It had been treated with partial cystectomy, omentoplasty and albendazole. Two years later at the admission to our center, his laboratory tests were in normal ranges. Abdominal imaging methods revealed splenomegaly, portal vein thrombosis, cavernous transformation and the previously operated hydatid liver cyst. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy demonstrated esophageal and gastric fundal varices. Due to his young age and low risk for surgery, the patient was planned for surgical treatment of both pathologies at the same time. At laparotomy, hydatid liver cyst was obliterated with omentum and there was no sign of active viable hydatid disease. A meso-caval shunt with an 8 mm in-diameter graft was created. In the postoperative period, his symptoms and endoscopic varices were regressed. There were four similar cases reported in the literature. This one was the youngest and the only one treated by a surgical shunt. Hydatid liver cysts that located around the hilum can lead to portal vein thrombosis and cavernous thrombosis. Treatment should consist of both hydatid liver cyst and portal hypertension. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case of surgically treated portal vein thrombosis that was originated from a hydatid liver cyst. PMID:27895860

  8. Association of Morbidity with Extent of Resection and Cavernous Sinus Invasion in Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas*

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Michael E.; Cheng, Jason S.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Sughrue, Michael E.; Clark, Aaron; Kane, Ari J.; Aranda, Derick; McDermott, Michael; Barani, Igor J.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Sphenoid wing meningiomas (SWMs) typically are histologically benign, insidious lesions, but the propensity of these tumors for local invasion makes disease control very challenging. In this review, we assess whether the degree of resection and extent of cavernous sinus invasion affects morbidity, mortality, and recurrence in patients with SWM. A comprehensive search of the English-language literature was performed. Patients were stratified according to extent of resection and extent of cavernous sinus invasion, and tumor recurrence rate, morbidity, and mortality were analyzed. A total of 23 studies and 131 patients were included. Overall recurrence and surgical mortality rate were 11% and 2%, respectively (average follow-up = 65 months). Cranial nerve III palsy was significantly associated with incompletely versus completely resected SWMs (7 to 0%) as well as meningiomas with cavernous sinus invasion versus no sinus invasion (14 vs. 0%). No significant difference in tumor recurrence rate was noted between these groups. In conclusion, complete excision of SWMs is always recommended whenever possible, but surgeons should acknowledge that there is nonetheless a chance of recurrence and should weigh this against the risk of causing cranial nerve injuries. PMID:23372999

  9. The treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas: evolution of a modern approach.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Daniel R; Flores, Bruno C; Lewis, Jeremy J; Barnett, Samuel L

    2013-12-01

    Cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSMs) are challenging lesions for the skull base neurosurgeon to manage given their close association with cranial nerves II-VI and the internal carotid artery. In the 1980s and early 1990s, with advancements in microsurgical techniques, increasing knowledge of the relevant microsurgical neuroanatomy, and the advent of advanced skull base surgical approaches, the treatment of CSMs involved attempts at gross-total resection (GTR). Initial fervor for a surgical cure waned, however, as skull base neurosurgeons demonstrated the limits of complete resection in this region, the ongoing issue of potential tumor recurrences, and the unacceptably high cranial nerve and vascular morbidity associated with this strategy. The advent of radiosurgery and its documented success for tumor growth control and limited morbidity in cavernous lesions has helped to shift the treatment goals for CSMs from GTR to tumor control and symptom relief while minimizing treatment- and lesion-associated morbidity. The authors review the relevant microanatomy of the cavernous sinus with anatomical and radiographic correlates, as well as the various treatment options. A modernized, multimodality treatment algorithm to guide management of these lesions is proposed.

  10. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  11. Micro-Macro Analysis and Phenomenological Modelling of Salt Viscous Damage and Application to Salt Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Pouya, Ahmad; Arson, Chloé

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to gain fundamental understanding of the microscopic mechanisms that control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep around salt caverns in typical geological storage conditions. We use a self-consistent inclusion-matrix model to homogenize the viscoplastic deformation of halite polycrystals and predict the number of broken grains in a Representative Elementary Volume of salt. We use this micro-macro modeling framework to simulate creep tests under various axial stresses, which gives us the critical viscoplastic strain at which grain breakage (i.e., tertiary creep) is expected to occur. The comparison of simulation results for short-term and long-term creep indicates that the initiation of tertiary creep depends on the stress and the viscoplastic strain. We use the critical viscoplastic deformation as a yield criterion to control the transition between secondary and tertiary creep in a phenomenological viscoplastic model, which we implement into the Finite Element Method program POROFIS. We model a 850-m-deep salt cavern of irregular shape, in axis-symmetric conditions. Simulations of cavern depressurization indicate that a strain-dependent damage evolution law is more suitable than a stress-dependent damage evolution law, because it avoids high damage concentrations and allows capturing the formation of a damaged zone around the cavity. The modeling framework explained in this paper is expected to provide new insights to link grain breakage to phenomenological damage variables used in Continuum Damage Mechanics.

  12. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for meningiomas in and around the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Spiegelmann, Roberto; Nissim, Ouzi; Menhel, Janna; Alezra, Dror; Pfeffer, M Raphael

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of linear accelerator radiosurgery in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Between 1993 and 2001, 42 patients with meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus underwent linear accelerator radiosurgery at our institution. A mean radiation dose of 14 Gy was delivered to the tumor margin. The median tumor volume was 8.2 cm3 (mean, 8.4 cm3). Median follow-up was 36 months (mean, 38 mo). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of the patients. There was no mortality or permanent extraocular motor or pituitary dysfunction. Treatment-related complications included new trigeminal neuropathy in 4.7% and a new visual field defect in 2.8%. Two patients required shunt placement after developing hydrocephalus. One patient with symptomatic temporal lobe edema underwent partial excision of the tumor. Improvement of existing cranial neuropathies was noted in 29% of affected trigeminal nerves, in 22% of oculomotor nerves, and in 13% of Cranial Nerves IV and VI. This study indicates that linear accelerator radiosurgery can achieve a high control rate of meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus with no mortality and a low incidence of morbidity.

  13. A pure epidural spinal cavernous hemangioma - with an innocuous face but a perilous behaviour!!

    PubMed

    A L, Hemalatha; T, Ravikumar; Chamarthy, Neelima P; Puri, Kunal

    2013-07-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas occur frequently in the intracranial structures but they are rare in the spine, with an incidence of 0.22 cases/million/year, which account for 5 - 12% of the spinal vascular lesions, 51% of which are extradural. Most of the epidural hemangiomas are secondary extensions from the vertebral lesions. The spinal cavernous hemangiomas which do not involve the vertebrae are referred to as "pure" types. The pure epidural hemangiomas are rare, which account for only 4% of all the epidural lesions. A case of a Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma in a 50 year old male, with the clinical picture of a slowly progressive compressive myelopathy, has been presented here. The imaging studies showed a well-defined, enhancing epidural lesion at the T7 - T8 level, with dorsal cordedema and myelomalacic changes. A radiological diagnosis of a meningioma was considered. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as a hemangioma. The patient improved dramatically after the excision of the lesion.

  14. Management of cerebral cavernous malformations in the pediatric population: a literature review and case illustrations.

    PubMed

    Kosnik-Infinger, L; Carroll, C; Greiner, H; Leach, J; Mangano, F T

    2015-09-01

    Cavernous malformations (CM) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system that may occur in the brain and spinal cord. They are one of the four major types of vascular malformations that also includes developmental venous anomalies (DVA)s, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and capillary telangiectasias. CMs are a common vascular malformation, and 25% of them occur in the pediatric age group. They can present with acute or chronic symptoms including headache, neurologic deficits secondary to hemorrhage, mass effect, or epilepsy. This review will focus on the neurosurgical management of intracranial cavernous malformations in children. Pediatric CMs have special considerations different from CM that occur in the adult population which are highlighted throughout this review. Characteristics specific to pediatric CM epidemiology, genetics, presentation, pathology, location, size, epilepsy, and management will be discussed. Specific considerations must be entertained with the diagnosis of pediatric CM in that management needs to include consideration of the lifetime risk of hemorrhage, as well as the possibility of development of epilepsy. If in an accessible location, most cavernomas should be surgically removed in a timely fashion to provide lifelong cure for pediatric patients. The review closes with the discussion of two interesting cavernous malformation cases occurring in a 12-year old male and a 12-year old female that exhibit many of the important aspects specific to the management of a pediatric patient with CM, highlighting the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to treatment.

  15. Herpes simplex virus vector-mediated delivery of neurturin rescues erectile dysfunction of cavernous nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ryuichi; Wolfe, Darren; Coyle, Christian H.; Wechuck, James B.; Tyagi, Pradeep; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Nelson, Joel B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Summary Neurturin (NTN), a member of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family, is known as an important neurotrphic factor for penis-projecting neurons. We recently demonstrated significant protection from erectile dysfunction (ED) following a replication defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-mediated GDNF delivery to the injured cavernous nerve. Herein we applied HSV vector-mediated delivery of NTN to this ED model. Rat cavernous nerve was injured bilaterally using a clamp and dry ice. For HSV-treated groups, 20μl of vector stock was administered directly to the damaged nerve. Delivery of an HSV vector expressing both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and lacZ (HSV-LacZ) was used as a control. Intracavernous pressure along with systemic arterial pressure (ICP/AP) was measured 2 and 4 weeks after the nerve injury. Fluorogold (FG) was injected into the penile crus 7 days before sacrifice to assess neuronal survival. Four weeks after nerve injury, rats treated with HSV-NTN exhibited significantly higher ICP/AP compared to untreated or control vector treated groups. The HSV-NTN group had more FG-positive MPG neurons than control group following injury. HSV vector-mediated delivery of NTN could be a viable approach for improvement of erectile dysfunction following cavernous nerve injury. PMID:18668142

  16. Hydatid liver cyst causing portal vein thrombosis and cavernous transformation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kirmizi, Serdar; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with abdominal distention after meals was admitted to the hospital. He had a history of surgery for hydatid liver cyst. The cyst was located at the liver hilum and there were portal venous thrombosis and cavernous transformation. It had been treated with partial cystectomy, omentoplasty and albendazole. Two years later at the admission to our center, his laboratory tests were in normal ranges. Abdominal imaging methods revealed splenomegaly, portal vein thrombosis, cavernous transformation and the previously operated hydatid liver cyst. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy demonstrated esophageal and gastric fundal varices. Due to his young age and low risk for surgery, the patient was planned for surgical treatment of both pathologies at the same time. At laparotomy, hydatid liver cyst was obliterated with omentum and there was no sign of active viable hydatid disease. A meso-caval shunt with an 8 mm in-diameter graft was created. In the postoperative period, his symptoms and endoscopic varices were regressed. There were four similar cases reported in the literature. This one was the youngest and the only one treated by a surgical shunt. Hydatid liver cysts that located around the hilum can lead to portal vein thrombosis and cavernous thrombosis. Treatment should consist of both hydatid liver cyst and portal hypertension. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case of surgically treated portal vein thrombosis that was originated from a hydatid liver cyst.

  17. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  18. A Japanese pedigree of familial cerebral cavernous malformations--a case report.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yasutaka; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Migita, Keisuke; Sadatomo, Takashi; Kuwabara, Masashi; Yamada, Toru; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2014-12-01

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCM) are autosomal-dominant vascular malformations. At present, 3 cerebral cavernous malformation genes (KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3) have been identified. Few genetic analyses of Japanese FCCM have been reported. A Japanese pedigree of 4 patients with FCCM has been reported that includes the genetic analysis of one of the patients. All 4 patients showed multiple lesions in the brain. Surgical removal was performed at our hospital due to enlargement or hemorrhage of the intracranial lesions in a 21-year-old female (Case 1) and a 30-year-old male (Case 2). The histological diagnoses were cavernous malformations. A 62-year-old female (Case 4), the mother of Cases 1, 2, and 3, suffered from intramedullary hemorrhage at T6-7 and surgical removal was performed at another hospital. Only one patient, a 32-year-old female (Case 3), did not show symptoms. The genetic analysis of Case 2 demonstrated heterozygous partial deletions of exons 12-15 of the KRIT1 gene.

  19. A Novel MGC4607/CCM2 Gene Mutation Associated with Cerebral Spinal and Cutaneous Cavernous Angiomas.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, M S; De Benedetti, S; Marocchi, A; Bacigaluppi, S; Primignani, P; Gesu, G; Citterio, A; Tassi, L; Mecarelli, O; Pulitano, P; Penco, S

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, headaches, intracerebral hemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits; they can also be clinically silent and occur as a sporadic or an autosomal dominant condition. Three genes have been identified as causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3, mapping, respectively, on chromosomes 7q, 7p, and 3q. Here, we report an Italian family affected by CCM due to a MGC4607 gene mutation, on exon 4. All the affected subjects suffered from seizures, and some of them underwent surgery for removal of a cavernous angioma. Brain MRI showed multiple lesions consistent with CCMs in all patients. Spinal and cutaneous cavernous angiomas were present too. This report underlines the need for a careful interdisciplinarity among neurologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, geneticists, ophthalmologists, and dermatologists for a total evaluation of the different manifestations of familial CCM. This points out that only referral centers are organized to offer a multidisciplinary management of this disease.

  20. Transarterial Onyx Embolization for Patients with Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas Who Have Failed Transvenous Embolization.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Duan, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Xin; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Xi-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Transvenous embolization is the treatment of choice for cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (csDAVFs) despite occasional difficulty in transvenous catheterization. We reported our experience in the treatment of csDAVFs by transarterial Onyx embolization in patients who had failed transvenous catheterization. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of csDAVFs patients receiving transarterial Onyx embolization after failed transvenous Onyx embolization at our institution over a period of 31 months. Success was defined as complete or near complete occlusion upon angiographic examination. In seven cases, the microcatheter failed to reach the cavernous sinus; in the remaining case, the internal jugular vein was occlusive. Eight sessions of the embolization and catheterization procedures via the arterial routes were conducted. Among them, five cases via the middle meningeal artery and the other three via the accessory meningeal artery. Angiography, immediately after embolization, revealed complete occlusion in seven cases (87.5 %) and partial occlusion in the remaining case. Angiographic follow-up (range, 6-10 months) showed that all patients achieved complete embolization. In cases where transvenous embolization of the cavernous sinus is difficult, transarterial embolization of the fistulas offers a safe and effective alternative.

  1. Transvenous approach for the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula following Pipeline embolization of cavernous carotid aneurysm: a report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Mei; Colby, Geoffrey P; Jiang, Bowen; Pero, Guglielmo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Coon, Alexander L

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters are increasingly used for the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. A rare complication from flow diversion is delayed aneurysm rupture, which can lead to carotid–cavernous fistula (CCF) in the setting of cavernous carotid aneurysms (CCAs). Direct CCFs pose unique management challenges, given the lack of transarterial access to the fistula. We present two cases of direct CCFs following treatment of CCAs with the Pipeline embolization device (PED). Case 1 was a middle-aged patient with a symptomatic 10 mm wide-necked left CCA. Six weeks after PED treatment the patient developed diplopia secondary to direct CCF. Case 2 was a middle-aged patient with a symptomatic 17 mm left CCA treated with PED. One-month follow-up angiography demonstrated a direct CCF. Both patients underwent successful coil embolization of the CCF through a transvenous approach. Direct CCF formation following PED deployment for CCA is a rare complication. Parent vessel sacrifice may be avoided with transvenous occlusion of the fistula. PMID:25073525

  2. Compilation of Gas Intrusion Measurements, Variations, and Consequence Modeling for SPR Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    HINKEBEIN, THOMAS E.

    2003-03-01

    The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H{sub 2}S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

  3. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease with orbital inflammation in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Sane, Mona; Chelnis, James; Kozielski, Rafal; Fasiuddin, Airaj

    2013-10-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is a rare but potentially debilitating cause of orbital inflammation, with a predilection for older males. We report the case of a 12-year-old African girl with immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, including possible extraorbital involvement. Because of an escalating severity of illness leading to oculomotor nerve palsy and cavernous sinus thrombosis that was resistant to steroids, systemic immunosuppressive therapy with rituximab was used to achieve disease remission. The diagnosis was histologically confirmed with a tissue biopsy. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bilateral blindness from orbital cellulitis caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rutar, Tina; Zwick, Orin M; Cockerham, Kimberly P; Horton, Jonathan C

    2005-10-01

    To describe bilateral blindness resulting from infection with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Observational case report. A 44-year-old man developed proptosis, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and no light perception vision after attempting to lance a nasal pustule. A nasal culture grew MRSA. Imaging showed bilateral orbital cellulitis, pansinusitis, and cavernous sinus thrombosis. The right fundus showed severe ischemia, but the left fundus was essentially normal. Despite initiation of appropriate antibiotics early in the course of infection, the patient lost sight in both eyes. Surgical drainage of the paranasal sinuses and use of intravenous corticosteroids and heparin led to the resolution of orbital cellulitis. MRSA orbital cellulitis can progress to irreversible blindness despite antibiotic treatment. A new, community-acquired clone of this organism has exhibited increased potential for tissue invasion.

  5. [Technique and Results for the Transconjunctival Removal of Orbital Haemangiomas].

    PubMed

    Lagrèze, W A; Augustynik, M; Biermann, J; Gross, N

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous haemangioma (cavernoma) is the most common orbital tumour in adults. Various surgical approaches have been described so far. We prefer a transconjunctival approach and analyse herein how our outcomes compare with those of transcutaneous or transosseous approaches. A retrospective series of 10 cases was analysed with regard to surgical success and complications. The tumour could be completely removed in all cases. In one case, preoperative diplopia disappeared after surgery. Another case suffered from postoperative diplopia, which resolved within two months. Two cases developed a long-lasting partial tonic pupil. A retrobulbar cavernoma can be safely removed via a transconjunctival approach through shrinkage by coagulation and subsequent cryoextraction. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Splitting failure in side walls of a large-scale underground cavern group: a numerical modelling and a field study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhishen; Li, Yong; Zhu, Weishen; Xue, Yiguo; Yu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Vertical splitting cracks often appear in side walls of large-scale underground caverns during excavations owing to the brittle characteristics of surrounding rock mass, especially under the conditions of high in situ stress and great overburden depth. This phenomenon greatly affects the integral safety and stability of the underground caverns. In this paper, a transverse isotropic constitutive model and a splitting failure criterion are simultaneously proposed and secondly programmed in FLAC3D to numerically simulate the integral stability of the underground caverns during excavations in Dagangshan hydropower station in Sichuan province, China. Meanwhile, an in situ monitoring study on the displacement of the key points of the underground caverns has also been carried out, and the monitoring results are compared with the numerical results. From the comparative analysis, it can be concluded that the depths of splitting relaxation area obtained by numerical simulation are almost consistent with the actual in situ monitoring values, as well as the trend of the displacement curves, which shows that the transverse isotropic constitutive model combining with the splitting failure criterion is appropriate for investigating the splitting failure in side walls of large-scale underground caverns and it will be a helpful guidance of predicting the depths of splitting relaxation area in surrounding rock mass.

  7. Designed angiopoietin-1 variant, COMP-angiopoietin-1, rescues erectile function through healthy cavernous angiogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji-Kan; Kim, Woo Jean; Koh, Young Jun; Piao, Shuguang; Jin, Hai-Rong; Lee, Sae-Won; Choi, Min Ji; Shin, Hwa-Yean; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Jung, Keehoon; Koh, Gou Young; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, curative treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) remains unavailable. Recently, the link between ED and cardiovascular disease was unveiled and the main etiology of ED was found to be vasculogenic. Therefore, neovascularization is a promising strategy for curing ED. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) is an angiogenic growth factor that promotes the generation of stable and functional vasculature. Here, we demonstrate that local delivery of the soluble, stable, and potent Ang1 variant, COMP-Ang1 gene or protein, into the penises of hypercholesterolemic mice increases cavernous angiogenesis, eNOS phosphorylation, and cGMP expression, resulting in full recovery of erectile function and cavernous blood flow up to 8 weeks after treatment. COMP-Ang1-induced promotion of cavernous angiogenesis and erectile function was abolished in Nos3-/- mice and in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. COMP-Ang1 also restored the integrity of endothelial cell-cell junction by down-regulating the expression of histone deacetylase 2 in the penis of hypercholesterolemic mice and in primary cultured mouse cavernous endothelial cells. These findings constitute a new paradigm toward curative treatment of both cavernous angiopathy and ED. PMID:25783805

  8. Orbital dystopia due to orbital roof defect.

    PubMed

    Rha, Eun Young; Joo, Hong Sil; Byeon, Jun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of patients who presented with delayed dystopia as a consequence of an orbital roof defect due to fractures and nontraumatic causes to search for a correlation between orbital roof defect size and surgical indications for the treatment thereof. Retrospective analyses were performed in 7 patients, all of whom presented with delayed dystopia due to orbital roof defects, between January 2001 and June 2011. The causes of orbital roof defects were displaced orbital roof fractures (5 cases), tumor (1 case), and congenital sphenoid dysplasia (1 case). All 7 patients had initially been treated conservatively and later presented with significant dystopia. The sizes of the defects were calculated on computed tomographic scans. Among the 7 patients, aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid, which caused ocular symptoms, in 1 patient with minimal displaced orbital roof and reconstruction with calvarial bone, titanium micromesh, or Medpor in 6 other patients were performed. The minimal size of the orbital roof in patients who underwent orbital roof reconstruction was 1.2 cm (defect height) x 1.0 cm (defect length), 0.94 cm(2). For all patients with orbital dystopia, displacement of the globe was corrected without any complications, regardless of whether the patient was evaluated grossly or by radiology. In this retrospective study, continuous monitoring of clinical signs and active surgical management should be considered for cases in which an orbital roof defect is detected, even if no definite symptoms are noted, to prevent delayed sequelae.

  9. Sclerosing idiopathic orbital inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Paul A; Kersten, Robert C; Kulwin, Dwight R

    2006-01-01

    A 5-year-old girl referred for orbital cellulitis was found to have a right orbital mass. Computed tomography revealed a mass occupying the inferotemporal orbit, extending into the maxillary sinus. Biopsy yielded a diagnosis of sclerosing idiopathic orbital inflammation. She was successfully treated with prednisone.

  10. Orbital fractures: a review

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey M; Glavas, Ioannis P

    2011-01-01

    This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1) to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2) to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3) to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training. PMID:21339801

  11. Transfer orbit determination accuracy for orbit maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Mery Passos

    This work intends to show the accuracy of the orbital elements determined during transfer orbit as a function of data span, as well as the feasibility of performance maneuvers. The orbit estimator used is a weighted least squares algorithm. The observation vector is composed of angle data (azimuth and elevation) and range data and are from the Astra IC mission. The state vector is either propagated by Brower model or numerical integration (for small eccentricities and inclination). The complete software to determine the orbit has been developed by Hughes Aircraft and been used for all Hughes satellite mission.

  12. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  13. A rare presentation of central nervous system in a pediatric patient with Hodgkin disease: cavernous sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alioglu, Bulent; Ustun, Huseyin; Sonmez, Akif; Kaplan, Hacer; Arikan, Fatma Inci; Dallar, Yildiz

    2009-10-01

    Intracranial involvement by Hodgkin disease is rare. We report a pediatric patient with Hodgkin disease who had intracranial disease at presentation. The patient was referred to our hospital with a suspicion of central nervous system tumor. Although the most common presenting feature of intracranial Hodgkin disease is cranial nerve palsy with brain parenchyma being the most common intracranial site of involvement, to our best knowledge no pediatric case of Hodgkin disease presented with isolated cavernous sinus syndrome reported. We report this rare case because of its unusual presentation, in which Hodgkin disease presented with cavernous sinus syndrome. Physicians should consider the probability of Hodgkin disease in children of all ages who present with cavernous sinus syndrome.

  14. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CAVERNOUS SINUS SURGERY FOR MENINGIOMAS AND RESULTANT COMMON OPHTHALMIC COMPLICATIONS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHLAMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Cavernous sinus surgery is considered neurosurgically feasible. A systematic review of patients undergoing cavernous sinus procedures for meningioma was undertaken to determine whether cavernous sinus surgery could be performed with an acceptable level of iatrogenic-induced dysfunction. Methods Fifty-six patients undergoing 57 cavernous sinus surgical procedures performed by a single senior neurosurgeon were systematically evaluated to determine the consequences of surgery. Quantitative assessment of afferent (acuity, fields, pupil) and efferent function was stressed. Results Five of 20 patients (25%) with preoperative optic nerve dysfunction improved, but vision worsened in 6 (30%), including 4 (20%) whose vision deteriorated to no light perception. Four (11%) of 37 patients developed newly acquired optic neuropathy. No patients with preoperative third nerve palsies (19) cleared, although one improved. All 57 patients had evidence of some cranial nerve dysfunction (III, IV, V, or VI) immediately after surgery. Eight patients with long-term follow-up had complete sixth nerve palsies (7 preoperatively), and 4 had complete third nerve dysfunction (none in patients normal preoperatively). Nine (16%) had evidence of aberrant regeneration of the third nerve, and 12 (21%) developed neurotrophic keratitis. Conclusions Cavernous sinus surgery results in transient worsening of third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerve function. Cavernous sinus surgery carries a high risk of worsening ocular motor disorders and producing new ones. Preexisting cranial nerve dysfunction (other than optic nerve) rarely improves. Patients and physicians should be aware of the potential for ophthalmic complications in addition to the more generalized risks of neurosurgery (eg, cerebrospinal fluid leak, infection, stroke). PMID:18427624

  15. Metalloproteinases ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwen; Voellger, Benjamin; Benzel, Julia; Schlomann, Uwe; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W; Carl, Barbara

    2016-09-15

    Invasion of tumor cells critically depends on cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Enzymes capable of modulating these interactions belong to the proteinase families of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) and MMP (matrix metalloprotease) proteins. Our objective is to examine their expression levels and evaluate the relationship between expression levels and cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas. Tissue samples from 35 patients with pituitary adenomas were analyzed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was employed to assess mRNA expression levels for ADAM and MMP genes. Protein levels were examined using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Correlation analyses between expression levels and clinical parameters were performed. By silencing ADAM12 and MMP-14 with siRNA in a mouse pituitary adenoma cell line (TtT/GF), their cellular effects were investigated. In our study, nine women and 26 men were included, with a mean age of 53.1 years (range 15-84 years) at the time of surgery. There were 19 cases with cavernous sinus invasion. The proteins ADAM12 and MMP-14 were significantly up-regulated in invasive adenomas compared to noninvasive adenomas. Both human isoforms of ADAM12 (ADAM12L and ADAM12s) were involved in tumor invasion; moreover, ADAM12L was found to correlate positively with Ki-67 proliferation index in pituitary adenomas. In TtT/GF pituitary adenoma cells, silencing of ADAM12 and MMP-14 significantly inhibited cell invasion and migration, respectively, whereas only silencing of ADAM12 suppressed cell proliferation. We conclude that ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas, which qualifies these proteins in diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Carotid and cranial nerve reconstruction after removal of cavernous sinus lesions.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, L N; Sen, C N; Lanzino, G; Pomonis, S

    1991-12-01

    During the last 7 years, approximately 170 neoplasms, and 35 vascular lesions involving the cavernous sinus were treated by the first two authors. During the treatment of such lesions, the direct vein graft reconstruction of the internal carotid artery from the petrous to the supraclinoid or infraclinoid ICA was performed in 23 patients. Graft occlusion occurred in 3 patients and in one of these, it was successfully salvaged by placing a long venous graft from the extracranial ICA to the M3 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The latter 3 patients were neurologically normal. One patient with significant atherosclerotic disease suffered the dissection of the distal internal carotid artery with the graft being patent. The suturing technique. This patient eventually died. Two patients with severely compromised collateral circulation suffered minor strokes due to the temporary occlusion of the ICA. This has been avoided in the more recent patients by the adoption of brain protection techniques such as moderate hypothermia, induced hypertension, and barbiturate coma. Low dose heparin therapy during grafting and high dose intravenous steroids prior to the grafting also appear to be beneficial. Direct vein graft reconstruction of the intracavernous carotid artery is a valuable tool during the management of cavernous sinus lesions. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique as well as the pros and cons of other revascularization techniques will be discussed. During microsurgical removal of cavernous sinus lesions, the cranial nerves III-VI were reconstructed by direct resuture or by nerve grafting in 16 patients. In the majority of these patients, recovery of cranial nerve function was observed, which was very encouraging.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Intraoperative cavernous nerve stimulation and Laser-Doppler flowmetry during radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Hans W; Johansson, Eva; Bill-Axelson, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common side effect following radical prostatectomy mainly due to damage of the pelvic autonomic nerve fibers (cavernous nerves). Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerves while measuring changes in penile girth has previously been shown to provide the surgeon with feedback of nerve integrity. To test the feasibility of recording changes in glans penis blood flow by Laser Doppler flowmetry from cavernous nerve stimulation. Fifteen patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy had electrical stimulation of the proximal and distal parts of the neurovascular bundles after prostate removal. The stimulation consisted of 30-40 seconds biphasic constant current (10-30 mA) with 0.5 millisecond pulse duration. Stimulus induced changes in penile blood flow was recorded from a Laser Doppler probe attached to the glans penis. Changes in penile girth were simultaneously recorded from a mercury-in rubber strain gauge. Erectile function was evaluated three months after surgery. Ten patients had stimulus induced increase in Laser Doppler flow unilaterally (N=7) or bilaterally (N=3). Out of 10 patients, 6 reported some preserved erectile function postoperatively at 3 months follow-up (indicating 6 true and 4 false positives). Three patients had no Doppler response from stimulation and had no postoperative erectile function postoperatively (indicating three true negatives). Two patients were excluded from the study due to bad signal quality in the Laser Doppler signal. In the majority of patients, stimulation produced increase in penile girth sensed by the strain gauge. This preliminary report provides evidence that Laser Doppler Flowmetry is able to detect increased penile blood flow from intraoperative electrical stimulation of the neurovascular bundles. However, further improvement in the recording technique is required. Laser Doppler Flowmetry may also be feasible to confirm autonomic nerve sparing in women

  18. Design of a compact laparoscopic probe for optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-02-01

    The cavernous nerves are responsible for erectile function and course along the prostate surface, varying in size and location among patients, making preservation of sexual function challenging after prostate cancer surgery. Electrical stimulation has proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying these nerves and evaluating nerve function. Optical stimulation of the rat cavernous nerves has recently been reported as a alternative to electrical stimulation, with potential advantages including noncontact stimulation and improved spatial selectivity. This study describes the design of a compact laparoscopic probe for future clinical use in optical nerve stimulation. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) prototype laparoscopic probe includes an aspheric lens for collimation of the laser beam with a 0.8- mm-diameter spot, coupled with a 200-μm-core optical fiber. A 45° gold-coated rod mirror in the probe tip provides side-firing delivery of the laser radiation. The probe handle houses a miniature linear motorized stage for lateral scanning of the probe tip over a 25-mm line along the prostate surface. A 5.5-W Thulium fiber laser with tunable wavelength range of 1850-1880 nm was tested with the probe. The probe fits through a standard 5-mm-ID laparoscopic port and is capable of delivering pulse energies up to 8 mJ (1.6 J/cm2) at a 2.5-ms pulse duration, well above the threshold (~ 0.35 J/cm2) for optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves.

  19. Bilateral Cavernous Nerve Crush Injury in the Rat Model: A Comparative Review of Pharmacologic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Haney, Nora M; Nguyen, Hoang M T; Honda, Matthew; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2017-08-18

    It is common for men to develop erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. The anatomy of the rat allows the cavernous nerve (CN) to be identified, dissected, and injured in a controlled fashion. Therefore, bilateral CN injury (BCNI) in the rat model is routinely used to study post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction. To compare and contrast the available literature on pharmacologic intervention after BCNI in the rat. A literature search was performed on PubMed for cavernous nerve and injury and erectile dysfunction and rat. Only articles with BCNI and pharmacologic intervention that could be grouped into categories of immune modulation, growth factor therapy, receptor kinase inhibition, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition, and anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic interventions were included. To assess outcomes of pharmaceutical intervention on erectile function recovery after BCNI in the rat model. The ratio of maximum intracavernous pressure to mean arterial pressure was the main outcome measure chosen for this analysis. All interventions improved erectile function recovery after BCNI based on the ratio of maximum intracavernous pressure to mean arterial pressure results. Additional end-point analysis examined the corpus cavernosa and/or the major pelvic ganglion and CN. There was extreme heterogeneity within the literature, making accurate comparisons between crush injury and therapeutic interventions difficult. BCNI in the rat is the accepted animal model used to study nerve-sparing post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction. However, an important limitation is extreme variability. Efforts should be made to decrease this variability and increase the translational utility toward clinical trials in humans. Haney NM, Nguyen HMT, Honda M, et al. Bilateral Cavernous Nerve Crush Injury in the Rat Model: A Comparative Review of Pharmacologic Interventions. Sex Med Rev 2017;X:XXX-XXX. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier

  20. Surveying genetic variants and molecular phylogeny of cerebral cavernous malformation gene, CCM3/PDCD10.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-12-05

    The three cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) genes namely CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 have been identified for which mutations cause cerebral cavernous malformations. However, the protein products of these genes involved in forming CCM signaling, are still poorly understood imposing an urgent need to understand these genes and their signaling processes in details. So far involvement of CCM3/PDCD10 in the cavernous angioma has been characterized from biochemical and biophysical analyses. However, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history and comprehensive genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10. Herein, we explored the phylogenetic history and genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10 gene. Synteny analyses revealed that CCM3/PDCD10 gene shared same genomic loci from Drosophila to human and the gene structure of CCM3/PDCD10 is conserved from human to Branchiostoma floridae for about 500 MYs with some changes in sea urchin and in insects. The conserved CCM3/PDCD10 is characterized by presence of indels in the N-terminal dimerization domain. We identified 951 CCM3/PDCD10 variants by analysis of 1092 human genomes with top three variation classes belongs to 84% SNPs, 6.9% insertions and 6.2% deletions. We identified 22 missense mutations in the human CCM3/PDCD10 protein and out of which three mutations are deleterious. We also identified four stop-codon gaining mutations at the positions E34*, E68*, E97* and E140*, respectively. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of the CCM3/PDCD10 gene based on phylogenetic origin and genetic variants. This study corroborates that the evolution of CCM proteins with tubular organization evolvements by endothelial cells.

  1. Orbits: Computer simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    In rotating machinery dynamics an orbit (Lissajous curve) represents the dynamic path of the shaft centerline motion during shaft rotation and resulting precession. The orbit can be observed with an oscilloscope connected to XY promixity probes. The orbits can also be simulated by a computer. The software for HP computer simulates orbits for two cases: (1) Symmetric orbit with four frequency components with different radial amplitudes and relative phase angles; and (2) Nonsymmetric orbit with two frequency components with two different vertical/horizontal amplitudes and two different relative phase angles. Each orbit carries a Keyphasor mark (one-per-turn reference). The frequencies, amplitudes, and phase angles, as well as number of time steps for orbit computation, have to be chosen and introduced to the computer by the user. The orbit graphs can be observed on the computer screen.

  2. Limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach for cavernous sinus biopsy: illustration of 3 cases and discussion.

    PubMed

    Graillon, T; Fuentes, S; Metellus, P; Adetchessi, T; Gras, R; Dufour, H

    2014-01-01

    Advances in transsphenoidal surgery and endoscopic techniques have opened new perspectives for cavernous sinus (CS) approaches. The aim of this study was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach, as performed in pituitary adenoma surgery, for CS tumor biopsy illustrated with three clinical cases. The first case was a 46-year-old woman with a prior medical history of parotid adenocarcinoma successfully treated 10 years previously. The cavernous sinus tumor was revealed by right third and sixth nerve palsy and increased over the past three years. A tumor biopsy using a limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach revealed an adenocarcinoma metastasis. Complementary radiosurgery was performed. The second case was a 36-year-old woman who consulted for diplopia with right sixth nerve palsy and amenorrhea with hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonist treatment was used to restore the patient's menstrual cycle. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a right sided CS tumor. CS biopsy, via a limited endoscopic transsphenoidal approach, confirmed a meningothelial grade 1 meningioma. Complementary radiosurgery was performed. The third case was a 63-year-old woman with progressive installation of left third nerve palsy and visual acuity loss, revealing a left cavernous sinus tumor invading the optic canal. Surgical biopsy was performed using an enlarged endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to the decompress optic nerve. Biopsy results revealed a meningothelial grade 1 meningioma. Complementary radiotherapy was performed. In these three cases, no complications were observed. Mean hospitalization duration was 4 days. Reported anatomical studies and clinical series have shown the feasibility of reaching the cavernous sinus using an endoscopic endonasal approach. Trans-foramen ovale CS percutaneous biopsy is an interesting procedure but only provides cell analysis results, and not tissue analysis. However, radiotherapy and

  3. A cavernous hemangioma of the thyroid gland: First documentation by ultrasound of a rare pathology.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Stuckmann, Gerd; Tosoni, Ivo; Erdin, Dieter; Binkert, Christoph A

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the thyroid gland is an extremely rare condition. We report a case of a primary cavernous hemangioma in the left lobe of the thyroid gland in an 84-year-old woman. Ultrasound examination of the lesion showed an inhomogeneous and hypoechoic nodule that was well demarcated from the rest of the left lobe and hypovascular on color Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration was performed. The cytologic differential diagnosis included an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid gland. After hemithyroidectomy, the final diagnosis was a benign hemangioma of the thyroid gland.

  4. Development of cavernous haemangioma following radical chemo-radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, J R; Joshi, S M; Kitchen, N

    2009-08-01

    We report an adult case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with radical chemo-radiotherapy, with subsequent development of a histologically proved temporal cavernous haemangioma within the radiation field. Case report and review of the current literature concerning radiation-induced, secondary, space-occupying lesions. The increasing role of radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment, together with improved patient survival, is likely to lead to radiation-induced, secondary, space-occupying lesions being encountered more frequently. We emphasise the need to be vigilant for this important but relatively rare complication, which has significant associated morbidity.

  5. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  6. Massive splenomegaly caused by cavernous hemangiomas associated with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Takeyuki; Shiba, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Yuki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Harada, Toru; Ikegami, Masahiro; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is not well understood. Although splenic involvement is very rare in KTS, life-threatening events such as spontaneous rupture of a splenic hemangioma may occur. We recently performed elective splenectomy for massive splenomegaly causing uncontrollable abdominal pain in a woman with KTS. The extracted spleen weighed 4260 g, and cavernous hemangiomas in the spleen were found to be the cause of the splenomegaly. The patient's abdominal pain resolved after surgery and her postoperative course was uneventful, except for persistent bleeding from the bladder. This is a rare case of KTS with associated severe splenomegaly caused by hemangiomas.

  7. One-step endovascular treatment of bilateral traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulae with atypical clinical course.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Alexandru; Iliescu, Bogdan F; Dobrin, Nicolae; Poeata, Ion

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a rare neurovascular pathologic entity. The bilateral form occurs even rarer and given the potential risk for both optic tracts presents an urgent indication for quick and effective treatment. We present a patient with a bilateral Barrow type A TCCF with a fulminant development of symptoms, who was successfully treated with bilateral detachable balloons in a single session endovascular procedure. The patient experienced complete relief of symptoms, however the complete neurological deficit in the left optic nerve was persistent.

  8. KRIT1 mutations in three Japanese pedigrees with hereditary cavernous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Kengo; Akagawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Asami; Oka, Hideki; Hino, Akihiko; Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Onda, Hideaki; Kawamata, Takakazu; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation is a neurovascular abnormality that can cause seizures, focal neurological deficits and intracerebral hemorrhage. Familial forms of this condition are characterized by de novo formation of multiple lesions and are autosomal-dominantly inherited via CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 mutations. We identified three truncating mutations in KRIT1 from three Japanese families with CCMs: a novel frameshift mutation, a known frameshift mutation and a known splice-site mutation that had not been previously analyzed for aberrant splicing. PMID:27766163

  9. KRIT1 mutations in three Japanese pedigrees with hereditary cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kengo; Akagawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Asami; Oka, Hideki; Hino, Akihiko; Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Onda, Hideaki; Kawamata, Takakazu; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation is a neurovascular abnormality that can cause seizures, focal neurological deficits and intracerebral hemorrhage. Familial forms of this condition are characterized by de novo formation of multiple lesions and are autosomal-dominantly inherited via CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 mutations. We identified three truncating mutations in KRIT1 from three Japanese families with CCMs: a novel frameshift mutation, a known frameshift mutation and a known splice-site mutation that had not been previously analyzed for aberrant splicing.

  10. Cerebral cavernous malformations as a disease of vascular permeability: from bench to bedside with caution.

    PubMed

    Yadla, Sanjay; Jabbour, Pascal M; Shenkar, Robert; Shi, Changbin; Campbell, Peter G; Awad, Issam A

    2010-09-01

    Tremendous insight into the molecular and genetic pathogenesis of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been gained over the past 2 decades. This includes the identification of 3 distinct genes involved in familial CCMs. Still, a number of unanswered questions regarding the process from gene mutation to vascular malformation remain. It is becoming more evident that the disruption of interendothelial junctions and ensuing vascular hyperpermeability play a principal role. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding of CCM genes, associated proteins, and functional pathways. Promising molecular and genetic therapies targeted at identified molecular aberrations are discussed as well.

  11. Emerging clinical imaging techniques for cerebral cavernous malformations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Peter G.; Jabbour, Pascal; Yadla, Sanjay; Awad, Issam A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are divided into sporadic and familial forms. For clinical imaging, T2-weighted gradient-echo sequences have been shown to be more sensitive than conventional sequences. Recently more advanced imaging techniques such as high-field and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has been employed for the evaluation of CCMs. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging have been applied to the preoperative and intraoperative management of these lesions. In this paper, the authors attempt to provide a concise review of the emerging imaging methods utilized in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of CCMs. PMID:20809764

  12. [Traumatic arteriovenous pial fistula masquerading as a carotid-cavernous fistula: an uncommon disorder with an unusual presentation].

    PubMed

    Santos-Franco, Jorge Arturo; Lee, Angel; Nava-Salgado, Giovanna; Zenteno, Marco; Gómez-Villegas, Thamar; Dávila-Romero, Julio César

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial pial arteriovenous fistulae are infrequent lesions. Their cardinal signs have been related to mass effect and hemorrhage, but their clinical manifestations due to venous retrograde flow into ophthalmic veins has never been described. This phenomenon is usually seen in dural arteriovenous fistula draining to the cavernous sinus or carotid-cavernous sinus fistula.A traumatic intracranial pial arteriovenous fistula arising from the supraclinoid internal carotid artery in a young patient was revealed by aggressive behavior and ophthalmologic manifestations. The endovascular management included the use of coils, stent, and ethylene-vinyl alcohol with transient balloon occlusion of the parent vessel.

  13. Decision-making in classic trigeminal neuralgia concurrent with a pontine cavernous malformation: Causal or coincidental association?

    PubMed

    Parise, Maud; Acioly, Marcus André; Vincent, Maurice; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is classically associated with neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve, at the root entry zone (REZ). However, patients are occasionally affected by intra-axial involvement of trigeminal sensory fibers caused by demyelinating diseases, strokes and, rarely, pontine cavernous malformations. We discuss the management strategies and decision-making process in a 55-year-old patient, affected by trigeminal neuralgia with 2 potential causative mechanisms: a neurovascular conflict at the trigeminal REZ and an ipsilateral cavernous malformation at the pontine nucleus of the trigeminal nerve.

  14. Laser-Doppler Flowmetry and Horner’s Syndrome in Patients with Complete Unilateral Damage to the Parasellar Sympathetic Fibers During Cavernous Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benedičič, Mitja; Debevc, David; Dolenc, Vinko V.; Bošnjak, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine ocular, sudomotor, and vasomotor components of Horner’s syndrome resulting from complete unilateral intraoperative damage to the parasellar sympathetic fibers during cavernous sinus surgery. Methods Complete damage to the parasellar sympathetic fibers was found in four patients operated for central skull base lesions. Pupilometry, eyelid fissure measurement, Hertel’s exophthalmometry, starch iodine sweat test, and laser-Doppler perfusion assessment of bilaterally symmetrical forehead and cheek areas were performed. Results Pupil diameter was smaller and the eyelid fissure was >2 mm narrower on the affected side in all four patients. Exophthalmometry after the operation never revealed >1 mm difference. Anhydrosis was localized to the medial forehead in three and to the entire forehead in one patient. Average perfusion did not significantly differ between the affected and opposite side of the forehead or cheek. Conclusions The parasellar sympathetic fibers exclusively innervate the orbit and variably innervate the forehead sweat glands. No conclusion regarding their contribution to the facial vasomotor control could be established. PMID:16625695

  15. Manned Venus Orbiting Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Manned orbiting stopover round trips to Venus are studied for departure dates between 1975 and 1986 over a range of trip times and stay times. The use of highly elliptic parking orbits at Venus leads to low initial weights in Earth orbit compared with circular orbits. For the elliptic parking orbit, the effect of constraints on the low altitude observation time on the initial weight is shown. The mission can be accomplished with the Apollo level of chemical propulsion, but advanced chemical or nuclear propulsion can give large weight reductions. The Venus orbiting mission weights than the corresponding Mars mission.

  16. Primary orbital melanoma associated with orbital melanocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rice, C D; Brown, H H

    1990-08-01

    We report a case of primary orbital melanoma in a 17-year-old girl. The patient presented with painless proptosis during the first trimester of pregnancy. Computed tomography demonstrated a well-circumscribed mass located infra-temporally in the right orbit. The tumor was bluish-black, grossly encapsulated, and associated with orbital blue nevi. Histologic examination of the mass revealed a pigmented spindle-cell neoplasm. On electron microscopy, the presence of premelanosomes and the absence of basal lamina supported the diagnosis of melanoma. Malignant transformation of a preexisting nevus is postulated since perineural foci of benign dendritic melanocytes were seen within the melanoma. There has been no recurrence or metastasis in a 2-year follow-up. Of 30 primary orbital melanomas reviewed, 12 (40%) were associated with periorbital pigmentary disorders, such as oculodermal melanocytosis, blue nevus, and ocular melanocytosis. Our case is unique since the pigmentary lesions were limited to the orbital tissues.

  17. Orbital complications in children: differential diagnosis of a challenging disease.

    PubMed

    Welkoborsky, Hans-J; Graß, Sylvia; Deichmüller, Cordula; Bertram, Oliver; Hinni, Michael L

    2015-05-01

    Orbital swelling in children presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Most are associated with acute sinusitis with complicating factors possibly including: amaurosis, meningitis, intracranial abscess or even cavernous sinus thrombosis. However not all acute orbital swelling is associated with acute sinusitis. A careful evaluation is critical prior to initiating therapy. Clinical records of 49 children (27 girls, 22 boys, with an average age of 11.8 years) were retrospectively reviewed. Historical data evaluated included all available information from parents and previous treating physicians. All patients underwent intensive pediatric, ophthalmologic, and otorhinolaryngologic examinations. Computed tomography (CT scans) were additionally performed in 40 % of children. The results of any examinations were also evaluated. Eighteen of the 49 patients had an orbital complication due to acute sinusitis. All 18 had elevated body temperature, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) values and white blood cell counts. Endoscopy of the nose revealed pus in the middle meatus in each case. According to Chandlers' classification, ten children presented with a preseptal, and eight children had a postseptal orbital cellulitis. All patients were admitted to the hospital and treated with intravenous antibiotics. CT scans further demonstrated signs of subperiostal abscess in four children. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was required in six children, including all patients with subperiostal abscess. Twenty children experienced orbital swelling unrelated to acute sinusitis, i.e. atheroma, inflammed insect stings, dental related abscess, conjunctivitis, and Herpes simplex associated superinfection. In three children, acute orbital swelling was caused by an orbital tumor. Orbital complications of an acute sinusitis occur often in the pediatric patient group, and most of these patients can be treated conservative with intravenous antibiotics. Indications for FESS include failure to

  18. Lunar orbiting prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One of the prime reasons for establishing a manned lunar presence is the possibility of using the potential lunar resources. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is a lunar orbiting platform whose mission is to prospect and explore the Moon from orbit in support of early lunar colonization and exploitation efforts. The LOP mission is divided into three primary phases: transport from Earth to low lunar orbit (LLO), operation in lunar orbit, and platform servicing in lunar orbit. The platform alters its orbit to obtain the desired surface viewing, and the orbit can be changed periodically as needed. After completion of the inital remote sensing mission, more ambitious and/or complicated prospecting and exploration missions can be contemplated. A refueled propulsion module, updated instruments, or additional remote sensing packages can be flown up from the lunar base to the platform.

  19. Treatment of carotid-cavernous fistulas using intraarterial balloon assistance: case series and technical note.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, L Fernando; Chalouhi, Nohra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Jabbour, Pascal; Dumont, Aaron S; Rosenwasser, Robert H

    2012-05-01

    Multiple approaches have been used to treat carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs). The transvenous approach has become a popular and effective route. Onyx is a valuable tool in today's endovascular armamentarium. The authors describe the use of a balloon-assisted technique in the treatment of CCFs with Onyx and assess its feasibility, utility, and safety. The authors searched their prospectively maintained database for CCFs embolized using Onyx with the assistance of a compliant balloon placed in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Five patients were treated between July 2009 and July 2011 at the authors' institution. A balloon helped to identify the fistulous point, served as a buttress for coils, protected from inadvertent arterial embolizations, and prevented Onyx and coils from obscuring the ICA during the course of embolization. No balloon-related complications were noted in any of the 5 cases. All 5 fistulas were completely obliterated at the end of the procedure. Four patients had available clinical follow-ups, and all 4 showed reversal of nerve palsies. Balloon-assisted Onyx embolization of CCFs offers a powerful combination that prevents inadvertent migration of the embolic material into the arterial system, facilitates visualization of the ICA, and serves as a buttress for coils deployed in the cavernous sinus through the fistulous point. Despite adding another layer of technical complexity, an intraarterial balloon can provide valuable assistance in the treatment of CCFs.

  20. Shunt for bypass graft of the cavernous carotid artery: an anatomical and technical study.

    PubMed

    al-Mefty, O; Khalil, N; Elwany, M N; Smith, R R

    1990-11-01

    During direct surgery of neoplastic and vascular lesions of the cavernous sinus, the intracavernous carotid artery may be injured beyond repair, or its total isolation may be necessary for surgical management of these lesions. The newly developed procedure of a saphenous vein graft bypass of the cavernous carotid artery allows re-establishment of carotid circulation. Patients with poor collateral circulation are at high risk for ischemic complications induced by the prolonged temporary occlusion required to perform the bypass graft. Optimal management of these patients is to perform the venous bypass graft for permanent vascularization while maintaining carotid cerebral circulation through an intraoperative shunt. We studied this procedure in cadavers, and three shunt types were evaluated: the external intrapetrous-supraclinoid shunt (Type A), the internal intrapetrous-supraclinoid shunt (Type B), and the neck internal carotid-supraclinoid shunt (Type C). Anatomical landmarks, techniques, distances, caliber, and materials used are presented. The rationale and candidates for such a procedure are discussed. The specifications of an optimal balloon shunt are presented, and the three procedures are compared.

  1. Recurrent Carotid Cavernous Fistula Originating from a Giant Cerebral Aneurysm after Placement of a Covered Stent

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jung Wook; Lee, Young Seo; Jeong, Young-Gyun; Jeong, Hae Woong; Baek, Jin Wook; Seo, Jung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a recurrent carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) originating from a giant cerebral aneurysm (GCA) after placement of a covered stent. A 47-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of severe headache, and left-sided exophthalmos and ptosis. Cerebral angiography revealed a CCF caused by rupture of a GCA in the cavernous segment of the left internal carotid artery. Two covered stents were placed at the neck of the aneurysm. The neurological symptoms improved at first, but were aggravated in the 6 months following the treatment. Contrast agent endoleak was seen in the distal area of the stent. Even though additional treatments were attempted via an endovascular approach, the CCF could not be cured. However, after trapping the aneurysm using coils and performing superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass, the neurological symptoms improved. In cases of recurrent CCF originating from a GCA after placement of a covered stent, it is possible to treat the CCF by endovascular trapping and surgical bypass. PMID:27847780

  2. Energy restriction ameliorates metabolic syndrome-induced cavernous tissue structural modifications in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Tomada, Inês; Fernandes, Dalila; Guimarães, João Tiago; Almeida, Henrique; Neves, Delminda

    2013-10-01

    High-fat (HF) diet regular intake along life highly contributes to vascular dysfunction and to an increment in prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and erectile dysfunction (ED), a surrogate symptom of occult vascular disease, in the elderly. However, little is known about the effects of energy restriction (ER) alone/or after an HF-feeding period. We show here that in male Sprague-Dawley rats, 16 months of HF-diet consumption led to an increase in body adiposity, blood pressure, lipidemia, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance and to hypoadiponectinemia, conditions that cluster in MetS. In addition, this treatment strongly favored collagen deposition in cavernous tissue and myocardium. Conversely, for the same time period, the ingestion of 75 % of ad libitum energy intake by controls (ER) extensively counteracted these outcomes. The impact of 6-month ER after 10-month HF period was also analyzed, and despite the decrease in body weight, adiposity, blood pressure, lipidemia, and C-reactive protein and improvement of insulin sensitivity, no differences were observed either in adiponectin blood levels or in retroperitoneal fat pad mass. Moreover, this treatment led to a reduction in cavernous tissue collagen deposition, but not in the myocardium, and evidenced differential mobilization of adipose tissue accretions. The data show the ability of HF diet to cause MetS and produce unwanted effects on myocardium and corpora vascular structure. They also indicate that these consequences are preventable upon ER diet starting early, but not later, in life.

  3. Compressed air energy storage monitoring to support refrigerated mined rock cavern technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Moo Yul; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-06-01

    This document is the final report for the Compressed Air Energy Storage Monitoring to Support Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology (CAES Monitoring to Support RMRCT) (DE-FC26-01NT40868) project to have been conducted by CAES Development Co., along with Sandia National Laboratories. This document provides a final report covering tasks 1.0 and subtasks 2.1, 2.2, and 2.5 of task 2.0 of the Statement of Project Objectives and constitutes the final project deliverable. The proposed work was to have provided physical measurements and analyses of large-scale rock mass response to pressure cycling. The goal was to develop proof-of-concept data for a previously developed and DOE sponsored technology (RMRCT or Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology). In the RMRCT concept, a room and pillar mine developed in rock serves as a pressure vessel. That vessel will need to contain pressure of about 1370 psi (and cycle down to 300 psi). The measurements gathered in this study would have provided a means to determine directly rock mass response during cyclic loading on the same scale, under similar pressure conditions. The CAES project has been delayed due to national economic unrest in the energy sector.

  4. Distribution of otic postganglionic and recurrent mandibular nerve fibres to the cavernous sinus plexus in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Ruskell, G L

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of dorsal rami of the otic ganglion was traced on one or both sides of 1 rhesus and 15 cynomolgus monkeys using interrupted serial sections. From 15 to 24 fine rami containing unmyelinated and small myelinated nerve fibres entered the cranial cavity with the mandibular nerve through the foramen ovale. Most rami contributed to a plexus positioned in the crotch of the mandibular and maxillary nerves adjacent to the trigeminal ganglion. The plexus was augmented by an accessory otic ganglion. Rami then continued dorsally on each side of or through the maxillary nerve and joined the cavernous sinus plexus. The pathway described probably gives otic parasympathetic fibres access to the cerebral arteries and may share a wider distribution in common with other nerves contributing to the cavernous sinus plexus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Figs. 13,15 Fig. 14 PMID:8376193

  5. Rehabilitation of the cavernous smooth muscle in patients with organic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Salem, H; Mostafa, T

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effect of regular use of intracorporeal injection (ICI), sildenafil citrate and vacuum constriction device (VCD) on cavernous smooth muscle and erectile activity. One hundred and sixty-five patients with organic erectile dysfunction were investigated for 3 months. The patient and his partner were classified prospectively after proper counselling: group I (n = 56) received ICI twice per week; group II (n = 55) received sildenafil 100 mg twice per week; and group III (n = 54) used VCD twice per week. Duplex ultrasound was carried out before and after treatment, and then, the patients were followed up for a month to assess the resumption of unaided erection. The results showed that there was significant improvement in mean peak systolic velocity (PSV) and mean cavernosal artery diameter (CAD) at the end of the treatment in all groups, being higher in the ICI group than in the other two groups. Also, the percentage of patients who resumed unaided intercourse were higher in the ICI group compared with the other two groups (17.9%, 9.1% and 3.7% respectively). It is concluded that repeated regular use of ICI, sildenafil or VCD by patients with organic erectile dysfunction has a positive impact on their cavernous blood flow and erectile activity.

  6. Assessing fungal community structure from mineral surfaces in Kartchner Caverns using multiplexed 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Michael Joe; Nelson, Will; Soderlund, Carol; Maier, Raina M; Pryor, Barry M

    2015-07-01

    Research on the distribution and structure of fungal communities in caves is lacking. Kartchner Caverns is a wet and mineralogically diverse carbonate cave located in an escarpment of Mississippian Escabrosa limestone in the Whetstone Mountains, Arizona, USA. Fungal diversity from speleothem and rock wall surfaces was examined with 454 FLX Titanium sequencing technology using the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 as a fungal barcode marker. Fungal diversity was estimated and compared between speleothem and rock wall surfaces, and its variation with distance from the natural entrance of the cave was quantified. Effects of environmental factors and nutrient concentrations in speleothem drip water at different sample sites on fungal diversity were also examined. Sequencing revealed 2,219 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the 95% similarity level. Speleothems supported a higher fungal richness and diversity than rock walls. However, community membership and the taxonomic distribution of fungal OTUs at the class level did not differ significantly between speleothems and rock walls. Both OTU richness and diversity decreased significantly with increasing distance from the natural cave entrance. Community membership and taxonomic distribution of fungal OTUs also differed significantly between the sampling sites closest to the entrance and those furthest away. There was no significant effect of temperature, CO2 concentration, or drip water nutrient concentration on fungal community structure on either speleothems or rock walls. Together, these results suggest that proximity to the natural entrance is a critical factor in determining fungal community structure on mineral surfaces in Kartchner Caverns.

  7. Profiling bacterial diversity and taxonomic composition on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, AZ.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Marianyoly; Neilson, Julia W; Nelson, William M; Legatzki, Antje; Byrne, Andrea; Yu, Yeisoo; Wing, Rod A; Soderlund, Carol A; Pryor, Barry M; Pierson, Leland S; Maier, Raina M

    2013-02-01

    Caves are relatively accessible subterranean habitats ideal for the study of subsurface microbial dynamics and metabolisms under oligotrophic, non-photosynthetic conditions. A 454-pyrotag analysis of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene was used to systematically evaluate the bacterial diversity of ten cave surfaces within Kartchner Caverns, a limestone cave. Results showed an average of 1,994 operational taxonomic units (97 % cutoff) per speleothem and a broad taxonomic diversity that included 21 phyla and 12 candidate phyla. Comparative analysis of speleothems within a single room of the cave revealed three distinct bacterial taxonomic profiles dominated by either Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, or Acidobacteria. A gradient in observed species richness along the sampling transect revealed that the communities with lower diversity corresponded to those dominated by Actinobacteria while the more diverse communities were those dominated by Proteobacteria. A 16S rRNA gene clone library from one of the Actinobacteria-dominated speleothems identified clones with 99 % identity to chemoautotrophs and previously characterized oligotrophs, providing insights into potential energy dynamics supporting these communities. The robust analysis conducted for this study demonstrated a rich bacterial diversity on speleothem surfaces. Further, it was shown that seemingly comparable speleothems supported divergent phylogenetic profiles suggesting that these communities are very sensitive to subtle variations in nutritional inputs and environmental factors typifying speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns.

  8. Subcutaneous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Nasal Dorsum: Report of Case Treated with Endoscopic Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Socher, Jan Alessandro; Marchi, Maurício F. de Sá; Rickli, Jeniffer C. Kozechen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hemangiomas are vascular malformations, with slow blood flow, that can occur in any part on the body. They are more common in women and, predominantly, are isolated lesions. The malformation does not spontaneously regress. Subcutaneous hemangioma is a rare variant with an aggressive growth pattern that sometimes recurs after excision. Objective Case report of a subcutaneous cavernous hemangioma in the nasal dorsum treated with endoscopic rhinoplasty. Case Report A 27-year-old woman had a fibroelastic tumor mass in the midline of the nasal dorsum, which was pulsatile; she had obstruction and nasal congestion with associated rhinorrhea, with evolution and worsening over the previous 2 years. Computed tomography showed a tumor demarcated in the nasal dorsum without evidence of intracranial communication. Endoscopic rhinoplasty with septoplasty and associated paranasal sinus sinusectomy was performed without arteriography embolization, sclerotherapy, or laser. Pathologic diagnosis showed cavernous hemangioma. Postoperative follow-up shows no recurrence at 3 years. Discussion This case presented with atypical features, thus making the diagnosis a challenge. Imaging studies were required to confirm the vascular nature of the tumor. Excisional biopsy is the procedure of choice for pathologic examination. Subcutaneous hemangiomas never involute and always need treatment. The surgical approach is exceptional because there was no preoperative diagnosis. In addition, the closed technique provided best aesthetic results in this case. Conclusion Endoscopic rhinoplasty is suitable for nasal dorsum tumor resection and has superior aesthetic result to open techniques. PMID:25992093

  9. Genomic causes of multiple cerebral cavernous malformations in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Ogino, Ikuko; Miyajima, Masakazu; Ikeda, Tomomi; Shindo, Noriko; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori; Arai, Hajime

    2013-05-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a hamartomatous vascular disease affecting the central nervous system. A fraction of CCM are thought to arise in association with genomic mutations in the cerebral cavernous malformation 1 (CCM1) (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) genes. In the present study, 18 Japanese patients with multiple CCM (10 with familial type and eight with sporadic type), underwent genomic analysis for CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3 mutations with blood samples and surgical specimens. MRI showed CCM in the cerebral hemisphere in 17 patients, the cerebellum in 10, the brainstem in 10 and the spinal cord in eight. CCM2 mutations were the most prominent, followed by CCM1 and CCM3. CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3 mutations were not identified in seven patients. Among the 10 patients with familial CCM, CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3 mutations were found in two, three and one patient, respectively, whereas four patients lacked these mutations. Among the eight patients with sporadic CCM, these mutations were found in one, three, and one patients, respectively, whereas three patients lacked these mutations. Most of the patients had a stable course during the follow-up period. Genomic mutations other than CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3 may be frequent in patients with multiple CCM in the Japanese population.

  10. Mutations in 2 distinct genetic pathways result in cerebral cavernous malformations in mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Aubrey C; Drakos, Stavros G; Ruiz, Oscar E; Smith, Alexandra C H; Gibson, Christopher C; Ling, Jing; Passi, Samuel F; Stratman, Amber N; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Revelo, M Patricia; Grossmann, Allie H; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Davis, George E; Metzstein, Mark M; Whitehead, Kevin J; Li, Dean Y

    2011-05-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are a common type of vascular malformation in the brain that are a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke. This condition has been independently linked to 3 separate genes: Krev1 interaction trapped (KRIT1), Cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2), and Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). Despite the commonality in disease pathology caused by mutations in these 3 genes, we found that the loss of Pdcd10 results in significantly different developmental, cell biological, and signaling phenotypes from those seen in the absence of Ccm2 and Krit1. PDCD10 bound to germinal center kinase III (GCKIII) family members, a subset of serine-threonine kinases, and facilitated lumen formation by endothelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that CCM may be a common tissue manifestation of distinct mechanistic pathways. Nevertheless, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for either Pdcd10 or Ccm2 resulted in CCMs in mice. The murine phenotype induced by loss of either protein reproduced all of the key clinical features observed in human patients with CCM, as determined by direct comparison with genotype-specific human surgical specimens. These results suggest that CCM may be more effectively treated by directing therapies based on the underlying genetic mutation rather than treating the condition as a single clinical entity.

  11. Histiocytic sarcoma of the cavernous sinus: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Williams, Erik A; McAneney, Taylor E; Williams, Brian J; Mandell, James W; Shaffrey, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of hematopoietic origin composed of cells showing morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of histiocytic differentiation. We describe the 2nd case of primary histiocytic sarcoma of the cavernous sinus/Meckel's cave, and the 8th case involving the CNS. A 61-year-old Caucasian man presented with numbness on the entire left side of his face, shooting pain in the left frontal region, and headaches. Imaging revealed an enhancing extra axial soft tissue mass located in the left cavernous sinus and left Meckel's cave. Diagnosis was established through open biopsy, after failed attempts via CT-guided trans-foramen ovale fine-needle aspiration biopsy and keyhole biopsy. The tumor was composed of large non-cohesive epithelioid cells invading nerves and ganglion cells. Tumor cells were immunopositive for CD68, CD163, and immunonegative for the anaplastic large cell lymphoma marker ALK-1 as well as other lymphoid, myeloid, and dendritic cell markers. Histiocytic sarcoma has strong potential for systemic spread; early diagnosis and treatment are important. Our patient was initially treated with radiation therapy but subsequently developed metastases.

  12. Ultrasound (US) and computed tomographic (CT) appearances of large (giant) hepatic cavernous hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Samad, S A; Maimunah, A; Zulfiqar, A; Zaharah, M

    1995-03-01

    The sonographic and CT appearances of 9 large cavernous hemangiomas of the liver were studied. On sonography, 6 masses (67%) exhibit heterogenous echo pattern; where in 2 patients the echotexture was a mixture of hypoechoic and isoechoic areas and in 4 patients there are varying amounts of bright hyperreflective areas similar to the texture typical of small hemangiomas. The masses were predominantly hypoechoic in the remaining 3 patients (33%). Incremental bolus or bolus-infusion dynamic CT showed peripheral contrast enhancement of varying intensities and thickness in all patients. The lesions were incorrectly diagnosed as hepatomas in 4 patients, suspected as hemangiomas with a differential diagnosis of hepatomas in 4 patients and an early liver abscess in 1 patient. It is concluded that large cavernous hemangiomas of the liver do not exhibit the typical homogenous hyperreflective echotexture as exhibited by small lesions and they mimic primary and secondary hepatic neoplasms. However, the diagnosis of hemangioma should be entertained when such a mass contains bright hyperechoic areas within its heterogenous echo pattern and exhibit peripheral enhancement on contrast enhanced CT. In addition to correlation with appropriate clinical information, confirmation of diagnosis include delayed scanning during a routine incremental bolus dynamic CT, single-slice dynamic contrast enhanced CT, angiography or isotope scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging depending on the availability of facility.

  13. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: A Study of 100 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Litre, Claude Fabien Colin, Philippe; Noudel, Remy; Peruzzi, Philippe; Bazin, Arnaud; Sherpereel, Bernard; Bernard, Marie Helene; Rousseaux, Pascal

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas; 84 female and 16 male patients were included. The mean patient age was 56 years. The most common symptoms were a reduction in visual acuity (57%), diplopia (50%), exophthalmy (30%), and trigeminal neuralgia (34%). Surgery was initially performed on 26 patients. All patients were treated with FSR. A total of 45 Gy was administered to the lesion, with 5 fractions of 1.8 Gy completed each week. Patient treatment was performed using a Varian Clinac linear accelerator used for cranial treatments and a micro-multileaf collimator. Results: No side effects were reported. Mean follow-up period was 33 months, with 20% of patients undergoing follow-up evaluation of more than 4 years later. The tumor control rate at 3 years was 94%. Three patients required microsurgical intervention because FSR proved ineffective. In terms of functional symptoms, an 81% improvement was observed in patients suffering from exophthalmy, with 46% of these patients being restored to full health. A 52% improvement was observed in diplopia, together with a 67% improvement in visual acuity and a 50% improvement in type V neuropathy. Conclusions: FSR facilitates tumor control, either as an initial treatment option or in combination with microsurgery. In addition to being a safe procedure with few side effects, FSR offers the significant benefit of superior functional outcomes.

  14. Five Equivalent d Orbitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; McClure, Vance

    1970-01-01

    Amplifies and clarifies a previous paper on pyramidal d orbitals. Discusses two sets of pyramid d orbitals with respect to their maximum bond strength and their symmetry. Authors described the oblate and prolate pentagonal antiprisms arising from the two sets of five equivalent d orbitals. (RR)

  15. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  16. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  17. SEASAT B orbit synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, F. G.; Warmke, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Addition were made to Battelle's Interactive Graphics Orbit Selection (IGOS) program; IGOS was exercised via telephone lines from JPL, and candidate SEASAT orbits were analyzed by Battelle. The additions to the program enable clear understanding of the implications of a specific orbit to the diverse desires of the SEASAT user community.

  18. Thermo-fluidal behavior of the air in a cavern for the CAES-G/T[Compressed Air Energy Storage Gas Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Shigeru; Yoshida, Hideo; Echigo, Ryozo; Oishi, Yasushi

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, a numerical analysis was performed to gain the detailed features of the thermo-fluidal behavior of the air inside the cavern for the compressed air storage gas turbine (CAES-G/T). The CAES-G/T, a peak shave power plant is now on the installation in Japan, where energy is stored in off peak period by compressed air in an underground cavern at pressure up to 80 atm abs. In the present work, an analytical model based on the two-dimensional laminar flow on the cross-section of the circular cavern was developed to quantify the effect of the transient process occurring in the cavern and wall during injection, storage and release of compressed air in the experimental circular cavern. the air was introduced until the required pressure inside the cavern is reached, then it was released outside after the storage period. It was found that the stratified temperature distribution was maintained in the cavern during compression and expansion periods. The wall temperature varied together with the variation of the air temperature with time, leading to the heat storage in the wall.

  19. The Effect of Audio Tours on Learning and Social Interaction: An Evaluation at Carlsbad Caverns National Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novey, Levi T.; Hall, Troy E.

    2007-01-01

    Auditory forms of nonpersonal communication have rarely been evaluated in informal settings like parks and museums. This study evaluated the effect of an interpretive audio tour on visitor knowledge and social behavior at Carlsbad Caverns National Park. A cross-sectional pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design compared the responses of audio…

  20. Treatment of a traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula by the sole use of a flow diverting stent.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Mahendran; Power, Mark; Barry, Bryan; Wenderoth, Jason

    2012-05-01

    Direct caroticocavernous fistula (CCF) has traditionally been treated by detachable balloon placement within the affected cavernous sinus. We describe a case of a direct CCF treated solely with flow-diverting stents. These novel devices may offer a simpler and potentially safer vessel-sparing option in this rare condition.