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Sample records for intracranial arteriosclerosis

  1. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  2. Arteriosclerosis Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Veterans Administration Hospital used computer image-processing techniques to detect arteriosclerosis. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center engineers to enhance spacecraft pictures, this device replaced the previous testing for this disease which was extremely painful and time consuming. With this instrument, computer detected edges are shown along with an estimate of location of pre-arteriosclerosis vessel wall. The difference between the two represents the relative amount of disease in the blood vessel. Instrumentation will be expanded again in 1976 to analyze the coronary arteries and the blood vessels of the retina.

  3. Cerebrovascular arteriopathy (arteriosclerosis) and ischemic childhood stroke.

    PubMed

    Daniels, S R; Bates, S; Lukin, R R; Benton, C; Third, J; Glueck, C J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the intracranial cerebrovascular abnormalities and clinical status of 8 children who had familial lipoprotein disorders and evidence of thromboembolic cerebrovascular disease. Six of the 8 children had low levels of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, two had high triglyceride levels, and all came from kindreds characterized by familial lipoprotein abnormalities and premature cardio- and/or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis. Vascular occlusion, irregularities of the arterial lumen, beading, tortuosity, and evidence of collateralization were consistently noted. We speculate that cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in pediatric ischemic stroke victims who have familial lipoprotein abnormalities may be related to lipoprotein-mediated endothelial damage and thrombosis formation, or to the failure to restore endothelial cells' integrity following damage. The apparent association of lipoproteins and strokes in children and their families merits further exploration, particularly when assessing cerebral angiograms in pediatric ischemic stroke victims. In children with unexplained ischemic cerebrovascular accidents, the diagnostic possibility of occlusive arteriosclerosis with thrombosis must be entertained.

  4. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  5. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  6. Genetic aspects of arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goldbourt, U; Neufeld, H N

    1986-01-01

    This review discusses the genetic factors in the development of arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). In several studies, multivariate analysis of prospective mortality/morbidity data and angiographic findings have indicated that a family history of CHD contributed to CHD risk independently of the established risk factors. In addition, ethnic groups that differ in the prevalence and incidence of CHD also markedly differ in blood groups and protein-enzymatic markers. These or other genetic differences may affect CHD rates. Data from fraternal and identical twins, the source of some early genetic CHD findings, are reviewed. Genetic disorders of lipoprotein metabolism and transport, such as familial hypercholesterolemia, as well as other monogenic disorders are discussed. The role of apoprotein E polymorphism i other monogenic disorders are discussed. The role of apoprotein E polymorphism in determining plasma LDL variability among individuals is considered. Recombinant DNA technology, molecular cloning, and the identification of restriction fragment length polymorphisms are new tools for investigators who assess DNA polymorphism. Recent advances in that domain include: DNA polymorphisms affecting blood levels of apo A-I and A-II, association of a DNA insertion on chromosome 19 with severe premature atherosclerosis, and information concerning linkage of the genes for various apolipoproteins. In addition, the evidence for a major genetic component in diabetes mellitus and research into the genetic aspects of hypertension are reviewed. The male/female ratio in pathologically and epidemiologically assessed atherosclerosis may provide clues to the role of genetics. Early structural changes in the coronary artery intima are compatible with the ethnic and gender predilection. A key question in understanding underlying mechanisms in atherosclerosis is why coronary arteries are occluded in individuals whose other arterial systems are largely unaffected. The

  7. Stem cells and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingbo

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cells to replace dead cells or to repair damaged tissues. Recent evidence indicates that stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis, an alloimmune initiated vascular stenosis that often results in transplant organ failure. Although the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis is not yet fully understood, recent developments in stem cell research have suggested novel mechanisms of vascular remodeling in allografts. For example, stem cells derived from the recipient may repair damaged endothelial cells of arteries in transplant organs. Further evidence suggests that stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells may be released from both bone marrow and non-bone marrow tissues. Vascular stem cells appear to replenish cells that died in donor vessels. Concomitantly, stem/progenitor cells may also accumulate in the intima, where they differentiate into smooth muscle cells. However, several issues concerning the contribution of stem cells to the pathogenesis of transplant arteriosclerosis are controversial, eg, whether bone marrow-derived stem cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells that form neointimal lesions of the vessel wall. This review summarizes recent research on the role of stem cells in transplant arteriosclerosis, discusses the mechanisms of stem cell homing and differentiation into mature endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and highlights the controversial issues in the field.

  8. [Portable instrument for arteriosclerosis assessment].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuai; Chen, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    A portable instrument for arteriosclerosis assessment containing sensor module, acquisition board and embedded module was developed for home care in this paper. The sensor module consists of one ECG module and three pulse wave extraction modules, synchronously acquiring human ECG and pulse wave signal of carotid, radial, and dorsal, respectively. The acquisition board converts the sensor module's analog output signals into digital signals and transmits them to the embedded module. The embedded module realizes the functions including signal display, storage and the calculation and output of pulse wave velocity. The structure of the proposed portable instrument is simple, easy to use, and easy to expand. Small size, low cost, and low power consumption are also the advantages of this device. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed portable instrument for arteriosclerosis assessment has high accuracy, good repeatability and can assess the degree of atherosclerosis appropriately.

  9. Laser Therapy For Arteriosclerosis: Current Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dries, David J.; Pollock, Marc E.; Eugene, John

    1987-03-01

    Shortly after the ruby laser was introduced, in 1959, a study for the use of this ruby laser for the in-vitro dissolution of arteriosclerotic plaque was performed.' With subsequent advances in laser technology and with refined delivery techniques, laser applications to the treatment of arteriosclerosis in the coronary arteries and peripheral vascular system is a reality. This report reviews the disease process, arteriosclerosis, and the ef-forts towards laser treatment of this disease. We conclude with a review of the technical barriers to the routine application of laser energy in arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease and the progress being made to overcome these obstacles.

  10. Work-Related Psychosocial Hazards and Arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Ping; Li, Chung-Yi; Hu, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    The association of psychosocial stress with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between arteriosclerosis and various work-related conditions among medical employees with various job titles.A total of 576 medical employees of a regional hospital in Taiwan with a mean age of 43 years and female gender dominance (85%) were enrolled. Arteriosclerosis was evaluated by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Workrelated conditions included job demands, job control, social support, shift work, work hours, sleep duration, and mental health. The crude relationship between each of the selected covariates and baPWV was indicated by Spearman correlation coefficients. A multiple linear regression model was further employed to estimate the adjusted associations of selected covariates with arteriosclerosis.The mean baPWV of participants was 11.4 ± 2.2 m/s, with the value for males being significantly higher than that for females. The baPWV was associated with gender, age, medical profession, work hours, work type, depression, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting glucose, and cholesterol. After being fully adjusted by these factors, only sleep duration of less than 6 hours and weekly work hours longer than 60 hours were significantly associated with increased risk of arteriosclerosis. The conditions of job demands, job control, social support, shift work, and depression showed no significant association with baPWV.Longer work hours and shorter sleep durations were associated with an increased risk of arteriosclerosis. These findings should make it easier for the employer or government to stipulate rational work hours in order to avoid the development of cardiovascular disease among their employees.

  11. Work-Related Psychosocial Hazards and Arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Ping; Li, Chung-Yi; Hu, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    The association of psychosocial stress with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between arteriosclerosis and various work-related conditions among medical employees with various job titles.A total of 576 medical employees of a regional hospital in Taiwan with a mean age of 43 years and female gender dominance (85%) were enrolled. Arteriosclerosis was evaluated by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Workrelated conditions included job demands, job control, social support, shift work, work hours, sleep duration, and mental health. The crude relationship between each of the selected covariates and baPWV was indicated by Spearman correlation coefficients. A multiple linear regression model was further employed to estimate the adjusted associations of selected covariates with arteriosclerosis.The mean baPWV of participants was 11.4 ± 2.2 m/s, with the value for males being significantly higher than that for females. The baPWV was associated with gender, age, medical profession, work hours, work type, depression, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, fasting glucose, and cholesterol. After being fully adjusted by these factors, only sleep duration of less than 6 hours and weekly work hours longer than 60 hours were significantly associated with increased risk of arteriosclerosis. The conditions of job demands, job control, social support, shift work, and depression showed no significant association with baPWV.Longer work hours and shorter sleep durations were associated with an increased risk of arteriosclerosis. These findings should make it easier for the employer or government to stipulate rational work hours in order to avoid the development of cardiovascular disease among their employees. PMID:26549394

  12. Relationship between myocardial bridging and coronary arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian Ling; Huang, Wei Min; Guo, Ji Hong; Li, Xiao Ying; Ma, Xian Lin; Wang, Chong Yu

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the prevalence and characteristics of myocardial bridging in patients who underwent coronary angiography and to also evaluate the correlation between bridged coronary segments and atherosclerosis. For this purpose, clinical materials of 1,500 patients who had received coronary angiography were retrospectively analyzed. The location and length of the myocardial bridge were recorded as well as the extent and location of coronary artery stenosis was described. Segments proximal and distal to the bridging were evaluated for coronary arteriosclerosis as were the remaining coronary segments. We found that myocardial bridging was present in 179 (11.9 %) patients. Bridges were frequently (84.9 %) localized in the mid-distal segment of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Myocardial bridging was not considered a significant risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis (odds ratio 0.58) compared with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The incidence of coronary arteriosclerosis in the distal segments was significantly less affected than the proximal segments (P < 0.01). It was, therefore, concluded that myocardial bridging frequently localized in the mid-distal segment of the LAD artery. The presence of myocardial bridging promotes proximal atherosclerosis but it is not an additional risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:23076634

  13. Transplant arteriosclerosis in a rat aortic model.

    PubMed Central

    Isik, F. F.; McDonald, T. O.; Ferguson, M.; Yamanaka, E.; Gordon, D.

    1992-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) has emerged as an obstacle to the long-term survival of transplanted organs, especially cardiac transplants. The animal models that have been used to study TA have not been fully characterized with regard to features such as the time course of cell proliferation and the sequence of cell types arriving in the developing intimal lesion. We present a model of TA based on a transplanted segment of abdominal aorta that helps address these questions. Two strains of rats (PVG x DA) underwent orthotopic aortic transplantation without immunosuppression and were killed at 14, 20, 40, and 60 days after transplantation. The within-strain control group displayed minimal evidence of cellular rejection with minimal to absent intimal lesions. In contrast, the allograft group showed a linearly increasing intimal lesion, up through 60 days after transplantation. The mechanism of intimal thickening was by an increase in cell number at the earlier time points with the later deposition of extracellular matrix. The early intimal lesion consisted mostly of mononuclear inflammatory cells (45%) with gradually increasing presence of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the intima between 20 and 60 days. Conversely, the media showed gradual infiltration by macrophage-type cells with virtual loss of all SMC from the media by 40 days. The proliferative index showed a peak of 6% and 8% at 20 days in both the intima and media, respectively, and was preceded by the presence of macrophages. In fact, most of the proliferating cells at the earlier time points were either monocytes/macrophages, or were immediately adjacent to monocyte-/macrophage-rich regions. This straight artery segment model of transplant arteriosclerosis provides an easily quantifiable system in which the effects of different interventions (e.g., immunosuppressive regimens) can be tested. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure

  14. Donor-specific antibodies accelerate arteriosclerosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary S; Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; Duong van Huyen, J P; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n=40) or without (n=59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P=0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P=not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis.

  15. Intracranial imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, M.; Cook, G.; Al-Kutoubi, A.

    1996-01-01

    This article concentrates on the imaging of intracranial structures and outlines some basic imaging strategies for common clinical presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:8935596

  16. Primary sclerosing cholangitis – The arteriosclerosis of the bile duct?

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Moustafa, Tarek; Trauner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology affecting the large bile ducts and characterized by periductal fibrosis and stricture formation, which ultimately result in biliary cirrhosis and liver failure. Arteriosclerosis involves the accumulation of altered lipids and lipoproteins in large arteries; this drives inflammation and fibrosis and ultimately leads to narrowing of the arteries and hypoperfusion of dependent organs and tissues. Knowledge of the causative factors is crucial to the understanding of disease mechanisms and the development of specific treatment. Based on pathogenetic similarities between PSC and arteriosclerosis, we hypothesize that PSC represents "arteriosclerosis of the bile duct" initiated by toxic biliary lipids. This hypothesis is based on common molecular, cellular, and morphological features providing the conceptual framework for a deeper understanding of their pathogenesis. This hypothesis should stimulate translational research to facilitate the search for novel treatment strategies for both diseases. PMID:17254334

  17. [Primary and secondary prevention of arteriosclerosis. Risk stratification of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gysan, D B

    2002-10-01

    Hypertension is one of the important risk factors in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. The differences between primary and secondary prevention in diagnosis and therapeutic strategies are reviewed from international studies. The optimal therapy for hypertension and risk stratification, including all other risk factors, will reduce the incidence and mortality of coronary heart disease and stroke. PMID:12395218

  18. Progenitor cells in arteriosclerosis: good or bad guys?

    PubMed

    Campagnolo, Paola; Wong, Mei Mei; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-08-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the mobilization and recruitment of circulating or tissue-resident progenitor cells that give rise to endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can participate in atherosclerosis, neointima hyperplasia after arterial injury, and transplant arteriosclerosis. It is believed that endothelial progenitor cells do exist and can repair and rejuvenate the arteries under physiologic conditions; however, they may also contribute to lesion formation by influencing plaque stability in advanced atherosclerotic plaque under specific pathologic conditions. At the same time, smooth muscle progenitors, despite their capacity to expedite lesion formation during restenosis, may serve to promote atherosclerotic plaque stabilization by producing extracellular matrix proteins. This profound evidence provides support to the hypothesis that both endothelial and smooth muscle progenitors may act as a double-edged sword in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the understanding of the regulatory networks that control endothelial and smooth muscle progenitor differentiation is undoubtedly fundamental both for basic research and for improving current therapeutic avenues for atherosclerosis. We update the progress in progenitor cell study related to the development of arteriosclerosis, focusing specifically on the role of progenitor cells in lesion formation and discuss the controversial issues that regard the origins, frequency, and impact of the progenitors in the disease.

  19. Intracranial pseudoaneurysm after intracranial pressure monitor placement.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kushal J; Jones, Aaron M; Arnold, Paul M; Ebersole, Koji

    2014-12-12

    Traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms are a rare but severe complication following arterial injury. Pseudoaneurysm formation can occur secondary to blunt or penetrating trauma or iatrogenic injury. We report a case of traumatic pseudoaneurysm secondary to placement of an intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor. A 27-year-old man was involved in a motorcycle accident resulting in multiple intracranial hemorrhages. The patient underwent craniectomy and placement of an ICP monitor. 17 days later he developed dilation of his left pupil, with imaging demonstrating a new hemorrhage in the vicinity of the previous ICP monitor. A cerebral angiogram confirmed a left-sided distal M4 pseudoaneurysm which was treated by n-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization. Intracranial pseudoaneurysm formation following neurosurgical procedures is uncommon. Delayed intracranial hemorrhage in a region of prior intracranial manipulation, even following a procedure as 'routine' as placement of an ICP monitor, should raise the suspicion for this rare but potentially lethal complication.

  20. Economics of health and mortality special feature: race, infection, and arteriosclerosis in the past.

    PubMed

    Costa, Dora L; Helmchen, Lorens A; Wilson, Sven

    2007-08-14

    We document racial trends in chronic conditions among older men between 1910 and 2004. The 1910 black arteriosclerosis rate was six times higher than the white 2004 rate and more than two times higher than the 2004 black rate. We argue that blacks' greater lifelong burden of infection led to high arteriosclerosis rates in 1910. Infectious disease, especially respiratory infections at older ages and rheumatic fever and syphilis at younger ages, predicted arteriosclerosis in 1910, suggesting that arteriosclerosis has an infectious cause. Additional risk factors for arteriosclerosis were being born in the second relative to the fourth quarter, consistent with studies implying that atherogenesis begins in utero, and a low body mass index, consistent with an infectious disease origin of arteriosclerosis.

  1. Intracranial Vascular Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Mechanical retrievers/aspiration systems: used to remove clots ... passageway between an artery and a vein. intracranial aneurysms, a ballooning out of the wall of an ...

  2. Immune-Mediated Vascular Injury and Dysfunction in Transplant Arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    von Rossum, Anna; Laher, Ismail; Choy, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage organ failure but this life-saving procedure is limited by immune-mediated rejection of most grafts. Blood vessels within transplanted organs are targeted by the immune system and the resultant vascular damage is a main contributor to acute and chronic graft failure. The vasculature is a unique tissue with specific immunological properties. This review discusses the interactions of the immune system with blood vessels in transplanted organs and how these interactions lead to the development of transplant arteriosclerosis, a leading cause of heart transplant failure. PMID:25628623

  3. Is hyperuricemia a risk factor for arteriosclerosis? Uric acid and arteriosclerosis in apolipoprotein e-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wakuda, Hirokazu; Uchida, Shinya; Ikeda, Masahiko; Tabuchi, Masaki; Akahoshi, Yasumitsu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    Although hyperlipidemia, high blood pressure, and diabetes increase the risk of arteriosclerosis, it is not clear whether hyperuricemia increases the risk of arteriosclerosis or not. We examined the effects of uric acid and curative drugs for hyperuricemia on atherosclerosis-susceptible C57BL/6J apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. Male apoE(-/-) mice (age: 6 weeks) were fed a normal diet (normal diet group) or a uric acid-enriched diet. Mice fed the uric acid-enriched diet were divided into three groups and administered a drinking vehicle (high uric acid diet group), allopurinol (20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), or benzbromarone (20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 10 weeks. Serum uric acid concentrations were higher in the high uric acid diet group than in the normal diet group, and concentrations in the allopurinol and benzbromarone groups were lower than in the high uric acid diet group. Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lower in the allopurinol group than in the high uric acid diet group. Oxidative stress was lower in the benzbromarone group than in the high uric acid diet group. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were smaller in the allopurinol and benzbromarone groups than in the high uric acid diet group. Thus, hyperuricemia may not be an independent risk factor for arteriosclerosis; however, the administration of allopurinol and benzbromarone prevented the development of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice fed a uric acid-enriched diet. The anti-atherosclerotic effect was in part due to lower total cholesterol and oxidative stress in the serum. Other possible mechanisms underlying this effect should be investigated.

  4. Epidemiology of intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Suri, M Fareed K; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2009-10-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common etiology for ischemic stroke. Due to limitations of imaging studies, there are limited data on the prevalence of symptomatic and asymptomatic intracranial stenosis. Intracranial stenosis is more prevalent in Asian, Hispanic, and African-American populations. The reported proportion of patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis among those hospitalized for ischemic cerebral events varies from 1% in non-Hispanic whites to as high as 50% in Asian populations. In population-based studies, the estimated prevalence of symptomatic intracranial disease varies from 1 in 100,000 for whites to 15 in 100,000 in African Americans. A Chinese population-based study reported intracranial stenosis in 7% of the population aged more than 40 years. Autopsy studies have noted intracranial atherosclerotic disease in about 23% of population in the 6th decade and 80% of population in the 9th decade of life. Angiotensin-converting enzyme polymorphisms, plasma endostatin/vascular endothelial growth factor ratio, glutathione S-transferase omega-1 gene polymorphism, and plasma homocysteine levels are non-modifiable risk factors noted to be associated with intracranial stenosis. Hypertension and serum lipid profile are major modifiable risk factors, whereas sickle cell disease is an uncommon risk factor that can be managed to reduce risk. Associations of intracranial atherosclerosis with diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, aortic plaques, radiotherapy, and meningitis are less well documented.

  5. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  6. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  7. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    AIP1 (encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an ASK1-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF and ER stress in EC (therefore AIP1 is an Anti-Inflammatory Protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations. PMID:25732743

  8. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-05-01

    AIP1 (ASK1-interacting protein-1; encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in EC (therefore, AIP1 is an anti-inflammatory protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations.

  9. Telomere length, cardiovascular risk and arteriosclerosis in human kidneys: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    De Vusser, Katrien; Pieters, Nicky; Janssen, Bram; Lerut, Evelyne; Kuypers, Dirk; Jochmans, Ina; Monbaliu, Diethard; Pirenne, Jacques; Nawrot, Tim; Naesens, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Background Replicative senescence, associated with telomere shortening, plays an important role in aging and cardiovascular disease. The relation between telomere length, cardiovascular risk, and renal disease is unknown. Methods Our study consisted of a cohort of 257 kidney donors for transplantation, divided into a test and a validation cohort. We used quantitative RT‐PCR to measure relative telomere length (log T/S ratio) in peripheral blood leucocytes, and in kidney biopsies performed prior to implantation. The association between leucocyte and intrarenal telomere length, cardiovascular risk factors, and renal histology, was studied using multiple regression models, adjusted for calendar age, gender and other donor demographics. Results Subjects with intrarenal arteriosclerosis had significantly shorter leucocyte telomere length compared with patients without arteriosclerosis (log T/S ratio ‐0.3 ± 0.4 vs. 0.1 ± 0.2 with vs. without arteriosclerosis; p = 0.0008). Intrarenal arteriosclerosis was associated with shorter telomere length, independent of gender, calendar age, history of hypertension and history of cardiovascular events. For each increase of one standard deviation of the log T/S ratio, the odds for intrarenal arteriosclerosis decreased with 64% (Odds ratio 0.36; 95% CI 0.17‐0.77; p = 0.02). In accordance with leucocyte telomere length, shorter intrarenal telomere length associated significantly with the presence of renal arteriosclerosis (log T/S ratio ‐0.04 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.01 with vs. without arteriosclerosis, p = 0.007), and not with other histological lesions. Interpretation We demonstrate that arteriosclerosis in smaller intrarenal arteries is associated with shorter telomere length. Our study suggests a central role of replicative senescence in the progression of renovascular disease, independent of calendar age. PMID:26539975

  10. Combination of clopidogrel and everolimus dramatically reduced the development of transplant arteriosclerosis in murine aortic allografts.

    PubMed

    Eckl, Sebastian; Heim, Christian; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Hoffmann, Julia; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2010-09-01

    Our group has shown that platelet inhibition with clopidogrel, an antagonist of the P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor on platelets, reduced the formation of transplant arteriosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of cyclosporin or everolimus with clopidogrel has a beneficial effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Fully MHC mismatched C57Bl/6 (H2(b)) donor aortas were transplanted into CBA.J (H2(k)) recipients and mice received either clopidogrel alone (1 mg/kg/day) or in combination with cyclosporin (2 mg/kg/day) or everolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day). Grafts were analysed by histology and morphometry on day 30 after transplantation. In mice treated with clopidogrel alone, transplant arteriosclerosis was significantly reduced [intima proliferation 56 +/- 11% vs. 81 +/- 7% (control)/n = 7]. Daily application of everolimus reduced the development of transplant arteriosclerosis compared with untreated controls [intima proliferation of 29 +/- 9% vs. 81 +/- 7% (control)/n = 7]. Strikingly, combination of clopidogrel and everolimus almost abolished the formation of transplant arteriosclerosis [intima proliferation: 11 +/- 8% vs. 81 +/- 7% (control)/n = 7]. By contrast, combination of cyclosporin and clopidogrel compared with clopidogrel alone showed no additive effect. These results demonstrate that combination of platelet- and mammalian target of Rapamycin-inhibition can dramatically reduce the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  11. Histamine receptors expressed in circulating progenitor cells have reciprocal actions in ligation-induced arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Guo, Xin; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2013-09-01

    Histamine is synthesized as a low-molecular-weight amine from L-histidine by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Recently, we demonstrated that carotid artery-ligated HDC gene-deficient mice (HDC(-/-)) showed less neointimal formation than wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that histamine participates in the process of arteriosclerosis. However, little is known about the roles of histamine-specific receptors (HHRs) in arteriosclerosis. To define the roles of HHRs in arteriosclerosis, we investigated intimal remodeling in ligated carotid arteries of HHR-deficient mice (H1R(-/-) or H2R(-/-)). Quantitative analysis showed that H1R(-/-) mice had significantly less arteriosclerogenesis, whereas H2R(-/-) mice had more, as compared with WT mice. Bone marrow transplantation from H1R(-/-) or H2R(-/-) to WT mice confirmed the above observation. Furthermore, the increased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), adhesion molecules and liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR3), interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R), was consistent with the arteriosclerotic phenotype of H2R(-/-) mice. Peripheral progenitor cells in H2R(-/-) mice accelerate ligation-induced arteriosclerosis through their regulation of MCP-1, PDGF, adhesion molecules and LXR-related inflammatory signaling factors. In contrast, peripheral progenitor cells act to suppress arteriosclerosis in H1R(-/-) mice, indicating that HHRs reciprocally regulate inflammation in the ligation-induced arteriosclerosis.

  12. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  13. Intracranial presentation of teratocarcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sweety Vijay, Shinde; Kumar, Tyagi Devendra; Srikant, Balasubramaniam; Vithal, Sawant Hemant Kumar; Vijay, Kane Shubda; Gurunath, Puranik

    2010-10-01

    Teratocarcinosarcoma (TCS), an aggressive and extremely rare neoplasm, usually presents as a nasal or paranasal mass. TCS can have intracranial or dural extension from a nasal mass. We found only two instances in the literature that described this lesion as primarily manifesting as an intracranial mass while arising from a primary nasal focus. We describe a patient who had a predominantly frontal-lobe TCS without any symptoms of a primary nasal mass. The gross surgical appearance was a glistening, slimy, firm white mucoid lesion, in contrast to the friable, necrotic and tan-colored lesion usually described. We report a patient with a rare intracranial TCS, and focus on the differential diagnoses of intracranial tumors. Neuropathologists and neurosurgeons should be aware of this mode of presentation for an accurate diagnosis and a well-targeted therapeutic approach.

  14. Hidradenoma with intracranial involvement.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, P G; Diengdoh, J V; Crockard, H A; Stern, G M

    1984-06-01

    A case of recurrent hidradenoma of the external ear with intracranial spread is described. The presentation, classification and management of this rare tumour are discussed and the importance of adequate long term review is stressed.

  15. Angioscopic assessment of various percutaneous treatments for arteriosclerosis obliterance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, Hiroyasu; Watanabe, Kazuo; Shiraishi, Shohzo; Sato, Takashi; Koga, Nobuhiko

    1993-06-01

    We have evaluated the angioscopic findings before and after various percutaneous techniques to treat 39 lesions in 32 cases of arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO). We applied a laser (CL50: SLT, Japan), percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), and atherectomy -- either singly or in combination, with angioscopic luminal observation (angioscope: PF14L & PF18L Olympus, Japan) recorded before and after the treatments. In the case of a complete obstruction, we employed PTA as the first choice. We used a laser prior to PTA when the PTA guide-wire failed to penetrate the lumen. For eccentric and calcified lesions atherectomy was applied. A sufficient enlargement was obtained initially in 37 of the 39 lesions. The angioscopic observations after treatment revealed carbonization (3/5) and attachment of small thrombi (3/5) after using the laser, intimal rupture (3/8), dissection (2/8), flap formation (2/8), and attachment of small thrombi (4/8) after PTA, and attachment of small thrombi (9/19), flap formation (6/19), and dissection (2/19) after atherectomy. We established the efficacy of angioscopic assessment demonstrating beneficial clinical results. The angioscopic findings suggest that attachment of small thrombi may be responsible for a poor prognosis. Additional angioscopic observations with angiography are recommended for improved understanding of the luminal changes.

  16. [Correction of intracranial pressure in patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhages].

    PubMed

    Virozub, I D; Chipko, S S; Chernovskiĭ, V I; Cherniaev, V A

    1986-01-01

    Therapeutical correction of intracranial pressure changes were conducted in 14 patients suffering from traumatic intracranial hematomas by endolumbar administration of physiological solution. The distinguishing feature of this method is the possibility of continuous control of the intracranial pressure level by means of long-term graphic recording of epidural pressure. This makes it possible to perform endolumbar administration of physiological solution in a dose which is determined by the initial level of epidural intracranial pressure. Therapeutic correction of intracranial pressure by endolumbar injection of physiological solution proved successful in the initial stages of dislocation of the brain and in stable intracranial hypotension.

  17. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sergeev, A V

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition due to high intracranial pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion, venous thrombosis or brain infection. It mostly occurs in young obese females. Currently, the incidence of IIH in obese women is estimated to be 12 per 100,000 people per year. Epidemiological data demonstrate the increase in incidence in this group: 323 cases per 100,000. IIH can cause visual loss in 1-2% of the patients during the year before the diagnosis and beginning of treatment. IIH treatment is a complex multidisciplinary problem that includes a body-mass reduction program, conservative pharmacological treatment, prolonged ophthalmological study and, if necessary, timely neurosurgical treatment.

  18. [The initial stage of thrombus formation in early stages of arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Breddin, K

    1978-09-01

    An arterial thrombosis develops via a lesion of the vascular wall. By the contact of the flowing blood with subendothelial collagen and basal membrane proportions the adhesion and aggregation of platelets develop which, depending on flowing conditions and local conditions, such as ADP-concentration, may lead to manifest thromboses. The prostaglandines have an essential influence on these processes. The relations of thrombosis to arteriosclerosis consist in the stimulation of the smooth muscle cells to proliferation by a factor of thrombocytes, in the organisation of experimental arterial thromboses with formation of an intima proliferation and in the complications of manifest arteriosclerosis by secondary thromboses. Methods for the proff of an increased inclination to thrombosis on the basis of an increased platelet function are critically discussed as to their clinical usability. A spontaneously increased aggregation of platelets is regarded as a reference to progressing arteriosclerosis. In these cases the significant increase of the spontaneous aggregation is of special importance in diabetics.

  19. Study on the classification algorithm of degree of arteriosclerosis based on fuzzy pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Zhou, Runjing; Liu, Guiying

    2010-08-01

    Pulse wave of human body contains large amount of physiological and pathological information, so the degree of arteriosclerosis classification algorithm is study based on fuzzy pattern recognition in this paper. Taking the human's pulse wave as the research object, we can extract the characteristic of time and frequency domain of pulse signal, and select the parameters with a better clustering effect for arteriosclerosis identification. Moreover, the validity of characteristic parameters is verified by fuzzy ISODATA clustering method (FISOCM). Finally, fuzzy pattern recognition system can quantitatively distinguish the degree of arteriosclerosis with patients. By testing the 50 samples in the built pulse database, the experimental result shows that the algorithm is practical and achieves a good classification recognition result.

  20. Intracranial infantile hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Brian J; Baranoski, Jacob F; Malhotra, Ajay; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Sze, Gordon; Duncan, Charles C

    2014-08-01

    Intracranial infantile hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are exceedingly rare lesions. Only 11 cases have been previously reported in the literature. As such, little is known about the etiology, long-term prognosis, and optimal treatment paradigm. Clinically, they are consistently less aggressive than those in adults. The authors present the case of a 2-month-old boy with an intracranial HPC, review the available literature, discuss the evolving concepts of what defines an HPC, and offer a potential explanation to how HPC histology might relate to the clinical behavior of these lesions.

  1. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  2. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  3. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis promotes transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing the production of SDF-1α.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, S; Li, W; Hu, S; Xiong, J; Shu, X; Hu, Q; Zheng, Q; Song, Z

    2012-08-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of late allograft loss. Medial smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis is considered to be an important event in transplant arteriosclerosis. However, the precise contribution of medial SMC apoptosis to transplant arteriosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We transferred wild-type p53 to induce apoptosis of cultured SMCs. We found that apoptosis induces the production of SDF-1α from apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, resulting in increased SDF-1α in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transferred SMCs activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/Erk signaling in a SDF-1α-dependent manner and thereby promoted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration and proliferation. In a rat aorta transplantation model, lentivirus-mediated BclxL transfer selectively inhibits medial SMC apoptosis in aortic allografts, resulting in a remarkable decrease of SDF-1α both in allograft media and in blood plasma, associated with diminished recruitment of CD90(+)CD105(+) double-positive cells and impaired neointimal formation. Systemic administration of rapamycin or PD98059 also attenuated MSC recruitment and neointimal formation in the aortic allografts. These results suggest that medial SMC apoptosis is critical for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing SDF-1α production and that MSC recruitment represents a major component of vascular remodeling, constituting a relevant target and mechanism for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Experimental coronary sclerosis induced by immobilization of rabbits: A new model of arteriosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyavokin, V. V.; Tjawokin, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for producing arteriosclerosis with coronary insufficiency in rabbits by means of immobilization is described and discussed. The experimentally induced atherosclerosis develops due to hypodynamics imposed by the reduced muscular activity without overloading with exogenous cholesterol. The atherosclerosis and coronary insufficiency are associated. With variations in the duration and extent of immobilization, coronary insufficiency alone or with atherosclerosis can be produced.

  5. Intracranial juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Wylie, J P; Slevin, N J; Johnson, R J

    1998-01-01

    We report the case history of a 26-year-old man who was diagnosed with advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with intracranial extension. The lesion was considered to be inoperable and the patient was treated with radical radiotherapy. Serial magnetic resonance imaging has shown continued tumour regression and he remains well after 3 years. The literature is reviewed and radiotherapy recommended as the modality of choice for these patients.

  6. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  7. Renal artery bilateral arteriosclerosis cause of resistant hypertension in hemodialysed patients.

    PubMed

    Niculae, Andrei; Peride, Ileana; Marinescu-Paninopol, Adriana; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Ginghină, Octav; Jecan, Cristian Radu; Bratu, Ovidiu Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old hemodialysed male patient known with severe hypertension resistant to six classes of hypotensive medication, in maximal doses, correlated with increased ultrafiltration during the hemodialysis session. In this case, bilateral nephrectomy was performed as final treatment option for malignant hypertension, and histopathological examination of both kidneys emphasized arteriosclerosis lesions. The results consisted in better hypertension management, with a reduction in both the number and doses of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:27516040

  8. Radiographic manifestations of Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasbi-Arashlow, Mehrnaz; Barghan, Sevin; Kashtwari, Deeba

    2016-01-01

    Mönckeberg sclerosis is a disease of unknown etiology, characterized by dystrophic calcification within the arterial tunica media of the lower extremities leading to reduced arterial compliance. Medial calcinosis does not obstruct the lumina of the arteries, and therefore does not lead to symptoms or signs of limb or organ ischemia. Mönckeberg sclerosis most commonly occurs in aged and diabetic individuals and in patients on dialysis. Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis is frequently observed in the visceral arteries, and it can occur in the head and neck region as well. This report describes a remarkable case of Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis in the head and neck region as detected on dental imaging studies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case that has been reported in which this condition presented in the facial vasculature. The aim of this report was to define the radiographic characteristics of Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis in an effort to assist health care providers in diagnosing and managing this condition. PMID:27051640

  9. Reduced elastogenesis: a clue to the arteriosclerosis and emphysematous changes in Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arteriosclerosis and emphysema develop in individuals with Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD), a multisystem disorder caused by biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1). However, the mechanism by which the vascular and pulmonary disease arises in SIOD remains unknown. Methods We reviewed the records of 65 patients with SMARCAL1 mutations. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted on autopsy tissue from 4 SIOD patients. Results Thirty-two of 63 patients had signs of arteriosclerosis and 3 of 51 had signs of emphysema. The arteriosclerosis was characterized by intimal and medial hyperplasia, smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and fragmented and disorganized elastin fibers, and the pulmonary disease was characterized by panlobular enlargement of air spaces. Consistent with a cell autonomous disorder, SMARCAL1 was expressed in arterial and lung tissue, and both the aorta and lung of SIOD patients had reduced expression of elastin and alterations in the expression of regulators of elastin gene expression. Conclusions This first comprehensive study of the vascular and pulmonary complications of SIOD shows that these commonly cause morbidity and mortality and might arise from impaired elastogenesis. Additionally, the effect of SMARCAL1 deficiency on elastin expression provides a model for understanding other features of SIOD. PMID:22998683

  10. Patient-controlled intracranial pressure for managing idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Werndle, Melissa C; Newling-Ward, Elizabeth; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a difficult condition to manage. We present a novel treatment that substantially improved the headaches and reduced admissions and shunt revision surgery in a patient. We inserted a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, performed subtemporal craniectomies, and instructed our patient to apply different sized headbands to allow her to anticipate and control her own intracranial pressure: a tight headband for low-pressure headaches; no band for high-pressure headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial pressure monitoring revealed this was not a placebo effect.

  11. Telemetry of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Corbin, S. D.; Silverberg, G. D.; Schmidt, E. V.; Ream, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    A completely implantable epidural pressure telemetry system designed for accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is described. The implant device is batteryless, providing unlimited operating life. The described system uses a capacitive pressure transducer with excellent long-term stability. Once detected with the transducer and converted to a frequency with the oscillator electronics, the pressure signal is digitized. It is then telemetered without the possibility of further degradation. After detection with the small external module, the data can be retransmitted by a radio link for complete patient mobility or the energizer signal pickup module can be wired to a bedside readout unit. Continuous data are available from the system so that the dynamic ICP changes reflecting arterial blood pressure can be observed and used for diagnosis.

  12. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Avinash; Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  13. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  14. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  15. Sphenoethmoidal mucoceles with intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Close, L G; O'Conner, W E

    1983-08-01

    Mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses are benign, expansile, locally destructive lesions that are thought to occur secondary to obstruction of the sinus ostia. Nasal and/or ocular signs and symptoms are the usual clinical manifestations of mucoceles arising in the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses, and intracranial extension is rare. We describe three cases of widely destructive sphenoethmoidal mucoceles extending intracranially, with bone erosion and dural exposure in all cases and brain necrosis in one case.

  16. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide–treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P < 0.01) and more vascular smooth muscle cells (4.8 ± 0.6% versus 2.4 ± 0.3% positive area; P < 0.01). Finally, lipid deposition measured by Oil-red-O staining in the aortic arch was significantly higher in the C-peptide group compared with controls. Our results demonstrate that elevated C-peptide levels promote inflammatory cell infiltration and lesion development in ApoE-deficient mice without having metabolic effects. These data obtained in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance. PMID:21707916

  17. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide-treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P < 0.01) and more vascular smooth muscle cells (4.8 ± 0.6% versus 2.4 ± 0.3% positive area; P < 0.01). Finally, lipid deposition measured by Oil-red-O staining in the aortic arch was significantly higher in the C-peptide group compared with controls. Our results demonstrate that elevated C-peptide levels promote inflammatory cell infiltration and lesion development in ApoE-deficient mice without having metabolic effects. These data obtained in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance.

  18. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  19. Nonlocal intracranial cavity extraction.

    PubMed

    Manjón, José V; Eskildsen, Simon F; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E; Collins, D Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  20. APOL1 Risk Alleles are Associated with More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels with Aging and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Mott, Susan A; Puelles, Victor G; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl L; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    The increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) among hypertensive African Americans is partly related to APOL1 allele variants. Hypertension-associated arterionephrosclerosis consists of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis. The initial glomerulosclerosis, attributed to preglomerular arteriosclerosis and ischemia, consists of focal global glomerulosclerosis (FGGS), but in biopsy studies, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is found with progression to ESKD, particularly in African Americans. This is a study of arterionephrosclerosis in successfully APOL1 genotyped autopsy kidney tissue of 159 African Americans (61 no risk alleles, 68 one risk allele, 30 two risk alleles) and 135 whites aged 18–89 years from a general population with no clinical renal disease. Glomerulosclerosis was nearly exclusively FGGS with only three subjects having FSGS-like lesions that were unrelated to APOL1 risk status. For both races, in multivariable analysis, the dependent variables of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis were all significantly related to the independent variables of older age (P < 0.001) and hypertension (P < 0.001). A relationship between APOL1 genotype and arteriosclerosis was apparent only after 35 years of age when, for any level of elevated blood pressure, more severe arteriosclerosis was found in the interlobular arteries of 14 subjects with two APOL1 risk alleles when compared to African Americans with none (n = 37, P = 0.02) or one risk alleles (n = 35, P = 0.02). With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. FSGS was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular. PMID:27610422

  1. Correlation Between Arteriosclerosis and Periodontal Condition Assessed by Lactoferrin and α1-Antitrypsin Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shuji; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-o; Sata, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Patients with periodontal disease exhibit exacerbated atherosclerosis, aortic stiffness, or vascular endothelial dysfunction. However, in a recent scientific statement, the American Heart Association noted that neither has periodontal disease been proven to cause atherosclerotic vascular disease nor has the treatment of periodontal disease been proven to prevent atherosclerotic vascular disease. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the correlation between periodontal condition and arteriosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), which is usually accompanied by systemic arteriosclerosis.We measured levels of gingival crevicular fluid lactoferrin (GCF-Lf) and α1-antitrypsin (GCF-AT) in 72 patients (67 ± 8 years, 56 men) with CAD. Furthermore, we evaluated the maximum intima-media thickness (max IMT) and plaque score of the carotid arteries as well as brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, each of which is a parameter for determining arteriosclerosis status. The average level of GCF-Lf was 0.29 ± 0.36 µg/mL and that of GCF-AT was 0.31 ± 0.66 µg/mL, with significant correlation between the two (r = 0.701, P < 0.001). No significant difference in GCF-Lf and GCF-AT levels was observed between patients with single-, double-, and triple-vessel CAD. There were no significant correlations between the arteriosclerosis parameters (ie, max IMT, plaque score, baPWV, and FMD) and GCF-Lf or GCF-AT.No correlation between the GCF biomarkers and the severity of arteriosclerosis was detected. This result may suggest that worsening of the periodontal condition assessed by GCF biomarkers is not a major potential risk factor for arteriosclerosis.

  2. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  3. Management of Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hoak, David A; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is a common cause of stroke worldwide, causing approximately 10 % of strokes in the USA and up to 50 % in Asian populations. Recurrent stroke risks are particularly high in those with a stenosis of 70 % or more and a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke. Warfarin has been associated with higher major hemorrhage rates and no reduction of recurrent stroke compared to aspirin in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. After early trials showed the feasibility of stenting, two randomized trials compared stenting plus medical management to medical management alone in symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Stenting was linked with increased risk and showed no benefit in any subpopulation of patients. Aggressive medical management in the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial was associated with half the risk of stroke compared to that in similar patients in a previous symptomatic intracranial stenosis trial after adjustment of confounding characteristics. Aggressive medical management comprises risk factor control, including a target systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, a low density lipoprotein <70 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1C <7.0 %, and lifestyle management that incorporates exercise, smoking cessation and weight management, and the use of antithrombotics. PMID:27443379

  4. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  5. CT and intracranial manifestations of otorhinologic disease.

    PubMed

    Keller, M A; Holgate, R C; McClarty, B M

    1982-12-01

    Most inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the ear, nose, nasopharynx, and paranasal sinuses have the capability of intracranial extension. CT is extremely important in defining such lesions, and surpasses complex motion tomography in delineating the extracranial soft tissue involvement and intracranial spread. Trauma can simultaneously affect both intracranial and extracranial compartments but because of its scope, is not dealt with in this submission.

  6. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  7. Unaltered levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in the absence of the B cell homing chemokine receptor CXCR5.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Stephan M; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Ohl, Lars; Spriewald, Bernd M; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Weyand, Michael; Förster, Reinhold

    2009-03-01

    Chemokine receptors and their ligands are crucial for lymphocyte trafficking under both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The chemokine receptor CXCR5 controls B cell migration and the organization of B cell follicles. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CXCR5 on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Fully MHC mismatched BALB/c (H2(d)) donor aortas were transplanted into C57BL/6-CXCR5(-/-) (H2(b)), C57BL/6-CXCR5(+/-) (H2(b)) or C57BL/6-CXCR5(+/+) (H2(b)) recipients. Grafts were analysed by morphometry and immunofluorescence and intra-graft cytokine mRNA production was analysed by RT-PCR. Transplant arteriosclerosis was evident in CXCR5+/+ and CXCR5+/- mice and only mildly reduced in CXCR5-/- recipients indicating that absence of CXCR5 had no substantial effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Analysis of the cellular infiltrate of aortic grafts implanted in CXCR5-/- recipients revealed no differences in the number of T-cells, macrophages and B cells as compared to controls. Intra-graft cytokine production showed no significant changes in Th1 (IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines as well as in TGF-beta and iNOS production. These data suggest that lack of CXCR5 expression by recipient T- and B-cells has little effect on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  8. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  9. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  10. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-05-17

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA.

  11. Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo Yuan; Zong, Miao; Zong, Wen Jing; Sun, Yan Hui; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Hong Bo

    2016-10-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare histioproliferative disorder that only occasionally involves the central nervous system. We present the diagnosis and treatment of five patients with intracranial RDD. The patients were preoperatively misdiagnosed as meningioma or eosinophilic granuloma. All five patients were treated by total or subtotal surgical resection and none of them experienced recurrence. Histopathological examination showed a characteristic emperipolesis, the lymphocytes were engulfed in the S-100 protein and CD68 positive histiocytes, with negative expression of CD1a. Preoperative diagnosis of intracranial RDD is still challenging because the lesion is usually a dural-based lesion that mimics a meningioma. Surgical resection is an effective treatment and radiotherapy, steroid and chemotherapy has not demonstrated reliable therapeutic efficiency. PMID:27561856

  12. Clinical Analysis of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Joo; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Lee, Youn-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracranial hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumors with aggressive behavior, including local recurrence and distant metastasis. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of grossly total resection and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for these tumors. Methods A total of 13 patients treated for intracranial HPC from January 1995 through May 2013 were included in this retrospective study. We analyzed the clinical presentations, radiologic appearances, treatment results, and follow-up outcomes, as well as reviewed other studies. Results The ages of the patients at the time of diagnosis ranged from 26 to 73 years (mean : 48 years). The majority of the patients were male (92.3%), and the majority of the tumors were located in the parasagittal and falx. The ratio of intracranial HPCs to meningiomas was 13 : 598 in same period, or 2.2%. Seven patients (53.8%) had anaplastic HPCs. Nine patients (69.2%) underwent gross total tumor resection in the first operation without mortality. Eleven patients (84.6%) underwent postoperative adjuvant RT. Follow-up period ranged from 13 to 185 months (mean : 54.3 months). The local recurrence rate was 46.2% (6/13), and there were no distant metastases. The 10-year survival rate after initial surgery was 83.9%. The initial mean Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) was 70.8 and the final mean KPS was 64.6. Conclusion Gross total tumor resection upon initial surgery is very important. We believe that adjuvant RT is helpful even with maximal tumor resection. Molecular biologic analyses and chemotherapy studies are required to achieve better outcomes in recurrent intracranial HPCs. PMID:24294454

  13. Diagnosis of Intracranial Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    KANOTO, Masafumi; HOSOYA, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial dissection is defined as a hematoma in the wall of a cervical or an intracranial artery. Cerebral arterial dissection causes arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm, resulting in acute infarction and hemorrhage. Image analysis by such methods as conventional angiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and so on plays an important role in diagnosing cerebral arterial dissection. In this study, we explore the methods and findings involved in the diagnosis of cerebral arterial dissection. PMID:27180630

  14. Prognostic significance of intracranial pressure monitoring and intracranial hypertension in severe brain trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Aleksandar; Stefanović, Ivan; Novak, Vesna; Veselinović, Dragan; Ivanov, Goran; Veselinović, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Since without prospective randomized studies it is not possible to have a clear attitude towards the importance of intracranial pressure monitoring, this study was aimed at examining the prognostic effect of the intracranial pressure monitoring and intracranial pressure oriented therapy in severe brain trauma patients, and at defining optimal intracranial pressure values for starting the treatment. Two groups of patients were treated in the study, one consisted of 32 patients undergoing intracranial pressure monitoring and the second group of 29 patients without intracranial pressure monitoring in the control group. The study was prospective with groups randomized. There were 53% survivals in the intracranial pressure monitored patients and 34% in the control group, with no significant difference in the survival rate between the two groups (chi2=2.11; p=0.15; p>0.05). The average intracranial pressure in the patients with intracranial hypertension who died was 27 mm Hg, while in the patients who survived the average intracranial pressure was significantly lower (Student's t test: t=2.91; p=0.008; p<0.01) and it was 18 mm Hg. We recommend starting intracranial pressure oriented therapy when the patient's intracranial pressure exceeds 18 mmHg during 2 hours of monitoring.

  15. Endoscopic treatment of transnasal intracranial penetrating foreign body.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Seo, Bo Ra; Lim, Sang Chul

    2011-09-01

    Transnasal intracranial penetrating injury is rare. We report a case of transnasal intracranial penetrating metallic chopstick, which was removed successfully by endoscopic approach, and management of transnasal intracranial penetrating injuries.

  16. Feasibility of microvascular head and neck reconstruction in the setting of calcified arteriosclerosis of the vascular pedicle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew K; Blackwell, Keith E; Kim, Brandon; Nabili, Vishad

    2013-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To report outcomes in free flap reconstructive surgery in the setting of calcified arteriosclerosis affecting the flap pedicle. DESIGN Retrospective review, including a detailed analysis of medical records, histopathologic findings, and a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A total of 1329 consecutive microvascular free tissue transfers were performed by 2 reconstructive surgeons at a university-affiliated tertiary care medical center from January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2011. Clinical notes, operative notes, and pathology reports were systematically reviewed to identify 44 patients (3%) with calcified arteriosclerosis involving the flap vascular pedicle. A comprehensive medical record review was performed for the included patients, detailing patient-related characteristics, flap survival, and incidence of perioperative complications. RESULTS A history of arteriosclerosis was identified preoperatively in 18 patients (41%). Eight patients (18%) were specifically recognized clinically and histologically to have a variant of arteriosclerosis known as Mönckeberg medial calcific sclerosis. In total, fibula osteocutaneous free flap was performed in 30 patients, radial forearm in 8 patients, rectus abdominus in 3 patients, latissimus dorsi in 2 patients, and parascapular in 1 patient. Perioperative complications occurred in 17 patients (39%), with the most common being pulmonary (14%) and cardiac (9%). Patient follow-up ranged from 3 to 137 months, with a mean postoperative follow-up of 21 months. The mean length of hospital stay was 12 days. There was a 0% incidence of total flap failure and a 7% incidence of partial flap necrosis. CONCLUSION Although technically challenging, successful microvascular free flap reconstruction can be achieved despite the presence of vascular calcifications affecting the flap vascular pedicle.

  17. [Correlation between autophagy and polarization of macrophages in atherosclerosis plaque in arteriosclerosis obliterans amputees].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-na; Guo, Sheng-nan; Wang, Jun-yan; Jia, Lian-qun; Li, Da-yong; Tian, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the correlation between autophagy and polarization of macrophages in atherosclerosis (AS) plaque in arteriosclerosis obliterans amputees. Femoral artery specimens from arteriosclerosis obliterans amputees were performed hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, oil red O and immunofluorescence staining to observe the morphology of atherosclerotic plaque, phenotype of macrophages and autophagy in plaque; using real-time quantitative RT-PCR technology to detect the mRNA level of M1 and M2 type markers in arterial tissue; to analyze polarized signal pathway and autophagy protein levels in macrophages by Western blotting. Arterial specimens staining showed obvious lipid deposition and obvious infiltration of amount of foam cells and inflammatory cells. Macrophages were mainly expression M1 type in percentage in fibrous plaque. Although both M1 and M2 macrophages were upregulated in atheromatous plaque, the increase was dominant in M2 type in percentage. The level of autophagy was significantly higher in the atheromatous plaque than that of fibrous plaque. The expression of tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA was significantly higher in fibrous plaque than that of atheromatous plaque (P < 0.01 or 0.05), and arginase-1 (Arg-1), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), CD163 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA was significantly lower than that in atheromatous plaque (P < 0.01). The levels of p-STAT1 and NF-κB were significantly increased in fibrous plaque (P < 0.01), while p-STAT6 expression was significantly increased in atheromatous plaque (P < 0.01). The level of LC3-II was significantly higher in atheromatous plaque than that in fibrous plaque (P < 0.01). Macrophages in early atherosclerotic plaque were induced to M1 type through p-STAT1/NF-κB pathway and expressed moderate levels of autophagy; while

  18. [Correlation between autophagy and polarization of macrophages in atherosclerosis plaque in arteriosclerosis obliterans amputees].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-na; Guo, Sheng-nan; Wang, Jun-yan; Jia, Lian-qun; Li, Da-yong; Tian, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the correlation between autophagy and polarization of macrophages in atherosclerosis (AS) plaque in arteriosclerosis obliterans amputees. Femoral artery specimens from arteriosclerosis obliterans amputees were performed hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, oil red O and immunofluorescence staining to observe the morphology of atherosclerotic plaque, phenotype of macrophages and autophagy in plaque; using real-time quantitative RT-PCR technology to detect the mRNA level of M1 and M2 type markers in arterial tissue; to analyze polarized signal pathway and autophagy protein levels in macrophages by Western blotting. Arterial specimens staining showed obvious lipid deposition and obvious infiltration of amount of foam cells and inflammatory cells. Macrophages were mainly expression M1 type in percentage in fibrous plaque. Although both M1 and M2 macrophages were upregulated in atheromatous plaque, the increase was dominant in M2 type in percentage. The level of autophagy was significantly higher in the atheromatous plaque than that of fibrous plaque. The expression of tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) mRNA was significantly higher in fibrous plaque than that of atheromatous plaque (P < 0.01 or 0.05), and arginase-1 (Arg-1), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), CD163 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA was significantly lower than that in atheromatous plaque (P < 0.01). The levels of p-STAT1 and NF-κB were significantly increased in fibrous plaque (P < 0.01), while p-STAT6 expression was significantly increased in atheromatous plaque (P < 0.01). The level of LC3-II was significantly higher in atheromatous plaque than that in fibrous plaque (P < 0.01). Macrophages in early atherosclerotic plaque were induced to M1 type through p-STAT1/NF-κB pathway and expressed moderate levels of autophagy; while

  19. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan; Nyström, Harriet; Andresen, Morten; Mathiesen, Tiit

    2013-07-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage.

  20. Establishing the bidirectional relationship between depression and subclinical arteriosclerosis – rationale, design, and characteristics of the BiDirect Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and cardiovascular diseases due to arteriosclerosis are both frequent and impairing conditions. Depression and (subclinical) arteriosclerosis appear to be related in a bidirectional way, and it is plausible to assume a partly joint causal relationship. However, the biological mechanisms and the behavioral pathways that lead from depression to arteriosclerosis and vice versa remain to be exactly determined. Methods/design This study protocol describes the rationale and design of the prospective BiDirect Study that aims at investigating the mutual relationship between depression and (subclinical) arteriosclerosis. BiDirect is scheduled to follow-up three distinct cohorts of individuals ((i) patients with acute depression (N = 999), (ii) patients after an acute cardiac event (N = 347), and (iii) reference subjects from the general population (N = 912)). Over the course of 12 years, four personal examinations are planned to be conducted. The core examination program, which will remain identical across follow-ups, comprises a personal interview (e.g. medical diagnoses, health care utilization, lifestyle and risk behavior), a battery of self-administered questionnaires (e.g. depressive symptoms, readiness to change health behavior, perceived health-related quality of life), sensory (e.g. olfaction, pain) and neuropsychological (e.g. memory, executive functions, emotional processing, manual dexterity) assessments, anthropometry, body impedance measurement, a clinical work-up regarding the vascular status (e.g. electrocardiogram, blood pressure, intima media thickness), the taking of blood samples (serum and plasma, DNA), and structural and functional resonance imaging of the brain (e.g. diffusion tensor imaging, resting-state, emotional faces processing). The present report includes BiDirect-Baseline, the first data collection wave. Discussion Due to its prospective character, the integration of three distinct cohorts, the long follow

  1. Anesthetic considerations in intracranial aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Steen, Stephen N; Johnson, Calvin; Lumb, Phillip D; Zelman, Vladimer; Mok, Martin S

    2002-03-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm generally has a poor outcome, though perioperative treatments have improved. At the present time, the important factors in the management of intracranial aneurysm surgery appear to be the maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure and the avoidance of hyperglycemia. Relevant features of the anesthetic management of this surgery are discussed.

  2. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  3. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  4. Rare extracranial localization of primary intracranial neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Susan; Wiech, Thorsten; Mader, Irina; Aschendorff, Antje; Maier, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Meningioma, craniopharyngeoma and glioma are mainly intracranial lesions. Nevertheless, in rare cases these entities may occur solely as extracranial lesions that may present as intranasal/sinusoidal masses, with headaches and nasal obstruction. We present three cases of common intracranial tumors, with purely extracranial extension. The three described cases demonstrate, that preoperative MRI and CT imaging is important for differential diagnosis to exclude intracranial connections of the tumors. A definitive diagnosis requires specialized immunohistochemical examinations. In all cases of intranasal or pharyngeal neoplasm the diagnosis of meningioma, craniopharyngeoma and glioma should be considered as differential diagnosis to optimize the surgical procedure. PMID:18416840

  5. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects. PMID:27523417

  6. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  7. Management of raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Pickard, J D; Czosnyka, M

    1993-08-01

    This review has been written at an unfortunate time. Novel questions are being asked of the old therapies and there is an abundance of new strategies both to lower ICP and protect the brain against cerebral ischaemia. In the United Kingdom, the problem is to ensure that appropriate patients continue to be referred to centres where clinical trials of high quality can be undertaken. One of the success stories of the past decade has been the decline in the number of road accidents as a result of seat belt legislation, improvements in car design and the drink/driving laws. Hence, fortunately there are fewer patients with head injuries to treat and it is even more important that patients are appropriately referred if studies to assess efficacy of the new strategies are not to be thwarted. The nihilistic concept that intensive investigation with ICP monitoring for patients with diffuse head injury or brain swelling following evacuation of a haematoma or a contusion has no proven beneficial effect on outcome, requires revision. A cocktail of therapies may be required that can be created only when patients are monitored in sufficient detail to reveal the mechanisms underlying their individual ICP problem. Ethical problems may arise over how aggressively therapy for intracranial hypertension should be pursued and for how long. There has always been the concern that cranial decompression or prolonged barbiturate coma may preserve patients but with unacceptably severe disability. Some patients may be salvaged from herniating with massive cerebral infarction with the use of osmotherapy but is the outcome acceptable? Similar considerations apply to some children with metabolic encephalopathies. Where such considerations have been scrutinised in patients with severe head injury, the whole spectrum of outcomes appears to be shifted so that the number of severe disabilities and persistent vegetative states are not increased. However, it is important to be sensitive to such issues

  8. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  9. Remotely-powered intracranial pressure monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1979-01-01

    Implantable RF powered monitor uses capacitive transducer and stiff metal diaphragm that gives high stability for long term intracranial pressure monitoring. Design of monitor reduces risk of infection while improving patient comfort and mobility.

  10. Intracranial complications of transorbital stab wounds.

    PubMed Central

    De Villiers, J C; Sevel, D

    1975-01-01

    Oscular and orbital injuries due to stab wounds may mask underlying serious intracranial damage. The correct clinical assessment and treatment of such cases require the attention of a team comprising a neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, and plastic surgeon. Images PMID:1125159

  11. [Experience using intracranial endoscopy in neurologic traumatology].

    PubMed

    Karakhan, V B

    1988-03-01

    The endoscopic anatomy of the subdural space structure and endoscopic semiotics of intracranial lesions are presented. The direct vision of the lesion substrate outside projection of a small trepanation opening raised the reliability of diagnosis, provides a wide and atraumatic access for the removal of spreaded hematomas and other foci, allows surgery to be fulfilled even in critical patients. The application of intracranial endoscopy in neurotraumatology is considered as a technical principle.

  12. Persistent depression is a significant risk factor for the development of arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroki; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Depression often coexists with hypertension and various cardiovascular diseases. However, the relationship between depression and the development of arteriosclerosis has not been fully established. We assessed depression and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in 828 middle-aged Japanese male subjects at baseline and during 3 years of follow-up. Depression was assessed using Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression questionnaires, and the study subjects were divided into the following three groups: persistent depression, transient depression and no depression. The number (%) of subjects with persistent, transient and no depression were 104 (12.6), 76 (9.2) and 648 (78.2), respectively. Blood pressure and baPWV did not differ among the three groups at baseline. The changes in the baPWV values (⊿baPWV) correlated significantly and positively with age, body mass index, baseline systolic blood pressure and persistent depression (r = 0.32, P < 0.01). After 3 years of follow-up, the ⊿baPWV was significantly greater in subjects with persistent depression compared with those with no depression (36 ± 28 vs. 18 ± 10 cm s(-1), P = 0.02). After adjustment for conventional risk factors, persistent depression was significantly associated with ⊿baPWV by multiple regression analysis (β = 0.261, P < 0.01). To sum up, persistent depression was a significant risk factor for the development of arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

  13. Flow Diverters for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Alderazi, Yazan J.; Kass-Hout, Tareq; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (pipeline embolization device, Silk flow diverter, and Surpass flow diverter) have been developed to treat intracranial aneurysms. These endovascular devices are placed within the parent artery rather than the aneurysm sac. They take advantage of altering hemodynamics at the aneurysm/parent vessel interface, resulting in gradual thrombosis of the aneurysm occurring over time. Subsequent inflammatory response, healing, and endothelial growth shrink the aneurysm and reconstruct the parent artery lumen while preserving perforators and side branches in most cases. Flow diverters have already allowed treatment of previously untreatable wide neck and giant aneurysms. There are risks with flow diverters including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, distant and delayed hemorrhages, and perforator occlusions. Comparative efficacy and safety against other therapies are being studied in ongoing trials. Antiplatelet therapy is mandatory with flow diverters, which has highlighted the need for better evidence for monitoring and tailoring antiplatelet therapy. In this paper we review the devices, their uses, associated complications, evidence base, and ongoing studies. PMID:24967131

  14. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  15. Hyperprolactinemia due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Nuño, Miriam; Rozen, Todd D; Maya, M Marcel; Mamelak, Adam N; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien S

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an increasingly recognized cause of headaches. Pituitary enlargement and brain sagging are common findings on MRI in patients with this disorder. The authors therefore investigated pituitary function in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. METHODS Pituitary hormones were measured in a group of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. For patients with hyperprolactinemia, prolactin levels also were measured following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed prior to and following treatment. RESULTS The study group consisted of 27 women and 15 men with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 52.2 ± 10.7 years (mean ± SD; range 17-72 years). Hyperprolactinemia was detected in 10 patients (24%), ranging from 16 ng/ml to 96.6 ng/ml in men (normal range 3-14.7 ng/ml) and from 31.3 ng/ml to 102.5 ng/ml in women (normal range 3.8-23.2 ng/ml). In a multivariate analysis, only brain sagging on MRI was associated with hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging was present in 60% of patients with hyperprolactinemia and in 19% of patients with normal prolactin levels (p = 0.02). Following successful treatment of the spontaneous intracranial hypotension, hyperprolactinemia resolved, along with normalization of brain MRI findings in all 10 patients. CONCLUSIONS Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a previously undescribed cause of hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging causing distortion of the pituitary stalk (stalk effect) may be responsible for the hyperprolactinemia. PMID:25380110

  16. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  17. [Suppurative intracranial infections in Africa].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Okome-Kouakou, M; Alliez, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review recent African literature on suppurative intracranial infection and its implications for neurosurgery. In order of decreasing frequency the main lesions are brain abscess, subdural empyema, and epidural abscess. Despite progress in diagnostic imaging and availability of antibiotic therapy, these lesions still cause disturbingly high morbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa where diagnosis is often delayed. The male-to-female ratio was 3.6:1 and 70 to 80% of patients were under the age of 20 years. Spread from the paranasal sinus or ear was the most common mechanism of infection. Hematogenous processes accounted for 22% of cases and the origin was undetermined in 11% to 26% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus and enteric gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacteria identified but cultures were reported as sterile in 30% to 50% of cases. While ultrasonography can be useful in newborns with an open fontanelle, arteriography is often the only feasible procedure for diagnosis in Black Africa. The diagnostic modality of choice is computed tomography which allows precise mapping prior to neurosurgery. Introduction of computed tomography in some African cities has led to a decrease in mortality ranging from 4.7% to 43%. The most effective treatment is a combination of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and surgical decompression of expanding lesions. The main procedures are aspiration through burr holes and craniotomy. Use of this combined strategy requires close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, infectious disease specialist, and microbiologist. Therapeutic indications are discussed within the context of Black Africa. PMID:9304016

  18. Prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jantzen, Jan-Peter A H

    2007-12-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure exerted by cranial contents on the dural envelope. It comprises the partial pressures of brain, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Normal intracranial pressure is somewhere below 10 mmHg; it may increase as a result of traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, Reye's syndrome, hepatic coma, or other pathologies. When ICP increases above 20 mmHg it may damage neurons and jeopardize cerebral perfusion. If such a condition persists, treatment is indicated. Control of ICP requires measurement, which can only be performed invasively. Standard techniques include direct ventricular manometry or measurement in the parenchyma with electronic or fiberoptic devices. Displaying the time course of pressure (high-resolution ICP tonoscopy) allows assessment of the validity of the signal and identification of specific pathological findings, such as A-, B- and C-waves. When ICP is pathologically elevated--at or above 20-25 mmHg--it needs to be lowered. A range of treatment modalities is available and should be applied with consideration of the underlying cause. When intracranial hypertension is caused by hematoma, contusion, tumor, hygroma, hydrocephalus or pneumatocephalus, surgical treatment is indicated. In the absence of a surgically treatable condition, ICP may be controlled by correcting the patient's position, temperature, ventilation or hemodynamics. If intracranial hypertension persists, drainage of CSF via external drainage is most effective. Other first-tier options include induced hypocapnea (hyperventilation; paCO2 < 35 mmHg), hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol, hypertonic saline) and induced arterial hypertension (CPP concept). When autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is compromised, hyperoncotic treatment aimed at reducing vasogenic edema and intracranial blood volume may be applied. When intracranial hypertension persists, second-tier treatments may be indicated. These include 'forced hyperventilation' (paCO2 < 25 mm

  19. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  20. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1620 Intracranial pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device...

  3. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  4. Intracranial Vertebral Artery Dissections: Evolving Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M.S.; Amenta, P.S.; Starke, R.M.; Jabbour, P.M.; Gonzalez, L.F.; Tjoumakaris, S.I.; Flanders, A.E.; Rosenwasser, R.H.; Dumont, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intracranial vertebral artery dissection (VAD) represents the underlying etiology in a significant percentage of posterior circulation ischemic strokes and subarachnoid hemorrhages. These lesions are particularly challenging in their diagnosis, management, and in the prediction of long-term outcome. Advances in the understanding of underlying processes leading to dissection, as well as the evolution of modern imaging techniques are discussed. The data pertaining to medical management of intracranial VADs, with emphasis on anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, is reviewed. Surgical intervention is discussed, including, the selection of operative candidates, open and endovascular procedures, and potential complications. The evolution of endovascular technology and techniques is highlighted. PMID:23217643

  5. CSF imaging in benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    James, A. Everette; Harbert, J. C.; Hoffer, P. B.; DeLand, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The cisternographic images in 10 patients with benign intracranial hypertension were reviewed. Nine were normal. Transfer of labelled tracer from the subarachnoid space was measured in five patients and was found to be abnormal in only two. The relation of these findings to the proposed pathophysiological alterations is discussed. Images

  6. Isotope cisternography in patients with intracranial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Kawano, H.; Handa, Y.; Kabuto, M.; Noguchi, Y.; Shirasaki, H.

    1986-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow (CSF) was studied using isotope cisternography in 52 patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), all of whom showed acute transient rises of ICP, i.e., plateau waves, in their continuous ICP recordings. The patients were assigned to two groups. Group I was comprised of 23 patients without hydrocephalus and high ICP resulting from brain tumors, benign intracranial hypertension, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Group II included 29 patients with either communicating hydrocephalus or high ICP resulting from rupture of intracranial aneurysm. Plateau waves were frequently observed in patients with baseline pressures ranging from 21 to 40 mmHg in both groups. The isotope cisternographic pattern in the Group I patients showed a large accumulation of radioactivity over the cerebral convexities, while that in the Group II patients revealed a complete obstruction of the subarachnoid space over both cerebral convexities. The isotope clearance from the intracranial CSF showed a marked delay in both groups of patients with one exception. The results suggest that, in the limited range of increased ICP caused by delayed CSF absorption, plateau waves are most evident regardless of the isotope cisternographic pattern.

  7. Varied computed tomographic appearance of intracranial cryptococcosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, S.H.; Jacoby, C.G.

    1982-06-01

    CT findings in 12 cases of intracranial cryptococcal infection were reviewed. Five patients had a normal scan. Seven patients had communicating or noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Additional findings included meningeal opacification, cerebritis, abscess, and granuloma. Although not specific for cryptococcosis, the CT scan is helpful for evaluating and following the status of the ventricles, subarachnoid spaces, and meninges.

  8. The Intracranial Volume Pressure Response in Increased Intracranial Pressure Patients: Clinical Significance of the Volume Pressure Indicator

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background For patients suffering from primary brain injury, monitoring intracranial pressure alone is not enough to reflect the dynamic intracranial condition. In our previous study, a segment of the pressure-volume curve can be expressed by the parabolic regression model with single indicator “a”. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the indicator “a” can reflect intracranial conditions. Methods Patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and/or hydrocephalus who had external ventricular drainage from January 2009 to February 2010 were included. The successive volume pressure response values were obtained by successive drainage of cerebral spinal fluid from intracranial pressure 20–25 mm Hg to 10 mm Hg. The relationship between withdrawn cerebral spinal fluid volume and intracranial pressure was analyzed by the parabolic regression model with single parameter “a”. Results The overall mean for indicator “a” was 0.422 ± 0.046. The mean of “a” in hydrocephalus was 0.173 ± 0.024 and in severe intracranial mass with slender ventricle, it was 0.663 ± 0.062. The two extreme intracranial conditions had a statistical significant difference (p<0.001). Conclusion The indicator “a” of a pressure-volume curve can reflect the dynamic intracranial condition and is comparable in different situations. A significantly larger indicator “a” with increased intracranial pressure is always observed in severe intracranial mass lesions with cerebral edema. A significantly smaller indicator “a” with increased intracranial pressure is observed in hydrocephalus. Brain computed tomography should be performed early if a rapid elevation of indicator “a” is detected, as it can reveal some ongoing intracranial pathology prior to clinical deterioration. Increased intracranial pressure was frequently observed in patients with intracranial pathology. The progression can be differentiated using the pattern of the volume

  9. Age at intracranial aneurysm rupture among generations

    PubMed Central

    Woo, D; Hornung, R; Sauerbeck, L; Brown, R; Meissner, I; Huston, J; Foroud, T; Broderick, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported intracranial aneurysm (IA) occurring at young ages in subsequent generations. These studies did not correct for duration of follow-up. Second-generation members who would have their ruptured IA late in life may not be detected due to shorter follow-up time than the first generation. We examined families in which ruptured IA occurred in two consecutive generations for the hypothesis that the second generation (F1) was more likely to have a rupture at a younger age than the older generation (F0). Methods: The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study is a multicenter, international study recruiting families of ruptured and unruptured IA. All available family members are interviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine differences by generation. Results: Although we found that the F1 generation was more likely to have an aneurysm rupture at a younger age than the F0 generation, we found that this was largely because of a lack of follow-up time in the F1 generation. The F1 generation had 50% the rupture rate of the prior generation. When analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves, we found a tendency to have a slightly later rupture rate in the F1 generation once time to follow-up was included in the analysis model. Conclusions: Families of ruptured intracranial aneurysm (IA) do not appear to demonstrate “anticipation.” Our finding suggests that genetic epidemiology of ruptured IA should examine all types of variations such as single base-pair changes, deletions, insertions, and other variations that do not demonstrate anticipation. GLOSSARY FIA = familial intracranial aneurysm; IA = intracranial aneurysm; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:19237697

  10. Longitudinal left ventricular myocardial dysfunction assessed by 2D colour tissue Doppler imaging in a dog with systemic hypertension and severe arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, A P; Carlos Sampedrano, C; Fontaine, J J; Tessier-Vetzel, D; Goumi, V; Pelligand, L; Pouchelon, J-L; Chetboul, V

    2005-03-01

    A 12-year-old sexually intact male Vendee Griffon Basset was presented for acute pulmonary oedema. Severe systemic systolic arterial hypertension (SAH) was diagnosed (290 mmHg). Despite blood and abdominal ultrasound tests, the underlying cause of the systemic hypertension could not be determined, and primary SAH was therefore suspected. Conventional echocardiography showed eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy with normal fractional shortening. Despite this apparent normal systolic function, 2D colour tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) identified a marked longitudinal systolic left ventricular myocardial alteration, whereas radial function was still preserved. Three months later, the dog underwent euthanasia because of an acute episode of distal aortic thromboembolism. Necropsy revealed severe aortic and iliac arteriosclerosis. SAH related to arteriosclerosis is a common finding in humans, but has not been previously described in dogs. Moreover, its consequence on longitudinal myocardial function using TDI has never been documented before in this species.

  11. A giant frontoethmoid mucocele with intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Işık, Abdülcemal Ümit; Arslan, Selçuk; Arslan, Erhan; Baykal, Süleyman

    2015-02-01

    Mucoceles are mucus-containing cysts lined by epithelium. Although benign, they may show expansive growth and remain undiagnosed until symptoms due to compression of surrounding structures arise. We report a rare case of frontoethmoid mucocele with intracranial extension in an 80-year-old woman with complaints of headache, right diplopia and proptosis. A right frontoorbital craniotomy was performed, and a mucocele in the frontal sinus extending into the frontal lobe and orbit was totally removed. The patient was successfully treated without any complication. The two-year follow-up results were satisfactory. Magnetic resonance imaging excluded any recurrence of the mucocele. Combined intranasal and transcranial approach is necessary to treat giant frontoetmoid mucoceles with intracranial extension.

  12. Method for noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrasonic-based method for continuous, noninvasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement and monitoring is described. The stress level in the skull bone is affected by pressure. This also changes the interfacial conditions between the dura matter and the skull bone. Standing waves may be set up in the skull bone and the layers in contact with the bone. At specific frequencies, there are resonance peaks in the response of the skull which can be readily detected by sweeping the excitation frequency on an excitation transducer in contact with a subject's head, while monitoring the standing wave characteristics from the signal received on a second, receiving transducer similarly in contact with the subject's head. At a chosen frequency, the phase difference between the excitation signal and the received signal can be determined. This difference can be related to the intracranial pressure and changes therein.

  13. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  14. An unusual intracranial metastasis of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, J W; Howng, S L; Sun, Z M; Kuo, T H; Duh, C C

    1994-12-01

    Intracranial metastasis is unusual in osteosarcoma. A case of osteosarcoma was presented with a large intracranial "stone" which was a subdural convexity metastasis. Smaller epidural metastases over other areas were noted also in brain CT scan. Using the radiographs and bone scans, many other lesions at bones, the mediastinum, pleura, perirenal space, and adrenal gland were detected simultaneously. This condition might result from either early metastases or multifocal osteosarcomas. Because many of the above lesion sites were not frequent locations of primary osteosarcoma and had been reported as metastatic targets of osteosarcoma. So the explanation of a very malignant osteosarcoma with early metastases may be more appropriate for this case. The baseball-like tumor in the subdural space with marked compression of the brain surface was grossly totally excised. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Postoperatively, the man's condition improved dramatically, though only for two months. He died 5 months later. Reports of such metastatic osteosarcomas are reviewed.

  15. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  16. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  17. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sumeet R; Gupta, Anju; Gupta, Vivek; Singhi, Pratibha D

    2016-08-01

    Neurological findings in HIV are common and include cognitive impairment, microcephaly, nonspecific white matter lesions and seizures. Cerebral vasculopathy and stroke are uncommon and may be due to primary HIV vasculopathy or opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis and cryptococcal meningitis. The authors describe a 7-y-old boy who presented with severe headache and was detected to have aneurysmal bleed due to intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27072660

  18. Filum ependymoma mimicking spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Akopov, Sergey E

    2005-05-01

    A 34-year-old man with a 2-week history of orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at lumbar puncture was found to have a lumbar intradural mass on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. A myxopapillary ependymoma was resected and the patient's headache completely resolved. The combination of spontaneous orthostatic headaches and a "dry tap" at the time of lumbar puncture does not always indicate the presence of a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension. PMID:15953283

  19. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  20. Emergency management of increased intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Pitfield, Alexander Fraser; Carroll, Allison B; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2012-02-01

    Primary neurological injury in children can be induced by diverse intrinsic and extrinsic factors including brain trauma, tumors, and intracranial infections. Regardless of etiology, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) as a result of the primary injury or delays in treatment may lead to secondary (preventable) brain injury. Therefore, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of increased ICP is vital in preventing or limiting secondary brain injury in children with a neurological insult. Present management strategies to improve survival and neurological outcome focus on reducing ICP while optimizing cerebral perfusion and meeting cerebral metabolic demands. Targeted therapies for increased ICP must be considered and implemented as early as possible during and after the initial stabilization of the child. Thus, the emergency physician has a critical role to play in early identification and treatment of increased ICP. This article intends to identify those patients at risk of intracranial hypertension and present a framework for the emergency department investigation and treatment, in keeping with contemporary guidelines. Intensive care management and the treatment of refractory increases in ICP are also outlined.

  1. Autologous transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells as an effective therapeutic approach for severe arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping Ping; Li, Shan Zhu; Han, Ming Zhe; Xiao, Zhi Jian; Yang, Ren Chi; Qiu, Lu Gui; Han, Zhong Chao

    2004-03-01

    Treatment of severe arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremities (ASOLE) remains a clinical challenge. To develop a more effective approach, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of autologous transplantation of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) in 5 patients with ASOLE. The patients received recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, 600 micro g/day) for 5 consecutive days. On day 5, PBSCs were collected, sorted from blood circulation of patients, and then intramuscularly injected into their ischemic lower limbs. A significant improvement of clinical manifestations including severe pain, skin temperature and ulcer, was observed, without obvious adverse effect. The patient's limb was successfully saved. Satisfactory remission was obtained 3 months after transplantation as shown by significant improvement in ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI), blood flow in personal vascular laboratory (PVL), laser Doppler blood perfusion, and the angio-graphic scores. Our data suggest for the first time that autologous transplantation of mobilized PBSCs provides a practical, safe, and effective method of treatment for lower limb ischemia.

  2. Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Induces TGF-β Signaling-Dependent Host Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition to Promote Transplant Arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Xiong, J; Yang, B; Zhou, Q; Wu, Y; Luo, H; Zhou, H; Liu, N; Li, Y; Song, Z; Zheng, Q

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) apoptosis is an initial event in transplant arteriosclerosis (TA), resulting in allograft function loss. To elucidate the precise mechanisms of ECs apoptosis leading to neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) accumulation during TA. We induced apoptosis in cultured ECs by overexpressing p53 through lentivirus-mediated transfection. ECs apoptosis induced the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in both apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, leading to increased TGF-β1 in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transfected ECs further promoted transition of cultured ECs to SM-like cells by activating TGF-β/Smad3, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, and MAPK/ERK signaling in a TGF-β-dependent manner. In transgenic rat aorta transplantation models, inhibition of ECs apoptosis in Bcl-xL(+/+) knock-in rat aortic allografts significantly reduced TGF-β1 production both in allograft endothelia and in blood plasma, which in turn decreased accumulation of SM22α+ cells from transgenic recipient ECs originally marked with EGFP knock-in in neointima and alleviated TA. Systemic treatment with SIS3, AP23573, or PD98059 also prevented recipient ECs-originated SM-like cells accumulation and intima hyperplasia in aortic allografts. These data suggest that allograft EC apoptosis induced recipient endothelial-mesenchymal (smooth muscle) transition via TGF-β signaling, resulting in recipient EC-derived SMC accumulation as a major mechanism of vascular remodeling during TA.

  3. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  4. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  5. [Prolonged hypothermia in refractory intracranial hypertension. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rovegno, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, José Luis; Mellado, Patricio; Andresen, Max

    2012-02-01

    The use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation is a standard clinical practice, however its use for neuroprotection has been extended to other conditions. We report a 23-year-old male with intracranial hypertension secondary to a parenchymal hematoma associated to acute hydrocephalus. An arterial malformation was found and embolized. Due to persistent intracranial hypertension, moderate hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C was started. After 12 hours of hypothermia, intracranial pressure was controlled. After 13 days of hypothermia a definitive control of intracranial pressure was achieved. The patient was discharged 40 days after admission, remains with a mild hemiparesia and is reassuming his university studies.

  6. Intracranial hemangiopericytoma: study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Alén, J F; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Boto, G R; Lagares, A; Ramos, A; Ricoy, J R

    2001-01-01

    Most hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are located in the musculoskeletal system and the skin, while the intracranial location is rare. They represent 2 to 4% in large series of meningeal tumours, thus accounting for less than 1% of all intracranial tumours. Many authors have argued about the true origin of this tumour. The current World Health Organization classification of Central Nervous System tumours distinguishes HPC as an entity of its own, and classified it into the group of "mesenchymal, non-meningothelial tumours". Radical surgery is the treatment of choice, but must be completed with postoperative radiotherapy, which has proved to be the therapy most strongly related to the final prognosis. HPCs have a relentless tendency for local recurrence and metastases outside the central nervous system which can appear even many years after diagnosis and adequate treatment of the primary tumour. Twelve patients with intracranial HPC were treated at our Unit between 1978 and 1999. There were 10 women and 2 men. Ten tumours were supratentorial and most located at frontoparietal parasagittal level. The most common manner of presentation was a focal motor deficit. All tumours were hyperdense in the basal Computed Tomography scans and most enhanced homogeneously following intravenous contrast injection. In 50% of cases, tumour margins were irregular or lobulated. Seven tumours were studied with Magnetic Resonance Imaging, being six of them iso-intense with the cortical gray matter on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Twenty operations were performed in the 12 patients. In 10 cases radical excision could be achieved with no operative mortality. Total recurrence rate was 33.3%. Eight patients were treated with external radiotherapy at some time through the course of their disease. Eight out of the 12 patients in this series are disease-free (Glasgow Outcome Scale categories 1 and 2) after a mean follow up of 52 months. PMID:11534674

  7. [Intracranial tumors and epileptic seizures: treatment principles].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2016-04-27

    Epileptic seizures represent a relatively frequent issue in patients with intracranial neoplasms, and very frequently imply the start of an antiepileptic treatment as secondary prophylaxis. Even if the current level of evidence is relatively low, compounds with a limited risk of pharmacokinetic interactions are clearly preferred. Levetiracetam is probably the most prescribed agent in this setting, while pregabalin, valproate, lacosamide and lamotrigine are valuable alternatives. The treatment choice has to consider the different profiles of side effects and should be tailored to each patient. In this setting, a multidisciplinary approach including general practicioner, oncologist and neurologist is strongly advocated. PMID:27281943

  8. An Intracranial Gliosis Mimicking Neoplasm: A Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-hong; Wang, Guo-liang; Yi, Xiang-hua; Wang, Pei-jun

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial gliosis has no typical clinical signals or imaging characteristics. Therefore, it can be easily misdiagnosed as neoplasm. Hereby, we report a unique case of gliosis that grew outward from the surface of the brain. MRI depicted its signal and enhancement pattern similar to the cerebral gray matter. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathology and immunohistochemistry. Although it was difficult to reach a diagnosis, correlating its origin, growing pattern and MR features and knowing that gliosis can present this way may help in differentiating it from other diseases.

  9. Intracranial blister aneurysms: clip reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo; McCracken, D Jay

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial blister aneurysms are difficult to treat cerebrovascular lesions that typically affect the anterior circulation. These rare aneurysms can lead to acute rupture which usually cannot be treated via endovascular methods, but still require urgent surgical intervention. Surgical options are limited given their unique pathology and often require a combination of wrapping and clip reconstruction. In this video we present two patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured blister aneurysms. We demonstrate several surgical techniques for repairing the vascular defect with and without intraoperative rupture. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/nz-JM45uKQU.

  10. Recovery from Intracranial Hemorrhage Due to Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Babamhmoodi, Abdolreza

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare and fatal presentation of leptospirosis. In this paper we present the case of a 51-year-old male farmer who lives in northern Iran. He came to our hospital with a severe headache. A paraclinical evaluation showed clear signs of thrombocytopenia, and a brain MRI revealed left temporoparietal hemorrhage. Our preliminary diagnosis was Leptospirosis, and after 26 days of hospital care the patient was discharged in good condition. This paper will educationally help physicians in better diagnosis and treatment of leptospirosis. PMID:22013452

  11. Clarithromycin Culprit of Benign Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khan, Habib Rehman; Mason, Colin; Mulcahy, Riona

    2015-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension is characterized with increase in CSF opening pressure with no specific etiology. It is predominantly found in women of child bearing age and particularly in individuals with obesity. Visual disturbances or loss and associated headaches are common and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Diagnosis can be achieved once other causes of visual loss, headaches and high opening pressures are excluded. Management consists of serial optic disc assessments although no specific treatment is available despite recent trials using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Diet modification and weight management can help in therapy. PMID:26713029

  12. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-10-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting.

  13. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-01-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting. PMID:3225588

  14. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  15. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  16. Severe intracranial haemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Morais, Sofia; Sevivas, Teresa; Veiga, Ricardo; Salvado, Ramon; Taborda, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a rare (1/1000–5000 births) life-threatening disorder, caused by fetomaternal incompatibility for a fetal human platelet alloantigen inherited from the father, with production of maternal alloantibodies against fetal platelets, leading to severe thrombocytopenia and potential bleeding. Intracranial haemorrhage is the most feared complication. This report presents the case of a term newborn infant, born from caesarean section after a normal pregnancy, presenting signs of skin bleeding with different ages. Obstetric history included a previous spontaneous abortion after amniocentesis. Severe thrombocytopenia (4×109/l platelets) was found and brain ultrasound showed multiple intracranial haemorrhages. Human platelet antigen (HPA) phenotyping showed maternal negative HPA-1a and paternal positive HPA-1a platelets. Strongly positive anti-HPA-1a and weakly positive anti-human leukocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Multiple platelet transfusions, intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid were given but favourable response was accomplished only after a compatible platelet transfusion. Brain MRI showed multiple subacute and chronic haemorrhages. PMID:22679192

  17. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  18. Neuroblastoma with intracranial involvement: an ENSG Study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P J; Eden, T

    1992-01-01

    We report the experience of the European Neuroblastoma Study Group (ENSG) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement of neuroblastoma. Among this series of intensively treated patients, CNS neuroblastoma was diagnosed by computerised tomography (CT) scanning, rather than by autopsy. Cranial disease occurred in 5% of ENSG patients. Of 11 patients with intracranial disease, 4 had disease in the posterior fossa, a site rarely reported previously. Furthermore, 5 cases had CNS metastases at a time when there was no detectable disease elsewhere, rather than as part of extensive relapse. The pattern of disease we observed, at least for those with parenchymal disease, is in keeping with arterial spread. Although CT scanning is the optimal modality for identifying CNS disease, 2 cases had normal head CT scans prior to the onset of CNS disease. As most patients had symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (RICP) at the time the CNS disease was diagnosed, there does not seem to be any indication for routine CT scanning of the head at diagnosis, but this should be performed as soon as any symptoms or signs appear. With patients living longer with their disease, vigilance must be maintained during follow-up. PMID:1734220

  19. Biology of intracranial aneurysms: role of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Ali, Muhammad S; Jabbour, Pascal M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Koch, Walter J; Dumont, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) linger as a potentially devastating clinical problem. Despite intense investigation, our understanding of the mechanisms leading to aneurysm development, progression and rupture remain incompletely defined. An accumulating body of evidence implicates inflammation as a critical contributor to aneurysm pathogenesis. Intracranial aneurysm formation and progression appear to result from endothelial dysfunction, a mounting inflammatory response, and vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation producing a pro-inflammatory phenotype. A later final common pathway appears to involve apoptosis of cellular constituents of the vessel wall. These changes result in degradation of the integrity of the vascular wall leading to aneurysmal dilation, progression and eventual rupture in certain aneurysms. Various aspects of the inflammatory response have been investigated as contributors to IA pathogenesis including leukocytes, complement, immunoglobulins, cytokines, and other humoral mediators. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of IA compared with control arteries has prominently featured differential expression of genes involved with immune response/inflammation. Preliminary data suggest that therapies targeting the inflammatory response may have efficacy in the future treatment of IA. Further investigation, however, is necessary to elucidate the precise role of inflammation in IA pathogenesis, which can be exploited to improve the prognosis of patients harboring IA. PMID:22781330

  20. Postural Effects on Intracranial Pressure as Assessed Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Hargens, Alan R.; Ballard, R. E.; Shuer, L. M.; Cantrell, J. H.; Yost, W. T.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of whole body tilting on intracranial compliance and pressure in six healthy volunteers by using a noninvasive ultrasonic device. Subjects were randomly tilted up or down sequentially at 60 degree, 30 degree head-up, supine, and 15 degree head-down position for one minute at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure with a finger pressure cuff and changes in intracranial distance with an ultrasonic device. The device measures skull movement on the order of micro-meter. Our ultrasound technique demonstrates that skull movement is highly correlated (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.77) with intracranial pressure variations due to cerebral arterial pulsation. The amplitudes of arterial pressure (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.99 and those of intracranial distance changes (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.87) associated with one cardiac cycle were inversely correlated with the angle of tilt. The ratio of pulsation amplitudes for intracranial distance over arterial pressure also showed a significant increase as the angle of tilt was lowered (p=0.003). Thus, postural changes alter intracranial compliance in healthy volunteers and intracranial volume-buffering capacity is reduced in head-down position.

  1. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  2. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Kieburtz, Karl D.; Corbett, James J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Friedman, Deborah I.; Katz, David M.; Keltner, John L.; Schron, Eleanor B.; McDermott, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, there are no large prospective cohorts of untreated patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) to characterize the disease. OBJECTIVE To report the baseline clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We collected data at baseline from questionnaires, examinations, automated perimetry, and fundus photography grading. Patients (n = 165) were enrolled from March 17, 2010, to November 27, 2012, at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America. All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation between −2 dB and −7 dB. All but 4 participants were women. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Baseline and laboratory characteristics. RESULTS The mean (SD) age of our patients was 29.0 (7.4) years and 4 (2.4%) were men. The average (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 39.9 (8.3). Headache was the most common symptom (84%). Transient visual obscurations occurred in 68% of patients, back pain in 53%, and pulse synchronous tinnitus in 52%. Only 32% reported visual loss. The average (SD) perimetric mean deviation in the worst eye was −3.5 (1.1) dB, (range, −2.0 to −6.4 dB) and in the best eye was −2.3 (1.1) dB (range, −5.2 to 0.8 dB). A partial arcuate visual field defect with an enlarged blind spot was the most common perimetric finding. Visual acuity was 85 letters or better (20/20) in 71% of the worst eyes and 77% of the best eyes. Quality of life measures, including the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 and the Short Form–36 physical and mental health summary scales, were lower compared with population norms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial represents the largest prospectively analyzed cohort of untreated patients with IIH. Our data show

  3. Musical hallucinations associated with seizures originating from an intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D L; Tatini, U; Zimmerman, R S; Bortz, J J; Sirven, J I

    2001-04-01

    Hallucinations are defined as sensory phenomena in the absence of external sensory stimuli. Auditory hallucinations have been shown to arise from many different intracranial lesions, but seizures manifesting as musical hallucinations triggered by unruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare. We present a case of persistent, episodic musical hallucinations associated with seizures that led to the discovery of 2 small intracranial aneurysms. Typical electroencephalographic findings for seizure activity were observed but resolved after surgical clipping of the aneurysms. Concomitantly, the patient's hallucinations resolved. The literature on musical hallucinations is reviewed. PMID:11322359

  4. Intracranial hypertension: was it really idiopathic?

    PubMed

    Williams, Manon Wyn; Vishwanath, Mandagere

    2011-01-01

    A healthy 44-year-old slim female presented with a constant, non-specific dull headache of subacute onset. The examination showed papilloedema but no other problem. On further questioning she revealed transient visual obscurations and pulsatile tinnitus. The CT scan of the brain was normal, the lumbar puncture showed increased pressure but normal cerebrospinal fluid, and the MR scan and MR venogram was reported showing a small area of developmental venous anomaly in the left parietal region but no venous thrombosis. Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) was diagnosed but later in the course further tests were done as the patient was atypical for BIH, which revealed essential thrombocythaemia. A CT venogram was arranged which showed partly recanalised chronic sigmoid sinus thrombosis with dilation of collaterals. The patient was treated with acetazolamide, wafarin and hydroxycarbamide. The headache resolved quickly and the papilloedema reduced significantly over 6 months. PMID:22696634

  5. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  6. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor. PMID:20616180

  7. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Altinkaya, Ayca; Topcular, Baris; Sakalli, Nazan Karagoz; Kuscu, Demet Yandim; Kirbas, Dursun

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy. In this report, we detail the course of a 58-year-old male patient who had headache and double vision followed by progressive paresthesia and difficulty in walking. The patient had bilateral papilledema and mild leg weakness, absent ankle jerks and loss of sensation in distal parts of his lower and upper extremities. His electromyography (EMG) was concordant with CIDP and lumbar puncture revealed high opening pressure. The polyradiculoneuropathy as well as the papilledema and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure improved under steroids. The improvement in intracranial hypertension (IHT) and papilledema under steroid treatment suggests that the IHT in this patient might be associated with CIDP.

  9. Intracranial Infectious Aneurysm in Orbital Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm and cavernous sinus thrombosis are rare complications of orbital cellulitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old male presenting with sinusitis and orbital cellulitis complicated by the development of an orbital mass. Following orbitotomy with debulking, the patient underwent bony orbital decompression for increasing proptosis postoperatively. While his exam stabilized, the patient developed complete ptosis and extraocular motor palsy in the contralateral eye after undergoing bilateral sinus debridement. Imaging was notable for the presence of a pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery, which was treated with a stent. This report demonstrates rare complications of orbital cellulitis. These patients should be monitored carefully with noninvasive imaging studies, such as cerebral angiography, for early detection of vascular abnormalities that can progress rapidly. PMID:25955309

  10. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges.

  11. Surgical Management of Intracranial Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    ARIMURA, Koichi; IIHARA, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial artery dissection (IAD) is a relatively rare cause of stroke, but it has been recognized increasingly with recent advances of the neuroimaging technique. Since rebleeding occurs frequently in the acute stage in the ruptured IAD, urgent surgical treatment should be performed to prevent rebleeding. On the other hand, surgical treatment for unruptured IAD is controversial because it has little risk for bleeding. However, surgical treatment for unruptured IAD may be considered if the formation or enlargement of the aneurysmal dilatation has been confirmed. Since there are several proposed surgical strategies for IAD, it is important to select an appropriate strategy on a case-by-case basis. If the risk of infarction due to vessel occlusion is high, combined bypass surgery should be considered. PMID:27063145

  12. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  13. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  14. Endoscope-Assisted Microneurosurgery for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato J.; Di Cola, Francesco; Raysi Dehcordi, Soheila; Ricci, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The endovascular techniques has widely changed the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. However surgery still represent the best therapeutic option in case of broad-based and complex lesions. The combined use of endoscopic and microsurgical techniques (EAM) may improve surgical results. Objective: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the advantages and limits of EAM for intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Between January 2002 and December 2012, 173 patients, harboring 206 aneurysms were surgically treated in our department with the EAM technique. One hundred and fifty-seven aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 49 were in the posterior circulation. Standard tailored approaches, based on skull base surgery principles, were chosen. The use of the endoscope included three steps: initial inspection, true operative time, and final inspection. For each procedure, an intraoperative video and an evaluation schedule were prepared, to report surgeons’ opinions about the technique itself. In the first cases, we always used the endoscope during surgical procedures in order to get an adequate surgical training. Afterwards we became aware in selecting cases in which to apply the endoscopy, as we started to become familiar with its advantages and limits. Results: After clipping, all patients were undergone postoperative cerebral angiography. No surgical mortality related to EAM were observed. Complications directly related to endoscopic procedures were rare. Conclusion: Our retrospective study suggests that endoscopic efficacy for aneurysms is only scarcely influenced by the preoperative clinical condition (Hunt–Hess grade), surgical timing, presence of blood in the cisterns (Fisher grade) and/or hydrocephalus. However the most important factors contributing to the efficacy of EAM are determined by the anatomical locations and sizes of the lesions. Furthermore, the advantages are especially evident using dedicated scopes and holders, after an

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  16. [Prolonged hypothermia in refractory intracranial hypertension. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rovegno, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, José Luis; Mellado, Patricio; Andresen, Max

    2012-02-01

    The use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation is a standard clinical practice, however its use for neuroprotection has been extended to other conditions. We report a 23-year-old male with intracranial hypertension secondary to a parenchymal hematoma associated to acute hydrocephalus. An arterial malformation was found and embolized. Due to persistent intracranial hypertension, moderate hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C was started. After 12 hours of hypothermia, intracranial pressure was controlled. After 13 days of hypothermia a definitive control of intracranial pressure was achieved. The patient was discharged 40 days after admission, remains with a mild hemiparesia and is reassuming his university studies. PMID:22739952

  17. Arteriosclerosis: facts and fancy.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Michael C; Fishbein, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Arterial vascular diseases comprise the leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Every physician learns about the pathology of these diseases in medical school. All pathologists evaluate arterial disease in surgical pathology and/or autopsy specimens. All clinicians encounter patients with clinical manifestations of these diseases. With such a common and clinically-important group of entities one would think there would be a general understanding of the "known" information that exists. That is, physicians and scientists should be able to separate what is fact and what is fancy. This review article is intended to generate thought in this regard.

  18. [Arteriosclerosis--selected aspects].

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The article summarizes the current knowledge concerning the diagnosis of atherosclerosis and therapeutic objectives. Atherosclerosis is one of the most common medical problems. It affects adults as well as children. It leads to clinically overt cardiovascular diseases (CVD), which are the cause of premature deaths. During its course, the formation of atherosclerotic plaque takes place, along with local inflammations artery walls. Gradually growing plaque does not cause clinical symptoms until the stenosis does not exceed 70-80% of the coronary vessel diameter, causing a marked reduction in blood flow to the heart muscle. The prevention of atherosclerosis and its complications requires an individual assessment of cardiovascular risk. In people without CVD symptoms, it is recommended to use SCORE risk card for Polish population, assessing the 10-year risk of cardiac death. A key element in combating atherosclerosis is to eliminate its risk factors by both implementing pro-health policies, as well as working with individual patients. An important objective is the proper control of blood pressure. It should not exceed 140/90 mmHg. A very important role is played by correct approach to patients with moderate or unusual cardiovascular risk. Despite knowing many facts about the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and its treatment, many issues still remain to be clarified. Finding methods to influence ongoing immune processes within arteries is of particular interest, which will soon make way to new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25338337

  19. [Arteriosclerosis--selected aspects].

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The article summarizes the current knowledge concerning the diagnosis of atherosclerosis and therapeutic objectives. Atherosclerosis is one of the most common medical problems. It affects adults as well as children. It leads to clinically overt cardiovascular diseases (CVD), which are the cause of premature deaths. During its course, the formation of atherosclerotic plaque takes place, along with local inflammations artery walls. Gradually growing plaque does not cause clinical symptoms until the stenosis does not exceed 70-80% of the coronary vessel diameter, causing a marked reduction in blood flow to the heart muscle. The prevention of atherosclerosis and its complications requires an individual assessment of cardiovascular risk. In people without CVD symptoms, it is recommended to use SCORE risk card for Polish population, assessing the 10-year risk of cardiac death. A key element in combating atherosclerosis is to eliminate its risk factors by both implementing pro-health policies, as well as working with individual patients. An important objective is the proper control of blood pressure. It should not exceed 140/90 mmHg. A very important role is played by correct approach to patients with moderate or unusual cardiovascular risk. Despite knowing many facts about the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and its treatment, many issues still remain to be clarified. Finding methods to influence ongoing immune processes within arteries is of particular interest, which will soon make way to new therapeutic possibilities.

  20. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives of this slide presentation are: 1: To review the morphological changes in orbit structures caused by elevated Intracranial Pressure (ICP), and their imaging representation. 2: To learn about the similarities and differences between MRI and sonographic imaging of the eye and orbit. 3: To learn about the role of MRI and sonography in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure in aerospace medicine, and the added benefits from their combined interpretation.

  1. Intracranial saccular aneurysm in a child with only persistent headache.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Olcay; Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Dilber, Cengiz; Çinar, Celal

    2015-06-01

    Headache is one of the common symptoms of intracranial aneursym. A 5-year-old child lately presented to our pediatric emergency department with persistent headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 7×8 mm rounded lesion with slowly heterogeneous low signal in T2 sequence consistent with a partial occluded aneurysm, in the right medial frontal lobe that close to anterior cerebral artery. Intracranial aneurysms are rare in children and they are noncommon without complications as our case.

  2. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  3. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  4. Traumatic aneurysms of the intracranial and cervical vessels: A review.

    PubMed

    Bhaisora, Kamlesh S; Behari, Sanjay; Godbole, Chaitanya; Phadke, Rajendra V

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysms (TICA) are rare in occurrence, constituting less than 1% of the total cases of intracranial aneurysms. Cervical posttraumatic aneurysms arising from major blood vessels supplying the brain are also extremely rare. Their variable locations, morphological variations and the presence of concomitant head injury makes their diagnosis and treatment a challenge. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, classification and management issues related to TICA as well as traumatic neck aneurysms and review the pertinent literature.

  5. Chronic Meningitis Complicating Intracranial Hypertension in Neurobrucellosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Betul; Nacaroglu, Senay Asik; Coskun, Cigdem; Kuscu, Demet Yandım; Onder, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    In neurobrucellosis, even though meningitis is encountered frequently, chronic intracranial hypertension is a rare manifestation. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for the prevention of permanent visual loss secondary to poststasis optic atrophy in these cases. We report a case that presented with permanent visual loss secondary to intracranial hypertension in neurobrucellosis. Our goal is to draw attention to the consideration of neurobrucellosis in cases with papilla stasis, even in the absence of neurological findings in endemic areas.

  6. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome.

  7. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Intracranial Hypertension and Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Sustained intracranial hypertension and acute brain herniation are “brain codes,” signifying catastrophic neurological events that require immediate recognition and treatment to prevent irreversible injury and death. As in cardiac arrest, a brain code mandates the organized implementation of a stepwise management algorithm. The goal of this emergency neurological life support protocol is to implement an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of patients with intracranial hypertension and/or herniation. PMID:26438459

  8. Intracranial pressure waveform analysis: clinical and research implications.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, C J; Mitchell, P H; Burr, R L; March, K S; Newell, D W

    2000-10-01

    Assessment of intracranial adaptive capacity is vital in critically ill individuals with acute brain injury because there is the potential that nursing care activities and environmental stimuli to result in clinically significant increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) in a subset of individuals with decreased intracranial adaptive capacity. ICP waveform analysis provides information about intracranial dynamics that can help identify individuals who have decreased adaptive capacity and are at risk for increases in ICP and decreases in cerebral perfusion pressure, which may contribute to secondary brain injury and have a negative impact on neurologic outcome. The ability to identify high-risk individuals allows nurses to initiate interventions targeted at decreasing adaptive demand or increasing adaptive capacity in these individuals. Changes in the ICP waveform occur under various physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions and may provide valuable information about intracranial adaptive capacity. Simple visual assessment of the ICP waveform for increased amplitude and P2 elevation is clinically relevant and has been found to provide a rough indicator of decreased adaptive capacity. Advanced ICP waveform analysis techniques warrant further study as a means of dynamically assessing intracranial adaptive capacity.

  9. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  10. Intracranial nonthermal irreversible electroporation: in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Neal, Robert E; Ellis, Thomas L; Olson, John D; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia; Robertson, John; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-07-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer. It is unique because of its nonthermal mechanism of tumor ablation. Intracranial NTIRE procedures involve placing electrodes into the targeted area of the brain and delivering a series of short but intense electric pulses. The electric pulses induce irreversible structural changes in cell membranes, leading to cell death. We correlated NTIRE lesion volumes in normal brain tissue with electric field distributions from comprehensive numerical models. The electrical conductivity of brain tissue was extrapolated from the measured in vivo data and the numerical models. Using this, we present results on the electric field threshold necessary to induce NTIRE lesions (495-510 V/cm) in canine brain tissue using 90 50-mus pulses at 4 Hz. Furthermore, this preliminary study provides some of the necessary numerical tools for using NTIRE as a brain cancer treatment. We also computed the electrical conductivity of brain tissue from the in vivo data (0.12-0.30 S/m) and provide guidelines for treatment planning and execution. Knowledge of the dynamic electrical conductivity of the tissue and electric field that correlates to lesion volume is crucial to ensure predictable complete NTIRE treatment while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:20668843

  11. An intracranial malignant solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chan-Young; Han, Seong-Rok; Yee, Gi-Taek; Joo, Mee

    2011-04-01

    Intracranial malignant solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is very rare. It was identified in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent malignant transformation over 6 months. MRI revealed an 8 × 5 × 6 cm mass with heterogenous strong enhancement in the left occipital lobe. Histologic findings and immunophenotype (positive for CD34, bcl-2 and vimentin, and negative for epithelial membrane antigen or S100 protein) of the primary tumor were typical of SFT. However, there was a focal area (<10% of tumor volume) showing hypercellularity, nuclear pleomorphism and increased Ki-67 labeling index (LI) of 10% (average, 1%). At the second operation, the recurrent tumor revealed full-blown histologic features of malignant SFT, such as infiltrative brain invasion, marked nuclear pleomorphism, frequent mitotic figures (15/10 high power fields), and high Ki-67 LI (25%). The presence of atypical histologic finding or increased Ki-67 LI in the typical SFT, although it is focal, needs to be mentioned in the diagnosis and also may require more aggressive surgical management.

  12. Parent Artery Occlusion for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lishan; Peng, Qiang; Ha, Wenbo; Zhou, Dexiang; Xu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Summary Peripheral cerebral aneurysms are difficult to treat with preservation of the parent arteries. We report the clinical and angiographic outcome of 12 patients with cerebral aneurysms located peripherally. In the past five years, 12 patients, six females and six males, presented at our institution with intracranial aneurysms distal to the circle of Willis and were treated endovascularly. The age of our patients ranged from four to 58 years with a mean age of 37 years. Seven of the 12 patients had subarachnoid and/or intracerebral hemorrhage upon presentation. Two patients with P2 dissecting aneurysms presented with mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia, one patient with a large dissecting aneurysm complained of headaches and two patients with M3 dissecting aneurysms had mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia of the right arm. Locations of the aneurysms were as follows: posterior cerebral artery in seven patients, anterior inferior cerebellar artery in two, posterior inferior cerebellar artery in one, middle cerebral artery in two. Twelve patients with peripheral cerebral aneurysms underwent parent artery occlusion (PAO). PAO was performed with detachable coils. No patient developed neurologic deficits. Distally located cerebral aneurysms can be treated with parent artery occlusion when selective embolization of the aneurysmal sac with detachable platinum coils or surgical clipping cannot be achieved. PMID:20465914

  13. [Intracranial pressure and hypotonic infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Zander, R

    2009-04-01

    The physiological osmolality of plasma is 288+/-5 mosmol/kgH2O when measured by freezing-point depression. The theoretical osmolarity (290 mosmol/l) calculated from composition, osmotic coefficient (0.93) and water content (0.94) is practically identical. Saline (0.9% NaCl) has an osmolarity of 308 mosmol/l and an osmolality of 286 mosmol/kgH2O (water content ca. 1.0). The osmolality in vivo is more important than that measured in vitro. A 5% dextrose solution in water (D5W) is isotonic in vitro, but the in vivo effect is that of pure water because the glucose is rapidly metabolized. Every infusion fluid should be isotonic (290+/-10 mosmol/kgH2O). Hypotonic solutions must move water from the extracellular space to the intracellular space. Typical examples are Ringer's lactate and acetate solutions (256 instead of 290 mosmol/kgH2O). The brain (central nervous system, CNS) is the critical organ: The rigidly shaped skull contains three incompressible compartments, only blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be partially, but limitedly shifted outside the skull. The consequence of a volume load is an increasing intracranial pressure (ICP). A decrease in plasma osmolality by only 3% produces an increase in ICP of about 15 mmHg. Therefore, infusion of larger volumes of hypotonic solutions should be avoided at all costs.

  14. Potential for intracranial movements in pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Prondvai, Edina; Osi, Attila

    2011-05-01

    Based on comparative anatomical, morphological, and phylogenetic considerations the potential of pterosaurs for cranial kinesis is assessed. Our investigation shows that whereas skeletally mature derived pterodactyloids have completely fused, rigid and doubtlessly akinetic skulls, skeletally immature derived pterodactyloids and more basal pterosaurs possess key features in the morphology of their otic and basal joints that are suggestive of cranial kinesis, namely streptostyly. In addition, pterosaurs exhibit an evolutionarily informative trend in the degree of cranial ossification, where it is low in most nonpterodactyloids (here named bifenestratans), intermediate in Rhamphorhynchus and Archaeopterodactyloidea, and high in derived pterodactyloids. Incomplete fusion could also indicate loose connections between skull elements. However, another crucial anatomical requirement of a kinetic skull, the permissive kinematic linkage is absent in all pterosaurian taxa. The fact, that the presence of permissive kinematic linkages in the skull is also a prerequisite of all types of cranial kinesis, provides hard evidence that all members of Pterosauria had akinetic skulls. Thus, the presence of the morphological attributes indicative of intracranial movements in some pterosaurs must be explained on grounds other than real potential for cranial kinesis. It could either be of mechanical or ontogenetic importance, or both. Alternatively, it might be considered as the morphological remnant of a real, kinetic skull possessed by the diapsid ancestors of pterosaurs.

  15. Potential for intracranial movements in pterosaurs.

    PubMed

    Prondvai, Edina; Osi, Attila

    2011-05-01

    Based on comparative anatomical, morphological, and phylogenetic considerations the potential of pterosaurs for cranial kinesis is assessed. Our investigation shows that whereas skeletally mature derived pterodactyloids have completely fused, rigid and doubtlessly akinetic skulls, skeletally immature derived pterodactyloids and more basal pterosaurs possess key features in the morphology of their otic and basal joints that are suggestive of cranial kinesis, namely streptostyly. In addition, pterosaurs exhibit an evolutionarily informative trend in the degree of cranial ossification, where it is low in most nonpterodactyloids (here named bifenestratans), intermediate in Rhamphorhynchus and Archaeopterodactyloidea, and high in derived pterodactyloids. Incomplete fusion could also indicate loose connections between skull elements. However, another crucial anatomical requirement of a kinetic skull, the permissive kinematic linkage is absent in all pterosaurian taxa. The fact, that the presence of permissive kinematic linkages in the skull is also a prerequisite of all types of cranial kinesis, provides hard evidence that all members of Pterosauria had akinetic skulls. Thus, the presence of the morphological attributes indicative of intracranial movements in some pterosaurs must be explained on grounds other than real potential for cranial kinesis. It could either be of mechanical or ontogenetic importance, or both. Alternatively, it might be considered as the morphological remnant of a real, kinetic skull possessed by the diapsid ancestors of pterosaurs. PMID:21455955

  16. Is neuroradiological imaging sufficient for exclusion of intracranial hypertension in children? Intracranial hypertension syndrome without evident radiological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Larysz, Dawid; Larysz, Patrycja; Klimczak, Andrzej; Mandera, Marek

    2010-01-01

    There are still many important questions about algorithms and clinical scenarios in the context of children with clinical intracranial hypertension symptoms (IHS) without radiological findings. Such conditions could appear in different clinical situations, including slit ventricle syndrome, overdrainage syndrome, normal volume hydrocephalus, or idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Many articles have defined specific treatment strategies for various forms of IHS, including ventriculoperitoneal shunting, medication for shunt-related migraine, steroids, and valve upgrades with antisiphoning devices or programmable systems. This study is an attempt to define the proper diagnostic procedures and treatment options for patients with various forms of IHS without evident neuroradiological findings. The authors discuss possible pathological mechanisms leading to IHS in the pediatric population. The authors present six children treated in their center. All of the children presented clinical manifestation of intracranial hypertension without evident neuroradiological findings in CT and/or MRI examinations. In three cases, the final diagnosis was slit ventricle syndrome; in two cases, normal volume hydrocephalus; in another case, idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The treatment options included short-term steroid (dexamethasone) administration and ventriculoperitoneal shunting using programmable systems. In one case of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, ICP monitoring was also performed. The authors discuss possible diagnostic and treatment strategies for the aforementioned cases. There are still many controversies about management of children with clinical symptoms of intracranial hypertension that are not confirmed in neuroimaging. It seems that our understanding of intracranial hypertension in the pediatric population is not nearly as sophisticated or complete as we might have imagined. Ventriculoperitoneal shunting with antisiphoning devices and/or short

  17. Superficial siderosis is a warning sign for future intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Linn, Jennifer; Wollenweber, Frank A; Lummel, Nina; Bochmann, Katja; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Bruckmann, Hartmut; Dichgans, Martin; Opherk, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Supratentorial superficial siderosis (SS) is a frequent imaging marker of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). It is most probably caused by focal subarachnoid hemorrhages (fSAHs). Based on single-case observations, it has been proposed that such fSAHs might be a predisposing factor for future intracranial hemorrhage. Here we tested the hypothesis if a SS as a residue of fSAHs must be regarded as a warning sign for future intracranial hemorrhage. Fifty-one consecutive patients with SS and no apparent cause other than possible or probable CAA were identified through a database search and followed-up for a median interval of 35.3 months (range 6-120 months). Main outcome measures were rate and location of new intracranial hemorrhages. Twenty-four patients (47.1 %) had experienced any new intracranial hemorrhage, 18 patients (35.3 %) had an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and in 13 of them (25.5 %), the hemorrhage was located at the site of pre-existing siderosis. Six patients (11.7 %) had developed a new subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), four of them at the site of siderosis. Patients with SS are at substantial risk for subsequent intracranial hemorrhage. SS can be considered a warning sign of future ICH or SAH, which frequently occur adjacent to pre-existing SS. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. The Management of Intracranial Aneurysms During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Barbarite, Eric; Hussain, Shahrose; Dellarole, Anna; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Peterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic changes during pregnancy may favor the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Despite this risk, guidelines for managing intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy have not been clearly defined. The objective of this review is to describe the treatment options for pregnant women with intracranial aneurysms, and to report the maternal and fetal outcomes associated with different treatment strategies. A search of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database for the period January 1991 through June 2015. Aneurysm characteristics and management, pregnancy management, and maternal and fetal outcomes were evaluated. The most recent search was performed in June 2015. In total, 50 aneurysms (44 patients) were evaluated. Rupture was confirmed upon imaging in 36 aneurysms (72%), and most aneurysms ruptured during the third trimester (77.8%). Coil embolization was associated with a lower complication rate than clipping in patients with ruptured aneurysms (9.5% vs 23.1%). For patients with unruptured aneurysms, surgical management was associated with 31.9% fewer complications compared to no treatment. Most patients underwent Cesarean delivery (84%), and a combined neurosurgical-obstetrical procedure was used for 8 patients with ruptured aneurysms near term. Adverse outcomes were reported in 11.9% of children. Treatment of intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy is safe and effective. Furthermore, we suggest that coil embolization be considered a first line treatment over clipping for surgical management of the pregnant population. Going forward, we encourage the establishment of formal guidelines for managing intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy. PMID:27400091

  19. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  20. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  1. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  2. The unruptured intracranial aneurysm treatment score

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert D.; Beseoglu, Kerim; Juvela, Seppo; Raymond, Jean; Morita, Akio; Torner, James C.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Raabe, Andreas; Mocco, J.; Korja, Miikka; Abdulazim, Amr; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Barrow, Daniel L.; Bederson, Joshua; Bonafe, Alain; Dumont, Aaron S.; Fiorella, David J.; Gruber, Andreas; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hasan, David M.; Hoh, Brian L.; Jabbour, Pascal; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Kelly, Michael E.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Knuckey, Neville; Koivisto, Timo; Krings, Timo; Lawton, Michael T.; Marotta, Thomas R.; Mayer, Stephan A.; Mee, Edward; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Molyneux, Andrew; Morgan, Michael K.; Mori, Kentaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Nagahiro, Shinji; Nakayama, Naoki; Niemelä, Mika; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Pierot, Laurent; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.; Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M.; Rinne, Jaakko; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Ronkainen, Antti; Schaller, Karl; Seifert, Volker; Solomon, Robert A.; Spears, Julian; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.; Wanke, Isabel; Wermer, Marieke J.H.; Wong, George K.C.; Wong, John H.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Connolly, E. Sander; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Pasqualin, Alberto; Rüfenacht, Daniel; Vajkoczy, Peter; McDougall, Cameron; Hänggi, Daniel; LeRoux, Peter; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We endeavored to develop an unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) treatment score (UIATS) model that includes and quantifies key factors involved in clinical decision-making in the management of UIAs and to assess agreement for this model among specialists in UIA management and research. Methods: An international multidisciplinary (neurosurgery, neuroradiology, neurology, clinical epidemiology) group of 69 specialists was convened to develop and validate the UIATS model using a Delphi consensus. For internal (39 panel members involved in identification of relevant features) and external validation (30 independent external reviewers), 30 selected UIA cases were used to analyze agreement with UIATS management recommendations based on a 5-point Likert scale (5 indicating strong agreement). Interrater agreement (IRA) was assessed with standardized coefficients of dispersion (vr*) (vr* = 0 indicating excellent agreement and vr* = 1 indicating poor agreement). Results: The UIATS accounts for 29 key factors in UIA management. Agreement with UIATS (mean Likert scores) was 4.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.1–4.3) per reviewer for both reviewer cohorts; agreement per case was 4.3 (95% CI 4.1–4.4) for panel members and 4.5 (95% CI 4.3–4.6) for external reviewers (p = 0.017). Mean Likert scores were 4.2 (95% CI 4.1–4.3) for interventional reviewers (n = 56) and 4.1 (95% CI 3.9–4.4) for noninterventional reviewers (n = 12) (p = 0.290). Overall IRA (vr*) for both cohorts was 0.026 (95% CI 0.019–0.033). Conclusions: This novel UIA decision guidance study captures an excellent consensus among highly informed individuals on UIA management, irrespective of their underlying specialty. Clinicians can use the UIATS as a comprehensive mechanism for indicating how a large group of specialists might manage an individual patient with a UIA. PMID:26276380

  3. Intracranial nonvestibular neurinomas: Young neurosurgeons’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Forhad Hossain; Haque, Mohammod R.; Kawsar, Khandkar A.; Sarker, Mainul H.; Hasan, Mahmudul; Goel, Atul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Neurinoma arising from other than nonvestibular cranial nerves is less prevalent. Here we present our experiences regarding the clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, and the outcome of nonvestibular cranial nerve neurinomas. Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to December 2011, the recorded documents of operated nonvestibular intracranial neurinomas were retrospectively studied for clinical profile, investigations, microneurosurgical management, complications, follow-up, and outcomes. Results: The average follow-up was 24.5 months. Total number of cases was 30, with age ranging from 9 to 60 years. Sixteen cases were males and 14 were females. Nonvestibular cranial nerve schwannomas most commonly originated from trigeminal nerve followed by glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve. There were three abducent nerve schwannomas that are very rare. There was no trochlear nerve schwannoma. Two glossopharyngeal+/vagus nerve schwannomas extended into the neck through jugular foramen and one extended into the upper cervical spinal canal. Involved nerve dysfunction was a common clinical feature except in trigeminal neurinomas where facial pain was a common feature. Aiming for no new neurodeficit, total resection of the tumor was done in 24 cases, and near-total resection or gross total resection or subtotal resection was done in 6 cases. Preoperative symptoms improved or disappeared in 25 cases. New persistent deficit occurred in 3 cases. Two patients died postoperatively. There was no recurrence of tumor till the last follow-up. Conclusion: Nonvestibular schwannomas are far less common, but curable benign lesions. Surgical approach to the skull base and craniovertebral junction is a often complex and lengthy procedure associated with chances of significant morbidity. But early diagnosis, proper investigations, and evaluation, along with appropriate decision making and surgical planning with microsurgical techniques are the

  4. Endovascular treatment of infectious intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bradley A; Puri, Ajit S

    2013-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysms (IIA) are rare but a considerable source of morbidity and mortality as a result of rupture. Most patients with these lesions have considerable medical comorbidities, making endovascular approaches a crucial modality in their treatment armamentarium. Contributing our own case, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature to illustrate overall results and outcomes for patients with IIA treated with endovascular approaches. Incorporating our own case, we found 65 patients harboring 72 IIA across 31 reports. Fifty-one were treated via parent artery occlusion (71%), 17 via direct aneurysm embolization (24%), two via stent-coiling (3%), and two with stent monotherapy (3%). Twenty-nine IIAs were treated with n-butylcyanoacrylate (NBCA) (40%), 25 with coils (35%), seven with Onyx or ethylene vinyl alcohol (10%), five with detachable balloons (7%), four with stents (6%), and one with autologous clot (1%). One case of incomplete aneurysm occlusion and two cases of recanalization were reported. Six symptomatic periprocedural ischemic events were reported (9%), with only three resulting in permanent sequelae (5%). No infectious complications were reported. Incorporating the natural history of the disease, 28 patients were neurologically intact (43%), while seven had died at the time of follow-up (11%). Endovascular treatment of ruptured, symptomatic, or enlarging IIA is an excellent treatment modality with high occlusion rates and low procedure-related complication rates. Distal IIA are more often treated with parent artery occlusion, in our hands, preferentially with Onyx, while proximal lesions may be treated with direct stent-coiling or even flow-diverting stent monotherapy.

  5. An isolated intracranial mucocoele herniated from the frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Huang, K L; Huang, C C; Lee, T J; Huang, C C

    2015-01-01

    Mucocoeles are chronic mucosa-lined retention cysts that occur due to sinus ostium obstruction and expand along the path of least resistance, most commonly involving the frontal sinus. A frontal mucocoele typically appears as a smooth and rounded expansile enlargement of a completely opacified frontal sinus, with or without thinning of the bony wall of the sinus. Here we report a rare case of isolated intracranial mucocoele that presented with posterior herniation to the anterior cranial fossa through a small bony defect on the posterior table of the frontal sinus. The findings upon imaging could easily be confused with intracranial abscess, potentially leading to craniotomy drainage. In the present case of mucocoele, the frontal intracranial lesion was completely resolved following endoscopic frontal sinusotomy.

  6. Ten self-inflicted intracranial penetrating nail gun injuries

    PubMed Central

    Yuh, Sung-Joo; Alaqeel, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating craniocerebral injuries from nail gun use are rare. We describe a case of 10 self-inflicted nail gun injuries with intracranial penetrations. We also review the literature and discuss management strategies of such craniocerebral trauma. A 33-year-old male with a long-standing history of severe depression took a nail gun and sustained 10 penetrating intracranial injuries. Initial neuroimaging revealed 10 penetrating nails, all sparing the major cerebral vasculature. Immediate surgical removal was undertaken in the surgical suite using a combination of craniotomies, craniectomies, and blind removal. Intracranial injuries from self-inflicted nail gun misuse is becoming increasingly more frequent. Initial appropriate clinical decision-making are critical in preventing further cortical or vascular damage. PMID:26166596

  7. Noninvasive Intracranial Volume and Pressure Measurements Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Prevention of secondary brain injuries following head can be accomplished most easily when intracranial pressure (ICP) is monitored. However, current measurement techniques are invasive and thus not practical in the combat environment. The Pulsed Phase Lock Loop (PPLL) devise, which was developed and patented, uses a unique, noninvasive ultrasonic phase comparison method to measure slight changes in cranial volume which occur with changes in ICP. Year one studies involved instrument improvements and measurement of altered intracranial distance with altered ICP in fresh cadavera. Our software was improved to facilitate future studies of normal subjects and trauma patients. Our bench studies proved that PPLL output correlated highly with changes in path length across a model cranium. Cadaveric studies demonstrated excellent compact, noninvasive devise for monitoring changes in intracranial distance may aid in the early detection of elevated ICP, decreasing risk of secondary brain injury and infection, and returning head-injured patients to duty.

  8. Primary varicella infection presenting with headache and elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Oded; Shefer-Averbuch, Noa; Garty, Ben Zion

    2015-05-01

    Primary varicella infection may be associated with neurologic complications, such as cerebritis and meningoencephalitis. Several cases of varicella infection with elevated intracranial pressure have been reported. We describe a 13-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with a clinical picture of headaches and elevated intracranial pressure as the only manifestation of primary varicella zoster infection. The working diagnosis at first was pseudotumor cerebri based on complaints of headache of 2 weeks' duration, in addition to vomiting and papilledema, without fever or skin eruption. On lumbar puncture, opening pressure was 420 mmH2O, but mild pleocytosis and mildly elevated protein level ruled out the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. Our patient had no history of previous varicella infection, and she did not receive the varicella zoster vaccine. Serology tests, done on admission and repeated 2 months later, suggested primary varicella infection. The literature on varicella infection associated with pseudotumor cerebri or elevated intracranial pressure is reviewed.

  9. Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma: two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Hong; Ma, Quanfeng; Chen, Yiyang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma was a relatively rare tumor composed of myeloid blasts and/or immature myeloid cells in an extramedullary site which is associated with acute/chronic myeloid leukemia. In this paper, two cases of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma, one male aged 36 and one 28-year-old female, were reported to improve the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases. Diagnostic and treatment procedures for them were retrospectively summarized and relevant literature reviews were combined. Pathological biopsy was conducted to validate the diagnosis. Surgical resections in combination with chemotherapy were performed. The differential diagnosis of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma from malignant lymphomas and alternative small round cell malignancy was confirmed by biopsy and immunohistochemistry. PMID:26770615

  10. Intracranial hemorrhage revealing pseudohypoparathyroidism as a cause of fahr syndrome.

    PubMed

    Swami, Abhijit; Kar, Giridhari

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT(4), low FT(3), and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  11. Factors Influencing the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Rebecca L; Podraza, Katherine M; Luthra, Nijee; Origitano, Thomas C; Schneck, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Deciding how to manage an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can be difficult for patients and physicians due to controversies about management. The decision as to when and how to intervene may be variable depending on physicians' interpretation of available data regarding natural history and morbidity and mortality of interventions. Another significant factor in the decision process is the patients' conception of the risks of rupture and interventions and the psychological burden of harboring an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Objective  To describe which factors are being considered when patients and their physicians decide how to manage unruptured intracranial aneurysms.  Materials & methods  In a retrospective chart review study, we identified patients seen for evaluation of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Data was collected regarding patient and aneurysm characteristics. The physician note pertaining to the management decision was reviewed for documented reasons for intervention. Results  Of 88 patients included, 36 (41%) decided to undergo open or endovascular surgery for at least one unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms were present in 14 (16%) patients. Younger patients and current smokers were more likely to undergo surgery, but gender and race did not affect management. Aneurysm size and location strongly influenced management. The most common documented reasons underlying the decision of whether to intervene were the risk of rupture, aneurysm size, and risks of the procedure. For 23 aneurysms (21%), there were no factors documented for the management decision.  Conclusion  The risk of rupture of unruptured intracranial aneurysms may be underestimated by currently available natural history data. Major factors weighed by physicians in management decisions include aneurysm size and location, the patient's age, and medical comorbidities along with the risk of procedural complications. Additional data is needed to define

  12. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  13. Unusual Radiologic Finding of Intracranial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Presenting a Cyst with Mural Nodule.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Heok; Yoon, Wan-Soo; Chung, Dong-Sup

    2015-10-01

    An intracranial cyst tumor with a mural nodule can be representative of some types of brain tumors, but is a rare presentation of intracranial inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Herein, we report the case of an intracranial IMT in a 48-year-old woman presenting with the extremely unusual radiologic findings of a cyst with a mural nodule.

  14. Harmonics tracking of intracranial and arterial blood pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, Sima; McKelvey, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Considering cardiorespiratory interaction and heart rate variability, a new approach is proposed to decompose intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure to their different harmonics. The method is based on tracking the amplitudes of the harmonics by a Kalman filter based tracking algorithm. The algorithm takes benefit of combined frequency estimation technique which uses both Fast Fourier Transform and RR-interval detection. The result would be of use in intracranial pressure and arterial blood pressure waveform analysis as well as other investigations which need to estimate contribution of specific harmonic in above mentioned signals such as Pressure-Volume Compensatory Reserve assessment.

  15. Fast virtual stenting with deformable meshes: application to intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Larrabide, Ignacio; Radaelli, Alessandro; Frangi, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial stents are medical devices that are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. A methodology that predicts the released stent configuration prior to intervention has the potential to support the physician in the selection of the optimal approach for a specific patient. This paper proposes a fast virtual stenting technique based on constrained simplex deformable models that is able to virtually release stents in arbitrarily shaped vessel and aneurysm models. The technique effectively embeds the geometrical properties of the stent (cell design, strut size and shape and angles between struts) and achieves favorable execution times of the order of one minute.

  16. Intracranial meningioma with ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Canfield, Don R

    2012-10-01

    A 21-y-old female rhesus macaque presented with signs of internal and external ophthamoplegia, including anisocoria and ptosis. Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or weakness of one or more intraocular or extraocular muscles that control the movement of eye; this condition can be caused by neurologic or muscle disorders. The macaque was euthanized due to progression of clinical symptoms, and postmortem gross examination revealed a mass at the base of the brain attached to the meninges. Histopathologic examination led to the diagnosis of intracranial meningioma. Here we describe a case of intracranial meningioma with internal and external ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

  17. Intracranial hypotension secondary to spinal pathology: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sartip, Kamyar; McKenna, Gregory; Spina, Michael; Grahovac, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Spinal pathology resulting in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension is an infrequently reported and a potentially severe cause of headaches. We present a case of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a thoracic disk herniation successfully treated with two targeted epidural blood patches. Although patients typically present with orthostatic headaches, the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension should prompt investigation of the spine for site and cause of the CSF leakage. Treatment includes autologous blood patch and surgery in refractory cases. PMID:26914140

  18. Sympathetic storming in a patient with intracranial basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Marino, Michael; Desai, Anjuli; Nissley, Frederick

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic deficits and medical complications are common sequelae after intracranial hemorrhage. Among the medical complications, sympathetic storming is relatively rare. We describe a case of a patient with an acute right basal ganglia hemorrhage. During the patient's hospital course, he developed tachypnea, diaphoresis, hypertension, hyperthermia, and tachycardia for three consecutive days. A complete laboratory work-up and imaging studies were unremarkable for infectious etiology, new intracranial hemorrhage, and deep vein thrombosis. The patient was diagnosed with sympathetic storming, a relatively uncommon cause of these symptoms. The storming was secondary to a kinked Foley catheter, and subsequent placement of a new catheter resulted in the resolution of his symptoms. PMID:21297401

  19. Hypertonic saline in elevated intracranial pressure: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Surani, Salim; Lockwood, Geoff; Macias, Melissa Y; Guntupalli, Bharat; Varon, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic Saline (HS) has been a proven and effective therapy and a safe alternative to mannitol in patients with increase intracranial pressure (ICP). We hereby present a case of 25-year-old women with intracranial bleed secondary to right parietal arteriovenous malformation. Patient underwent surgery for evacuation of hematoma and resection of arteriovenous malformation. Post- operative course was complicated by recurrent episodes of elevated ICP. She received total of 17 doses of 23.4% HS and 30 doses of mannitol with good outcome. Despite reluctance from some clinicians to use HS, hypertonic saline seems to be a safe and effective therapy.

  20. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient. PMID:27376217

  1. Changes in intracranial pressure associated with delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, M.; Cervos-Navarro, J.; Holdorff, B.

    1984-07-01

    Continuous recording of intracranial pressure (ICP) from one lateral ventricle in a case of histologically proven delayed temporal radionecrosis due to previous irradiation of the pituitary gland for the treatment of an adiposity of the Cushing type has revealed the occurrence of B-waves and ramplike waves despite the absence of raised intracranial pressure. Ventriculo-atrial shunting failed to relieve the severe psychic symptomatology, which was due to direct tissue damage. These observations indicate that B-waves may have a neurogenic origin.

  2. Pediatric intracranial gunshot wounds: the Memphis experience.

    PubMed

    DeCuypere, Michael; Muhlbauer, Michael S; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Penetrating brain injury in civilians is much less common than blunt brain injury but is more severe overall. Gunshot wounds (GSWs) cause high morbidity and mortality related to penetrating brain injury; however, there are few reports on the management and outcome of intracranial GSWs in children. The goals of this study were to identify clinical and radiological factors predictive for death in children and to externally validate a recently proposed pediatric prognostic scale. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of penetrating, isolated GSWs sustained in children whose ages ranged from birth to 18 years and who were treated at 2 major metropolitan Level 1 trauma centers from 1996 through 2013. Several standard clinical, laboratory, and radiological factors were analyzed for their ability to predict death in these patients. The authors then applied the St. Louis Scale for Pediatric Gunshot Wounds to the Head, a scoring algorithm that was designed to provide rapid prognostic information for emergency management decisions. The scale's sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictability were determined, with death as the primary outcome. RESULTS Seventy-one children (57 male, 14 female) had a mean age of 14 years (range 19 months to 18 years). Overall mortality among these children was 47.9%, with 81% of survivors attaining a favorable clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score ≥ 4). A number of predictors of mortality were identified (all p < 0.05): 1) bilateral fixed pupils; 2) deep nuclear injury; 3) transventricular projectile trajectory; 4) bihemispheric injury; 5) injury to ≥ 3 lobes; 6) systolic blood pressure < 100 mm Hg; 7) anemia (hematocrit < 30%); 8) Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 5; and 9) a blood base deficit < -5 mEq/L. Patient age, when converted to a categorical variable (0-9 or 10-18 years), was not predictive. Based on data from the 71 patients in this study, the positive predictive value of the St

  3. Severe symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis treated with intracranial stenting: a single center study with 58 patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Liang; Gao, Bu-Lang; Li, Tian-Xiao; Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Li, Zhao-Shuo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of intracranial stenting in a population with severe (≥70%) symptomatic intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) atherosclerotic stenosis. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with severe intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. The baseline data, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up were prospectively analyzed. RESULTS All patients had successful intracranial stenting (100%), and the mean degree of stenosis was improved from 84.3%±7.5% to 23.5%±5.1% after the stent procedure. During the 30-day perioperative period, only one patient (1.7%) had ischemic stroke. Seven patients (12.1%) had headache and dysphoria. Thirty-six patients (62.1%) had clinical follow-up for 6–68 months after stenting. Five female patients (13.9%) had ipsilateral stroke including one death, but no disabling stroke, while three other patients (8.3%) had ipsilateral temporary ischemic attack (TIA). The recurrent stroke rate was higher in patients presenting with stroke (4/17, 23.5%) than in patients presenting with TIA (1/19, 5.3%), with no statistical significance (P = 0.33). Thirteen patients (22.4%) had imaging follow-up of 5–12 months following stenting, five of whom (38.5%) had in-stent restenosis. CONCLUSION Intracranial stenting for patients with intracranial ICA atherosclerotic stenosis has a low perioperative stroke rate and decent outcome on long-term follow-up, despite a relatively high in-stent restenosis rate. PMID:26809831

  4. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension. PMID:27621920

  5. Surgery of intracranial aneurysms at Yonsei University: 780 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, K C

    1991-03-01

    Seven hundred and eighty patients with intracranial aneurysm, which were surgically treated by the author since 1976, were analyzed. Strategies important for intracranial aneurysm surgery were the timing of surgery, preoperative preparation and intraoperative management. The best management outcome could be achieved by early operation, removal of subarachnoid blood clot, maintenance of circulating blood volume, administration of nimodipine, and meticulous surgical tactics to avoid pitfalls. Indications for aneurysm surgery in the acute phase were determined by intracerebral hematoma, angiographic findings, clinical grade, general physical status and readiness of the surgical team. Important goals to be considered during the operation were obtaining a slack brain, preparation of proximal control, protection of the brain, awareness of microsurgical anatomy, and complete dissection of the sac. The morbidity and mortality were 2.7% and 4.0%, respectively. The mortality was attributed to intracranial causes in 20 cases (poor grade, delayed ischemic deficits, rebleeding, postoperative infarction, and postoperative epidural hematoma), extracranial causes in 7 cases (pulmonary embolism, heparin induced intracerebral hemorrhage, hepatic failure, myocardial infarction, and gastrointestinal bleeding), and unknown problems in 5 cases. The postoperative intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 16 cases and seemed to be caused by one or more of the following events: cerebral infarction developed during the preoperative period, occlusion of the cerebral veins during the Sylvian dissection, cerebral retraction and/or sudden change of intracranial hemodynamics. Hydrocephalus, almost always a communicating type as confirmed by isotope cisternography, was managed by lumboperitoneal shunt.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2046205

  6. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  7. Continuous measurement of intracranial pressure with SFT: clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, S; Matsuda, M; Handa, J; Handa, H

    1975-09-01

    In 29 consecutive patients, the epidural intracranial pressure (EDP) was continuously measured with a semiconductor strain film transducer, and with a telemetric monitoring system in two patients. Factors affecting the EDP during pre-, intra- and postoperative periods were analyzed and their significance in clinical practice stressed.

  8. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  9. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  10. [Intraoperative localization of space-occupying intracranial processes using ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, B N; Epstein, F J; Cooper, P R; Horii, S C; Ransohoff, J

    1984-10-01

    During a two-year period, intra-operative ultrasonic explorations were performed in 44 patients for the purpose of localisation of intracranial masses. This facilitated accurate intraoperative assessment of the location and consistency of the mass. We consider operative ultrasound to be an invaluable adjunct to surgery of small intracerebral masses.

  11. /sup 123/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy of ectopic intracranial retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bomanji, J.; Kingston, J.E.; Hungerford, J.L.; Britton, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Radioiodinated metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) has been used for diagnostic purposes to image neural crest tumors. We report the uptake of /sup 123/I MIBG in a child with ectopic intracranial retinoblastoma. It is felt that /sup 123/I MIBG scintigraphy may have a role in detecting occult metastatic disease in these patients.

  12. Asymptomatic Intracranial Foreign Body: An Incidental Finding on Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Mohammadreza; Shahbazzadegan, Bita; Pezeshki, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial needles are rare entities. Intracranial foreign bodies due to non-missile intracranial penetrations are one of the most rarely encountered situations in neurosurgery. Sewing needles are among the more unusual foreign bodies that may be found in the brain. Although uncommon, foreign body cases are important and interesting. Foreign bodies enter the body through trauma or iatrogenic injuries. Needles are mostly inserted through fontanelles, cranial sutures, and more rarely through the orbits in infancy for the purpose of killing unwanted babies. Case Presentation This article presents a case of intracranial foreign body found upon radiography. A 24-year-old female, who two days prior to presentation suffered only once from dizziness, and was otherwise healthy. Conclusions Because this incident may have occurred during the patient’s neonatal period, it may be a case of child abuse. In spite of the very limited number of cases in the literature, having a stepmother, a stepfather, or a babysitter, being the youngest child, or having family members who suffer from psychiatric disorders, (especially if these relatives are responsible for child care), living in a society that allows homicide of children born from extramarital relationships, and being female have been suggested as possible risk factors. PMID:27626006

  13. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension.

  14. Diagnosing intracranial vasculitis: The roles of MR and angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.G.; Tran, D.D.; Sickels, W.J.; Cornell, S.H.; Yuh, W.T.C. )

    1994-02-01

    To describe our experience with MR and angiography in diagnosing intracranial vasculitis and to test the hypothesis that MR can be used to screen for patients unlikely to have vasculitis. Ninety-two patients who had angiography with [open quotes]exclude vasculitis[close quotes] as the indication or who had angiography and a clinical diagnosis of vasculitis were identified. Angiograms of all 92 patients and the MRs of the 70 patients who had both studies were reviewed. Eleven patients had intracranial vasculitis. Angiography showed characteristic changes in 8. MR performed in 9 of 11 vasculitis cases, was significantly abnormal in all 9. Among 70 patients who had both studies, 19 had MR that was completely normal or showed only incidental findings. None of these 19 was diagnosed with vasculitis. The diagnostic yield of angiography performed to exclude vasculitis was only 6%. Evaluation for intracranial vasculitis should include MR. A negative MR excludes intracranial vasculitis more definitively than does a negative angiogram and makes the likelihood of finding vasculitis with angiography negligible. 23 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Asymptomatic Intracranial Foreign Body: An Incidental Finding on Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Mohammadreza; Shahbazzadegan, Bita; Pezeshki, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial needles are rare entities. Intracranial foreign bodies due to non-missile intracranial penetrations are one of the most rarely encountered situations in neurosurgery. Sewing needles are among the more unusual foreign bodies that may be found in the brain. Although uncommon, foreign body cases are important and interesting. Foreign bodies enter the body through trauma or iatrogenic injuries. Needles are mostly inserted through fontanelles, cranial sutures, and more rarely through the orbits in infancy for the purpose of killing unwanted babies. Case Presentation This article presents a case of intracranial foreign body found upon radiography. A 24-year-old female, who two days prior to presentation suffered only once from dizziness, and was otherwise healthy. Conclusions Because this incident may have occurred during the patient’s neonatal period, it may be a case of child abuse. In spite of the very limited number of cases in the literature, having a stepmother, a stepfather, or a babysitter, being the youngest child, or having family members who suffer from psychiatric disorders, (especially if these relatives are responsible for child care), living in a society that allows homicide of children born from extramarital relationships, and being female have been suggested as possible risk factors.

  16. Intracranial Hemodynamic Changes During Adult Moyamoya Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kwag, Hyun-Jeong; Jeong, Dong-Wook; Lee, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose This study evaluated the changes in blood flow velocity in the anterior and posterior intracranial circulations according to the progression of moyamoya disease in adult patients. Methods We evaluated Suzuki's angiographic stage and mean blood flow velocity (MBFV) changes in intracranial vessels from both sides in 19 adult moyamoya patients. We then analyzed the linearity of MBFV changes from early to late moyamoya stages in each intracranial vessel using piecewise linear regression models. Results The MBFV in the middle cerebral artery, terminal internal carotid artery, and anterior cerebral artery increased non linearly until stage III, and then decreased progressively up to stage VI. The ophthalmic artery also showed nonlinear velocity changes, with an increase in MBFV up to stage IV, followed by a decrease in MBFV up to stage VI. The MBFV of the basilar artery increased linearly from a normal velocity at an early moyamoya stage to a stenotic velocity at a late stage. There was no statistically significant regression model for the relationship between the MBFV in the posterior cerebral artery and moyamoya stage. Conclusions The nonlinear and/or linear MBFV changes associated with variable intracranial vessels might be useful in initial and follow-up evaluations of different stages of moyamoya disease. PMID:19513306

  17. Intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis. CT and bone marrow scan findings

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, M.; O'Sullivan, R.A.; Nugent, R.A.; Lentle, B.C. )

    1991-06-01

    This case concerns a patient with intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis (EH) suspected on a CT scan and subsequently confirmed with In-111 chloride and Tc-99m SC bone marrow scans. The bone marrow scans also provided additional information by demonstrating other sites of EH in the paravertebral tissues and bone marrow expansion into the distal extremities.

  18. Giant Intracranial Aneurysm in a Ten-Year-Old Boy with Parry Romberg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, T.; Van Beijnum, J.; Van Walderveen, M.A.A.; Brouwer, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS) is a rare acquired syndrome consisting of progressive hemiatrophy of the face. We present a child with PRS and progressive neurological deficit caused by a giant intracranial aneurysm and reviewed the literature concerning all intracranial abnormalities in patients with PRS. A literature search identified 27 articles reporting on 88 patients with PRS and intracranial abnormalities. Ipsilateral brain calcification and hemiatrophy are the most prominent features on CT scan and hyperintense white matter lesions are most frequently seen on T2-weighted MRI. Although lacking precise prevalence data, intracranial abnormalities are not uncommon in patients with PRS. We found three other PRS patients with intracranial aneurysms. Our case and literature search suggests a possible association between PRS and intracranial aneurysms. We consider this association important for clinical practice and recommend including intracranial vascular diseases in the differential diagnosis when dealing with a PRS patient with neurological symptoms. PMID:20465894

  19. Nocturnal ultrasound measurements of optic nerve sheath diameter correlate with intracranial pressure in children with craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Caroline; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Lequin, Maarten; Joosten, Koen F M; Mathijssen, Irene M J

    2012-09-01

    Children with craniosynostosis are at risk for increased intracranial pressure, and additional possibilities to screen for increased intracranial pressure are required. The authors' aim was to use ultrasound measurements of the optic nerve sheath to understand and express the variability of intracranial pressure in syndromic craniosynostosis. Therefore, five pediatric patients with craniosynostosis underwent invasive 24-hour intracranial pressure monitoring and simultaneous optic nerve sheath measurements. In three patients, the intracranial pressure was abnormal, and during the second half of the night, the optic nerve sheath was increased in all three patients. The optic nerve sheath diameter changes during the night and is as dynamic as the intracranial pressure. To the best of their knowledge, the authors are the first to describe a real-time relationship of the optic nerve sheath with increased intracranial pressure in children.

  20. Hyponatremia with intracranial malignant tumor resection in children

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cydni; Simon, Tamara D.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Bratton, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Object Intracranial neoplasms are the second most common childhood cancer, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Hyponatremia is a complication associated with neurosurgical procedures, but children undergoing intracranial tumor resection have not been selectively studied. In this study, the authors aimed to determine the incidence and risk factors associated with hyponatremia among children undergoing intracranial neoplasm resection. Methods A retrospective cohort was compiled using the 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database to identify children younger than 21 years of age who underwent intracranial neoplasm resection. Hyponatremia was ascertained by diagnosis codes. Bivariate analyses were conducted using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Logistic regression models were developed to evaluate factors associated with hyponatremia in bivariate analyses. Results Hyponatremia occurred in 205 (8.7%) of 2343 annual weighted cases, and was independently associated with tumor location in the deep brain structures and ventricles compared with the cortical area (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.4; 95% CI 1.17–5.3). Hyponatremia was also associated with obstructive hydrocephalus (aOR 2.7; 95% CI 1.7–4.3) and emergency department admission (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.4). Hyponatremia was significantly associated with mechanical ventilation, ventriculostomy placement, ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and sepsis. Hyponatremia was also associated with a significantly longer average length of stay (24.6 vs 10.2 days), higher average charges ($191,000 vs $92,000), and a higher percentage of discharges to intermediate-care facilities. Conclusions Hyponatremia commonly occurs with resection of intracranial malignant tumors, especially for lesions located in the deep brain and in patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. Hyponatremia was associated with higher morbidity. Further research is needed to develop targeted monitoring and intervention strategies to decrease

  1. Extracranial and intracranial vertebrobasilar dissections: diagnosis and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    de Bray, J M; Penisson-Besnier, I; Dubas, F; Emile, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To compare the diagnosis and prognosis of extracranial versus intracranial vertebral artery dissections without intracerebral haemorrhage.
METHODS—Twenty two vertebral artery dissections were defined by intra-arterial angiography and classified in two groups: group 1,nine extracranial dissections (seven patients) and group 2, 13intracranial dissections (nine patients), involving the basilar artery in five cases. Bilateral dissections were found in 38% of the population. Before angiography, all the patients had been investigated by continuous wave Doppler, colour coded Doppler, and transcranial Doppler. Mean follow up was 44months.
RESULTS—The two most important symptoms of both dissections (81% of patients) were unbearable pain preceding stroke and progressive onset of stroke within a few hours. Severe ultrasonic abnormalities were present in 94% of the patients whereas specific ultrasonic signs (segmental dilation with eccentric channel) were rare (19%) in both groups. Major strokes and brainstem strokes represented respectively 67% and 78% in intracranial versus 43% and 29% in extracranial dissections. Severe sequelae (permanent disabling motor or cerebellar deficit) were more often associated with intracranial (44%) than with extracranial dissections (14%). No recurrence of dissection and no cerebral haemorrhage were found under heparin. Significant factors of poor outcome (P< 0.05) were the initial severity of the stroke and the bilateral location of dissections.
CONCLUSION—The combination of a pain and a progressive onset of the stroke, corroborated by ultrasonic findings, could have helped to recognise most of these types of dissections. Intracranial dissections have a poorer prognosis than extracranial dissections.

 PMID:9221967

  2. A randomized, open-label, multicentre study to evaluate plasma atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and arteriosclerosis obliterans when treated with Probucol and Cilostazol

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Xiao, Xin-Hua; Guo, Li-Xin; Lv, Xiao-Feng; Li, Quan-Min; Gao, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the plasma atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and arteriosclerosis obliteran (ASO) when treated with Probucol plus Cilostazol in combination and individually. Methods In this open-label study, patients aged 40–75 years were randomized to receive conventional therapy alone, or with Cilostazol 100 mg bid, or with Probucol 250 mg bid, or with both in combination. Endpoints included changes in plasma biomarker and safety at 12 weeks. Results Of the 200 randomized patients, 165 for per-protocol and 160 for the safety (QTc intervals) were set, respectively. Probucol significantly reduced total cholesterol (P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), (P = 0.01), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (P < 0.001) compared with conventional therapy. Cilostazol was effective in increasing HDL-C (P = 0.002) and reducing triglycerides levels (P < 0.01) compared with conventional therapy. A trend towards significance was observed for the difference between conventional therapy alone and Probucol plus Cilostazol group for the change in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL, P = 0.065). No significant effects on the majority of the remaining biomarkers were found across the treatment groups. Conclusions We have confirmed that Ox-LDL could be a possible plasma atherosclerotic biomarker among the evaluated biomarkers, which reflected the synergetic effect of Cilostazol plus Probucol in patients with T2DM and ASO shown previously in preclinical studies. PMID:23097651

  3. Borderline Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Venous Sinus Stenting.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Pickard, John; Lever, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension without signs of raised intracranial pressure can be impossible to distinguish without direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Moreover, lumbar puncture, the usual method of measuring intracranial pressure, can produce a similar respite from symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue as it does in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This suggests a connection between them, with chronic fatigue syndrome representing a forme fruste variant of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. If this were the case, then treatments available for idiopathic intracranial hypertension might be appropriate for chronic fatigue. We describe a 49-year-old woman with a long and debilitating history of chronic fatigue syndrome who was targeted for investigation of intracranial pressure because of headache, then diagnosed with borderline idiopathic intracranial hypertension after lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Further investigation showed narrowings at the anterior ends of the transverse sinuses, typical of those seen in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and associated with pressure gradients. Stenting of both transverse sinuses brought about a life-changing remission of symptoms with no regression in 2 years of follow-up. This result invites study of an alternative approach to the investigation and management of chronic fatigue.

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  5. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  6. Non-thermal irreversible electroporation for deep intracranial disorders.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Neal, Robert E; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V

    2010-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to kill undesirable tissue. We build on our previous intracranial studies in order to evaluate the possibility of using N-TIRE for deep intracranial disorders. In this manuscript we describe a minimally invasive computed tomography (CT) guided N-TIRE procedure in white matter. In addition, we report the electric field threshold needed for white matter ablation (630 - 875 V/cm) using four sets of twenty 50 µs pulses at a voltage-to-distance ratio of 1000 V/cm. We also confirm the non-thermal aspect of the technique with real time temperature data measured at the electrode-tissue interface. PMID:21095962

  7. Surgical case of intracranial osteoma arising from the falx

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Miyata, Shiro; Ota, Nakao; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial osteomas completely unrelated to osseous tissues are extremely rare. In the present study, the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with persistent headache is reported. Computed tomography (CT) and bone window CT revealed an ossified lesion in the frontal area. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA)/CT venography fusion imaging demonstrated that the mass was located just below the superior sagittal sinus and cortical veins, and had adhered partially to these veins. Surgery achieved complete tumor removal with preservation of the cortical veins and superior sagittal sinus. The histological examination findings were compatible with osteoma. The present postoperative course was uneventful. The present rare case of intracranial osteoma originating from the falx was successfully treated surgically. Preoperative FIESTA/CT venography fusion imaging was very useful to demonstrate adhesion between the tumor mass and the superior sagittal sinus and cortical veins. PMID:27588144

  8. Coexistence of Spinal Intramedullary Tuberculoma and Multiple Intracranial Tuberculomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Yoon; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Kim, In-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Spinal intramedullary tuberculoma remains a very rare entity of central nervous system tuberculosis. This is the same with the coexistence of spinal intramedullary and intracranial tuberculomas that remains extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported at present. Authors describe this uncommon case by analyzing a 65-year-old female patient who had past history of kidney transplantation due to stage 5 chronic kidney disease and pulmonary tuberculosis on medication. The patient experiences progressive paraplegia and numbness on both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary mass at T9-10 level and multiple intracranial enhancing nodules. Microsurgical resection of spinal intramedullary mass was performed and the lesion was histopathologically confirmed as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Efficient diagnosis and management of this rare disease are reviewed along with previously reported cases.

  9. Thoracolumbar intraspinal tumours presenting features of raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Ridsdale, L; Moseley, I

    1978-01-01

    Five patients are described in whom a benign or malignant thoracolumbar tumour, producing increased level of cerebrospinal fluid protein, was associated with hydrocephalus or papilloedema or both. A review of the clinical and laboratory features in these and 40 published cases underlines the difficulty in explaining the increased intracranial pressure in such patients. Slow absorption of cerebrospinal fluid as a result of the elevated protein levels or recurrent subarachnoid bleeding may play a part. When patients are discovered to have communicating hydrocephalus or a syndrome resemlbing benign intracranial hypertension, the finding of increased cerebrospinal fluid protein or any symptoms or signs relative to the spine should suggest the possibility of an intraspinal tumour. Images PMID:681961

  10. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taddeo, Terrance A.

    2010-01-01

    During recent long duration missions to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers have reported changes in visual acuity or visual field defects. Exams in the postflight period revealed changes to the visual system and elevated intracranial pressures. As a result, NASA Space Medicine has added a number of tests to be performed in the preflight, inflight and postflight periods for ISS and shuttle missions with the goal of determining the processes at work and any potential mitigation strategies. This discussion will acquaint you with the changes that NASA has made to its medical requirements in order to address the microgravity induced intracranial hypertension and associated visual changes. Key personnel have been assembled to provide you information on this topic. Educational Objectives: Provide an overview of the current Medical Operations requirements and the mitigation steps taken to operationally address the issue.

  11. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  12. Primary Intracranial Myoepithelial Neoplasm: A Potential Mimic of Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Choy, Bonnie; Pytel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Myoepithelial neoplasms were originally described in the salivary glands but their spectrum has been expanding with reports in other locations, including soft tissue. Intracranial cases are exceptionally rare outside the sellar region where they are assumed to be arising from Rathke pouch rests. Two cases of pediatric intracranial myoepithelial neoplasm in the interhemispheric fissure and the right cerebral hemisphere are reported here. Imaging studies suggest that the second case was associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Both cases showed typical variation in morphology and immunophenotype between more epithelioid and more mesenchymal features. The differential diagnosis at this particular anatomic location includes meningioma, which can show some overlap in immunophenotype since both tumors express EMA as well as GLUT1. One case was positive for EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One patient is disease free at last follow-up while the other succumbed to the disease within days illustrating the clinical spectrum of these tumors.

  13. Right cardiac intracavitary metastases from a primary intracranial myxofibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diogo Alpuim; Barata, Pedro; Gouveia, Emanuel; Mafra, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Primary intracranial myxofibrosarcoma is exceedingly rare, with less than 10 cases published. We present a case of a 23-year-old man with previous history of a primary low grade myxofibrosarcoma of the left parietal-occipital convexity resected in March 1999. He subsequently underwent several interventions for multiple local recurrent disease until March 2004. At that time, complete remission was documented. About 8 years later, in February 2012, the patient was admitted to the emergency room with refractory acute pulmonary oedema. On work up, sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and hyperechoic myocardial mass with invasion of the right ventricular cavity were detected. Electrical cardioversion was unsuccessful and irreversible cardiac arrest followed. The autopsy confirmed multiple bilateral lung metastases, malignant pulmonary embolism and myocardial invasion by the primary tumour, with intracavitary cardiac thrombosis and absence of intracranial disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of extracranial metastases of this neoplasm. PMID:27013654

  14. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  15. [Measuring intracranial pressure with a fontanelle palpation transducer (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J F; Lacombe, J; Pierre-Kahn, A; Renier, D

    1978-01-01

    The accuracy and reliability of a non-invasive method for the measurement of intracranial pressure through the fontanelle without puncture was tested during 12 or even 24 hours recordings. Wealthall and Smallwood modified aplanation transducer was first used. A metal frame had to be developed in order to secure the transducer rigidly over the fontanelle so that the recording could take place with the infant in any position and completely free of its movements. Simultaneous recordings of extradural or intraventricular pressure have shown the measurements were accurate to about 1 or 2 cm H2O in a neurosurgical environnement (i.e large fontanelles with pressure over 10 cm H2O). For smaller fontanelles or low or even negative intracranial pressure, a smaller transducer seems to be needed. The preliminary test of a plane strain gauge transducer that partially fills this need is shown.

  16. Controversies in epidemiology of intracranial aneurysms and SAH.

    PubMed

    Korja, Miikka; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is the most common cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which is a life-threatening acute cerebrovascular event that typically affects working-age people. The exact prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) is unknown, but at least one in 20 to 30 adults is likely to carry an asymptomatic UIA. Approximately one quarter of these UIAs rupture in a lifetime. Complex methodological challenges in conducting studies of epidemiology and risk factors for UIAs and SAH might have led to conclusions being drawn on the basis of epidemiological data of variable quality. We believe that, as a result, misconceptions about UIAs and SAH may have arisen. In this Perspectives article, we discuss three possible misconceptions about the epidemiology of UIAs and SAH, and suggest how the quality of future research could be improved. PMID:26670298

  17. Esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension: A non-surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah Boby; Balasubramaniam, Deepak; Hiran, K R; Dinesh, M; Pavithran, K

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumor arising from the olfactory mucosa of upper respiratory tract. The primary modality of treatment has been surgery with craniofacial resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy. There are only a few reported cases of non-surgical approaches. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension treated with Vincristine, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, Etoposide protocol followed by radiation with 5 years of follow-up. This is the first reported case using this chemotherapy schedule. PMID:27366272

  18. Esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension: A non-surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sarah Boby; Balasubramaniam, Deepak; Hiran, K. R.; Dinesh, M.; Pavithran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare tumor arising from the olfactory mucosa of upper respiratory tract. The primary modality of treatment has been surgery with craniofacial resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy. There are only a few reported cases of non-surgical approaches. We report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma with intracranial extension treated with Vincristine, Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide, Etoposide protocol followed by radiation with 5 years of follow-up. This is the first reported case using this chemotherapy schedule. PMID:27366272

  19. Large Intracranial Aneurysm after Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Cho, Chun-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for pituitary adenoma can lead to meningitis. Intracranial mycotic pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication in central nervous system infection. Large single pseudoaneurysm is more uncommon. Most mycotic aneurysms occur due to endocarditis. The present patient had no heart problem and was infected by CSF leakage after transsphenoidal surgery. We present a case of large ruptured mycotic pseudoaneurysm as a complication of cerebral infection after TSS for pituitary macroadenoma. PMID:24851153

  20. Late complication after tropic storm accident: subcutaneous and intracranial actinomycetoma.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shyam B; Nayak, Suresh; Pasale, Ravindra K; Kittner, Thomas; Wollina, Uwe

    2008-12-01

    We report a 53-year-old farmer who developed subcutaneous and cerebral masses 24 years after penetrating trauma during a tropic storm. Computed tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology disclosed actinomycetoma, a disease that rarely develops after trauma and is only occasionally seen with intracranial manifestation. Clinically, the cutaneous manifestation resembled acne keloidalis nuchae or dissecting folliculitis of the scalp. He was treated by neurosurgery and antibiosis.

  1. PTFOS: Flexible and Absorbable Intracranial Electrodes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Fujimoto, Kyoko; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial electrocortical recording and stimulation can provide unique knowledge about functional brain anatomy in patients undergoing brain surgery. This approach is commonly used in the treatment of medically refractory epilepsy. However, it can be very difficult to integrate the results of cortical recordings with other brain mapping modalities, particularly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The ability to integrate imaging and electrophysiological information with simultaneous subdural electrocortical recording/stimulation and fMRI could offer significant insight for cognitive and systems neuroscience as well as for clinical neurology, particularly for patients with epilepsy or functional disorders. However, standard subdural electrodes cause significant artifact in MRI images, and concerns about risks such as cortical heating have generally precluded obtaining MRI in patients with implanted electrodes. We propose an electrode set based on polymer thick film organic substrate (PTFOS), an organic absorbable, flexible and stretchable electrode grid for intracranial use. These new types of MRI transparent intracranial electrodes are based on nano-particle ink technology that builds on our earlier development of an EEG/fMRI electrode set for scalp recording. The development of MRI-compatible recording/stimulation electrodes with a very thin profile could allow functional mapping at the individual subject level of the underlying feedback and feed forward networks. The thin flexible substrate would allow the electrodes to optimally contact the convoluted brain surface. Performance properties of the PTFOS were assessed by MRI measurements, finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, micro-volt recording, and injecting currents using standard electrocortical stimulation in phantoms. In contrast to the large artifacts exhibited with standard electrode sets, the PTFOS exhibited no artifact due to the reduced amount of metal and conductivity of the

  2. Age-dependence of intracranial viscoelastic properties in living rats.

    PubMed

    Shulyakov, Alexander V; Cenkowski, Stefan S; Buist, Richard J; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2011-04-01

    To explore the effect of maturation on intracranial mechanical properties, viscoelastic parameters were determined in 44 live rats at ages 1-2, 10-12, 21, 56-70, and 180 days using instrumented indentation. With the dura mater intact, the apparent modulus of elasticity, the indentation modulus, and viscous behavior were measured in vivo, as well as 1 h after death. In a separate group of 25 rats, brain water, and protein content were determined. A significant increase of the elastic and indentation moduli beginning at 10-12 days after birth and continuing to 180 days was observed. The creep behavior decreased in the postnatal period and stabilized at 21 days. Changes in intracranial biomechanical properties corresponded to a gradual decrease of brain water, and an increase in total protein content, including glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin basic protein, and neurofilament light chain. Elastic properties were not significantly different comparing the live and dead states. However, there were significant postmortem changes in viscous behavior. Viscoelastic properties of living rat intracranial contents are shown to be age dependent, reflecting the physical and biochemical changes during postnatal development. This may be important for understanding why young and mature brains respond differently in situations of brain trauma and hydrocephalus.

  3. Visuoperceptual sequelae in children with hemophilia and intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Esmeralda; O’Callaghan, Erin T.; Murray, Joan; Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine the impact of focal brain injuries on the outcomes of visual perception and visuospatial abilities in Mexican children with hemophilia who have experienced intracranial hemorrhages. Methods We assessed ten boys who had hemophilia with intracranial hemorrhage (HIC), six boys who had hemophilia without intracranial hemorrhage (HH), and ten boys without hemophilia (CTL). The Verbal (VIQ), Performance IQs (PIQ), and Full Scale IQs (FSIQ) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children—Mexican Revision, Visual Perception, and Visuospatial Abilities domains, which are from a neuropsychological assessment battery for Spanish-speaking children (ENI), were employed for our analysis. Results The results showed that the HIC group performed in the low-average range on the PIQ and FSIQ, which was lower than the HH group. The HIC group showed low performance on visual perception tests, such as line orientation, fragmented objects, and overlapping figures, compared with their matched controls. Conclusions The results suggest that it is not the ability to recognize objects that is impaired in the HIC group, but the ability to identify objects under less favorable conditions. Our findings may have therapeutic and rehabilitative implications for the management of children with hemophilia and early focal brain lesions. PMID:26835360

  4. Furosemide lowers intracranial pressure by inhibiting CSF production.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, A V; Hornig, G; Zavala, L M; Boss, V; Welch, K

    1986-12-01

    Furosemide administration effectively lowers intracranial pressure in newborn preterm and term rabbit pups. This effect may be due to the diuretic action of the drug, its ability to inhibit cerebrospinal fluid production or to a combination of both. To test these possibilities newborn rabbits were either injected with furosemide and left unmolested for 6 hours, or anaesthetized and subjected to ventriculocisternal perfusions. During the 6 hour postnatal period the decrease in body weight was 8 times greater in furosemide than in saline treated pups. However, no difference was noted between the average brain weights of these two groups. Secondary effects of the diuretic were noted in blood (12.5% increase in the haematocrit over control value) and in muscle in which tissue water content and NA+ concentration were decreased while K+ concentration was increased. The fact that these parameters remained unchanged in brain suggests that the lowering of intracranial pressure was not attributable to the secondary effects of the diuretic agent. However, the marked reduction in cerebrospinal production noted following furosemide administration indicates that in newborn rabbits this may represent the primary mechanism by which furosemide lowers intracranial pressure.

  5. Noninvasive measurement of pulsatile intracranial pressure using ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, T.; Ballard, R. E.; Shuer, L. M.; Cantrell, J. H.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to validate our noninvasive ultrasonic technique (pulse phase locked loop: PPLL) for measuring intracranial pressure (ICP) waveforms. The technique is based upon detecting skull movements which are known to occur in conjunction with altered intracranial pressure. In bench model studies, PPLL output was highly correlated with changes in the distance between a transducer and a reflecting target (R2 = 0.977). In cadaver studies, transcranial distance was measured while pulsations of ICP (amplitudes of zero to 10 mmHg) were generated by rhythmic injections of saline. Frequency analyses (fast Fourier transformation) clearly demonstrate the correspondence between the PPLL output and ICP pulse cycles. Although theoretically there is a slight possibility that changes in the PPLL output are caused by changes in the ultrasonic velocity of brain tissue, the decreased amplitudes of the PPLL output as the external compression of the head was increased indicates that the PPLL output represents substantial skull movement associated with altered ICP. In conclusion, the ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect transcranial pulsations which occur in association with the cardiac cycle. Our technique makes it possible to analyze ICP waveforms noninvasively and will be helpful for understanding intracranial compliance and cerebrovascular circulation.

  6. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: Targeted or blind blood patch.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review is to determine the efficacy and optimal strategy for epidural blood patch placement in the treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We present a 37-year-old man who developed a 4 week duration postural headache without sustaining significant trauma. The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with associated subdural hygromas was confirmed with lumbar puncture and radiologic imaging. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is generally due to cerebrospinal fluid leak from the thecal sac or nerve root sleeves, although the cause of leakage is unknown. In our patient, the site of leakage was identified at cervical C1-C2 level in the spine on myelography. Conservative management with repeated epidural blood patches was successful in symptom relief and complete resolution of cerebrospinal fluid leak and subdural hygromas. We reviewed the literature for efficacy of blood patches delivered directly to the site of leakage (targeted) or to the lumbar or thoracic spine away from the site of leakage or where the site cannot be determined (blind). No clear evidence exists on comparative efficacy due to paucity of randomized trials. However, epidural blood patches in general result in positive outcomes with overall efficacy near 90%. Some trials have suggested greater efficacy for targeted rather than blind epidural blood patches, but randomized studies and long-term prognosis remain to be evaluated. PMID:26461907

  7. Flow diversion for complex intracranial aneurysms in young children.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ramon; Brown, Benjamin L; Beier, Alexandra; Ranalli, Nathan; Aldana, Philipp; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are exceedingly rare and account for less than 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Open surgery to treat such aneurysms has been shown to be more durable than endovascular techniques, and durability of treatment is particularly important in the pediatric population. Over the past 2 decades, however, a marked shift in aneurysm treatment from open surgery toward endovascular procedures has occurred for adults. The authors describe their early experience in treating 3 unruptured pediatric brain aneurysms using the Pipeline embolization device (PED). The first patient, a girl with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism Type II who was harboring multiple intracranial aneurysms, underwent two flow diversion procedures for a vertebrobasilar aneurysm and a supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. The second patient underwent PED placement on a previously coiled but enlarging posterior communicating artery aneurysm. All procedures were uneventful, with no postsurgical complications, and led to complete angiographic obliteration of the aneurysms. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first series of flow diversion procedures in children reported in the medical literature. While flow diversion is a new and relatively untested technology in children, outcomes in adults have been promising. For challenging lesions in the pediatric population, flow diversion may have a valuable role as a well-tolerated, safe treatment with durable results. Many issues remain to be addressed, such as the durability of flow diverters over a very long follow-up and vessel response to growth in the presence of an endoluminal device.

  8. Treatment of ruptured intracranial dissecting aneurysms in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Tang, Hoi Bun; Poon, Wai Sang; Yu, Simon Chun Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background: Data suggests that hemorrhagic presentations occur in 20% of internal carotid artery dissections and 50% of vertebral artery dissections. A Finnish study has reported favorable outcomes in only 32% of patients. We aimed to review the epidemiology and management outcomes in a Chinese population. Methods: We reviewed the aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage registry of patients who presented with intracranial dissecting aneurysms at a neurosurgical center in Hong Kong over a five-year period. Results: A total of 23 patients with intracranial dissecting aneurysms were identified, accounting for 8% of all spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Forty-eight percent of the patients identified were treated by main trunk occlusion and 39% were treated by embolization or stent-assisted embolization or stent alone. Thirteen percent were managed by craniotomy and trapping or wrapping. Favorable outcomes at six months were achieved in 67%. Conclusions: Patients with intracranial dissecting aneurysms account for a significant proportion of the cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in our population. Carefully selected endovascular and microsurgical treatments can lead to management outcomes similar to patients with saccular aneurysms. PMID:21206536

  9. Flow diversion for complex intracranial aneurysms in young children.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ramon; Brown, Benjamin L; Beier, Alexandra; Ranalli, Nathan; Aldana, Philipp; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are exceedingly rare and account for less than 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Open surgery to treat such aneurysms has been shown to be more durable than endovascular techniques, and durability of treatment is particularly important in the pediatric population. Over the past 2 decades, however, a marked shift in aneurysm treatment from open surgery toward endovascular procedures has occurred for adults. The authors describe their early experience in treating 3 unruptured pediatric brain aneurysms using the Pipeline embolization device (PED). The first patient, a girl with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism Type II who was harboring multiple intracranial aneurysms, underwent two flow diversion procedures for a vertebrobasilar aneurysm and a supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. The second patient underwent PED placement on a previously coiled but enlarging posterior communicating artery aneurysm. All procedures were uneventful, with no postsurgical complications, and led to complete angiographic obliteration of the aneurysms. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first series of flow diversion procedures in children reported in the medical literature. While flow diversion is a new and relatively untested technology in children, outcomes in adults have been promising. For challenging lesions in the pediatric population, flow diversion may have a valuable role as a well-tolerated, safe treatment with durable results. Many issues remain to be addressed, such as the durability of flow diverters over a very long follow-up and vessel response to growth in the presence of an endoluminal device. PMID:25555114

  10. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: ongoing clinical challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Julayanont, Parunyou; Karukote, Amputch; Ruthirago, Doungporn; Panikkath, Deepa; Panikkath, Ragesh

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure without radiological or laboratory evidence of intracranial pathology except empty sella turcica, optic nerve sheath with filled out cerebrospinal fluid spaces, and smooth-walled nonflow-related venous sinus stenosis or collapse. This condition typically affects obese women. The incidence of IIH is increasing with the rising prevalence of obesity. Persistent headache is the most common symptom. Visual impairment is a serious complication that may not be recognized by the patients. This paper reviews clinical manifestations, diagnostic challenges, and current treatments of IIH in adults. Various imaging modalities have been studied on their validity for detection of IIH and papilledema. This review also includes new studies on medical, surgical, and interventional management of this condition. Acetazolamide and topiramate are the only two medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials about their efficacy in treatment of IIH. In patients who have severe visual impairment or progressive visual deterioration despite medical management, surgical or interventional treatment may be considered. The efficacy and complications of cerebrospinal fluid diversion, optic nerve sheath fenestration, and endovascular venous stenting reported in the last 3 decades have been summarized in this review. Finally, the prospective aspects of biomarkers and treatments are proposed for future research. PMID:26929666

  11. Recanalization Results After Intracranial Stenting of Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Yuekzek, Zeynep; Kurre, Wiebke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias; Hattingen, Elke; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to provide a detailed description of the angiographic results after stenting of high-grade intracranial stenosis using balloon-expandable stents. Forty consecutive patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis >50% received endovascular treatment by placement of balloon-expandable stents using the concept of slight underdilation and strict avoidance of overdilation. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography images before and after stenting in the same projection were reviewed for pre- and post-therapeutic measurement of the degree of stenosis and evaluation of morphologic criteria like plaque coverage, stent apposition, patency of side branches, and signs of dissection or vasospasm. Stenting decreased the mean percentage stenosis from 76.2 (WASID criteria) to 20.8%. Residual stenosis ranged from 0 to 55% with residual stenosis >50% in two of 40 cases. Technical success rate was 95%. There were no major vessel complications, but minor abnormalities like incomplete stent apposition (8/40) or plaque coverage (7/40), incomplete filling of side branches (13/40), and minor dissections after stenting (2/40) were seen. One case with incomplete stent apposition and two cases with side branch compromise were associated with clinical symptoms. In conclusion, intracranial stenting with slight underdilation avoided major vessel complication and created reliable luminal gain. Suboptimal recanalization results were frequently detected and may be the source of neurological complications in individual cases.

  12. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J. . E-mail: amdurrj@ufl.edu; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element.

  13. Performing behavioral tasks in subjects with intracranial electrodes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew A; Thompson, Susan; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Park, Hyun-Joo; Bulacio, Juan; Najm, Imad; Kahn, Kevin; Kerr, Matthew; Sarma, Sridevi V; Gale, John T

    2014-01-01

    Patients having stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) electrode, subdural grid or depth electrode implants have a multitude of electrodes implanted in different areas of their brain for the localization of their seizure focus and eloquent areas. After implantation, the patient must remain in the hospital until the pathological area of brain is found and possibly resected. During this time, these patients offer a unique opportunity to the research community because any number of behavioral paradigms can be performed to uncover the neural correlates that guide behavior. Here we present a method for recording brain activity from intracranial implants as subjects perform a behavioral task designed to assess decision-making and reward encoding. All electrophysiological data from the intracranial electrodes are recorded during the behavioral task, allowing for the examination of the many brain areas involved in a single function at time scales relevant to behavior. Moreover, and unlike animal studies, human patients can learn a wide variety of behavioral tasks quickly, allowing for the ability to perform more than one task in the same subject or for performing controls. Despite the many advantages of this technique for understanding human brain function, there are also methodological limitations that we discuss, including environmental factors, analgesic effects, time constraints and recordings from diseased tissue. This method may be easily implemented by any institution that performs intracranial assessments; providing the opportunity to directly examine human brain function during behavior. PMID:25349952

  14. Trends in cognitive dysfunction following surgery for intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Manju; Gupta, Sandhya; Mohanty, Manju; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to prospectively assess the cognitive function of patients with intracranial tumors. Methods: The cognitive status of patients with intracranial tumors were prospectively studied before surgery, and later at 1 and 6 months following surgery, on purposive sampling, using validated post graduate institute (PGI) battery for brain dysfunction (score 0–30) with a higher dysfunction rating score indicating poor cognitive status. Results: Out of 23 patients enrolled, 20 could complete the study. They had substantial cognitive dysfunction before surgery (score 17.1 ± 9.4). Though there was no significant improvement (16.9 ± 9.0) at 1 month, the score improved significantly (10.3 ± 9.2) at 6 months following surgery (P = 0.008). The improvement was relatively subdued in intra-axial, malignant, and radiated tumors. Overall, there was a significant improvement in mental balance (P = 0.048), verbal retention of dissimilar pairs (P = 0.01), and recognition (P = 0.01), while dysfunction persisted in the domains of memory, verbal retention to similar pairs, and visual retention. Conclusion: Patients with intracranial tumors have substantial cognitive dysfunction, which tend to show significant improvement beyond 6 months following surgery, especially among tumors, which were extra-axial, benign, and nonirradiated. PMID:27114854

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the Middle East: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Almarzouqi, Sumayya J.; Morgan, Michael L.; Lee, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial pressure without any identifiable etiology. It is defined by elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) with normal neuroimaging and normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contents. IIH typically affects young obese women and produces symptoms and signs related to high ICP. Headache and blurred vision are the most common symptoms, and papilledema is the major clinical sign. In this review we examine the epidemiology and demographic features of IIH in Middle Eastern countries and compare and contrast them with the published IIH literature from Western countries. The incidence of IIH in several Middle East countries has been estimated at 2.02–2.2/100,000 in the general population, which is higher than the Western rate. Obesity is a major risk factor globally and it is associated with an increased risk of severe vision loss due to IIH. There has been an increase in obesity prevalence in the Middle East countries mainly affecting the Gulf Council Countries (GCC), which parallels increased industrial development. This rise may be contributing to the increasing incidence of IIH in these countries. Other risk factors may also be contributing to IIH in Middle East countries and the differences and similarities to Western IIH merit further study. PMID:25859136

  16. Intracranial subdural osteoma: a rare benign tumor that can be differentiated from other calcified intracranial lesions utilizing MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Barajas, Ramon F; Perry, Arie; Sughrue, Michael; Aghi, Manish; Cha, Soonmee

    2012-10-01

    We report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of subdural osteoma and other benign calcified intracranial lesions to highlight imaging features that differentiate between these disease entities. A 63-year-old woman presented with progressively altered mental status. Non-contrast CT demonstrated a densely calcified right middle cranial fossa extra-axial mass. MR imaging of the lesion demonstrated T1 and T2 hypointensity without evidence of contrast enhancement, parenchymal abnormality, or connection to adjacent venous structures. Diffusion weighted imaging demonstrated markedly decreased signal intensity and artificially reduced diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient map. Histologically, the tumor was predominantly composed of lamellar bone and small fragments of residual dura consistent with subdural osteoma. This case demonstrates that radiological examination can provide additional insight into the origin of intracranial osteomas (extradural versus subdural versus sinonasal) and help distinguish from other diagnostic considerations including benign meningeal ossification and calcified meningioma prior to surgical resection.

  17. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  18. Melatonin Attenuates Aortic Endothelial Permeability and Arteriosclerosis in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: Possible Role of MLCK- and MLCP-Dependent MLC Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Song-tao; Su, Huan; Zhang, Qiu; Tang, Hai-qin; Wang, Chang-jiang; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Hua-qing; Wang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The development of diabetic macrovascular complications is a multifactorial process, and melatonin may possess cardiovascular protective properties. This study was designed to evaluate whether melatonin attenuates arteriosclerosis and endothelial permeability by suppressing the myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK)/myosin light-chain phosphorylation (p-MLC) system via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway or by suppressing the myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit phosphorylation (p-MYPT)/p-MLC system in diabetes mellitus (DM). Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, including control, high-fat diet, DM, and DM + melatonin groups. Melatonin was administered (10 mg/kg/d) by gavage for 12 weeks. The DM significantly increased the serum fasting blood glucose and lipid levels, as well as insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, which were attenuated by melatonin therapy to various extents. Importantly, the aortic endothelial permeability was significantly increased in DM rats but was dramatically reversed following treatment with melatonin. Our findings further indicated that hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia enhanced the expressions of MLCK, p-MYPT, and p-MLC, which were partly associated with decreased membrane type 1 expression, increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, and increased p38 expression. However, these changes in protein expression were also significantly reversed by melatonin. Thus, our results are the first to demonstrate that the endothelial hyperpermeability induced by DM is associated with increased expressions of MLCK, p-MYPT, and p-MLC, which can be attenuated by melatonin at least partly through the ERK/p38 signaling pathway.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 potentiates mesenchymal stem cell-induced IL-10+IFN-γ+CD4+ regulatory T cells to control transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Jui, Hsiang-Yiang; Wu, Kenneth Kun-Yu; Lee, Chii-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known for their immunomodulatory functions. We previously demonstrated that bone marrow-derived MSCs effectively control transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) by enhancing IL-10(+) and IFN-γ(+) cells. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which MSCs induce IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) regulatory T type 1 (T(R)1)-like cells. In an MLR system using porcine PBMCs, MSC-induced IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) cells, which confer resistance to allogeneic proliferation in an IL-10-dependent manner, resemble T(R)1-like cells. Both cyclooxygenase-derived PGE(2) and IDO help to induce T(R)1-like cells by MSCs. MSCs constitutively secrete PGE(2), which is augmented in allogeneic reactions. However, T(R)1-like cells were deficient in PGE(2) and 4-fold less potent than were MSCs in suppressing MLR. PGE(2) mimetic supplements can enhance the immunosuppressive potency of T(R)1-like cells. In a porcine model of allogeneic femoral arterial transplantation, MSC-induced T(R)1-like cells combined with PGE(2), but not either alone, significantly reduced TA at the end of 6 wk (percentage of luminal area stenosis: T(R)1-like cells + PGE(2): 11 ± 10%; PGE(2) alone: 93 ± 8.7%; T(R)1-like cells alone: 88 ± 2.4% versus untreated 94 ± 0.9%, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that PGE(2) helps MSC-induced IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) T(R)1-like cells inhibit TA. PGE(2) combined with MSC-induced T(R)1-like cells represents a new approach for achieving immune tolerance.

  20. [Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula draining into spinal cord veins: case report].

    PubMed

    Seda, Lauro Franco; Pieruccetti, Marco Antonio; Freitas, José Maria Modenesi; Listik, Sérgio; Pereira, Clemente Augusto Brito

    2002-09-01

    We present an usual case of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary and spinal cord venous plexus drainage and discuss its etiological, physiopathological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  1. Novel role for endogenous hepatocyte growth factor in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Peña-Silva, Ricardo A; Chalouhi, Nohra; Wegman-Points, Lauren; Ali, Muhammad; Mitchell, Ian; Pierce, Gary L; Chu, Yi; Ballas, Zuhair K; Heistad, Donald; Hasan, David

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Because hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) protects against vascular inflammation, we sought to assess the role of endogenous HGF in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms. Circulating HGF concentrations in blood samples drawn from the lumen of human intracranial aneurysms or femoral arteries were compared in 16 patients. Tissue from superficial temporal arteries and ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms collected from patients undergoing clipping (n=10) were immunostained with antibodies to HGF and its receptor c-Met. Intracranial aneurysms were induced in mice treated with PF-04217903 (a c-Met antagonist) or vehicle. Expression of inflammatory molecules was also measured in cultured human endothelial, smooth muscle cells and monocytes treated with lipopolysaccharides in presence or absence of HGF and PF-04217903. We found that HGF concentrations were significantly higher in blood collected from human intracranial aneurysms (1076±656 pg/mL) than in femoral arteries (196±436 pg/mL; P<0.001). HGF and c-Met were detected by immunostaining in superficial temporal arteries and in both ruptured and unruptured human intracranial aneurysms. A c-Met antagonist did not alter the formation of intracranial aneurysms (P>0.05), but significantly increased the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and decreased survival in mice (P<0.05). HGF attenuated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (P<0.05) and E-Selectin (P<0.05) in human aortic endothelial cells. In conclusion, plasma HGF concentrations are elevated in intracranial aneurysms. HGF and c-Met are expressed in superficial temporal arteries and in intracranial aneurysms. HGF signaling through c-Met may decrease inflammation in endothelial cells and protect against intracranial aneurysm rupture. PMID:25510828

  2. Angioplasty or Stenting of Extra- and Intracranial Vertebral Artery Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M.; Gissler, H. Martin; Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2004-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of angioplasty or angioplasty and stenting of extra- and intracranial vertebral artery (VA) stenosis. Methods: In 16 consecutive patients (9 men, 7 women; mean age 61 years, range 49-74 years) 16 stenotic VAs were treated with angioplasty orangioplasty and stenting. Eleven stenoses were localized in V1 segment,1 stenosis in V2 segment and 4 stenoses in V4 segment of VA. Fourteen VA stenoses were symptomatic, 2 asymptomatic. The etiology of the stenoses was atherosclerotic in all cases. Results:Angioplasty was performed in 8 of 11 V1 and 2 of 4 V4 segments of the VA. In 3 of 11 V1 segments and 2 of 4 V4 segments of the VA we combined angioplasty with stenting. The procedures were successfully performed in 14 of 16 VAs (87%). Complications were asymptomatic vessel dissection resulting in vessel occlusion in 1 of 11 V1 segments and asymptomatic vessel dissection in 2 of 4 V4 segments of the VA. One patient died in the 24-hr period after the procedure because of subarachnoid hemorrhage as a complication following vessel perforation of the treated V4 segment. Conclusion: Angioplasty orangioplasty and stenting of extracranial VA stenoses can be performed with a high technical success rate and a low complication rate. In intracranial VA stenosis the procedure is technically feasible but complications can be life-threatening. The durability and procedural complication rates of primary stenting without using predilation in extra- and intracranial VA stenosis should be defined in the future.

  3. Preclinical studies of photodynamic therapy of intracranial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Sepers, Marja; Park, Jane; O'Carroll, Cindy; Pournazari, Poupak; Prosper, Joe; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    The applicability and limitations of the photodynamic threshold model were investigated for an intracranial tumor (VX2) and normal brain tissues in a rabbit model. Photodynamic threshold values for four different photosensitizers, i.e., Photofrin, 5(delta) -aminolaevulinic acid (5(delta) -ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), Tin Ethyl Etiopurpurin (SnET2), and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (AlClPc), were determined based on measured light fluence distributions, macroscopic photosensitizer concentration in various brain structures, and histologically determined extent of tissue necrosis following PDT. For Photofrin, AlClPc, and SnET2, normal brain displayed a significantly lower threshold value than VX2 tumor. For 5(delta) -ALA induced PPIX and SnET2 no or very little white matter damage, equalling to very high or infinite threshold values, was observed. Additionally, the latter two photosensitizers showed significantly lower uptake in white matter compared to other brain structures and VX2 tumor. Normal brain structures lacking a blood- brain-barrier, such as the choroid plexus and the meninges, showed high photosensitizer uptake for all photosensitizers, and, hence, are at risk when exposed to light. Results to date suggest that the photodynamic threshold values iares valid for white matter, cortex and VX2 tumor. For clinical PDT of intracranial neoplasms 5(delta) -ALA induced PPIX and SnET2 appear to be the most promising for selective tumor necrosis.However, the photosensitizer concentration in each normal brain structure and the fluence distribution throughout the treatment volume and adjacent tissues at risk must be monitored to maximize the selectivity of PDT for intracranial tumors.

  4. Interleukin-6 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, was found to surge in the cerebral spinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized that the plasma level of IL-6 could be an independent biomarker in predicting clinical outcome of patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Methods We prospectively included 53 consecutive patients treated with platinum coil embolization of the ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Plasma IL-6 levels were measured in the blood samples at the orifices of the aneurysms and from peripheral veins. The outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale one month after SAH. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between the plasma IL-6 levels and the neurological outcome. Results Significant risk factors for the poor outcome were old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on day 0, high Fisher grades, and high aneurysmal and venous IL-6 levels in univariate analyses. Aneurysmal IL-6 levels showed modest to moderate correlations with GCS on day 0, vasospasm grade and Fisher grade. A strong correlation was found between the aneurysmal and the corresponding venous IL-6 levels (ρ = 0.721; P<0.001). In the multiple logistic regression models, the poor 30-day mRS was significantly associated with high aneurysmal IL-6 level (OR, 17.97; 95% CI, 1.51–214.33; P = 0.022) and marginally associated with high venous IL-6 level (OR, 12.71; 95% CI, 0.90–180.35; P = 0.022) after adjusting for dichotomized age, GCS on day 0, and vasospasm and Fisher grades. Conclusions The plasma level of IL-6 is an independent prognostic biomarker that could be used to aid in the identification of patients at high-risk of poor neurological outcome after rupture of the intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26176774

  5. Intracranial arterial variations: A comprehensive evaluation using CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Kovač, Jelena Djokić; Stanković, Ana; Stanković, Danilo; Kovač, Bojan; Šaranović, Djordjije

    2014-01-01

    Background Intracranial arterial variations are a frequent finding in the general population. Knowledge of these vascular variations has significant clinical impact because some of them predispose patients to development of an aneurysm or cerebrovascular ischemic disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of intracranial vascular variations and associated vascular lesions on computed tomography angiography (CTA) examinations. Material/Methods CTA examinations performed by 16-detector computed tomography were prospectively reviewed in 455 patients for the presence of fenestrations, duplications, hypoplasia, aplasia, aneurysms, and other vascular lesions. Results Arterial fenestrations were found in 2.4% of patients, with the vertebrobasilar system as the most common location. The remaining fenestrations were located on the middle cerebral artery M1 segment (0.2%), anterior communicating artery (0.4%), and anterior cerebral artery A1 segment (0.6%). No associated aneurysms were noted in these patients. The prevalence of an azygos anterior cerebral artery was 1.5%. Bihemispheric anterior cerebral artery was found in 0.9%, hypoplastic A1 segment in 17.6%, and congenital absence of A1 segment in 0.4% of patients. Fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery was found in 37% of cases. Hypoplastic vertebral artery terminating as posterior inferior cerebellar artery was observed in 9 patients, while transversal anastomosis between vertebral arteries was seen in only 1 patient. Conclusions CTA precisely demonstrates the diversity of intracranial arterial variations, whose overall frequency in this study is similar to previous radiological reports. Furthermore, our results do not show significant association between the frequency of aneurysms and cerebral arterial anomalies. PMID:24625840

  6. Quality of life in idiopathic intracranial hypertension at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Balcer, Laura J.; Wall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study purpose was to examine vision-specific and overall health-related quality of life (QOL) at baseline in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial patients who were newly diagnosed and had mild visual loss. We also sought to determine the associations between vision-specific QOL scores and visual symptoms, visual function, pain, headache-related disability, and obesity. Methods: We assessed QOL using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 (NEI-VFQ-25), and 10-Item NEI-VFQ-25 Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement. We compared these results with those of previously reported idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) QOL studies. We assessed relationships between QOL and other clinical characteristics. Results: Among 165 participants with IIH (161 women and 4 men with a mean age ± SD of 29.2 ± 7.5 years), vision-specific QOL scores were reduced compared with published values for disease-free controls. Scores of participants were comparable to published results for patients with multiple sclerosis and a history of optic neuritis. A multiple linear regression model for the NEI-VFQ-25 composite score found that perimetric mean deviation in the best eye, visual acuity in the worst eye, visual symptoms, and pain symptoms (headache, neck pain), but not obesity, were independently associated with QOL. Conclusions: IIH affects QOL at time of diagnosis even in patients with mild visual impairment. Vision-specific QOL in patients with newly diagnosed IIH may be as decreased as that for patients with other neuro-ophthalmic disorders. IIH treatment should target visual loss and other symptoms of increased intracranial pressure associated with reduced QOL. Reduced QOL does not simply reflect obesity, an underlying IIH risk factor. PMID:25995055

  7. Prognosis by tumor location in adults with intracranial ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Eli T; Aranda, Derick; Kim, Joseph M; Oh, Taemin; Parsa, Andrew T; Oh, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    Intracranial ependymomas are rare tumors in adults. Thus, factors affecting prognosis are poorly understood. We performed a study to investigate whether tumor location is an important prognostic factor in adults who undergo surgery for intracranial ependymomas. PubMed was searched to identify studies that reported clinical outcomes in adult patients with intracranial ependymoma. Data were extracted for patient and tumor characteristics, extent of resection, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Tumors were categorized as supratentorial or infratentorial and extraventricular or intraventricular. Presenting clinical features and tumor characteristics were tabulated. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression survival analyses were performed to determine PFS and OS by tumor location. Extent of resection was also analyzed by tumor location. A total of 183 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Patients presented at a mean of 8.2months with a myriad of clinical features. The mean tumor size was 3.38 cm, and 19.3% of tumors were cystic. Supratentorial tumors were most commonly located in the frontal and parietal lobes, and infratentorial tumors in the fourth ventricle. Supratentorial tumors demonstrated significantly poorer PFS (p<0.001) and OS (p=0.003) than infratentorial tumors, despite a higher rate of gross total resection (GTR) for the supratentorial tumors (72.6% versus 42.1%). Extraventricular ependymomas displayed significantly poorer PFS than intraventricular ependymomas (p=0.009). In summary, supratentorial ependymomas have significantly poorer PFS and OS than their infratentorial counterparts, despite being more conducive to GTR, suggesting increased clinical aggressiveness. Extraventricular location is also associated with significantly poorer PFS than intraventricular location.

  8. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Materials and Methods In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent–cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P < .05) and showed the highest mean grading score (2.94 ± 0.94; P < .05) and contrast/noise ratio of in-stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P < .05) among all the modes. Conclusion Iodine (water) images can help reduce stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis. PMID:26731534

  9. Intracranial growing teratoma syndrome: clinical characteristics and treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chae-Yong; Choi, Jung-Won; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Park, Sung-Hye; Choe, Gheeyoung; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Kim, Il-Han; Cho, Byung-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical and radiological characteristics, as well as the treatment outcomes, for the rare phenomenon known as intracranial growing teratoma syndrome (iGTS). One hundred seventy patients diagnosed with intracranial germ cell tumours (GCT) between 1997 and 2008 were enrolled in this retrospective analysis. Thorough reviews of medical records, brain magnetic resonance images (MRI), pathological findings and tumour markers [alpha-fetoprotein (αFP) and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βHCG)] were performed to identify the incidence of iGTS cases and to clarify their clinical characteristics. Eleven out of the 170 intracranial GCT patients (6.5%) were identified as having iGTS. All instances of iGTS originated from non-germinomatous GCT (NGGCT), with incidence rate of 21% (11/52). Six iGTS cases developed from mixed GCTs, four from immature teratomas (ITs) and one from yolk sac tumour. All 11 iGTS patients showed honeycomb-shaped multi-cystic growth patterns on MRI, which is a typical characteristic of iGTS. Surgical excision was performed in all patients, and complete excision was possible in nine patients. Eight of them are alive with no evidence of recurrence; however, two patients who had residual masses died owing to progression of iGTS. Early recognition and suspicion of iGTS, during or after adjuvant therapy of NGGCT, is crucial to ensure that surgical intervention can be performed in a timely manner. Early radical excision may be the treatment of choice for better iGTS prognosis. PMID:20532955

  10. Small Intracranial Aneurysm Treatment Using Target ® Ultrasoft ™ Coils

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gaurav; Miller, Timothy; Iyohe, Moronke; Shivashankar, Ravi; Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The introduction of small, soft, complex-shaped microcoils has helped facilitate the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms (IAs) over the last several years. Here, we evaluate the initial safety and efficacy of treating small IAs using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils. Materials and methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database at a single, high volume, teaching hospital was performed from September 2011 to May 2015. IAs smaller than or equal to 5.0 mm in maximal dimension treated with only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils were included. Results A total of 50 patients with 50 intracranial aneurysms were included. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from index aneurysm rupture was the indication for treatment in 23 of 50 (46%) cases, and prior subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from another aneurysm was the indication for treatment in eight of 50 (16%) cases. The complete aneurysm occlusion rate was 70% (35/50), the minimal residual aneurysm rate was 14% (7/50), and residual aneurysm rate was 16% (8/50). One intraoperative aneurysm rupture occurred. Three patients died during hospitalization from clinical sequelae of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Follow-up at a mean of 13.6 months demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion in 75% (30/40) of cases, near complete occlusion in 15% (6/40) of cases, and residual aneurysm in 10% (4/40) of cases, all four of which were retreated. Conclusion Our initial results using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils for the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms demonstrate initial excellent safety and efficacy profiles. PMID:27403224

  11. Non-Invasive Method of Determining Absolute Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor); Hargens, Alan E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented for determining absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) in a patient. Skull expansion is monitored while changes in ICP are induced. The patient's blood pressure is measured when skull expansion is approximately zero. The measured blood pressure is indicative of a reference ICP value. Subsequently, the method causes a known change in ICP and measured the change in skull expansion associated therewith. The absolute ICP is a function of the reference ICP value, the known change in ICP and its associated change in skull expansion; and a measured change in skull expansion.

  12. Visceral larva migrans presenting as multiple intracranial and intraspinal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Moiyadi, Alefia; Mahadevan, Anita; Anandh, Balasubramaniam; Shivashankar, Ravi Shankar; Chickabasavaiah, Yasha Thagadur; Shankar, Susarla Krishna

    2007-08-01

    Involvement of nervous system by toxocariasis is rare and can produce a spectrum of pathology that includes eosinophillic meningoencephalitis, meningomyelitis, space occupying lesions, vasculitis causing seizures or behavioral abnormalities posing diagnostic dilemmas. We describe a 38-year-old man who presented with multiple intracranial and intramedullary abscesses caused by visceral larva migrans. Neurohelminthiasis as a cause of multiple abscesses, though rare, should be entertained as a differential diagnosis particularly in tropical South-east Asian countries where helminthiasis is still an epidemiological concern prevalent in the pediatric age group. PMID:17899691

  13. Computer-assisted volumetric resections of intracranial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Moure, Federico; Zamorano, Lucia J.

    1993-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies reconstructed in a stereotactic space can be used for accurate localization of intracranial lesions located in deep or eloquent regions in the brain, and for optimization of subsequent surgical removal. We describe our experience with 163 patients who underwent computer-assisted volumetric resection. The planning for the stereotactic volumetric neurosurgical methodology utilized the Zamarano-Dujovny localizing unit, the neurosurgical planning software (NSPS) system, which generates 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional views of the area of surgical interest, the arc setting parameters, and reconstructed CT images corresponding to the surgeon's eye-view perspective.

  14. Non-invasive method of determining diastolic intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor); Hargens, Alan R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented for determining diastolic intracranial pressure (ICP) in a patient. A first change in the length of a path across the skull of the patient caused by a known change in ICP is measured and used to determine an elasticity constant for the patient. Next, a second change in the length of the path across the patient's skull occurring between systolic and diastolic portions of the patient's heartbeat is measured. The patient's diastolic ICP is a function of the elasticity constant and the second change.

  15. Trial of Decompressive Craniectomy for Traumatic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G; Timofeev, Ivan S; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Czosnyka, Marek; Timothy, Jake; Anderson, Ian; Bulters, Diederik O; Belli, Antonio; Eynon, C Andrew; Wadley, John; Mendelow, A David; Mitchell, Patrick M; Wilson, Mark H; Critchley, Giles; Sahuquillo, Juan; Unterberg, Andreas; Servadei, Franco; Teasdale, Graham M; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Murray, Gordon D; Kirkpatrick, Peter J

    2016-09-22

    Background The effect of decompressive craniectomy on clinical outcomes in patients with refractory traumatic intracranial hypertension remains unclear. Methods From 2004 through 2014, we randomly assigned 408 patients, 10 to 65 years of age, with traumatic brain injury and refractory elevated intracranial pressure (>25 mm Hg) to undergo decompressive craniectomy or receive ongoing medical care. The primary outcome was the rating on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E) (an 8-point scale, ranging from death to "upper good recovery" [no injury-related problems]) at 6 months. The primary-outcome measure was analyzed with an ordinal method based on the proportional-odds model. If the model was rejected, that would indicate a significant difference in the GOS-E distribution, and results would be reported descriptively. Results The GOS-E distribution differed between the two groups (P<0.001). The proportional-odds assumption was rejected, and therefore results are reported descriptively. At 6 months, the GOS-E distributions were as follows: death, 26.9% among 201 patients in the surgical group versus 48.9% among 188 patients in the medical group; vegetative state, 8.5% versus 2.1%; lower severe disability (dependent on others for care), 21.9% versus 14.4%; upper severe disability (independent at home), 15.4% versus 8.0%; moderate disability, 23.4% versus 19.7%; and good recovery, 4.0% versus 6.9%. At 12 months, the GOS-E distributions were as follows: death, 30.4% among 194 surgical patients versus 52.0% among 179 medical patients; vegetative state, 6.2% versus 1.7%; lower severe disability, 18.0% versus 14.0%; upper severe disability, 13.4% versus 3.9%; moderate disability, 22.2% versus 20.1%; and good recovery, 9.8% versus 8.4%. Surgical patients had fewer hours than medical patients with intracranial pressure above 25 mm Hg after randomization (median, 5.0 vs. 17.0 hours; P<0.001) but had a higher rate of adverse events (16.3% vs. 9.2%, P=0.03). Conclusions At 6

  16. Intracranial Rhabdomyoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Zhou, Tianzan; Jones, Karra A; Chen, James Y; Hansen, Lawrence; U, Hoi Sang

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male presented with eight months of increasingly severe frontal headaches, decreased right facial sensation, and periodic vertigo. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a heterogeneously contrast-enhancing mass involving and expanding the right foramen ovale.  A biopsy of the lesion was performed, and the final pathologic diagnosis revealed a neoplastic rhabdomyoma. To date, only five cases of intracranial rhabdomyoma have been reported, and a rhabdomyoma involving the trigeminal nerve has never been described in an adult. This manuscript reviews the available literature and highlights the clinical, imaging, pathologic characteristics, and surgical management of these exceedingly rare lesions. PMID:27335706

  17. Trial of Decompressive Craniectomy for Traumatic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G; Timofeev, Ivan S; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Czosnyka, Marek; Timothy, Jake; Anderson, Ian; Bulters, Diederik O; Belli, Antonio; Eynon, C Andrew; Wadley, John; Mendelow, A David; Mitchell, Patrick M; Wilson, Mark H; Critchley, Giles; Sahuquillo, Juan; Unterberg, Andreas; Servadei, Franco; Teasdale, Graham M; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Murray, Gordon D; Kirkpatrick, Peter J

    2016-09-22

    Background The effect of decompressive craniectomy on clinical outcomes in patients with refractory traumatic intracranial hypertension remains unclear. Methods From 2004 through 2014, we randomly assigned 408 patients, 10 to 65 years of age, with traumatic brain injury and refractory elevated intracranial pressure (>25 mm Hg) to undergo decompressive craniectomy or receive ongoing medical care. The primary outcome was the rating on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E) (an 8-point scale, ranging from death to "upper good recovery" [no injury-related problems]) at 6 months. The primary-outcome measure was analyzed with an ordinal method based on the proportional-odds model. If the model was rejected, that would indicate a significant difference in the GOS-E distribution, and results would be reported descriptively. Results The GOS-E distribution differed between the two groups (P<0.001). The proportional-odds assumption was rejected, and therefore results are reported descriptively. At 6 months, the GOS-E distributions were as follows: death, 26.9% among 201 patients in the surgical group versus 48.9% among 188 patients in the medical group; vegetative state, 8.5% versus 2.1%; lower severe disability (dependent on others for care), 21.9% versus 14.4%; upper severe disability (independent at home), 15.4% versus 8.0%; moderate disability, 23.4% versus 19.7%; and good recovery, 4.0% versus 6.9%. At 12 months, the GOS-E distributions were as follows: death, 30.4% among 194 surgical patients versus 52.0% among 179 medical patients; vegetative state, 6.2% versus 1.7%; lower severe disability, 18.0% versus 14.0%; upper severe disability, 13.4% versus 3.9%; moderate disability, 22.2% versus 20.1%; and good recovery, 9.8% versus 8.4%. Surgical patients had fewer hours than medical patients with intracranial pressure above 25 mm Hg after randomization (median, 5.0 vs. 17.0 hours; P<0.001) but had a higher rate of adverse events (16.3% vs. 9.2%, P=0.03). Conclusions At 6

  18. CO2 Effects in Space: Relationship to Intracranial Hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 on Earth and in space. The effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 are experienced in almost all bodily systems. In space some of the effects are heightened due to the fluid shifts to the thorax and head. This fluid shift results in increased intracranial pressure, congested cerebral circulation, increased Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Intravenous dilatation. The mechanism of the effect of CO2 on CBF is diagrammed, as is the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) production. A listing of Neuroendocrine targets is included.

  19. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  20. Intracranial myiasis by Hypoderma bovis (Linnaeus) in a horse.

    PubMed

    Hadlow, W J; Ward, J K; Krinsky, W L

    1977-04-01

    Acute neurologic disease associated with intracranial migration of a first instar larva of a warble fly, Hypoderma bovis (Linnaeus), was observed in a 14-year-old Quarter Horse gelding in western Montana. The disease was characterized by incoordination of gait, circling to the left, head tilt to the right, partial paralysis of the right side of the face, and impaired vision in the right eye. Two and one-half hours after it was first noticed sick, the horse collapsed and was euthanized. Massive hemorrhage unaccompanied by necrosis or significant cellular response was present in the right side of the midbrain and pons.

  1. Thrombosis modeling in intracranial aneurysms: a lattice Boltzmann numerical algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouared, R.; Chopard, B.; Stahl, B.; Rüfenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.; Courbebaisse, G.

    2008-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann numerical method is applied to model blood flow (plasma and platelets) and clotting in intracranial aneurysms at a mesoscopic level. The dynamics of blood clotting (thrombosis) is governed by mechanical variations of shear stress near wall that influence platelets-wall interactions. Thrombosis starts and grows below a shear rate threshold, and stops above it. Within this assumption, it is possible to account qualitatively well for partial, full or no occlusion of the aneurysm, and to explain why spontaneous thrombosis is more likely to occur in giant aneurysms than in small or medium sized aneurysms.

  2. Intracranial Aneurysms: Wall Motion Analysis for Prediction of Rupture.

    PubMed

    Vanrossomme, A E; Eker, O F; Thiran, J-P; Courbebaisse, G P; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, K

    2015-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are a common pathologic condition with a potential severe complication: rupture. Effective treatment options exist, neurosurgical clipping and endovascular techniques, but guidelines for treatment are unclear and focus mainly on patient age, aneurysm size, and localization. New criteria to define the risk of rupture are needed to refine these guidelines. One potential candidate is aneurysm wall motion, known to be associated with rupture but difficult to detect and quantify. We review what is known about the association between aneurysm wall motion and rupture, which structural changes may explain wall motion patterns, and available imaging techniques able to analyze wall motion. PMID:25929878

  3. Intracranial venous sinus thrombosis complicating AIDS-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Afsari, Khosrow; Frank, Jeffrey; Vaksman, Yulia; Nguyen, Thanhan V

    2003-03-01

    An alert and oriented 27-year-old African American woman with AIDS presented with a 10-day history of fever, cough productive of yellow sputum, nausea, and vomiting and a 1-day history of excruciating headache and photophobia. Her condition rapidly deteriorated into a coma with decorticate and then decerebrate posture, and she died 3 weeks later. There was evidence of extensive intracranial venous sinus thrombosis (ICVST), renal vein thrombosis (RVT), and multiple cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts due to a hypercoagulable state complicating AIDS-associated nephrotic syndrome. This is the first reported case of fatal ICVST and RVT with extensive cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts complicating nephrotic syndrome in a patient with AIDS.

  4. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Associated with Kinetic Tremor and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a clinically variable syndrome caused by low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure due to a non-traumatic CSF leak. Phenomenology Shown This case describes a 68-year-old gentleman who presents with chronic and slightly progressive kinetic tremor of bilateral hands associated with gait ataxia and gait start hesitation. Educational Value This case underscores the importance of having a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of SIH when encountering a patient presenting with late-onset progressive kinetic tremor and gait ataxia syndrome. PMID:27351232

  5. Hypervitaminosis A causing benign intracranial hypertension. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhettay, E M; Bakst, C M

    1988-12-01

    Hypervitaminosis A is a well-recognized clinical entity, but the toxic manifestations develop so insidiously and involve so many systems that diagnosis can easily be missed or delayed. A patient with juvenile chronic arthritis developed benign intracranial hypertension and other manifestations of excessive vitamin A intake and made a complete recovery after it was withdrawn. Vitamin A is a non-prescription drug and any history of its ingestion must be obtained during evaluation of papilloedema. A plea is made for the public to be repeatedly reminded that no proposed remedy is safe or effective until it is demonstrated to be so. PMID:3194809

  6. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in pregnancy: A common autoimmune etiology.

    PubMed

    Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Lakhotia, Manoj; Gandhi, Ronak; Choudhary, Akanksha; Madan, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder, primarily affect female in fertile age. Pregnancy in SLE female is a high-risk situation which can adversely affect maternal-fetal dyad. SLE can flare during pregnancy or in postpartum period. We describe a case of a young pregnant female who presented because of right hemiparesis due multiple hemorrhages in the brain. The first presentation of the SLE with multiple intracranial hemorrhages in pregnancy, preceding the other characteristic clinical symptoms is rare. Here, we high lighten the major neurological issues and maternal-fetal dyad issues in SLE pregnancy and treatment strategies for management of SLE in pregnancy. PMID:27114665

  7. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  8. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in pregnancy: A common autoimmune etiology

    PubMed Central

    Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Lakhotia, Manoj; Gandhi, Ronak; Choudhary, Akanksha; Madan, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder, primarily affect female in fertile age. Pregnancy in SLE female is a high-risk situation which can adversely affect maternal-fetal dyad. SLE can flare during pregnancy or in postpartum period. We describe a case of a young pregnant female who presented because of right hemiparesis due multiple hemorrhages in the brain. The first presentation of the SLE with multiple intracranial hemorrhages in pregnancy, preceding the other characteristic clinical symptoms is rare. Here, we high lighten the major neurological issues and maternal-fetal dyad issues in SLE pregnancy and treatment strategies for management of SLE in pregnancy. PMID:27114665

  9. Colloid cyst mimicking intracranial hemorrhage after head trauma.

    PubMed

    Buyukkaya, Ayla; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Özel, Mehmet Ali; Sarıtas, Ayhan

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients consist vast majority of the patients who admit to emergency department, and most of them have a head trauma. A 58-year-old patient was taken to emergency department with head trauma, and a hyperdense lesion neighboring to third ventricle was detected. A diagnosis of colloid cyst was made in the patient who was being followed up for hemorrhage. In patients with head trauma, colloid cyst may easly be confused with intracranial hemorrhage due to hyperdensity. The aim of this report is to emphasize the importance of clinical thinking in the differential diagnosis of hyperdense lesion on computed tomography imaging of a patient with head injury.

  10. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  11. PET examination in intracranial tumor diagnosis of a cat

    SciTech Connect

    Angyal, G.; Csepura, G.; Balkay, L.; Galuska, L.; Molnar, J.; Valastyan, I.

    2008-12-08

    This paper shows the significance of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the veterinary medication through a case study of a cat brain tumor. A castrated male cat with bilateral mydriasis and blindness arrived at the veterinary clinic. After physical, laboratory and neurological investigations other sickness was ruled out and the inkling of the intracranial lesion had come to light. Brain tumor seemed the most likely to cause the illness because other symptoms appeared (for example: anorexia, depression) and they progrediated fast. PET examination, using {sup 18}F-FDG isotope, was performed to confirm the possible causes of the cat's symptoms.

  12. Computed tomographic spectrum of intracranial mycosis: correlation with histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.A.; Stern, J.; deNapoli, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    Four cases of intracerebral fungal infection are reviewed. The clinical course is outlined, and the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics are analyzed in light of known pathological data. The CT appearance of intracranial mycosis is dependent on the type of fungus as well as the dominant infecting form, i.e., yeast or hyphae. The hyphal form leads predominantly to a CT pattern consistent with vascular occlusion and secondary abscess formation; the yeast form generally results in noncaseating granulomas, which appear on CT scan as nodular enhancing lesions. If the patient survives the acute infective process, these fungal lesions undergo a prolonged subacute phase, and may eventually calcify.

  13. PET examination in intracranial tumor diagnosis of a cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angyal, G.; Csepura, G.; Balkay, L.; Galuska, L.; Molnár, J.; Valastyán, I.

    2008-12-01

    This paper shows the significance of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the veterinary medication through a case study of a cat brain tumor. A castrated male cat with bilateral mydriasis and blindness arrived at the veterinary clinic. After physical, laboratory and neurological investigations other sickness was ruled out and the inkling of the intracranial lesion had come to light. Brain tumor seemed the most likely to cause the illness because other symptoms appeared (for example: anorexia, depression) and they progrediated fast. PET examination, using 18F-FDG isotope, was performed to confirm the possible causes of the cat's symptoms

  14. Thinking outside the box: Use of the pressure wire to assess intracranial large artery stenoses.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Vani P; Prasad, Anand

    2016-08-01

    A novel study investigating the utility of the 0.014″ diameter pressure wire to assess the hemodynamic significance of intermediate intracranial stenosis. Technical aspects of pressure wire positioning across intracranial arteries are described. Further research is required to clarify the assessment of pressure gradients in the cerebral circulation and to define the optimal threshold for intervention. PMID:27530191

  15. Limitations of using a cancer registry to identify incident primary intracranial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Counsell, C.; Collie, D.; Grant, R.

    1997-01-01

    The completeness and accuracy of registration of primary intracranial tumours in the Scottish Cancer Registry was compared with a detailed incidence study performed over a two year period (1989-90). Of 228 patients with any primary intracranial tumour in the incidence study, 124 (54%) were identified as intracranial tumours in the cancer registry. The registry excluded benign tumours (although this was not consistent) and so the sensitivity of the registry varied with tumour type (84% for neuroepithelial tumours, 22% meningeal, 29% sellar, 0% cranial nerve). Of the 31 malignant tumours not found in the registry on our initial search, nine were found to have been included between 1989-90 but using different International Classification of Diseases-9th revision (ICD-9) codes or postcodes, and seven were found registered after 1990.Eleven per cent of cases (18/170) identified in the cancer registry were excluded from the incidence study: 11 had evidence of an intracranial tumour before 1989 whereas four definitely did not have an intracranial tumour. The cancer registry therefore significantly underestimated the incidence of all primary intracranial tumours, and of malignant intracranial tumours. Incidence studies must use additional methods to identify all primary tumours. Cancer registries should consider registering all primary intracranial tumours and may improve case ascertainment by screening neuroradiology data.

 PMID:9221974

  16. Intracranial-to-intracranial bypass for posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms: options, technical challenges, and results in 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Abla, Adib A; McDougall, Cameron M; Breshears, Jonathan D; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial-to-intracranial (IC-IC) bypasses are alternatives to traditional extracranial-to-intracranial (EC-IC) bypasses to reanastomose parent arteries, reimplant efferent branches, revascularize branches with in situ donor arteries, and reconstruct bifurcations with interposition grafts that are entirely intracranial. These bypasses represent an evolution in bypass surgery from using scalp arteries and remote donor sites toward a more local and reconstructive approach. IC-IC bypass can be utilized preferentially when revascularization is needed in the management of complex aneurysms. Experiences using IC-IC bypass, as applied to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms in 35 patients, were reviewed. METHODS Patients with PICA aneurysms and vertebral artery (VA) aneurysms involving the PICA's origin were identified from a prospectively maintained database of the Vascular Neurosurgery Service, and patients who underwent bypass procedures for PICA revascularization were included. RESULTS During a 17-year period in which 129 PICA aneurysms in 125 patients were treated microsurgically, 35 IC-IC bypasses were performed as part of PICA aneurysm management, including in situ p3-p3 PICA-PICA bypass in 11 patients (31%), PICA reimplantation in 9 patients (26%), reanastomosis in 14 patients (40%), and 1 V3 VA-to-PICA bypass with an interposition graft (3%). All aneurysms were completely or nearly completely obliterated, 94% of bypasses were patent, 77% of patients were improved or unchanged after treatment, and good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale ≤ 2) were observed in 76% of patients. Two patients died expectantly. Ischemic complications were limited to 2 patients in whom the bypasses occluded, and permanent lower cranial nerve morbidity was limited to 3 patients and did not compromise independent function in any of the patients. CONCLUSIONS PICA aneurysms receive the application of IC-IC bypass better than any other aneurysm, with nearly one

  17. Parameter Optimization for Selected Correlation Analysis of Intracranial Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Faltermeier, Rupert; Proescholdt, Martin A.; Bele, Sylvia; Brawanski, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recently we proposed a mathematical tool set, called selected correlation analysis, that reliably detects positive and negative correlations between arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Such correlations are associated with severe impairment of the cerebral autoregulation and intracranial compliance, as predicted by a mathematical model. The time resolved selected correlation analysis is based on a windowing technique combined with Fourier-based coherence calculations and therefore depends on several parameters. For real time application of this method at an ICU it is inevitable to adjust this mathematical tool for high sensitivity and distinct reliability. In this study, we will introduce a method to optimize the parameters of the selected correlation analysis by correlating an index, called selected correlation positive (SCP), with the outcome of the patients represented by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). For that purpose, the data of twenty-five patients were used to calculate the SCP value for each patient and multitude of feasible parameter sets of the selected correlation analysis. It could be shown that an optimized set of parameters is able to improve the sensitivity of the method by a factor greater than four in comparison to our first analyses. PMID:26693250

  18. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy and the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroharu; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Neki, Reiko; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Iihara, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy and is responsible for important morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. This study reviewed reports of ruptured IA during pregnancy and the puerperium, and our own cases of ruptured IA in pregnant women. Hemorrhage occurred predominantly during the third trimester of pregnancy, when maternal cardiac output and blood volume increase and reach maximum. Physiological and hormonal changes in pregnancy are likely to affect the risk of IA rupture. Ruptured IAs during pregnancy should be managed based on neurosurgical considerations, and the obstetrical management of women with ruptured IAs should be decided according to the severity of SAH and the gestational age. Emergent cesarean section followed by clipping or coiling of aneurysms is indicated if the maternal condition and the gestational age allow such interventions. Although SAH during pregnancy can result in disastrous outcomes, the necessity of intracranial screening for high-risk pregnant women is still controversial. PMID:23979051

  19. Intravascular Ultrasound for Intracranial and Extracranial Carotid Artery Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ahmad S

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information regarding endoluminal morphology. We present the first description of IVUS-guided intracranial and extracranial carotid artery stent placement for arterial dissection. A 41-year-old female with a sudden-onset headache and blurred vision underwent a computed tomography (CT) angiogram imaging that revealed bilateral carotid artery dissections (BCAD) and a left vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Endovascular treatment (EVT) of a long segment right carotid artery dissection (CAD) was performed employing two Carotid WALLSTENT™ Monorails™ (8 x 36 mm, 10 x 31 mm) (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With the help of the IVUS, the distal stent was placed up to the petrous carotid artery, followed by the placement of the second stent in the immediate proximal location with some overlap that extended down to the carotid artery bulb. Intraoperative angiography and post-stenting IVUS revealed excellent stent placement with good resolution of the dissection and good luminal patency with pseudolumen obliteration. Stent use for intracranial circulation dissections will continue to be a favorable option given the decreased morbidity of endovascular therapy in this location. As endovascular surgeons become more facile with the use of IVUS, using it as a guide for stent placement and post-stenting confirmation will help them to ensure proper positioning and improved patency rates. PMID:27672529

  20. Intracranial teratoma in children: the role of chromosome 21 trisomy.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Sabrine Teixeira; Valera, Elvis Terci; Brassesco, María Sol; Santos de Oliveira, Ricardo; Carlos dos Santos, Antonio; Saggioro, Fabiano Pinto; Neder, Luciano; Scrideli, Carlos Alberto; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga

    2014-04-01

    Teratomas are very rare intracranial tumors and cytogenetic information on this group remains rare. We report a case of a mature teratoma with abnormal +21 trisomy in tumor karyotype ocurring in a non-Down syndrome(DS) infant. Additionally, the evidence for the contribution of chromosome 21 trisomy in this neoplasia are briefly reviewed. The 6-month-old male baby presented with a posterior fossa tumor. Histological evaluation of tumor specimen showed a mature teratoma composed of fully differentiated ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal components. Although somatic karyotyping of the index case was normal, composite tumor karyotype depicted 47,XY,+21[6]/46,XY[6]. Besides previous reports of children with DS and intracranial teratomas, this is the first report to describe the occurrence of an isolated chromosome 21 trisomy within the tumor of a non-DS child. The participation of chromosome 21 in this rare pediatric tumor, either somatic or restricted to tumor specimen,may deserve special interest and further investigation. PMID:24812702

  1. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Polk, J. D.; Tarver, W.; Gibson, C. R.; Sargsyan, A.; Taddeo, T.; Alexander, D.; Otto, C.

    2010-01-01

    What is the risk? Given that astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic astronauts have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts have some degree of increased intracranial pressure (ICP; intracranial hypertension), and that those susceptible (via eye architecture, anatomy, narrow optic disc) have a high likelihood of developing papilledema (optic disc edema, globe flattening), choroidal folds, and/or hyperopic shifts and that the degree of edema may determine long-term or permanent vision impairment or loss. Back to back panels on this topic have been developed to address this emerging risk. The first panel will focus on the 6 clinical cases with emphasis on ophthalmic findings and imaging techniques used pre-, in-, and post-flight. The second panel will discuss the operational mitigation and medical requirements, the potential role of CO2 on ISS, and the research approach being developed. In total these back to back panels will explore what is known about this risk, what has been done immediately to address it, and how an integrated research model is being developed.

  2. Radiotherapy-related intracranial aneurysms: A role for conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Parag, Sayal; Arif, Zafar; Chittoor, Rajaraman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy-related intracranial aneurysms are a recognized but rare phenomenon and often present following rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment poses a particular dilemma and both endovascular, and surgical approaches have been used with varied success. We present the case of a radiotherapy-related aneurysm treated conservatively with a favorable outcome. Case Description: A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with a left temporal lobe mass for which he underwent an uneventful craniotomy and debulking. Histology revealed Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma following which he received radiotherapy. Three years later, he presented with subacute headache and transient dysphasia. Computed tomography and catheter angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the supramarginal branch of the left middle cerebral artery with probable intra-aneurysmal thrombus. Adjacent vessels also showed mild vasculitic changes. Trial balloon occlusion of the parent vessel resulted in profound dysphasia and was therefore abandoned. Bypass surgery or stent placement was deemed to have too high a risk of neurological deficit, and keeping in mind, the diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma, conservative management was pursued with partial thrombosis noted on serial imaging and stable appearances subsequently at 42 months’ follow-up. Conclusion: Conservative management can be pursued in selective cases of radiotherapy-related aneurysms, particularly if the risk of treating is too high and in the context of intracranial malignancy with limited lifespan. PMID:27313964

  3. Latency relationships between cerebral blood flow velocity and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Vespa, Paul M; Bergsneider, Marvin; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Pulsatile intracranial pressure (ICP) is a key to the understanding of several neurological disorders in which compliance is altered, e.g., hydrocephalus. A recently proposed model suggests that ICP pulse is a standing wave and not a transmitted wave. The present work, aimed at obtaining a better understanding of the pulsatility in the cranium, tries to test the following hypotheses: first, ICP pulse onset latency would be lower than that of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) pulses measured at a distal vessel; second, CBFV pulse at different intracranial arteries will have different pulse onset latencies, and hence they are not generated as a standing wave. The dataset used in the present study consists of ICP and CBFV signals collected from 60 patients with different diagnoses. The results reveal that the ICP pulse leads CBFV for 90% of the patients regardless of the diagnosis and mean ICP value. In addition, we show that CBFV pulse onset latency is roughly determined by the distance of the measurement point to the heart. We conclude that the ICP signal is not generated as a standing wave and that ICP pulse onset may be related to the arteries proximal to the heart.

  4. Clinical Analysis of Giant Intracranial Aneurysms with Endovascular Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical analysis of nine patients with giant aneurysms managed with endovascular embolization. Methods From March 2000 to September 2009, nine cases of giant intracranial aneurysms were treated (five unruptured and four ruptured). The nine patients included two males and seven females who were 47 to 72 years old (mean, 59.2 years old). The types of giant intracranial aneurysms were eight internal carotid artery aneurysms and one vertebral artery aneurysm. Treatment for each aneurysm was chosen based on anatomic relationships, aneurysmal factors, and the patients' clinical state. Three patients underwent endovascular coiling with stent and six initially underwent endovascular coiling alone. Medical records, operation records, postoperative angiographies, and follow-up angiographies were reviewed retrospectively. Results Eight out of nine patients showed good clinical outcomes. (six were excellent and two were good) after a mean follow-up period of 27.9 months. Six (67%) of the nine patients had a near-complete occlusions on the post-operative angiogram (mean, 13.5 months after the procedure). Occlusion rates of 90% or higher were obtained for eight (89%) of all the patients. One patient died due to multiple organ failure. Stents were ultimately required at some point for managing four aneurysms. Two patients needed additional procedures because of aneurysm regrowth. Conclusion Endovascular treatment could be an alternative option for managing giant aneurysms adjuvant to surgical intervention. PMID:23210026

  5. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  6. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  7. Reconfigurable Polymer Networks for Improved Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninh, Chi Suze Q.

    Endovascular embolization of intracranial aneurysms is a minimally invasive treatment in which an implanted material forms a clot to isolate the weakened vessel. Current strategy suffers from long-term potential failure modes. These potential failure modes include (1) enzymatic degradation of the fibrin clot that leads to compaction of the embolic agent, (2) incomplete filling of the aneurysm sac by embolic agent, and (3) challenging geometry of wide neck aneurysms. In the case of wide neck aneurysms, usually an assisting metal stent is used to help open the artery. However, metal stents with much higher modulus in comparison to the soft blood vessel can cause biocompatibilities issues in the long term such as infection and scarring. Motivated to solve these challenges associated with endovascular embolization, strategies to synthesize and engineer reconfigurable and biodegradable polymers as alternative therapies are evaluated in this thesis. (1) Reconfiguration of fibrin gel's modulus was achieved through crosslinking with genipin released from a biodegradable polymer matrix. (2) Reconfigurability can also be achieved by transforming triblock co-polymer hydrogel into photoresponsive material through incorporation of melanin nanoparticles as efficient photosensitizers. (3) Finally, reconfigurability can be conferred on biodegradable polyester networks via Diels-Alder coupling of furan pendant groups and dimaleimide crosslinking agent. Taken all together, this thesis describes strategies to transform a broad class of polymer networks into reconfigurable materials for improved treatment of intracranial aneurysms as well as for other biomedical applications.

  8. Intravascular Ultrasound for Intracranial and Extracranial Carotid Artery Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ahmad S

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information regarding endoluminal morphology. We present the first description of IVUS-guided intracranial and extracranial carotid artery stent placement for arterial dissection. A 41-year-old female with a sudden-onset headache and blurred vision underwent a computed tomography (CT) angiogram imaging that revealed bilateral carotid artery dissections (BCAD) and a left vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Endovascular treatment (EVT) of a long segment right carotid artery dissection (CAD) was performed employing two Carotid WALLSTENT™ Monorails™ (8 x 36 mm, 10 x 31 mm) (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With the help of the IVUS, the distal stent was placed up to the petrous carotid artery, followed by the placement of the second stent in the immediate proximal location with some overlap that extended down to the carotid artery bulb. Intraoperative angiography and post-stenting IVUS revealed excellent stent placement with good resolution of the dissection and good luminal patency with pseudolumen obliteration. Stent use for intracranial circulation dissections will continue to be a favorable option given the decreased morbidity of endovascular therapy in this location. As endovascular surgeons become more facile with the use of IVUS, using it as a guide for stent placement and post-stenting confirmation will help them to ensure proper positioning and improved patency rates.

  9. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  10. Intravascular Ultrasound for Intracranial and Extracranial Carotid Artery Stent Placement.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ahmad S; Hussain, Namath S

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can provide valuable information regarding endoluminal morphology. We present the first description of IVUS-guided intracranial and extracranial carotid artery stent placement for arterial dissection. A 41-year-old female with a sudden-onset headache and blurred vision underwent a computed tomography (CT) angiogram imaging that revealed bilateral carotid artery dissections (BCAD) and a left vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Endovascular treatment (EVT) of a long segment right carotid artery dissection (CAD) was performed employing two Carotid WALLSTENT™ Monorails™ (8 x 36 mm, 10 x 31 mm) (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With the help of the IVUS, the distal stent was placed up to the petrous carotid artery, followed by the placement of the second stent in the immediate proximal location with some overlap that extended down to the carotid artery bulb. Intraoperative angiography and post-stenting IVUS revealed excellent stent placement with good resolution of the dissection and good luminal patency with pseudolumen obliteration. Stent use for intracranial circulation dissections will continue to be a favorable option given the decreased morbidity of endovascular therapy in this location. As endovascular surgeons become more facile with the use of IVUS, using it as a guide for stent placement and post-stenting confirmation will help them to ensure proper positioning and improved patency rates. PMID:27672529

  11. Method and Apparatus for Assessment of Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A non-invasive method and apparatus for monitoring changes in intracranial pressure which removes extracranial effects from the measurements. The method and apparatus can include the supplying of a fixed frequency electrical output to a transducer coupled to the patient's head, thereby generating an acoustical tone burst in the patient's head which generates a first echo and a second echo, the first echo reflecting from a first interface in the side of the patient's head coupled to the transducer, and the second echo reflecting from a second interface at the opposite side of the patient's head. The first and second echoes are received by the transducer which can generate a first electrical signal and a second electrical signal, wherein the first and second electrical signals vary in accordance with the corresponding first and second echoes. The counterbalancing phase shifts required to bring about quadrature between each of the first and second electrical signals and the fixed frequency electrical output can be measured, and values for the change in intracranial distance based on the changes in the counterbalancing phase shifts can be obtained.

  12. Organic electronics based pressure sensor towards intracranial pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    The intra-cranial space, which houses the brain, contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that acts as a fluid suspension medium for the brain. The CSF is always in circulation, is secreted in the cranium and is drained out through ducts called epidural veins. The venous drainage system has inherent resistance to the flow. Pressure is developed inside the cranium, which is similar to a rigid compartment. Normally a pressure of 5-15 mm Hg, in excess of atmospheric pressure, is observed at different locations inside the cranium. Increase in Intra-Cranial Pressure (ICP) can be caused by change in CSF volume caused by cerebral tumors, meningitis, by edema of a head injury or diseases related to cerebral atrophy. Hence, efficient ways of monitoring ICP need to be developed. A sensor system and monitoring scheme has been discussed here. The system architecture consists of a membrane less piezoelectric pressure sensitive element, organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based signal transduction, and signal telemetry. The components were fabricated on flexible substrate and have been assembled using flip-chip packaging technology. Material science and fabrication processes, subjective to the device performance, have been discussed. Capability of the device in detecting pressure variation, within the ICP pressure range, is investigated and applicability of measurement scheme to medical conditions has been argued for. Also, applications of such a sensor-OTFT assembly for logic sensor switching and patient specific-secure monitoring system have been discussed.

  13. Study and Therapeutic Progress on Intracranial Serpentine Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kan; Yu, Tiecheng; Guo, Yunbao; Yu, Jinlu

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial serpentine aneurysm (SA) is a clinically rare entity, and very few multi-case studies on SA have been published. The present study reviewed the relevant literature available on PubMed. The studied information included the formation mechanism and natural history of SA as well as its clinical manifestation, imaging characteristics, and current treatments. After reviewing the literature, we conclude that intracranial SA can be managed surgically and by endovascular embolization, but the degree of blood flow in normal brain tissue distal to the SA must be evaluated. A balloon occlusion test (BOT) or cross compression test is recommended for this evaluation. If the collateral circulation is sufficiently compensatory, direct excision or embolization can be performed. However, if the compensatory collateral circulation is poor, a bypass surgery is necessary. Satisfactory results can be achieved in the majority of SA patients after treatment. However, the size of the aneurysm may increase in some patients after endovascular treatment. Special attention should be paid to cases exhibiting a significant mass effect to avoid subsequent SA excision due to an intolerable mass effect. Satisfactory results can be achieved with careful treatment of SA. PMID:27279792

  14. Delayed intracranial hematoma following stereoelectroencephalography for intractable epilepsy: case report.

    PubMed

    Derrey, Stéphane; Lebas, Axel; Parain, Dominique; Baray, Marie Gilles; Marguet, Christophe; Freger, Pierre; Proust, François

    2012-12-01

    Intracranial bleeding following stereoelectroencephalography (sEEG) is rare and commonly occurs early after electrode implantation. The authors report the case of a delayed intracranial hematoma following sEEG. This 10-year-old boy was referred to the authors' department to undergo an sEEG study for intractable epilepsy, with the hypothesis of a single localized epileptic zone in the left precentral region. To perform the exploration, 14 depth electrodes were implanted under stereotactic conditions. The results of a postoperative CT scan performed routinely at the end of the surgical procedure were normal. Eight days later, following an epileptic seizure, the child's condition worsened. The neurological examination revealed a left hemiparesis, agitation, and coma due to a right subdural hematoma with intraparenchymal bleeding. Despite a surgical evacuation followed by a decompressive craniectomy, the curative treatments were stopped 1 week later due to severe diffuse ischemic lesions found on MRI studies. This is the first observation of a delayed hematoma following an sEEG procedure. The mechanism underlying this complication remains unclear, but the rupture of a growing pseudoaneurysm caused by the electrode's implantation or the tearing of a neighboring vessel by an electrode were suspected. In consequence, physicians must remain vigilant during the entire sEEG recording period and probably also several days after electrode removal.

  15. Visual Impairment/Increased Intracranial Pressure (VIIP): Layman's Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    To date NASA has documented that seven long duration astronauts have experienced in-flight and post-flight changes in vision and eye anatomy including degraded distant vision, swelling of the back of the eye, and changes in the shape of the globe. We have also documented in a few of these astronauts post-flight, increases in the pressure of the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. This is referred to as increased intracranial pressure (ICP). The functional and anatomical changes have varied in severity and duration. In the post-flight time period, some individuals have experienced a return to a pre-flight level of visual function while others have experienced changes that remain significantly altered compared to pre-flight. In addition, the increased ICP also persists in the post-flight time period. Currently, the underlying cause or causes of these changes is/are unknown but the spaceflight community at NASA suspects that the shift of blood toward the head and the changes in physiology that accompany it, such as increased intracranial pressure, play a significant role.

  16. Intracranial injection of adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Rebecca L; Majewska, Ania K

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial injection of viral vectors engineered to express a fluorescent protein is a versatile labeling technique for visualization of specific subsets of cells in different brain regions both in vivo and in brain sections. Unlike the injection of fluorescent dyes, viral labeling offers targeting of individual cell types and is less expensive and time consuming than establishing transgenic mouse lines. In this technique, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is injected intracranially using stereotaxic coordinates, a micropipette and an automated pump for precise delivery of AAV to the desired area with minimal damage to the surrounding tissue. Injection parameters can be tailored to individual experiments by adjusting the animal age at injection, injection location, volume of injection, rate of injection, AAV serotype and the promoter driving gene expression. Depending on the conditions chosen, virally-induced transgene expression can allow visualization of groups of cells, individual cells or fine cellular processes, down to the level of dendritic spines. The experiment shown here depicts an injection of double-stranded AAV expressing green fluorescent protein for the labeling of neurons and glia in the mouse primary visual cortex. PMID:21113119

  17. Histological and immunohistochemical studies on primary intracranial canine histiocytic sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    THONGTHARB, Atigan; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; CHAMBERS, James Kenn; KAGAWA, Yumiko; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a progressive and fatal malignant neoplasm that mainly occurs in middle- to old-aged dogs. This study describes clinicopathological, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of intracranial histiocytic sarcomas in 23 dogs. Magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography of the brains revealed that the tumors mainly located in the cerebrum, particularly the frontal lobe. Seizure was a predominant clinical sign in most of the cases. Histologically, the tumor cells were morphologically classified into round/polygonal- and spindle-shaped cell types. There was a significant association between tumor cell types and hemophagocytic activity (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in other clinicopathological parameters and mitotic index between the 2 types. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were strongly positive for HLA-DR, Iba-1 and CD204 in all the 23 cases, for iNOS in 20, for CD163 in 17, for CD208 (DC-LAMP) in 9, for lysozyme in 8 and for S100 in 5 cases. In addition, the Ki67-proliferative index showed range of 0.50–64.33% (Average 26.60 ± 3.81%). These observations suggest that canine primary intracranial histiocytic sarcomas tend to exhibit both dendritic cell and macrophage phenotypes of histiocytic differentiation. PMID:26668164

  18. [Bile acids in coronary arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Shelest, A N; Volkov, V I; Cherevatov, B G

    1984-10-01

    Seventy-six patients with chronic coronary heart disease of the atherosclerotic genesis were examined using clinical laboratory and instrumental research methods. The blood serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoproteins and bile acids were measured throughout the course of treatment. When hyperlipoproteinemias were divided according to phenotypes, type II hyperlipoproteinemia proved to be most commonly occurring (65.8%). The patients exhibited lower blood serum levels of bile acids as compared to control.

  19. Decrease in circulating myeloid dendritic cell precursors in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Xia; Li, Bing-Ling; Lin, Zhong-Qiu; Zhang, Ni; Peng, Xiong; Gong, Zhi-Hua; Long, Liu-Cheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xiang, Ding-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) is a major cause of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the levels of circulating dendritic cell precursors (DCP) could reflect the severity of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA). For this purpose, a series of angiography were taken to determine the severity and extent of coronary artery and intracranial large artery stenosis, and flow cytometry were taken to determine the levels of circulating mDC precursors and pDC precursors in patients with severe intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) (n = 101) and mild intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) (n = 123) according to the angiography. Circulating mDC precursors were lower in patients with severe intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) than in mild intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) (P < 0.05), but circulating pDC precursors were not significant differences (P > 0.05). According to these data, circulating mDC precursors could predict the severity of ILAA, which also could be able to reflect the severity of ILAA.

  20. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Wang, Wu; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis. Date Sources: We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015, using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial arterial stenosis, black blood, and intracranial atherosclerosis. Study Selection: We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI. We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application. Results: VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size, and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously. Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening, enhancement, and vessel remodeling on VWI. This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis, identification of stroke mechanism, risk-stratifying patients, and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice. In addition, a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy. Conclusions: This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management. PMID:27231176

  1. Review article: the surgical approach to the management of increased intracranial pressure after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Lucia M; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Hutchinson, Peter J A

    2010-09-01

    Increased intracranial pressure occurring after severe traumatic brain injury is a common and potentially devastating phenomenon. It has been clearly demonstrated that increased intracranial pressure that is refractory to initial medical measures is a poor prognostic sign. Current optimal management is based on a sequential, target-driven approach combining both medical and surgical treatment strategies. The surgical measures in current common practice include external ventricular drain insertion and decompressive craniectomy. There is evidence that both of these measures reduce intracranial pressure but the effect on outcome, particularly in the long term, is equivocal. Current Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines recommend timely evacuation of mass lesions and there is clear guidance regarding the indications for intracranial pressure monitoring; however, decompressive craniectomy is only cautiously recommended as a possible option for selected patients. In this review, we highlight the ongoing debate about the use of decompressive craniectomy to control intracranial pressure after traumatic brain injury; included is a summary of review of the most recent literature on the effect of decompressive craniectomy on increased intracranial pressure after traumatic brain injury and associated long-term outcome. The RESCUEicp and DECRA studies are discussed in detail. It is hoped that these 2 randomized controlled trials, which are evaluating the short- and longer-term outcomes of decompressive craniectomy, will provide conclusive evidence regarding the role of decompressive craniectomy in managing increased intracranial pressure after trauma.

  2. Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, L. Scott; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Barnwell, Stanley L.; Waters, Michael F.; Hoh, Brian L.; Hourihane, J. Maurice; Levy, Elad I.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Chiu, David; Klucznik, Richard P.; Clark, Joni M.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Johnson, Mark D.; Pride, G. Lee; Torbey, Michel T.; Zaidat, Osama O.; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic intracranial arterial stenosis is an important cause of stroke that is increasingly being treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) to prevent recurrent stroke. However, PTAS has not been compared with medical management in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned patients who had a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke attributed to stenosis of 70 to 99% of the diameter of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management alone or aggressive medical management plus PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system. The primary end point was stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during the follow-up period or stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. Results Enrollment was stopped after 451 patients underwent randomization, because the 30-day rate of stroke or death was 14.7% in the PTAS group (nonfatal stroke, 12.5%; fatal stroke, 2.2%) and 5.8% in the medical-management group (nonfatal stroke, 5.3%; non–stroke-related death, 0.4%) (P = 0.002). Beyond 30 days, stroke in the same territory occurred in 13 patients in each group. Currently, the mean duration of follow-up, which is ongoing, is 11.9 months. The probability of the occurrence of a primary end-point event over time differed significantly between the two treatment groups (P = 0.009), with 1-year rates of the primary end point of 20.0% in the PTAS group and 12.2% in the medical-management group. Conclusions In patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, aggressive medical management was superior to PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system, both because the risk of early stroke after PTAS was high and because the risk of stroke with aggressive medical therapy alone was lower than expected. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; SAMMPRIS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00576693.) PMID

  3. Anterior approaches in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Danesi, G; Panizza, B; Mazzoni, A; Calabrese, V

    2000-02-01

    Although surgery is regarded as the mainstay of treatment for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs), ancillary treatment modalities such as radiotherapy and on rare occasions chemotherapy are still recommended by many for intracranial extension with apparent radiologic involvement of the cavernous sinus and internal carotid artery. Further, most authors undertaking surgical excision of this subgroup of patients would recommend a lateral or combined frontal and lateral approach for its removal. In a series of 49 cases of JNA, 14 were found during surgery to have intracranial extradural extension; the anterior approach was used for their removal. Although in these cases, on radiography the cavernous sinus often looked to be invaded and the internal carotid artery was displaced superolaterally, there was no difficulty in establishing a plane of dissection. Total removal was achieved in 11 of the 14 cases with a single-stage procedure. Of the 3 cases with residual tumor, only 1 occurred intracranially. Removal was achieved by a subtemporal approach in this case. For the extracranial residual tumors 1 required a midface degloving and the other, with a 1-cm residual tumor in the nasopharynx, has been treated conservatively for 6 years with no evidence of growth. No deaths or significant complications have occurred, and radiotherapy has not been required. We conclude that JNAs are tumors with a predilection for spread but that rarely invade dura, acting instead to displace it. We believe that surgery is the method of choice for treating these lesions and that an anterior surgical approach with microsurgical techniques should be used in the first instance. In the last 2 cases we preferred a midface degloving technique to avoid facial scarring and because this approach allows a widening of the surgical field if needed by the performance of bilateral maxillary free bone flaps. On the rare occasion that a lateral approach, with its attendant permanent conductive

  4. Intracranial Calcifications and Hemorrhages: Characterization with Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Zhu, Wenzhen; Kovanlikaya, IIhami; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Liu, Tian; Wang, Shuai; Salustri, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare gradient-echo (GRE) phase magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) in the detection of intracranial calcifications and hemorrhages. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Thirty-eight patients (24 male, 14 female; mean age, 33 years ± 16 [standard deviation]) with intracranial calcifications and/or hemorrhages diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT), MR imaging (interval between examinations, 1.78 days ± 1.31), and clinical information were selected. GRE and QSM images were reconstructed from the same GRE data. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently identified the calcifications and hemorrhages on the QSM and GRE phase images in two randomized sessions. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement were computed and compared with the McNemar test and k coefficients. Calcification loads and volumes were measured to gauge intermodality correlations with CT. Results A total of 156 lesions were detected: 62 hemorrhages, 89 calcifications, and five mixed lesions containing both hemorrhage and calcification. Most of these lesions (146 of 151 lesions, 96.7%) had a dominant sign on QSM images suggestive of a specific diagnosis of hemorrhage or calcium, whereas half of these lesions (76 of 151, 50.3%) were heterogeneous on GRE phase images and thus were difficult to characterize. Averaged over the two independent observers for detecting hemorrhages, QSM achieved a sensitivity of 89.5% and a specificity of 94.5%, which were significantly higher than those at GRE phase imaging (71% and 80%, respectively; P < .05 for both readers). In the identification of calcifications, QSM achieved a sensitivity of 80.5%, which was marginally higher than that with GRE phase imaging (71%; P = .08 and .10 for the two readers), and a specificity of 93.5%, which was significantly higher than that with GRE phase imaging (76.5%; P < .05 for both readers

  5. Spinal Recurrence From Intracranial Germinoma: Risk Factors and Treatment Outcome for Spinal Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Shikama, Naoto; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Uno, Takashi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Iraha, Shiro; Hyodo, Akio; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Tamaki, Wakana; Ito, Hisao; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the risk factors of spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma and clinical outcomes of patients who developed spinal recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 2007, 165 patients with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis were treated with cranial radiotherapy without spinal irradiation. The median follow-up in all 165 patients was 61.2 months (range, 1.2-260.1 months). Results: After the initial treatment, 15 patients (9.1%) developed spinal recurrences. Multivariate analysis revealed that large intracranial disease ({>=}4 cm) and multifocal intracranial disease were independent risk factors for spinal recurrence. Radiation field, total radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy did not affect the occurrence of spinal recurrences. Of the 15 patients who experienced spinal recurrence, the 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) rates from the beginning of salvage treatments were 65% and 57%, respectively. In the analysis, presence of intracranial recurrence and salvage treatment modality (radiotherapy with chemotherapy vs. radiotherapy alone) had a statistically significant impact on DFS. The 3-year DFS rate in patients with no intracranial recurrence and treated with both spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was 100%, whereas only 17% in patients with intracranial recurrence or treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Large intracranial disease and multifocal intracranial disease were risk factors for spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis. For patients who developed spinal recurrence alone, salvage treatment combined with spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective in controlling the recurrent disease.

  6. Ventricular Tract Hemorrhage Following Intracranial Nail Removal: Utility of Real-time Endovascular Assistance.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Steinberg, Jeffrey A; Sack, Jayson; Pannell, J Scott; Khalessi, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating brain trauma commonly results in occult neurovascular injury. Detailed cerebrovascular imaging can evaluate the relationship of intracranial foreign bodies to major vascular structures, assess for traumatic pseudoaneurysms, and ensure hemostasis during surgical removal. We report a case of a self-inflicted intracranial nail gun injury causing a communicating ventricular tract hemorrhage upon removal, as well as a delayed pseudoaneurysm. Pre- and post-operative vascular imaging, as well as intra-operative endovascular assistance, was critical to successful foreign body removal in this patient. This report demonstrates the utility of endovascular techniques for the assessment and treatment of occult cerebrovascular injuries from intracranial foreign bodies. PMID:27471490

  7. Neuraxial anesthesia in parturients with intracranial pathology: a comprehensive review and reassessment of risk.

    PubMed

    Leffert, Lisa R; Schwamm, Lee H

    2013-09-01

    Parturients with intracranial lesions are often assumed to have increased intracranial pressure, even in the absence of clinical and radiographic signs. The risk of herniation after an inadvertent dural puncture is frequently cited as a contraindication to neuraxial anesthesia. This article reviews the relevant literature on the use of neuraxial anesthesia in parturients with known intracranial pathology, and proposes a framework and recommendations for assessing risk of neurologic deterioration, with epidural analgesia or anesthesia, or planned or inadvertent dural puncture. The authors illustrate these concepts with numerous case examples and provide guidance for the practicing anesthesiologist in determining the safety of neuraxial anesthesia. PMID:23584382

  8. A case of intracranial solitary fibrous tumor/hemangiopericytoma with dedifferentiated component.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Akira; Kohashi, Kenichi; Yamada, Yuichi; Nakamizo, Akira; Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iwaki, Toru; Oda, Yoshinao

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of a 51-year-old Japanese man with an intracranial dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumor/hemangiopericytoma (SFT/HPC) identified morphologically and immunohistochemically, comprised of a typical SFT/HPC with a high-grade pleomorphic component. NAB2-STAT6 fusion transcripts were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in both the conventional and high-grade components. The tumor cells in both components showed the nuclear expression of STAT6 protein, indicating the diagnostic value of these examinations. Intracranial dedifferentiated SFT/HPC is a very rare but important differential diagnosis in intracranial pleomorphic tumors.

  9. Ventricular Tract Hemorrhage Following Intracranial Nail Removal: Utility of Real-time Endovascular Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Steinberg, Jeffrey A.; Sack, Jayson; Pannell, J. Scott; Khalessi, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating brain trauma commonly results in occult neurovascular injury. Detailed cerebrovascular imaging can evaluate the relationship of intracranial foreign bodies to major vascular structures, assess for traumatic pseudoaneurysms, and ensure hemostasis during surgical removal. We report a case of a self-inflicted intracranial nail gun injury causing a communicating ventricular tract hemorrhage upon removal, as well as a delayed pseudoaneurysm. Pre- and post-operative vascular imaging, as well as intra-operative endovascular assistance, was critical to successful foreign body removal in this patient. This report demonstrates the utility of endovascular techniques for the assessment and treatment of occult cerebrovascular injuries from intracranial foreign bodies. PMID:27471490

  10. Parry-Romberg syndrome with multiple intracranial cysts: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh; Patil, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS) is a rare, poorly understood degenerative condition characterized by atrophic changes affecting one side of the face. The cause of these changes remains obscure. Migraine and facial pain such as trigeminal neuralgia are the most common neurological symptoms in this patient group. Sometimes, it causes epilepsy and rarely cerebral hemiatrophy, meningeal thickening, cortical dysgenesis, calcified lesions, aneurysms, and intracranial vascular malformations. Herein, the author reports the first case of PRS with multiple large intracranial cysts producing raised intracranial pressure. PMID:27606027

  11. Parry–Romberg syndrome with multiple intracranial cysts: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh; Patil, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Parry–Romberg syndrome (PRS) is a rare, poorly understood degenerative condition characterized by atrophic changes affecting one side of the face. The cause of these changes remains obscure. Migraine and facial pain such as trigeminal neuralgia are the most common neurological symptoms in this patient group. Sometimes, it causes epilepsy and rarely cerebral hemiatrophy, meningeal thickening, cortical dysgenesis, calcified lesions, aneurysms, and intracranial vascular malformations. Herein, the author reports the first case of PRS with multiple large intracranial cysts producing raised intracranial pressure. PMID:27606027

  12. Multiple intracranial mucoceles associated with phaeohyphomycosis of the paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Aviv, J E; Lawson, W; Bottone, E J; Sachdev, V P; Som, P M; Biller, H F

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to alert clinicians to a new pathogenic fungus of the paranasal sinuses called Exserohilum rostratum. Exserohilum species are one of the etiologic agents of phaeohyphomycosis, a constellation of entities caused by dematiaceous fungi. This class of fungal sinus infection has emerged only in the past decade; it occurs primarily in immunocompetent individuals and produces a tenacious, progressive pansinusitis. To our knowledge, this study describes the first case of multiple intracranial mucoceles secondary to E rostratum. The diagnostic workup includes computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging followed by direct microscopic examination of tissue biopsy specimens. A craniotomy followed by a bilateral external ethmoidectomy was necessary for complete extirpation of the infected mucoceles. Aggressive surgical management of this mycotic infection is described.

  13. A Unique Case of Intracranial Mucormycosis Following an Assault

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Fadilah S

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial mucormycosis is a very unusual presentation of an infection after a depressed skull fracture due to an assault. Only sporadic cases have been reported in the literature previously. A 30-year-old male with a traumatic brain injury following an assault, status-post debridement and elevation of a depressed skull fracture, was discharged home several weeks postoperatively. A CT scan of the head with contrast was obtained due to mental status changes and revealed an enhancing ring-shaped lesion in the right frontal lobe consistent with a brain abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for image-guided excisional biopsy of the lesion, with pathology revealing mucormycosis. 

  14. [Preliminary investigation on dynamic CT scan of intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Wu, E H

    1989-04-01

    74 patients with various intracranial tumors were studied by means of dynamic CT, among them 45 cases were confirmed by operation and pathology. In analyzing the time-density curve and the ratio of increase in CT number of the tumoral tissue to that in the arterial lumens (tissue-blood ratio, TBR), we found that: (1) Dynamic CT technique is safe and easy to perform suitable for out-patients; (2) The time-density curves in acoustic neurinoma, meningioma, glioma and metastatic tumors are different from each other because of difference in vascularity and the degree of B.B.B. breakdown. Meningioma curve shows a rapid rise to the peak followed by a subsequent plateau; (3) TBR at the peak time (TBRp) is useful as an index for tumor. Combined analysis of time-density curve and TBRp is helpful for tumor differentiation. PMID:2758930

  15. Recurrent intracranial solitary fibrous tumor initially diagnosed as hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Hori, Emiko; Kurimoto, Masanori; Fukuda, Osamu; Takahashi, Chiaki; Nagai, Shoichi; Oya, Takeshi; Endo, Shunro

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of an intracranial solitary fibrous tumor that recurred three times consecutively in an 11-year period. A 72-year-old man presented with a headache and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a dumbbell tumor at the left tentorium. The tumor was removed but recurred. The first diagnosis was hemangiopericytoma, but all specimens showed a "patternless pattern" and few reticulin fibers, which features were not compatible with hemangiopericytoma. All tumors showed immunoreactivity for CD34 and bcl-2. These results point to a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) and not to hemangiopericytoma. We present here a hypercellular spindle-cell tumor that was very similar to hemangiopericytoma but is better diagnosed as SFT.

  16. Intracranial hydatid cyst: imaging findings of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Darwish, Houssein

    2016-09-12

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting for a few months. The mass was totally excised, with no postoperative complications. We present MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this operatively proven case of hydatid cyst of the brain. We discuss imaging findings, in particular the findings on MRS, which is rarely reported in the literature.

  17. Evolving evidence in adult idiopathic intracranial hypertension: pathophysiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Susan P; Ali, Fizzah; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Botfield, Hannah; Friedman, Deborah I; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare but important disease associated with significant morbidity. There is an expected rise in prevalence in line with the escalating global burden of obesity. Modern revisions in the terminology and diagnostic criteria for IIH help guide clinicians in investigations and researchers in standardising recruitment criteria for clinical trials. The pathophysiology of IIH is incompletely characterised; suggested underpinning mechanisms include the role of cerebrospinal fluid regulation as well as metabolic and endocrinological perspectives. Recent treatment trials are providing insights into the management but debate still surrounds key areas in treatment. This review will provide an up-to-date discussion on the potential pathogenic mechanisms and management of IIH. PMID:26888960

  18. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Sim, Sook Young

    2015-10-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  19. Transformation of Merkel cell carcinoma to ganglioneuroblastoma in intracranial metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lach, Boleslaw; Joshi, Sangeeta S; Murty, Naresh; Huq, Nasimul

    2014-09-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor occasionally demonstrating aberrant differentiation to other epithelial and nonepithelial cell lines. We describe a case of Merkel cell carcinoma displaying unique patterns of differentiation in the primary focus and brain metastasis. The skin primary was almost uniformly small cell carcinoma positive for epithelial and neuroendocrine markers, with a few glial fibrillary acidic protein- and cytokeratin 20-positive cells. The neoplasm contained giant cells immunoreactive for neurofilament and negative for epithelial markers. The neck lymph node metastasis was a typical neuroendocrine Merkel cell carcinoma positive for cytokeratin 20. A solitary dural intracranial metastasis displayed features of aggressive ganglioneuroblastoma, expressing many neuronal antigens with no evidence of glial or epithelial differentiation. After total gross resection, the tumor recurred within 3 months, and the patient developed skeletal metastases and died 6 months after craniotomy. PMID:24996688

  20. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  1. A Unique Case of Intracranial Mucormycosis Following an Assault

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Fadilah S

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial mucormycosis is a very unusual presentation of an infection after a depressed skull fracture due to an assault. Only sporadic cases have been reported in the literature previously. A 30-year-old male with a traumatic brain injury following an assault, status-post debridement and elevation of a depressed skull fracture, was discharged home several weeks postoperatively. A CT scan of the head with contrast was obtained due to mental status changes and revealed an enhancing ring-shaped lesion in the right frontal lobe consistent with a brain abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for image-guided excisional biopsy of the lesion, with pathology revealing mucormycosis.  PMID:27672528

  2. Primary Intracranial Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián, Cristina; Vela, Ana Carmen; Figueroa, Ramón; Marín, Miguel Ángel; Alfaro, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Summary Low-grade B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas typically arise from the marginal zone of the secondary lymphatic follicles. Their intracranial expression is very rare, most frequently affecting the dura mater and the choroid plexus glomi in the lateral ventricles. Their initial evaluation requires the exclusion of more common extra-axial lesions, such as meningiomas, dural metastasis, granulomatous lesions or secondary lymphoproliferative dural extension from body lymphomas. Whenever a ventricular lesion is present, the patient's age and lesion location help narrow the differential diagnosis. Dural-based lymphomas and ventricular/choroid plexus lymphomas are slow-growing lesions with imaging features similar to meningiomas, which is typically their main differential consideration. Diffusion-weighted images frequently show restricted diffusion behaviour on lymphomas, helping to differentiate them from the typical meningiomas. PMID:25196615

  3. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension resulting from a thoracic osteophyte.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ling-Chien; Hsu, Yung-Chu

    2015-06-01

    We report a 34-year-old woman who presented with progressive postural headache and neck tightness over 1week. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and spinal images showed a thoracic osteophyte caused the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. SIH caused by spinal CSF leak is generally thought to be a consequence of deficiency of the spinal meninges in conjunction with trivial trauma. Less commonly, spinal bony pathology can lead to SIH. We reviewed 13 reported patients with bony structural pathology related SIH. After two to three epidural blood patches, eight patients underwent surgery. They generally had good outcomes. In conclusion, even though surgical repair confers specific risks, it should be considered after repetitive failures of epidural blood patches. The long-term prognoses of surgical versus non-surgical patients warrants further investigation. PMID:25778385

  4. Generalized Morphea following Radiotherapy for an Intracranial Tumor.

    PubMed

    Balegar, Shrenik; Mishra, Dharmendra Kumar; Chatterjee, Sagarika; Kumari, Shweta; Tiwary, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Morphea is a localized scleroderma variety which can be circumscribed or generalized and is characterized by sclerotic plaques developing on trunk and limbs. Surgery and radiation have been implicated as etiological factors for the development of morphea. Majority of the radiation-induced morphea cases have occurred in patients with breast cancer. The affected areas have been generally restricted to the area of radiation and nearby surrounding area in most of the reported cases. We hereby report a case of a 27-year-old male who developed radiation-induced progressive generalized morphea after getting radiotherapy for an intracranial tumor. His condition improved after dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. With increased incidence of cancer worldwide and radiotherapy as a modality of treatment, it is imperative to follow the patient and look for the development of morphea which itself is a debilitating disease. PMID:27688464

  5. Intracranial hydatid cyst: imaging findings of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Darwish, Houssein

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting for a few months. The mass was totally excised, with no postoperative complications. We present MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this operatively proven case of hydatid cyst of the brain. We discuss imaging findings, in particular the findings on MRS, which is rarely reported in the literature. PMID:27620198

  6. Implantable intracranial pressure telemeter using custom integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, A. M. P.

    1981-10-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of an implantable intracranial pressure (ICP) telemetry transmitter is described. Data transmission is accomplished by means of a radio frequency (RF) link. A silicon piezoresistive pressure transducer is used. Electrostatic bonding of this transducer onto a tubular glass support provides long-term stability, stress isolation and a hermetic package. Pressure baseline stability of better than 2 mm Hg/month has been achieved. Pulse code modulation is employed in the pressure channel to assure accurate data transmission. Low duty cycle pulse powering technique lowers the power consumption of the telemeter to only 0.3 mW. The complexity of the electronics is reduced by the use of a custom integrated circuit (PM2) which is a 40-pin bipolar device measuring 150 mil x 150 mil. It contains 75 NPN transistors, 26 PNP transistors, 45 base resistors (480 K total) and 16 pinch resistors (560 K total). The operating characteristics of the telemeter are described.

  7. Intracranial arachnoid cysts in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Kaneko, Takaaki; Sakai, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akihisa; Watanabe, Akino; Watanabe, Shohei; Maeda, Norihiko; Kumazaki, Kiyonori; Suzuki, Juri; Fujiwara, Reina; Makishima, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Takeshi; Hayashi, Misato; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Mikami, Akichika

    2014-01-01

    An intracranial arachnoid cyst was detected in a 32-year-old, 44.6-kg, female chimpanzee at the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed and the cognitive studies in which she participated were reviewed. MRI revealed that the cyst was present in the chimpanzee's right occipital convexity, and was located in close proximity to the posterior horn of the right lateral ventricle without ventriculomegaly. CT confirmed the presence of the cyst and no apparent signs indicating previous skull fractures were found. The thickness of the mandible was asymmetrical, whereas the temporomandibular joints and dentition were symmetrical. She showed no abnormalities in various cognitive studies since she was 3 years old, except a different behavioural pattern during a recent study, indicating a possible visual field defect. Detailed cognitive studies, long-term observation of her physical condition and follow-up MRI will be continued.

  8. Primary Intracranial Choriocarcinoma Located in the Suprasellar Region

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuli; Murayama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Ayumi; Abe, Masato; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A 10 year old girl was admitted to our hospital due to headache, nausea, and weight loss for about half a year. She also had visual field disorders. Suprasellar tumor was found by X-ray computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a ring-like lobulated enhanced mass with hemorrhage and necrosis. Biopsy of this lesion showed primary intracranial choriocarcinoma on histopathological examination. The serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level was measured after the biopsy and was elevated at 71,298.2 IU/L. The patient died due to hydrocephalus caused by an increase in the size of the tumor with a larger amount of hemorrhage than the preoperative features. If young patients present with a suprasellar lobulated mass with hemorrhage, the serum hCG level should be measured before operation. PMID:27499824

  9. Intracranial compensatory mechanisms for volume perturbations: a theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, S; Anand, S

    1993-06-01

    The proposed mathematical formulation accounts for the role of the absorption and production mechanisms of the intracranial cavity. The transport barrier conduction is governed by the pressure gradients across them and hence by the instantaneous flow rates. The above mentioned mechanisms have now been incorporated into a previous model for static changes in the cranial cavity. The integrated model now evolved is simulated for a constant, bolus and sinusoidal infusion. The output has been correlated to experimentally observed trends. The results that emerge, point to a system whose response is sensitive to the nature of CSF volume perturbations. The production and absorption mechanisms function in a relay configuration, whose primary objective is to maintain the base line CSF pressure values when deviations in pressure occur. These mechanisms have a finite activation time which is dependent on the nature of the volume variation.

  10. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  11. Generalized Morphea following Radiotherapy for an Intracranial Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Balegar, Shrenik; Mishra, Dharmendra Kumar; Chatterjee, Sagarika; Kumari, Shweta; Tiwary, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Morphea is a localized scleroderma variety which can be circumscribed or generalized and is characterized by sclerotic plaques developing on trunk and limbs. Surgery and radiation have been implicated as etiological factors for the development of morphea. Majority of the radiation-induced morphea cases have occurred in patients with breast cancer. The affected areas have been generally restricted to the area of radiation and nearby surrounding area in most of the reported cases. We hereby report a case of a 27-year-old male who developed radiation-induced progressive generalized morphea after getting radiotherapy for an intracranial tumor. His condition improved after dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. With increased incidence of cancer worldwide and radiotherapy as a modality of treatment, it is imperative to follow the patient and look for the development of morphea which itself is a debilitating disease. PMID:27688464

  12. Generalized Morphea following Radiotherapy for an Intracranial Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Balegar, Shrenik; Mishra, Dharmendra Kumar; Chatterjee, Sagarika; Kumari, Shweta; Tiwary, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Morphea is a localized scleroderma variety which can be circumscribed or generalized and is characterized by sclerotic plaques developing on trunk and limbs. Surgery and radiation have been implicated as etiological factors for the development of morphea. Majority of the radiation-induced morphea cases have occurred in patients with breast cancer. The affected areas have been generally restricted to the area of radiation and nearby surrounding area in most of the reported cases. We hereby report a case of a 27-year-old male who developed radiation-induced progressive generalized morphea after getting radiotherapy for an intracranial tumor. His condition improved after dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. With increased incidence of cancer worldwide and radiotherapy as a modality of treatment, it is imperative to follow the patient and look for the development of morphea which itself is a debilitating disease.

  13. A Unique Case of Intracranial Mucormycosis Following an Assault.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Fadilah S; Hussain, Namath S

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial mucormycosis is a very unusual presentation of an infection after a depressed skull fracture due to an assault. Only sporadic cases have been reported in the literature previously. A 30-year-old male with a traumatic brain injury following an assault, status-post debridement and elevation of a depressed skull fracture, was discharged home several weeks postoperatively. A CT scan of the head with contrast was obtained due to mental status changes and revealed an enhancing ring-shaped lesion in the right frontal lobe consistent with a brain abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for image-guided excisional biopsy of the lesion, with pathology revealing mucormycosis. PMID:27672528

  14. Aggressive middle turbinate osteoblastoma with intracranial extension: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Osteoblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumor that accounts for 1 percent of all primary bone tumors. About 30 to 40 percent of all osteoblastoma cases involve the spine. Osteoblastoma involving the nasal cavity is rare, with only 11 reported cases in the English-language literature, while only four cases of turbinate osteoblastoma have been described. Case presentation We report an unusual case of middle turbinate osteoblastoma associated with right-sided nasal obstruction and severe headache in a 14-year-old Caucasian girl. The tumor involved the right middle turbinate, complete anterior and incomplete posterior ethmoidal cells, and the frontal sinus ostium. Cribriform lamina was, in the most part, consumed by the tumor growth, while the skull base was mostly of normal bone structure. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of middle turbinate osteoblastoma with intracranial spread. Surgical treatment is the only therapeutic option for osteoblastoma. PMID:24884831

  15. Non-Invasive Measurement of Pulsatile Intracranial Pressures Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Shuer, Lawrence M.; Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, John H.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1997-01-01

    Early detection of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) will aid clinical decision-making for head trauma, brain tumor and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conventional methods, however, require surgical procedures which take time and are accompanied by increased risk of infection. Accordingly we have developed and refined a new ultrasound device to measure skull movements which are known to occur in conjunction with altered ICP. The principle of this device is based upon pulse phase locked loop (PPLL), which enables us to detect changes in distance on the order of microns between an ultrasound transducer on one side of the skull and the opposite inner surface of the cranium. The present study was designed to verify this measurement technique in cadavera. Transcranial distance was increased in steps of 10 mmHg from zero to 50 mmHg by saline infusion into the lateral ventricle of two cadavera. In separate experiments, pulsations of ICP with the amplitudes of zero to 2 mmHg were generated by rhythmic injections of saline using a syringe. When the ICP was stepwise increased from zero to 50 mmHg, transcranial distance increased in proportion with the ICP increase (y=12 x - 76, r=0.938), where y is changes in transcranial distance in microns and x is ICP in mmHg. In the data recorded while ICP pulsations were generated, fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrated that cranial pulsations were clearly associated with ICP pulsations. The results indicate that changes in transcranial distance is linearly correlated with those in ICP, and also that the PPLL device has sufficient sensitivity to detect transcranial pulsations which occur in association with the cardiac cycle. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsations, we may be able to estimate the pressure-volume index in the cranium. As a result, estimates of intracranial compliance may be possible by using the PPLL device. Further studies are necessary in normal subjects and patients.

  16. Endovascular treatment of unruptured posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Ge, Huijian; Jin, Hengwei; He, Hongwei; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Endovascular treatment of unruptured posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms (UPCIAs) is limited in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA). The aim of this study is to evaluate the periprocedural morbidity, mortality, and midterm clinical and angiographic follow-ups of endovascular treatment of UPCIAs. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients treated in a 2-year period (89 patients: 10–78 years of age, mean: 45.5 ± 14.3/92 UPCIAs). Fifty-eight aneurysms were found incidentally, 12 in association with mass effect symptoms and 22 with stroke. Results: A clinical improvement or stable outcome was achieved in 84 patients (94.4%). The two cases of permanent morbidity included a patient with paralysis and another patient with hemianopia. One patient died after treatment of a giant fusiform vertebrobasilar aneurysm. In one patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in death. Another patient suffered a fatal aneurysm rupture 4 days after treatment. Giant size (P = 0.005) and mass effect presentation (P = 0.029) were independent predictors of unfavorable outcomes in UPCIAs. Angiographic follow-up was available in 76 of the 86 surviving patients (88.4%) with a mean of 6.8 months (range: 1–36 months). Recanalization in six patients (7.9%) at 3 months, 4 months, 4 months, 24 months, and 36 months required retreatment in three patients. In-stent stenosis of >50% was found in three patients. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy is an attractive option for UPCIAs with stable midterm outcome. However, the current endovascular option seems to have a limitation for the treatment of the aneurysm with giant size or mass effect presentation. PMID:27570378

  17. Evaluation of chromosome 1q gain in intracranial ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Rajeshwari, Madhu; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Kakkar, Aanchal; Nambirajan, Aruna; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Singh, Manmohan; Saran, Ravindra Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are relatively uncommon gliomas with poor prognosis despite recent advances in neurooncology. Molecular pathogenesis of ependymomas is not extensively studied. Lack of correlation of histological grade with patient outcome has directed attention towards identification of molecular alterations as novel prognostic markers. Recently, 1q gain has emerged as a potential prognostic marker, associated with decreased survival, especially in posterior fossa, high grade tumors. Cases of intracranial ependymomas were retrieved. Tumors were graded using objective criteria to supplement WHO grading. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for 1q gain was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded sections. Eighty-one intracranial ependymomas were analyzed. Pediatric (76%) and infratentorial (70%) ependymomas constituted the majority. 1q gain was seen in 27 cases (33%), was equally frequent in children (34%) and adults (32%), supratentorial (37%) and infratentorial (32%) location, grade II (33%) and III (25%) tumors. Recurrence was noted in 24 cases and death in 7 cases with 5-year progression-free and overall-survival rates of 37% and 80%, respectively. Grade II tumors had a better survival than grade III tumors; histopathological grade was the only prognostically significant marker. 1q gain had no prognostic significance. 1q gain is frequent in ependymomas in Indian patients, seen across all ages, sites and grades, and thus is likely an early event in pathogenesis. The prognostic value of 1q gain, remains uncertain, and multicentric pooling of data is required. A histopathological grading system using objective criteria correlates well with patient outcome and can serve as an economical option for prognostication of ependymomas. PMID:26725097

  18. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Michael Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 {+-} 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  19. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  20. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  1. Incidence of Intracranial Hemorrhage After a Cranial Operation

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Robert; Sparrow, Harlan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of patients who underwent a cranial operation and postoperatively suffered an intracranial hemorrhage significant enough to require evacuation. Materials & methods  3,109 cranial operations were performed at Houston Methodist Hospital (Texas Medical Center campus) between January 2009 and December 2013. Of these, 59 cases required a second operation for evacuation of an intracranial hemorrhage. The information gathered included the patients’ age, gender, past medical history, medications and laboratory data, initial diagnosis, date/type of first and second operations, duration of hospitalization, discharge condition, and discharge destination. Results The study found a 1.90% rate of a postoperative hemorrhage significant enough to require evacuation after a cranial operation. The average age in the cohort requiring reoperation was 63 +/- 14 years with 42 male and 17 female. Hematoma evacuations were performed at various time intervals depending on the pathology treated at the initial operation. The time to second operation was 2.7 days after intraparenchymal hematoma evacuation, 6.0 days after cerebrovascular surgery, 6.2 days after tumor surgery and 9.7 days after subdural hematoma evacuation. The rate of postoperative hematoma development was 9.1% after a subdural hematoma evacuation, while it was only 1.1% in all other operations. Overall, those requiring hematoma evacuation had a 15% mortality rate, 64% were non-ambulatory, and 54% were discharged to long-term acute care facility, skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation facility or hospice. Conclusions  Neurological outcomes were poor in patients who underwent a cranial operation and required a second operation to remove a hematoma. This study suggests close observation of elderly males after a cranial operation, especially after subdural hematoma evacuation, and longer observation time for patients undergoing subdural hematoma evacuation than intraparenchymal

  2. Multiple pulmonary metastases in recurrent intracranial meningioma: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Zhan, Renya; Zhang, Chong; Zhou, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary metastases from meningioma are rare. We report here a 59-year-old man with multiple pulmonary metastases from a recurrent intracranial meningioma. The primary intracranial tumour in the left occiput was totally excised in 2009. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of atypical meningioma and adjuvant radiotherapy was given to help prevent recurrence. However, recurrence occurred in the left occipital region in 2011 and the meningioma was re-excised in 2012. At the same time, multiple metastases in the right pulmonary lobe were found and excised 3 months after the second craniotomy. The patient has not developed any further recurrence or metastases to date. Neurosurgeons should be aware of the occurrence of pulmonary metastases in patients with intracranial meningioma; potential predictive factors include atypical meningioma, venous sinus invasion, recurrence or previous intracranial surgery, and loss of heterozygosity. PMID:26944388

  3. Are Medications Involved in Vision and Intracranial Pressure Changes Seen in Spaceflight?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    Some crewmembers have experienced changes in their vision after long-duration spaceflight on the ISS. These impairments include visual performance decrements, development of cotton-wool spots or choroidal folds, optic-disc edema, optic nerve sheath distention, and/or posterior globe flattening with varying degrees of severity and permanence. These changes are now used to define the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. It is known that many medications can have side effects that are similar to VIIP symptoms. Some medications raise blood pressure, which can affect intracranial pressure. Many medications that act in the central nervous system can affect intracranial pressures and/or vision. About 40% of the medications in the ISS kit are known to cause side effects involving changes in blood pressure, intracranial pressure and/or vision. For this reason, we have begun an investigation of the potential relationship between ISS medications and their risk of causing or exacerbating VIIP-like symptoms.

  4. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography. PMID:27101982

  5. Increased Intracranial Pressure in a Boy with Gorham-Stout Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manisha K.; Mittelstaedt, Brent R.; Valentin, Frank E.; Thomas, Linda P.; Carlson, Christian L.; Faux, Brian M.; Hsieh, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD), also known as vanishing bone disease, is a rare disorder, which most commonly presents in children and young adults and is characterized by an excessive proliferation of lymphangiomatous tissue within the bones. This lymphangiomatous proliferation often affects the cranium and, due to the proximate location to the dura surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, can result in CSF leaks manifesting as intracranial hypotension with clinical symptoms to include orthostatic headache, nausea, and vertigo. We present the case of a boy with GSD and a known history of migraine headaches who presented with persistent headaches due to increased intracranial pressure. Although migraine had initially been suspected, he was eventually diagnosed with intracranial hypertension after developing ophthalmoplegia and papilledema. We describe the first known instance of successful medical treatment of increased intracranial pressure in a patient with GSD. PMID:27194986

  6. Early Experiences of Neuroform Stent-Assisted Coiling in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Joon

    2007-01-01

    Summary Endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms with detachable coils has proven a favorable alternative to surgical clipping. However, coiling has limitations in the treatment of complex or broad neck aneurysms because of possible coil prolapse or coil migration into the parent vessel and long-term angiographic recurrences. To achieve reconstruction of intracranial vessels with preservation of the parent artery, the use of stents has the greatest potential for assisted coil embolization. Three-dimensional coils and reconstructive techniques such as balloon-assisted remodeling may overcome these problems. But these methods had some drawbacks. The Neuroform stent is the most recently developed endovascular stent with self-expandable and micro-delivery properties that are specially designed for the treatment of unruptured intracranial broad neck aneurysms. Aim of the following working is to report a single center experience of stent-assisted coiling on ruptured intracranial aneurysms with assessment of its efficacy and safety, and follow-up findings. PMID:20566127

  7. Quantification of abnormal intracranial pressure waves and isotope cisternography for diagnosis of occult communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, E.R.; Piatek, D.; Del Bigio, M.R.; Stambrook, M.; Sutherland, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen consecutive patients with suspected occult communicating hydrocephalus were investigated by means of clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, isotope cisternography, computed tomography scanning, and continuous intracranial pressure monitoring. Semi-quantitative grading systems were used in the evaluation of the clinical, neuropsychological, and cisternographic assessments. Clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, and computed tomography scanning were repeated 3 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. All patients showed abnormal intracranial pressure waves and all improved after shunting. There was close correlation between number, peak, and pulse pressures of B waves and the mean intracranial pressure. However, quantification of B waves by means of number, frequency, and amplitude did not help in predicting the degree of clinical improvement postshunting. The most sensitive predictor of favorable response to shunting was enlargement of the temporal horns on computed tomography scan. Furthermore, the size of temporal horns correlated with mean intracranial pressure. There was no correlation between abnormalities on isotope cisternography and clinical improvement.

  8. Intracranial calcification in a neonate with the Sturge Weber syndrome and additional problems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Taboada, D; Ceres, L; Beltran, J; Olague, R; Nogues, A

    1979-02-26

    The neonate in this report had severe encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis with intracranial calcification, cranial hemiatrophy, microcephaly and generalised severe cerebral atrophy. Such findings are not common in the newborn with this syndrome. PMID:431990

  9. Susceptibility Artifacts in Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cysts: A Poorly Understood but Important Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Shashank; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Summary Rupture of intracranial dermoid cyst is a rare event. The classical imaging feature is described as a fat-containing lesion with tiny fat droplets in the subarachnoid or ventricular system. The lesion and the fat droplets show susceptibility blooming artifact on susceptibility-weighted images (SWI). Knowledge of this fact is important because these lesions mimic the blooming artifact of haemorrhage on SWI. The cause of the susceptibility artifact in intracranial dermoids has not been reported in the literature to date. We describe two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoids in the basifrontal region and review the clinical and imaging features and possible causes of susceptibility artifacts in intracranial dermoid cysts. PMID:25489890

  10. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Conclusion: Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage. PMID:26862454

  11. [Intravascular hypothermia for the management of Intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure: case report].

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luis; Pérez, Cristian; Ruiz, Carolina; Bugedo, Guillermo; Hernández, Glenn; Martínez, Jorge; Jarufe, Nicolás; Pérez, Rosa; Mellado, Patricio; Domínguez, Pilar

    2009-06-01

    Acute liver failure has a mortality rate in excess of 80%. Most deaths are attributed to brain edema with intracranial hypertension and herniation of structures, where ammonium plays a major role in its generation. We report an 18 year-old female with a fulminant hepatic failure caused by virus A infection. The patient developed a profound sopor and required mechanical ventilation. A CT scan showed the presence of brain edema and intracranial hypertension. A Raudemic catheter was inserted to measure intracranial pressure and brain temperature. Intracranial hypertension became refractory and intravascular hypothermia was started, reducing brain temperature to 33 degrees C. Seventy two hours later, a liver transplantation was performed. After testing graft perfusion, rewarming was started, completing 122 hours of hypothermia at 33 degrees C. The patient was discharged in good conditions after 69 days of hospitalization.

  12. Etiological agent and primary source of infection in 42 cases of focal intracranial suppuration.

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, J; Casanova, A; Fernández Viladrich, P; Liñares, J; Pallarés, R; Rufí, G; Verdaguer, R; Gudiol, F

    1986-01-01

    The microbiological findings for 42 patients with focal intracranial suppuration were analyzed and correlated with the different sources of primary infection. Streptococcus spp. were identified in focal intracranial suppuration of all origins except postcraniotomy. Microaerophilic streptococci were important in cases secondary to respiratory tract infection and in those of unknown origin. Streptococcus faecalis, Proteus spp., and Bacteroides fragilis were the organisms most commonly found in polymicrobial otogenic abscesses. Clostridium sp. was the main microorganism implicated in postcraniotomy suppurations. PMID:2877009

  13. Feasibility and methodology of optical coherence tomography imaging of human intracranial aneurysms: ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Barry; Sun, Cuiru; Khiel, Tim-Rasmus; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Standish, Beau A.; da Costa, Leodante; de Morais, Josaphat; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysm is a common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. An aneurysm may undergo microscopic morphological changes or remodeling of the vessel wall prior to rupture, which could potentially be imaged. In this study we present methods of tissue sample preparation of intracranial aneurysms and correlation between optical coherence tomography imaging and routine histology. OCT has a potential future in the assessment of microscopic features of aneurysms, which may correlate to the risk of rupture.

  14. Intramedullary spinal cord and leptomeningeal metastases from intracranial low-grade oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nipun; Nolan, Craig; Hirano, Miki; Young, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a patient with an intracranial low-grade oligodendroglioma who developed recurrence with an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and multiple spinal leptomeningeal metastases. The intramedullary spinal cord metastasis showed mild enhancement similar to the original intracranial primary, while the multiple spinal leptomeningeal metastases revealed no enhancement. This is the seventh reported case of symptomatic intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a low-grade oligodendroglioma.

  15. Intracranial subdural hematoma and pneumocephalus after spinal instrumentation of myelodysplastic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Roman; Maliszewski, Mariusz; Krawczyk, Lech

    2011-01-01

    To report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma, pneumocephalus, and pneumorachis, which occurred because of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a malpositioned transpedicular screw during spinal surgery for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis accompanied with hydrocephalus. Intracranial hemorrhage may occur as a consequence of dural sac penetration and CSF leakage after various medical procedures at the spinal level. The awareness of this severe complication is especially important during spinal instrumentation procedures in which inadvertent dural sac violation and CSF loss may be overlooked. A case report and literature review are presented here. A 12-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus underwent instrumentation for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis. Postoperatively, she became aphasic and increasingly somnolent. An urgent computed tomographic scan of the head and spine showed massive intracranial hematoma, pneumocephalus, pneumorachis, and a malpositioned pedicular screw that caused CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and bleeding remote from the surgical site. The patient needed neurosurgical cranial decompression and subsequent spinal reoperation with dural tear repair. The final outcome was an uneventful complete recovery. The increasing use of pedicular screws in spinal surgery carries a potential risk of occult dural sac violation with subsequent CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and the possibility of intracranial bleeding and pneumocephalus remote from the surgical site. This potentially fatal complication should always be considered after spinal surgery in the presence of early signs of neurological deterioration and necessitates an urgent cranial and spinal imaging to confirm the diagnosis and to make adequate treatment decisions. PMID:20829719

  16. Intracranial microcapsule chemotherapy delivery for the localized treatment of rodent metastatic breast adenocarcinoma in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Urvashi M.; Tyler, Betty; Patta, Yoda; Wicks, Robert; Spencer, Kevin; Scott, Alexander; Masi, Byron; Hwang, Lee; Grossman, Rachel; Cima, Michael; Brem, Henry; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Metastases represent the most common brain tumors in adults. Surgical resection alone results in 45% recurrence and is usually accompanied by radiation and chemotherapy. Adequate chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is hindered by the blood–brain barrier. Efforts at delivering chemotherapy locally to gliomas have shown modest increases in survival, likely limited by the infiltrative nature of the tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ) is first-line treatment for gliomas and recurrent brain metastases. Doxorubicin (DOX) is used in treating many types of breast cancer, although its use is limited by severe cardiac toxicity. Intracranially implanted DOX and TMZ microcapsules are compared with systemic administration of the same treatments in a rodent model of breast adenocarcinoma brain metastases. Outcomes were animal survival, quantified drug exposure, and distribution of cleaved caspase 3. Intracranial delivery of TMZ and systemic DOX administration prolong survival more than intracranial DOX or systemic TMZ. Intracranial TMZ generates the more robust induction of apoptotic pathways. We postulate that these differences may be explained by distribution profiles of each drug when administered intracranially: TMZ displays a broader distribution profile than DOX. These microcapsule devices provide a safe, reliable vehicle for intracranial chemotherapy delivery and have the capacity to be efficacious and superior to systemic delivery of chemotherapy. Future work should include strategies to improve the distribution profile. These findings also have broader implications in localized drug delivery to all tissue, because the efficacy of a drug will always be limited by its ability to diffuse into surrounding tissue past its delivery source. PMID:25349381

  17. Analysis of intracranial pressure pulse waveform and brain capillary morphology in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hidetaka; Oshio, Kotaro; Uchida, Masashi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus in neurosurgical patients is known to be a disease with high risks and severe outcomes. However, the mechanism by which diabetes mellitus induces dysfunction of brain tissue is not well known. The hypothesis of this study was that the damage to brain microvasculature in diabetes mellitus results in impaired compliance of the brain. Pathological changes associated with type II diabetes were investigated using a rat model. Pathophysiological changes in diabetic brain tissue were also investigated to confirm cerebral compliance by analyzing intracranial pressure waveforms. Pathologic findings revealed thickening of the basement membrane and fibrous collagen infiltration into the inner basement membrane of the brain microvasculature in diabetes mellitus. Analysis of intracranial pressure waveforms revealed that the P2 portion increased in diabetic rats compared to the control and was increased further with the increase in intracranial pressure. Analysis of the differential pressure curve, with respect to time, demonstrated that intracranial elasticity showed a concomitant increase. Pathologic findings and intracranial pressure waveforms were consistent with changes in brain microvasculature in diabetes mellitus. The increase of elasticity of brain tissue in diabetes mellitus may exacerbate the damage of intracranial disease.

  18. Intracranial microcapsule chemotherapy delivery for the localized treatment of rodent metastatic breast adenocarcinoma in the brain.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Urvashi M; Tyler, Betty; Patta, Yoda; Wicks, Robert; Spencer, Kevin; Scott, Alexander; Masi, Byron; Hwang, Lee; Grossman, Rachel; Cima, Michael; Brem, Henry; Langer, Robert

    2014-11-11

    Metastases represent the most common brain tumors in adults. Surgical resection alone results in 45% recurrence and is usually accompanied by radiation and chemotherapy. Adequate chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is hindered by the blood-brain barrier. Efforts at delivering chemotherapy locally to gliomas have shown modest increases in survival, likely limited by the infiltrative nature of the tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ) is first-line treatment for gliomas and recurrent brain metastases. Doxorubicin (DOX) is used in treating many types of breast cancer, although its use is limited by severe cardiac toxicity. Intracranially implanted DOX and TMZ microcapsules are compared with systemic administration of the same treatments in a rodent model of breast adenocarcinoma brain metastases. Outcomes were animal survival, quantified drug exposure, and distribution of cleaved caspase 3. Intracranial delivery of TMZ and systemic DOX administration prolong survival more than intracranial DOX or systemic TMZ. Intracranial TMZ generates the more robust induction of apoptotic pathways. We postulate that these differences may be explained by distribution profiles of each drug when administered intracranially: TMZ displays a broader distribution profile than DOX. These microcapsule devices provide a safe, reliable vehicle for intracranial chemotherapy delivery and have the capacity to be efficacious and superior to systemic delivery of chemotherapy. Future work should include strategies to improve the distribution profile. These findings also have broader implications in localized drug delivery to all tissue, because the efficacy of a drug will always be limited by its ability to diffuse into surrounding tissue past its delivery source.

  19. Circle of Willis Configuration as a Determinant of Intracranial Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Sultan, Sally; Bagci, Ahmet; Rundek, Tatjana; Alperin, Noam; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Circle of Willis (COW) variants might influence arterial caliber in the brain. We hypothesized that these variants would be associated with the prevalence of intracranial dolichoectasia (DE). Methods We examined COW variants and DE in a sample of stroke-free participants (n = 436) undergoing magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as part of a population-based study. Large intracranial arterial diameters were obtained when available; if not, the artery was defined as hypoplastic or absent according to its visibility on MRA. Subscores for the anterior and the posterior circulations were created. DE was defined as arterial diameters ≥ 2 SD above the population mean for that artery, adjusting for intracranial volume. Generalized linear models with a Poisson distribution were used to evaluate predictors of both absent and hypoplastic vessels, and logistic regression was used to assess the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of DE depending on COW variants. Results Only 44% of the sample had all 14 arteries present, 32% lacked 1 artery, 18% lacked 2 and 6% lacked 3 or more. DE of at least 1 artery was not associated with the total number of hypoplastic or absent arteries, but DE in a posterior circulation artery was weakly associated with the number of absent arteries in the posterior circulation (β coefficient = 0.36, p = 0.06). DE of at least 1 artery was more frequent in those with 1 or more absent arteries (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03–1.57). Posterior circulation DE was more frequent in participants with at least 1 or more absent arteries at any location (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02–1.78). Participants with an incomplete posterior COW were more likely to have DE in the anterior circulation (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.01–2.33). Having an absent left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) A1 segment was associated with right ACA DE (OR 34.1, 95% CI 3.16–368.2); an absent right ACA was associated with left ACA DE (OR 14.1, 95% CI 1.69–118.28). Absence of 1 (OR 1

  20. Pencil beam scanning proton therapy for pediatric intracranial ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Ares, Carmen; Albertini, Francesca; Frei-Welte, Martina; Bolsi, Alessandra; Grotzer, Michael A; Goitein, Gudrun; Weber, Damien C

    2016-05-01

    To assess the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PT) delivered to children with intracranial ependymoma. Between July-2004 and March-2013, 50 patients with intracranial ependymoma (n = 46, grade 3) received involved-field PT at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Median age at time of PT was 2.6 years (range 1.1-15.2). Thirty-six patients had infratentorial and 14 supratentorial ependymomas. Seventeen patients presented with macroscopic residual disease after subtotal resection before starting PT (8 with ≤1.5 cc and 9 with >1.5 cc residual tumor respectively). Forty-three (86 %) patients received post-operative chemotherapy before PT according to protocols; 44 (88 %) patients younger than 5 years required general anesthesia. Median prescribed dose was 59.4 Gy (RBE) (range 54-60) delivered in 1.8-2 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Late toxicity was assessed according to CTCAE v4.0. With a mean follow-up time of 43.4 months (range 8.5-113.7) seven patients experienced local failure (6 with infratentorial tumors and 1 with supratentorial tumor); four of the local failures were in patients with residual disease ≥1.5 cc at the time of PT and 3 without residual macroscopic disease. Five patients died from tumor progression. Actuarial 5-year Local Control rates were 78 ± 7.5 % and 5-year OS rates were 84 ± 6.8 %. Three patients developed grade ≥3 toxicity: 2 developed unilateral deafness (infratentorial tumors infiltrating into the internal acoustic canal), one patient developed a fatal brainstem necrosis. Repeated general anesthesia in children younger than 5 years was delivered without complications. Our data indicate the safety and the effectiveness of PT for pediatric ependymomas. Local control and survival rates are encouraging considering the high grade histology in 92 % of the patients and the number of patients with residual tumor ≥1.5 cc. The rates of late effects compare favorably with published

  1. Patterns of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pediatric Patients with Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Marano, Andrew A; Hoppe, Ian C; Halsey, Jordan N; Kordahi, Anthony M; Granick, Mark S; Lee, Edward S

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a potentially fatal injury accompanying fractures of the cranium and facial skeleton. When occurring at a young age, ICH can lead to developmental delay, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and death. It is therefore important for clinicians to recognize the presence of ICH early, and understand the factors that affect its prognosis. In this study, we aim to identify diagnostic and prognostic signs for ICH in pediatric facial fracture patients by examining aspects of patient presentation, concomitant injuries, and fracture patterns. Data were collected for all radiologically diagnosed facial fractures between January 2000 and December 2012 at a level I trauma center in Newark, NJ. This was then further refined to include only patients 18 years of age or younger who had a documented ICH. Patient age, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on presentation, fracture location, type of hemorrhage, and certain aspects of management were collected from these records. Data were then analyzed by either Pearson chi-square test or a t-test to determine significant relationships. A total of 285 pediatric patients were found to have sustained a facial fracture during this time period, 67 of which had concomitant ICH; 46 of these patients were male and 21 were female, with average ages of 14.26 and 9.52 (p < 0.01), respectively. Causes of injury included motor vehicle accidents, pedestrians struck, assault, falls, gunshot injuries, and sports-related injuries. All patients who suffered injuries as a result of violent crimes (assault and gunshot injuries) were male. Although nearly all fracture patterns were significantly associated with the presence of ICH, mandibular fractures showed a significant negative association with the presence of ICH. In addition, patients who received surgical intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (7.7 vs. 13.7, p < 0.05). The GCS was significantly lower in patients who underwent ICP (intracranial pressure

  2. Pencil beam scanning proton therapy for pediatric intracranial ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Ares, Carmen; Albertini, Francesca; Frei-Welte, Martina; Bolsi, Alessandra; Grotzer, Michael A; Goitein, Gudrun; Weber, Damien C

    2016-05-01

    To assess the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PT) delivered to children with intracranial ependymoma. Between July-2004 and March-2013, 50 patients with intracranial ependymoma (n = 46, grade 3) received involved-field PT at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Median age at time of PT was 2.6 years (range 1.1-15.2). Thirty-six patients had infratentorial and 14 supratentorial ependymomas. Seventeen patients presented with macroscopic residual disease after subtotal resection before starting PT (8 with ≤1.5 cc and 9 with >1.5 cc residual tumor respectively). Forty-three (86 %) patients received post-operative chemotherapy before PT according to protocols; 44 (88 %) patients younger than 5 years required general anesthesia. Median prescribed dose was 59.4 Gy (RBE) (range 54-60) delivered in 1.8-2 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Late toxicity was assessed according to CTCAE v4.0. With a mean follow-up time of 43.4 months (range 8.5-113.7) seven patients experienced local failure (6 with infratentorial tumors and 1 with supratentorial tumor); four of the local failures were in patients with residual disease ≥1.5 cc at the time of PT and 3 without residual macroscopic disease. Five patients died from tumor progression. Actuarial 5-year Local Control rates were 78 ± 7.5 % and 5-year OS rates were 84 ± 6.8 %. Three patients developed grade ≥3 toxicity: 2 developed unilateral deafness (infratentorial tumors infiltrating into the internal acoustic canal), one patient developed a fatal brainstem necrosis. Repeated general anesthesia in children younger than 5 years was delivered without complications. Our data indicate the safety and the effectiveness of PT for pediatric ependymomas. Local control and survival rates are encouraging considering the high grade histology in 92 % of the patients and the number of patients with residual tumor ≥1.5 cc. The rates of late effects compare favorably with published

  3. MS-31INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS COMPLICATED BY HYPERTENSION: FOUR CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Haining; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Jun; Huo, Junli; Zhang, Xiang; Fei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology and mechanism of both meningioma and hypertension are still not fully understood, and their diagnosis and treatment still need to be improved. The phenomenon that some meningiomas can directly lead hypertension was never reported previously. Here we reported four consecutive cases with hypertension secondary to intracranial meningiomas. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 62-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm) at left frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 10 years; Case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 1.5 cm × 1.2 cm × 1.1 cm) at right parietal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 4 years; Case 3 was a 42-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.7 cm × 2.6 cm × 2.3 cm) in trigonum of left lateral ventricle and with a medical history of hypertension for 3 months; Case 4 was a 56-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.8 cm × 1.5 cm) at bilateral falx of frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 8 years. All the four cases were treated in our hospital from April to June in 2013. After surgical resection of the tumors, blood pressure of all the patients returned to normal level in a short term, and it remained stable for 10 to 12 months of postoperative follow-up period. CONCLUSION: These four cases may present a new clinical syndrome and provide important clinical insights, and also should attract the attention of clinicians, i.e. in patients with hypertension, coexisting intracranial meningiomas should be suspected, and appropriate diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment should be provided; for patients with hypertension secondary to meningiomas, their hypertension can be cured after surgical removal of the tumors.

  4. Time trends in intracranial bleeding associated with direct oral anticoagulants: a 5-year cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Kerstin; Bahl, Bharat; Latrous, Meriem; Scaffidi Argentina, Sarina; Thompson, Jesse; Chatha, Aasil Ayyaz; Castellucci, Lana; Stiell, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past 5 years, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban were approved for stroke prevention. Phase III studies have shown a lower risk of intracranial bleeding with these direct oral anticoagulants than with warfarin; however, there is a lack of real-life data to validate this. We analyzed time trends in atraumatic intracranial bleeding from 2009 to 2013 among patients prescribed oral anticoagulants and those not prescribed oral anticoagulants. Methods: We used ICD-10-CA (enhanced Canadian version of the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems) codes to identify all patients with atraumatic intracranial bleeding who presented to our neurosurgical centre (serving a population of more than 1.2 million). Trained researchers extracted data on anticoagulant medications used in the week before diagnosis of the intracranial bleed. Provincial prescription data for oral anticoagulants were obtained from IMS Brogan CompuScript Market Dynamics. The primary outcome was the time trend in incident intracranial bleeds associated with oral anticoagulation during the period 2009-2013. The secondary outcomes were the time trend in intracranial bleeds not associated with oral anticoagulation and the provincial prescribing patterns for oral anticoagulants during the same period. Results: A total of 2050 patients presented with atraumatic intracranial bleeds during the study period. Of the 371 (18%) prescribed an anticoagulant in the week before presentation, 335 were prescribed an oral anticoagulant. There was an increasing time trend in intracranial bleeding associated with oral anticoagulants (p = 0.009; 6 additional events per year) and in intracranial bleeding not associated with oral anticoagulation (p = 0.06). During 2013, prescriptions for warfarin decreased to 70% of all oral anticoagulant prescriptions in the province, whereas those for dabigatran and rivaroxaban increased to 17% and 12

  5. Pediatric Masked Mastoiditis Associated with Multiple Intracranial Complications.

    PubMed

    Voudouris, Charalampos; Psarommatis, Ioannis; Nikas, Ioannis; Kafouris, Dimitrios; Chrysouli, Konstantina

    2015-01-01

    Masked mastoiditis is a distinct form of mastoiditis with little or no symptomatology, characterized by its potential to generate severe otogenic complications. Therefore, suspected masked mastoiditis should be diagnosed and treated without delay. This study reports a rare case of masked mastoiditis, manifested by multiple intracranial complications in an immunocompetent girl. The child exhibited headache and neurological symptomatology. Imaging studies revealed an epidural and a large cerebellar abscess and the patient was immediately treated with a triple antibiotic therapy. Mastoid surgery and drainage of the epidural abscess took place after the stabilization of the patient's neurologic status, on the 3rd hospitalization day. The cerebellar abscess was treated by craniectomy and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in the 3rd week of hospitalization. The girl was finally discharged in excellent condition. Two years later, she is still in good health, without otological or neurological sequelae. Masked mastoiditis is an insidious disease which requires increased clinical awareness and adequate imaging. Should clinical and/or radiological findings be positive, mastoidectomy must follow in order to prevent severe otogenic complications that can be triggered by masked mastoiditis.

  6. Intracranial pressure increases during exposure to a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Bir, Cynthia A; Ritzel, Dave V; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) affect a significant percentage of surviving soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. The extent of a blast TBI, especially initially, is difficult to diagnose, as internal injuries are frequently unrecognized and therefore underestimated, yet problems develop over time. Therefore it is paramount to resolve the physical mechanisms by which critical stresses are inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study recorded direct pressure within the brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats during exposure to blast. The goal was to understand pressure wave dynamics through the brain. In addition, we optimized in vivo methods to ensure accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP). Our results demonstrate that proper sealing techniques lead to a significant increase in ICP values, compared to the outside overpressure generated by the blast. Further, the values seem to have a direct relation to a rat's size and age: heavier, older rats had the highest ICP readings. These findings suggest that a global flexure of the skull by the transient shockwave is an important mechanism of pressure transmission inside the brain.

  7. Nonlinear closed-loop control system for intracranial pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Coté, G L; Durai, R; Zoghi, B

    1995-01-01

    A nonlinear closed-loop control system with flat pressure-versus-flow characteristics that is aimed at regulating intracranial pressure (ICP) by adjusting the volume of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) was designed, built, and tested. The control system design allows both the pressure setpoint and hysteresis to be adjusted to overcome the difficulties inherent in differential pressure-activated, fixed resistance, open-loop shunts. A dynamic six-compartment bench-top fluid system, which mimics the cerebral spinal fluid system, was designed, built, and tested. A computer simulation was developed which included the nonlinear on-off controller with hysteresis and a sixth-order, linear, multicompartmental model of the CSF system. The computer model and in vitro system results showed the ability of the system to track and compensate for pressure variations above and below normal as well as for spurious outputs that mimic such in vivo problems as blood pressure changes, sneezing, or coughing. There was one discrepancy between the simulated and in vitro results. The in vitro system had a higher rate of increase in pressure due to the more rigid compliance of the materials used, whereas the computer model compliance, based on the basal in vivo compliance of the CSF system, was less rigid. Based on these findings, the controller was modified to account for short-duration, extremely elevated pressures. PMID:8572426

  8. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Multimodal Brain Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dias, Celeste; Maia, Isabel; Cerejo, Antonio; Smielewski, Peter; Paiva, José-Artur; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe multimodal brain monitoring characteristics during plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with head injury, using ICM+ software for continuous recording. Plateau waves consist of an abrupt elevation of ICP above 40 mmHg for 5-20 min. This is a prospective observational study of patients with head injury who were admitted to a neurocritical care unit and who developed plateau waves. We analyzed 59 plateau waves that occurred in 8 of 18 patients (44 %). At the top of plateau waves arterial blood pressure remained almost constant, but cerebral perfusion pressure, cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygenation, and cerebral oximetry decreased. After plateau waves, patients with a previously better autoregulation status developed hyperemia, demonstrated by an increase in cerebral blood flow and brain oxygenation. Pressure and oxygen cerebrovascular reactivity indexes (pressure reactivity index and ORxshort) increased significantly during the plateau wave as a sign of disruption of autoregulation. Bedside multimodal brain monitoring is important to characterize increases in ICP and give differential diagnoses of plateau waves, as management of this phenomenon differs from that of regular ICP.

  9. Community-acquired intracranial suppurative infections: A 15-year report

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırmak, Taner; Gedik, Habip; Şimşek, Funda; Kantürk, Arzu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of patients with intracranial suppurative infection (ISI) by review of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Methods: The data collected from all patients who had been diagnosed with ISI and followed up at the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Department of the study site between 1998 and 2013 were reviewed. Results: Of the 23 ISI patients identified, the mean age was 38.21 ± 12.61 years (range: 19–67 years, median: 34) and mean symptom duration was 22.25 ± 20.22 days. Headache was the most common symptom, the frontal lobe the most common localization of ISI, and mastoiditis due to chronic suppurative otitis media the most common source of infection causing ISI. Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas spp., Peptostreptococcus spp., Enterococcus avium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and Toxoplasma gondii were isolated from the specimens collected from 6 (37.5%) of the 16 patients who underwent invasive procedures. Of these 16 patients, 2 underwent craniotomy, 12 burr hole aspiration, and 2 stereotactic biopsy. The rate of recurrence was 0% and the rates of sequelae and fatality were both 8%. Conclusions: ISI should be considered in male patients presenting with headache and neurological signs and symptoms, whether with or without fever, on admission for early diagnosis and provision of timely, adequate therapy and, if required, surgical intervention to reduce mortality and sequelae rates. PMID:25317357

  10. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  11. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and oxaliplatin: a causal association?

    PubMed

    Painhas, Teresa; Amorim, Manuela; Soares, Raquel; Duarte, Lilianne; Salgado-Borges, José

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old woman presented at the emergency service with complaints of transitory visual obscurations for four days, and headache, nausea and occasional vomiting in the last two months. She had been diagnosed of colorectal cancer one year ago and she was on treatment with oxaliplatin on a FOLFOX schedule. On ophthalmic examination, the vision was of 20/20 in both eyes and bilateral disc swelling was noted. The neurologic examination was normal. Magnetic resonance revealed no changes. A diagnostic lumbar puncture demonstrated an elevated opening pressure of 290 mm H2O with normal compounds. Due to the suspicion of ocular toxicity, oxaliplatin treatment was stopped. Treatment with oral acetazolamide was started and maintained for one month. In three weeks ocular and systemic symptoms totally disappeared and disc swelling gradually improved in the following months. Ocular toxicity has been reported as an infrequent adverse effect of oxaliplatin, but intracranial idiopathic pressure has not yet been described. Findings in this case suggest that oxaliplatin could be the cause for these symptoms. As the use of oxaliplatin is increasing as first-line treatment in colorectal cancer, we have to be alert to its potential toxicity.

  12. Opiate modification of intracranial self-stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Weibel, S L; Wolf, H H

    1979-01-01

    Studies were conducted to confirm the involvement of central opiate receptors in the expression of opiate modulation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Biphasic, dose-related changes in ICSS responding are described following IP administration of morphine sulfate (1-25 mg/kg) and levorphanol tartrate (LEV, 0.5-5 mg/kg). Similar patterns of response modification are reported following intraventricular (IVt) administration of LEV (0.01-0.2 muMoles) LEV's enantiomorph, dextrorphan, was not found to elicit comparable effects after either IP or IVt administration. Both the facilitatory and the depressant phases of LEV's action were antagonized by naltrexone (10 microgram, IVt), which had no apparent effect on ICSS by itself. Complete tolerance developed to the suppression of responding by 2.5 mg/kg LEV (IP) but not to the facilitatory effect of 0.5 mg/kg (IP), during a 5-day course of administration. The implications of these results for opiate reinforcement theory are discussed and possible mechanisms are advanced.

  13. Space Flight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Ophthalmic Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Mader, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although physiologic and pathologic changes associated with microgravity exposure have been studied extensively, the effect of this environment on the eye is largely unknown. Over the last several years, NASA s Space Medicine Division has documented astronauts presenting with varying degrees of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, and hyperopic shifts after long-duration space flight. Methods: Before and after long-duration space flight, six astronauts underwent complete eye examinations to include cycloplegic and/or manifest refraction and fundus photography. Five of these astronauts had Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed following their missions. Results: Following exposure to space flight of approximately 6-months duration, six astronauts had neuro-ophthalmic findings. These consisted of disc edema in four astronauts, globe flattening in four astronauts, choroidal folds in four astronauts, cotton wool spots in three astronauts, nerve fiber layer thickening by OCT in five astronauts, and decreased near vision in five astronauts. Four of the astronauts with near vision complaints had a hyperopic shift equal to or greater than + 0.50D between pre- and post-mission spherical equivalent refraction in one or both eyes (range +0.50D to +1.50D). These same four had globe flattening by MRI. Conclusions: The findings we describe may have resulted from a rise in intracranial pressure caused by microgravity fluid shifts, and could represent parts of a spectrum of ocular and cerebral responses to extended microgravity.

  14. Ventricular dilation as an instability of intracranial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzerar, R.; Ambarki, K.; Balédent, O.; Kongolo, G.; Picot, J. C.; Meyer, M. E.

    2005-11-01

    We address the question of the ventricles’ dilation as a possible instability of the intracranial dynamics. The ventricular system is shown to be governed by a dynamical equation derived from first principles. This general nonlinear scheme is linearized around a well-defined steady state which is mapped onto a pressure-volume model with an algebraic effective compliance depending on the ventricles’ geometry, the ependyma’s elasticity, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surface tension. Instabilities of different natures are then evidenced. A first type of structural instability results from the compelling effects of the CSF surface tension and the elastic properties of the ependyma. A second type of dynamical instability occurs for low enough values of the aqueduct’s conductance. This last case is then shown to be accompanied by a spontaneous ventricle’s dilation. A strong correlation with some active hydrocephalus is evidenced and discussed. The transfer function of the ventricles, compared to a low-pass filter, are calculated in both the stable and unstable regimes and appear to be very different.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of the Formation and Progression of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    KATAOKA, Hiroharu

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, only a little was understood about molecular mechanisms of the development of an intracranial aneurysm (IA). Recent advancements over the last decade in the field of genetics and molecular biology have provided us a wide variety of evidences supporting the notion that chronic inflammation is closely associated with the pathogenesis of IA development. In the field of genetics, large-scale Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified some IA susceptible loci and genes related to cell cycle and endothelial function. Researches in molecular biology using human samples and animal models have revealed the common pathway of the initiation, progression, and rupture of IAs. IA formation begins with endothelial dysfunction followed by pathological remodeling with degenerative changes of vascular walls. Medical treatments inhibiting inflammatory cascades in IA development are likely to prevent IA progression and rupture. Statins and aspirin are expected to suppress IA progression by their anti-inflammatory effects. Decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) inhibiting inflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and Ets-1 are the other promising choice of the prevention of IA development. Further clarification of molecular mechanisms of the formation and progression of IAs will shed light to the pathogenesis of IA development and provide insight into novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IAs. PMID:25761423

  16. Intracranial Stenting in the Treatment of Wide-Necked Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall'olio, M.; Cenni, P.; Raffi, L.; Simonetti, L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We positioned the following self-expanding stents certified for intracranial application: 16 Neuro form (Boston Scientific), three INX (Medtronic), one Leo (Balt). 6F calibre femoral introducers and guiding catheters were used for stent placement changing to 5F calibre introducers and guiding catheters (Envoy, Cordis) for the Neuroform 2 and 3 stents. All procedures were carried out under general anaesthesia and heparinization. Our pharmacological protocol consisted of adjunctive treatment with anti-aggregants during the interventional procedure and for the following six months, without premedication. From November 2000 to August 2006 we treated 28 patients (27 F/1M) with giant wide-necked aneurysms and one dissecting basilar artery aneurysm requiring the placement of 29 stents. We successfully positioned 20 stents: 11 stents combined with coils (8 immediate; 3 late) with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in seven cases and subtotal exclusion in four; nine stents not followed by embolization with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in six cases and subtotal exclusion in three. Stenting was not possible in nine cases due to extreme vessel tortuosity and the poor flexibility of release systems for the first stents. No late stent occlusion or subarachnoid haemorrhage were encountered after treatment. PMID:20566126

  17. Pathophysiology, presentation, prognosis, and management of intracranial arterial dolichoectasia.

    PubMed

    Pico, Fernando; Labreuche, Julien; Amarenco, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Up to 12% of patients with stroke have intracranial arterial dolichoectasia (IADE) and the basilar artery is affected in 80% of these cases. Diagnostic criteria and prognosis studies of IADE are based on basilar artery diameter, which is a good quantitative marker for the severity of the disease. The pathophysiology is largely unknown, but IADE can be viewed as a common final pathway of arterial wall response or damage in the tunica media due to various mechanisms, such as matrix metalloproteinase dysfunction or muscle cell or elastic fibre injury. No randomised controlled trials have been undertaken in IADE and thus little high-level evidence is available on which to base treatment guidelines. IADE management depends on clinical presentation and disease severity, and includes blood pressure control, antithrombotic treatments, endovascular procedures, and surgery. Further studies are needed to better define IADE in the general population, to establish its prevalence and pathophysiology, to identify subgroups at risk of life-threatening complications, and to offer effective treatment options.

  18. Wireless data and power transmission aiming intracranial epilepsy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Gurkan; Atasoy, Oguz; Dehollain, Catherine

    2013-05-01

    This study presents a wireless power and data transmission system to overcome the problems in intracranial epilepsy monitoring associated with transcutaneous wires. Firstly, a wireless power transfer link based on inductive coupling is implemented and a power management unit for the implant is designed. 4-coil resonant inductive link scheme is exploited since it exhibits a high efficiency and optimal load flexibility. Power management unit consists of an active rectifier, a low drop-out voltage regulator which is biased internally with a supply independent current source; all implemented as integrated circuit. Wireless power link provides 10 mW under 1.8 V dc to the load, more specifically the electrodes and read-out electronics. Wireless data communication is realized using the same frequency, 8.4 MHz, as the power link. Load shift keying is performed for uplink (from implant to external) communication by switching an integrated modulator which, in fact, detunes the resonance. Modulated signal is recovered on the external device by means of an integrated self-referenced ASK demodulator. Data rate is adapted for a fast ripple ( < 500 Hz) detection system which requires 300 kbps communication. The measurements show that the system works at 36% power transfer efficiency without communication link and the efficiency drops to 33% with 300 kbps uplink data transfer. Finally, in-vitro tests that emulate the real operation scenario are performed thanks to the two-polymer packaging and almost the same power transfer efficiency is achieved under same operation conditions.

  19. Complex Coil Assisted Single Coil Embolization for Small Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tzu-Hsien; Ou, Chang-Hsien; Chan, Si-Wa; Chen, Tai-I; Yang, Chia-Jung; Chiang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Wen-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the technical note is to introduce the complex coil assisted coil embolization method in the treatment of intracranial small aneurysm, in order to enhance the safety of the procedure. The first microcatheter was navigated into the aneurysm sac and the ultrasoft coil was used as the embolization coil. If the embolizations coil could not stay within the aneurysm sac smoothly, such as coil herniation into parent artery during the delivery process. The second microcatheter would be navigated to the aneurysm level in the parent artery. Another complex coil was delivered within the parent artery via the second microcatheter to provide the neck bridge effect in order to enhance the stability of embolization coil. Besides, the protection coil will not disturb the parent artery flow. While the embolization coil was put into the aneurysm sac smoothly under the help of complex protective coil, the protective coil was then withdrawn gently. We use the most magnified view, dual-plane approach simultaneously to observe the stability of embolization coil. The embolization coil would be detached without any evidence of coil motion or vibration. The new method could provide the physiological protective method, without leaving any protective device such as stent within the parent artery. PMID:24024075

  20. Optic nerve diameters and perimetric thresholds in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Salgarello, T.; Tamburrelli, C.; Falsini, B.; Giudiceandrea, A.; Colotto, A.

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND--Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a central nervous disorder characterised by abnormally increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure leading to optic nerve compression. An indirect estimate of increased CSF pressure can be obtained by the ultrasonographic determination of optic nerve sheaths diameters. Computerised static perimetry is regarded as the method of choice for monitoring the course of the optic neuropathy in IIH. The aims were to compare the echographic optic nerve diameters (ONDs) and the perimetric thresholds of patients with IIH with those of age-matched controls, and to examine the correlation between these two variables in individual patients with papilloedema. METHODS--Standardised A-scan echography of the mid orbital optic nerve transverse diameters and automated threshold perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) were performed in 20 patients with IIH with variable degree of papilloedema (according to the Frisén scheme) and no concomitant ocular diseases. Echographic and perimetric results were compared with those obtained from 20 age-matched controls. RESULTS--When compared with controls, patients with IIH showed a significant increase in mean ONDs and significantly reduced mean perimetric sensitivities. In individual patients with papilloedema, the transverse ONDs correlated negatively with Humphrey mean deviation values and positively with pattern standard deviation values. CONCLUSION--These results indicate that OND changes in IIH are associated with perimetric threshold losses, and suggest that IIH functional deficits may be related to the degree of distension of optic nerve sheaths as a result of an increased CSF pressure. PMID:8759260

  1. Studying Network Mechanisms Using Intracranial Stimulation in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    David, Olivier; Bastin, Julien; Chabardès, Stéphan; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering from focal drug-resistant epilepsy who are explored using intracranial electrodes allow to obtain data of exceptional value for studying brain dynamics in correlation with pathophysiological and cognitive processes. Direct electrical stimulation (DES) of cortical regions and axonal tracts in those patients elicits a number of very specific perceptual or behavioral responses, but also abnormal responses due to specific configurations of epileptic networks. Here, we review how anatomo-functional brain connectivity and epilepsy network mechanisms can be assessed from DES responses measured in patients. After a brief summary of mechanisms of action of brain electrical stimulation, we recall the conceptual framework for interpreting DES results in the context of brain connectivity and review how DES can be used for the characterization of functional networks, the identification of the seizure onset zone, the study of brain plasticity mechanisms, and the anticipation of epileptic seizures. This pool of exceptional data may be underexploited by fundamental research on brain connectivity and leaves much to be learned. PMID:21060722

  2. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel; Varble, Nicole; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are potentially devastating pathological dilations of arterial walls that affect 2-5% of the population. In our previous CFD study of 119 IAs, we found that ruptured aneurysms were correlated with complex flow pattern and statistically predictable by low wall shear stress and high oscillatory shear index. To understand flow mechanisms that drive the pathophysiology of aneurysm wall leading to either stabilization or growth and rupture, we aim at exploring vortex dynamics of aneurysmal flow and provide insight into the correlation between the previous predictive morphological parameters and wall hemodynamic metrics. We adopt the Q-criterion definition of coherent structures (CS) and analyze the CS dynamics in aneurysmal flows for both ruptured and unruptured IA cases. For the first time, we draw relevant biological conclusions concerning aneurysm flow mechanisms and pathophysiological outcome. In pulsatile simulations, the coherent structures are analyzed in these 119 patient-specific geometries obtained using 3D angiograms. The images were reconstructed and CFD were performed. Upon conclusion of this work, better understanding of flow patterns of unstable aneurysms may lead to improved clinical outcome.

  3. Intracranial pressure increases during exposure to a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Bir, Cynthia A; Ritzel, Dave V; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) affect a significant percentage of surviving soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. The extent of a blast TBI, especially initially, is difficult to diagnose, as internal injuries are frequently unrecognized and therefore underestimated, yet problems develop over time. Therefore it is paramount to resolve the physical mechanisms by which critical stresses are inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study recorded direct pressure within the brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats during exposure to blast. The goal was to understand pressure wave dynamics through the brain. In addition, we optimized in vivo methods to ensure accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP). Our results demonstrate that proper sealing techniques lead to a significant increase in ICP values, compared to the outside overpressure generated by the blast. Further, the values seem to have a direct relation to a rat's size and age: heavier, older rats had the highest ICP readings. These findings suggest that a global flexure of the skull by the transient shockwave is an important mechanism of pressure transmission inside the brain. PMID:21091267

  4. [Intracranial pressure targeted treatment in acute bacterial meningitis increased survival].

    PubMed

    Glimåker, Martin; Johansson, Bibi; Halldorsdottir, Halla; Wanecek, Michael; Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-12-16

    To evaluate the efficacy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment, compared to standard intensive care, in adults with community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) and severely impaired consciousness, a prospectively designed intervention-control comparison study was performed. Included were patients with confirmed ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission. Fifty-two patients, given ICP-targeted treatment at a neuro-intensive care unit, and 53 control cases, treated with conventional intensive care, were included. All patients received intensive care with me-chanical ventilation, sedation, antibiotics and corticosteroids according to current guidelines. ICP-targeted treatment was performed in the intervention group, aiming at ICP 50 mmHg. The mortality was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to controls, 5/52 (10%) versus 16/53 (30%). Furthermore, only 17 patients (32%) in the control group fully recovered, compared to 28 (54%) in the intervention group. Early neuro-intensive care using ICP-targeted therapy reduces mortality and improves the overall outcome in adult patients with ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission.

  5. Recording of intracranial pressure in conscious rats via telemetry.

    PubMed

    Guild, Sarah-Jane; McBryde, Fiona D; Malpas, Simon C

    2015-09-01

    Although cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is known to be fundamental in the control of normal brain function, there have been no previous long-term measurements in animal models. The aim of this study was to explore the stability and viability of long-term recordings of intracranial pressure (ICP) in freely moving rats via a telemetry device. We also developed a repeatable surgical approach with a solid-state pressure sensor at the tip of the catheter placed under the dura and in combination with arterial pressure (AP) measurement to enable the calculation of CPP. Telemeters with dual pressure catheters were implanted in Wistar rats to measure ICP and AP. We found that the signals were stable throughout the 28-day recording period with an average ICP value of 6 ± 0.8 mmHg. Significant light-dark differences were found in AP (3.1 ± 2.7 mmHg, P = 0.02) and HR (58 ± 12 beats/min, P = 0.003), but not ICP (0.3 ± 0.2 mmHg, P >0.05) or CPP (2.6 ± 2.8 mmHg, P > 0.05). Use of kaolin to induce hydrocephalus in several rats demonstrates the ability to measure changes in ICP throughout disease progression, validating this new solution for chronic measurement of ICP, CPP, and AP in conscious rats.

  6. Reducing false intracranial pressure alarms using morphological waveform features.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David; Hu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    False alarms produced by patient monitoring systems in intensive care units are a major issue that causes alarm fatigue, waste of human resources, and increased patient risks. While alarms are typically triggered by manually adjusted thresholds, the trend and patterns observed prior to threshold crossing are generally not used by current systems. This study introduces and evaluates, a smart alarm detection system for intracranial pressure signal (ICP) that is based on advanced pattern recognition methods. Models are trained in a supervised fashion from a comprehensive dataset of 4791 manually labeled alarm episodes extracted from 108 neurosurgical patients. The comparative analysis provided between spectral regression, kernel spectral regression, and support vector machines indicates the significant improvement of the proposed framework in detecting false ICP alarms in comparison to a threshold-based technique that is conventionally used. Another contribution of this work is to exploit an adaptive discretization to reduce the dimensionality of the input features. The resulting features lead to a decrease of 30% of false ICP alarms without compromising sensitivity.

  7. Analysis of intracranial pressure: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Schmitz, Erika M; Cusimano, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    The monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important tool in medicine for its ability to portray the brain's compliance status. The bedside monitor displays the ICP waveform and intermittent mean values to guide physicians in the management of patients, particularly those having sustained a traumatic brain injury. Researchers in the fields of engineering and physics have investigated various mathematical analysis techniques applicable to the waveform in order to extract additional diagnostic and prognostic information, although they largely remain limited to research applications. The purpose of this review is to present the current techniques used to monitor and interpret ICP and explore the potential of using advanced mathematical techniques to provide information about system perturbations from states of homeostasis. We discuss the limits of each proposed technique and we propose that nonlinear analysis could be a reliable approach to describe ICP signals over time, with the fractal dimension as a potential predictive clinically meaningful biomarker. Our goal is to stimulate translational research that can move modern analysis of ICP using these techniques into widespread practical use, and to investigate to the clinical utility of a tool capable of simplifying multiple variables obtained from various sensors.

  8. A randomised controlled trial of treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ball, Alexandra K; Howman, Andrew; Wheatley, Keith; Burdon, Michael A; Matthews, Timothy; Jacks, Andrew S; Lawden, Mark; Sivaguru, Arul; Furmston, Alexandra; Howell, Steven; Sharrack, Basil; Davies, M Brendan; Sinclair, Alexandra J; Clarke, Carl E

    2011-05-01

    The cause of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) remains unknown, and no consensus exists on how patients should be monitored and treated. Acetazolamide is a common treatment but has never been examined in a randomised controlled trial. The objectives of this pilot trial are to prospectively evaluate the use of acetazolamide, to explore various outcome measures and to inform the design of a definitive trial in IIH. Fifty patients were recruited from six centres over 23 months and randomised to receive acetazolamide (n = 25) or no acetazolamide (n = 25). Symptoms, body weight, visual function and health-related quality-of-life measures were recorded over a 12-month period. Recruited patients had typical features of mild IIH and most showed improvement, with 44% judged to have IIH in remission at the end of the trial. Difficulties with recruitment were highlighted as well as poor compliance with acetazolamide therapy (12 patients). A composite measure of IIH status was tested, and the strongest concordance with final disease status was seen with perimetry (Somers' D = 0.66) and optic disc appearance (D = 0.59). Based on the study data, a sample size of 320 would be required to demonstrate a 20% treatment effect in a substantive trial. Clinical trials in IIH require pragmatic design to involve sufficiently large numbers of patients. Future studies should incorporate weighted composite scores to reflect the relative importance of common outcome measures in IIH.

  9. Intracranial chordoma presenting as acute hemorrhage in a child: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kenneth A.; Bohnstedt, Bradley N.; Shah, Sanket U.; Abdulkader, Marwah M.; Bonnin, Jose M.; Ackerman, Laurie L.; Shaikh, Kashif A.; Kralik, Stephen F.; Shah, Mitesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare, slow-growing malignant neoplasms derived from remnants of the embryological notochord. Pediatric cases comprise only 5% of all chordomas, but more than half of the reported pediatric chordomas are intracranial. For patients of all ages, intracranial chordomas typically present with symptoms such as headaches and progressive neurological deficits occurring over several weeks to many years as they compress or invade local structures. There are only reports of these tumors presenting acutely with intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients. Case Description: A 10-year-old boy presented with acute onset of headache, emesis, and diplopia. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of brain were suspicious for a hemorrhagic mass located in the left petroclival region, compressing the ventral pons. The mass was surgically resected and demonstrated acute intratumoral hemorrhage. Pathologic examination was consistent with chordoma. Conclusion: There are few previous reports of petroclival chordomas causing acute intracranial hemorrhage. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a petroclival chordoma presenting as acute intracranial hemorrhage in a pediatric patient. Although uncommon, it is important to consider chordoma when evaluating a patient of any age presenting with a hemorrhagic lesion of the clivus. PMID:25949851

  10. Association between extra- and intracranial calcifications of the internal carotid artery: a CBCT imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Aartman, I H A; Tsiklakis, K; van der Stelt, P; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the association between the extracranial and intracranial calcification depiction of the internal carotid artery (ICA), incidentally found in CBCT examinations in adults, and to discuss the conspicuous clinical implications. Methods: Out of a series of 1085 CBCT examinations, 705 CBCT scans were selected according to pre-defined criteria. The extra- and intracranial calcifications depicted along the course of the ICA were documented according to a comprehensive set of descriptive criteria. Results: In total, 799 findings were detected, 60.1% (n = 480) were intracranially and 39.9% (n = 319) were extracranially allocated. The χ2 test showed associations between all variables (p < 0.001). Also, most of the combinations of variables showed statistically significant results in the McNemar's test (p < 0.001). Conclusions: We found that a significant correlation exists between extra- and intracranial calcifications of the ICA. It is clear that in cases of the presence of a calcification in the ICA extracranially, the artery's intracranial portion has an increased risk of showing the same findings. CBCT imaging is widely used as a diagnostic tool, thus, our results contribute to the identification of a subgroup of patients who should undergo further medical evaluation of the atherosclerosis of the ICAs. PMID:25690425

  11. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Facilitating Surgical Resection of Infantile Massive Intracranial Immature Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Takahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihito; Shirase, Tomoyuki; Yukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeichi, Yasuhiro; Yamazoe, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Immature teratoma (IMT) is the most frequent histological subtype of infantile intracranial teratoma, the most common congenital brain tumor. IMT contains incompletely differentiated components resembling fetal tissues. Infantile intracranial IMT has a dismal prognosis, because it is often inoperable due to its massive size and high vascularity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to be effective in decreasing tumor volume and vascularity to facilitate surgical resection in other types of infantile brain tumors. However, only one recent case report described the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for infantile intracranial IMT in the literature, even though it is common entity with a poor prognosis in infants. Here, we describe the case of a 2-month-old male infant with a very large intracranial IMT. Maximal surgical resection was first attempted but was unsuccessful because of severe intraoperative hemorrhage. Neoadjuvant carboplatin and etoposide (CARE) chemotherapy was then administered with the aim of shrinking and devascularizing the tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size did not decrease, but intraoperative blood loss significantly decreased and near-total resection was achieved by the second and third surgery. The patient underwent adjuvant CARE chemotherapy and has been alive for 3 years after surgery without tumor regrowth. Even when neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not decrease tumor volume of infantile intracranial IMT, surgical resection should be tried because chemotherapy can facilitate surgical resection and improve clinical outcome by reducing tumor vascularity. PMID:27039944

  12. Prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis in Iranian patients with acute ischemic stroke using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Abdolhamid; Niknam, Leila; Izadi, Sadegh; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of intracranial artery stenosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke in Iran. Methods: A total of 169 patients with acute ischemic stroke were eligible to participate and were enrolled in this study from January 2012 to February 2013. All the patients were admitted to the Nemazee ‎Hospital, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. They underwent transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography. Mean flow velocity (MFV) of basilar artery, vertebral artery, middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA), and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) were evaluated. Results: A mean of patients’ age was 67.80 ± 8.14 years. There were 83 men (49.1%) and 86 women (50.9%). Overall, 43 patients (25.4%), with a mean age of 66.7 ± 6.2 years, had intracranial stenosis. The number of men and women with intracranial stenosis was comparable (52.4% men vs. 47.6% women). Hypertension (P < 0.001), hyperlipidemia (P < 0.001), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (P < 0.001) were major risk factors for intracranial stenosis. Conclusion: The prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke is 25.4% which is comparable with previous reports from Iran and other Middle East countries. PMID:27648174

  13. Intradiploic epidermoid cyst with intracranial hypertension syndrome: Report of two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Holguin, J.C.; Medélez-Borbonio, R.; Quintero-Lopez, E.; García-González, U.; Gómez-Amador, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intradiploic epidermoid intracranial cysts (IEIC) derive from ectodermal cells and are covered with stratified squamous epithelium. They are extremely rare, and most common locations are in the occipital, frontal and parietal bones. They have a very slow growth and can be asymptomatic until becoming evident by the deformation produced. The treatment is based on the removal of the lesion, and subsequent histopathological confirmation. Presentation of case Two cases are reported, with intracranial hypertension syndrome, which is very uncommon because of the slow growth of this type of pathology; however, decompensations occurring in the space-occupying lesions at intracranial level explain this type of clinical presentation. Discussion The most common presentation of intracranial intradiploic epidermoid cysts (IEIC) is asymptomatically, which is made evident by the prominence at the level of the soft tissues and then presenting less frequently local pain and cephalea; rarely the size of the lesion can cause focal neurological signs. Conclusion These benign lesions, although they are of low incidence, are seen very rarely in intradiploic locations and above all, of significant size, may produce significant mass effect in patients, which was initially tolerated because of its slow growth, however, they may become decompensate and cause intracranial hypertension syndrome. PMID:26433925

  14. Primary intracranial and spinal hydatidosis: a retrospective study of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kun; Luo, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Ting-Rong; Wen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyse the epidemiological characteristics, clinical symptoms, radiological aspects, treatments, and outcomes of primary central nervous system (CNS) hydatidosis and compare our results with those observed for secondary intracranial hydatidosis. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 21 cases of primary CNS hydatid cysts operated on at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between 1996 and 2010. Results Of the 21 primary cases, the vast majority were intracranial hydatidosis patients (20 cases, 95.24%). Only one patient had spinal hydatidosis. Unlike previously published reports, we found that intracranial hydatid cysts were more common in adults (80.96%) than in children (19.04%), with a slight male predominance (M/F  =  1.1). All symptoms, including vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs, resulted from the increased intracranial pressure, which was closely associated with the cyst location. For the spinal hydatidosis patient, the primary symptom of back pain was indicative of spinal cord compression syndrome. All cysts in the 21 primary cases were pathologically similar. The recurrence percentage was 28% over 12 years. Two patients with multiple intracranial hydatid cysts died due to foramen magnum herniation. Conclusion Despite imaging and therapeutic advances, CNS hydatidosis remains difficult to treat, and severe complications and the high incidence of recurrence result in unsatisfactory outcomes. PMID:23683329

  15. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery as a Therapeutic Strategy for Intracranial Sarcomatous Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Thomas; Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Monaco, Edward A.; Flickinger, John C.; Kofler, Julia; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the indication and outcomes for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) in the care of patients with intracranial sarcomatous metastases. Methods and Materials: Data from 21 patients who underwent radiosurgery for 60 sarcomatous intracranial metastases (54 parenchymal and 6 dural-based) were studied. Nine patients had radiosurgery for solitary tumors and 12 for multiple tumors. The primary pathology was metastatic leiomyosarcoma (4 patients), osteosarcoma (3 patients), soft-tissue sarcoma (5 patients), chondrosarcoma (2 patients), alveolar soft part sarcoma (2 patients), and rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, liposarcoma, neurofibrosarcoma, and synovial sarcoma (1 patient each). Twenty patients received multimodality management for their primary tumor, and 1 patient had no evidence of systemic disease. The mean tumor volume was 6.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.07-40.9 cm{sup 3}), and a median margin dose of 16 Gy was administered. Three patients had progressive intracranial disease despite fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS. Results: A local tumor control rate of 88% was achieved (including patients receiving boost, up-front, and salvage SRS). New remote brain metastases developed in 7 patients (33%). The median survival after diagnosis of intracranial metastasis was 16 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 61%. Conclusions: Gamma Knife radiosurgery was a well-tolerated and initially effective therapy in the management of patients with sarcomatous intracranial metastases. However, many patients, including those who also received fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy, developed progressive new brain disease.

  16. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with

  17. Assessment of intracranial metastases from neuroendocrine tumors/carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ragab Shalaby, Ahmed M.; Kazuei, Hoshi; Koichi, Honma; Naguib, Saeed; Al-Menawei, Lubna A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most common sites of origin for neuroendocrine carcinoma are gastrointestinal tract and its accessory glands, and lungs. Materials and Methods: One-hundred fifty cases diagnosed with metastatic brain lesions were retrieved from hospital records within 5 years. For these cases, the primary neoplasm, histopathological classification, metastasis, treatment, and fate all were studied. Results: Intracranial deposits were detected in 10%. The primary lesion was in the lungs in 87% of patients, and 1 patient in the breast and 1 in esophagus. Pathological classification of the primary lesion was Grade 2 (MIB-1: 3–20%) in 1 patient and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MIB-1: ≥21%) in 14 patients. The median period from onset of the primary lesion up to diagnosis of brain metastasis was 12.8 months. About 33% of patients had a single metastasis whereas 67% patients had multiple metastases. Brain metastasis was extirpated in 33% of patients. Stereotactic radiotherapy alone was administered in 20% of patients, and brain metastasis was favorably controlled in most of the patients with coadministration of cranial irradiation as appropriate. The median survival period from diagnosis of brain metastasis was 8.1 months. Conclusion: Most of patients with brain metastasis from neuroendocrine carcinoma showed the primary lesion in the lungs, and they had multiple metastases to the liver, lymph nodes, bones, and so forth at the time of diagnosis of brain metastasis. The guidelines for accurate diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma should be immediately established based on further analyses of those patients with brain metastasis. PMID:27365963

  18. Stereotactic proton beam therapy for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vernimmen, Frederik J.A.I. . E-mail: fv@sun.ac.za; Slabbert, Jacobus P.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Fredericks, Shaheeda

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypofractionated stereotactic proton therapy of predominantly large intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by analyzing retrospectively the results from a cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Since 1993, a total of 85 patients with vascular lesions have been treated. Of those, 64 patients fulfilled the criteria of having an arteriovenous malformation and sufficient follow-up. The AVMs were grouped by volume: <14 cc (26 patients) and {>=}14 cc (38 patients). Treatment was delivered with a fixed horizontal 200 MeV proton beam under stereotactic conditions, using a stereophotogrammetric positioning system. The majority of patients were hypofractionated (2 or 3 fractions), and the proton doses are presented as single-fraction equivalent cobalt Gray equivalent doses (SFEcGyE). The overall mean minimum target volume dose was 17.37 SFEcGyE, ranging from 10.38-22.05 SFEcGyE. Results: Analysis by volume group showed obliteration in 67% for volumes <14 cc and 43% for volumes {>=}14 cc. Grade IV acute complications were observed in 3% of patients. Transient delayed effects were seen in 15 patients (23%), becoming permanent in 3 patients. One patient also developed a cyst 8 years after therapy. Conclusions: Stereotactic proton beam therapy applied in a hypofractionated schedule allows for the safe treatment of large AVMs, with acceptable results. It is an alternative to other treatment strategies for large AVMs. AVMs are likely not static entities, but probably undergo vascular remodeling. Factors influencing angiogenesis could play a new role in a form of adjuvant therapy to improve on the radiosurgical results.

  19. Intracranial haemorrhage among a population of haemophilic patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Antunes, S V; Vicari, P; Cavalheiro, S; Bordin, J O

    2003-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in haemophilic patients. The overall incidence of ICH has been reported to range from 2.2% to 7.5% in patients with haemophilia. From 1987 to 2001, 401 haemophilic patients from the Serviço de Hemofilia, Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo were evaluated. The episodes of ICH were documented by CT scan and the anatomic location, clinical presentation, relationship to trauma and clinical factors, including the presence of HIV infection and the presence of inhibitor, were reviewed. Among 401 haemophilic patients, 45 ICH episodes in 35 (8.7%) patients with age ranging from 4 days to 49 years (mean 10.6 years) were observed. A history of recent trauma was documented in 24 (53.3%) cases. Seventeen (37.8%) episodes occurred in more than one site of bleeding, 12 (26.7%) were subdural, seven (15.5%) subarachnoid, four (8.9%) epidural, two (4.4%) intracerebral and one (2.2%) intraventricular. The most frequent symptoms were headache and drowsiness. All patients were submitted to replacement therapy and neurosurgical intervention was performed in eight (17.8%) patients. Despite the treatment, three (8.6%) haemophilia A patients died due to the ICH event and three presented late sequelae. The most important aspect of ICH management is the early replacement therapy in haemophilic patients. This prompt treatment will increase the chances of a better prognosis. Another impact measure consists in the administration of the deficient coagulation factor after every head trauma, even when considered minor.

  20. The relationship of intracranial venous pressure to hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, H D; Branch, C; Castro, M E

    1994-01-01

    Little is known about intracranial venous pressure in hydrocephalus. Recently, we reported that naturally occurring hydrocephalus in Beagle dogs was associated with an elevation in cortical venous pressure. We proposed that the normal pathway for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption includes transcapillary or transvenular absorption of CSF from the interstitial space and that the increase in cortical venous pressure is an initial event resulting in decreased absorption and subsequent hydrocephalus. Further analysis, however, suggests that increased cortical venous pressure reflects the effect of the failure of transvillus absorption with increase in CSF pressure on the venous pressure gradient between ventricle and cortex. Normally, the cortical venous pressure is maintained above CSF pressure by the Starling resistor effect of the lateral lacunae. A similar mechanism is absent in the deep venous system, and thus the pressure in the deep veins is similar to that in the dural sinuses. Decreased CSF absorption causes an increase in CSF pressure followed by an increase in cortical venous pressure without a similar increase in periventricular venous pressure. The periventricular CSF to venous (transparenchymal) pressure (TPP) gradient increases. In contrast, cortical vein pressure remains greater than CSF pressure (negative TPP). The elevated periventricular TPP gradient causes ventricular dilatation and decreased periventricular cerebral blood flow (CBF), a condition that persists even if the CSF pressure returns to normal, particularly if tissue elastance is lessened by tissue damage. If deep CBF is to be maintained, periventricular venous pressure must increase. Since the veins are in a continuum, cortical venous pressure will further increase above the CSF pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8194060

  1. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  2. Comparative study of novel endovascular treatment techniques for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantón, Gádor; Lasheras, Juan C.; Levy, David I.; Sparks, Steven R.

    2002-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are life-threatening vascular lesions, which are potentially treatable to avoid the consequences of their rupture. Current treatments, either surgical or endovascular, are all guided to reduce the hemodynamic forces acting on the aneurysm wall in an effort to minimize the risk of rupture. Surgical clipping is still the most used technique to treat this type of aneurysm but there is a continued demand for less invasive approaches. This has led to the development of several endovascular techniques. We report here a comparative study of the reduction in the hemodynamic stresses and the modification of the flow in the parent vessel resulting from the use of three different techniques. The first one consists of endosaccular packing with platinum coils (GDC, Target Therapeutics), which is already widely used but its long-term efficacy has not yet been determined. The second one consists of the embolization of the aneurismal sac with Onyx, a polymer which hardens when in contact with the blood (being developed by Micro Therapeutics, Inc.). The third one involves the packing of the sac with hydrocoils, platinum wires coated with a gel which quickly hydrates when in contact with blood (developed by MicroVention). A Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) system is used to measure in vitro the velocity field inside a model of an ACOM aneurysm (an aneurysm forming in the anterior communicating artery). Physiological accurate pulsatile flow conditions are input to the arterial model through a programmable pump. The measurements show that although all treatment techniques lead to a reduction in both normal and tangential shear stresses on the aneurismal sac, each one of them also leads to different modifications of the flow in the parent vessel which may have consequences related to potential for clotting. Comparison of the untreated aneurysm with the above three treated cases also showed that the characteristics of the wall shear stresses on the parent

  3. [Clinical picture and pathophysiology of elevated intracranial pressure].

    PubMed

    Jacobi, G; Klinter, D; Weiermann, G

    1988-01-01

    In 48 children who had raised intracranial pressure (icp) this was monitored continuously by an epidural route. Icp-values were correlated with other important parameters like the mean arterial pressure (map) and the early components of brainstem acoustic evoked responses (BAER). The results were as follows: 1. focal and multifocal brain lesions resulting in vasogenic brain edema have better prognosis than those morbid conditions causing cytotoxic edema. In the letter group the whole brain's metabolism is impaired, brainstem, cerebellum and spinal cord included. 2. by monitoring map and icp we are enabled to assess the cerebral perfusion pressure. If this value falls short of 20 Torr the duration of unconsciousness and the frequency of brainstem related symptoms increases as well as impairment of cranial nerves and cerebellar-extrapyramidal symptoms and mental handicaps in the long term course. 3. cerebral dysfunction and organic brain syndromes in general are not related to icp-increase. They resemble local brain damage, e.g. after contusions. 4. serial registration of BAER is a good aid in iatrogenic induced deep phenobarbital coma. If there are critical values of the perfusion pressure mainly the waves III and V of BAER have increased peak latencies and go flattened. This trend takes place slowly within hours or even days. Loss of the components III and V is prompted by an irreversible damage of the caudal brainstem. This finding after cytotoxic brain edema is even more relevant than after vasogenic edema. If the component loss III-V is bilateral dissociated brain death has to be anticipated. Some important issues of icp-pathophysiology are discussed according to the literature.

  4. Intracranial stenosis, cerebrovascular diseases, and cognitive impairment in chinese.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Saini, Monica; Tan, Chuen Seng; Catindig, Joseree A; Dong, Yan Hong; Holandez, Rachelle L; Niessen, Wiro J; Vrooman, Henri A; Ting, Eric; Wong, Tien Yin; Chen, Christopher; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ikram, Mohammad K

    2015-01-01

    Extracranial carotid artery disease has been shown to be related to cognitive deficits. However, limited data are available on intracranial stenosis (ICS) and cognitive impairment. We investigate the association between ICS and cognitive impairment in Chinese. Subjects (n=278), recruited from the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore Study, underwent comprehensive clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including 3-dimensional-time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cognitive function was expressed as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia and dementia were diagnosed according to internationally accepted diagnostic criteria. Linear and logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, education, vascular risk factors, and other MRI markers. A total of 29 (10.4%) persons had ICS on MRA, which was significantly associated with both composite cognitive Z-scores [mean difference in Z-score, presence vs. absence of ICS: -0.37 (95% confidence interval: -0.63, -0.12)] and specific domains including executive function, language, visuomotor speed, verbal memory, and visual memory. ICS was also related to significant cognitive impairment (odds ratio: 5.10 [1.24 to 21.02]). With respect to other MRI markers, adjusted for the presence of lacunar infarcts, the associations of ICS with both composite and domain-specific Z-scores, and significant cognitive impairment became nonsignificant; however, adjustment for other MRI markers did not alter these associations. In this Chinese population, presence of ICS was associated with cognitive impairment independent of vascular risk factors. These associations may be mediated through the presence of infarcts.

  5. Morphology Parameters for Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sujan; Tremmel, Markus; Mocco, J; Kim, Minsuok; Yamamoto, Junichi; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Meng, Hui

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to identify image-based morphological parameters that correlate with human intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture. METHODS For 45 patients with terminal or sidewall saccular IAs (25 unruptured, 20 ruptured), three-dimensional geometries were evaluated for a range of morphological parameters. In addition to five previously studied parameters (aspect ratio, aneurysm size, ellipticity index, nonsphericity index, and undulation index), we defined three novel parameters incorporating the parent vessel geometry (vessel angle, aneurysm [inclination] angle, and [aneurysm-to-vessel] size ratio) and explored their correlation with aneurysm rupture. Parameters were analyzed with a two-tailed independent Student's t test for significance; significant parameters (P < 0.05) were further examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Additionally, receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed on each parameter. RESULTS Statistically significant differences were found between mean values in ruptured and unruptured groups for size ratio, undulation index, nonsphericity index, ellipticity index, aneurysm angle, and aspect ratio. Logistic regression analysis further revealed that size ratio (odds ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.03−1.92) and undulation index (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08−2.11) had the strongest independent correlation with ruptured IA. From the receiver operating characteristic analysis, size ratio and aneurysm angle had the highest area under the curve values of 0.83 and 0.85, respectively. CONCLUSION Size ratio and aneurysm angle are promising new morphological metrics for IA rupture risk assessment. Because these parameters account for vessel geometry, they may bridge the gap between morphological studies and more qualitative location-based studies. PMID:18797347

  6. Postural effects on intracranial pressure: modeling and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Qvarlander, Sara; Sundström, Nina; Malm, Jan; Eklund, Anders

    2013-11-01

    The physiological effect of posture on intracranial pressure (ICP) is not well described. This study defined and evaluated three mathematical models describing the postural effects on ICP, designed to predict ICP at different head-up tilt angles from the supine ICP value. Model I was based on a hydrostatic indifference point for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system, i.e., the existence of a point in the system where pressure is independent of body position. Models II and III were based on Davson's equation for CSF absorption, which relates ICP to venous pressure, and postulated that gravitational effects within the venous system are transferred to the CSF system. Model II assumed a fully communicating venous system, and model III assumed that collapse of the jugular veins at higher tilt angles creates two separate hydrostatic compartments. Evaluation of the models was based on ICP measurements at seven tilt angles (0-71°) in 27 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. ICP decreased with tilt angle (ANOVA: P < 0.01). The reduction was well predicted by model III (ANOVA lack-of-fit: P = 0.65), which showed excellent fit against measured ICP. Neither model I nor II adequately described the reduction in ICP (ANOVA lack-of-fit: P < 0.01). Postural changes in ICP could not be predicted based on the currently accepted theory of a hydrostatic indifference point for the CSF system, but a new model combining Davson's equation for CSF absorption and hydrostatic gradients in a collapsible venous system performed well and can be useful in future research on gravity and CSF physiology.

  7. A dimensionless parameter for classifying hemodynamics in intracranial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a disease with high rates of mortality. Given the risk associated with the aneurysm surgery, quantifying the likelihood of aneurysm rupture is essential. There are many risk factors that could be implicated in the rupture of an aneurysm. However, the most important factors correlated to the IA rupture are hemodynamic factors such as wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) which are affected by the IA flows. Here, we carry out three-dimensional high resolution simulations on representative IA models with simple geometries to test a dimensionless number (first proposed by Le et al., ASME J Biomech Eng, 2010), denoted as An number, to classify the flow mode. An number is defined as the ratio of the time takes the parent artery flow transports across the IA neck to the time required for vortex ring formation. Based on the definition, the flow mode is vortex if An>1 and it is cavity if An<1. We show that the specific definition of Le et al. works for sidewall but needs to be modified for bifurcation aneurysms. In addition, we show that this classification works on three-dimensional geometries reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography of human subjects. Furthermore, we verify the correlation of IA flow mode and WSS/OSI on the human subject IA. This work was supported partly by the NIH grant R03EB014860, and the computational resources were partly provided by CCR at UB. We thank Prof. Hui Meng and Dr. Jianping Xiang for providing us the database of aneurysms and helpful discussions.

  8. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  9. The Pupillary Light Reflex in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason C.; Moss, Heather E.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) on rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflexes (PLRs). Methods Pupillary light reflexes elicited by full-field, brief-flash stimuli were recorded in 13 IIH patients and 13 normal controls. Subjects were dark-adapted for 10 minutes and the PLR was recorded in response to short-wavelength flashes (0.001 cd/m2: rod condition; 450 cd/m2: melanopsin condition). Subjects were then exposed to a rod-suppressing field and 10 cd/m2 long-wavelength flashes were presented (cone condition). Pupillary light reflexes were quantified as the maximum transient constriction (rod and cone conditions) and the post-illumination pupil constriction (melanopsin condition), relative to the baseline pupil size. Diagnostic power was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The IIH patients had significantly smaller PLRs under the melanopsin (P < 0.001) and rod (P = 0.04) paradigms; a trend for reduced cone-mediated PLRs was also found (P = 0.08). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated areas under the curves (AUC) of 0.83 (melanopsin-meditated; P = 0.001), 0.71 (rod-mediated; P = 0.07), and 0.77 (cone-mediated; P = 0.02). The AUC (0.90, P < 0.001), sensitivity (85%), and specificity (85%) were high for ROC analysis performed on the mean of the rod, cone, and melanopsin PLRs. Conclusions Pupillary light reflex reductions in IIH patients indicate compromised RGC function. PLR measurement, particularly under rod- and melanopsin-mediated conditions, may be a useful adjunct to standard clinical measures of visual function in IIH. PMID:26746015

  10. Intracranial Self-Stimulation to Evaluate Abuse Potential of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence L.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is a behavioral procedure in which operant responding is maintained by pulses of electrical brain stimulation. In research to study abuse-related drug effects, ICSS relies on electrode placements that target the medial forebrain bundle at the level of the lateral hypothalamus, and experimental sessions manipulate frequency or amplitude of stimulation to engender a wide range of baseline response rates or response probabilities. Under these conditions, drug-induced increases in low rates/probabilities of responding maintained by low frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation are interpreted as an abuse-related effect. Conversely, drug-induced decreases in high rates/probabilities of responding maintained by high frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation can be interpreted as an abuse-limiting effect. Overall abuse potential can be inferred from the relative expression of abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects. The sensitivity and selectivity of ICSS to detect abuse potential of many classes of abused drugs is similar to the sensitivity and selectivity of drug self-administration procedures. Moreover, similar to progressive-ratio drug self-administration procedures, ICSS data can be used to rank the relative abuse potential of different drugs. Strengths of ICSS in comparison with drug self-administration include 1) potential for simultaneous evaluation of both abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects, 2) flexibility for use with various routes of drug administration or drug vehicles, 3) utility for studies in drug-naive subjects as well as in subjects with controlled levels of prior drug exposure, and 4) utility for studies of drug time course. Taken together, these considerations suggest that ICSS can make significant contributions to the practice of abuse potential testing. PMID:24973197

  11. Left atrial appendage occlusion in atrial fibrillation after intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Solveig; Zugck, Christian; Krumsdorf, Ulrike; Rizos, Timolaos; Rauch, Geraldine; Geis, Nicolas; Hardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: In an explorative, prospective, single-center, observational study, LAAO was performed in patients with previous ICH and AF using the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug device. Risks of ischemic strokes and hemorrhagic complications were estimated using the CHA2DS2Vasc score and the HAS-BLED score. Before and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after the procedure, clinical status and complications were recorded. Major complications were predefined as periprocedural stroke, death, pericardial effusion, and device embolism. Results: LAAO was performed in 20 patients. Based on CHA2DS2Vasc score (mean 4.5 ± 1.4) and HAS-BLED score (mean 4.7 ± 1.0), annual risks of stroke and hemorrhagic complications were 4.0%–6.7% and 8.7%–12.5%, respectively. No patient had a procedure-related complication. Minor postprocedural complications were observed in 4/20 patients (2 inguinal hematoma, 1 self-limiting asystole, and 1 thrombus formation on device). No ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke occurred during a mean follow-up of 13.6 ± 8.2 months. Conclusions: In this first study of LAAO in patients with previous ICH, LAAO appears feasible and safe. A larger, controlled trial is needed to assess the efficacy and safety of the procedure compared to other preventive measures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with a history of previous ICH and AF, percutaneous LAAO is safe and feasible. PMID:24319042

  12. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, polycystic-ovary syndrome, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Aregawi, Dawit; Goldenberg, Naila; Golnik, Karl C; Sieve, Luann; Wang, Ping

    2005-02-01

    We studied thrombophilia, hypofibrinolysis, and polycystic-ovary syndrome (PCOS) in 65 women consecutively referred because of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) as a means of better understanding the origin of IIH, with the ultimate goal of developing novel medical therapies for IIH. Our hypothesis: IIH results in part from inadequate drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resulting from thrombotic obstruction to CSF resorption-outflow, favored by thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. We conducted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and assessed serologic coagulation measures in 65 women (64 of them white) with IIH, PCR in 102 healthy white female controls (72 children, 30 age-matched adults), and serologic measures in the 30 adults. Of the 65 patients, 37 (57%) were found to have PCOS; 16 (43%) were obese (BMI > or = 30 to < 40), and 19 (51%) were extremely obese (BMI > or = 40). Of the 65 women with IIH, 25 (38%) were homozygous for the thrombophilic C677T MTHFR mutation, compared with 14% of controls (14/102) ( P = .0002). Thrombophilic high concentrations of factor VIII (>150%) were present in 9 of 65 (14%) IIH cases, compared with 0 of 30 controls (0%) (Fisher's p [p f ] = .053). An increased concentration of lipoprotein A (> or = 35 mg/dL), associated with hypofibrinolysis, was present in 19 of 65 IIH cases (29%), compared with 3 of 30 controls (10%) (p f = .039). IIH occurred in 18 of 65 IIH patients taking estrogen-progestin contraceptives (28%), in 6 patients taking hormone-replacement therapy (9%), and in 5 pregnant subjects (8%). We speculate that PCOS, associated with obesity and extreme obesity, is a treatable promoter of IIH. We also speculate that if thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis and subsequent thrombosis are associated with reduced CSF resorption in the arachnoid villi of the brain, thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis-often exacerbated by thrombophilic exogenous estrogens, pregnancy, or the paradoxical hyperestrogenemia of PCOS-are treatable

  13. The effect of furosemide on intracranial pressure and hemorrhage in preterm rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, A V; Greene, C S; Hornig, G W; Zavala, L M; Welch, K

    1989-05-01

    The hypothesis that intracranial hypotension due to excessive postnatal fluid loss places the premature infant at risk for germinal matrix and intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) was tested in preterm rabbits delivered at 28 and 29 days of gestation (term 32 days). Furosemide administered to newborn pups induced a diuresis that resulted in a 11% to 22% loss in body weight and a concomitant decline in muscle water (13% to 16%) and sodium (18% to 21%). Paradoxically, no change occurred in the water or electrolyte content of the brain even though cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue pressure, but not blood pressure, declined. These changes were absent in littermates treated with saline. Microscopic examination of brain sections revealed a greater incidence of intracranial hemorrhage, particularly in the germinal matrix and choroid plexus, in furosemide-treated than in saline-treated preterm rabbit pups. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that intracranial hypotension promotes the incidence of GH-IVH in preterm animals.

  14. Development of a noninvasive technique for the measurement of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, T.; Shuer, L. M.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamics are important for understanding adjustments to altered gravity. Previous flight observations document significant facial edema during exposure to microgravity, which suggests that ICP is elevated during microgravity. However, there are no experimental results obtained during space flight, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed and refined a noninvasive technique to measure intracranial pressure noninvasively. The technique is based upon detecting skull movements of a few micrometers in association with altered intracranial pressure. We reported that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with the pulsation of ICP in cadavera. In normal operations, however, we place a transducer on the scalp. Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the PPLL technique picks up cutaneous pulsation. The purpose of the present study was therefore to show that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with cardiac cycles in vivo.

  15. Ocular manifestations of intracranial germinomas: three cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Wei; Dai, Yan-Li; Qiu, Huai-Yu; Wei, Shi-Hui

    2012-08-01

    Intracranial germinomas are malignant neoplasms of gonadal origin, which have some features in terms of age, sex, and clinical manifestations. They mainly occur in children and adolescents. Patients with intracranial germinomas mainly manifest with hypothalamic pituitary axis dysfunction and/or compression syndromes. Visual disturbance is one of the most significant clinical presentations, which is mainly caused by tumor cell infiltration into the optic pathway. In this article, we present three cases of patient with intracranial germinoma to analyze the ocular manifestations. All the three patients presented with endocrine symptoms in the early stage and with visual disturbances (including decreased visual acuity and visual field defects) later. In general, germinoma is diagnosed by its characteristic radiological appearance, supported by tumor markers and/or stereotactic biopsy. However, decisive diagnoses were established when ocular manifestations were presented. A suspicion for germinoma should be considered, when young patients manifest visual disturbances accompanied by endocrine symptoms.

  16. [Non-invasive determination of intracranial pressure. Physiological basis and practical procedure].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Schwickerath, R; Stodtmeister, R; Hartmann, K

    2004-12-01

    It has been shown in some recently published papers that the intracranial pressure can be determined by dynamometric measurement of the outflow pressure of the central retinal vein (VOP). The knowledge gained by the basic experiments of Baurmann in 1925 has been forgotten by the ophthalmic community for many years. In this paper the basic phenomena of venous collapse are outlined which are fundamentally different from the biomechanics of the arterial collapse phenomenon observed by ophthalmodynamometry. A practical guideline is given for the dynamometric measurement of venous outflow pressure which equals the intracranial pressure. Performing dynamometry of the central retinal vein enables the ophthalmologist to determine intracranial pressure in a non-invasive way.

  17. Optical coherence tomography of the intracranial vasculature and Wingspan stent in a patient

    PubMed Central

    Given, Curtis Alden; Ramsey, Christian Norman; Attizzani, Guilherme Ferragut; Jones, Michael R; Brooks, William H; Bezerra, Hiram G; Costa, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 67-year-old man with medically refractory vertebrobasilar insufficiency and short segment occlusions of the intracranial vertebral arteries was treated with angioplasty and stent placement. Fifteen hours after the procedure the patient developed symptoms of posterior fossa ischemia and repeat angiography showed thrombus formation within the stent which was treated with thrombolytic and aggressive antiplatelet therapy. Angiography revealed lysis of the clot, but concerns regarding the mechanism of the thrombotic phenomenon prompted frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) assessment. FDOCT provided excellent visualization of the stent and vessel wall interactions, as well as excluding residual flow-limiting stenosis, obviating the need for further intervention. The potential utility of FDOCT in the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease and additional intracranial applications are discussed. PMID:24835808

  18. Method and Apparatus for Non-Invasive Measurement of Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring intracranial pressure. In one embodiment, the method comprises the steps of generating an information signal that comprises components (e.g., pulsatile changes and slow changes) that are related to intracranial pressure and blood pressure, generating a reference signal comprising pulsatile components that are solely related to blood pressure, processing the information and reference signals to determine the pulsatile components of the information signal that have generally the same phase as the pulsatile components of the reference signal, and removing from the information signal the pulsatile components determined to have generally the same phase as the pulsatile components of the reference signal so as to provide a data signal having components wherein substantially all of the components are related to intracranial pressure.

  19. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  20. Successful percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery stenosis using intravascular ultrasound virtual histology.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Katsutoshi; Taoka, Toshiaki; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Myouchin, Kaoru; Wada, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Fukusumi, Akio; Iwasaki, Satoru; Kurokawa, Shinichiro; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2007-06-01

    This is the first report of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of an intracranial artery applying intravascular ultrasound virtual histology (IVUS-VH), which has been recently developed for tissue characterization of coronary artery plaque. We report a case of successful PTA and stenting for symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery stenosis using IVUS-VH.

  1. Subpeak regional analysis of intracranial pressure waveform morphology based on cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in the cerebral aqueduct and prepontine cistern.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert B; Baldwin, Kevin; Vespa, Paul; Bergsneider, Marvin; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse waveform morphology and selected hydrodynamic metrics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement using a novel method for ICP pulse pressure regional analysis based on the Morphological Clustering and Analysis of Continuous Intracranial Pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm.

  2. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt complications in hydrocephalus patients with intracranial tumors: an analysis of relevant risk factors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Kesava; Bollam, Papireddy; Caldito, Gloria; Willis, Brian; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Patients with intracranial tumors are predisposed to persistent hydrocephalus, often requiring a permanent CSF diversion procedure with shunts. This study reviews the long-term experience with ventriculoperitoneal shunts for the management of hydrocephalus in patients with intracranial tumors. Patients with intracranial tumors who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for hydrocephalus from October 1990 to October 2009 were included in this study. During the 19-year period, medical charts, operative reports, imaging studies, and clinical follow- up evaluations were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively for all patients. A total of 187 intracranial tumor patients with hydrocephalus were included. The median follow up was 391 days. Malignant tumors were present in 40% of the patients. Overall shunt failure was 27.8%. Single shunt revision occurred in 13% of the patients and 14% had multiple shunt revision. Tumor histology, age and a procedure prior to shunt placement (ventriculostomy/Ommaya reservoirs) were significantly associated with the shunt revisions. Shunt system replacement and proximal shunt complication were significantly attributed to multiple shunt revisions. The overall shunt revision within 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 5 years was 17.7%, 18.7%, 19.8% and 24.1%, respectively. The results of the study demonstrate that VP shunting is an effective for the management of hydrocephalus in patients with intracranial tumors. The overall incidence of shunt revision was 27.8%. Age, tumor histology, and a procedure prior to shunt placement (ventriculostomy/Ommaya reservoirs) were significantly associated with the shunt revisions. Additional studies using minimally invasive techniques are being explored for the management of hydrocephalus in patients with intracranial tumors.

  3. Wall-to-lumen ratio of intracranial arteries measured by indocyanine green angiography

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Daichi; Shojima, Masaaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Imai, Hideaki; Nomura, Seiji; Saito, Toki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) is an important parameter in vascular medicine because it indicates the character of vascular wall as well as the degree of stenosis. Despite the advances in medical imaging technologies, it is still difficult to measure the thin-walled normal intracranial arteries, and the reports on the WLR of normal intracranial artery are limited. It might be possible to calculate the WLR using the indocyanine green (ICG) angiography, which is used to observe intracranial vessels during microsurgery. Purpose: To evaluate the WLR of normal intracranial arteries using ICG angiography. Materials and Methods: From the three cases in which ICG angiography was recorded with a ruler during microsurgery, 20 measurement points were chosen for the analysis. The ICG was injected intravenously with a dose of 0.2 mg/kg, and the vessels were inspected at high magnification using an operating microscope equipped with near-infrared illumination system. The vessel outer diameter and the luminal diameter were measured using the images before and after the ICG arrival based on the pixel ratio method using a ruler as reference, respectively. The WLR was calculated as 0.5 × (vessel outer diameter − vessel luminal diameter). Results: The WLR (mean ± standard deviation) of normal intracranial arteries was 0.086 ± 0.022. The WLR tended to be high in small arteries. Conclusion: The WLR of normal intracranial arteries calculated using ICG angiography was consistent with the WLR reported in the previous reports based on human autopsy.

  4. Are Medications Involved in Vision and Intracranial Pressure Changes Seen in Spaceflight?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been reported that intracranial pressure (ICP) and/or vision changes, have occurred in a number of long duration astronauts. Some crewmembers have experienced changes in their vision after long-duration spaceflight on the ISS. These impairments include visual performance decrements, development of cotton-wool spots or choroidal folds, optic-disc edema, optic nerve sheath distention, and/or posterior globe flattening with varying degrees of severity and permanence. These changes are now used to define the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The reasons for these potentially debilitating medical issues are currently unknown. The potential role of administered medications has not yet been examined, but it is known that many medications can have side effects that are similar to VIIP symptoms. Some medications raise blood pressure, which can affect intracranial pressure. Many medications that act in the central nervous system can affect intracranial pressures and/or vision. About 40% of the medications in the ISS kit are known to cause side effects involving changes in blood pressure, intracranial pressure and/or vision. For this reason, we proposed an investigation of the potential relationship between ISS medications and their risk of causing or exacerbating VIIP-like symptoms. The purpose of this study was to use medication usage records for affected and unaffected crew to determine if use of particular medications seemed to correlate with VIIP occurrence or severity. Due to the limited amount of data available from crewmembers, we added a large terrestrial data set to this study. Using publically available FDA Adverse Event Reports (FDA AERs) from many medications and medication classes, we identified increased reports of vision or intracranial pressure changes in several medication categories, which are presumed to be the most likely medications that could be involved in VIIP occurrence or severity.

  5. Wall-to-lumen ratio of intracranial arteries measured by indocyanine green angiography

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Daichi; Shojima, Masaaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Imai, Hideaki; Nomura, Seiji; Saito, Toki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) is an important parameter in vascular medicine because it indicates the character of vascular wall as well as the degree of stenosis. Despite the advances in medical imaging technologies, it is still difficult to measure the thin-walled normal intracranial arteries, and the reports on the WLR of normal intracranial artery are limited. It might be possible to calculate the WLR using the indocyanine green (ICG) angiography, which is used to observe intracranial vessels during microsurgery. Purpose: To evaluate the WLR of normal intracranial arteries using ICG angiography. Materials and Methods: From the three cases in which ICG angiography was recorded with a ruler during microsurgery, 20 measurement points were chosen for the analysis. The ICG was injected intravenously with a dose of 0.2 mg/kg, and the vessels were inspected at high magnification using an operating microscope equipped with near-infrared illumination system. The vessel outer diameter and the luminal diameter were measured using the images before and after the ICG arrival based on the pixel ratio method using a ruler as reference, respectively. The WLR was calculated as 0.5 × (vessel outer diameter − vessel luminal diameter). Results: The WLR (mean ± standard deviation) of normal intracranial arteries was 0.086 ± 0.022. The WLR tended to be high in small arteries. Conclusion: The WLR of normal intracranial arteries calculated using ICG angiography was consistent with the WLR reported in the previous reports based on human autopsy. PMID:27695538

  6. Design of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, Scott; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery are at high risk of recurrent stroke on usual medical management, suggesting the need for alternative therapies for this disease. Methods The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial is an ongoing, randomized, multicenter, two-arm trial that will determine whether intracranial angioplasty and stenting adds benefit to aggressive medical management alone for preventing the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days) during a mean follow-up of 2 years in patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Aggressive medical management in both arms consists of aspirin 325 mg per day, clopidogrel 75mg per day for 90 days after enrollment, intensive risk factor management primarily targeting systolic blood pressure < 140 mm Hg (< 130 mm Hg in diabetics) and low density cholesterol < 70 mg / dl, and a lifetsyle modification program. The sample size required todetect a 35% reduction in the rate of the primary endpoint from angioplasty and stenting based on the log-rank test with an alpha of 0.05, 80% power, and adjusting for a 2% loss to follow-up and 5% crossover from the medical to the stenting arm is 382 patients per group. Conclusion This is the first randomized trial to compare intracranial angioplasty and stenting with medical therapy and to incorporate intensive management of multiple risk factors and a lifestyle modification program in the study design. Hopefully, the results of the trial will lead to more effective therapy for this high-risk disease. PMID:21729789

  7. The Role of Fluid Dynamics and Inflammation in Intracranial Aneurysm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turjman, Alexis S.; Turjman, Francis; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of inflammation as a key mediator of aneurysmogenesis provides new opportunities to understand the processes underlying development of intracranial aneurysms (IA). Inflammation unifies the triptych influences of alterations in local flow, mechanical properties of the wall and biochemical mediators and opens new avenues for building robust predictive tools. This review discusses the impact of the inflammatory cascade during the formation of intracranial aneurysms, and its associated morphological, structural and mechanical changes especially in the setting of flow-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24446407

  8. Are Medications Involved in Vision and Intracranial Pressure Changes Seen in Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.

    2015-01-01

    The Food and Drug Association Adverse Event Reports (FDA AER) from 2009-2011 were used to create a database from millions of known and suspected medication-related adverse events among the general public. Vision changes, sometimes associated with intracranial pressure changes (VIIP), have been noted in some long duration crewmembers. Changes in vision and blood pressure (which can subsequently affect intracranial pressure) are fairly common side effects of medications. The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of medication involvement in crew VIIP symptoms.

  9. Early evolution of neurological surgery: conquering increased intracranial pressure, infection, and blood loss.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Jennifer R; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spencer, Dennis D

    2005-04-15

    At the end of the 19th century, the early evolution of the specialty of neurological surgery was restricted by complications related to infection, increased intracranial pressure, and excessive intraoperative blood loss. These complications often caused mortality rates of 30 to 50%. An improved understanding of pathophysiological factors involved in increased intracranial pressure, along with meticulous surgical techniques learned from William Halsted, allowed Harvey Cushing to increase the safety of neurosurgical procedures that were then in their infancy. Cushing's later development of the "silver clip" and incorporation of electrosurgical techniques facilitated safe resection of brain tumors previously assumed to be inoperable. These pivotal accomplishments paved the way for the establishment of our specialty.

  10. Intracranial tuberculoma in children: a new look at an old problem.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, N C; van Eys, J; Baram, T Z; Starke, J R

    1988-10-01

    Intracranial tuberculoma has become a rare cause of space-occupying intracranial lesions in childhood, but it must still be considered in the differential diagnosis. Tuberculosis remains a significant disease in developing countries and in the United States, and tuberculoma is a well known presentation of childhood tuberculosis. This diagnosis must be considered especially in persons traveling or living in developing countries and in immigrants from third-world areas. We report three cases of tuberculoma in children seen during one year at our institutions to illustrate the need for continued suspicion. We summarize the clinical presentation and current treatment recommendations and review the available literature.

  11. Intracranial Vessel Wall MRI: An Emerging Technique With a Multitude of Uses.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Joanna D; Mikulis, David J; Mandell, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (VW-MRI) can be a useful diagnostic technique in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Unlike conventional vascular imaging that depicts only the vessel lumen, VW-MRI allows visualization of pathology in the arterial wall itself. The ability to image the arterial wall is useful, as many pathological processes reside within the wall and only secondarily affect the lumen. In this review, we will present 6 clinical uses for intracranial wall imaging to highlight the versatility of this technique.

  12. Noninvasive Intracranial Volume and Pressure Measurements Using Ultrasound (Head and Spinal)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    Prevention of secondary brain injuries following head trauma can be accomplished most easily when intracranial pressure (ICP) is monitored. However, current measurement techniques are invasive and thus not practical in the combat environment. The Pulsed Phase Lock Loop device, which was developed and patented by consultants Drs. Yost and Cantrell, uses a unique, noninvasive ultrasonic phase comparison method to measure slight changes in cranial volume which occur with changes in ICP. Year two studies included whole body head-up and head-down tilting effects on intracranial compliance and pressure in six healthy volunteers.

  13. [Evidence-based intensive care treatment of intracranial hypertension after traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Pannen, B H J; Loop, T

    2005-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs frequently and is associated with a poor prognosis. Severe TBI results in substantial disability or death in more than 40% of cases. The major aim of treatment of these patients is to minimize secondary brain injury and in this respect, the prevention of intracranial hypertension plays a key role. In addition to surgical approaches, various conservative treatment options exist, such as the use of osmodiuretics, barbiturates, or corticosteroids, hyperventilation as well as induced therapeutic hypothermia. This review analyzes these treatment options and the therapeutic goals of lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients after TBI using evidence-based criteria, and provides recommendations for clinical practice.

  14. Intracranial angiolipoma as cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Saraiva, P; Goulão, A

    2005-02-01

    A 33-year-old female with a longstanding history of seizures was admitted to our hospital with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) depicted a vascular fat-containing lesion overlying a right frontal cortical polymicrogyria. The diagnosis of angiolipoma was established. Conservatory management was undertaken with full recovery. She has been followed for 5 years since, with neither re-bleeding nor morphologic change of the lesion. This is a rare intracranial lesion, with only 11 intracranial angiolipomas published in the literature, and is the first case reported which is associated with SAH caused by this lesion.

  15. [Dynamics of intracranial pressure in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A S; Burov, S A; Petrikov, S S; Asratian, S A; Gorshkov, K M; Krylov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was assessment of the value of ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy. 12 patients with massive ischemic stroke were performed ICP monitoring after decompressive craniotomy. We identified 3 types of ICP dynamics: a) normal ICP, which no need to treat; b) ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more in postoperative period, which can be treated by nonsurgical therapy; c) refractory to therapy ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg and more with development of intracranial hypertension. We consider that ICP monitoring in patients with massive ischemic stroke after decompressive craniotomy can be useful for optimization of the therapy and correction of intracranial hypertension.

  16. Balloon frontal sinuplasty for intracranial abscess in a pediatric acute sinusitis patient.

    PubMed

    Roland, Lauren T; Wineland, Andre M; Leonard, David S

    2015-03-01

    A case of balloon frontal sinuplasty in a 12-year old male with intracranial abscess from acute sinusitis is presented. The patient experienced photophobia, fever, headache, nausea and vomiting. Frontal sinusitis with intracranial abscess was diagnosed on imaging. The patient was taken to the operating room for drainage with left frontal balloon sinuplasty. The patient showed immediate clinical improvement, did not suffer from any complications of surgery and was further managed with long term intravenous antibiotics. We believe that balloon frontal sinuplasty is potentially safe and effective in the treatment of complicated acute frontal sinus obstruction in children.

  17. Computed tomographic detection of sinusitis responsible for intracranial and extracranial infections

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, B.L.; Bankoff, M.S.; Fisk, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now used extensively for the evaluation of orbital, facial, and intracranial infections. Nine patients are presented to illustrate the importance of detecting underlying and unsuspected sinusitis. Prompt treatment of the sinusitis is essential to minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with complications such as brain abscess, meningitis, orbital cellulitis, and osteomyelitis. A review of the literature documents the persistence of these complications despite the widespread use of antibiotic therapy. Recognition of the underlying sinusitis is now possible with CT if the region of the sinuses is included and bone-window settings are used during the examination of patients with orbital and intracranial infection.

  18. Determining an Optimal Cutoff of Serum β-Human Chorionic Gonadotropin for Assisting the Diagnosis of Intracranial Germinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Jun; Qiu, Binghui; Pan, Jun; Zhang, Xi’an; Fang, Luxiong; Qi, Songtao

    2016-01-01

    Background Beta (β)-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG) is used to confirm the diagnosis and plan treatment of intracranial germinomas. However, the cutoff values of serum β-HCG in diagnosis of intracranial germinomas reported in the literature are inconsistent. To establish an appropriate cutoff value of serum β-HCG for diagnosis of intracranial germinomas, we retrospectively reviewed the records of intracranial tumor patients who received serum β-HCG and α-fetoprotein (AFP) tests for diagnostic purposes at our hospital from 2005 to 2014. Methods A total of 93 intracranial germinomas and 289 intracranial non-germ cell tumors were included in this study. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of 3 cutoffs (0.1, 0.4, and 0.5 mIU/mL) for diagnosing intracranial germinomas. The serum β-HCG level of intracranial germinoma patients was further analyzed to investigate the effect of metastasis status and tumor location on serum β-HCG level. Results The area under the ROC curve was 0.81 (P < .001), suggesting β-HCG is an effective marker. Of the 3 cutoff values, 0.1 mIU/mL possessed a highest sensitivity (66.67%) and good specificity (91%). Although there was no β-HCG level difference between metastatic and non-metastatic intracranial germinoma patients, the diagnostic rate of metastatic neurohypophyseal germinomas was significantly higher than that of its non-metastatic counterpart (P < .05), implying that the location of the germinoma might need to be considered when β-HCG is used as a marker to predict metastasis. Conclusions Determining an optimal cutoff of serum β-HCG is helpful for assisting the diagnosis of intracranial germinoma. PMID:26771195

  19. [Evoked potentials in intracranial operations: current status and our experiences].

    PubMed

    Nau, H E; Hess, W; Pohlen, G; Marggraf, G; Rimpel, J

    1987-03-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring, especially evoked potential monitoring, has gained interest in recent years for both the anesthesiologist evaluating cerebral function and the neurosurgeon wishing to avoid neuronal lesions during intracranial operations. Before evoked potential monitoring can be introduced as a routine method of intraoperative management, experience with this method particularly in intensive care units, is imperative. We recorded evoked potentials with the Compact Four (Nicolet) and Basis 8000 (Schwarzer Picker International) computer systems. Preoperative derivations should be done with the same apparatus used intraoperatively and parameters of peri- and intraoperative derivations should not be changed. The patient's head must be fixed in a Mayfield clamp in order to avoid artefacts during trepanation. The possible artefacts due to apparatus, patient, or anesthesia are summarized in the tables. The derivations of evoked potentials should be supervised by a person who is not involved in the anesthesia or the surgical procedure; this condition may change in the future with full automatization of the recording technique and alarms. Good communication between surgeon, anesthesiologist, and neurophysiological assistant is a prerequisite. The modality is chosen in accordance with the affected neuronal system: visual-evoked potential (VEP) monitoring in the management of processes affecting the visual pathway, brain stem auditory-(BAER) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring in lesions affecting these pathways, in particular space-occupying lesions of the posterior fossa. VEP monitoring may be useful, but we observed alterations of the responses without changes in the level of anesthesia or manipulation of the visual pathways. In space-occupying processes of the cerebellopontine angle, BAER could not be developed in nearly all cases because the large underlying tumor had caused the disappearance of waves II-V. In these cases SSEP monitoring

  20. Feasibility of using the Vero SBRT system for intracranial SRS.

    PubMed

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Poels, Kenneth; Simon, Viorica; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Vero SBRT system was benchmarked in a planning study against the Novalis SRS system for quality of delivered dose distributions to intracranial lesions and assessing the Vero system's capacity for SRS. A total of 27 patients with one brain lesion treated on the Novalis system, with 3 mm leaf width MLC and C-arm gantry, were replanned for Vero, with a 5 mm leaf width MLC mounted on an O-ring gantry allowing rotations around both the horizontal and vertical axis. The Novalis dynamic conformal arc (DCA) planning included vertex arcs, using 90° couch rotation. These vertex arcs cannot be reproduced with Vero due to the mechanical limitations of the O-ring gantry. Alternative class solutions were investigated for the Vero. Additionally, to distinguish between the effect of MLC leaf width and different beam arrangements on dose distributions, the Vero class solutions were also applied for Novalis. In addition, the added value of noncoplanar IMRT was investigated in this study. Quality of the achieved dose distributions was expressed in the conformity index (CI) and gradient index (GI), and compared using a paired Student's t-test with statistical significance for p-values ≤ 0.05. For lesions larger than 5 cm3, no statistical significant difference in conformity was observed between Vero and Novalis, but for smaller lesions, the dose distributions showed a significantly better conformity for the Novalis (ΔCI = 13.74%, p = 0.0002) mainly due to the smaller MLC leaf width. Using IMRT on Vero reduces this conformity difference to nonsignificant levels. The cutoff for achieving a GI around 3, characterizing a sharp dose falloff outside the target volume was 4 cm3 for Novalis and 7 cm3 for Vero using DCA technique. Using noncoplanar IMRT, this threshold was reduced to 3 cm3 for the Vero system. The smaller MLC and the presence of the vertex fields allow the Novalis system to better conform the dose around the lesion and to obtain steeper dose falloff outside the lesion

  1. [Evoked potentials in intracranial operations: current status and our experiences].

    PubMed

    Nau, H E; Hess, W; Pohlen, G; Marggraf, G; Rimpel, J

    1987-03-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring, especially evoked potential monitoring, has gained interest in recent years for both the anesthesiologist evaluating cerebral function and the neurosurgeon wishing to avoid neuronal lesions during intracranial operations. Before evoked potential monitoring can be introduced as a routine method of intraoperative management, experience with this method particularly in intensive care units, is imperative. We recorded evoked potentials with the Compact Four (Nicolet) and Basis 8000 (Schwarzer Picker International) computer systems. Preoperative derivations should be done with the same apparatus used intraoperatively and parameters of peri- and intraoperative derivations should not be changed. The patient's head must be fixed in a Mayfield clamp in order to avoid artefacts during trepanation. The possible artefacts due to apparatus, patient, or anesthesia are summarized in the tables. The derivations of evoked potentials should be supervised by a person who is not involved in the anesthesia or the surgical procedure; this condition may change in the future with full automatization of the recording technique and alarms. Good communication between surgeon, anesthesiologist, and neurophysiological assistant is a prerequisite. The modality is chosen in accordance with the affected neuronal system: visual-evoked potential (VEP) monitoring in the management of processes affecting the visual pathway, brain stem auditory-(BAER) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring in lesions affecting these pathways, in particular space-occupying lesions of the posterior fossa. VEP monitoring may be useful, but we observed alterations of the responses without changes in the level of anesthesia or manipulation of the visual pathways. In space-occupying processes of the cerebellopontine angle, BAER could not be developed in nearly all cases because the large underlying tumor had caused the disappearance of waves II-V. In these cases SSEP monitoring

  2. Raised intracranial pressure in Crouzon syndrome: incidence, causes, and management.

    PubMed

    Abu-Sittah, Ghassan S; Jeelani, Owase; Dunaway, David; Hayward, Richard

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Patients with Crouzon syndrome (CS) are at risk for developing raised intracranial pressure (ICP), which has the potential to impair both vision and neurocognitive development. For this reason, some experts recommend early prophylactic cranial vault expansion on the basis that if ICP is not currently raised, it is likely to become so. The aim of this study was to examine the justification for such a policy. This was done by analyzing the incidence, causes, and subsequent risk of recurrence in a series of patients with CS, in whom raised ICP was treated only after it had been diagnosed. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of the medical records and imaging data of patients with a clinical diagnosis of CS. RESULTS There were 49 patients in the study, of whom 30 (61.2%) developed at least 1 episode of raised ICP. First episodes occurred at an average age of 1.42 years and were attributable to craniocerebral disproportion/venous hypertension (19 patients), hydrocephalus (8 patients), and airway obstruction (3 patients). They were managed, respectively, by vault expansion, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion, and airway improvement. Fourteen of the 30 patients developed a second episode of raised ICP an average of 1.42 years after treatment for their initial episode, and 3 patients developed a third episode an average of 3.15 years after that. Causes of subsequent episodes of raised ICP often differed from previous episodes and required different management. Patients who were < 1 year old when the first episode was diagnosed were at increased risk of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS Although the incidence of raised ICP in CS is high, it did not occur in nearly 40% of children during the course of this study. The several possible causes of CS require different management and may vary from episode to episode. The authors recommend an expectant policy toward these children with careful clinical, ophthalmological, respiratory, and radiological monitoring for raised

  3. Efficacy and outcomes of perioperative anesthetic management of extracranial to intracranial bypass for complex intracranial aneurysm in the absence of advanced neurological monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Kinthala, Sudhakar; Sahu, Barada Prasad; Panigrahi, Manas Kumar; Mantha, Srinivas; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Anesthetic management of extracranial to intracranial (EC-IC) bypass for complex intracranial aneurysms is challenging as the goals involve balancing the cerebral perfusion during parent artery clamping and avoiding factors that predispose to rupture of the unsecured aneurysm. There is very sparse literature available on anesthetic management for this procedure. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the records of 20 patients undergoing EC-IC bypass was performed with an objective of assessing the efficacy and outcomes of anesthetic management in the absence of advanced neurological monitoring. Results: A total of 20 patients underwent EC-IC bypass as an adjunct cerebral revascularization in the management of complex intracranial aneurysms. Intraoperatively normotension and normocarbia were maintained. During the EC-IC bypass, when the temporary clamp was applied, mild hypertension (increase from baseline by 20%) and hypervolemia (central venous pressure increased to 12 mmHg) were maintained. Cerebral protection during temporary clipping of intracranial vessel was provided using moderate hypothermia to 34°C and intravenous thiopentone. Temporary clip time ranged from 15 min to 54 min (mean-25 min). All patients except one were extubated post-operatively (19/20 = 95%). None of the patients had rupture of aneurysm in the peri-operative period. Three patients developed neurologic events (3/20 = 15%). One patient had cerebral vasospasm and two patients developed cerebral infarction. Two patient subsequently improved and one succumbed to the neurological deterioration (mortality 1/20 = 5%). Conclusion: Adherence to the principal goals for the procedure, avoidance of hemodynamic fluctuations such as hypotension and hypertension, maintenance of normocarbia, and cerebral protection, result in favorable neurological outcome even in the absence of advanced neuromonitoring. PMID:25190941

  4. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Research Clinical Advisory Panel (RCAP) Meeting. [Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) Research and Clinical Advisory Panel convened on December 1, 2014 at the ISS Conference Facility in Houston. The panel members were provided updates to the current clinical cases and treatment plans along with the latest research activities (http://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/Risks/?i=105) and preliminary study results. The following is a summary of this meeting.

  5. Osteoma of the frontoethmoidal sinus with secondary brain abscess and intracranial mucocele: case report.

    PubMed

    Shady, J A; Bland, L I; Kazee, A M; Pilcher, W H

    1994-05-01

    The authors report the case of a 17-year-old patient with an osteoma of the frontoethmoidal sinus who had a secondary abscess of the frontal lobe and an intracranial mucocele. Clinical, radiological, and surgical correlates of this triad are presented.

  6. Solitary intracranial osteoma with attachment to the falx: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracranial osteomas are uncommon lesions that usually arise from the inner table of the cranium. There are few reports in the literature of intracranial osteomas with meninges attachment and without direct relation with the skull bone; these osteomas were mostly attached with dura. We report a rare osteoma with falx attachment. Case A 64-year-old woman presented with a 3-month history of intermittent tinnitus and dizziness. The scout film of petrous bone computed tomography scan revealed a high-density lesion in the frontal area. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 2.5-cm mass attached to the surface of the falx in the right frontal parasagittal area. The patient underwent right frontal craniotomy, and a bony hard mass was found located in the right frontal parasagittal region extra-axially, with its medial surface attached to the falx. It could not be broken down by the cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator or even the cutting loop and was detached from the falx and removed in one piece. Histopathological examination showed a nodule with bony trabeculae and bone marrow tissue, compatible with osteoma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged from the hospital with no neurological deficits one week after operation. Conclusions This is the first case report in the English literature of an intracranial osteoma arising from the falx. Because of their slow growth and their locations in silent brain areas, intracranial osteomas are usually diagnosed incidentally. Surgical resection is the primary treatment choice. PMID:24010982

  7. A Method for Automatic Extracting Intracranial Region in MR Brain Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Keiji; Miura, Shin; Nishida, Makoto; Kageyama, Yoichi; Namura, Ikuro

    It is well known that temporal lobe in MR brain image is in use for estimating the grade of Alzheimer-type dementia. It is difficult to use only region of temporal lobe for estimating the grade of Alzheimer-type dementia. From the standpoint for supporting the medical specialists, this paper proposes a data processing approach on the automatic extraction of the intracranial region from the MR brain image. The method is able to eliminate the cranium region with the laplacian histogram method and the brainstem with the feature points which are related to the observations given by a medical specialist. In order to examine the usefulness of the proposed approach, the percentage of the temporal lobe in the intracranial region was calculated. As a result, the percentage of temporal lobe in the intracranial region on the process of the grade was in agreement with the visual sense standards of temporal lobe atrophy given by the medical specialist. It became clear that intracranial region extracted by the proposed method was good for estimating the grade of Alzheimer-type dementia.

  8. Are Medications Involved in Vision and intracranial Pressure Changes Seen in Spaceflight?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    Some crewmembers have experienced changes in their vision after long-duration spaceflight on the ISS. These impairments include visual performance decrements, development of cotton-wool spots or choroidal folds, optic-disc edema, optic nerve sheath distention, and/or posterior globe flattening with varying degrees of severity and permanence. These changes are now used to define the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The reasons for these potentially debilitating medical issues are currently unknown. The potential role of administered medications has not yet been examined, but it is known that many medications can have side effects that are similar to VIIP symptoms. Some medications raise blood pressure, which can affect intracranial pressure. Many medications that act in the central nervous system can affect intracranial pressures and/or vision. About 40% of the medications in the ISS kit are known to cause side effects involving changes in blood pressure, intracranial pressure and/or vision. For this reason, we proposed an investigation of the potential relationship between ISS medications and their risk of causing or exacerbating VIIP-like symptoms. The purpose of this study was to use medication usage records for affected and unaffected crew to determine if use of particular medications seemed to correlate with VIIP occurrence or severity.

  9. The Impact of Left and Right Intracranial Tumors on Picture and Word Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Bram; Armstrong, Carol L.; Modestino, Edward; Ledakis, George; John, Cameron; Hunter, Jill V.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of left and right intracranial tumors on picture and word recognition memory. We hypothesized that left hemispheric (LH) patients would exhibit greater word recognition memory impairment than right hemispheric (RH) patients, with no significant hemispheric group picture recognition memory differences. The LH…

  10. Orbital Hemangioma with Intracranial Vascular Anomalies and Hemangiomas: A New Presentation of PHACE Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Antonov, Nina K; Spence-Shishido, Allyson; Marathe, Kalyani S; Tlougan, Brook; Kazim, Michael; Sultan, Sally; Hess, Christopher P; Morel, Kimberly D; Frieden, Ilona J; Garzon, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of infants with a similar constellation of clinical findings: retro-orbital infantile hemangioma (IH), internal carotid artery (ICA) arteriopathy, and intracranial IH. In both cases, intracranial vascular anomalies and hemangiomas were found incidentally during evaluation of unilateral proptosis. Neither infant had evidence of cutaneous segmental IH of the face or neck, which might have provided a clue to the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome or of intracranial hemangiomas. In one case, intracranial involvement was particularly extensive and function threatening, with mass effect on the brain parenchyma. These cases serve to highlight the fact that clinical findings of proptosis, globe deviation, and strabismus should prompt immediate imaging to confirm the presence of orbital IHs and to exclude other diagnoses. Moreover, based on our cases and the embryologic origin of the orbit as a unique developmental unit, patients with confirmed retro-orbital IHs should undergo evaluation for anomalies associated with PHACE syndrome. Patients with orbital IHs and an additional major criterion for PHACE syndrome should be considered to have definite, and not just possible, PHACE syndrome.

  11. Clopidogrel plus Aspirin for Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kass-Hout, Tareq; Winningham, Melanie; Kass-Hout, Omar; Henriquez, Laura; Tong, Frank; Dion, Jacques; Cawley, Michael; Belagaje, Samir; Frankel, Michael; Anderson, Aaron; Nahab, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are limited data on the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy for secondary stroke prevention in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Methods Consecutive patients presenting with high-grade (70–99%) symptomatic intracranial stenosis from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2013, and evaluated within 30 days of the index event were eligible for this analysis. All patients underwent treatment with aspirin plus clopidogrel for a target duration of 12 months along with aggressive medical management based on the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) protocol; all patients were given gastrointestinal prophylaxis for the duration of their aspirin and clopidogrel treatment. Clinical and safety outcomes of our cohort were compared with the medical arm of the SAMMPRIS trial cohort (n = 227). Results Our cohort included 25 patients that met the inclusion criteria. Achievement of blood pressure and LDL cholesterol targets were similar between our cohort and the SAMMPRIS cohort. At 1 year, the rates of stroke, myocardial infarction or vascular death were 0% in our cohort and 16% in the SAMMPRIS cohort (p = 0.03). At 1 year, major bleeding rates were similar between our cohort and the SAMMPRIS cohort (4 vs. 2.2%, p = 1.0). Conclusion A prolonged course of dual antiplatelet therapy for symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease may be associated with less vascular events with no increase in hemorrhagic complications. PMID:27781044

  12. Intracranial Volume and Whole Brain Volume in Infants With Unicoronal Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Cheryl A.; Vaddi, S.; Moffitt, Amanda; Kane, A.A.; Marsh, Jeffrey L.; Panchal, Jayesh; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Aldridge, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Objective Craniosynostosis has been hypothesized to result in alterations of the brain and cerebral blood flow due to reduced intracranial volume, potentially leading to cognitive deficits. In this study we test the hypothesis that intracranial volume and whole brain volume in infants with unilateral coronal synostosis differs from those in unaffected infants. Design Our study sample consists of magnetic resonance images acquired from 7- to 72-week-old infants with right unilateral coronal synostosis prior to surgery (n = 10) and age-matched unaffected infants (n = 10). We used Analyze 9.0 software to collect three cranial volume measurements. We used nonparametric tests to determine whether the three measures differ between the two groups. Correlations were calculated between age and the three volume measures in each group to determine whether the growth trajectory of the measurements differ between children with right unicoronal synostosis and unaffected infants. Results Our results show that the three volume measurements are not reduced in infants with right unicoronal synostosis relative to unaffected children. Correlation analyses between age and various volume measures show similar correlations in infants with right unicoronal synostosis compared with unaffected children. Conclusions Our results show that the relationship between brain size and intracranial size in infants with right unicoronal synostosis is similar to that in unaffected children, suggesting that reduced intracranial volume is not responsible for alterations of the brain in craniosynostosis. PMID:20815706

  13. Refractory High Intracranial Pressure following Intraventricular Hemorrhage due to Moyamoya Disease in a Pregnant Caucasian Woman

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Virginie; Grandin, Cécile; Goffette, Pierre; Fomekong, Edward; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage during pregnancy is usually followed by a poor recovery. When caused by moyamoya disease, ischemic or hemorrhagic episodes may complicate the management of high intracranial pressure. A 26-year-old Caucasian woman presented with generalized seizures and a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 3 during the 36th week of pregnancy. The fetus was delivered by caesarean section. The brain CT in the mother revealed bilateral intraventricular hemorrhage, a callosal hematoma, hydrocephalus and right frontal ischemia. Refractory high intracranial pressure developed and required bilateral ventricular drainage and intensive care treatment with barbiturates and hypothermia. Magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography revealed a moyamoya syndrome with rupture of the abnormal collateral vascular network as the cause of the hemorrhage. Intracranial pressure could only be controlled after the surgical removal of the clots after a large opening of the right ventricle. Despite an initially low GCS, this patient made a good functional recovery at one year follow-up. Management of refractory high intracranial pressure following moyamoya related intraventricular bleeding should require optimal removal of ventricular clots and appropriate control of cerebral hemodynamics to avoid ischemic or hemorrhagic complications. PMID:20508823

  14. Brain abscess after transnasal intracranial penetration of a paint-brush.

    PubMed

    de Tribolet, W; Guignard, G; Zander, E

    1979-03-01

    The case of a brain abscess caused by intracranial, transnasal penetration of a paint-brush is presented. The danger that such foreign bodies may remain unnoticed, especially in children, is stressed. Cure was achieved by total resection of the abscess capsule. PMID:473011

  15. Intraspinal hemorrhage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension: link to superficial siderosis? Report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Wasserstein, Philip; Maya, M Marcel

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal CSF leak has become a well-recognized cause of headaches, but such spinal CSF leaks also are found in approximately half of patients with superficial siderosis of the CNS. It has been hypothesized that friable vessels at the site of the spinal CSF leak are the likely source of chronic bleeding in these patients, but such an intraspinal hemorrhage has never been visualized. The authors report on 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension and intraspinal hemorrhage, offering support for this hypothesis. A 33-year-old man and a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous intracranial hypotension were found to have a hemorrhage within the ventral spinal CSF collection and within the thecal sac, respectively. Treatment consisted of microsurgical repair of a ventral dural tear in the first patient and epidural blood patching in the second patient. The authors suggest that spontaneous intracranial hypotension should be included in the differential diagnosis of spontaneous intraspinal hemorrhage, and that the intraspinal hemorrhage can account for the finding of superficial siderosis when the CSF leak remains untreated.

  16. [Transcranial color-coded sonography in the management of patients with cervical and intracranial arterial stenosis].

    PubMed

    Schoysman, L; Tshibanda, J F; Otto, B; Sprynger, M; Nchimi, A

    2014-03-01

    Technological innovations have endowed the development of powerful tools in medical imaging, such as transcranial color-coded sonography. In addition to other imaging techniques, its relevance in cerebrovascular disorders is increasing. This article aims to describe the technique through specification of its current indications in patients with arterial cervical and intracranial stenosis.

  17. The interaction between intracranial pressure, intraocular pressure and lamina cribrosal compression in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles W

    2016-05-01

    This review examines some of the biomechanical consequences associated with the opposing intraocular and intracranial forces. These forces compress the lamina cribrosa and are a potential source of glaucomatous pathology. A difference between them creates a displacement force on the lamina cribrosa. Increasing intraocular pressure and/or decreasing intracranial pressure will increase the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference and the risk of its posterior displacement, canal expansion and the formation of pathological cupping. Both intraocular pressure and intracranial pressure can be elevated during a Valsalva manoeuvre with associated increases in both anterior and posterior lamina cribrosa loading as well as its compression. Any resulting thinning of or damage to the lamina cribrosa and/or retinal ganglion cell axons and/or astrocyte and glial cells attached to the matrix of the lamina cribrosa and/or reduction in blood flow to the lamina cribrosa may contribute to glaucomatous neuropathy. Thinning of the lamina cribrosa reduces its stiffness and increases the risk of its posterior displacement. Optic nerve head posterior displacement warrants medical or surgical lowering of intraocular pressure; however, compared to intraocular pressure, the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference may be more important in pressure-related pathology of the optic nerve head region. Similarly important could be increased compression loading of the lamina cribrosa. Reducing participation in activities which elevate intraocular and intracranial pressure will decrease lamina cribrosa compression exposure and may contribute to glaucoma management and may have prognostic significance for glaucoma suspects. PMID:27079432

  18. Intracranial abscesses: Retrospective analysis of 32 patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, David O.; Ibadin, Emmanuel; Udoh, Mojisola O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial abscess collections, though uncommon, are dreaded complications of head trauma, neurosurgical operations, meningitis, and otogenic, mastoid, and paranasal air sinus infections. Combining surgical evacuation with the appropriate antibiotic therapy is the effective treatment for intracranial abscesses. However, literature on surgical treatment is replete with several procedures which, on their own, may not Objectives: To determine the epidemiology and outcomes (of various treatment modalities) of intracranial abscesses in our institution, a major referral center for neurosurgical conditions in the midwestern region of Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of demographic data as well as indications, treatment modalities, and outcomes of various surgical procedures for evacuation of intracranial abscesses between September 2006 and December 2011. Results: We carried out 40 procedures in 32 (23 male and 9 female) patients with various intracranial abscesses. These represented approximately 5.6% of all operative neurosurgical procedures in our unit since inception. Most abscesses [16, i.e. 50%] occurred in the second decade. In the first decade, there were 7 (22%), and after the age of 30 years, there were 4 (12.5%). The most susceptible single year of life was infancy with 4 (12.5%) cases of intracranial abscesses. None of the infants had features of congenital heart disease. The predisposing factors were mostly otolaryngologic (9) or posttraumatic (6). Most abscesses (41%) were located in the frontal region, and intraparenchymal (i.e. intracerebral or intracerebellar) (50%) lesions were commoner than extradural, subdural, or intraventricular lesions. The commonest procedure performed (50%) was burr hole evacuation. Four patients (12.5% of cases) died. Prognosis appears to worsen with meningitis as the predisposing infection, ventriculitis, multiple abscesses especially in infants, and immunosuppression. Conclusion

  19. Intracranial abscesses: Retrospective analysis of 32 patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, David O.; Ibadin, Emmanuel; Udoh, Mojisola O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial abscess collections, though uncommon, are dreaded complications of head trauma, neurosurgical operations, meningitis, and otogenic, mastoid, and paranasal air sinus infections. Combining surgical evacuation with the appropriate antibiotic therapy is the effective treatment for intracranial abscesses. However, literature on surgical treatment is replete with several procedures which, on their own, may not Objectives: To determine the epidemiology and outcomes (of various treatment modalities) of intracranial abscesses in our institution, a major referral center for neurosurgical conditions in the midwestern region of Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of demographic data as well as indications, treatment modalities, and outcomes of various surgical procedures for evacuation of intracranial abscesses between September 2006 and December 2011. Results: We carried out 40 procedures in 32 (23 male and 9 female) patients with various intracranial abscesses. These represented approximately 5.6% of all operative neurosurgical procedures in our unit since inception. Most abscesses [16, i.e. 50%] occurred in the second decade. In the first decade, there were 7 (22%), and after the age of 30 years, there were 4 (12.5%). The most susceptible single year of life was infancy with 4 (12.5%) cases of intracranial abscesses. None of the infants had features of congenital heart disease. The predisposing factors were mostly otolaryngologic (9) or posttraumatic (6). Most abscesses (41%) were located in the frontal region, and intraparenchymal (i.e. intracerebral or intracerebellar) (50%) lesions were commoner than extradural, subdural, or intraventricular lesions. The commonest procedure performed (50%) was burr hole evacuation. Four patients (12.5% of cases) died. Prognosis appears to worsen with meningitis as the predisposing infection, ventriculitis, multiple abscesses especially in infants, and immunosuppression. Conclusion

  20. Bite force in the extant coelacanth Latimeria: the role of the intracranial joint and the basicranial muscle.

    PubMed

    Dutel, Hugo; Herbin, Marc; Clément, Gaël; Herrel, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    The terrestrialization process involved dramatic changes in the cranial anatomy of vertebrates. The braincase, which was initially divided into two portions by the intracranial joint in sarcopterygian fishes, became consolidated into a single unit in tetrapods and lungfishes [1-3]. The coelacanth Latimeria is the only extant vertebrate that retains an intracranial joint, which is associated with a unique paired muscle: the basicranial muscle. The intracranial joint has long been thought to be involved in suction feeding by allowing an extensive elevation of the anterior portion of the skull, followed by its rapid depression driven by the basicranial muscle [4-7]. However, we recently challenged this hypothesis [8, 9], and the role of the basicranial muscle with respect to the intracranial joint thus remains unclear. Using 3D biomechanical modeling, we show here that the basicranial muscle and the intracranial joint are involved in biting force generation. By flexing the anterior portion of the skull at the level of the intracranial joint, the basicranial muscle increases the overall bite force. This likely allows Latimeria to feed on a broad range of preys [10, 11] and coelacanths to colonize a wide range of environments during their evolution [4]. The variation in the morphology of the intracranial joint observed in Devonian lobe-finned fishes would have impacted to various degrees their biting performance and might have permitted feeding specializations despite the stability in their lower jaw morphology [12]. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  1. Single-Isocenter Frameless Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiosurgery For Multiple Intracranial Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Steven K. M.; Zakeri, Kaveh; Zhao, Xiao; Carmona, Ruben; Knipprath, Erik; Simpson, Daniel R.; Nath, Sameer K.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Sanghvi, Parag; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.; Chen, Clark C.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic radiosurgery is a well-accepted treatment for patients with intracranial metastases, but outcomes with volumetric modulated arc radiosurgery (VMAR) are poorly described. Objective To report our initial clinical experience applying a novel single-isocenter technique to frameless VMAR for simultaneous treatment of multiple intracranial metastases. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 15 patients undergoing frameless VMAR for multiple intracranial metastases using a single, centrally-located isocenter between 2009 and 2011. Among these, 3 patients were treated for progressive or recurrent intracranial disease. A total of 62 metastases (median 3 per patient, range 2-13) were treated to a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 15-30 Gy). 3 patients were treated with fractionated SRS. Follow-up including clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) occurred every 3 months. Results Median follow-up for all patients was 7.1 months (range, 1.1-24.3), with 11 patients (73.3%) followed until death. For the remaining 4 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 19.6 months (range, 9.2-24.3). Local control at 6 and 12 months was 91.7 (95% Confidence Interval [C.I.], 84.6-100.0%) and 81.5 (95% C.I., 67.9-100.0%), respectively. Regional failure was observed in 9 patients (60.0%), and 7 patients (46.7%) received salvage therapy. Overall survival at 6 months was 60.0% (95% C.I., 40.3-88.2%). Grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicity was not observed. Median total treatment time was 7.2 minutes (range, 2.8-13.2 minutes). Conclusion Single-isocenter, frameless VMAR for multiple intracranial metastases is a promising technique that may provide similar clinical outcomes compared to conventional radiosurgery. PMID:25856109

  2. Intracranial physiological calcifications in adults on computed tomography in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, M H; Rezaei, V; Zarrintan, S; Pourfathi, H

    2007-05-01

    Intracranial physiological calcifications are unaccompanied by any evidence of disease and have no demonstrable pathological cause. They are often due to calcium and sometimes iron deposition in the blood vessels of different structures of the brain. Computed tomography (CT) is the most sensitive means of detection of these calcifications. The aim of this study was the assessment of intracranial physiological calcifications in adults. We studied 1569 cases ranging in age from 15 to 85 in Tabriz Imam Khomeini Hospital, Iran. These patients had a history of head trauma and their CT scan did not show any evidence of pathological findings. The structures evaluated consisted of (A) the pineal gland, (B) the choroid plexus, (C) the habenula, (D) the basal ganglia, (E) the tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus and falx cerebri, (F) vessels and (G) lens and other structures which could be calcified. Of the 1569 subjects, 71.0% had pineal calcification, 66.2% had choroid plexus calcification, 20.1% had habenular calcification, 7.3% had tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus or falx cerebri calcifications, 6.6% had vascular calcification, 0.8% had basal ganglia calcification and 0.9% had lens and other non-defined calcifications. In general, the frequency of intracranial physiological calcifications was greater in men than in women. All types of calcification increased at older ages except for lens and other non-defined calcifications. We evaluated all the cranial structures and determined percentages for all types of intracranial physiological calcification. These statistics can be used for comparing physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. Moreover, these statistics may be of interest from the clinical perspective and are potentially of clinical use. PMID:17594669

  3. Nitrous oxide withdrawal reduces intracranial pressure in the presence of pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Skahen, S; Shapiro, H M; Drummond, J C; Todd, M M; Zelman, V

    1986-08-01

    Nitrous oxide anesthesia has been implicated as contributing to the development of delayed tension pneumocephalus following surgery performed in the sitting position. The authors tested the hypothesis that withdrawal of nitrous oxide anesthesia administered during formation of an intracranial gas cavity would lead to a decrease in intracranial pressure (ICP) as N2O diffuses from the cavity back into the blood. Ten halothane-anesthetized rabbits were prepared for measurement of supracortical ICP and arterial blood pressure (BP) and for intracranial volume alterations via a cisterna magna infusion catheter. Hyperventilation (Paco2 = 28-30 mmHg) and mannitol were used to shrink the brain to accommodate intracranial infusion of either air or lactated Ringer's (LR) solution, which was used to elevate ICP to between 10-15 mmHg from a baseline ICP of 2.1 +/- 2.5 mmHg over a period of 8 to 10 min. Following stabilization at an elevated ICP, inhalation of nitrous oxide (75%) was either initiated or withdrawn (if already present during the induced ICP increase) and the subsequent changes in mean ICP and BP were recorded. Following ICP elevation with LR to 10 +/- 1 mmHg, initiation of 75% N2O administration resulted in no change in ICP and modest increases (P less than 0.05) in BP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP = BP - ICP) after 4 min. However, when ICP was raised (to 12 +/- 3.5 mmHg) with intracranial air infusion, subsequent initiation of 75% N2O inhalation caused an abrupt ICP increase to 22.3 +/- 9 mmHg (from control P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3740508

  4. Influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xiang; Lai, Ling-Feng; Zheng, Kuang; Li, Guo-Xiong; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Liang-Ping; Duan, Chuan-Zhi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze influencing factors associated with immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment (EVT), providing theoretical evidence and guidance for clinical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Totally 529 patients met the inclusive criteria, consisting of 338 males and 191 females. Gender; age; history of hypertension, diabetes, and smoking; intracranial atherosclerosis; rupture status, size and location, features of aneurysmal neck, shapes; vasospasm; treatment modality; and degree of aneurysm occlusion were all carefully and completely recorded. All data were investigated in univariate and multivariate logistic regression model to determine whether they were correlated with the degree of aneurysm occlusion. According to aneurysm size, aneurysms were classified as micro-miniature, miniature, and large aneurysms. There were 451 narrow-neck aneurysms and 78 wide-neck aneurysms. Totally 417 were regular and 112 were irregular. And 125 were un-ruptured aneurysms; 404 were ruptured aneurysms. The modalities of treatment were as follows: embolization with coil (n = 415), stent-assisted coil embolization (n = 89), and balloon-assisted coil embolization (n = 25). Univariate analysis showed that aneurysm size, feature of aneurysm neck, shape, and rupture status might affect the immediate occlusion after EVT. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that ruptured aneurysm, tiny aneurysm, and wide-neck aneurysm were independent influencing factors of complete occlusion of intracranial aneurysm. Aneurysm rupture status, size, feature of aneurysmal neck, and shape might be the independent influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysm patients after EVT. Un-ruptured, micro-miniature, narrow-neck, and regular-shaped aneurysms were more probable to be occluded completely. PMID:26100332

  5. In silico investigation of intracranial blast mitigation with relevance to military traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nyein, Michelle K.; Jason, Amanda M.; Yu, Li; Pita, Claudio M.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Moore, David F.; Radovitzky, Raul A.

    2010-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is the most prevalent military injury in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head, and still less is known about how personal protective equipment affects the brain’s response to blasts. In this study we investigated the effect of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH) and a conceptual face shield on the propagation of stress waves within the brain tissue following blast events. We used a sophisticated computational framework for simulating coupled fluid–solid dynamic interactions and a three-dimensional biofidelic finite element model of the human head and intracranial contents combined with a detailed model of the ACH and a conceptual face shield. Simulations were conducted in which the unhelmeted head, head with helmet, and head with helmet and face shield were exposed to a frontal blast wave with incident overpressure of 10 atm. Direct transmission of stress waves into the intracranial cavity was observed in the unprotected head and head with helmet simulations. Compared to the unhelmeted head, the head with helmet experienced slight mitigation of intracranial stresses. This suggests that the existing ACH does not significantly contribute to mitigating blast effects, but does not worsen them either. By contrast, the helmet and face shield combination impeded direct transmission of stress waves to the face, resulting in a delay in the transmission of stresses to the intracranial cavity and lower intracranial stresses. This suggests a possible strategy for mitigating blast waves often associated with military concussion. PMID:21098257

  6. In silico investigation of intracranial blast mitigation with relevance to military traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nyein, Michelle K; Jason, Amanda M; Yu, Li; Pita, Claudio M; Joannopoulos, John D; Moore, David F; Radovitzky, Raul A

    2010-11-30

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is the most prevalent military injury in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head, and still less is known about how personal protective equipment affects the brain's response to blasts. In this study we investigated the effect of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH) and a conceptual face shield on the propagation of stress waves within the brain tissue following blast events. We used a sophisticated computational framework for simulating coupled fluid-solid dynamic interactions and a three-dimensional biofidelic finite element model of the human head and intracranial contents combined with a detailed model of the ACH and a conceptual face shield. Simulations were conducted in which the unhelmeted head, head with helmet, and head with helmet and face shield were exposed to a frontal blast wave with incident overpressure of 10 atm. Direct transmission of stress waves into the intracranial cavity was observed in the unprotected head and head with helmet simulations. Compared to the unhelmeted head, the head with helmet experienced slight mitigation of intracranial stresses. This suggests that the existing ACH does not significantly contribute to mitigating blast effects, but does not worsen them either. By contrast, the helmet and face shield combination impeded direct transmission of stress waves to the face, resulting in a delay in the transmission of stresses to the intracranial cavity and lower intracranial stresses. This suggests a possible strategy for mitigating blast waves often associated with military concussion. PMID:21098257

  7. Case-control study of intracranial tumors among employees at a petrochemical research facility.

    PubMed

    Beall, C; Delzell, E; Rodu, B; Sathiakumar, N; Lees, P S; Breysse, P N; Myers, S

    2001-12-01

    This case-control study evaluated the relation between potential exposure to chemical and physical agents and the occurrence of intracranial tumors among employees at a petrochemical research facility. Cases were employees with glioma (n = 6) or benign intracranial tumors (n = 6). Controls (n = 119) were individually matched to cases on gender and birth year, and they were alive and did not have an intracranial tumor at the case's diagnosis date. Exposure information came from interviews with subjects or surrogates and from corporate records on agents used in research projects. Analyses computed matched odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self-reported exposure to 15 agents and project-based estimates of exposure to 29 agents. For gliomas, the OR was elevated for self-reported exposure to ionizing radiation (OR, 15.7; CI, 1.4 to 179.4), n-hexane (OR, infinity; CI, 1.4 to infinity), organometallics (OR, 9.4; CI, 1.5 to 59.7), and amines other than nitrosamines (OR, 6.0; CI, 1.0 to 35.7). The OR also was elevated for project-based potential use of ionizing radiation (OR, 9.6; CI, 1.7 to 55.2) and for potential use of n-hexane lasting at least 4 years (OR, 16.2; CI, 1.1 to 227.6). For benign intracranial tumors, the OR was elevated only for self-reported exposure to ionizing radiation (OR, 5.4; CI, 1.7 to 43.1) and other amines (OR, 5.2; CI, 0.9 to 29.5). Occupational exposure may have contributed to the glioma excess, but the specific causal agents remain unknown. The study indicated that benign intracranial tumors were unlikely to be work-related.

  8. Accuracy and reproducibility of patient-specific hemodynamic models of stented intracranial aneurysms: report on the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2011.

    PubMed

    Cito, S; Geers, A J; Arroyo, M P; Palero, V R; Pallarés, J; Vernet, A; Blasco, J; San Román, L; Fu, W; Qiao, A; Janiga, G; Miura, Y; Ohta, M; Mendina, M; Usera, G; Frangi, A F

    2015-01-01

    Validation studies are prerequisites for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to be accepted as part of clinical decision-making. This paper reports on the 2011 edition of the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge. The challenge aimed to assess the reproducibility with which research groups can simulate the velocity field in an intracranial aneurysm, both untreated and treated with five different configurations of high-porosity stents. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were obtained to validate the untreated velocity field. Six participants, totaling three CFD solvers, were provided with surface meshes of the vascular geometry and the deployed stent geometries, and flow rate boundary conditions for all inlets and outlets. As output, they were invited to submit an abstract to the 8th International Interdisciplinary Cerebrovascular Symposium 2011 (ICS'11), outlining their methods and giving their interpretation of the performance of each stent configuration. After the challenge, all CFD solutions were collected and analyzed. To quantitatively analyze the data, we calculated the root-mean-square error (RMSE) over uniformly distributed nodes on a plane slicing the main flow jet along its axis and normalized it with the maximum velocity on the slice of the untreated case (NRMSE). Good agreement was found between CFD and PIV with a NRMSE of 7.28%. Excellent agreement was found between CFD solutions, both untreated and treated. The maximum difference between any two groups (along a line perpendicular to the main flow jet) was 4.0 mm/s, i.e. 4.1% of the maximum velocity of the untreated case, and the average NRMSE was 0.47% (range 0.28-1.03%). In conclusion, given geometry and flow rates, research groups can accurately simulate the velocity field inside an intracranial aneurysm-as assessed by comparison with in vitro measurements-and find excellent agreement on the hemodynamic effect of different stent configurations.

  9. [Hierarchical strategy for treating elevated intracranial pressure in severe traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Orban, J-C; Ichai, C

    2007-05-01

    The objective of the treatment of intracranial hypertension is to decrease intracranial pressure (ICP) while maintaining cerebral blood flow (CBF). Despite numerous treatments, none of them associates total efficiency and security. Systemic secondary cerebral injuries, which are responsible for cerebral ischemia, lead us to administer non specific treatments in order to optimize CBF and cerebral oxygenation. Thus, the goals are: 1) to maintain cerebral perfusion pressure> or =70 mmHg; 2) to control metabolic status by preventing hyperglycaemia, anaemia and hyperthermia; 3) to maintain normoxia and normocapnia (hypercapnia increases ICP and hypocapnia decreases CBF). Beside the neurosurgical evacuation of extra- and intraparenchymatous haematomas, osmotherapy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evacuation are the two specific treatments of intracranial hypertension. Osmotherapy consists in an administration of a hypertonic solution which induces a decrease in cerebral water and finally in ICP. Mannitol (20%), which is the reference, associates osmotic and rheologic effects, and decreases CSF production too. Recent data conduct us to administer larger doses, between 0.7 and 1 g/kg in 15 minutes. Hypertonic saline solution associates osmotic effects and plasma volume loading. Thus, this solution is particularly appropriate in severe head injury with arterial hypotension. CBF evacuation decreases rapidly ICP without any major side-effect. Until now, there is no proof of a superior efficiency of a treatment for intracranial hypertension compared to another. Considering their mechanism of action, all of them are efficient but potentially dangerous too. Indeed, the choice between treatments depends on data which are issued from the multimodal monitoring. General non specific treatments are always necessary. Specific treatments are indicated if ICP is above 20-25 mmHg. Maintaining cerebral perfusion pressure represents the first therapeutic goal. If intracranial hypertension

  10. Angiotensin 1-7 reduces mortality and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in mice.

    PubMed

    Peña Silva, Ricardo A; Kung, David K; Mitchell, Ian J; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A S; Faraci, Frank M; Heistad, Donald D; Hasan, David M

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in mice. Because Ang 1-7 acts on Mas receptors and generally counteracts deleterious effects of Ang II, we tested the hypothesis that Ang 1-7 attenuates formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Intracranial aneurysms were induced in wild-type and Mas receptor-deficient mice using a combination of Ang II-induced hypertension and intracranial injection of elastase in the basal cistern. Mice received elastase+Ang II alone or a combination of elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7. Aneurysm formation, prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, mortality, and expression of molecules involved in vascular injury were assessed. Systolic blood pressure was similar in mice receiving elastase+Ang II (mean±SE, 148±5 mm Hg) or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 (144±5 mm Hg). Aneurysm formation was also similar in mice receiving elastase+Ang II (89%) or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 (84%). However, mice that received elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 had reduced mortality (from 64% to 36%; P<0.05) and prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (from 75% to 48%; P<0.05). In cerebral arteries, expression of the inflammatory markers, Nox2 and catalase increased similarly in elastase+Ang II or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 groups. Ang 1-7 increased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 induced by elastase+Ang II (P<0.05). In Mas receptor-deficient mice, systolic blood pressure, mortality, and prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage were similar (P>0.05) in groups treated with elastase+Ang II or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7. The expression of Mas receptor was detected by immunohistochemistry in samples of human intracranial arteries and aneurysms. In conclusion, without attenuating Ang II-induced hypertension, Ang 1-7 decreased mortality and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in mice through a Mas receptor-dependent pathway.

  11. [Effectiveness of cerebrolysin in hypertensive supratentorial intracranial hemorrhages: results of a randomized triple blind placebo-controled study].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, M Iu; Briukhov, V V; Timerbaeva, S L; Kistenev, B A; Rebrova, O Iu; Suslina, Z A

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrolysin was administered to 38 patients with small hypertensive supratentorial intracranial hemorrhages. Cerebrolysin was used intravenous in drops in dosage of 30 ml during 14 days. High effectiveness and good tolerability of the treatment was shown. In the end of treatment, groups receiving cerebrolysin or placebo were statistically significant differed by the total NIHSS score, Bartel index and the Rankin's modified scale. Moreover, a trend to the decrease of intracranial hemorrhage volume was observed in patients treated with cerebrolysin.

  12. Microwave technology for localization of traumatic intracranial bleedings-a numerical simulation study.

    PubMed

    Candefjord, Stefan; Winges, Johan; Yu, Yinan; Rylander, Thomas; McKelvey, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem worldwide. Intracranial bleedings represents the most serious complication of TBI and need to be surgically evacuated promptly to save lives and mitigate injury. Microwave technology (MWT) is promising as a complement to computed tomography (CT) to be used in road and air ambulances for early detection of intracranial bleedings. In this study, we perform numerical simulations to investigate if a classification algorithm based on singular value decomposition can distinguish between bleedings at different positions adjacent to the skull bone for a similar but simplified problem. The classification accuracy is 94-100% for all classes, a result that encourages us to pursue our efforts with MWT for more realistic scenarios. This indicates that MWT has potential for localizing a detected bleeding, which would increase the diagnostic value of this technique.

  13. Adult Neuroblastoma Complicated by Increased Intracranial Pressure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Patrick L.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Thompson, Mary Ann; Keedy, Vicki L.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Snyder, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most commonly occurring malignancy of the pediatric population, although it is extremely rare in the adult population. In adults, neuroblastoma is often metastatic and portends an extremely poor overall survival. Our case report documents metastatic neuroblastoma occurring in a healthy 29-year-old woman whose course was complicated by an unusual presentation of elevated intracranial pressures. The patient was treated with systemic chemotherapy, I131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) radiotherapy, and autologous stem cell transplant (SCT). Unfortunately the patient's response to therapy was limited and she subsequently died. We aim to review neuroblastoma in the context of increased intracranial pressure and the limited data of neuroblastoma occurring in the adult population, along with proposed treatment options. PMID:25328733

  14. Toward large-scale computational fluid-solid-growth models of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Di Achille, Paolo; Humphrey, Jay D

    2012-06-01

    Complementary advances in medical imaging, vascular biology, genetics, biomechanics, and computational methods promise to enable the development of mathematical models of the enlargement and possible rupture of intracranial aneurysms that can help inform clinical decisions. Nevertheless, this ultimate goal is extremely challenging given the many diverse and complex factors that control the natural history of these lesions. As it should be expected, therefore, predictive models continue to develop in stages, with new advances incorporated as data and computational methods permit. In this paper, we submit that large-scale, patient-specific, fluid-solid interaction models of the entire circle of Willis and included intracranial aneurysm are both computationally tractable and necessary as a critical step toward fluid-solid-growth (FSG) models that can address the evolution of a lesion while incorporating information on the genetically and mechanobiologically determined microstructure of the wall.

  15. [Giant osteoma with intracranial extension filling sinonasal cavity: a rare case].

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Merve; Karaca Erdoğan, Nezahat; Dağ, Fatih; Başoğlu, Mehmet Sinan; Rezanko Atasever, Türkan

    2015-01-01

    Osteomas are the most frequently observed benign bone tumors of paranasal sinuses. Although they are generally detected by chance during radiological analyses, they may create severe complications after intracranial extension. While computed tomography findings play a key role to differentiate osteoma from other osseous lesions of paranasal sinus, magnetic resonance imaging identifies extension to surrounding structures and possible complications. Osteoma was detected in a 28-year-old female patient who admitted with complaints of headache and difficulty in breathing. Patient was operated after diagnosis; however, we were unable to remove the mass totally due to its location and size. In this article, we report, to our knowledge, the largest defined osteoma case in the literature to date, with ethmoid sinus origin, orbital, nasal cavity and intracranial extension, accompanied with distinctive computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  16. Frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial extension associated with osteoma in the anterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Kato, Naoki; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with a rare case of paranasal osteoma with secondary mucocele extending intracranially, manifesting as a generalized convulsion. Computed tomography showed a large calcified tumor adjacent to the cystic mass in the left frontal lobe. He underwent left frontal craniotomy, and the cystic lesion was totally removed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteoma and mucocele. The giant paranasal sinus osteoma prevented growth of the mucocele into orbital recess and extension into the orbital space and paranasal sinus. The mucocele disrupted the dura in the anterior cranial fossa, resulting in a giant cystic intracranial lesion. Frontal osteoplastic craniotomy was effective for exposing both lesions and plastic repair of the dural perforation to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage and secondary infection.

  17. Intracranial spaces in childhood macrocephaly: comparison of length measurements and volume calculations.

    PubMed

    Gooskens, R H; Gielen, C C; Hanlo, P W; Faber, J A; Willemse, J

    1988-08-01

    CT scanning was done to calculate the volume of intracranial spaces in children with the purpose of developing a reliable method of differentiating the various causes of macrocephaly. The technique has been applied to the CT scans of 60 apparently normal children, and the resulting graphs show the normal relationship between intracranial volumes and age from birth to 15 years. The measurements for 25 children with macrocephaly and normal rate of growth of head circumference were then compared with the reference values. It was possible to make accurate differentiations between megalencephaly, extraventricular hydrocephalus and communicating hydrocephalus. The advantage of this technique in relation to length measurements on CT scans is discussed. The authors advocate the estimation of the product of head circumference and head height as a much more reliable indication of normal and deviant head-size than head circumference alone.

  18. DSA volumetric 3D reconstructions of intracranial aneurysms: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Cieściński, Jakub; Serafin, Zbigniew; Strześniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Władysław; Beuth, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Summary A gold standard of cerebral vessel imaging remains the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) performed in three projections. However, in specific clinical cases, many additional projections are required, or a complete visualization of a lesion may even be impossible with 2D angiography. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of rotational angiography were reported to improve the performance of DSA significantly. In this pictorial essay, specific applications of this technique are presented in the management of intracranial aneurysms, including: preoperative aneurysm evaluation, intraoperative imaging, and follow-up. Volumetric reconstructions of 3D DSA are a valuable tool for cerebral vessels imaging. They play a vital role in the assessment of intracranial aneurysms, especially in evaluation of the aneurysm neck and the aneurysm recanalization. PMID:22844309

  19. Commercial flight and patients with intracranial mass lesions: a caveat. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Crocker, Matthew; Zrinzo, Laurence V; Thomas, David G T; Watkins, Laurence

    2006-10-01

    The authors report two cases of neurological deterioration following long commercial flights. Both individuals harbored intracranial space-occupying lesions. The authors assert that preexisting reduced intracranial compliance diminishes an individual's reserve to accommodate the physiological changes resulting from a commercial flight. Airline passengers are exposed to a mild degree of hypercapnia as well as conditions that simulate those of high-altitude ascents. High-altitude cerebral edema following an ascent to great heights is one facet of acute mountain sickness and can be life threatening in conditions similar to those present on commercial flights. Comparable reports documenting neurological deterioration at high altitudes in patients with coexisting space-occupying lesions were also reviewed.

  20. Intracranial and internal jugular vein thrombosis secondary to ENT infections: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Riffat, Faruque; Forer, Martin; Wignall, Andrew; Veivers, David; Patel, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    We report 3 cases of rare, life-threatening intracranial and internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis that were caused by common ENT infections. These infections included otitis media in a 6-year-old girl, tonsillitis in a 21-year-old woman, and odontogenic sepsis in a 56-year-old woman. All 3 patients were treated with culture-directed systemic antibiotics; 2 of them also required surgical drainage (the child and the older adult). The 2 adults also received therapeutic anticoagulation, which was continued until venous recanalization was documented; the duration of combined antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment was 6 weeks. All 3 patients made uneventful recoveries. Significant morbidities associated with intracranial and IJV thrombosis were avoided as a result of prompt diagnosis and judicious treatment. PMID:24170472