Science.gov

Sample records for intracranial ring enhancing

  1. Intracranial hypertension as the primary symptom of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiali; Xu, Lingjia; Yin, Xinzhen; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intracranial hypertension (IH) is a neurological disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure. It is a poorly understood syndrome that most commonly manifests nonspecific symptoms such as stroke-like headache, vision changes, nausea, vomiting, and papilledema. IH has been reported in young cancer patients but never in association with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma. Methods: Here, we discuss the case of an 18-year-old girl with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma in which IH was the primary symptom accompanied by the even rarer symptom of cutaneous metastases. We also present a review of the relevant literature. The patient experienced frequent headaches, vomiting, and blurred vision but showed no abnormal findings on cranial imaging studies. Further examination showed multiple skin nodules on the abdomen. Then pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules were done. Results: Pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules confirmed gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma with skin metastases. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma primarily presenting IH and accompanied by subcutaneous metastases. This case emphasizes the importance of excluding malignancy from the differential diagnosis of IH. PMID:27583897

  2. Intracranial hypertension as the primary symptom of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiali; Xu, Lingjia; Yin, Xinzhen; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial hypertension (IH) is a neurological disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure. It is a poorly understood syndrome that most commonly manifests nonspecific symptoms such as stroke-like headache, vision changes, nausea, vomiting, and papilledema. IH has been reported in young cancer patients but never in association with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma. Here, we discuss the case of an 18-year-old girl with gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma in which IH was the primary symptom accompanied by the even rarer symptom of cutaneous metastases. We also present a review of the relevant literature. The patient experienced frequent headaches, vomiting, and blurred vision but showed no abnormal findings on cranial imaging studies. Further examination showed multiple skin nodules on the abdomen. Then pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules were done. Pathological and immunohistochemical examination of gastroscopic specimens and the biopsied subcutaneous nodules confirmed gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma with skin metastases. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma primarily presenting IH and accompanied by subcutaneous metastases. This case emphasizes the importance of excluding malignancy from the differential diagnosis of IH.

  3. Quantifying Intracranial Plaque Permeability with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, P.; Elmokadem, A.H.; Syed, F.H.; Cantrell, C.G.; Dehkordi, F.H.; Carroll, T.J.; Ansari, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaque hyperintensity and/or gadolinium contrast enhancement have been studied as imaging biomarkers of acutely symptomatic ischemic presentations using single static MR imaging measurements. However, the value in modeling the dynamics of intracranial plaque permeability has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to use dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to quantify the contrast permeability of intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques in symptomatic patients and to compare these parameters against existing markers of plaque volatility using black-blood MR imaging pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a prospective study of contrast uptake dynamics in the major intracranial vessels proximal and immediately distal to the circle of Willis using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, specifically in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Using the Modified Tofts model, we extracted the volume transfer constant (Ktrans) and fractional plasma volume (Vp) parameters from plaque-enhancement curves. Using regression analyses, we compared these parameters against time from symptom onset as well as intraplaque hyperintensity and postcontrast enhancement derived from T1 SPACE, a black-blood MR vessel wall imaging sequence. RESULTS We completed analysis in 10 patients presenting with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Ktrans and Vp measurements were higher in plaques versus healthy white matter and similar or less than values in the choroid plexus. Only Ktrans correlated significantly with time from symptom onset (P = .02). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging parameters were not found to correlate significantly with intraplaque enhancement or intraplaque hyperintensity (P = .4 and P = .17, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Elevated Ktrans and Vp values found in intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques versus healthy white matter suggest that dynamic

  4. Intracranial plaque enhancement from high resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging predicts stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Moon, Jangsup; Shin, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jaeseok; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Han, Moon Hee; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with frequent stroke recurrence. High resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) can provide atheroma information related to its vulnerability. We performed HRMRI in stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis to determine whether plaque characteristics from vessel wall imaging can predict future stroke recurrence. Between July 2011 and June 2013, acute stroke patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis were prospectively enrolled and 3-tesla HRMRI was performed on the relevant artery. The plaque enhancement was visually determined from T1 post-gadolinium enhancement image. Stroke recurrence was monitored after index event and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to identify factors related to future stroke recurrence. A total of 138 patients were included with a median follow-up of 18 months. There were 39 stroke recurrences. Plaque enhancement was detected in 108 patients (78.3%), and 37 of them experienced stroke recurrence. Among 30 stroke patients without plaque enhancement, two patients experienced stroke recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated a significant difference in event free survival between the patients with plaque enhancement and those patients without plaque enhancement (event rates at year 1: 30.3% vs. 6.8%, log-rank test, p = 0.004). Multivariate Cox-regression analysis showed that the plaque enhancement from HRMRI was independently associated with stroke recurrence (hazard ratio: 7.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.74-31.75, p = 0.007). Intracranial plaque enhancement from HRMRI is associated with stroke recurrence among the patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  5. A survey of various enhancement techniques for square rings antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumin, Abdul Rashid O.; Alias, Rozlan; Abdullah, Jiwa; Abdulhasan, Raed Abdulkareem; Ali, Jawad; Dahlan, Samsul Haimi; Awaleh, Abdisamad A.

    2017-09-01

    The square ring shape becomes a famous reconfiguration on antenna design. The researchers have been developed the square ring by different configurations. It has high efficiency and simple calculation method. The performance enhancement for an antenna is the main reason to use this setting. Furthermore, the multi-objectives for the antenna also are considered. In this paper, different studies of square ring shape are discussed. This shape is developed in five different techniques, which are the gain enhancement, dual band antenna, reconfigurable antenna, CSRR, and circularly polarization. Moreover, the validation between these configurations also demonstrates for square ring shapes. In particular, the square ring slot improved the gain by 4.3 dB, provide dual band resonance at 1.4 and 2.6 GHz while circular polarization at 1.54 GHz, and multi-mode antenna. However, square ring strip achieved an excellent band rejection on UWB antenna at 5.5 GHz. The square ring slot length is the most influential factor on the antenna performance, which refers to the free space wavelength. Finally, comparisons between these techniques are presented.

  6. Importance of Contrast-Enhanced Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Various Intracranial Pathologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Sungwon; Lee, Yong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions. PMID:26798225

  7. Systemic treatment with 4-211Atphenylalanine enhances survival of rats with intracranial glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, N; Friedrich, S; Schwabe, K; Hedrich, H J; Krauss, J K; Knapp, W H; Nakamura, M; Meyer, G-J; Walte, A

    2013-12-13

    Increased amino acid transport in brain tumours is used for diagnostic purposes. It has been shown that the α-emitting radionuclide astatine-211 labeled to L-phenylalanine is taken up by glioblastoma cells. We here tested, if systemic treatment with 4-[211At]astatine-phenylalanine (At-Phe) has a beneficial effect on survival of rats with intracranial glioblastoma. The rat glioblastoma cell line BT4Ca was implanted into the prefrontal cortex of female BDIX rats by stereotaxic microinjection (10,000 cells/3 µl; n = 83). 3 days after implantation At-Phe or phosphate buffered saline were injected intravenously. A third group was treated twice, i.e., on day 3 and 10. Health condition was assessed each day by using a score system. Rats were sacrificed on days 6, 10, 13 and 17 after implantation, or when showing premortal health condition to measure tumour volume and necrosis. The proliferation index (PI) was assessed after immunohistochemical staining of Ki-67. Survival time of rats treated twice with At-Phe was significantly prolonged. Additionally, both At-Phe-treated groups remained significantly longer in a better health condition. Rats with poor health status had larger tumours than rats with fair health condition. Overall, irrespective of treatment the PI was reduced in rats with poor health condition. Necrosis was larger in rats treated twice with At-Phe. Intravenous treatment with At-Phe enhanced survival time of rats with intracranial glioblastomas and improved health condition. These results encourage studies using local treatment of intracranial glioblastoma with At-Phe, either by repeated local injection or by intracavital application after tumour resection.

  8. An ellipsoid convex enhancement filter for detection of asymptomatic intracranial aneurysm candidates in CAD frameworks.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ze; Arimura, Hidetaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Yamashita, Fumio; Sasaki, Makoto; Korogi, Yukunori

    2016-02-01

    Various kinds of enhancement filters have been developed in computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) frameworks for asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). However, many bending or branching portions on vessels are also enhanced by the conventional filters as false positives in 3.0 T MRA, which can visualize smaller vessels compared with 1.5 T MRA. To overcome this problem, this study focused on developing an ellipsoid convex enhancement (ECE) filter, which can selectively enhance aneurysms while reducing false positive contrasts on bending or branching portions on vessels, for detection of asymptomatic intracranial aneurysm candidates in CAD frameworks. The ECE filter was mathematically designed to enhance various convex regions in the intensity space such as convex aneurysms, in which the ratio of the shortest and longest diameters for aneurysms corresponds to the ratio of reciprocals of the square roots of the first and third eigenvalues of a Hessian matrix. The proposed ECE filter was evaluated by measuring an average contrast for false positive models and free-response receiver operating characteristic curves between two simple CAD frameworks using the ECE and conventional filters based on a leave-one-out-by-patient test. MRA images for thirty patients (male: 10, female: 20; age: 48-86 yr, mean: 69.2) with 31 unruptured aneurysms (longest diameter: 2.0-5.5 mm, mean: 3.7 mm) were selected for this study. The average contrast for false positive models was reduced by 51.4% using the ECE filter, compared with the conventional filter for the convex regions with ratios of the shortest and longest diameters less than 0.4. The number of false positives per case was decreased from 41.1 to 22.8 on average at a sensitivity of 87% by using the ECE filter. The ECE filter would be useful for boosting the performance of the CAD framework of asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms by providing higher contrast aneurysms and lower contrast false

  9. Echo contrast-enhanced three-dimensional power Doppler of intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Postert, T; Braun, B; Pfundtner, N; Sprengelmeyer, R; Meves, S; Przuntek, H; Büttner, T

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3-D) power Doppler (CE3DPD) in the assessment of intracranial vascular structures, and to compare the results with unenhanced 3-D power Doppler (3DPD) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) findings. We insonated 25 patients without cerebrovascular diseases through the temporal bone window using 3DPD and CE3DPD; for comparison, 13 patients underwent MRA. Identification rates of vascular segments and of small branches of intracranial vessels were evaluated by two independent investigators blinded to MRA results. In 21 patients with adequate insonation conditions, CE3DPD significantly improved identification rates compared to 3DPD for the complete visualization of the P1 segment (80.9 vs. 19.0%, p < 0.005, P2 segment (80.9 vs. 42.8%, p < 0.05 and A1 segment (85.7 vs. 38.1%, p < 0.005). Furthermore, CE3DPD depicted, in significantly more examinations, branches of the middle (MCA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA). Interobserver agreement was higher than 95% for the main intracranial segments and branches of the MCA, but relatively low (80.1-85.7%) for branches of the PCA. In comparison to CE3DPD, MRA identified only parieto-occipital branches of the PCA, temporal branches of the MCA, frontal branches of the anterior cerebral artery and the MCA bifurcation more frequently and accurately. In 4 patients with inadequate acoustic temporal bone windows, the application of a galactose-based microbubble suspension allowed clear 3-D visualization of almost all major intracranial vascular segments and some branches of the large arteries. In conclusion, CE3DPD is a more sensitive ultrasonic tool compared to unenhanced 3-D reconstructions. It makes 3-D ultrasound imaging of the basal cerebral circulation easier to perform and interpret, by providing an improved spatially oriented display of image position. As such, this method may increase operator diagnostic confidence level under

  10. Solitary ring enhancing brain lesion in a patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Aldeen, Taha; Lunn, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis in immune competent patients usually causes asymptomatic infection or mild symptoms, while in immunocompromised and AIDS patients it can be a life threatening condition. We report a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with AIDS and review the causes of brain ring enhancing lesions. PMID:22132018

  11. Intracranial transplantation of monocyte-derived multipotential cells enhances recovery after ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hidenori; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Okazaki, Yuka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kuwana, Masataka

    2012-02-01

    Cell transplantation has emerged as a potential therapy to reduce the neurological deficits caused by ischemic stroke. We previously reported a primitive cell population, monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs), which can differentiate into mesenchymal, neuronal, and endothelial lineages. In this study, MOMCs and macrophages were prepared from rat peripheral blood and transplanted intracranially into the ischemic core of syngeneic rats that had undergone a left middle cerebral artery occlusion procedure. Neurological deficits, as evaluated by the corner test, were less severe in the MOMC-transplanted rats than in macrophage-transplanted or mock-treated rats. Histological evaluations revealed that the number of microvessels that had formed in the ischemic boundary area by 4 weeks after transplantation was significantly greater in the MOMC-transplanted rats than in the control groups. The blood vessel formation was preceded by the appearance of round CD31(+) cells, which we confirmed were derived from the transplanted MOMCs. Small numbers of bloodvessels incorporating MOMC-derived endothelial cells expressing a mature endothelial marker RECA-1 were detected at 4 weeks after transplantation. In addition, MOMCs expressed a series of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoetin-1, and placenta growth factor (PlGF). These findings provide evidence that the intracranial delivery of MOMCs enhances functional recovery by promoting neovascularization in a rat model for ischemic stroke.

  12. Wall enhancement on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dan-Dan; Guan, Shao-Chen; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2016-10-01

    The aneurysm wall has been reported to play a critical role in the formation, development, and even rupture of an aneurysm. We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) to investigate the aneurysm wall in an effort to identify evidence of inflammation invasion and define its relationship with aneurysm behavior. Patients with intracranial aneurysms who were prospectively evaluated using HRMRI between July 2013 and June 2014 were enrolled in this study. The aneurysm's wall enhancement and evidence of inflammation invasion were determined. In addition, the relationship between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size and symptoms, including ruptured aneurysms, giant unruputred intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) presenting as mass effect, progressively growing aneurysms, and aneurysms associated with neurological symptoms, was statistically analyzed. Twenty-five patients with 30 aneurysms were available for the current study. Fourteen aneurysms showed wall enhancement, including 6 ruptured and 8 unruptured aneurysms. Evidence of inflammation was identified directly through histological studies and indirectly through intraoperative investigations and clinical courses. The statistical analysis indicated no significant correlation between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size. However, there was a strong correlation between wall enhancement and aneurysm symptoms, with a kappa value of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.68-1). Aneurysm wall enhancement on HRMRI might be a sign of inflammatory change. Symptomatic aneurysms exhibited wall enhancement on HRMRI. Wall enhancement had a high consistent correlation of symptomatic aneurysms. Therefore, wall enhancement on HRMRI might predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm.

  13. Quantifying Intracranial Aneurysm Wall Permeability for Risk Assessment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Vakil, P; Ansari, S A; Cantrell, C G; Eddleman, C S; Dehkordi, F H; Vranic, J; Hurley, M C; Batjer, H H; Bendok, B R; Carroll, T J

    2015-05-01

    Pathological changes in the intracranial aneurysm wall may lead to increases in its permeability; however the clinical significance of such changes has not been explored. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify intracranial aneurysm wall permeability (K(trans), VL) to contrast agent as a measure of aneurysm rupture risk and compare these parameters against other established measures of rupture risk. We hypothesized K(trans) would be associated with intracranial aneurysm rupture risk as defined by various anatomic, imaging, and clinical risk factors. Twenty-seven unruptured intracranial aneurysms in 23 patients were imaged with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and wall permeability parameters (K(trans), VL) were measured in regions adjacent to the aneurysm wall and along the paired control MCA by 2 blinded observers. K(trans) and VL were evaluated as markers of rupture risk by comparing them against established clinical (symptomatic lesions) and anatomic (size, location, morphology, multiplicity) risk metrics. Interobserver agreement was strong as shown in regression analysis (R(2) > 0.84) and intraclass correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.92), indicating that the K(trans) can be reliably assessed clinically. All intracranial aneurysms had a pronounced increase in wall permeability compared with the paired healthy MCA (P < .001). Regression analysis demonstrated a significant trend toward an increased K(trans) with increasing aneurysm size (P < .001). Logistic regression showed that K(trans) also predicted risk in anatomic (P = .02) and combined anatomic/clinical (P = .03) groups independent of size. We report the first evidence of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging-modeled contrast permeability in intracranial aneurysms. We found that contrast agent permeability across the aneurysm wall correlated significantly with both aneurysm size and size-independent anatomic risk factors. In addition, K(trans) was a significant and size

  14. Intracranial collateral pathways assessed by contrast-enhanced three-dimensional transcranial color-coded sonography.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Tiemo; Bozzato, Alessandro; Mull, Michael; Klötzsch, Christof

    2004-11-01

    Individual parameter settings of the duplex machine and limited insonation angles may influence the visualization of small intracranial vessels in 2-D transcranial color-coded sonography. The aim of our study was the morphologic assessment of intracranial collateral pathways (first auditory area celiac artery, A(1)CA; anterior communicating artery, AComA; first parental generation celiac artery P(1)CA; posterior communicating artery, PComA) using 3-D transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (3-D TCCS) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A total of 41 patients with large vessel disease and 30 patients who had suffered subarachnoidal hemorrhage (mean age 52 +/- 15 years) were involved. In all patients, angiography was performed within 10 days following 3-D sonography. The patients were investigated with a color-coded duplex system using the power mode. Contrast enhancement was achieved by continuous infusion of a galactose-based echo-enhancer using a perfusor pump. The 3-D system consists of an electromagnet that induces a low-intensity magnetic field near the head of the patient. A magnetic position sensor is attached to the ultrasound (US) probe and transmits the spatial orientation to a personal computer, which also receives the corresponding 2-D images from the video port of the duplex machine. Angiography revealed a "complete" circle of Willis in one third of the patients and, in the remaining patients at least one vessel was hypoplastic or absent. Sufficient temporal bone windows allowed the sonographic investigation of 466 (94%) of 497 expected arterial segments. The comparison of both techniques resulted in a weighted kappa value of 0.56 for the A(1)CA and 0.63 for the AComA. In the posterior circulation kappa values of 0.56 for the P(1)CA and 0.43 for the PComA were calculated. In 50 vessels (10%), 3-D sonography misdiagnosed the diameter of a collateral vessel as normal and angiography revealed hypoplasia or aplasia of this vessel. The main

  15. 3-T contrast-enhanced MR angiography in evaluation of suspected intracranial aneurysm: comparison with MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Villablanca, J Pablo; Mossaz, Léonard; Pope, Whitney; Juncosa, Alex; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate a high-spatial-resolution contrast-enhanced 3-T MR angiography protocol for detection and characterization of intracranial aneurysms and to compare the results with those of MDCT angiography. Forty-one patients with suspected intracranial aneurysm underwent high-spatial-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography and CT angiography (CTA). With a generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition algorithm with an acceleration factor of 4 at 3 T, contrast-enhanced MR angiographic images were acquired over 20 seconds with a spatial-resolution of 0.7 x 0.7 x 0.8 mm. CTA images were acquired with a spatial resolution of 0.35 x 0.35 x 0.8 mm on a 16-MDCT scanner in 17 seconds. The images from the two studies were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists for image quality, presence of aneurysm, and characterization of aneurysm. The dimensions of the aneurysm were measured independently with both techniques. A total of 25 aneurysms were identified with both contrast-enhanced MR angiography and CTA. A comparative analysis of detection and depiction of aneurysms showed excellent interobserver agreement for both contrast-enhanced MR angiography (kappa = 0.81) and CTA (kappa = 0.91) images. There was significant correlation between the techniques for both qualitative assessment of aneurysm depiction (rho = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.88-0.95) and quantitative dimensional measurement of aneurysm size (r = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97). Contrast-enhanced MR angiography at 3 T is reliable for evaluation and characterization of intracranial aneurysms. The results are comparable with those of MDCTA.

  16. SU-E-J-78: Enhance Patient Positioning Accuracy with Optically Guided Frameless Target Localization Technique for Intracranial Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Crossan, P

    2012-06-01

    To make use of the optical guided frameless stereotactic target localization technique to detect the interfraction and intrafraction patient positioning errors and correct the patient position for fractional intracranial therapy, therefore, to enhance the patient positioning accuracy. Four patients who underwent fractionated intracranial intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were studied. For each patient, in addition to the thermoplastic head mask, frameless array and bite-block were used for patient positioning. Optical guided frameless planning was utilized to define the coordinates of the isocenter during the treatment planning procedure. In each treatment fraction, the patient was first set up by matching the room lasers to the BB markers attached on the mask. The optical guided frameless system then captured the patient position and reported displacements of the current patient position to the planned patient position. These displacements were called interfraction errors. The treatment plan was designed to have up to 8 non-coplanar fields. Dose delivery of the non-coplanar fields required couch rotation which introduced isocenter displacements called intrafraction errors. Population statistics of interfraction and intrafraction errors (4 patient, 110 fractions) were calculated. The optical guided frameless system monitored the patient positioning errors and provided guidance for correction prior to the dose delivery. Among all patients and radiation treatment fractions, the overall detected interfraction error was 3.6±1.3 mm (mean ±SD) and the intrafraction error was 1.4±0.8 mm. Both types of errors were online corrected with the guidance of optical guided frameless system. Conventional laser guided thermoplastic mask patient position for intracranial therapy has interfraction and intrafraction errors. The optical guided frameless target localization technique allows clinicians to dectect and correct these errors online, therefore, to enhance the

  17. Assessment of reinforcement enhancing effects of toluene vapor and nitrous oxide in intracranial self-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Matthew E.; Slavova-Hernandez, Galina G.; Shelton, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Despite widespread abuse there are few validated methods to study the rewarding effects of inhalants. One model that that may have utility for this purpose is intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Objectives We wished to compare and contrast the ICSS reward-facilitating effects of abused inhalants to other classes of abused drugs. Compounds were examined using two different ICSS procedures in mice to determine the generality of each drug's effects on ICSS and the sensitivity of the procedures. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle were trained under a three component rate-frequency as well as a progressive ratio (PR) ICSS procedure. The effects of nitrous oxide, toluene vapor, cocaine and diazepam on ICSS were then examined. Results Concentrations of 1360-2900 ppm inhaled toluene vapor significantly facilitated ICSS in the rate frequency procedure and 1360 ppm increased PR breakpoint. A concentration of 40% nitrous oxide facilitated ICSS in the rate-frequency procedure but reduced PR breakpoint. Doses of 3-18 mg/kg cocaine facilitated ICSS in the rate frequency procedure and 10 and 18 mg/kg increased PR breakpoint. Doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg diazepam facilitated ICSS in the rate frequency procedure and 3 mg/kg increased PR breakpoint. Conclusions The reinforcement facilitating effect of toluene in ICSS is at least as great as diazepam. In contrast, nitrous oxide weakly enhances ICSS in only the rate frequency procedure. The data suggest that the rate frequency procedure may be more sensitive than the PR schedule to the reward facilitating effects of abused inhalants. PMID:24186077

  18. Concentric circular ring and nanodisk optical antenna enhanced multispectral quantum dot infrared photodetector with spectral localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Kemsri, Thitikorn; Li, Lin; Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we report a concentric circular ring and nanodisk plasmonic optical antenna (POA) enhanced multispectral quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). The circular ring and the nanodisk POA structures are designed to have plasmonic resonant wavelengths in the longwave infrared (LWIR) and the midwave infrared (MWIR) spectral regimes, respectively. The electric field (E-field) distributions are simulated and show spectral localization due to the distinct plasmonic resonant wavelengths of the POA structures. The circular ring is found to enhance the E-fields in the nanodisk regions due to the mutual coupling. A concentric circular ring and nanodisk POA enhanced multispectral QDIP was fabricated and tested. Multispectral enhancement was observed. The enhancement is compared to that of a QDIP with only the circular ring POA structure. The experiment data agree with the simulation. The concentric circular ring and nanodisk POA provides a compact planar structure for multispectral QDIP enhancement.

  19. Loop 2 of Ophiophagus hannah toxin b binds with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and enhances intracranial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Yan, Zhiqiang; Xie, Cao; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-12-06

    Three-finger snake neurotoxins have been widely investigated for their high binding affinities with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are widely expressed in the central nervous system including the blood-brain barrier and thus mediate intracranial drug delivery. The loop 2 segments of three-finger snake neurotoxins are considered as the binding domain with nAChRs, and thus, they may have the potential to enhance drug or drug delivery system intracranial transport. In the present work, binding of the synthetic peptides to the neuronal nAChRs was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of (125)I-α-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The loop 2 segment of Ophiophagus hannah toxin b (KC2S) showed high binding affinity, and the competitive binding IC(50) value was 32.51 nM. Furthermore, the brain targeting efficiency of KC2S had been investigated in vitro and in vivo. The specific uptake by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) demonstrated that KC2S could be endocytosized after binding with nAChRs. In vivo, the qualitative and quantitative biodistribution results of fluorescent dyes (DiR or coumarin-6) indicated that KC2S modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) micelles (KC2S-PEG-PLA micelles) could enhance intracranial drug delivery. Furthermore, intravenous treatment with paclitaxel-encapsulated KC2S-PEG-PLA micelles (KC2S-PEG-PLA-PTX micelles) afforded robust inhibition of intracranial glioblastoma. The median survival time of KC2S-PEG-PLA-PTX-micelle-treated mice (47.5 days) was significantly longer than that of mice treated by mPEG-PLA-PTX micelles (41.5 days), Taxol (38.5 days), or saline (34 days). Compared with the short peptide derived from rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29) that has been previously reported as an excellent brain targeting ligand, KC2S has a similar binding affinity with neuronal nAChRs but fewer amino acid residues. Thus, we concluded that the loop 2 segment of Ophiophagus hannah toxin b could bind

  20. Role of the Hippocampus in Distinct Memory Traces: Timing of Match and Mismatch Enhancement Revealed by Intracranial Recording.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing; Wu, Ruijie; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Yongjie; Liu, Zuxiang

    2017-08-31

    A previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study reported evidence for parallel memory traces in the hippocampus: a controlled match signal detecting matches to internally-generated goal states and an automatic mismatch signal identifying unpredicted perceptual novelty. However, the timing information in this process is unknown. In the current study, facilitated by the high spatial and temporal resolution of intracranial recording from human patients, we confirmed that the left posterior hippocampus played an important role in the goal match enhancement effect, in which combinations of object identity and location were involved. We also found that this effect happened within 520 ms to 735 ms after the probe onset, ~150 ms later than the perceptual mismatch enhancement found bilaterally in both the anterior and posterior hippocampus. More specifically, the latency of the perceptual mismatch enhancement effect of the right hippocampus was positively correlated with the performance accuracy. These results suggested that the hippocampus is crucial in working memory if features binding with location are involved in the task and the goal match enhancement effect happens after perceptual mismatch enhancement, implying the dissociation of different components of working memory at the hippocampus. Moreover, single trial decoding results suggested that the intracranial field potential response in the right hippocampus can classify the match or switch task. This is consistent with the findings that the right hippocampal activity observed during the simulation of the future events may reflect the encoding of the simulation into memory.

  1. Enhanced Discharge Performance in a Ring Cusp Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    There is a need for a lightweight, low power ion thruster for space science missions. Such an ion thruster is under development at NASA Glenn Research Center. In an effort to better understand the discharge performance of this thruster, a thruster discharge chamber with an anode containing electrically isolated electrodes at the cusps was fabricated and tested. Characteristics of this ring cusp ion discharge were measured without ion beam extraction. Discharge current was measured at collection electrodes located at the magnetic cusps and at the anode body itself. Discharge performance and plasma properties were measured as a function of power, which was varied between 20 and 50 W. It was found that ion production costs decreased by as much as 20 percent when the two most downstream cusp electrodes were allowed to float. Floating the electrodes did not give rise to a significant increase in discharge power even though the plasma density increased markedly. The improved performance is attributed to enhanced electron containment.

  2. Enhanced sensing in a double-Raman superluminal ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi-Salloum, T. Y.; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the feasibility of realizing a superluminal ring laser with enhanced sensitivity by using the gain produced via double-Raman pumping in an inverted three-level system. If the laser cavity is tuned to the center between the two gain peaks produced in such a system, it is expected to experience an effective negative dispersion, which can be tuned to the condition necessary for enhancing the sensitivity of the laser frequency to a change in the cavity length. Using a model of two idealized, independent Lorentzian gains, we solve the laser equations to show the enhancement of sensitivity. We then extend our analysis to calculate the gain profile in a real lambda system. Unlike the idealized system mentioned above, where the dual gain peaks are modeled as two adjacent Lorentzians in a manner that ignores the relative coherence between the Raman pumps, we present a more accurate model where this coherence is not neglected. As such, the Hamiltonian remains time dependent after making the rotating wave transformation. Using an approximation --- valid for practical systems --- where higher order terms in the density matrix are neglected, we determine the gain experienced by a weak probe beam. Numerical techniques are needed to incorporate the resulting gain and dispersion profiles into the laser equation to determine accurately the behavior of the superluminal laser. This work will be carried out in the near future. Experimental realization of a superluminal laser based on this approach may prove to be easier than other approaches proposed previously.

  3. Convection-enhanced delivery of polyethylene glycol-coated liposomal doxorubicin: characterization and efficacy in rat intracranial glioma models.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Saito, Ryuta; Sugiyama, Shin-ichirou; Yamashita, Yoji; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Krauze, Michal; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2008-11-01

    The characteristics of polyethylene glycol-coated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), the only liposomal drug now clinically available for intravenous injection, were investigated after convection-enhanced delivery (CED) into the rat brain parenchyma. The distribution, tissue retention, and toxicity profile were evaluated after CED into the rat brain parenchyma. The antitumor efficacy was also determined in rodent intracranial U-251MG and U-87MG glioma models. Convection-enhanced delivery of PLD achieved wider distributions and delayed onset of toxicity in the brain parenchyma compared with CED of free doxorubicin infusion. Fluorescence generated from doxorubicin infused as PLD was detected until at least 30 days after infusion. Local toxicity was not observed when a 10% dilution of the commercially available PLD solution was used (0.2 mg/ml doxorubicin), but was significant at higher concentrations. Results after 10% PLD was delivered locally with CED demonstrated significant survival prolongation in both intracranial U-251MG and U-87MG xenograft models. Convection-enhanced delivery of PLD achieved extensive tissue distribution and sustained drug release. Convection-enhanced delivery of PLD is a promising chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  4. CAD scheme for detection of intracranial aneurysms in MRA based on 3D analysis of vessel skeletons and enhanced aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Li, Qiang; Korogi, Yukunori; Hirai, Toshinori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Ikeda, Ryuji; Doi, Kunio

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for detection of unruptured intracranial aneurysms in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) based on findings of short branches in vessel skeletons, and a three-dimensional (3D) selective enhancement filter for dots (aneurysms). Fifty-three cases with 61 unruptured aneurysms and 62 non-aneurysm cases were tested in this study. The isotropic 3D MRA images with 400 x 400 x 128 voxels (a voxel size of 0.5 mm) were processed by use of the dot enhancement filter. The initial candidates were identified not only on the dot-enhanced images by use of a multiple gray-level thresholding technique, but also on the vessel skeletons by finding short branches on parent skeletons, which can indicate a high likelihood of small aneurysms. All candidates were classified into four categories of candidates according to effective diameter and local structure of the vessel skeleton. In each category, a number of false positives were removed by use of two rule-based schemes and by linear discriminant analysis on localized image features related to gray level and morphology. Our CAD scheme achieved a sensitivity of 97% with 5.0 false positives per patient by use of a leave-one-out-by-patient test method. This CAD system may be useful in assisting radiologists in the detection of small intracranial aneurysms as well as medium-size aneurysms in MRA.

  5. Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) with intracranial Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue; Sun, Xiaolong; Li, Wen; Li, Yi; Kang, Tao; Yang, Xiai; Jiang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is an inflammatory disorder in the central nervous system (CNS) with distinct clinical, radiological, and pathological features. The pathophysiology of CLIPPERS still remains unclear and the reports are quite few. Although the radiological lesions were reported to be located predominantly in the pons, brachium pontis, and cerebellum, other adjacent structures such as the white matter and spinal cord were very recently reported as involved regions in CLIPPERS. In this study, we report a case of CLIPPERS presenting with intracranial Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection and diffuse white matter involvement. Case summary: A 37-year-old male was diagnosed with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma (lymphocyte predominance type) at the age of 26, and then obtained complete remission after treatment and remained free of relapse for 11 years. He was admitted with 7 months’ history of mental disorder, and 20 days’ history of gait and limb ataxia, dysphagia, and cough. The diagnosis of CLIPPERS was established based on the findings of punctate and nodular enhancing lesions in the bilateral pons, the basal ganglia, the mid-brain, the pontine brachium, and diffuse white matter in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), together with CD3+ T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltration in perivascular and parenchymal area revealed by bilateral parietal lobe brain biopsy. Also, our patient exhibited a good response to steroid therapy and remained free of relapse for 5 months. Importantly, we found intracranial Epstein–Barr virus infection in this patient. Conclusion: CLIPPERS might be an autoimmune disorder, and intracranial EBV-infection raises the possibility that EBV-associated autoimmunity is associated with CLIPPERS pathogenesis. PMID:27861371

  6. Evaluation of fast highly undersampled contrast-enhanced MR angiography (sparse CE-MRA) in intracranial applications - initial study.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Marcel; Schlamann, Marc; Goericke, Sophia; Maderwald, Stefan; Quick, Harald H

    2017-03-01

    To assess the image quality of sparsely sampled contrast-enhanced MR angiography (sparse CE-MRA) providing high spatial resolution and whole-head coverage. Twenty-three patients scheduled for contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the head, (N = 19 with intracranial pathologies, N = 9 with vascular diseases), were included. Sparse CE-MRA at 3 Tesla was conducted using a single dose of contrast agent. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated the data regarding vascular visibility and diagnostic value of overall 24 parameters and vascular segments on a 5-point ordinary scale (5 = very good, 1 = insufficient vascular visibility). Contrast bolus timing and the resulting arterio-venous overlap was also evaluated. Where available (N = 9), sparse CE-MRA was compared to intracranial Time-of-Flight MRA. The overall rating across all patients for sparse CE-MRA was 3.50 ± 1.07. Direct influence of the contrast bolus timing on the resulting image quality was observed. Overall mean vascular visibility and image quality across different features was rated good to intermediate (3.56 ± 0.95). The average performance of intracranial Time-of-Flight was rated 3.84 ± 0.87 across all patients and 3.54 ± 0.62 across all features. Sparse CE-MRA provides high-quality 3D MRA with high spatial resolution and whole-head coverage within short acquisition time. Accurate contrast bolus timing is mandatory. • Sparse CE-MRA enables fast vascular imaging with full brain coverage. • Volumes with sub-millimetre resolution can be acquired within 10 seconds. • Reader's ratings are good to intermediate and dependent on contrast bolus timing. • The method provides an excellent overview and allows screening for vascular pathologies.

  7. The Contrast Enhancement of Intracranial Arterial Wall on High-resolution MRI and Its Clinical Relevance in Patients with Moyamoya Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maoxue; Yang, Yongbo; Zhou, Fei; Li, Ming; Liu, Renyuan; Guan, Maobin; Li, Rui; He, Le; Xu, Yun; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Bin; Zhao, Xihai

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of intracranial vessel wall enhancement and its relationship with ischemic infarction in patients with Moyamoya vasculopathy (MMV). Forty-seven patients with MMV confirmed by angiography were enrolled in this study. The vessel wall enhancement of the distal internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery was classified into eccentric and concentric patterns, as well as divided into three grades: grade 0, grade 1 and grade 2. The relationship between ischemic infarction and vessel wall enhancement was also determined. Fifty-six enhanced lesions were found in patients with (n = 25) and without acute infarction (n = 22). The incidence of lesions with grade 2 enhancement in patients with acute infarction was greater than that in those without acute infarction (p = 0.011). In addition, grade 2 enhancement of the intracranial vessel wall was significantly associated with acute ischemic infarction (Odds ratio, 26.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.8–258.2; p = 0.005). Higher-grade enhancement of the intracranial vessel wall is independently associated with acute ischemic infarction in patients with MMV. The characteristics of intracranial vessel wall enhancement may serve as a marker of its stability and provide important insight into ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:28276529

  8. Quasi-isochronous storage ring for enhanced FEL performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Robin, D.; Yamazaki, T.

    1996-02-01

    A compact storage ring is designed to be used as driver for a free electron laser (FEL). This ring can be operated very close to zero momentum compaction factor (α) to increase the electron density and thus the gain of the FEL. In order to control α with zero dispersion in the straight sections we use an inverted dipole located between the bending magnets and 4 families of quadrupoles. By using 3 families of sextupoles we can control the 2 transverse chromaticities and 2nd order momentum compaction. We find that the ring has sufficient dynamic aperture for good performance.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of a herpes simplex virus with radiation or temozolomide for intracranial glioblastoma after convection-enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Fellows-Mayle, Wendy; Deluca, Neal A

    2008-11-01

    The herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase implicated in cell cycle arrest and DNA repair inhibition. Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of either the replication-defective, ICP0-producing HSV-1 mutant, d106, or the recombinant d109, devoid of all viral genome expression, was performed to determine the in vivo efficacy of ICP0 in combination with ionizing radiation (IR) or systemic temozolomide (TMZ) in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Intracranial U87-MG xenografts were established in athymic nude mice. Animal survival was determined after mice underwent intracranial CED of either the replication-defective d106 or d109 viruses, or Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), before a single session of whole-brain irradiation or TMZ treatment. Median survival for animals that underwent treatment with HBSS alone, d109 alone, d106 alone, HBSS + IR, HBSS + TMZ, d109 + IR, d106 + IR, and d106 + TMZ was 28, 35, 41, 39, 44, 39, 68 (P < 0.01), and 66 days (P < 0.01), respectively. Intracerebral d106 CED resulted in a significant increase in athymic nude mouse survival when combined with IR or TMZ. d106 CED allows for distribution of HSV-1 in human GBM xenografts and persistent viral infection.

  10. Convection-enhanced delivery of nanoliposomal CPT-11 (irinotecan) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in rodent intracranial brain tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Michal T.; Noble, Charles O.; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Drummond, Daryl; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Yamashita, Yoji; Kullberg, Erika; Forsayeth, John; Park, John W.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of highly stable nanoparticle/liposome agents encapsulating chemotherapeutic drugs is effective against intracranial rodent brain tumor xenografts. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of a newly developed nanoparticle/liposome containing the topoisomerase I inhibitor CPT-11 (nanoliposomal CPT-11 [nLs-CPT-11]), and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) containing the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin. Both drugs were detectable in the CNS for more than 36 days after a single CED application. Tissue half-life was 16.7 days for nLs-CPT-11 and 10.9 days for Doxil. The combination of the two agents produced synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo in U251MG and U87MG intracranial rodent xenograft models, CED of the combination was also more efficacious than either agent used singly. Analysis of the parameters involved in this approach indicated that tissue pharmacokinetics, tumor microanatomy, and biochemical interactions of the drugs all contributed to the therapeutic efficacy observed. These findings have implications for further clinical applications of CED-based treatment of brain tumors. PMID:17652269

  11. Convection-enhanced delivery of nanoliposomal CPT-11 (irinotecan) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in rodent intracranial brain tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Krauze, Michal T; Noble, Charles O; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Drummond, Daryl; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Yamashita, Yoji; Kullberg, Erika; Forsayeth, John; Park, John W; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2007-10-01

    We have previously shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of highly stable nanoparticle/liposome agents encapsulating chemotherapeutic drugs is effective against intracranial rodent brain tumor xenografts. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of a newly developed nanoparticle/liposome containing the topoisomerase I inhibitor CPT-11 (nanoliposomal CPT-11 [nLs-CPT-11]), and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) containing the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin. Both drugs were detectable in the CNS for more than 36 days after a single CED application. Tissue half-life was 16.7 days for nLs-CPT-11 and 10.9 days for Doxil. The combination of the two agents produced synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo in U251MG and U87MG intracranial rodent xenograft models, CED of the combination was also more efficacious than either agent used singly. Analysis of the parameters involved in this approach indicated that tissue pharmacokinetics, tumor microanatomy, and biochemical interactions of the drugs all contributed to the therapeutic efficacy observed. These findings have implications for further clinical applications of CED-based treatment of brain tumors.

  12. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, L S; Shih, C J

    1993-12-01

    This paper analyzes the available literature on intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in Taiwan. The incidence and symptoms of the disease are studied with a view to assisting practitioners in its recognition. The incidence of intracranial AVM in patients who have suffered hemorrhagic stroke in Taiwan is 2.5% to 4.8%, with the male to female ratio being 1.5:1. The peak age at which bleeding from intracranial AVM occurred ranged from 10 to 40 years; bleeding showed no seasonal variation. Sudden headaches, vomiting, and disturbance of consciousness were the commonest presenting symptoms of AVM, similar to the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. However, the possibility of focal neurological deficit among patients with intracranial AVM was higher than in patients with intracranial aneurysms. Risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, smoking and alcohol intake showed no close relationship to bleeding in intracranial AVM. Pregnancy is not a risk factor in female patients with intracranial AVM with no history of hemorrhage. Small intracranial AVM are more likely to bleed. Since 1961 the majority of Taiwan's intracranial AVM patients have been treated surgically, while before that date general medicine was the treatment of choice. In recent years, several developments such as operation microscope, microsurgical instruments and microsurgical techniques have enhanced the efficacy of surgical intervention in the treatment of AVM. When the mortality and morbidity rates resulting from the two forms of treatment are compared, surgical treatment shows a better prognosis for the treatment of intracranial AVM.

  13. Why a standard contrast-enhanced MRI might be useful in intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Oeinck, Maximilian; Rozeik, Christoph; Wattchow, Jens; Meckel, Stephan; Schlageter, Manuel; Beeskow, Christel

    2016-01-01

    In patients with ischemic stroke of unknown cause cerebral vasculitis is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis, especially when signs of intracranial artery stenosis are found and laboratory findings show systemic inflammation. In such cases, high-resolution T1w vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; ‘black blood’ technique) at 3 T is preferentially performed, but may not be available in every hospital. We report a case of an 84-year-old man with right hemispheric transient ischemic attack and signs of distal occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) in duplex sonography. Standard MRI with contrast agent pointed the way to the correct diagnosis since it showed an intramural contrast uptake in the right ICA and both vertebral arteries. Temporal artery biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis and dedicated vessel wall MRI performed later supported the suspected intracranial large artery inflammation. Our case also shows that early diagnosis and immunosuppressive therapy may not always prevent disease progression, as our patient suffered several infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory with consecutive high-grade hemiparesis of the right side within the following four months. PMID:26988083

  14. Imaging of intracranial aneurysm by three-dimensional contrast enhanced duplex sonography-two case reports.

    PubMed

    Delcker; Turowski

    1997-12-01

    We report two cases of intracranial aneurysms to give an impression of the use of three-dimensional (3-D) transcranial duplex sonography in combination with the application of a transpulmonary stable contrast agent. Data acquisition was performed with a free-hand scanning of the transducer (2 MHz) and a prototype of a new magnetic sensor system to track the spatial orientation of the ultrasound probe while scanning the volume of interest. The 3-D data were stored and afterwards 3-D reconstructions performed. Three-dimensional transcranial color duplex system with power Doppler mode showed an exact spatial orientation of the intracranial arteries. The three-dimensional system lets the reader retrospectively choose the section plane through the 3-D data set, and the reconstructions through the data set allowed us to localize aneurysms in both cases. The increased freedom of movement of the transducer allows the sonographer to maintain transducer contact with the skin, while offering the freedom to move the transducer as needed to remain on the acoustic window. Copyright 1997 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  15. Hyperautofluorescent Macular Ring in a Series of Patients With Enhanced S-Cone

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rony; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Duncker, Tobias; Nguyen, Huy V.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe fundus autofluorescence (AF) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings in three patients with enhanced S-cone syndrome and their correlation around the hyperautofluorescent ring border. Patients had AF imaging in combination with SD-OCT line-scans through the fovea, at the posterior pole, and at a temporal locus centered on the ring border. All eyes demonstrated a macular ring of high-intensity AF. The inner segment ellipsoid band showed thinning and disorganization toward the ring border, where it was lost. PMID:25423642

  16. Prospective intraindividual comparison of gadoterate and gadobutrol for cervical and intracranial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Hoelter, Philip; Lang, Stefan; Weibart, Marina; Schmidt, Manuel; Knott, Michael F X; Engelhorn, Tobias; Essig, Marco; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd

    2017-09-14

    Gadobutrol (GB) is reported to provide improved relaxivity and concentration compared to gadoterate (GT). This study was designed to intraindividually compare quantitative and qualitative enhancement characteristics of GB to GT in cervicocranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Patients (n = 54) with CVD underwent two identical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) examinations of the cervical and intracranial vasculature in randomized order, using GB and GT in equimolar dose. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were obtained by two independent neuroradiologists, blinded to the applied contrast agents. Qualitative assessment was performed using a three-point scale with a focus on M1/M2 segments. One thousand and twenty-six vessel segments were analyzed. GB revealed a significantly higher SNR (p = 0.032) and CNR (p = 0.031) in all vessel segments. GB featured a significantly higher SNR and CNR in thoracic (p = 0.022; p = 0.016) and cervical vessels (p = 0.03; p = 0.038), as well as in the posterior circulation (p = 0.012; p = 0.005). In blinded qualitative assessment, overall preference was given to GB (p = 0.02), showing a significant better delineation of the M1/M2 segments (p = 0.041). Compared to GT, the use of GB results in a significantly higher SNR and CNR in cervical and cerebral CE-MRA, leading to a better delineation of the intracranial vasculature. Present results underline the potential of GB for improved CE-MRA assessment of vasculature in CVD patients.

  17. Enhanced ring lasers: a new measurement tool for Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, K. U.; Kluegel, T.; Wells, J.-P.; Holdaway, J.; Gebauer, A.; Velikoseltsev, A.

    2012-11-01

    We report the progress in the technology of fabrication of large ring lasers that has resulted in an increase in instrumental rotation sensitivity by as much as a factor of 3, to δΩ = 1.2 × 10-11 rad s-1 Hz-1/2, which makes the domain of changes in the angular velocity of Earth's rotation, ΔΩ/Ω ≈ 10-9, accessible to a local rotation sensor. New studies show that the largest contribution to the observed deviation in sensor performance with respect to the computed shot noise limit is caused by the micro-seismic background activity of the Earth. Our efforts have been concentrated on the improvement of sensor stability, including correction of drift effects, which are caused by the aging of the laser gas, fixing scale factor instabilities induced by atmospheric pressure variations, and minimising the temperature variations resulting from corresponding adiabatic expansion and compression of the local air around the instrument. To achieve this, we have recently introduced a pressure-stabilising vessel with dimensions slightly larger than the ring laser apparatus, such that it encloses the entire structure. By monitoring the optical frequency in the ring laser cavity continuously and stabilising the scale factor in a closed loop system with the pressure-stabilising vessel, it has become possible to extend the range of sensor stability from the short term (1 — 3 days) to well into the mid-term regime (>40 days), and possibly even well beyond that. Once a sufficiently long timeseries of the ring laser data has been recorded, we will be able to define the range of temporal stability in more detail. The extension of the regime of stability gives access to geophysical signals at frequencies substantially lower than previously observable with ring lasers.

  18. Enhanced ring lasers: a new measurement tool for Earth sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, K U; Kluegel, T; Wells, J.-P.; Holdaway, J; Gebauer, A; Velikoseltsev, A

    2012-11-30

    We report the progress in the technology of fabrication of large ring lasers that has resulted in an increase in instrumental rotation sensitivity by as much as a factor of 3, to {delta}{Omega} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} rad s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}, which makes the domain of changes in the angular velocity of Earth's rotation, {Delta}{Omega}/{Omega} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9}, accessible to a local rotation sensor. New studies show that the largest contribution to the observed deviation in sensor performance with respect to the computed shot noise limit is caused by the micro-seismic background activity of the Earth. Our efforts have been concentrated on the improvement of sensor stability, including correction of drift effects, which are caused by the aging of the laser gas, fixing scale factor instabilities induced by atmospheric pressure variations, and minimising the temperature variations resulting from corresponding adiabatic expansion and compression of the local air around the instrument. To achieve this, we have recently introduced a pressure-stabilising vessel with dimensions slightly larger than the ring laser apparatus, such that it encloses the entire structure. By monitoring the optical frequency in the ring laser cavity continuously and stabilising the scale factor in a closed loop system with the pressure-stabilising vessel, it has become possible to extend the range of sensor stability from the short term (1 - 3 days) to well into the mid-term regime (>40 days), and possibly even well beyond that. Once a sufficiently long timeseries of the ring laser data has been recorded, we will be able to define the range of temporal stability in more detail. The extension of the regime of stability gives access to geophysical signals at frequencies substantially lower than previously observable with ring lasers. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Enhanced delivery of paclitaxel liposomes using focused ultrasound with microbubbles for treating nude mice bearing intracranial glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuanyuan; Pi, Zhaoke; Yan, Fei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Zeng, Xiaojun; Diao, Xianfen; Hu, Yaxin; Chen, Siping; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel liposomes (PTX-LIPO) are a clinically promising antineoplastic drug formulation for the treatment of various extracranial cancers, excluding glioblastoma. A main reason for this is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or blood-tumor barrier (BTB), preventing liposomal drugs from crossing at a therapeutically meaningful level. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles (MBs) has been suggested in many studies to be an effective approach to increase the BBB or BTB permeability. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of enhancing the delivery of PTX-LIPO in intracranial glioblastoma-bearing nude mice using pulsed low-intensity FUS exposure in the presence of MBs. Our results showed that the delivery efficiency of PTX-LIPO could be effectively improved in terms of the penetration of both the BBB in vitro and BTB in vivo by pulsed FUS sonication with a 10 ms pulse length and 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency at 0.64 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in the presence of MBs. Quantitative analysis showed that a 2-fold higher drug concentration had accumulated in the glioblastoma 3 h after FUS treatment, with 7.20±1.18 µg PTX per g glioma tissue. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis illustrated that the intracranial glioblastoma progression in nude mice treated with PTX-LIPO delivered via FUS with MBs was suppressed consistently for 4 weeks compared to the untreated group. The medium survival time of these tumor-bearing nude mice was significantly prolonged by 20.8%, compared to the untreated nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis further confirmed the antiproliferation effect and cell apoptosis induction. Our study demonstrated that noninvasive low-intensity FUS with MBs can be used as an effective approach to deliver PTX-LIPO in order to improve their chemotherapy efficacy toward glioblastoma.

  20. Intracranial Hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... one that causes only a brief lapse of consciousness (concussion) — can be minor, an intracranial hematoma is ... Increasing headache Vomiting Drowsiness and progressive loss of consciousness Dizziness Confusion Unequal pupil size Slurred speech As ...

  1. Enhancing spatial resolution of digital holographic microscopy using speckle patterns generated from ring-slit apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funamizu, Hideki; Chen, Tan Qin; Onodera, Yusei; Uozumi, Jun; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we propose a method to enhance the spatial resolution of digital holographic microscopy with speckle-illumination. In this method, speckle patterns are generated from coherence light passing through ring-slit apertures instead of the most typical circular apertures, to obtain higher numerical aperture. The results show that a reconstructed image with the higher resolution is obtained using ring-slit apertures.

  2. Optical Peaking Enhancement in High-Speed Ring Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Müller, J.; Merget, F.; Azadeh, S. Sharif; Hauck, J.; García, S. Romero; Shen, B.; Witzens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Ring resonator modulators (RRM) combine extreme compactness, low power consumption and wavelength division multiplexing functionality, making them a frontrunner for addressing the scalability requirements of short distance optical links. To extend data rates beyond the classically assumed bandwidth capability, we derive and experimentally verify closed form equations of the electro-optic response and asymmetric side band generation resulting from inherent transient time dynamics and leverage these to significantly improve device performance. An equivalent circuit description with a commonly used peaking amplifier model allows straightforward assessment of the effect on existing communication system architectures. A small signal analytical expression of peaking in the electro-optic response of RRMs is derived and used to extend the electro-optic bandwidth of the device above 40 GHz as well as to open eye diagrams penalized by intersymbol interference at 32, 40 and 44 Gbps. Predicted peaking and asymmetric side band generation are in excellent agreement with experiments. PMID:25209255

  3. Spoof localized surface plasmons on ultrathin textured MIM ring resonator with enhanced resonances

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Xiao, Qian Xun; Jia Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate that spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonant modes can be enhanced based on ultrathin corrugated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) ring resonator. Further enhancement of the LSPs modes has been achieved by incorporating an efficient and ease-of-integration exciting method. Quality factors of resonance peaks have become much larger and multipolar resonances modes can be easily observed on the textured MIM ring resonator excited by a microstrip line. Experimental results validate the high-efficiency excitation and resonance enhancements of spoof LSPs modes on the MIM ring resonator in the microwave frequencies. We have shown that the fabricated resonator is sensitive to the variation of both the dielectric constant and the thickness of surrounding materials under test. The spoof plasmonic resonator can be used as key elements to provide many important device functionalities such as optical communications, signal processing, and spectral engineering in the plasmonic integration platform. PMID:26420668

  4. Spoof localized surface plasmons on ultrathin textured MIM ring resonator with enhanced resonances.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Xiao, Qian Xun; Yang, Bao Jia

    2015-09-30

    We numerically demonstrate that spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonant modes can be enhanced based on ultrathin corrugated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) ring resonator. Further enhancement of the LSPs modes has been achieved by incorporating an efficient and ease-of-integration exciting method. Quality factors of resonance peaks have become much larger and multipolar resonances modes can be easily observed on the textured MIM ring resonator excited by a microstrip line. Experimental results validate the high-efficiency excitation and resonance enhancements of spoof LSPs modes on the MIM ring resonator in the microwave frequencies. We have shown that the fabricated resonator is sensitive to the variation of both the dielectric constant and the thickness of surrounding materials under test. The spoof plasmonic resonator can be used as key elements to provide many important device functionalities such as optical communications, signal processing, and spectral engineering in the plasmonic integration platform.

  5. Cocaine-induced reward enhancement measured with intracranial self-stimulation in rats bred for low versus high saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Radke, Anna K; Zlebnik, Natalie E; Holtz, Nathan A; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-04-01

    Rats selectively bred for high (HiS) or low (LoS) saccharin intake are a well-established model of drug-abuse vulnerability, with HiS rats being more likely to consume sweets and cocaine than LoS rats. Still, the nature of these differences is poorly understood. This study examined whether the motivational consequences of cocaine exposure are differentially expressed in HiS and LoS rats by measuring intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds following acute injections of cocaine (10 mg/kg). Reductions in ICSS thresholds following cocaine injection were greater in HiS rats than in LoS rats, suggesting that the reward-enhancing effects of cocaine are greater in the drug-vulnerable HiS than LoS rats. Higher cocaine-induced reward, indicated by lower ICSS thresholds, may explain the higher rates of drug consumption in sweet-preferring animal models, providing a clue to the etiology of cocaine addiction in vulnerable populations.

  6. Contrast-enhanced MR myelography in spontaneous intracranial hypotension: description of an artefact imitating CSF leakage.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; DuMesnil, Richard; Pilatus, Ulrich; Raabe, Andreas; Kahles, Timo; Beck, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    In contrast-enhanced (CE) MR myelography, hyperintense signal outside the intrathecal space in T1-weighted sequences with spectral presaturation inversion recovery (SPIR) is usually considered to be due to CSF leakage. We retrospectively investigated a hyperintense signal at the apex of the lung appearing in this sequence in patients with SIH (n = 5), CSF rhinorrhoea (n = 2), lumbar spine surgery (n = 1) and in control subjects (n = 6). Intrathecal application of contrast agent was performed in all patients before MR examination, but not in the control group. The reproducible signal increase was investigated with other fat suppression techniques and MR spectroscopy. All patients and controls showed strongly hyperintense signal at the apex of the lungs imitating CSF leakage into paraspinal tissue. This signal increase was identified as an artefact, caused by spectroscopically proven shift and broadening of water and lipid resonances (1-2 ppm) in this anatomical region. Only patients with SIH showed additional focal enhancement along the spinal nerve roots and/or in the spinal epidural space. In conclusion CE MR myelography with spectral selective fat suppression shows a reproducible cervicothoracic artefact, imitating CSF leakage. Selective water excitation technique as well as periradicular and epidural contrast collections may be helpful to discriminate between real pathological findings and artefacts.

  7. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  8. Demonstration of composite signal enhancement from surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in a liquid core optical ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian M.; Gohring, John; Fan, Xudong

    2007-09-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) utilizing silver colloids for localized plasmonic enhancement has been heavily researched due to its tremendous increase in the Raman signal of bio/chemical molecules. We demonstrate further enhancement by multiplying the SERS effect by the resonant enhancement of a ring resonator microcavity. The liquid core optical ring resonator (LCORR) offers a high-performance and practical design to obtain this composite enhancement for bio/chemical molecule detection. The LCORR integrates an array of optical ring resonators into a capillary-based microfluidic channel to form a novel bio/chemical sensing platform. The circular cross-section of the glass capillary acts as an optical ring resonator, with the evanescent field of the resonant light interacting with the sample passing through the capillary. The LCORR has already been well-studied for applications in label free biomolecule sensing. In this work, we utilize a silver colloid solution inside the capillary to perform SERS-based detection. In contrast to a typical SERS system where the incident light interacts with the colloid and target molecules only once, in the LCORR system, the tightly confined light resonates around the capillary wall, repeatedly interacting with the SERS system. Our experimental results show the increased enhancement due to the composite effect of the cavity resonance and the localized plasmonic effect of the nanoparticles inside the cavity. We have achieved detection of 3.3 nM R6G inside the LCORR. In addition to the excellent sensitivity, this detection system represents an advancement in the development of practical SERS bio/chemical sensors due to the arrayed nature of the sensors combined with the integrated microfluidics of the LCORR.

  9. Three-dimensional dynamic time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA using parallel imaging and a variable rate k-space sampling strategy in intracranial arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Mina; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Trystram, Denis; Nataf, François; Godon-Hardy, Sylvie; Munier, Thierry; Oppenheim, Catherine; Meder, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA (TR-CE-MRA) using a combination of a parallel imaging technique (ASSET: array spatial sensitivity encoding technique) and a time-resolved method (TRICKS: time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics) and to compare it with 3D dynamic TR-CE-MRA using ASSET alone in the assessment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Twenty consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed AVMs were investigated using both 3D dynamic TR-CE-MRA techniques. Examinations were compared with respect to image quality, spatial resolution, number and type of feeders and drainers, nidus size, presence of early venous filling and temporal resolution. Digital subtraction angiography was used as standard of reference. The higher temporal and spatial resolution of 3D dynamic TR-CE-MRA TRICKS ASSET allowed a better assessment of intracranial vascular malformations, namely better depiction of feeders, drainers and better detection of early venous drainage. There was no significant difference between them in terms of nidus size. 3D dynamic TR-CE-MRA combining parallel imaging and a time-resolved method with subsecond and submillimeter resolution could become the first-line investigation technique in both diagnosis and follow-up of intracranial AVMs.

  10. The Gemini-Monoceros X-ray enhancement - A giant X-ray ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Lindblad, C. J.; Garmire, G. P.; Cowie, L. L.; Hu, E.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5 deg spatial resolution map of the 1/4 KeV diffuse X-ray background enhancement in the Gemini and Monoceros constellations is found to show a circular ring-shaped emission feature with a diameter of 20 deg. The feature and possible X-ray contributions from the Mon OB1 association and neighboring supernova remnants are discussed. From 300 pc, the region has a radius of 50 pc, with an emitting electron density of 0.01 per cu cm. A shell of expanding neutral hydrogen and nonthermal radio spur is observed outside the ring with the X-ray emitting pulsar PSR 0656 + 14 lying close to the center of the ring. Origins of the ring are discussed, ruling out formation by the association Mon OB1. The ring is considered to be a field supernova remnant formed by the progenitor of the central pulsar, and providing constraints on theories of remnant evolution. This conclusion is found to agree with estimated supernova rates, and the absence of additional examples of this stage of evolution is an observational selection effect.

  11. The Gemini-Monoceros X-ray enhancement - A giant X-ray ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Lindblad, C. J.; Garmire, G. P.; Cowie, L. L.; Hu, E.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5 deg spatial resolution map of the 1/4 KeV diffuse X-ray background enhancement in the Gemini and Monoceros constellations is found to show a circular ring-shaped emission feature with a diameter of 20 deg. The feature and possible X-ray contributions from the Mon OB1 association and neighboring supernova remnants are discussed. From 300 pc, the region has a radius of 50 pc, with an emitting electron density of 0.01 per cu cm. A shell of expanding neutral hydrogen and nonthermal radio spur is observed outside the ring with the X-ray emitting pulsar PSR 0656 + 14 lying close to the center of the ring. Origins of the ring are discussed, ruling out formation by the association Mon OB1. The ring is considered to be a field supernova remnant formed by the progenitor of the central pulsar, and providing constraints on theories of remnant evolution. This conclusion is found to agree with estimated supernova rates, and the absence of additional examples of this stage of evolution is an observational selection effect.

  12. Concurrent operational modes and enhanced current sensitivity in heterostructure of magnetoelectric ring and piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengyao; Ming Leung, Chung; Kuang, Wei; Wing Or, Siu; Ho, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    A heterostructure possessing two concurrent operational modes: current sensing (CS) mode and current transduction (CT) mode and an enhanced current sensitivity associated with the CT mode is proposed by combining a magnetoelectric ring (MER) with a piezoelectric transformer (PET). The MER is a ring-shaped magnetoelectric laminate having an axially polarized Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic ring sandwiched between two circumferentially magnetized, inter-magnetically biased Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.92 (Terfenol-D) short-fiber/NdFeB magnet/epoxy three-phase magnetostrictive composite rings, while the PET is a Rosen-type PZT piezoelectric ceramic transformer. The current sensitivity (SI) and magnetoelectric voltage coefficient (αV) of the heterostructure in the two operational modes are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. The CS mode provides a large SI of ˜10 mV/A over a flat frequency range of 10 Hz-40 kHz with a high resonance SI of 157 mV/A at 62 kHz. The CT mode gives a 6.4-times enhancement in resonance SI, reaching 1000 mV/A at 62 kHz, as a result of the amplified vortex magnetoelectric effect caused by the vortex magnetoelectric effect in the MER, the matching of the resonance frequencies between the MER and the PET, and the resonance voltage step-up effect in the PET.

  13. Surface-plasmon-enhanced photoluminescence of quantum dots based on open-ring nanostructure array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannegulla, Akash; Liu, Ye; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-03-01

    Enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of quantum dots (QD) in visible range using plasmonic nanostructures has potential to advance several photonic applications. The enhancement effect is, however, limited by the light coupling efficiency to the nanostructures. Here we demonstrate experimentally a new open-ring nanostructure (ORN) array 100 nm engraved into a 200 nm thick silver thin film to maximize light absorption and, hence, PL enhancement at a broadband spectral range. The structure is different from the traditional isolated or through-hole split-ring structures. Theoretical calculations based on FDTD method show that the absorption peak wavelength can be adjusted by their period and dimension. A broadband absorption of about 60% was measured at the peak wavelength of 550 nm. The emission spectrum of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots was chosen to match the absorption band of the ORN array to enhance its PL. The engraved silver ORN array was fabricated on a silver thin film deposited on a silicon substrate using focus ion beam (FIB) patterning. The device was characterized by using a thin layer of QD water dispersion formed between the ORN substrate and a cover glass. The experimental results show the enhanced PL for the QD with emission spectrum overlapping the absorption band of ORN substrate and quantum efficiency increases from 50% to 70%. The ORN silver substrate with high absorption over a broadband spectrum enables the PL enhancement and will benefit applications in biosensing, wavelength tunable filters, and imaging.

  14. OPUS - Outer Planets Unified Search with Enhanced Surface Geometry Parameters - Not Just for Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Mitchell; Showalter, Mark Robert; Ballard, Lisa; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Heather, Neil

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the massive influx of data into the PDS from a wide array of missions and instruments, finding the precise data you need has been an ongoing challenge. For remote sensing data obtained from Jupiter to Pluto, that challenge is being addressed by the Outer Planets Unified Search, more commonly known as OPUS.OPUS is a powerful search tool available at the PDS Ring-Moon Systems Node (RMS) - formerly the PDS Rings Node. While OPUS was originally designed with ring data in mind, its capabilities have been extended to include all of the targets within an instrument's field of view. OPUS provides preview images of search results, and produces a zip file for easy download of selected products, including a table of user specified metadata. For Cassini ISS and Voyager ISS we have generated and include calibrated versions of every image.Currently OPUS supports data returned by Cassini ISS, UVIS, VIMS, and CIRS (Saturn data through June 2010), New Horizons Jupiter LORRI, Galileo SSI, Voyager ISS and IRIS, and Hubble (ACS, WFC3 and WFPC2).At the RMS Node, we have developed and incorporated into OPUS detailed geometric metadata, based on the most recent SPICE kernels, for all of the bodies in the Cassini Saturn observations. This extensive set of geometric metadata is unique to the RMS Node and enables search constraints such as latitudes and longitudes (Saturn, Titan, and icy satellites), viewing and illumination geometry (phase, incidence and emission angles), and distances and resolution.Our near term plans include adding the full set of Cassini CIRS Saturn data (with enhanced geometry), New Horizons MVIC Jupiter encounter images, New Horizons LORRI and MVIC Pluto data, HST STIS observations, and Cassini and Voyager ring occultations. We also plan to develop enhanced geometric metadata for the New Horizons LORRI and MVIC instruments for both the Jupiter and the Pluto encounters.OPUS: http://pds-rings.seti.org/search/

  15. Spinal dural enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging associated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, N N; Henson, J W; Schaefer, P W; Zervas, N T

    1998-05-01

    This report offers a description of typical changes seen on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the entire spine that indicate spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of its kind. They describe three cases of SIH that were accompanied by dural enhancement throughout the neuraxis on imaging, with the evolution of associated subdural and epidural fluid collections in the spine. Recognition of this disorder is important to be able to distinguish it from an infectious or neoplastic process in which surgical intervention might be warranted. Evaluation using gadolinium-enhanced cranial and spinal MR imaging in patients with postural headaches and an (111)In-labeled cerebrospinal fluid leak study are discussed. Treatment with an epidural blood patch is shown to be particularly effective, with resolution of the radiological and clinical findings.

  16. Intracranial Trigeminal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial trigeminal schwannomas are rare tumors. Patients usually present with symptoms of trigeminal nerve dysfunction, the most common symptom being facial pain. MRI is the imaging modality of choice and is usually diagnostic in the appropriate clinical setting. The thin T2-weighted CISS 3D axial sequence is important for proper assessment of the cisternal segment of the nerve. They are usually hypointense on T1, hyperintense on T2 with avid enhancement post gadolinium. CT scan is supplementary to MRI, particularly for tumors located in the skull base. Imaging plays a role in diagnosis and surgical planning. In this pictorial essay, we retrospectively reviewed imaging findings in nine patients with pathologically proven trigeminal schwannoma. Familiarity with the imaging findings of intracranial trigeminal schwannoma may help to diagnose this entity. PMID:25924170

  17. Interference enhancement and modulation introduced by surface plasmon polaritons in a concentric-ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Senfeng; Wu, Wen; Peng, Li; Gu, Wenhua

    2015-10-01

    This article studied the interference enhancement and modulation introduced by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in a double-concentric-ring structure. Young's double-slit interference experiment is a classic experiment in the history of physics, and has many modifications with deep impacts in many areas including physics, optics, and electromagnetics. In this work, to use the classic bull's eye structure to produce the surface plasmon polariton effect, a double-concentricring- hole structure was used instead of the double-slit structure to generate optical interference, and the bull's eye structure was applied in the surroundings to generate surface plasmonic wave for modulation of the interference. For structure details, a concentric double-ring-hole was etched in a silver film, with a series of periodic concentric-ringshaped shallow grooves etched in both the upper and bottom surfaces of the silver films. Simulation results showed that the interference of the double-ring-hole could be modulated by SPPs, generating new transmission spectra with desired peak positions and intensities. The transmission peak intensity could be enhanced by 2 to 6 times. The proposed structure can be used as a powerful and convenient tool to adjust the transmission spectra, which can have promising applications in the design and implementation of optical devices for filtering and sensing, especially in the sub-wavelength structure size range.

  18. Non-Contrast-Enhanced Silent Scan MR Angiography of Intracranial Anterior Circulation Aneurysms Treated with a Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device.

    PubMed

    Takano, N; Suzuki, M; Irie, R; Yamamoto, M; Teranishi, K; Yatomi, K; Hamasaki, N; Kumamaru, K K; Hori, M; Oishi, H; Aoki, S

    2017-08-01

    The Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device comprises a small-cell nitinol structure and a single-wire braided stent that provides greater metal coverage than previously reported intracranial stents, as well as assumed strong susceptibility artifacts. This study aimed to assess the benefits of non-contrast-enhanced MRA by using a Silent Scan (Silent MRA) for intracranial anterior circulation aneurysms treated with Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device stents. Thirty-one aneurysms treated with Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device stents were assessed by using Silent MRA, 3D TOF-MRA, and x-ray DSA. The quality of MRA visualization of the reconstructed artery was graded on a 4-point scale from 1 (not visible) to 4 (excellent). Aneurysm occlusion status was evaluated by using a 2-grade scale (total occlusion/remnant [neck or aneurysm]). Weighted κ statistics were used to evaluate interobserver and intermodality agreement. The mean scores ± SDs for Silent MRA and 3D TOF-MRA were 3.16 ± 0.79 and 1.48 ± 0.67 (P < .05), respectively, with substantial interobserver agreement (κ = 0.66). The aneurysm occlusion rates of the 2-grade scale (total occlusion/remnant [neck or aneurysm]) were 69%/31% for DSA, 65%/35% for Silent MRA, and 92%/8% for 3D TOF-MRA, respectively. The intermodality agreements were 0.88 and 0.30 for DSA/Silent MRA and DSA/3D TOF-MRA, respectively. Silent MRA seems to be useful for visualizing intracranial anterior circulation aneurysms treated with Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Device stents. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Intracranial endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, H W; Gaab, M R

    1999-04-15

    The authors' intention is to reduce the invasiveness of intracranial procedures while avoiding traumatization of brain tissue, to decrease the risk of neurological and mental deficits. Intracranial endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides rapid access to the target via small burr holes without the need for brain retraction. Craniotomy as well as microsurgical brain splitting and dissection can often be avoided. Furthermore, because obstructed cerebrospinal fluid pathways can be physiologically restored, the need for shunt placement is eliminated. The ventricular system and subarachnoid spaces provide ideal conditions for the use of an endoscope. Therefore, a variety of disorders, such as hydrocephalus, small intraventricular lesions, and arachnoid and parenchymal cysts can be effectively treated using endoscopic techniques. With the aid of special instruments, laser fibers, and bipolar diathermy, even highly vascularized lesions such as cavernomas may be treated. Moreover, during standard microsurgical procedures, the endoscopic view may provide valuable additional information ("looking around a corner") about the individual anatomy that is not visible with the microscope. In transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, transseptal dissection can be avoided if an endonasal approach is taken. In the depth of the intrasellar space, the extent of tumor removal can be more accurately controlled, especially in larger tumors with para- and suprasellar growth. The combined use of endoscopes and computerized neuronavigation systems increases the accuracy of the approach and provides real-time control of the endoscope tip position and approach trajectory. In the future, the indications for neuroendoscopy will certainly expand with improved technical equipment.

  20. Enhanced strongly modulated spin transmission of Fano-Rashba mesoscopic ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Liu, Z. X.; Zhang, X. H.

    2010-09-01

    One-dimensional Rashba quantum ring structure with two leads subjected to a weak external magnetic field is proposed as a possible candidate for spintronic current modulators. By tuning spin-orbit coupling and magnitude of external magnetic field, resonance and antiresonance behavior can be found in our investigation. Comparing with results in other structures like quantum wires with local or periodic Rashba interaction, the T-shaped structure, more broader energy range of vanishing small transmission and larger on/off transmission ratio can be found in the structure and Fano-Rashba interference behaviors of the quantum ring model. Moreover, it is found the enhanced robustness of these interference against random Anderson-type disorder of device, which may conduce to the real application of this device.

  1. Intracranial elimination of human glioblastoma brain tumors in nude rats using the bispecific ligand-directed toxin, DTEGF13 and convection enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seunguk; Ohlfest, John R; Todhunter, Deborah A; Vallera, Vincent D; Hall, Walter A; Chen, Hua; Vallera, Daniel A

    2009-12-01

    A bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT) consisting of human interleukin-13, epithelial growth factor, and the first 389 amino acids of diphtheria toxin was assembled in order to target human glioblastoma. In vitro, DTEGF13 selectively killed the human glioblastoma cell line U87-luc as well as other human glioblastomas. DTEGF13 fulfilled the requirement of a successful BLT by having greater activity than either of its monospecific counterparts or their mixture proving it necessary to have both ligands on the same single chain molecule. Aggressive brain tumors established intracranially (IC) in nude rats with U87 glioma genetically marked with a firefly luciferase reporter gene were treated with two injections of DTEGF13 using convection enhanced delivery resulting in tumor eradication in 50% of the rats which survived with tumor free status at least 110 days post tumor inoculation. An irrelevant BLT control did not protect establishing specificity. The bispecific DTEGF13 MTD dose was measured at 2 microg/injection or 0.5 microg/kg and toxicity studies indicated safety in this dose. Combination of monospecific DTEGF and DTIL13 did not inhibit tumor growth. ELISA assay indicated that anti-DT antibodies were not generated in normal immunocompetent rats given identical intracranial DTEGF13 therapy. Thus, DTEGF13 is safe and efficacious as an alternative drug for glioblastoma therapy and warrants further study.

  2. BAY K 8644-induced enhancement of 45Ca uptake by rabbit aortic rings

    SciTech Connect

    Scriabine, A.; Anderson, C.L.; Janis, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    BAY K 8644, a Ca/sup 2 +/ channel activator, enhances uptake of /sup 45/Ca by rabbit aortic rings. This effect depends on the concentration of K/sup +/ in the medium: at 20 mM K/sup +/ the effect of BAY K 8644 was more pronounced than at 5 mM, whereas at 80 mM, no significant enhancement of /sup 45/Ca uptake by BAY K 8644 was found. In the medium containing 5 mM K/sup +/, BAY K 8644 was effective in experiments involving 10 or 30 (but not 3) min exposure of aortic rings to /sup 45/Ca. The dose-response curve for BAY K 8644 was established in 5 mM K/sup +/-containing medium and for 30 min exposure to /sup 45/Ca. BAY K 8644 was effective at 0.01 microM and higher concentrations. In the presence of norepinephrine (0.1 or 10 microM), BAY K 8644 had no greater effect on /sup 45/Ca uptake than in control 5 mM K/sup +/ medium. Our observation that the presence of norepinephrine in 5 mM K/sup +/ did not enhance BAY K 8644-induced /sup 45/Ca uptake suggests that activation of alpha-adrenergic receptor does not depolarize aortic membranes to the same extent as an increase in K+ concentration to 20 mM or that BAY K 8644 does not enhance Ca/sup 2 +/ entry through receptor-operated channels.

  3. Management of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Castillo, Leonardo; Gopinath, Shankar; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2008-01-01

    Effective management of intracranial hypertension involves meticulous avoidance of factors that precipitate or aggravate increased intracranial pressure. When intracranial pressure becomes elevated, it is important to rule out new mass lesions that should be surgically evacuated. Medical management of increased intracranial pressure should include sedation, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, and osmotherapy with either mannitol or hypertonic saline. For intracranial hypertension refractory to initial medical management, barbiturate coma, hypothermia, or decompressive craniectomy should be considered. Steroids are not indicated and may be harmful in the treatment of intracranial hypertension resulting from traumatic brain injury. PMID:18514825

  4. Intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Puskar, G; Ruggieri, P M

    1995-08-01

    MR angiography provides a rapid, accurate, and extremely flexible noninvasive evaluation of intracranial aneurysms without the cost and risk of conventional angiography. TOF and phase contrast techniques each have specific advantages and disadvantages that can be selectively exploited to optimize aneurysm evaluation. Present indications for MR angiography in aneurysm evaluation include: (1) the presence of incidental findings on a CT or MR examination that suggest the possibility of aneurysm (Figs. 7 and 8), (2) when angiography is contraindicated or when the risk is too high, (3) non-invasive follow-up of patients with known aneurysms, (4) patient refusal of contrast angiography, and (5) evaluation of patients with specific clinical symptoms (i.e., third cranial nerve palsy) or patients with non-specific subacute symptoms in whom an aneurysm might explain the clinical presentation. Although MR angiography certainly can detect aneurysms with a high rate of sensitivity and specificity, detailed decision analyses generally have not supported the overall benefit of this type of screening. Future technical advances as well as advances in the overall understanding of aneurysms may one day prove unequivocally the benefit of MR angiography in screening high-risk patient groups. MR angiography has not yet been clinically evaluated as a tool in the evaluation of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Potential obstacles to such an evaluation include the clinical instability of SAH patients, limited spatial resolution of the MR angiography acquisitions, the potential for subarachnoid blood or focal intraparenchymal hematomas to obscure or mimic small aneurysms, and the unreliability of MR angiography in demonstrating vasospasm. Currently these factors continue to provide an integral role for contrast angiography in aneurysm evaluation.

  5. Cumulative Intracranial Tumor Volume (CITV) Enhances the Prognostic Value of the Lung-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) Model.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Logan P; Marshall, Deborah; Hirshman, Brian R; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Gonda, David D; Koiso, Takao; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A; Carter, Bob S; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Chen, Clark C

    2016-08-01

    Management of patients afflicted with brain metastasis requires tailoring of therapeutic strategies based on survival expectations. Therefore, the development of prognostic indices is of critical importance in this patient population. To determine whether the cumulative intracranial tumor volume (CITV) of brain metastasis augments the prognostic value of the lung-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) index. Patient data were derived from 365 lung cancer patients with brain metastasis who were consecutively treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the University of California, San Diego/San Diego Gamma Knife Center. CITV was analyzed to determine the volume cutoff that maximized sensitivity and specificity for 1-year survival. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed, and overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method risk stratifying with or without this optimal CITV. The prognostic value of these models (lung-specific GPA ± CITV) was quantitatively compared with the use of net reclassification improvement (>0) and integrated discrimination improvement. For the University of California, San Diego/San Diego Gamma Knife Center cohort, the CITV cutoff that had the greatest survival discrimination at 1 year was 4 cm. The addition of CITV to the lung-specific GPA indexes significantly improved the prognostic value of lung-specific GPA, with net reclassification improvement >0 of 0.430 (95% confidence interval, 0.228-0.629) and integrated discrimination improvement of 0.029 (95% confidence interval, 0.004-0.073). These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 1638 lung cancer patients with brain metastasis who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the Katsuta Hospital Mito Gamma House in Japan. In independent cohorts, the addition of CITV to the lung-specific GPA index significantly improved the prognostic value of this index. AUC, area under the receiver-operating characteristic curveBM, brain metastasis

  6. Contrast-Enhanced and Time-of-Flight MR Angiographic Assessment of Endovascular Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms at 1.5 T

    PubMed Central

    Levent, Akin; Yuce, Ihsan; Eren, Suat; Ozyigit, Omer; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) through comparisons with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated with detachable coils. Sixty-seven patients with 79 aneurysms underwent 3D-TOF-MRA, CE-MRA, and catheter angiography one year after coiling. Two independent observers classified recanalization status on images as neck or body remnant or no recanalization. For 3D-TOF-MRA and CE-MRA, the intermodality agreement, interobserver agreement, and correlation with angiography were assessed. Sixty-seven patients with 79 coiled aneurysms agreed to participate in the study. Three aneurysms could not be detected on 3D-TOF-MRA, so they were excluded from this study. Interobserver agreement was very good for 3D-TOF-MRA and CE-MRA (kappa (κ): 0.87, 0.94, respectively). Correlation of TOF-MRA with angiography was good (κ: 0.76). Correlation of CE-MRA with angiography was excellent (κ: 0.91). The sensitivity and specificity of TOF-MRA were 92% and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA were 96% and 98%, respectively. After selective embolization of intracranial aneurysms, CE-MRA is useful and comparable to DSA in the assessment of aneurysmal recanalization. Agreement with the gold standard is stronger with CE-MRA than with 3D-TOF-MRA. PMID:25496678

  7. Antiferromagnetic resonance excitation by terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with split ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Y.; Hirori, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kageyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-07-14

    Excitation of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) in a HoFeO{sub 3} crystal combined with a split ring resonator (SRR) is studied using terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The magnetic field in the vicinity of the SRR is induced by the incident THz electric field component and excites spin oscillations that correspond to the AFMR, which are directly probed by the Faraday rotation of the polarization of a near-infrared probe pulse. The good agreement of the temperature-dependent magnetization dynamics with the calculation using the two-lattice Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation confirms that the AFMR is excited by the THz magnetic field, which is enhanced at the SRR resonance frequency by a factor of 20 compared to the incident magnetic field.

  8. Straw Formation and Enhanced Damping of Strong Density Waves in Saturn’s Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2017-06-01

    High resolution Cassini images of strong density waves in Saturn’s rings often show kilometer-scale structures in the wave troughs that are sometimes described as straw-like structures. These structures are likely formed by transient gravitational instabilities within the density wave and have the potential to greatly enhance the local viscous angular momentum transport and thereby limit the maximum amplitude of the density wave. A Hamiltonian theory for density waves has been developed that can describe the rate of local gravitational instabilities in the wave train. The Hamiltonian for single particle motion in the vicinity of an inner Lindblad resonance with a Saturnian satellite can be formulated such that the angle variable conjugate to the radial action is the resonant argument for the resonance. The density wave can then be derived using Hamiltonian perturbation methods to remove the satellite perturbation such that the transformed radial action and conjugate angles include the usual solution for self-gravitating density waves. Local gravitational instabilities in the density wave can now be formulated using a linearized collisionless Boltzmann equation that is expressed in terms of the transformed action-angle variables that contain the density wave solution. The gravitational potential of the linearized perturbation is found to be enhanced by a factor of ten or more in strong density waves, which likely explains the observation of kilometer-scale structures in these waves. The Hamiltonian formalism can also be used to derive an enhanced effective viscosity that results from these straw-like structures.

  9. "Rings of saturn-like" nanoarrays with high number density of hot spots for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhigao; Mei, Fei; Xiao, Xiangheng; Liao, Lei; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jiao; Wu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Ren, Feng; Jiang, Changzhong

    2014-07-01

    The Ag nanoparticles (NPs) surrounding triangular nanoarrays (TNAs) with high number density of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) hot spots (SERS hot spots ring) are prepared by a combination of NPs deposition and subsequent colloid lithography processing. Owing to the SERS hot spots ring, the Ag NPs surrounding TNAs have been proved an excellent candidate for ultrasensitive molecular sensing for their high SERS signal enhancing capacity in experiments and theories. The Ag NPs surrounding TNAs can be readily used for the quick detection of low concentrations of molecules related to food safety; herein, detection of melamine is discussed.

  10. SpyRings Declassified: A Blueprint for Using Isopeptide-Mediated Cyclization to Enhance Enzyme Thermal Resilience.

    PubMed

    Schoene, C; Bennett, S P; Howarth, M

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes often have marginal stability, with unfolding typically leading to irreversible denaturation. This sensitivity is a major barrier, both for de novo enzyme development and for expanding enzyme impact beyond the laboratory. Seeking an approach to enhance resilience to denaturation that could be applied to a range of different enzymes, we developed SpyRing cyclization. SpyRings contain genetically encoded SpyTag (13 amino acids) on the N-terminus and SpyCatcher (12kDa) on the C-terminus of the enzyme, so that the Spy partners spontaneously react together through an irreversible isopeptide bond. SpyRing cyclization gave major increases in thermal resilience, including on a model for enzyme evolution, β-lactamase, and an industrially important enzyme in agriculture and nutrition, phytase. We outline the SpyRing rationale, including comparison of SpyRing cyclization to other cyclization strategies. The cloning strategy is presented for the simple insertion of enzyme genes for recombinant expression. We discuss structure-based approaches to select suitable enzyme cyclization targets. Approaches to evaluate the cyclization reaction and its effect on enzyme resilience are described. We also highlight the use of differential scanning calorimetry to understand how SpyRing cyclization promotes enzyme refolding. Efficiently searching sequence space will continue to be important for enzyme improvement, but the SpyRing platform may be a valuable rational adjunct for conferring resilience.

  11. Cluster Observations of Channels of Enhanced Convection Velocity in the Ring Current Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Foerster, M.; Labelle, J.; Linder, J.; Matsui, H.; Treumann, R.

    2003-12-01

    For decades, spacecraft-borne instruments have detected enhanced convection features in the duskside and premidnight subauroral region, variously known as polarization jet [Galperin et al., 1973] or subauroral ion drifts (SAID) [Spiro et al., 1979]. We report Cluster observations of this phenomenon, detected with the electron drift instrument (EDI) which uses a novel particle-detection method to measure electric fields in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We have identified enhanced convection velocity striations within the dusk-side ring current region. Such striations with durations 1-5 minutes were observed in AMPTE/IRM data [LaBelle et al., 1988] and also may be the source of fine features observed recently in ground-based radar observations of SAID [Erickson et al., 2002]. Cluster, due to its more polar orbit, finds them on time scales of tens of minutes implying that the channels are extended along magnetic flux tubes. A survey of Cluster/EDI data from February, 2001 until July, 2003 was performed, using data from 14 to 24 hours local time, from 60-69 degrees invariant latitude, and for Kp > 4. Enhanced electric fields were defined as those in the anti-corotation direction (westward) with amplitude exceeding twice the corotation speed. The data show a tendency for the enhanced electric fields to occur at lower latitudes in premidnight/midnight local time than on the duskside, consistent with previous observations. Many previous observations report widths as narrow as 0.1 degrees for SAID events, and for example the 1-5 minute crossing times at IRM imply striation widths on the order of 1000-2000 km. The variable separations of the Cluster spacecraft over the multi-year data set provides a unique opportunity to improve the determination of this width. In this paper, we elaborate about statistical properties, theoretical implications, and association with the SAPS (sub-auroral polarization streams) and SAID phenomena. Erickson, P.J., et al

  12. The Serotonin 2C Receptor Agonist Lorcaserin Attenuates Intracranial Self-Stimulation and Blocks the Reward-Enhancing Effects of Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Fiona D; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    Lorcaserin, a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 2C receptor agonist, was recently approved for the treatment of obesity. We previously suggested that 5-HT2C receptor agonists affect reward processes and reduce the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Here, we determined whether lorcaserin (1) decreases responding for brain stimulation reward (BSR) and (2) prevents nicotine from enhancing the efficacy of BSR. Rats were trained on the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm to nosepoke for BSR of either the dorsal raphé nucleus or left medial forebrain bundle. In Experiment 1, lorcaserin (0.3-1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced the efficacy of BSR. This effect was blocked by prior administration of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB242084. In Experiment 2, separate groups of rats received saline or nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) for eight sessions prior to testing. Although thresholds were unaltered in saline-treated rats, nicotine reduced reward thresholds. An injection of lorcaserin (0.3 mg/kg) prior to nicotine prevented the reward-enhancing effect of nicotine across multiple test sessions. These results demonstrated that lorcaserin reduces the rewarding value of BSR and also prevents nicotine from facilitating ICSS. Hence, lorcaserin may be effective in treating psychiatric disorders, including obesity and nicotine addiction, by reducing the value of food or drug rewards.

  13. Analysis of SDWDM Ring Network and Enhancement Using Different Hybrid Optical Amplifiers and Modulation Formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Vineet; Sharma, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, performance enhancement of super-dense wavelength division multiplexing (SDWDM) optical add-drop multiplexer optical ring network for six nodes, 50 wavelengths having channel spacing of 0.2 nm for 300 km unidirectional nonlinear fiber is successfully demonstrated. The performance of the designed system is enhanced by comparing different modulation formats (non-return to zero (NRZ), return to zero (RZ), soliton, chirped return to zero (CRZ), carrier-suppressed RZ (CSRZ)) and hybrid amplifiers (Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA)-EDFA, semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-SOA, SOA, EDFA, EDFA-SOA) on the basis of eye diagram and bit error rate (BER). It has been observed that CRZ modulation format and EDFA-SOA shows the best results. It has been reported that EDFA-SOA/CRZ modulation format can achieve BER as better as e-13, which gives best performance. The effect of channel spacing on SDWDM system and performance degradation due to crosstalk is also evaluated.

  14. A Compact Pentagonal Ring CPW-Fed Zeroth Order Resonating Antenna with Gain Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashish; Chaudhary, Raghvendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a pentagonal ring CPW-fed zeroth order resonating (ZOR) antenna with gain enhancement is proposed. Gain enhancement is achieved by means of electromagnetic bandgap structures (EBG) loaded on patch. The proposed antenna is operated in series resonant mode, therefore resonance frequency is dominated by series parameters of the conventional CRLH transmission line. The antenna comprises of a circular patch which is imposed by interdigital capacitor and EBG structures. Meandered line inductor is connected between patch and pentagonal ground plane in order to ensure miniaturization using CRLH resonant approach. Measurement results shows that proposed antenna offers ZOR resonance at 2.7 GHz with 4.81 %, 10 dB fractional bandwidth. The antenna offers simulated gain of 1.63 dBi and 80.6 % radiation efficiency at ZOR frequency. Surface current distribution shows that how these CRLH - TL components responsible for origination of ZOR mode. Proposed antenna exhibits excellent radiation patterns with cross polarization level of -53 dB in the boresight direction.

  15. Enhancement of spatial resolution in digital holographic microscopy using speckle field generated from ring-slit apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funamizu, Hideki; Onodera, Yusei; Uozumi, Jun; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we propose a method to enhance the spatial resolution of digital holographic microscopy with speckle illuminations. In this method, speckle patterns are generated from coherence light passing through ringslit apertures instead of the most typical circular apertures, to obtain higher numerical aperture. The results show that a reconstructed image with the higher resolution is obtained using ring-slit apertures.

  16. Intracranial microvascular free flaps.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven; Garfein, Evan S; Weiner, Howard; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Saadeh, Pierre B; Gurtner, Geoffrey; Levine, Jamie P; Warren, Stephen M

    2009-02-01

    Large acquired intracranial defects can result from trauma or surgery. When reoperation is required because of infection or tumor recurrence, management of the intracranial dead space can be challenging. By providing well-vascularized bulky tissue, intracranial microvascular free flaps offer potential solutions to these life-threatening complications. A multi-institutional retrospective chart and radiographic review was performed of all patients who underwent microvascular free-flap surgery for salvage treatment of postoperative intracranial infections between 1998 and 2006. A total of six patients were identified with large intracranial defects and postoperative intracranial infections. Four patients had parenchymal resections for tumor or seizure and two patients had posttraumatic encephalomalacia. All patients underwent operative debridement and intracranial free-flap reconstruction using the latissimus dorsi muscle (N=2), rectus abdominis muscle (N=2), or omentum (N=2). All patients had titanium (N=4) or Medpor (N=2) cranioplasties. We concluded that surgery or trauma can result in significant intracranial dead space. Treatment of postoperative intracranial infection can be challenging. Vascularized free tissue transfer not only fills the void, but also provides a delivery system for immune cells, antibodies, and systemically administered antibiotics. The early use of this technique when intracranial dead space and infection coexist is beneficial.

  17. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 10- 7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close range and in real time in planetary rings.We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk) and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally confined arcs at Neptune, Saturn, and Jupiter. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.Planetary rings have shown themselves to be useful as detectors of planetary processes around them, including the planetary magnetic field and interplanetary impactors as well as the gravity of nearby perturbing moons. Experimental rings science has made great progress in recent decades, especially numerical simulations of self-gravity wakes and other processes but also laboratory investigations of coefficient of restitution and spectroscopic ground truth. The age of self-sustained ring systems is a matter of

  18. Accelerated noncontrast-enhanced 4-dimensional intracranial MR angiography using golden-angle stack-of-stars trajectory and compressed sensing with magnitude subtraction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Fei; Yu, Songlin; Yu, Dandan; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Song, Hee Kwon; Wang, Danny J J; Hu, Peng; Yan, Lirong

    2017-05-07

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of compressed sensing (CS) with magnitude subtraction regularization in accelerating non-contrast-enhanced dynamic intracranial MR angiography (NCE-dMRA). A CS algorithm was introduced in NCE-dMRA by exploiting the sparsity of the magnitude difference of the control and label images. The NCE-dMRA data were acquired using golden-angle stack-of-stars trajectory on six healthy volunteers and one patient with arteriovenous fistula. Images were reconstructed using (i) the proposed magnitude-subtraction CS (MS-CS); (ii) complex-subtraction CS; (iii) independent CS; and (iv) view-sharing with k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC). The dMRA image quality was compared across the four reconstruction strategies. The proposed MS-CS method was further compared with KWIC for temporal fidelity of depicting dynamic flow. The proposed MS-CS method was able to reconstruct NCE-dMRA images with detailed vascular structures and clean background. It provided better subjective image quality than the other two CS strategies (P < 0.05). Compared with KWIC, MS-CS showed similar image quality, but reduced temporal blurring in delineating the fine distal arteries. The MS-CS method is a promising CS technique for accelerating NCE-dMRA acquisition without compromising image quality and temporal fidelity. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated by a WEB flow disrupter: a comparative study of DSA and contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Mine, Benjamin; Tancredi, Illario; Aljishi, Ali; Alghamdi, Faisal; Beltran, Margarita; Herchuelz, Maxime; Lubicz, Boris

    2016-06-01

    To compare contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and DSA for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) treated with the Woven EndoBridge embolization system DL (WEB DL; Sequent Medical, Aliso Viejo, California, USA). We retrospectively identified all patients treated with a WEB DL between November 2010 and February 2013 in 2 hospitals. The IA occlusion was graded on follow-up CE-MRA and DSA by 4 independent readers and by 2 readers reaching a consensus, respectively. Interobserver agreement for MRA and intertechnique agreement was evaluated by calculating linear weighted κ. Fifteen patients with 16 IAs were included. Mean delay between MRA and DSA was 2 months (range 0-16 months). Interobserver agreement for MRA was substantial to almost perfect (κ=0.686-0.921; mean κ=0.809). Intertechnique agreement was moderate to substantial (κ=0.579-0.724; mean κ=0.669). Only three out of five inadequately occluded IAs were detected by MRA. CE-MRA is a useful tool for the follow-up of IAs treated with a WEB DL. However, early follow-up with DSA remains mandatory to detect inadequately occluded IAs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Dural attachment of intracranial meningiomas: evaluation with contrast-enhanced three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Junkoh; Kakeda, Shingo; Takahashi, Mayu; Aoyama, Yuichi; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Saito, Takeshi; Akiba, Daisuke; Korogi, Yukunori; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced fast imaging with steady-state acquisition (CE-FIESTA) for assessing whether dural attachment in intracranial meningiomas is adhesive or not by correlation with intraoperative findings. Fourteen consecutive patients who were candidates for surgical treatment of meningiomas were prospectively analyzed with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, including CE-FIESTA at 3 T. First, two neuroradiologists assessed several characteristics of the attachment of the meningioma to the dura mater or skull base on CE-FIESTA images. Second, the surgical findings of adhesion at the dural attachment of meningiomas were evaluated by two neurosurgeons. Finally, the CE-FIESTA findings were correlated with the surgical findings by one neurosurgeon and one neuroradiologist by consensus. CE-FIESTA clearly depicted a hypointense marginal line at the attachment site of the meningioma. When CE-FIESTA revealed smooth marginal lines or hyperintense zones along the marginal lines, tumors were detached easily from the dura mater. On the contrary, when CE-FIESTA showed an irregularity, such as partial disruption of the marginal lines, vessels, or bony hyperostosis, the tumors tended to adhere firmly to the dura mater, which was found to contain small vessels and fine fibrous tissues. There seems to be an excellent correlation between the characteristics of dural attachment of meningiomas on CE-FIESTA images and intraoperative findings. Therefore, for operative planning, CE-FIESTA may provide useful information regarding the adhesiveness of dural attachment.

  1. Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Detection of Biomolecules Using Gold Nanoparticles, Matrix, and the Coffee Ring Effect.

    PubMed

    Marsico, Alyssa L M; Duncan, Bradley; Landis, Ryan F; Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2017-03-07

    Nanomaterials have been extensively used as alternate matrices to minimize the low molecular weight interferences observed in typical MALDI but such nanomaterials typically do not improve the spot-to-spot variability that is commonly seen. In this work, we demonstrate that nanoparticles and low matrix concentrations (<2.5 mg/mL) can be used to homogeneously concentrate analytes into a narrow ring by taking advantage of the "coffee ring" effect. Concentration of the samples in this way leads to enhanced signals when compared to conventional MALDI, with higher m/z analytes being enhanced to the greatest extent. Moreover, the ionization suppression often observed in samples with high salt concentrations can be overcome by preparing samples in this way. The ring that is formed is readily visible, allowing the laser to be focused only on spots that contain analyte. The coffee-ring effect represents a new mode by which nanomaterials can be used to enhance the MALDI-based detection of biomolecules.

  2. New Developments in Mechanical Enhancement of Colonoscopy: Cuffs, Caps and Rings.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepanshu; Sandhu, Naemat; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common cause of cancer-related deaths. Early detection of precursor lesions in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence via colonoscopy can decrease mortality from CRC. In this review article, we have summarized retrospective studies, prospective single center, multicenter studies and randomized controlled trials describing the efficacy of endocuff colonoscopy (EC), cap-assisted colonoscopy (CAC) and endorings colonoscopy (ERC). Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations and complications reported are discussed. Use of colonoscope with cap, cuff or rings attached to its distal tip has been shown to increase the polyp detection rate and adenoma detection rate, predominantly for the small polyps (<1 cm) and proximal colon location. Evidence is uniform for EC and ERC but not for CAC. Benefits of shorter cecum intubation time, improved cecum intubation rates and decreased pain scores during colonoscopy done with assistance of cuff or cap has potential to decrease the number of incomplete colonoscopy and increase overall patient satisfaction, thus improving follow-up. In the absence of any additional adverse events, EC, CAC and ERC have potential to enhance the benefits of colonoscopy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Enhanced spin figure of merit in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a double quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xingfei; Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun

    2014-04-21

    We theoretically investigate the thermoelectric effects in an Aharonov-Bohm ring with a serially coupled double quantum dot embedded in one arm. An external magnetic field is perpendicularly applied to the two dots. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method in the linear-response regime, we calculate the charge and spin figures of merit. When the energy levels of the two quantum dots are equal and the system is connected to two normal leads, a large spin figure of merit (Z{sub s}T ≈ 4.5) accompanying with a small charge figure of merit (Z{sub c}T ≈ 0) can be generated due to the remarkable bipolar effect. Further, when the system is connected to two ferromagnetic leads, the spin figure of merit can reach even a higher value about 9. Afterwards, we find that Z{sub s}T is enhanced while Z{sub c}T is reduced in the coaction of the Aharonov-Bohm flux and Rashba spin-orbit coupling. It is argued that the bipolar effect is positive (negative) to spin (charge) figure of merit in the presence of level detuning of the two quantum dots and intradot Coulomb interactions, respectively. Also, we propose a possible experiment to verify our results.

  4. Nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Nancy J; Wijman, Christine A C

    2010-11-01

    Nontraumatic (or spontaneous) intracranial hemorrhage most commonly involves the brain parenchyma and subarachnoid space. This entity accounts for at least 10% of strokes and is a leading cause of death and disability in adults. Important causes of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage include hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, aneurysms, vascular malformations, and hemorrhagic infarcts (both venous and arterial). Imaging findings in common and less common causes of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage are reviewed.

  5. Vertical optical antennas integrated with spiral ring gratings for large local electric field enhancement and directional radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoan; Wang, Dongxing; Shi, Chuan; Crozier, Kenneth B; Yang, Tian

    2011-05-23

    We propose a device for reproducible achievement of enormous enhancement of local electric field intensities. In each device, a metallic spiral ring grating is employed for efficient excitation of local surface plasmon resonance in the tiny gap of a vertically oriented optical antenna. Radiation from the optical antenna is collimated by the ring grating which facilitates efficient collection. As a numerical example, for a gold nanosphere placed one nanometer above the center of a gold spiral ring grating, our simulations predict an increase in local electric field intensity of up to seven orders of magnitude compared to planewave illumination, and collection efficiencies of up to 68% by an objective with a numerical aperture of 0.7. Single molecule SERS application is discussed.

  6. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. Many conditions can increase intracranial pressure. Common causes include: Aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage Brain tumor Encephalitis Head injury Hydrocephalus (increased fluid around ...

  7. Chronic Graft-versus-host Disease Presenting with Multiple Punctate Intracranial Lesions on Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Makoto; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Obara, Naoshi; Ogawa, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sato, Taiki; Nohara, Seitaro; Chiba, Shigeru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system graft-versus-host disease can present quite a diagnostic challenge. We herein present a case of histologically-confirmed chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) involving the central nervous system that occurred at 19 months after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of confluent hyperintensity in the deep/subcortical white matter with multiple punctate and curvilinear gadolinium enhancements, suggesting the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. A brain biopsy revealed perivascular CD3-positive T cell infiltration around the small vessels. We propose that the detection of punctate-enhanced lesions by magnetic resonance imaging may be a useful finding that facilitates the early diagnosis of chronic GVHD involving the central nervous system. PMID:28154284

  8. A Unique Case of Intracranial Mucormycosis Following an Assault

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Fadilah S

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial mucormycosis is a very unusual presentation of an infection after a depressed skull fracture due to an assault. Only sporadic cases have been reported in the literature previously. A 30-year-old male with a traumatic brain injury following an assault, status-post debridement and elevation of a depressed skull fracture, was discharged home several weeks postoperatively. A CT scan of the head with contrast was obtained due to mental status changes and revealed an enhancing ring-shaped lesion in the right frontal lobe consistent with a brain abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for image-guided excisional biopsy of the lesion, with pathology revealing mucormycosis.  PMID:27672528

  9. Effect of linewidth enhancement factor in actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2014-03-01

    Fundamental performance of the swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is defined by its wavelength-swept laser. Especially narrower instantaneous spectral linewidth of the laser has the advantage in deeprange tomography. We have demonstrated narrow-linewidth actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLL), employing anomalous dispersion configuration. The linewidth of an AMLL is determined by anomalous dispersion and self-phase modulation (SPM) in the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). For such soliton-like phenomenon of AMLLs, numerical calculation predicts that both of large dispersion and small SPM make the linewidth narrower. Since the dispersion restricts wavelength sweeping range of AMLLs, too large dispersion cannot be used. To weaken the SPM effect, low linewidth enhancement factor α of SOA is desirable. Quantum-dot(QD)-based SOA offers low α-factor in comparison with quantum-well SOA (QWSOA). In this study, we employ a QDSOA as a gain medium in an AMLL and also use a QWSOA for comparison. The wavelength band of the QWSOA-AMLL is 1.5 μm and that of QDSOA-AMLL is 1.0 μm. Since we employed the 10 ps/nm of net dispersion in both configurations, the dispersion parameter β2 for the QDSOA-AMLL is approximately half of that for the QWSOA-AMLL. The measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) linewidths in a static state were 0.08 nm for the QWSOA-AMLL and 0.04nm for the QDSOA-AMLL. In spite of the small β2 the QDSOA-AMLL achieves narrower spectral than the QWSOA-AMLL. We also confirmed that the interference signal was improved by adopting the QDSOA.

  10. Planar ring-shaped phononic crystal anchoring boundaries for enhancing the quality factor of Lamb mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binci, L.; Tu, C.; Zhu, H.; Lee, J. E.-Y.

    2016-11-01

    We report the use of planar ring-shaped phononic crystals (PnCs) as anchor boundaries of very-high-frequency band piezoelectric-on-silicon Lamb mode resonators for the purpose of enhancing their quality factor (Q). Here, we exploit the acoustic bandgap associated with the PnC anchoring boundaries to reduce acoustic energy leakage out of the micromechanical resonator. The proposed approach provides greater mechanical robustness (by merit of interlocking the cells in a matrix) and the possibility of electrical routing through the PnC cells. We experimentally show enhancements in Q by a factor of three using the proposed approach of hybridizing planar ring-shaped PnCs with micromechanical resonators. The effect of these PnCs on resonator Q is further corroborated by their effects in suppressing transmission when incorporated into a delay line.

  11. Enhancement of chemical sensing capability in a photonic crystal fiber with a hollow high index ring defect at the center.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Soan; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2011-01-31

    A new type of index-guided photonic crystal fiber is proposed to enhance chemical sensing capability by introducing a hollow high index ring defect that consists of the central air hole surrounded by a high index GeO2 doped SiO2 glass ring. Optical properties of the fundamental guided mode were numerically analyzed using the full-vector finite element method varying the design parameters of both the defects in the center and the hexagonal air-silica lattice in the cladding. Enhanced evanescent wave interaction in the holey region and lower confinement loss by an order of magnitude were achieved simultaneously, which shows a high potential in hyper sensitive fiber-optic chemical sensing applications.

  12. Convection-enhanced delivery of SN-38-loaded polymeric micelles (NK012) enables consistent distribution of SN-38 and is effective against rodent intracranial brain tumor models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Saito, Ryuta; Mano, Yui; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kawashima, Ryuta; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-10-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of therapeutic agents is a promising local delivery technique that has been extensively studied as a treatment for CNS diseases over the last two decades. One continuing challenge of CED is accurate and consistent delivery of the agents to the target. The present study focused on a new type of therapeutic agent, NK012, a novel SN-38-loaded polymeric micelle. Local delivery profiles of NK012 and SN-38 were studied using rodent brain and intracranial rodent brain tumor models. First, the cytotoxicity of NK012 against glioma cell lines was determined in vitro. Proliferations of glioma cells were significantly reduced after exposure to NK012. Then, the distribution and local toxicity after CED delivery of NK012 and SN-38 were evaluated in vivo. Volume of distribution of NK012 after CED was much larger than that of SN-38. Histological examination revealed minimum brain tissue damage in rat brains after delivery of 40 µg NK012 but severe damage with SN-38 at the same dose. Subsequently, the efficacy of NK012 delivered via CED was tested in 9L and U87MG rodent orthotopic brain tumor models. CED of NK012 displayed excellent efficacy in the 9L and U87MG orthotopic brain tumor models. Furthermore, NK012 and gadolinium diamide were co-delivered via CED to monitor the NK012 distribution using MRI. Volume of NK012 distribution evaluated by histology and MRI showed excellent agreement. CED of NK012 represents an effective treatment option for malignant gliomas. MRI-guided CED of NK012 has potential for clinical application.

  13. Multifocal fibrosclerosis with intracranial pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Kitano, A; Shimomura, T; Okada, A; Takahashi, K

    1995-04-01

    A 29-year-old woman with a 4-year history of multifocal fibrosclerosis showed unique neurologic complications. Episcleritis, orbital pseudotumor, and eosinophilic phlegmon preceded intracranial inflammatory pachymeningitis. The pachymeningitis was associated with disturbance of the visual field, incomplete Gerstmann's syndrome, and pseudotumor cerebri. T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed a high signal intensity lesion in the left temporal and occipital lobes, and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images revealed the enhancement of the thickened left tentorial leaf. The laboratory data suggested that the etiology might be autoimmunological. The disease and MRI abnormalities improved following administration of corticosteroids.

  14. Imaging of Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Heit, Jeremy J.; Iv, Michael; Wintermark, Max

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is common and is caused by diverse pathology, including trauma, hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, hemorrhagic conversion of ischemic infarction, cerebral aneurysms, cerebral arteriovenous malformations, dural arteriovenous fistula, vasculitis, and venous sinus thrombosis, among other causes. Neuroimaging is essential for the treating physician to identify the cause of hemorrhage and to understand the location and severity of hemorrhage, the risk of impending cerebral injury, and to guide often emergent patient treatment. We review CT and MRI evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage with the goal of providing a broad overview of the diverse causes and varied appearances of intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:28030895

  15. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, J; Egger, K; Harloff, A

    2017-02-01

    This review describes the clinical findings as well as thes diagnostic and therapeutic options for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri). Furthermore, the pathophysiological concepts are discussed. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure with no established pathogenesis. Common symptoms include headaches, visual loss and pulsatile tinnitus. Treatment has two major goals: the alleviation of headaches and the preservation of vision. Weight loss and acetazolamide are the cornerstones in the treatment of the disorder. Drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, optic nerve sheath fenestration and stent angioplasty of a sinus stenosis can be employed in severe cases.

  16. Intracranial dural based chondroma.

    PubMed

    Reinshagen, Clemens; Redjal, Navid; Sajed, Dipti P; Nahed, Brian V; Walcott, Brian P

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial chondromas are benign, slow-growing, cartilaginous tumors, which comprise only about 0.2% of all intracranial tumors. The majority of these lesions occur at the base of the skull, where they are thought to arise from residual embryonic chondrogenic cells along the basal synchondrosis. Very rarely, they may also originate from the convexity dura, falx cerebri, or the brain parenchyma. We present a patient with a dural based chondroma to highlight the technical considerations of surgical resection. The recent literature on intracranial chondromas regarding incidence, pathophysiologic origin, clinical symptoms, imaging, histopathology and prognosis is reviewed.

  17. Quantitative analysis of high-resolution, contrast-enhanced, cone-beam CT for the detection of intracranial in-stent hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Flood, Thomas F; van der Bom, Imramsjah M J; Strittmatter, Lara; Puri, Ajit S; Hendricks, Gregory M; Wakhloo, Ajay K; Gounis, Matthew J

    2015-02-01

    Intracranial in-stent hyperplasia is a stroke-associated complication that requires routine surveillance. To compare the results of in vivo experiments to determine the accuracy and precision of in-stent hyperplasia measurements obtained with modified C-arm contrast-enhanced, cone-beam CT (CE-CBCT) imaging with those obtained by 'gold standard' histomorphometry. Additionally, to carry out clinical analyses comparing this CE-CBCT protocol with digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A non-binned CE-CBCT protocol (VasoCT) was used that acquires x-ray images with a small field-of-view and applies a full-scale reconstruction algorithm providing high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging with 100 µm isotropic voxels. In an vivo porcine model, VasoCT cross-sectional area measurements were compared with gold standard vessel histology. VasoCT and DSA were used to calculate in-stent stenosis in 23 imaging studies. Porcine VasoCT cross-sectional stent, lumen, and in-stent hyperplasia areas strongly correlated with histological measurements (r(2)=0.97, 0.93, 0.90; slope=1.14, 1.07, and 0.76, respectively; p<0.0001). Clinical VasoCT percentage stenosis correlated well with DSA percentage stenosis (r(2)=0.84; slope=0.76), and the two techniques were free of consistent bias (Bland-Altman, bias=3.29%; 95% CI -14.75% to 21.33%). An illustrative clinical case demonstrated the advantages of VasoCT, including 3D capability and non-invasive IV contrast administration, for detection of in-stent hyperplasia. C-arm VasoCT is a high-resolution 3D capable imaging technique that has been validated in an animal model for measurement of in-stent tissue growth. Successful clinical implementation of the protocol was performed in a small case series. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. The monitor senses the pressure inside the skull and sends measurements to a recording device. ... are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is ...

  19. Hidradenoma with intracranial involvement.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, P G; Diengdoh, J V; Crockard, H A; Stern, G M

    1984-06-01

    A case of recurrent hidradenoma of the external ear with intracranial spread is described. The presentation, classification and management of this rare tumour are discussed and the importance of adequate long term review is stressed.

  20. Warm Oxygen Enhancements in the Inner Magnetosphere and Their Relation to Geomagnetic Activity, Plasmasphere, and Ring Current.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, J. M.; Skoug, R. M.; Gkioulidou, M.; Bonnell, J. W.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    Ionospheric oxygen plays an important role in the dynamics of Earth's magnetosphere. During geomagnetic storms, oxygen transported into the tail can experience significant energization and become a major contributor to the storm-time ring current. At very low energies, a dense cold oxygen torus straddles the outer plasmasphere, frequently with O+/H+ ratios approaching unity. With the Radiation Belt Storm Probes we now also observe a third oxygen population in this region. In this paper we discuss the nature of "warm" (10's eV to few keV, i.e., between plasmasphere and ring current ion energies) oxygen density enhancements over the course of the Van Allen Probes mission. We find that the composition of this warm thermal plasma is very dynamic throughout the inner magnetosphere. The warm oxygen density is highly responsive to changes in geomagnetic activity, varying by more than two orders of magnitude between quiet times and moderate storms. This variation at times is a greater than the variation of the corresponding proton density. The O+/H+ warm plasma density ration will frequently exceed unity, usually during the recovery phase of storms. The region of enhanced warm oxygen density reaches from the plasmasphere boundary out to at least geosynchronous orbit (the largest L-shells covered by the Van Allen Probes). It can be observed at all local times. Barring other geomagnetic activity, warm oxygen density enhancements disappear typically within 5 days of their first detection, which is consistent with drift times through the inner magnetosphere along open drift paths. We are putting these characteristics in context of the composition, location, and evolution of the plasmasphere and the ring current.

  1. [TIC4]endomorphins, analogues of endomorphins, have significantly enhanced vasorelaxant effects in rat aorta rings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian-Yu; Chen, Qiang; Feng, Yun; Lin, Xin; Wang, Rui

    2005-05-01

    [Tic(4)]EM1 and [Tic(4)]EM2, new endomorphins (EMs) analogues, caused relaxation of rat aorta rings precontracted with phenylphrine in a concentration-dependent manner and were 240- to 370-fold more potent than EMs. This effect was inhibited by endothelium removal or by incubation with NO synthase inhibitor L-NNA or opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. The results demonstrate that [Tic(4)]EMs have NO- and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant effects which are mediated by the opioid receptor.

  2. Enhancing the versatility and functionality of fast photochromic bridged imidazole dimers by flipping imidazole rings.

    PubMed

    Shima, Kentaro; Mutoh, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Abe, Jiro

    2014-03-12

    The widely tunable optical properties and the visible sensitivity have been required for fast photochromic molecules whose coloration-decoloration cycle completes in μs to ms time scale not only for practical applications such as full-color holographic displays but also for fundamental researches in biochemistry. However, the so far developed [2.2]paracyclophane-bridged imidazole dimers, which are one of the best candidates for fast photochromic molecules, have their weaknesses for these requirements. Herein, we overcome the issues with sustaining fast photochromism and high durability by flipping the two imidazole rings (the head-to-tail and tail-to-tail forms). The alteration in the relative configuration of the imidazole rings suppresses the broad absorption band resulting from the radical-radical interaction. The substitution to the 2-position of the imidazole ring of the tail-to-tail form gives the drastic changes in the steady-state and the transient absorption spectra. The pyrene-substituted tail-to-tail form demonstrates that the transient absorption spectrum is featured by the inherent spectrum of the imidazolyl radical. This molecular framework is easy to functionalize fast photochromic molecules such as sensitizations to the red light, chirality, and biological tagging, and therefore it is versatile for various fast photochromic applications.

  3. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  4. Hub-enhanced noise-sustained synchronization of an externally forced FitzHugh-Nagumo ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Alejandro D.; Izús, Gonzalo G.; dell'Erba, Matías G.; Deza, Roberto R.

    2017-02-01

    A ring of FitzHugh-Nagumo units with antiphase coupling between their activator fields and submitted to a adiabatic harmonic subthreshold signal, is in turn globally coupled in electrical mode with the activator field of a hub. Noise sustained synchronization of neural activity with the signal is numerically observed, and theoretically characterized. The different dynamical regimes are elucidated using the concept of nonequilibrium potential, and the hub is found to promote network synchronization. The minimum noise intensities triggering the activation and synchronization processes are estimated in the framework of a three-neuron model.

  5. Clinical and radiological pictures of hepatocellular carcinoma with intracranial metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yen, F S; Wu, J C; Lai, C R; Sheng, W Y; Kuo, B I; Chen, T Z; Tsay, S H; Lee, S D

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with extrahepatic spreading is not uncommon. In order to delineate the clinical and radiological pictures of HCC with intracranial metastasis, 33 documented cases were analysed. Eighteen had brain parenchymal metastasis without skull involvement; the other 15 cases disclosed skull metastasis with brain invasion. The underlying HCC are mainly of expanding (13/33, 39.4%) and multifocal (13/33, 39.4%) types. Eighteen cases (18/33, 54.5%) had mental changes not related to hypoglycaemia or hepatic encephalopathy. Eighteen cases (18/20, 90%) disclosed hyperdense mass lesions by non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scans and 17 cases showed homogeneous enhancement (17/22, 77.3%) by post-contrast CT images. In the non-skull involved group, five cases (5/12, 41.7%) disclosed ring-shape enhancement and 14 cases (14/16, 87.5%) had perifocal oedema, which were not seen in the skull involved group. Eight cases (8/33, 24.2%) presented as intracerebral haemorrhage. Twelve (12/33, 36.4%) died of brain herniation. Most (14/18, 77.8%) non-skull involved cases had simultaneous lung metastasis without bony metastasis, while the skull involved group often (10/15, 66.7%) disclosed extracranial bony metastasis without lung metastasis. The difference in extracranial metastasis was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The multivariate survival analysis disclosed that lower lactate dehydrogenase level (< or = 316 U/L, P = 0.029) and treatments (surgery or radiation, P = 0.001) were positively associated with longer survival. In conclusion, HCC with intracranial metastasis is symptomatic and life-threatening. Half the cases may come from pulmonary metastasis and the other half may be from bony metastasis. Brain irradiation or surgery can prolong their survival.

  6. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  7. Large pure intracranial vagal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Costanzo, De Bonis; Carotenuto, Vincenzo; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    2009-04-01

    We report a patient with a large, pure intracranial vagal schwannoma, compressing the medulla who presented with essential hypertension. Based on this and on previous cases, we suggest that a differentiation of pure intracranial schwannomas (subtype A1) from intracranial schwannomas with some extension in the jugular foramen (type A) should be used.

  8. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fs of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.

  9. Prediction of enhanced solvent-induced enantioselectivity for a ring opening with a bifurcating reaction path

    DOE PAGES

    Carpenter, Barry K.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Glowacki, David R.

    2014-12-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are reported for the deazetisation and ring opening of meso-2,3-difluoro-2,3-dimethyldiazocyclopropane in three solvents: CHCl3, CHFClBr and CH3CH(OH)CF3 (TFIPA). In this study, the achiral reactant leads to enantiomeric allene products, and the question addressed in the study is whether either of the chiral, enantiomerically pure solvents can induce significant enantiomeric excess in the products. The direct dynamics calculations use an empirical valence bond potential for the solute, with empirical parameters optimised against M06-2X/cc-pVTZ density functional results. The results reveal that the exothermic N2 loss and ring opening promote transient strong solvent–solute interactions within the first ~100 fsmore » of the reaction. Because of the bifurcating reaction path, these interactions occur at time when the “decision” about which enantiomer of the product to form has yet to be made (at least for many of the trajectories). Hence, it is possible in principle that the solvent could exert a larger-than-normal influence on the course of the reaction. In fact, the results reveal no such effect for CHFClBr but do predict that TFIPA should induce 15.2 ± 2.1% enantiomeric excess. This is roughly an order of magnitude larger than solvent-induced enantiomeric excesses found experimentally in reactions where the conversion of reactant(s) to enantiomeric products occur over separate transition states.« less

  10. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  11. Retained Carrier-Mobility and Enhanced Plasmonic-Photovoltaics of Graphene via ring-centered η(6) Functionalization and Nanointerfacing.

    PubMed

    Che, Songwei; Jasuja, Kabeer; Behura, Sanjay K; Nguyen, Phong; Sreeprasad, T S; Berry, Vikas

    2017-07-12

    Binding graphene with auxiliary nanoparticles for plasmonics, photovoltaics, and/or optoelectronics, while retaining the trigonal-planar bonding of sp(2) hybridized carbons to maintain its carrier-mobility, has remained a challenge. The conventional nanoparticle-incorporation route for graphene is to create nucleation/attachment sites via "carbon-centered" covalent functionalization, which changes the local hybridization of carbon atoms from trigonal-planar sp(2) to tetrahedral sp(3). This disrupts the lattice planarity of graphene, thus dramatically deteriorating its mobility and innate superior properties. Here, we show large-area, vapor-phase, "ring-centered" hexahapto (η(6)) functionalization of graphene to create nucleation-sites for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) without disrupting its sp(2) character. This is achieved by the grafting of chromium tricarbonyl [Cr(CO)3] with all six carbon atoms (sigma-bonding) in the benzenoid ring on graphene to form an (η(6)-graphene)Cr(CO)3 complex. This nondestructive functionalization preserves the lattice continuum with a retention in charge carrier mobility (9% increase at 10 K); with AgNPs attached on graphene/n-Si solar cells, we report an ∼11-fold plasmonic-enhancement in the power conversion efficiency (1.24%).

  12. Noncontrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) intracranial MR angiography using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling and accelerated 3D radial acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Block, Walter F; Turski, Patrick A; Mistretta, Charles A; Johnson, Kevin M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) can be used to generate noncontrast magnetic resonance angiograms of the cerebrovascular structures. Previously described PCASL-based angiography techniques were limited to two-dimensional projection images or relatively low-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging due to long acquisition time. This work proposes a new PCASL-based 3D magnetic resonance angiography method that uses an accelerated 3D radial acquisition technique (VIPR, spoiled gradient echo) as the readout. Benefiting from the sparsity provided by PCASL and noise-like artifacts of VIPR, this new method is able to obtain submillimeter 3D isotropic resolution and whole head coverage with a 8-min scan. Intracranial angiography feasibility studies in healthy (N = 5) and diseased (N = 5) subjects show reduced saturation artifacts in PCASL-VIPR compared with a standard time-of-flight protocol. These initial results show great promise for PCASL-VIPR for static, dynamic, and vessel selective 3D intracranial angiography.

  13. Advances in intracranial monitoring.

    PubMed

    Blount, Jeffrey P; Cormier, Jason; Kim, Hyunmi; Kankirawatana, Pongkiat; Riley, Kristen O; Knowlton, Robert C

    2008-09-01

    Intracranial monitoring using electroencephalography (IC-EEG) continues to play a critical role in the assessment of patients with medically intractable localization-related epilepsy. There has been minimal change in grid or electrode design in the last 15-20 years, and the surgical approaches for implantation are unchanged. Intracranial monitoring using EEG allows detailed definition of the region of ictal onset and defines the epileptogenic zone, particularly with regard to adjacent potentially eloquent tissue. Recent developments of IC-EEG include the coregistration of functional imaging data such as magnetoencephalography to the frameless navigation systems. Despite significant inherent limitations that are often overlooked, IC-EEG remains the gold standard for localization of the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electrodes take a variety of different forms and may be placed either in the subdural (subdural strips and grids, depth electrodes) or extradural spaces (sphenoidal, peg, and epidural electrodes). Each form has its own advantages and shortcomings but extensive subdural implantation of electrodes is most common and is most comprehensively discussed. The indications for intracranial electrodes are reviewed.

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed Central

    Renowden, S A; Gregory, R; Hyman, N; Hilton-Jones, D

    1995-01-01

    The clinical features and radiological appearances of spontaneous intracranial hypotension are described in three patients and the medical literature is reviewed. Awareness of this condition and its differentiation from more sinister meningitic processes is important to avoid unnecessary invasive investigations and to allow prompt diagnosis and effective treatment. Images PMID:8530936

  15. Network connectivity enhancement by exploiting all optical multicast in semiconductor ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siraj, M.; Memon, M. I.; Shoaib, M.; Alshebeili, S.

    2015-03-01

    The use of smart phone and tablet applications will provide the troops for executing, controlling and analyzing sophisticated operations with the commanders providing crucial documents directly to troops wherever and whenever needed. Wireless mesh networks (WMNs) is a cutting edge networking technology which is capable of supporting Joint Tactical radio System (JTRS).WMNs are capable of providing the much needed bandwidth for applications like hand held radios and communication for airborne and ground vehicles. Routing management tasks can be efficiently handled through WMNs through a central command control center. As the spectrum space is congested, cognitive radios are a much welcome technology that will provide much needed bandwidth. They can self-configure themselves, can adapt themselves to the user requirement, provide dynamic spectrum access for minimizing interference and also deliver optimal power output. Sometimes in the indoor environment, there are poor signal issues and reduced coverage. In this paper, a solution utilizing (CR WMNs) over optical network is presented by creating nanocells (PCs) inside the indoor environment. The phenomenon of four-wave mixing (FWM) is exploited to generate all-optical multicast using semiconductor ring laser (SRL). As a result same signal is transmitted at different wavelengths. Every PC is assigned a unique wavelength. By using CR technology in conjunction with PC will not only solve network coverage issue but will provide a good bandwidth to the secondary users.

  16. Rings of saturn-like” nanoarrays with high number density of hot spots for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Zhigao; Liao, Lei; Wu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Ren, Feng; Jiang, Changzhong E-mail: czjiang@whu.edu.cn; Mei, Fei; Xiao, Xiangheng E-mail: czjiang@whu.edu.cn; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jiao

    2014-07-21

    The Ag nanoparticles (NPs) surrounding triangular nanoarrays (TNAs) with high number density of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) hot spots (SERS hot spots ring) are prepared by a combination of NPs deposition and subsequent colloid lithography processing. Owing to the SERS hot spots ring, the Ag NPs surrounding TNAs have been proved an excellent candidate for ultrasensitive molecular sensing for their high SERS signal enhancing capacity in experiments and theories. The Ag NPs surrounding TNAs can be readily used for the quick detection of low concentrations of molecules related to food safety; herein, detection of melamine is discussed.

  17. Pediatric intracranial primary anaplastic ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, Wolf; Banan, Rouzbeh; Hartmann, Christian; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2017-02-01

    Primary intracranial anaplastic gangliogliomas are rare tumors in the pediatric patient group. Most of them present with symptoms of elevated pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. Extraaxial location is far more common than axial location. On MRI examination, they mimic pilocytic astrocytomas. The outcome after surgery depends mainly on the possible amount of surgical resection, and oncological therapy is necessary to prevent recurrence of the disease. An 11-year-old boy presented with headache and double vision due to obstructive hydrocephalus. MRI of the brain revealed an axial partially contrast enhancing lesion in the quadrigeminal plate extending from the cerebellum to the pineal gland and causing hydrocephalus. Subtotal removal of the lesion was performed, and the diagnosis of an anaplastic ganglioglioma was established and confirmed by the reference center. At the latest follow up (3 months), the boy is without any neurological symptoms and scheduled for radiation therapy as well as chemotherapy.

  18. Performance Enhancement of Space-Time Adaptive Processing for GPS and Microstrip Antenna Design Using Ferrite Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Albino, Alix

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is a navigation system widely used in civilian and military application, but its accuracy is highly impacted with consequential fading, and possible loss of communication due to multipath propagation and high power interferences. This dissertation proposes alternatives to improve the performance of the GPS receivers to obtain a system that can be reliable in critical situations. The basic performance of the GPS receiver consists of receiving the signal with an antenna array, delaying the signal at each antenna element, weighting the delayed replicas, and finally, combining the weighted replicas to estimate the desired signal. Based on these, three modifications are proposed to improve the performance of the system. The first proposed modification is the use of the Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm with two variations to decrease the convergence time of the classic LMS while achieving good system stability. The results obtained by the proposed LMS demonstrate that the algorithm can achieve the same stability as the classic LMS using a small step size, and its convergence rate is better than the classic LMS using a large step size. The second proposed modification is to replace the uniform distribution of the time delays (or taps) by an exponential distribution that decreases the bit-error rate (BER) of the system without impacting the computational efficiency of the uniform taps. The results show that, for a BER of 0.001, the system can operate with a 1 to 2 dB lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when an exponential distribution is used rather than a uniform distribution. Finally, the third modification is implemented in the design of the antenna array. In this case, the gain of each microstrip element is enhanced by embedding ferrite rings in the substrate, creating a hybrid substrate. The ferrite rings generates constructive interference between the incident and reflected fields; consequently, the gain of a single microstrip element

  19. Lidocaine relaxation in isolated rat aortic rings is enhanced by endothelial removal: possible role of Kv, KATP channels and A2a receptor crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Arsyad, Aryadi; Dobson, Geoffrey P

    2016-12-03

    Lidocaine is an approved local anesthetic and Class 1B antiarrhythmic with a number of ancillary properties. Our aim was to investigate lidocaine's vasoreactivity properties in intact versus denuded rat thoracic aortic rings, and the effect of inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO), prostenoids, voltage-dependent Kv and KATP channels, membrane Na(+)/K(+) pump, and A2a and A2b receptors. Aortic rings were harvested from adult male Sprague Dawley rats and equilibrated in an organ bath containing oxygenated, modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, pH 7.4, 37 °C. The rings were pre-contracted sub-maximally with 0.3 μM norepinephrine (NE), and the effect of increasing lidocaine concentrations was examined. Rings were tested for viability after each experiment with maximally dilating 100 μM papaverine. The drugs 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), glibenclamide, 5-hydroxydecanoate, ouabain, 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine and PSB-0788 were examined. All drugs tested had no significant effect on basal tension. Lidocaine relaxation in intact rings was biphasic between 1 and 10 μM (Phase 1) and 10 and 1000 μM (Phase 2). Mechanical removal of the endothelium resulted in further relaxation, and at lower concentrations ring sensitivity (% relaxation per μM lidocaine) significantly increased 3.5 times compared to intact rings. The relaxing factor(s) responsible for enhancing ring relaxation did not appear to be NO- or prostacyclin-dependent, as L-NAME and indomethacin had little or no effect on intact ring relaxation. In denuded rings, lidocaine relaxation was completely abolished by Kv channel inhibition and significantly reduced by antagonists of the MitoKATP channel, and to a lesser extent the SarcKATP channel. Curiously, A2a subtype receptor antagonism significantly inhibited lidocaine relaxation above 100 μM, but not the A2b receptor. We show that lidocaine relaxation in rat thoracic aorta was biphasic and significantly enhanced by endothelial removal, which did not appear to be NO or

  20. Effect of parametric variation on generation and enhancement of chaos in erbium-doped fiber-ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Syed Zafar; Islam, Muhammad Khawar; Zafrullah, Muhammad

    2010-10-01

    The simulation and numerical analysis of erbium-doped fiber-ring lasers for generation and enhancement of chaos is presented. The degree of chaos determines the level of security in chaotic optical communication systems. Various parameters such as pump power, modulation index, modulation frequency, decay rate, and cavity gain can be varied as a control in producing higher degree optical chaos. The effect of each pertinent model parameter is analyzed in time-expanded mode using a phase plot direct-observation method and time series analysis of the time domain wave form by calculating its Lyapunov exponents. The mathematical and numerical analysis of the generated chaos helps in generalizing the trend through variation of cavity parameters and driving conditions in achieving a relatively higher degree of chaos. These trends help in optimizing various parameters for generation of new sequences of optical chaos in realizing better security. To gain an insight into chaotic signatures, the width and height of individual pulses, relationship of their time periods, gain quenching, shape, formation of bunches, and humps of the chaotic wave forms are also analyzed. The study of individual and cumulative behavior of all the parameters in enhancing optical chaos leads toward a reliable development in designing secure communication systems.

  1. Intracranial pial arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Son, Young-Je; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2008-08-01

    Intracranial pial arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a rare cerebrovascular lesion that has only recently been recognized as a distinct pathological entity. A 41-year-old woman (Patient 1) presented with the sudden development of an altered mental state. Brain CT showed an acute subdural hematoma. A red sylvian vein was found intraoperatively. A pial AVF was revealed on postoperative angiography, and surgical disconnection of the AVF was performed. A 10-year-old boy (Patient 2) presented with a 10-day history of paraparesis and urinary incontinence. Brain, spinal MRI and angiography revealed an intracranial pial AVF and a spinal perimedullary AVF. Endovascular embolization was performed for both lesions. The AVFs were completely obliterated in both patients. On follow-up, patient 1 reported having no difficulty in performing activities of daily living. Patient 2 is currently able to walk without assistance and voids into a diaper. Intracranial pial AVF is a rare disease entity that can be treated with surgical disconnection or endovascular embolization. It is important for the appropriate treatment strategy to be selected on the basis of patientspecific and lesion-specific factors in order to achieve good outcomes.

  2. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  3. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    associated with intractable intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion At the close of Year 3  Recruitment of targeted 50 subjects...Determination of serum and CSF biomarkers that predict worsening of cerebral hypoperfusion, intracranial hypertension , and cerebral hypoxia. At the close of Year...rate variation is associated with intractable intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion. Kahraman S, Dutton R, Hu P, Stansbury L, Xiao Y

  4. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  5. A fluorometric microarray with ZnO substrate-enhanced fluorescence and suppressed ``coffee-ring'' effects for fluorescence immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuying; Dong, Minmin; Li, Rui; Zhang, Liyan; Qiao, Yuchun; Jiang, Yao; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    A glass slide was first patterned with hydrophobic hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDS) and then microspotted with hydrophilic ZnO nanoparticles in an aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) matrix. The resulting HDS-ZnO-APS microarray could present the capability of suppressing the undesirable ``coffee-ring'' effects through its hydrophobic pattern so as to allow the fabrication of ZnO-APS testing microspots with a highly dense and uniform distribution. The lotus-like ``self-cleaning'' function could also be expected to effectively curb the cross contamination of multiple sample droplets. More importantly, the introduction of ZnO nanoparticles could endow the testing microspots with substrate-enhanced fluorescence leading to signal-amplification microarray fluorometry. The practical application of the developed HDS-ZnO-APS microarray was investigated by the sandwiched fluorometric immunoassays of human IgG, showing a linear detection range from 0.010 to 10.0 ng mL-1. Such a throughput-improved fluorometric microarray could be tailored for probing multiple biomarkers in complicated media like serum or blood.A glass slide was first patterned with hydrophobic hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDS) and then microspotted with hydrophilic ZnO nanoparticles in an aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) matrix. The resulting HDS-ZnO-APS microarray could present the capability of suppressing the undesirable ``coffee-ring'' effects through its hydrophobic pattern so as to allow the fabrication of ZnO-APS testing microspots with a highly dense and uniform distribution. The lotus-like ``self-cleaning'' function could also be expected to effectively curb the cross contamination of multiple sample droplets. More importantly, the introduction of ZnO nanoparticles could endow the testing microspots with substrate-enhanced fluorescence leading to signal-amplification microarray fluorometry. The practical application of the developed HDS-ZnO-APS microarray was investigated by the sandwiched fluorometric

  6. Echoing Plaque Activity of the Coronary and Intracranial Arteries in Patients With Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jong-Won; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Mi Ji; Hwang, Jaechun; Cha, Jihoon; Choi, Jin-Ho; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease, and both coronary and intracranial atherosclerosis are common in the elderly. Unlike coronary artery disease (CAD), intracranial atherosclerotic disease can cause intracranial atherosclerotic stroke by branch occlusive disease (B-type) and coronary-type rupture of plaque (C-type). We hypothesized that plaque characteristics of intracranial arteries are associated with those of coronary arteries. Eighty-one patients with acute cerebral infarcts caused by intracranial atherosclerotic disease without history of CAD were analyzed. Asymptomatic CAD burden (number and degree of stenosis) and plaque characteristics (calcified, mixed, and noncalcified) were measured with multidetector computed tomography, whereas the asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease burden was measured using magnetic resonance angiography. The symptomatic intracranial artery was analyzed using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging for vascular morphology (stenosis degree, remodeling index, and wall index) and plaque activation (enhancement pattern and volume). The asymptomatic CAD burden was correlated with the asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease burden. The overall CAD burden did not differ between B- and C-type intracranial atherosclerotic stroke. However, the prevalence of noncalcified coronary plaque was much higher in C-type intracranial atherosclerotic stroke and the presence of coronary noncalcified plaque was independently associated with C-type intracranial atherosclerotic stroke (odds ratio, 3.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-10.85; P=0.041). As the number of coronary noncalcified plaques increased, positive remodeling and plaque enhancement increased in the symptomatic intracranial artery on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Plaques within the intracranial and coronary arteries behave in similar ways. Our results suggest the need to evaluate and treat other vascular trees in patients with vulnerable plaques

  7. MR imaging of intracranial hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed

    Mama, N; Ben Abdallah, A; Hasni, I; Kadri, K; Arifa, N; Ladib, M; Tlili-Graiess, K

    2014-12-01

    To describe the MR features of primary intracranial hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) on conventional imaging, diffusion and MR spectroscopy and aim to determinate distinguishing features from meningiomas. From 2006 to 2012, seven patients with pathologically confirmed primary intracranial HPCs were included. The clinical data, conventional MR findings (n=7), DWI features (n=7) and MR spectroscopy (n=5) were retrospectively analyzed. ADC values of the HPCs (n=7) were measured on ADC map and were compared with that of contralateral normal white matter. Of the seven HPCs, four were anaplastic HPCs (WHO grade III) and three were HPCs (WHO grade II). MR pattern consisted in lobulated or irregular margin tumors in all cases with cross-leaf growth on both side of the falx in two cases. The lesions showed mainly iso signal (n=4) on T1 WI and heterogeneous high signal (n=5) on T2 WI. Heterogenity was mainly related to intra tumoral hemorrhage (n=4), and proeminent intratumoral flow voids (n=3). Marked heterogeneous enhancement (n=5) with dural tail (n=4) was noted. All tumours showed significant peritumoral edema. ADC values of the tumor tissue component range between 0.638 and 1.50×10(-3)mm/s(2) (average = 1,02). Three grade II HPCs showed higher values compared to normal parenchyma ADC (range between 0.772 and 0.930×10(-3)mm/s(2) with average of 0.830), whereas grade III HPCs showed either equal (three cases) or decreased ADC values (one case). MRS showed in all cases markedly increased Cho with lip/lac peak, decreased Cr and almost absent NAA. High mI peak with large glutamine/glutamate were noted in the three grade II HPCs. Conventional MR pattern when combined with DWI and MRS findings are highly suggestive of HPC and appear valuable data to differentiate HPCs from meningiomas. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Influence of ring size on the cognition-enhancing activity of DM235 and MN19, two potent nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, L; Martini, E; Di Cesare Mannelli, L; Dei, S; Manetti, D; Scapecchi, S; Teodori, E; Ghelardini, C; Romanelli, M N

    2012-03-01

    A series of analogs of DM235 and MN19, characterized by rings with different size, have been prepared and evaluated for their nootropic activity in the mouse passive-avoidance test. It was found that the optimal ring size for the analogs of DM235, showing endocyclic both amidic groups, is 6 or 7 atoms. For the compounds structurally related to MN19, carrying an exocyclic amide group, the piperidine ring is the moiety which gives the most interesting compounds.

  9. Rebound intracranial hypertension: a complication of epidural blood patching for intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Kranz, P G; Amrhein, T J; Gray, L

    2014-06-01

    Rebound intracranial hypertension is a complication of epidural blood patching for treatment of intracranial hypotension characterized by increased intracranial pressure, resulting in potentially severe headache, nausea, and vomiting. Because the symptoms of rebound intracranial hypertension may bear some similarity to those of intracranial hypotension and literature reports of rebound intracranial hypertension are limited, it may be mistaken for refractory intracranial hypotension, leading to inappropriate management. This clinical report of 9 patients with confirmed rebound intracranial hypertension reviews the clinical characteristics of patients with this condition, emphasizing factors that can be helpful in discriminating rebound intracranial hypertension from refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension, and discusses treatment.

  10. Saturn's E ring revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Images of the E ring of Saturn obtained by the image processing of photographs of the 1966 edge-on presentation of the planet's ring plane are presented. Two methods of image enhancement were used: scanning with an image quantizer operated in the derivative mode to enhance contrast and computerized subtraction of a circularly symmetric image of the overexposed Saturn disk. Further photographic and CCD observation confirming the existence of the ring extending to twice the diameter of the A ring, which was not detected by the Pioneer 11 imaging photopolarimeter, is indicated.

  11. Multiple intracranial enterogenous cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Walls, T J; Purohit, D P; Aji, W S; Schofield, I S; Barwick, D D

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 40-year-old woman with increasing ataxia is described. Although the clinical presentation and evoked response studies raised the possibility of multiple sclerosis, further investigation revealed multiple cystic intracranial lesions. Surgical excision of one of the lesions relieved the patient's symptoms. Histological examination revealed that this was an enterogenous cyst. Although single cysts of this type have rarely been reported occurring in the posterior cranial fossa, the occurrence of multiple lesions, some in the supratentorial compartment, appears to be unique. Images PMID:3701354

  12. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Wetzel, S G; Lyrer, P; Bächli, H; Stock, K W

    1999-09-01

    Intradural dermoids are rare congenital tumors representing approximately 0.05% of all intracranial lesions. These benign tumors have a typical appearance on CT and MR due to their lipid components. The complication caused by rupture are the spillage of the fatty material into the cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of a ruptured dermoid cyst showing fat/fluid levels in both side ventricles and fatty material in the subarachnoid space on CT and MR-imaging and the follow-up over four years after incomplete resection of the tumor.

  13. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  14. Intracranial hypotension: the nonspecific nature of MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Bruera, O C; Bonamico, L; Giglio, J A; Sinay, V; Leston, J A; Figuerola, M L

    2000-01-01

    We present three patients who complained of postural headache related to different types of intracranial hypotension: spontaneous or primary, and secondary, but presenting the same findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement supports the belief that the enhancement is a nonspecific meningeal reaction to low pressure.

  15. Intracranial abscess in Ectopia Cordis.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph; Tipper, Geoffrey Adrian; Hussain, Zakier; Balakrishnan, Venkataraman; Gan, Peter

    2014-08-25

    We present a case of intracranial abscess in a young female with Ectopia Cordis, an exceptionally rare cardiac condition. The neurosurgical implication is the predisposition to intracranial abscess formation. A heightened awareness of this association will aid diagnosis in similar clinical scenarios.

  16. Single ring vs multiple ring determination of Super Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Patrick; Messier, Mark

    2004-10-01

    Super Kamiokande houses the world's largest Cherenkov detector and whose primary goal is to detect and study neutrino interactions. My purpose in the project was to write a program to enhance the accuracy the ring counting. Currently, ring counting is the largest single source of systematic uncertainty in the single ring event rate, contributing an uncertainty of 5-8This article presents an algorithm the single ring selection efficiency based on a statistical test of azimuthal symmetry of the event topology. With the aid of my advisor, Dr. Mark Messier, I was able to write a program that enhanced the decision between single-ring and multiple ring events by 35

  17. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Reem, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Primary (idiopathic) intracranial hypertension has been considered to be a rare entity, but with no precise estimates of the pediatric incidence in the United States. There have been attempts to revise the criteria over the years and adapt the adult criteria for use in pediatrics. The clinical presentation varies with age, and symptoms tending to be less obvious in younger individuals. In the prepubertal population, incidentally discovered optic disc edema is relatively common. By far the most consistent symptom is headache; other symptoms include nausea, vomiting tinnitus, and diplopia. Treatment mainstays include weight loss when appropriate and acetazolamide. Furosemide may exhibit a synergistic benefit when used in conjunction with acetazolamide. Surgical interventions are required relatively infrequently, but include optic nerve sheath fenestration and cerebrospinal fluid shunting. Pain and permanent vision loss are the two major complications of this disorder and these manifestations justify aggressive treatment. Once intracranial hypertension has resolved, up to two thirds of patients develop a new or chronic headache type that is different from their initial presenting headache.

  18. Intracranial Hypertension Is Painless!

    PubMed

    Manet, R; Fabre, N; Moyse, E; Laurent, B; Schmidt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Headache is usually considered a key symptom of intracranial hypertension (ICHT). However, there are no published experimental data to support the concept that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is painful in humans. This prospective study was performed in 16 patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, necessitating a lumbar infusion test with measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. During the test, ICP was increased from baseline to a plateau. Headache was scored on a visual analog scale (VAS) (0 = no pain, 10 = very severe pain) at baseline ICP and when ICP plateaued. At baseline, mean ICP was 11 ± 3.6 mmHg and VAS was 0. At plateau, mean ICP was 28 ± 9.5 mmHg and VAS was 0. There was a significant increase in ICP (p <0.001), but no increase in headache intensity (VAS). An acute (20-min) moderate increase in ICP was not accompanied by a headache. We demonstrate that an acute, isolated increase in CSF pressure does not produce a headache. To occur, a headache needs activation of the pain-sensitive structures (dura and venous sinuses) or central activation of the cerebral nociceptive structures. This peripheral or central activation does not occur with an isolated increase in CSF pressure.

  19. Bimetallic 3D nanostar dimers in ring cavities: recyclable and robust surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for signal detection from few molecules.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Chirumamilla, Manohar; De Angelis, Francesco; Toma, Andrea; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Krahne, Roman

    2014-08-26

    Top-down fabrication of electron-beam lithography (EBL)-defined metallic nanostructures is a successful route to obtain extremely high electromagnetic field enhancement via plasmonic effects in well-defined regions. To this aim, various geometries have been introduced such as disks, triangles, dimers, rings, self-similar lenses, and more. In particular, metallic dimers are highly efficient for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and their decoupling from the substrate in a three-dimensional design has proven to further improve their performance. However, the large fabrication time and cost has hindered EBL-defined structures from playing a role in practical applications. Here we present three-dimensional nanostar dimer devices that can be recycled via maskless metal etching and deposition processes, due to conservation of the nanostructure pattern in the 3D geometry of the underlying Si substrate. Furthermore, our 3D-nanostar-dimer-in-ring structures (3D-NSDiRs) incorporate several advantageous aspects for SERS by enhancing the performance of plasmonic dimers via an external ring cavity, by efficient decoupling from the substrate through an elevated 3D design, and by bimetallic AuAg layers that exploit the increased performance of Ag while maintaining the biocompatibility of Au. We demonstrate SERS detection on rhodamine and adenine at extremely low density up to the limit of few molecules and analyze the field enhancement of the 3D-NSDiRs with respect to the exciting wavelength and metal composition.

  20. Application of the Green's function method to some nonlinear problems of an electron storage ring. Part III. Beam-size enhancement due to the presence of nonlinear magnets in a ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1983-01-01

    A perturbation method which allows one to find the distribution function and the beam size for a broad class of storage ring nonlinear problems is described in Part I of this work. In present note I apply this method to a particular problem. Namely, I want to evaluate an enhancement of the vertical beam size of a bunch due to the presence of the ring of nonlinear magnetic fields. The main part of the work deals with sextupole magnets. Formula for the beam size in the presence of octupole fields are also developed to the first order in the octupole strength, although octupole magnets are not widely used in present storage ring designs. This calculation is done mainly because the octupole field has the same symmetry as the beam-beam force for the head-on collision. This will give us the opportunity to compare the conduct of the bunch due to this two types of nonlinear kicks. The general terms of the applicability of the Green's function method is discussed in the first part of this work.

  1. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR) quantum cascade

  2. Vorticity dynamics in an intracranial aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation is carried out to investigate the vortex dynamics of physiologic pulsatile flow in an intracranial aneurysm. The numerical solver is based on the CURVIB (curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method) approach developed by Ge and Sotiropoulos, J. Comp. Physics, 225 (2007) and is applied to simulate the blood flow in a grid with 8 million grid nodes. The aneurysm geometry is extracted from MRI images from common carotid artery (CCA) of a rabbit (courtesy Dr.Kallmes, Mayo Clinic). The simulation reveals the formation of a strong vortex ring at the proximal end during accelerated flow phase. The vortical structure advances toward the aneurysm dome forming a distinct inclined circular ring that connects with the proximal wall via two long streamwise vortical structures. During the reverse flow phase, the back flow results to the formation of another ring at the distal end that advances in the opposite direction toward the proximal end and interacts with the vortical structures that were created during the accelerated phase. The basic vortex formation mechanism is similar to that observed by Webster and Longmire (1998) for pulsed flow through inclined nozzles. The similarities between the two flows will be discussed and the vorticity dynamics of an aneurysm and inclined nozzle flows will be analyzed.This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman spectra of medicines with large-scale self-assembled silver nanoparticle films based on the modified coffee ring effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiping; Hu, Anming; Bai, Shi; Ma, Ying; Su, Quanshuang

    2014-02-01

    We report here a simple and innovative method to prepare large-scale silver nanoparticle films based on the controlled coffee ring effect. It is demonstrated that the films can be used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering probes to detect low-concentration medicines. Silver nanoparticles with the average size about 70 nm were prepared by reduction of silver nitride. In our experiment, the coffee ring effect was controlled by tilting the substrates during the deposition of silver nanoparticle films. Silver nanoparticle films were spontaneously formed on the surface of silicon substrates at the temperatures about 50°C based on the solvent evaporation and the coffee ring effect. The microstructure of the films was investigated using the scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The surface roughness of the films is found as small as 20 nm. Then, the films were exposed to aqueous solutions of medicine at different concentrations. A comparison with a Raman spectra measured with a conventional Raman spectrometer showed that the Raman signal can be detected in the solution with concentrations as low as 1 × 10-5 M, and the enhancement factor achieved by the silver nanoparticle film can at least reach to 1.08 × 104. Our experimental results indicate that this technique is promising in the production of large-scale silver nanoparticle films for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering. These may be utilized in biochemical and trace analytical applications.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectra of medicines with large-scale self-assembled silver nanoparticle films based on the modified coffee ring effect.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiping; Hu, Anming; Bai, Shi; Ma, Ying; Su, Quanshuang

    2014-02-19

    We report here a simple and innovative method to prepare large-scale silver nanoparticle films based on the controlled coffee ring effect. It is demonstrated that the films can be used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering probes to detect low-concentration medicines. Silver nanoparticles with the average size about 70 nm were prepared by reduction of silver nitride. In our experiment, the coffee ring effect was controlled by tilting the substrates during the deposition of silver nanoparticle films. Silver nanoparticle films were spontaneously formed on the surface of silicon substrates at the temperatures about 50°C based on the solvent evaporation and the coffee ring effect. The microstructure of the films was investigated using the scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The surface roughness of the films is found as small as 20 nm. Then, the films were exposed to aqueous solutions of medicine at different concentrations. A comparison with a Raman spectra measured with a conventional Raman spectrometer showed that the Raman signal can be detected in the solution with concentrations as low as 1 × 10-5 M, and the enhancement factor achieved by the silver nanoparticle film can at least reach to 1.08 × 104. Our experimental results indicate that this technique is promising in the production of large-scale silver nanoparticle films for the surface-enhanced Raman scattering. These may be utilized in biochemical and trace analytical applications.

  5. Telemetry of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.; Corbin, S. D.; Silverberg, G. D.; Schmidt, E. V.; Ream, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    A completely implantable epidural pressure telemetry system designed for accurate measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is described. The implant device is batteryless, providing unlimited operating life. The described system uses a capacitive pressure transducer with excellent long-term stability. Once detected with the transducer and converted to a frequency with the oscillator electronics, the pressure signal is digitized. It is then telemetered without the possibility of further degradation. After detection with the small external module, the data can be retransmitted by a radio link for complete patient mobility or the energizer signal pickup module can be wired to a bedside readout unit. Continuous data are available from the system so that the dynamic ICP changes reflecting arterial blood pressure can be observed and used for diagnosis.

  6. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  7. Enhancement of strong-field multiple ionization in the vicinity of the conical intersection in 1,3-cyclohexadiene ring opening

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, Vladimir S. Kim, Jaehee; Schorb, Sebastian; White, James; Cryan, James P.; Zipp, Lucas; Glownia, J. Michael; Broege, Douglas; Miyabe, Shungo; Tao, Hongli; Martinez, Todd; Bucksbaum, Philip H.

    2013-11-14

    Nonradiative energy dissipation in electronically excited polyatomic molecules proceeds through conical intersections, loci of degeneracy between electronic states. We observe a marked enhancement of laser-induced double ionization in the vicinity of a conical intersection during a non-radiative transition. We measured double ionization by detecting the kinetic energy of ions released by laser-induced strong-field fragmentation during the ring-opening transition between 1,3-cyclohexadiene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. The enhancement of the double ionization correlates with the conical intersection between the HOMO and LUMO orbitals.

  8. Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis-Associated Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis Mimicking Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hee; Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2017-03-01

    Dural enhancement is a characteristic finding in both spontaneous intracranial hypotension and hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Positional headache is the most important feature that distinguishes the two diseases. We report a patient with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) who initially manifested like spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We report here the case of a 63-year old man who presented with severe positional headache. The patient had typical symptoms, symmetric dural enhancement, and a recent history of nontraumatic subdural hygroma which led to the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension, but was finally diagnosed as granulomatosis with polyangiitis-associated secondary hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Cyclophosphamide therapy was effective for the maintenance of remission. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis can present with positional headache and subdural hygroma, mimicking spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis should be suspected when patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension or hypertrophic pachymeningitis show atypical features. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  9. Follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated with detachable coils: comparison of 3D inflow MRA at 3T and 1.5T and contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T with DSA.

    PubMed

    Ramgren, Birgitta; Siemund, Roger; Cronqvist, Mats; Undrén, Per; Nilsson, Ola G; Holtås, Stig; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to compare 3T and 1.5T magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the follow-up of endovascular treated intracranial aneurysms to assess the grade of occlusion. Thirty-seven patients with 41 aneurysms who had undergone endovascular treatment with detachable coils were included. MRA was performed on the same day using an eight-channel sensitivity encoding head-coil with 3D axial inflow technique. At 3T, a contrast-enhanced transverse 3D fast gradient echo acquisition was also performed. Most patients underwent DSA the following day. MRA scans and DSA were classified first independently by two neuroradiologists and an interventional neuroradiologist. Secondly, a consensus was done. Source images, maximum intensity projection, multiplanar reconstruction and volume rendering reconstructions were used for MRA evaluations. A modification of the Raymond classification, previously used for DSA evaluation of recanalization, was used. Statistical comparison of the consensus showed that 3T MRA with 3D axial inflow technique had better agreement with DSA (kappa = 0.43) than 1.5T MRA(kappa = 0.21) and contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) at 3T (kappa = 0.17). The susceptibility artefacts from the coil mesh were significally smaller at 3T (p = 0.002-0.007) than at 1.5T. 3T MRA, using a sensitivity encoding head-coil, showed better agreement with DSA than 1.5T and CE-MRA at 3T for evaluation of aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling.

  10. Enhanced light extraction efficiency of micro-ring array AlGaN deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele Fayisa, Gabisa; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Jungsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2017-09-01

    An effective approach to overcome inherently poor light extraction efficiency of AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. We demonstrated the 5 × 5 array micro-ring DUV LED having an inclined sidewall at the outer perimeter and a p-GaN-removed inner circle of the micro-ring, together with MgF2/Al omnidirectional reflectors. The micro-ring array DUV LED shows remarkably higher light output power by 70% than the reference, consistent with the calculated result, as well as comparable turn-on and operational voltages, which are attributed to the effective extraction of strong transverse-magnetic polarized anisotropic emission and the reduction of the absorption loss by the p-GaN contact layer, simultaneously.

  11. Enhancing the robustness of the equipotential ring of edge termination for 4.5KV IGBT by introducing a Partial N layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weizhong; Li, Zehong; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Bo; Liao, Pengfei; Li, Zhaoji

    2014-01-01

    A novel insulated-gate bipolar transistor IGBT featuring a Partial N-Layer is proposed. The static and dynamic processes of the reverse blocking property at room temperature and high temperature for 4.5KV IGBT are investigated. It is discovered that the leakage current crowding in the equipotential ring induced the temperature filament and eventually lead the thermal destruction of the devices. Then a well-designed Partial N-Layer in the active and transition region is introduced to diminish the leakage current and relax electric field in the equipotential ring of edge termination. Simulated and measured results show that the IGBT with Partial N-Layer can enhance the robustness of the edge termination towards reverse voltage biasing not only at room temperature but also at the high temperature comparing with the conventional IGBT.

  12. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  13. Intracranial pial arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kentaro; Ohe, Naoyuki; Yoshimura, Shin-ichi; Iwama, Toru

    2007-12-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with a rare intracranial pial arteriovenous fistula manifesting as monoparesis and hypesthesia of the right lower extremity. Computed tomography demonstrated an approximately 10-mm diameter subcortical hematoma in the left postcentral gyrus. Two months after suffering the ictus, angiography demonstrated a pial arteriovenous fistula in the late arterial phase fed by the left paracentral artery and drained into the left precentral vein. No nidus or dural arteriovenous fistula was detected. Left parietal craniotomy was performed and the pial arteriovenous fistula was extirpated by electrocoagulation. Intraoperative angiography demonstrated disappearance of the fistula. She experienced no postoperative neurological deterioration, but hypesthesia of the right leg persisted. Obliteration of the pial arteriovenous fistula was reconfirmed by postoperative angiography. She suffered no rebleeding episodes during the 36-month follow-up period. Pial arteriovenous fistula causing mild symptoms should be treated by flow disconnection because the direct arteriovenous shunt and attendant high blood flow usually results in huge venous varices. To determine whether direct surgery or endovascular treatment is appropriate, the position and shape of the lesion must be known.

  14. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  15. Convection-enhanced delivery of a topoisomerase I inhibitor (nanoliposomal topotecan) and a topoisomerase II inhibitor (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin) in intracranial brain tumor xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yoji; Krauze, Michal T.; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Noble, Charles O.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Park, John W.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2007-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment options, the response and survival rates for patients with malignant gliomas remain dismal. Clinical trials with convection-enhanced delivery (CED) have recently opened a new window in neuro-oncology to the direct delivery of chemotherapeutics to the CNS, circumventing the blood-brain barrier and reducing systemic side effects. Our previous CED studies with liposomal chemotherapeutics have shown promising antitumor activity in rodent brain tumor models. In this study, we evaluated a combination of nanoliposomal topotecan (nLs-TPT) and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) to enhance efficacy in our brain tumor models, and to establish a CED treatment capable of improving survival from malignant brain tumors. Both liposomal drugs decreased key enzymes involved in tumor cell replication in vitro. Synergistic effects of nLs-TPT and PLD on U87MG cell death were found. The combination displayed excellent efficacy in a CED-based survival study 10 days after tumor cell implantation. Animals in the control group and those in single-agent groups had a median survival of less than 30 days, whereas the combination group experienced a median survival of more than 90 days. We conclude that CED of two liposomal chemotherapeutics (nLs-TPT and PLD) may be an effective treatment option for malignant gliomas. PMID:17018695

  16. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  17. Ring World

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-01

    Our robotic emissary, flying high above Saturn, captured this view of an alien copper-colored ring world. The overexposed planet has deliberately been removed to show the unlit rings alone, seen from an elevation of 60 degrees

  18. Neptune Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-29

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by NASA Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged.

  19. Ring Backdrop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-03

    Saturn moon Enceladus brightly reflects sunlight before a backdrop of the planet rings and the rings shadows cast onto the planet. NASA Cassini spacecraft captured this snapshot during its flyby of the moon on Nov. 30, 2010.

  20. Exploitation of the coffee-ring effect to realize mechanically enhanced inkjet-printed microelectromechanical relays with U-bar-shaped cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Seungjun; Ul Karim, Muhammed Ahosan; Spencer, Matthew; Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Alon, Elad; Subramanian, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    We report a mechanically enhanced inkjet-printed microelectromechanical (MEM) relay with a U-bar-shaped cantilever by exploiting the coffee-ring effect. The printed cantilever shape, especially the effective thickness caused by the elevated walls, can be controlled during the drying process by outward convective flow of silver nanoparticles. This enhances mechanical stiffness to efficiently produce a strongly suspended cantilever that is immune to collapse- and curling-related failures. This approach to enhancing cantilever stiffness is unique to printing-based processes using metal-nanoparticle inks and is not feasible for conventional photolithography processes. The resulting printed MEM relays show a pull-in voltage of only 6.6 V and an on/off ratio of 108 with extremely low on-state resistance (˜14.3 Ω) and off-state leakage that is comparable to those of conventional silicon-based MEM relays.

  1. High-resolution black-blood contrast-enhanced T1 weighted images for the diagnosis and follow-up of intracranial arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Saam, T; Habs, M; Pollatos, O; Cyran, C; Pfefferkorn, T; Dichgans, M; Dietrich, O; Glaser, C; Reiser, M F; Nikolauo, K

    2010-01-01

    Primary arteritis of the central nervous system (CNS) comprises a heterogeneous group of CNS disorders, which is characterised by non-atheromatous inflammation and necrosis of the arterial wall. The clinical presentation is highly variable, with stroke being the most common manifestation. Conventional angiography is considered to be the best imaging tool for diagnosing the disease. However, angiographic findings, which usually show lumen irregularities and stenosis, are often unspecific and can occur with a variety of other vascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis and arterial dissection. Therefore, brain biopsies are often needed to confirm the diagnosis. Recent reports have shown that MRI is able to visualise contrast enhancement in subjects with known primary CNS arteritis. PMID:20739338

  2. Smart multifunctional core-shell nanospheres with drug and gene co-loaded for enhancing the therapeutic effect in a rat intracranial tumor model.

    PubMed

    Wang, HanJie; Su, Wenya; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Xiaomin; Liao, Zhenyu; Kang, Chunsheng; Han, Lei; Chang, Jin; Wang, Guangxiu; Pu, Peiyu

    2012-10-21

    Glioblastoma with high mortality has been one of the most serious cancers threatening human health. Because of the present treatment limitations, there is an urgent need to construct a multifunctional vesicle for enhancing the treatment of in situ malignant glioblastoma. In our study, drug and gene co-loaded magnetic PLGA/multifunctional polymeric liposome (magnetic PLGA/MPLs) core-shell nanospheres were constructed. They were mainly self-assembled from two parts: hydrophobic PLGA cores that can load drugs and magnetic nanocrystals; and polymeric lipid shells anchored with functional molecules such as PEG chains, TAT peptides and RGD peptides that can help the vectors to condense the gene, prolong the circulation time, cross the blood brain barrier and target delivery to the cancer tissue. The results showed that the magnetic PLGA/MPLs nanosphere has a nanosized core-shell structure, can achieve sustained drug release and has good DNA binding abilities. Importantly, compared with the control group and other groups with single functionality, it can co-deliver the drug and gene into the same cell in vitro and show the strongest inhibiting effect on the growth of the in situ malignant glioblastoma in vivo. All of these results indicated that the different functional components of magnetic PLGA/MPLs, can form an organic whole and none of them can be dispensed with. The magnetic PLGA/MPLs nanosphere may be another option for treatment of glioblastoma.

  3. Smart multifunctional core-shell nanospheres with drug and gene co-loaded for enhancing the therapeutic effect in a rat intracranial tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanjie; Su, Wenya; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Xiaomin; Liao, Zhenyu; Kang, Chunsheng; Han, Lei; Chang, Jin; Wang, Guangxiu; Pu, Peiyu

    2012-09-01

    Glioblastoma with high mortality has been one of the most serious cancers threatening human health. Because of the present treatment limitations, there is an urgent need to construct a multifunctional vesicle for enhancing the treatment of in situ malignant glioblastoma. In our study, drug and gene co-loaded magnetic PLGA/multifunctional polymeric liposome (magnetic PLGA/MPLs) core-shell nanospheres were constructed. They were mainly self-assembled from two parts: hydrophobic PLGA cores that can load drugs and magnetic nanocrystals; and polymeric lipid shells anchored with functional molecules such as PEG chains, TAT peptides and RGD peptides that can help the vectors to condense the gene, prolong the circulation time, cross the blood brain barrier and target delivery to the cancer tissue. The results showed that the magnetic PLGA/MPLs nanosphere has a nanosized core-shell structure, can achieve sustained drug release and has good DNA binding abilities. Importantly, compared with the control group and other groups with single functionality, it can co-deliver the drug and gene into the same cell in vitro and show the strongest inhibiting effect on the growth of the in situ malignant glioblastoma in vivo. All of these results indicated that the different functional components of magnetic PLGA/MPLs, can form an organic whole and none of them can be dispensed with. The magnetic PLGA/MPLs nanosphere may be another option for treatment of glioblastoma.Glioblastoma with high mortality has been one of the most serious cancers threatening human health. Because of the present treatment limitations, there is an urgent need to construct a multifunctional vesicle for enhancing the treatment of in situ malignant glioblastoma. In our study, drug and gene co-loaded magnetic PLGA/multifunctional polymeric liposome (magnetic PLGA/MPLs) core-shell nanospheres were constructed. They were mainly self-assembled from two parts: hydrophobic PLGA cores that can load drugs and magnetic

  4. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025870 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  5. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025872 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  6. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025866 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  7. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025868 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  8. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025879 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  9. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Al-Kandari, Salwa Ramadan; Pandey, Tarun; Badawi, Mona H

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification.

  10. Alternating Skew Deviation from Traumatic Intracranial Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Moster, Stephen J.; Moster, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A 56-year-old woman developed progressive headache, mental status changes, and diplopia after trauma. She was diagnosed with alternating skew deviation caused by intracranial hypotension. This is the first case of alternating skew deviation reported from intracranial hypotension and perhaps a differential pressure between intracranial and intraspinal spaces plays a role in the development of these findings. PMID:27928294

  11. Intracranial, intradural aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Afnan, Jalil; Snuderl, Matija; Small, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign, expansile, blood-filled, osteolytic lesions with internal septations that may be intraosseous or extraosseous. The cysts may cause local mass effect, and changes in the regional vascular supply necessitating intervention. A case of an intracranial, intradural ABC in a young male patient with progressively severe headaches is presented. This is only the third recorded intradural case, the majority of these rare lesions being extracranial and only a minute fraction intracranial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fetal intracranial teratoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Hart

    2014-01-01

    A literature and institutional review of fetal intracranial teratomas yielded 90 tumors. The mean age at ultrasound diagnosis was 32 weeks, ranging from 21 to 41 weeks. Males and females were equally affected. The average, maximum tumor size was 10 cm, varying between 3.5 and 23 cm. Forty-two percent of patients died within the first week of life. Death rate was exceptionally high before 30 weeks gestation where almost half the affected fetuses expired. The overall survival rate for 90 fetuses with intracranial teratoma was only 7.8%.

  13. [Progress in diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus in children with intracranial infections].

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Peng, Jing; Yin, Fei

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial infections are one of the most common neurological diseases in children and are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus are the common, fatal complications of intracranial infections, so early diagnosis and timely treatment are the keys to saving patients' lives and reducing neurological sequelae. This paper introduces the progress in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus in children with intracranial infections.

  14. Dramatically Enhanced Visible Light Response of Monolayer ZrS2 via Non-covalent Modification by Double-Ring Tubular B20 Cluster.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Wu, Hong-Yu; Yang, Hao-Ming; Huang, Wei-Qing; Yang, Ke; Peng, Ping; Huang, Gui-Fang

    2016-12-01

    The ability to strongly absorb light is central to solar energy conversion. We demonstrate here that the hybrid of monolayer ZrS2 and double-ring tubular B20 cluster exhibits dramatically enhanced light absorption in the entire visible spectrum. The unique near-gap electronic structure and large built-in potential at the interface will lead to the robust separation of photoexcited charge carriers in the hybrid. Interestingly, some Zr and S atoms, which are catalytically inert in isolated monolayer ZrS2, turn into catalytic active sites. The dramatically enhanced absorption in the entire visible light makes the ZrS2/B20 hybrid having great applications in photocatalysis or photodetection.

  15. Coupling and power transfer efficiency enhancement of modular and array of planar coils using in-plane ring-shaped inner ferrites for inductive heating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, V. T.; Unal, E.; Demir, H. V.

    2017-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate a highly effective method of enhancing coupling and power transfer efficiency in inductive heating systems composed of planar coils. The proposed method is based on locating ring-shaped ferrites in the inner side of the coils in the same plane. Measurement results of simple inductive heating systems constructed with either a single or a pair of conventional circular coils show that, with the in-plane inner ferrites, the total dissipated power of the system is increased by over 65%. Also, with three-dimensional full electromagnetic solutions, it is found that power transfer efficiency of the system is increased up to 92% with the inner ferrite placement. The proposed method is promising to be used for efficiency enhancement in inductive heating applications, especially in all-surface induction hobs.

  16. Second generation bisheteroarylpiperazine (BHAP) HIV-1 reverse transcriptasae inhibitors: Enhancement of antiviral activity and aqueous solubility via 5- and 6-substitution of the indole ring

    SciTech Connect

    Poel, T.; Thomas, R.C.; Romero, D.L.; Hosley, M.J.; Morge, R.A.; Biles, C.; Reusser, F.; Althaus, I.W.; Schinzer, W.C.; Platzer, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    U-87201E, a potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) discovered at Upjohn, is currently in Phase II clinical trials. Additional structure-activity studies have identified second-generation BHAPs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved pharmaceutical properties, notably increased aqueous solubility. Capitalizing on initial SAR studies which demonstrated a tolerance for substitution in the indole ring, a series of BHAPs bearing 5- and 6-substituted indoles was evaluated. Substituents such as ethers, sulfonamides, ureas, and sulfamides containing water-solubilizing groups such as polyethers or basic amines provided highly potent BHAPs with greatly enhanced solubility, such as U-93923. The synthesis, antiviral evaluation and solubility properties of these potent HIV-1 RTIs will be detailed.

  17. Insensitivity of Tree-Ring Growth to Temperature and Precipitation Sharpens the Puzzle of Enhanced Pre-Eruption NDVI on Mt. Etna (Italy).

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ruedi; Kirchner, James W; Krusic, Paul J; Tognetti, Roberto; Houlié, Nicolas; Andronico, Daniele; Cullotta, Sebastiano; Egli, Markus; D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    On Mt. Etna (Italy), an enhanced Normalized Difference in Vegetation Index (NDVI) signature was detected in the summers of 2001 and 2002 along a distinct line where, in November 2002, a flank eruption subsequently occurred. These observations suggest that pre-eruptive volcanic activity may have enhanced photosynthesis along the future eruptive fissure. If a direct relation between NDVI and future volcanic eruptions could be established, it would provide a straightforward and low-cost method for early detection of upcoming eruptions. However, it is unclear if, or to what extent, the observed enhancement of NDVI can be attributed to volcanic activity prior to the subsequent eruption. We consequently aimed at determining whether an increase in ambient temperature or additional water availability owing to the rise of magma and degassing of water vapour prior to the eruption could have increased photosynthesis of Mt. Etna's trees. Using dendro-climatic analyses we quantified the sensitivity of tree ring widths to temperature and precipitation at high elevation stands on Mt. Etna. Our findings suggest that tree growth at high elevation on Mt. Etna is weakly influenced by climate, and that neither an increase in water availability nor an increase in temperature induced by pre-eruptive activity is a plausible mechanism for enhanced photosynthesis before the 2002/2003 flank eruption. Our findings thus imply that other, yet unknown, factors must be sought as causes of the pre-eruption enhancement of NDVI on Mt. Etna.

  18. Insensitivity of Tree-Ring Growth to Temperature and Precipitation Sharpens the Puzzle of Enhanced Pre-Eruption NDVI on Mt. Etna (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Krusic, Paul J.; Tognetti, Roberto; Houlié, Nicolas; Andronico, Daniele; Egli, Markus; D'Arrigo, Rosanne

    2017-01-01

    On Mt. Etna (Italy), an enhanced Normalized Difference in Vegetation Index (NDVI) signature was detected in the summers of 2001 and 2002 along a distinct line where, in November 2002, a flank eruption subsequently occurred. These observations suggest that pre-eruptive volcanic activity may have enhanced photosynthesis along the future eruptive fissure. If a direct relation between NDVI and future volcanic eruptions could be established, it would provide a straightforward and low-cost method for early detection of upcoming eruptions. However, it is unclear if, or to what extent, the observed enhancement of NDVI can be attributed to volcanic activity prior to the subsequent eruption. We consequently aimed at determining whether an increase in ambient temperature or additional water availability owing to the rise of magma and degassing of water vapour prior to the eruption could have increased photosynthesis of Mt. Etna's trees. Using dendro-climatic analyses we quantified the sensitivity of tree ring widths to temperature and precipitation at high elevation stands on Mt. Etna. Our findings suggest that tree growth at high elevation on Mt. Etna is weakly influenced by climate, and that neither an increase in water availability nor an increase in temperature induced by pre-eruptive activity is a plausible mechanism for enhanced photosynthesis before the 2002/2003 flank eruption. Our findings thus imply that other, yet unknown, factors must be sought as causes of the pre-eruption enhancement of NDVI on Mt. Etna. PMID:28099435

  19. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  20. Classical intracranial chondrosarcoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Jingyang; Zhang, Mingchao; Kang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant cartilage-forming tumor, with only a small number of cases in the posterior cranial fossa reported previously. The present study reports the case of a 40-year-old male patient who was admitted to Tianjin Huanhu Hospital with a progressive headache and dizziness that had lasted for 2 years. Physical and neurological examinations were normal. Radiography of the skull identified an opaque lesion in the left frontal region of the brain. Cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion with calcification and homogenous contrast enhancement in the left frontal region. Subsequently, the patient underwent bicoronal craniotomy and gross total resection of the tumor. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of classical intracranial chondrosarcoma. The patient was discharged 10 days after surgery, with no neurological deficit. One month after initial discharge, the patient underwent γ-knife treatment. A follow-up examination 9 months after surgery revealed that the patient was still alive and had returned to work, with no obvious symptoms or evidence of recurrence. PMID:27895770

  1. Intracranial Arteries - Anatomy and Collaterals.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S; Caplan, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology are inextricably linked in patients with intracranial atherosclerosis. Knowledge of abnormal or pathological conditions such as intracranial atherosclerosis stems from detailed recognition of the normal pattern of vascular anatomy. The vascular anatomy of the intracranial arteries, both at the level of the vessel wall and as a larger structure or conduit, is a reflection of physiology over time, from in utero stages through adult life. The unique characteristics of arteries at the base of the brain may help our understanding of atherosclerotic lesions that tend to afflict specific arterial segments. Although much of the knowledge regarding intracranial arteries originates from pathology and angiography series over several centuries, evolving noninvasive techniques have rapidly expanded our perspective. As each imaging modality provides a depiction that combines anatomy and flow physiology, it is important to interpret each image with a solid understanding of typical arterial anatomy and corresponding collateral routes. Compensatory collateral perfusion and downstream flow status have recently emerged as pivotal variables in the clinical management of patients with atherosclerosis. Ongoing studies that illustrate the anatomy and pathophysiology of these proximal arterial segments across modalities will help refine our knowledge of the interplay between vascular anatomy and cerebral blood flow. Future studies may help elucidate pivotal arterial factors far beyond the degree of stenosis, examining downstream influences on cerebral perfusion, artery-to-artery thromboembolic potential, amenability to endovascular therapies and stent conformation, and the propensity for restenosis due to biophysical factors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  3. [Multiple intracranial tuberculomas in infancy].

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Campistol, J; Chávez, B; Caritg, J; Fortuny, C; Costa, J M

    Tuberculous involvement of the CNS is most frequent in children aged between 6 months and 6 years, although it may occur at any age. It may present as meningoencephalitis, basal arachnoiditis or intracranial tuberculomas. Whilst meningitis is typical of infancy, tuberculomas and arachnoiditis are commoner in adults. It has been estimated that tuberculomas make up 3% of the cases of neurotuberculosis. The increasing use of CAT and MR has been a great help for diagnosis of this serious complication of tuberculosis. A 5 month old patient presented with tuberculous meningitis which had been treated with streptomycin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and rifampicin at the usual dosage. One month later, after good initial progress, triventricular hydrocephaly was diagnosed and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt inserted. Three months after this, there was an episode of intracranial hypertension. Cranial CAT showed considerable zones of hypodense parenchyma without ventricle dilatation. On MR there were multiple, disseminated, rounded areas which were hyperintense on T2 and compatible with intracranial tuberculomas. After fresh insertion of a ventricular shunt, the patient progressed but still had a residual right hemiparesia and retarded development. Although intracranial tuberculomas usually occur in adults, they may be seen in children following meningoencephalitis. Occasionally, following a good initial response to tuberculostatic drugs, tuberculomas appear, although not present before, as happened in our patient. This usually occurs within the first three months, and although the mechanism is unknown, it is believed to be due to the accumulation of lymphocytes and macrophages at preexisting microscopic foci when treatment is started.

  4. Intracranial tuberculoma mimicking brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Salaskar, Abhijit L; Hassaneen, Wael; Keenan, Cheryl H; Suki, Dima

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intracranial tuberculoma in an immunocompetent patient with a solid primary tumor outside the central nervous system. This case is important because the patient underwent treatment for a presumed brain metastasis, based on the knowledge that a solid extracranial primary tumor was present, but before the brain lesion pathology was determined.

  5. Translucent Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-08

    Although solid-looking in many images, Saturn's rings are actually translucent. In this picture, we can glimpse the shadow of the rings on the planet through (and below) the A and C rings themselves, towards the lower right hand corner. For centuries people have studied Saturn's rings, but questions about the structure and composition of the rings lingered. It was only in 1857 when the physicist James Clerk Maxwell demonstrated that the rings must be composed of many small particles and not solid rings around the planet, and not until the 1970s that spectroscopic evidence definitively showed that the rings are composed mostly of water ice. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 17 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 12, 2014 in near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.3 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 24 degrees. Image scale is 85 miles (136 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18295

  6. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  7. Widening Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-18

    Saturn rings and its moon Rhea are imaged before a crescent of the planet in this image captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The shadows of the rings continue to grow wider after their disappearing act during the planet August 2009 equinox.

  8. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  9. Ring Slicer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-06

    Saturn's moon Prometheus, seen here looking suspiciously blade-like, is captured near some of its sculpting in the F ring. Prometheus' (53 miles or 86 kilometers across) orbit sometimes takes it into the F ring. When it enters the ring, it leaves a gore where its gravitational influence clears out some of the smaller ring particles. Below Prometheus, the dark lanes interior to the F ring's bright core provide examples of previous ring-moon interactions. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 7 degrees below the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 15, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 286,000 miles (461,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 115 degrees. Image scale is 1.7 miles (2.8 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18324

  10. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  11. Tuning the voices of a choir: Introducing a new tool to enhance the signals that are stored in tree-ring archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Allan; van der Maaten, Ernst; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Heinrich, Ingo; Helle, Gerd; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Eusemann, Pascal; Schnittler, Martin; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tree-ring based archives, such as ring-width or density, are frequently used proxies for the reconstruction of past environmental parameters at annual resolution (e.g. Fritts, 1976). In terms of tree-ring width based reconstructions, ring-width measurements are usually acquired from several (often at least 20) trees growing under similar conditions (the 'choir') which are then averaged to a so-called master chronology (the 'voice'). Theoretically, this averaging evens out the individual-specific noises that act upon single trees. A statistical measure which frequently has been assumed to reflect the quality of tree-ring based reconstructions is the so-called expressed population signal (EPS, Wigley et al., 1984). Investigators have often sought to maximize EPS independent of individual tree reactions, but rather aiming at large sample sizes, which increase the value of EPS. Although studies have shown that the environmental signal of master chronologies may be enhanced in comparison with single trees (e.g. Carrer, 2011), ecological theory suggests that depending on particular site conditions (e.g. dry vs. wet sites) different trees within populations may react on different environmental drivers. In this context, recent studies have aimed at an individual selection of trees to form groups of similar growth responses (e.g. Piovesan et al., 2008, Walker and Johnstone, 2014). Grouping may help to lower the noise in the resulting averaged chronologies and therefore potentially enhance the strength of the targeted signal further. As a contribution to this particular topic, we present a new methodological approach - the Weighted Principal Component Analysis (WPCA), designed to identify variable growth responses in tree populations. To test its performance, we applied WPCA to various datasets which express different gradients of individual growth responses and compared WPCA to three other statistical approaches which have earlier been used in this context. For all tested

  12. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension: mechanisms, management, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus, and back and neck pain, but the clinical presentation is highly variable. Although few studies have been done to support evidence-based management, several recent advances have the potential to enhance understanding of the causes of the disease and to guide treatment decisions. Investigators of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway. The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients.

  13. Clinicopathologic features of intracranial central neurocytomas in 2 dogs.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Piñeyro, P; Sponenberg, D P; Garman, R H; Jortner, B S

    2012-01-01

    In humans, central neurocytomas are rare and typically benign intracranial tumors found within the lateral ventricles, although extraventricular variants have been reported. Intracranial central neurocytomas have not been previously recognized in domestic animals. To describe the clinicopathologic features of canine intracranial central neurocytomas. Two dogs with spontaneous intracranial and intraventricular neoplasms. Both dogs experienced seizures, rapid neurological deterioration, and death from tumor-associated complications within 5 days of the onset of clinical signs, and had neoplastic masses within the lateral ventricles. A brain MRI was performed in 1 dog, which revealed a T1-isointense, heterogeneously T2 and FLAIR hyperintense, and markedly and heterogeneously contrast-enhancing mass lesions within both lateral ventricles. Histologically, the neoplasms resembled oligodendrogliomas. The diagnosis of central neurocytoma was supported by documenting expression of multiple neuronal markers, including neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, neural-cell adhesion molecule, and neuronal nuclear antigen within the tumors, and ultrastructural evidence of neuronal differentiation of neoplastic cells. Central neurocytoma should be a differential diagnosis for dogs with intraventricular brain masses. Morphologic differentiation of central neurocytoma from other intraventricular neoplasms, such as ependymoma or oligdendroglioma, can be difficult, and definitive diagnosis often requires immunohistochemical or ultrastructural confirmation of the neural origin of the neoplasm. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Treatment of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypotension With Tea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Petramfar, Peyman; Mohammadi, S. Saeed; Hosseinzadeh, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been increasingly diagnosed since its discovery through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a rare syndrome that is due to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a tear in the dura and can occur at any age, even among adolescents, but is most frequently seen among females in late middle age. Case Presentation Here, we describe a 32-year-old woman with a two-month history of headaches and occasional nausea and vomiting (N/V). MRI without gadolinium was normal, but meningeal enhancement was seen in MRI with gadolinium. The lumbar puncture revealed a low opening pressure. Computed tomography myelography (CT myelography) showed no leakage; Therefore, idiopathic intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. Treatment was started using tea, and the patient’s headache got significantly better in about a day. Conclusions Conservative therapy, such as bed rest and caffeine treatment with eight cups of tea daily, yielded a significant improvement in our patient. Effectively, the patient constitutes a case of idiopathic intracranial hypotension due to undetectable CSF leakage or hyper-absorption, with good response to conservative management through tea-drinking. Further investigations with an appropriate sample size are needed in order to confirm this intervention in the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypotension. PMID:27621920

  15. Primary intracranial choriocarcinoma: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lv, X-F; Qiu, Y-W; Zhang, X-L; Han, L-J; Qiu, S-J; Xiong, W; Wen, G; Zhang, Y-Z; Zhang, J

    2010-11-01

    PICCC is the rarest, most malignant primary intracranial GCT. The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the MR imaging findings in a series of 7 patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 11.9 years) with pathologically proved PICCC in our institution from 2004 to 2009. All tumors were located within the pineal (n = 6) or suprasellar (n = 1) regions. On T2-weighted MR imaging, the lesions appeared markedly heterogeneous with areas of both hypointensity and hyperintensity reflecting the histologic heterogeneity, including hemorrhage, fibrosis, cysts, or necrosis. Heterogeneous (n = 7), ringlike (n = 4), and/or intratumoral nodular (n = 3) enhancement was noted on T1-weighted images with gadolinium. These MR imaging findings, combined with patient age and serum β-HCG levels, may prove helpful in distinguishing PICCC from the more common primary brain tumors, thereby avoiding biopsy of this highly vascular tumor.

  16. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  17. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  18. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressure changes within the venous outflow tract from the brain were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Segmental vascular resistance changes were also calculated and the results correlated with the changes in cerebral blood flow, measured by the 133Xenon clearance method. Three different methods were used to raise intracranial pressure: cisterna magna infusion, a supratentorial subdural balloon, and an infratentorial subdural balloon. A close correlation was found between the cortical vein pressure and intracranial pressure with all methods of raising intracranial pressure: the overall correlation coefficient was 0·98. In the majority of animals sagittal sinus pressure showed little change through a wide range of intracranial pressure. In three of the six animals in the cisterna magna infusion group, however, sagittal sinus pressure increased to levels approaching the intracranial pressure during the later stages of intracranial hypertension. Jugular venous pressure showed little change with increasing intracranial pressure. The relationship between cerebral prefusion pressure and cerebral blood flow differed according to the method of increasing intracranial pressure. This was due to differing patterns of change in prevenous vascular resistance as venous resistance increased progressively with increasing pressure in all three groups. The present results confirm, therefore, the validity of the current definition of cerebral perfusion pressure—that is, cerebral perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus mean intracranial pressure—by demonstrating that intracranial pressure does represent the effective cerebral venous outflow pressure. Images PMID:4209160

  19. Traumatic intracranial haemorrhage in conscious patients with facial fractures--a review of 1959 cases.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Frank; Laimer, Klaus; Hohlrieder, Matthias; Ulmer, Hanno; Hackl, Wolfgang; Benzer, Arnulf; Schmutzhard, Erich; Gassner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Facial fracture patients who are conscious with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 15 in the absence of clinical neurological abnormalities are commonly not expected to have suffered severe intracranial pathology. However, high velocity impact may result in intracranial haemorrhage in different compartments. Over a 7-year period, 1959 facial fracture patients with GCS scores of 15 and the absence of neurological abnormalities were analysed. In 54 patients (2.8%) computed tomography scans revealed the presence of accompanying intracranial haemorrhage (study group). These patients were compared with the 1905 patients without intracranial haemorrhage (control group). Univariate analysis identified accompanying vomiting/nausea and seizures, cervical spine injuries, cranial vault and basal skull fractures to be significantly associated with intracranial bleeding. In multivariate analysis the risk was increased nearly 25-fold if an episode of vomiting/nausea had occurred. Seizures increased the risk of bleeding more than 15-fold. The mean functional outcome of the study group according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale was 4.7+/-0.7. Intracranial haemorrhage cannot be excluded in patients with facial fractures despite a GCS score of 15 and normal findings following neurological examination. Predictors, such as vomiting/nausea or seizures, skull fractures and closed head injuries, enhance the likelihood of an intracranial haemorrhage and have to be considered.

  20. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-01-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis. PMID:23549852

  1. Modification of a commercial cavity ring-down spectroscopy NO{sub 2} detector for enhanced sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Castellanos, Patricia; Ehrman, Sheryl H.; Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2009-11-15

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) plays a central role in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, and biogeochemical cycles. Many analytical techniques have been developed to detect NO{sub 2}, but only chemiluminescence-based instruments are commonly, commercially available. There remains a need for a fast, light, and simple method to directly measure NO{sub 2}. In this work we describe the modification and characterization of a small, commercially available cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) NO{sub 2} detector suitable for surface and aircraft monitoring. A metal oxide scrubber was added to remove NO{sub 2}, and provide a chemical zero, improving the detection limit (3{sigma} of the background noise) from several parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 0.06 ppbv, integrated over 60 s. Known interferences by water and particles were removed using Nafion tubing and a 1 {mu}m Teflon filter, respectively. A 95% response time of 18{+-}1 s was observed for a step change in concentration. The CRDS detector was run in parallel to an ozone chemiluminescence device with photolytic conversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. The two instruments measured ambient air in suburban Maryland. A least-squares fit to the comparison data resulted a slope of 0.960{+-}0.002 and R of 0.995, showing agreement within experimental uncertainty.

  2. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-04-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis.

  3. NERF encodes a RING E3 ligase important for drought resistance and enhances the expression of its antisense gene NFYA5 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Wenwen; Zhao, Meng; Li, Wen-Xue

    2015-01-01

    NFYA5 is an important drought-stress inducible transcription factor gene that is targeted by miR169 in Arabidopsis. We show here that the cis-natural antisense transcript gene of NFYA5, NFYA5 Enhancing RING FINGER (NERF), can produce siRNAs from their overlapping region (OR) and affect NFYA5 transcripts by functioning together with miR169. The NERF protein functions as an E3 ligase for ubiquitination. Overexpression of NERF or OR cDNA leads to siRNANERF accumulation, miR169 repression, and NFYA5 transcript enhancement; knock-down of NERF transcripts by an artificial miRNA enhances miR169 abundance and reduces NFYA5 transcripts. Overexpression of NFYA5 does not affect the NERF mRNA level. Deep sequencing of the small RNA library from 35S::OR plants identifies 960 sequences representing 323 unique siRNAs that originate from OR; the sequences of some siRNANERF are similar/complementary to those of miR169. Overexpression of the 195- to 280-bp OR cDNA-containing siRNAs similar/complementary to miR169 also leads to the accumulation of NFYA5 transcripts. Analysis of NERF knock-down plants and NERF overexpression lines showed that, like NFYA5, NERF is important for controlling stomatal aperture and drought resistance. This regulatory model might apply to other natural antisense transcripts with positively correlated expression patterns. PMID:25514924

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Kosmorsky, Gregory S

    2014-02-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is most often diagnosed in young obese females of childbearing years. The diagnosis is made based on the modified Dandy criteria and the exclusion of alternate causes of raised intracranial pressure. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment options for patients with IIH. There are long-term consequences for patients experiencing IIH, with visual loss being the most serious. We conclude that the diagnosis of IIH is not usually difficult. An ophthalmologic examination is essential in patients with IIH to monitor visual function. A neurologist or neurosurgeon may be needed at some point for medical and/or surgical intervention. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  5. Diagnosis of Intracranial Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    KANOTO, Masafumi; HOSOYA, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial dissection is defined as a hematoma in the wall of a cervical or an intracranial artery. Cerebral arterial dissection causes arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm, resulting in acute infarction and hemorrhage. Image analysis by such methods as conventional angiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and so on plays an important role in diagnosing cerebral arterial dissection. In this study, we explore the methods and findings involved in the diagnosis of cerebral arterial dissection. PMID:27180630

  6. Ring King

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    Saturn reigns supreme, encircled by its retinue of rings. Although all four giant planets have ring systems, Saturn's is by far the most massive and impressive. Scientists are trying to understand why by studying how the rings have formed and how they have evolved over time. Also seen in this image is Saturn's famous north polar vortex and hexagon. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 4, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 2 million miles (3 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 110 miles (180 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18278

  7. Rational design of hetero-ring-expanded guanine analogs with enhanced properties for modified DNA building blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinmei; Cukier, Robert I; Bu, Yuxiang

    2007-07-19

    The properties and modes of recognition of physiological DNAs associated with the four natural nucleobases might be extended, in principle, by the design of non-natural nucleobase derivatives. The goal is an expansion of the genetic alphabet, with the possible outcome of producing new DNAs with improved physical or biological properties. In this work, a new series of hetero-ring-expanded guanine analogs are proposed, and their relevant structural characteristics and electronic properties are determined by density functional theory. The stabilities of the decamer DNA duplexes (dn.dC)10 (where n represents the corresponding expanded guanine analog designed here) are also examined, using molecular dynamics. The simulations show that the designed motifs can form stable DNA-like structures. We determined the pairing energies for the Watson-Crick (WC) hydrogen-bonded dimers between the expanded G-analogs and the natural C, and found that the pairing energies are close to those of the natural GC pair. The calculated adiabatic ionization potentials (IPs) of the size-expanded guanine analogs and their base pairs, and the corresponding vertical ionization potentials, show that some are distinctly smaller than the corresponding natural versions. The HOMO-LUMO energy gaps for most of the size-expanded guanine analogs and their WC base pairs are considerably lower than those of the corresponding natural base and base pairs. Thus, the expanded G bases may be considered as DNA genetic motifs, and they may serve as building blocks for potential biological applications and the development of molecular electronic devices.

  8. Uranus Rings in False Color

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This false-color view of the rings of Uranus was made from images taken by NASA Voyager 2 on Jan. 21, 1986. All nine known rings are visible here; the somewhat fainter, pastel lines seen between them are contributed by the computer enhancement. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00033

  9. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  11. Rapid growth of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Koffie, Robert M; Stapleton, Christopher J; Torok, Collin M; Yoo, Albert J; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Codd, Patrick J

    2015-03-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysms are rare vascular lesions that classically occur in patients with infective endocarditis. We present a 49-year-old man with altered mental status and headache with rapid growth and rupture of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage, and review issues related to open neurosurgical and endovascular interventions.

  12. Clinical and imaging findings in five dogs with intracranial blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatiditis).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B

    2011-01-01

    Fungal infections affecting the central nervous system are rare. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical and imaging findings in dogs with intracranial blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatiditis). The radiology database was searched retrospectively for patients with a diagnosis of intracranial blastomycosis which had computed tomography performed as part of their diagnostic work-up. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed. Five dogs met the inclusion criteria. Major presenting complaints were stertor/nasal discharge (n=2), exophthalmos (n=1), and seizures (n=2). Clinical and laboratory findings were variable. Computed tomographic examination revealed a single contrast-enhancing intra-axial mass (n=1), a nasal mass disrupting the cribriform plate (n=3), and an intracranial mass extending into the orbit and nasal cavity (n=1). Findings in intracranial blastomycosis in dogs are variable, and the disease may mimic other inflammatory disorders or neoplasia.

  13. Saturn Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-12

    Like Earth, Saturn has an invisible ring of energetic ions trapped in its magnetic field. This feature is known as a "ring current." This ring current has been imaged with a special camera on Cassini sensitive to energetic neutral atoms. This is a false color map of the intensity of the energetic neutral atoms emitted from the ring current through a processed called charged exchange. In this process a trapped energetic ion steals and electron from cold gas atoms and becomes neutral and escapes the magnetic field. The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument's ion and neutral camera records the intensity of the escaping particles, which provides a map of the ring current. In this image, the colors represent the intensity of the neutral emission, which is a reflection of the trapped ions. This "ring" is much farther from Saturn (roughly five times farther) than Saturn's famous icy rings. Red in the image represents the higher intensity of the particles, while blue is less intense. Saturn's ring current had not been mapped before on a global scale, only "snippets" or areas were mapped previously but not in this detail. This instrument allows scientists to produce movies (see PIA10083) that show how this ring changes over time. These movies reveal a dynamic system, which is usually not as uniform as depicted in this image. The ring current is doughnut shaped but in some instances it appears as if someone took a bite out of it. This image was obtained on March 19, 2007, at a latitude of about 54.5 degrees and radial distance 1.5 million kilometres (920,000 miles). Saturn is at the center, and the dotted circles represent the orbits of the moon's Rhea and Titan. The Z axis points parallel to Saturn's spin axis, the X axis points roughly sunward in the sun-spin axis plane, and the Y axis completes the system, pointing roughly toward dusk. The ion and neutral camera's field of view is marked by the white line and accounts for the cut-off of the image on the left. The

  14. Enhanced CO2 Adsorption Affinity in a NbO-type MOF Constructed from a Low-Cost Diisophthalate Ligand with a Piperazine-Ring Bridge.

    PubMed

    Mu, Qian; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Liangjun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Xuebo

    2015-09-01

    A metal-organic framework (NPC-6) with an NbO topology based on a piperazine ring-bridged diisophthalate ligand was synthesized and characterized. The incorporated piperazine group leads to an enhanced adsorption affinity for CO2 in NPC-6, in which the CO2 uptake is 4.83 mmol g(-1) at 293 K and 1 bar, ranking among the top values of CO2 uptake on MOF materials. At 0.15 bar and 293 K, the NPC-6 adsorbs 1.07 mmol g(-1) of CO2 , which is about 55.1 % higher than that of the analogue MOF NOTT-101 under the same conditions. The enhanced CO2 uptake combined with comparable uptakes for CH4 and N2 leads to much higher selectivities for CO2 /CH4 and CO2 /N2 gas mixtures on NPC-6 than on NOTT-101. Furthermore, an N-alkylation is used in the synthesis of the PDIA ligand, leading to a much lower cost compared with that in the synthesis of ligands in the NOTT series, as the former does not require a palladium-based catalyst and borate esters. Thus, we conclude that NPC-6 is a promising candidate for CO2 capture applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Raised intracranial pressure in Apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marucci, Damian D; Dunaway, David J; Jones, Barry M; Hayward, Richard D

    2008-10-01

    Raised intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of Apert syndrome. The current policy in the authors' unit is to monitor these patients and only perform surgery when raised intracranial pressure has been diagnosed. The authors present their experience with this protocol, as it allows a more accurate picture of the natural history of raised intracranial pressure in Apert syndrome. The records of 24 patients, aged between 7 and 14 years, with Apert syndrome who had been managed expectantly (i.e., with no routine "automatic" early surgery) were reviewed. Data were collected on the incidence, timing, and management of raised intracranial pressure. Twenty of 24 patients (83 percent) developed raised intracranial pressure. The average age of the first episode was 18 months (range, 1 month to 4 years 5 months). Raised intracranial pressure was managed with surgery in 18 patients, including two patients who underwent shunt procedures for hydrocephalus. Two patients had their raised intracranial pressure treated successfully by correcting coexisting upper airway obstruction alone. Seven of the 20 patients (35 percent) developed a second episode of raised intracranial pressure, on average 3 years 4 months later (range, 1 year 11 months to 5 years 9 months). In Apert syndrome, there is a high incidence of raised intracranial pressure, which can first occur at any age up to 5 years and may recur despite initial successful treatment. Causes of raised intracranial pressure include craniocerebral disproportion, venous hypertension, upper airway obstruction, and hydrocephalus. Careful clinical, ophthalmologic, respiratory, and radiologic monitoring will allow raised intracranial pressure to be diagnosed accurately when it occurs and then treated most appropriately.

  16. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome: report of twelve cases.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Enrico; Savino, Anna; Sances, Grazia; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2004-06-01

    To investigate clinical, MRI, and radioisotope findings and therapeutic outcome of the syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is characterized by orthostatic headache, low CSF pressure, and MRI findings of diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement without previous history of head trauma or lumbar puncture. Spontaneous CSF leakage from a spinal dural tear has been suggested as the underlying pathogenic mechanism of SIH. Most patients recover without sequelae, but subdural collections have been described in a few. Twelve consecutive patients (10 females, 2 males, mean age 39 years) with headache related to the syndrome of spontaneous intracranial hypotension were investigated. Eleven patients presented orthostatic headache, one patient had continuous nonpostural headache. Additional clinical symptoms included nausea, vomiting, tinnitus, diplopia, and back pain. All the patients had low CSF opening pressure, seven had increased CSF albumin, and four had pleocytosis. Brain MRI showed diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement. Other features included subdural fluid collections (hematoma/hygroma) in four patients, downward displacement of the brain in four patients, and enlargement of the pituitary gland in one patient. Radioisotope cisternography results indicated, in two patients, a CSF leakage site in the cervico-thoracic region, and in one patient showed limited ascent of the tracer to the cerebral convexity and early appearance of radioisotope in the bladder. All the patients had complete resolution of headache with conservative treatment. Patients with SIH have distinct MRI and sometimes radioisotope cisternographic abnormalities and generally respond favorably to conservative management.

  17. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  18. Intracranial complications of transnasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Freije, J E; Donegan, J O

    1991-06-01

    The transnasal approach to the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses is a well-established technique for treating nasal polyposis and chronic sinusitis. The literature supports the effectiveness and safety of this procedure when performed by experienced surgeons. Although various authors allude to catastrophic complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, there are few case reports of complications involving significant morbidity or mortality. The potential for serious intracranial trauma is present during ethmoid surgery, especially during an intranasal approach due to limited exposure and difficulty in identifying surgical landmarks, but with renewed interest in this approach utilizing endoscopic instrumentation, the risks may be reduced.

  19. [Penetrating transorbital intracranial foreign body].

    PubMed

    Civelek, Erdinç; Bilgiç, Salih; Kabataş, Serdar; Hepgül, Kemal Tanju

    2006-07-01

    We report a seven year-old boy who suffered left orbital penetration of an industrial sewing machine needle. The needle passing through the left orbit and sphenoid bone at the posterior was extending into the layers of the dura of the left temporal lobe. In this patient, we preferred surgical approach and there was no complication after surgery. Penetrating intraorbital foreign materials with intracranial extension may lead to complications such as intracerebral hematoma, brain abscess, CSF fistula, proptosis of the eye, diplopia, orbital cellulitis and periorbital abscess. They have to be removed by surgical approach to prevent potential complications.

  20. Benign intracranial hypertension: diagnosis and conservative management.

    PubMed

    Theisler, C W

    1986-03-01

    The clinical features of benign intracranial hypertension are described. Pathological components are discussed and are contrasted against the current theoretical model of pain production in benign intracranial hypertension. Diagnosis and associated conditions are discussed from a review of the literature, and conservative management is outlined.

  1. INVITED TALK: Dynamics Of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    2011-04-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We will review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We will then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk), and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally-confined arcs both at Saturn, Jupiter, and Neptune. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.

  2. CO2 Effects in Space: Relationship to Intracranial Hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 on Earth and in space. The effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 are experienced in almost all bodily systems. In space some of the effects are heightened due to the fluid shifts to the thorax and head. This fluid shift results in increased intracranial pressure, congested cerebral circulation, increased Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Intravenous dilatation. The mechanism of the effect of CO2 on CBF is diagrammed, as is the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) production. A listing of Neuroendocrine targets is included.

  3. Intracranial arteriopathy in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Susana; Shaaya, Elias A; Auladell, Maria; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Caruso, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Arterial aneurysms, mostly aortic and intracranial, have been occasionally reported in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Brain magnetic resonance imaging reports of 404 patients with definite and 16 patients with either probable or possible tuberous sclerosis complex were revised for intracranial aneurysms. Among these patients, brain images of 220 patients with definite and 16 with probable or possible tuberous sclerosis complex were reviewed. Intracranial aneurysms were reported in 3 of 404 patients with a definite diagnosis (0.74%) (general population: 0.35%), including 2 children. A fourth intracranial aneurysm was found in a patient with probable tuberous sclerosis complex, who did not have tubers or subependymal nodules but had clinical manifestations related to neural crest derivatives, including lymphangioleiomyomatosis and extrarenal angiomyolipomas. The authors hypothesize that neural crest dysfunction can have a major role in intracranial arteriopathy in tuberous sclerosis complex, as smooth muscle cells in the forebrain vessels are of neural crest origin. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets.

  5. Establishment of the intracranial hemodynamic model based on contrast medium and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yaoer; He, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases are one of the most common vascular diseases in aged people and CT perfusion (CTP) is a very popular tool to detect the ischemic changes in brain vascular. The present study aims to establish a novel intracranial hemodynamic model to simulate anterior cerebral artery blood flow, and compare the actual and simulated hemodynamic parameters of healthy people and patients with carotid stenosis or occlusion. A mathematical model of the intracranial hemodynamic was generated using MATLAB software, and data from patients with or without infarct disease (57 and 44 cases, respectively) were retrospectively collected to test the new model. The actual time-density curve (TDC) of anterior cerebral artery was obtained from the original intracranial CTP data, and simulated TDC was calculated from our intracranial hemodynamic model. All model parameters were adjusted according to patients’ sex, height, and weight. Time to peak enhancement (TTP), maximum enhancement (ME), and mean transit time (MTT) were selected to evaluate the status of hemodynamics. In healthy people, there were no significant differences of TTP and ME between actual and simulated curves. For patients with infarct symptoms, ME was significantly decreased in actual data compared with simulated curve, while there was no obvious difference of TTP between actual and simulated data. Moreover, MTT was delayed in infarct patients compared with healthy people. Our group generated a computer-based, physiologic model to simulate intracranial hemodynamics. The model successfully simulated anterior cerebral artery hemodynamics in normal healthy people and showed noncompliant ME and MTT in infarct patients, reflecting their abnormal cerebral hemodynamic status. The digital model is reliable and may help optimize the protocol of contrast medium enhancement in intracranial CT, and provide a solid tool to study intracranial hemodynamics. PMID:27930555

  6. Establishment of the intracranial hemodynamic model based on contrast medium and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaoer; He, Wen

    2016-12-01

    Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases are one of the most common vascular diseases in aged people and CT perfusion (CTP) is a very popular tool to detect the ischemic changes in brain vascular. The present study aims to establish a novel intracranial hemodynamic model to simulate anterior cerebral artery blood flow, and compare the actual and simulated hemodynamic parameters of healthy people and patients with carotid stenosis or occlusion.A mathematical model of the intracranial hemodynamic was generated using MATLAB software, and data from patients with or without infarct disease (57 and 44 cases, respectively) were retrospectively collected to test the new model. The actual time-density curve (TDC) of anterior cerebral artery was obtained from the original intracranial CTP data, and simulated TDC was calculated from our intracranial hemodynamic model. All model parameters were adjusted according to patients' sex, height, and weight. Time to peak enhancement (TTP), maximum enhancement (ME), and mean transit time (MTT) were selected to evaluate the status of hemodynamics.In healthy people, there were no significant differences of TTP and ME between actual and simulated curves. For patients with infarct symptoms, ME was significantly decreased in actual data compared with simulated curve, while there was no obvious difference of TTP between actual and simulated data. Moreover, MTT was delayed in infarct patients compared with healthy people.Our group generated a computer-based, physiologic model to simulate intracranial hemodynamics. The model successfully simulated anterior cerebral artery hemodynamics in normal healthy people and showed noncompliant ME and MTT in infarct patients, reflecting their abnormal cerebral hemodynamic status. The digital model is reliable and may help optimize the protocol of contrast medium enhancement in intracranial CT, and provide a solid tool to study intracranial hemodynamics.

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tyree, Tammy L; Porter, Randall

    2012-05-01

    To present an illustrative case study of a patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and to increase awareness of this condition among nurse practitioners (NPs). A literature search was conducted, and deidentified patient information forms the basis of this presentation. The authors' experience and appropriate images enhance the presentation of the case study. SIH is a condition that typically occurs without a traumatic event, although it can be associated with minor trauma. It occurs when cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks through a focal weakness in the dural sac or meningeal diverticula, resulting in CSF hypovolemia. Patients usually present with an orthostatic headache. The most common brain magnetic resonance imaging findings are diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement, descent of the cerebellar tonsils, and subdural fluid collections. Treatment options range from management of symptoms to surgical repair of the leak. As NPs continue to provide care in a variety of settings, including emergency departments and urgent care areas, they must be familiar with the progression of symptoms that might indicate SIH and be prepared to make appropriate referrals to prevent iatrogenic morbidity. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Previous Statin Use and High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Plaque: The Intensive Statin Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients With Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jong-Won; Hwang, Jaechun; Lee, Mi Ji; Cha, Jihoon; Bang, Oh Young

    2016-07-01

    Although statin use has been linked to the stabilization of systemic atherosclerosis, its effect on symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic plaques has yet to be explored. We hypothesized that premorbid statin use is associated with plaque instability in intracranial arteries and may lead to differential patterns (size and distribution) of ischemic lesions in patients with acute intracranial atherosclerotic stroke. One hundred and thirty-six patients with acute infarcts caused by intracranial atherosclerotic stroke underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their premorbid statin use: nonuser, low-dose user, and high-dose user, according to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on blood cholesterol. Symptomatic lesions in intracranial arteries were analyzed using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging for vascular morphology (degree of stenosis, remodeling index, and wall index) and plaque activation (pattern and volume of enhancement). The cortical distribution and volume of ischemic brain lesions were measured using diffusion-weighted imaging. Among the enrolled patients, 38 (27.94%) were taking statins before the index stroke (22 low-dose statins and 16 high-dose statins). The degree of stenosis, remodeling index, and wall index did not differ between the 3 groups. However, the volume of plaque enhancement was significantly lower in statin users (nonuser, 33.26±40.72; low-dose user, 13.15±17.53; high-dose user, 3.13±5.26; P=0.002). Premorbid statin use was associated with a higher prevalence of nonembolic stroke and a decrease in large cortical infarcts (P=0.012). Premorbid statin usage is independently associated with reduced plaque enhancement and a decrease in large cortical lesions in patients with intracranial atherosclerotic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Capacitive radio frequency discharges with a single ring-shaped narrow trench of various depths to enhance the plasma density and lateral uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Y. Matsumoto, N.; Schulze, J.; Schuengel, E.

    2016-03-15

    Spatial structures of the electron density and temperature in ring-shaped hollow cathode capacitive rf plasma with a single narrow trench of 2 mm width have been investigated at various trench depths of D = 5, 8, 10, 12, and 15 mm. It is found that the plasma density is increased in the presence of the trench and that the radial profile of the plasma density has a peak around the narrow hollow trench near the cathode. The density becomes uniform further away from the cathode at all trench depths, whereas the electron temperature distribution remains almost uniform. The measured radial profiles of the plasma density are in good agreement with a theoretical diffusion model for all the trench depths, which explains the local density increase by a local enhancement of the electron heating. Under the conditions investigated, the trench of 10 mm depth is found to result in the highest plasma density at various axial and radial positions. The results show that the radial uniformity of the plasma density at various axial positions can be improved by using structured electrodes of distinct depths rather than planar electrodes.

  10. Capacitive radio frequency discharges with a single ring-shaped narrow trench of various depths to enhance the plasma density and lateral uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Y.; Matsumoto, N.; Schulze, J.; Schuengel, E.

    2016-03-01

    Spatial structures of the electron density and temperature in ring-shaped hollow cathode capacitive rf plasma with a single narrow trench of 2 mm width have been investigated at various trench depths of D = 5, 8, 10, 12, and 15 mm. It is found that the plasma density is increased in the presence of the trench and that the radial profile of the plasma density has a peak around the narrow hollow trench near the cathode. The density becomes uniform further away from the cathode at all trench depths, whereas the electron temperature distribution remains almost uniform. The measured radial profiles of the plasma density are in good agreement with a theoretical diffusion model for all the trench depths, which explains the local density increase by a local enhancement of the electron heating. Under the conditions investigated, the trench of 10 mm depth is found to result in the highest plasma density at various axial and radial positions. The results show that the radial uniformity of the plasma density at various axial positions can be improved by using structured electrodes of distinct depths rather than planar electrodes.

  11. Novel Nitrogen-Enriched Oridonin Analogs with Thiazole-Fused A-Ring: Protecting Group-Free Synthesis, Enhanced Anticancer Profile, and Improved Aqueous Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chunyong; Zhang, Yusong; Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Wild, Christopher; Chu, Lili; Liu, Huiling; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Oridonin (1), a complex ent-kaurane diterpenoid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Isodon rubescens, has demonstrated great potential in the treatment of various human cancers due to its unique and safe anticancer pharmacological profile. Nevertheless, the clinical development of oridonin for cancer therapy has been hampered by its relatively moderate potency, limited aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. Herein, we report the concise synthesis of a series of novel nitrogen-enriched oridonin derivatives with thiazole-fused A-ring through an efficient protecting group-free synthetic strategy. Most of them including compounds 7-11, 13 and 14 exhibited potent antiproliferative effects against breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer cells with low micromolar to submicromolar IC50 values, as well as markedly enhanced aqueous solubility. These new analogs obtained by rationally modifying the natural product have been demonstrated not only to significantly induce the apoptosis and suppress growth of triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer both in vitro and in vivo, but also effective against drug-resistant ER-positive MCF-7 clones. PMID:23746196

  12. The RING Finger Ubiquitin E3 Ligase OsHTAS Enhances Heat Tolerance by Promoting H2O2-Induced Stomatal Closure in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Cuicui; Wei, Chuchu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mugui; Yu, Feifei; Xie, Qi; Tu, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress often results in the generation of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which plays a vital role as a secondary messenger in the process of abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal closure. Here, we characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) HEAT TOLERANCE AT SEEDLING STAGE (OsHTAS) gene, which plays a positive role in heat tolerance at the seedling stage. OsHTAS encodes a ubiquitin ligase localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. OsHTAS expression was detected in all tissues surveyed and peaked in leaf blade, in which the expression was concentrated in mesophyll cells. OsHTAS was responsive to multiple stresses and was strongly induced by exogenous ABA. In yeast two-hybrid assays, OsHTAS interacted with components of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system and an isoform of rice ascorbate peroxidase. OsHTAS modulated hydrogen peroxide accumulation in shoots, altered the stomatal aperture status of rice leaves, and promoted ABA biosynthesis. The results suggested that the RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase OsHTAS functions in leaf blade to enhance heat tolerance through modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced stomatal closure and is involved in both ABA-dependent and DROUGHT AND SALT TOLERANCE-mediated pathways. PMID:26564152

  13. Amino-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Lead to Successful Ring-Opening Polymerization of Poly(ε-caprolactone): Enhanced Interfacial Bonding and Optimized Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Roumeli, Eleftheria; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Tsanaktsis, Vasilios; Terzopoulou, Zoe; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2015-06-03

    In this work, the synthesis, structural characteristics, interfacial bonding, and mechanical properties of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites with small amounts (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 wt %) of amino-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) prepared by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) are reported. This method allows the creation of a covalent-bonding zone on the surface of nanotubes, which leads to efficient debundling and therefore satisfactory dispersion and effective load transfer in the nanocomposites. The high covalent grafting extent combined with the higher crystallinity provide the basis for a significant enhancement of the mechanical properties, which was detected in the composites with up to 1 wt % f-MWCNTs. Increasing filler concentration encourages intrinsic aggregation forces, which allow only minor grafting efficiency and poorer dispersion and hence inferior mechanical performance. f-MWCNTs also cause a significant improvement on the polymerization reaction of PCL. Indeed, the in situ polymerization kinetics studies reveal a significant decrease in the reaction temperature, by a factor of 30-40 °C, combined with accelerated the reaction kinetics during initiation and propagation and a drastically reduced effective activation energy.

  14. Kinematics and dynamics of the Uranian rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-gravity model of apse alignment was tested by comparing its predictions about structure within the epsilon ring with an extensive set of observed occultation profiles covering a wide range of ring longitudes. The self-gravity model as presently constructed is inconsistent with the observations. The Lindblad resonance survey and Shepherd satellite ring perturbation are discussed. The kinematic model of the Uranian ring orbit was enhanced to accommodate Voyager observations as well as ground-based occultation observations.

  15. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  16. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  17. [Intracranial Pressure Evaluation by Ophthalmologist].

    PubMed

    Čmelo, J; Illéš, R; Šteňo, J

    2017-01-01

    The value of ICT is important in diagnosis of the diseases of the eye and orbit Methods for direct measurement of intracranial pressure (ICT) are exact, but they are invasive and there is some risk of infection and damage of the tissue. Currently there are 2 valid indirect methods of mesurement of IKT. Digital Ophthalmodynamometry (D-ODM) and Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TDU). D-ODM is a non-invasive method for measuring of the Pulsating Venous Pressure (VPT). We can measure VPT by the pulse phenomena. Physiologically (to be maintained blood flow) VPT not be less than the ICT and intraorbital pressure (IorbitT). If we raise the VPT to compensate the current IKT (or IorbitT) - there is a pulsation VCR. We can calculate aproxymative IKT with the formula: IKT = 0.903 - (VPT) - 8.87, or IKT = 0.29 + 0.74 (VOT / PI (AO)). [VOT = intraocular pressure. PI - pulsatility index arteriae ophthalmic from Color Doppler ultrasonography.] IKT can be approximate calculate with mathematical formulas: IKT = 0:55 × BMI (kg / m2) + 0.16 × KTD (mmHg) - 0:18 x age (years) - 1.91. [KTD - diastolic blood pressure, BMI - Body master index] or: IKT = 16.95 x 0.39 x OSASW09 + BMI + 0.14 + TKS - 20.90. [OSASW095: width of the orbital arachnoid space at a distance of 9 mm behind the eyeball (nuclear magnetic resonance). BMI: Body Mass Index. TKS: mean arterial pressure]. Normal values of VPT are under 15 torr. The risk of increased intracranial pressure is above 20 torr. Under physiological conditions, there is intraocular pressure lower in about 5 torr than VPT. D-ODM is a useful screening method in the evaluation of IKT for hydrocephalus, brain tumors, cerebral hemorrhage after brain trauma and also in ocular diseases: Glaucoma, Ocular hypertension, orbitopathy (endocrine orbitopathy), ischemic / non-ischemic occlusion of blood vessels of the eye, indirect detection ICT carotid artery-cavernous fistula, amaurosis fugax, optic neuropathy. D-ODM is suitable for immediate evaluation

  18. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  19. Cerebral venous etiology of intracranial hypertension and differentiation from idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Iencean, Stefan Mircea; Poeata, Ion; Iencean, Andrei Stefan; Tascu, Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the characteristics that distinguish between idiopathic intracranial hypertension (ICH) and ICH caused by intracranial vascular damage. Twenty-one patients with ICH were included in this study. The analysis of the symptomatology correlated with the values of intracranial pressure, and the imaging findings revealed significant differences between these two types of ICH. ICH caused by intracranial venous vascular damage is named vascular ICH. Vascular ICH has a known etiology, such as cerebral vascular illness, and a relatively rapid increase in intracranial pressure of approximately 21 cmH2O and imaging findings show characteristic images of thrombosis or stenosis of the intracranial venous system, while all brain images (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, angio-magnetic resonance imaging) are normal in idiopathic ICH. The treatment of vascular ICH is etiologic, pathogenic, and symptomatic, but that of idiopathic ICH is only symptomatic. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Intracranial recordings and human memory.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth L; Knight, Robert T

    2015-04-01

    Recent work involving intracranial recording during human memory performance provides superb spatiotemporal resolution on mnemonic processes. These data demonstrate that the cortical regions identified in neuroimaging studies of memory fall into temporally distinct networks and the hippocampal theta activity reported in animal memory literature also plays a central role in human memory. Memory is linked to activity at multiple interacting frequencies, ranging from 1 to 500Hz. High-frequency responses and coupling between different frequencies suggest that frontal cortex activity is critical to human memory processes, as well as a potential key role for the thalamus in neocortical oscillations. Future research will inform unresolved questions in the neuroscience of human memory and guide creation of stimulation protocols to facilitate function in the damaged brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects.

  2. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Hypophosphatemia after nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Junttila, E; Koskenkari, J; Ala-Kokko, T

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and contributing factors of hypophosphatemia and the association with poor long-term outcome after nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage. This was a prospective, observational study of patients with nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage (i.e., aneurysmal or perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage, or spontaneous intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhage) treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) at our university hospital. Plasma phosphate concentrations were measured serially in 2-day sections during the 6 day study period. The ICU mortality was recorded, 3-month and 1-year outcomes were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. One hundred patients were enrolled. The frequency of hypophosphatemia (Pi ≤ 0.65 mmol/l) was 70%. Chronic hypertension, acute hydrocephalus, and diffuse brain edema were more common in patients with hypophosphatemia compared with normophosphatemics (44% vs. 21%, P = 0.021; 59% vs. 33%, P = 0.021; and 43% vs. 13%, P = 0.004, respectively). Hypophosphatemic patients had higher maximum SOFA scores [10 (7-11) vs. 7.5 (5.75-10), P = 0.024]. Initial phosphate concentration correlated inversely with APACHE II score on admission (ρ = -0.304, P = 0.002) and SOFA score on the first ICU day (ρ = -0.269, P = 0.008). There was no difference in outcome between hypophosphatemic and normophosphatemic patients. In all five patients with severe hypophosphatemia (Pi < 0.32 mmol/l) the functional outcome was good. Hypophosphatemia was common in this patient population. The outcome was similar between hypophosphatemic and normophosphatemic patients. Chronic hypertension, acute hydrocephalus, diffuse brain edema and higher SOFA scores were more common in patients with hypophosphatemia. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Occult intracranial injury in infants.

    PubMed

    Greenes, D S; Schutzman, S A

    1998-12-01

    The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) to determine whether clinical symptoms and signs of brain injury are sensitive indicators of intracranial injury (ICI) in infants admitted with head trauma, (2) to describe the clinical characteristics of infants who have ICI in the absence of symptoms and signs of brain injury, and (3) to determine the clinical significance of those ICIs diagnosed in asymptomatic infants. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all infants younger than 2 years of age admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with acute ICI during a 6(1/2)-year period. Infants were considered symptomatic if they had loss of consciousness, history of behavior change, seizures, vomiting, bulging fontanel, retinal hemorrhages, abnormal neurologic examination, depressed mental status, or irritability. All others were considered to have occult ICI. Of 101 infants studied, 19 (19%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 12%, 28%) had occult ICI. Fourteen of 52 (27%) infants younger than 6 months of age had occult ICI, compared with 5 of 34 (15%) infants 6 months to 1 year, and none of 15 (0%) infants older than 1 year. Eighteen (95%) infants with occult ICI had scalp contusion or hematoma, and 18 (95%) had skull fracture. Nine (47%) infants with occult ICI received therapy for the ICI. No infants with occult ICI (0%) (95% CI 0, 14%) required surgery or medical management for increased intracranial pressure. Only 1 subject (5%) with occult ICI had any late symptoms or complications: a brief, self-limited convulsion. We found that 19 of 101 ICIs in infants admitted with head trauma were clinically occult. All 19 occult ICIs occurred in infants younger than 12 months of age, and 18 of 19 had skull fractures. None experienced serious neurologic deterioration or required surgical intervention. Physicians cannot depend on the absence of clinical signs of brain injury to exclude ICI in infants younger than 1 year of age.

  5. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Michael Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 {+-} 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  6. Intracranial intraaxial cerebral tufted angioma: case report.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Randy S; Zanazzi, George; Hargus, Gunnar; Dyster, Timothy; Chan, Shirley; Lignelli-Dipple, Angela; Wang, Tony J C; Faust, Phyllis L; McKhann, Guy M

    2017-02-24

    Tufted angioma (TA) is a rare, slow-growing, vascular lesion that commonly presents as a solitary macule, papule, or nodule arising in the soft tissues of the torso, extremities, and head and neck in children and young adults. Adult-onset cases have been infrequently reported. While typically benign, TAs may be locally aggressive. Complete physical examination and hematological workup are recommended in patients with TA to exclude the presence of Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon (KMP). The authors describe the case of a 69-year-old man with a contrast-enhancing frontal lobe lesion, with surrounding vasogenic edema, which was treated by gross-total resection. Characteristic histological features of a TA were demonstrated, with multiple cannonball-like tufts of densely packed capillaries emanating from intraparenchymal vessels in cerebral cortex and adjacent white matter. Tumor recurrence was detected after 4 months and treated with adjuvant Gamma Knife radiosurgery. To the extent of the authors' knowledge, this case illustrates the first report of TA presenting in an adult as an intracranial intraaxial tumor without associated KMP. The fairly rapid regrowth of this tumor, requiring adjuvant treatment after resection, is consistent with a potential for locally aggressive growth in a TA occurring in the brain.

  7. Unusual imaging appearance of a huge intracranial dermoid cyst located across the anterior and middle skull base.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejian; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Hu, Fan; Gu, Ye; Xie, Tao; Yu, Hao; Cai, Zhenhua

    2013-12-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts are rare congenital neoplasms. Typical dermoid cysts are well-circumscribed fat-density masses with no associated contrast enhancement. We report a woman with a dermoid cyst across the anterior and middle skull base of unusual imaging appearance. This report highlights the challenge facing the diagnosis and management of intracranial dermoid cysts with unusual primary imaging findings. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059478 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  9. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059467 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (mostly obscured), both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  10. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059344 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  11. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow during incremental increases of intracranial pressure produced by infusion of fluid into the cisterna magna were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow remained constant at intracranial pressure levels up to approximately 50 mm Hg. At intracranial pressure levels between 50-96 mm Hg a marked increase in cerebral blood flow occurred, associated with the development of systemic hypertension and changes in cerebrovascular resistance. Further increases of intracranial pressure led to a progressive fall in cerebral blood flow. Prior section of the cervical cord prevented both the increase in cerebral blood flow and the systemic hypertension. Alteration of cerebral perfusion pressure by bleeding during the hyperaemia in a further group of animals suggested that autoregulation was at least partially preserved during this phase. After maximum hyperaemia had occurred, however, autoregulation appeared to be lost. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4624687

  12. Systemic vascular responses to increased intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, William; McDowall, D. Gordon

    1977-01-01

    This paper details the results of experimental studies, on 16 dogs with artificially-induced intracranial space-occupying lesions, of the systemic vascular responses and the intracranial pressure changes (both in the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments) induced by increasing intracranial pressure. The changes produced were divided into two phases such that phase 1 detailed the alterations observed from the start of the balloon inflation up to the initiation of the systemic pressor response. Phase 2 recorded those alterations which occurred during, and immediately after, the period of systemic hypertension (see Fitch et al., 1977). The changes observed during phase 1, and presented in this communication, were those of increasing intracranial pressures and decreasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. These alterations were associated with decreases in supratentorial perfusion pressure and increases in transtentorial pressure gradient and arrhythmia index. PMID:599360

  13. Remotely-powered intracranial pressure monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1979-01-01

    Implantable RF powered monitor uses capacitive transducer and stiff metal diaphragm that gives high stability for long term intracranial pressure monitoring. Design of monitor reduces risk of infection while improving patient comfort and mobility.

  14. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  15. Symptomatic intracranial metastasis in penile carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Tongaonkar, Hemant B.; Bakshi, Ganesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Distant metastases in penile cancers are rare, especially metachronous symptomatic intracranial metastasis. A middle-aged patient presented to us with an intracranial mass 2 years after being treated for penile cancer. Given the rarity of metastasis and the diagnostic dilemma along with the need for relief of neurological symptoms, it was excised and found to be a metastatic deposit. We discuss the case and review the relevant literature. PMID:21369397

  16. Precursors to Rapid Elevations in Intracranial Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    difference between the systemic arterial blood pressure and the intracranial pressure , CPP = ABP − ICP. 2Ischemia is a decrease in blood supply...and the average arterial blood pressure , µABP, were consistently higher. Our results seem to be inconsistent with the observations of previous studies...1 PRECURSORS TO RAPID ELEVATIONS IN INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE James McNames1, Cristina Crespo1, Mateo Aboy1, Miles Ellenby2, Susanna Lai2, Robert

  17. Intracranial Rhabdomyoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Zhou, Tianzan; Jones, Karra A; Chen, James Y; Hansen, Lawrence; U, Hoi Sang

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male presented with eight months of increasingly severe frontal headaches, decreased right facial sensation, and periodic vertigo. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a heterogeneously contrast-enhancing mass involving and expanding the right foramen ovale.  A biopsy of the lesion was performed, and the final pathologic diagnosis revealed a neoplastic rhabdomyoma. To date, only five cases of intracranial rhabdomyoma have been reported, and a rhabdomyoma involving the trigeminal nerve has never been described in an adult. This manuscript reviews the available literature and highlights the clinical, imaging, pathologic characteristics, and surgical management of these exceedingly rare lesions. PMID:27335706

  18. Computed tomographic spectrum of intracranial mycosis: correlation with histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.A.; Stern, J.; deNapoli, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    Four cases of intracerebral fungal infection are reviewed. The clinical course is outlined, and the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics are analyzed in light of known pathological data. The CT appearance of intracranial mycosis is dependent on the type of fungus as well as the dominant infecting form, i.e., yeast or hyphae. The hyphal form leads predominantly to a CT pattern consistent with vascular occlusion and secondary abscess formation; the yeast form generally results in noncaseating granulomas, which appear on CT scan as nodular enhancing lesions. If the patient survives the acute infective process, these fungal lesions undergo a prolonged subacute phase, and may eventually calcify.

  19. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow with increasing intracranial pressure were studied in anaesthetized baboons during expansion of a subdural balloon in one of two different sites. With an infratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow bore no clear relation to intracranial pressure, but was linearly related to cerebral perfusion pressure. Apart from an initial change in some animals, cerebrovascular resistance remained constant with increasing intracranial pressure, and autoregulation appeared to be lost from the outset. With a supratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow remained constant as intracranial pressure was increased to levels around 60 mm Hg, corresponding to a cerebral perfusion pressure range of approximately 100 to 40 mmHg. Cerebrovascular resistance fell progressively, and autoregulation appeared to be effective during this phase. At higher intracranial pressure levels (lower cerebral perfusion pressure levels), autoregulation was lost and cerebral blood flow became directly dependent on cerebral perfusion pressure. The importance of the cause of the increase in intracranial pressure on the response of the cerebral circulation and the relevance of these findings to the clinical situation are discussed. PMID:4196632

  20. Role of MRI in Diagnosis of Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Muçaj, Sefedin; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Ramadani, Naser; Jerliu, Naim

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Intracranial dermoid cystic tumors account for <1% of all intracranial masses. Case report: A 52-year-old male, having headaches, nausea and is presented with a history of 2 episodes of new onset seizures. On presentation, the patient had a normal physical exam, including a complete neurological and cranial nerve exam. Methods: Precontrast MRI; TSE/T2Wsequence in axial/coronal planes; 3D – HI-resolution T1W sagittal; FLAIR/T2W axial; FLAIR/T2W, Flash/T2W oblique coronal plane, GRE/T2W axial. Post-contrast TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Diffusion weighted and ADC mapping, postcontrast: TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Results: Subsequent MRI of the brain revealed an oval and lobulated 47x34x30mm (TRxAPxCC) non-enhancing T1-hyperintense mass in right cavernous sinus, with compression of surrounding mesial temporal lobe and right anterolateral aspect of mesencephalon. Findings are consistent with ruptured dermoid cyst, given the evacuated sebum content at its lower half. Sebum particles in millimetric sizes are seen within right Sylvian fissure, anterior horns of lateral ventricles and to a lesser extent within left Sylvian fissure, right parietal sulci, cerebral aqueduct, and basal cisterns. No restricted diffusion is seen, eliminating the possibility of epidermoid. A shunt catheter is evident traversing between right lateral ventricle and right parietal bone; besides, slit-like right lateral ventricle is noted (likely secondary to over-draining shunt catheter). Conclusion: Intracranial dermoid cysts are benign rare slow-growing tumors that upon rupture, however, widespread presence of T1 hyperintense droplets and leptomeningeal enhancement can be noted–making MRI the best imaging modality for diagnosis of this rare entity. PMID:28883682

  1. Treatment of Giant Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report on report the clinical outcome obtained in treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms (GAs). Between 2005 and 2007, 51 patients with 51 GAs presented at our hospital. Twentynine were treated with primary parent vessel occlusion without distal bypass and ten underwent treatment preserving the parent artery. Twelve patients could not be treated endovascularly. Selective embolization (including two remodeling techniques and two stent-coil embolizations) resulted in only one cure. Two patients died as a result of subarachnoid hemorrhage periprocedurely. Twenty-nine patients treated primarily with parent vessel occlusion and three patients treated with covered stent were considered cured after their treatments. Only one patient treated with parent vessel occlusion experienced ischemia during follow-up, which resulted in a mild neurological deficit. Of the twelve patients who could not be treated endovascularly, one succumbed to surgery, four died while being treated conservatively, and three were lost to follow-up. Parent artery occlusion, covered stent and coil occlusion provide effective protection against bleeding. In treatment of paraclinoid GAs of the internal carotid artery, the use of a stent, and stent-assisted coil embolization may be a pitfall. PMID:20465907

  2. [Genetic dissection of intracranial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Onda, Hideaki; Yoneyama, Taku; Akagawa, Hiroyuki; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2008-11-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a devastating condition with high mortality and morbidity. Genetic as well as environment factors play important roles in the pathogenesis of SAH and IAs. We review the present knowledge on the genetic factors responsible for SAH or IAs. Linkage analysis and association study are used for genetic dissection. Genome-wide linkage analyses have specified several genetic loci for IAs and 6 loci (1p34-36, 7q11, 11q24-25, 14q22-31, 19q13, and Xp22) have been replicated in different populations. Numerous functional and/or positional candidate genes for IAs have been investigated by case-control association studies. The results of genetic association studies are modest because of small sample sizes. To date, no specific genes have been identified as responsible for IA development or rupture. Recent, large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) studies have revealed consistent and replicable genetic markers of several complex diseases such as coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes. Although, thus far, no GWA studies have been performed for IAs, such a study may accomplish the breakthrough of genetic dissection of IAs. The identification of susceptible genes might lead to the understanding of the mechanism of IA formation or rupture and to novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Cortical astrogliosis and increased perivascular aquaporin-4 in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eide, Per Kristian; Eidsvaag, Vigdis Andersen; Nagelhus, Erlend A; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2016-08-01

    The syndrome idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) includes symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and impaired vision, usually in overweight persons. The pathogenesis is unknown. In the present prospective observational study, we characterized the histopathological changes in biopsies from the frontal brain cortical parenchyma obtained from 18 IIH patients. Reference specimens were sampled from 13 patients who underwent brain surgery for epilepsy, tumors or acute vascular diseases. Overnight ICP monitoring revealed abnormal intracranial pressure wave amplitudes in 14/18 IIH patients, who underwent shunt surgery and all responded favorably. A remarkable histopathological observation in IIH patients was patchy astrogliosis defined as clusters of hypertrophic astrocytes enclosing a nest of nerve cells. Distinct astrocyte domains (i.e. no overlap between astrocyte processes) were lacking in most IIH biopsy specimens, in contrast to their prevalence in reference specimens. Evidence of astrogliosis in IIH was accompanied with significantly increased aquaporin-4 (AQP4) immunoreactivity over perivascular astrocytic endfeet, compared to the reference specimens, measured with densitometry. Scattered CD68 immunoreactive cells (activated microglia and macrophages) were recognized, indicative of some inflammation. No apoptotic cells were demonstrable. We conclude that the patchy astrogliosis is a major finding in patients with IIH. We propose that the astrogliosis impairs intracranial pressure-volume reserve capacity, i.e. intracranial compliance, and contributes to the IIH by restricting the outflow of fluid from the cranium. The increased perivascular AQP4 in IIH may represent a compensatory mechanism to enhance brain fluid drainage.

  4. Petrous apex cephalocoele: contribution of coexisting intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duran, S; Hatipoglu, H G; Cılız, D S; Elverici, E; Sakman, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to show the MRI findings of petrous apex cephalocoele (PAC) and the other intracranial pathologies that coexist with PAC, and to discuss the contribution of the co-existing pathologies to aetiopathogenesis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of our imaging archive for the period from January 2012 to October 2013 revealed 13 patients with PAC (12 females and 1 male; age range, 26–69 years). 11 patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium, and 2 patients underwent MRI examination of the sellar region. We evaluated the lesions for content, signal intensity, enhancement, relation to petrous apex and Meckel's cave. Images were also evaluated for coexisting pathologies. Results: The presenting symptoms included headache, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and trigeminal neuropathy. All patients had PAC. All lesions were located posterolateral to the Meckel's cave and were isointense with CSF signal on all pulse sequences. All lesions were continuous with Meckel's cave. Coexisting pathologies included intracranial aneurysmal dilatation, empty sella, mass in hypophysis, arachnoid cyst, inferior herniation of parahippocampal gyrus and optic nerve sheath CSF distension. Conclusion: Coexistence with other intracranial pathologies supports the possibility of CSF imbalance and/or intracranial hypertension in the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. Advances in knowledge: This study examined the contribution of the co-existing intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. PMID:25651410

  5. CBL linker region and RING finger mutations lead to enhanced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling via elevated levels of JAK2 and LYN.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L

    2013-07-05

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways.

  6. CBL Linker Region and RING Finger Mutations Lead to Enhanced Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Signaling via Elevated Levels of JAK2 and LYN*

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D.; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways. PMID:23696637

  7. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  8. Primary Stenting of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Straube, T. Stingele, Robert; Jansen, Olav

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and safety of stenting intracranial atherosclerotic stenoses.Methods: In 12 patients the results of primary intracranial stenting were evaluated retrospectively. Patient ages ranged from 49 to 79 years (mean 64 years). Six patients presented with stenoses in the anterior circulation, and six had stenosis in the posterior circulation. One patient presented with extra- and intracranial tandem stenosis of the left internal carotid artery. Three patients presented with acute basilar thrombosis, caused by high-grade basilar stenoses.Results: Intracranial stenoses were successfully stented in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient the stent could not be advanced over the carotid siphon to reach the stenosis of the ophthalmic internal carotid artery. Follow-up digital subtraction angiographic studies were obtained in two patients who had presented with new neurologic signs or symptoms. In both cases the angiogram did not show any relevant stenotic endothelial hyperplasia. In one patient, after local thrombolysis the stenosis turned out to be so narrow that balloon angioplasty had to be performed before stent deployment. All three patients treated for stenosis-related basilar thrombosis died due to brainstem infarction that had ensued before the intervention.Conclusions: Prophylactic primary stenting of intracranial stenoses of the anterior or posterior cerebral circulation can be performed with a low complication rate; technical problems such as stent flexibility must still be solved. Local thrombolysis followed by stenting in stenosis-related thrombotic occlusion is technically possible.

  9. Hyperprolactinemia due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Nuño, Miriam; Rozen, Todd D; Maya, M Marcel; Mamelak, Adam N; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien S

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an increasingly recognized cause of headaches. Pituitary enlargement and brain sagging are common findings on MRI in patients with this disorder. The authors therefore investigated pituitary function in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. METHODS Pituitary hormones were measured in a group of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. For patients with hyperprolactinemia, prolactin levels also were measured following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed prior to and following treatment. RESULTS The study group consisted of 27 women and 15 men with a mean age at onset of symptoms of 52.2 ± 10.7 years (mean ± SD; range 17-72 years). Hyperprolactinemia was detected in 10 patients (24%), ranging from 16 ng/ml to 96.6 ng/ml in men (normal range 3-14.7 ng/ml) and from 31.3 ng/ml to 102.5 ng/ml in women (normal range 3.8-23.2 ng/ml). In a multivariate analysis, only brain sagging on MRI was associated with hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging was present in 60% of patients with hyperprolactinemia and in 19% of patients with normal prolactin levels (p = 0.02). Following successful treatment of the spontaneous intracranial hypotension, hyperprolactinemia resolved, along with normalization of brain MRI findings in all 10 patients. CONCLUSIONS Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a previously undescribed cause of hyperprolactinemia. Brain sagging causing distortion of the pituitary stalk (stalk effect) may be responsible for the hyperprolactinemia.

  10. Overdiagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fisayo, Adeniyi; Bruce, Beau B; Newman, Nancy J; Biousse, Valerie

    2016-01-26

    To delineate the factors contributing to overdiagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) among patients seen in one neuro-ophthalmology service at a tertiary center. We retrospectively reviewed new patients referred with a working diagnosis of IIH over 8 months. The Diagnosis Error Evaluation and Research taxonomy tool was applied to cases referred with a diagnosis of IIH and a discrepant final diagnosis. Of 1,249 patients, 165 (13.2%) were referred either with a preexisting diagnosis of IIH or to rule out IIH. Of the 86/165 patients (52.1%) with a preexisting diagnosis of IIH, 34/86 (39.5%) did not have IIH. The most common diagnostic error was inaccurate ophthalmoscopic examination in headache patients. Of 34 patients misdiagnosed as having IIH, 27 (27/34 [79.4%]; 27/86 [31.4%]) had at least one lumbar puncture, 29 (29/34 [85.3%]; 29/86 [33.7%]) had a brain MRI, and 8 (8/34 [23.5%]; 8/86 [9.3%]) had a magnetic resonance/CT venogram. Twenty-six had received medical treatment, 1 had a lumbar drain, and 4 were referred for surgery. In 8 patients (8/34 [23.5%]; 8/86 [9.3%]), an alternative diagnosis requiring further evaluation was identified. Diagnostic errors resulted in overdiagnosis of IIH in 39.5% of patients referred for presumed IIH, and prompted unnecessary tests, invasive procedures, and missed diagnoses. The most common errors were inaccurate ophthalmoscopic examination in headache patients and thinking biases, reinforcing the need for rapid access to specialists with experience in diagnosing optic nerve disorders. Indeed, the high prevalence of primary benign headaches and obesity in young women often leads to costly and invasive evaluations for presumed IIH. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  12. The Ring Sculptor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-08

    Prometheus zooms across the Cassini spacecraft field of view, attended by faint streamers and deep gores in the F ring. This movie sequence of five images shows the F ring shepherd moon shaping the ring inner edge

  13. Beyond Bright Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-30

    The tiny moon Pandora appears beyond the bright disk of Saturn rings in this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft. Pandora orbits outside the F ring and, in this image, is farther from Cassini than the rings are.

  14. Intracranial hypertension without headache in children.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Reem, Rachel; Rogers, David; Roach, E Steve

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without headache in children. We retrospectively analyzed patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension referral center. Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they complained of headache at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank-sum test because of non-normality. A P value of .05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension and 22/152 patients (14.5%) met the criteria of optic nerve edema without headache. There were clinically significant differences in age and body mass index between the 2 groups. The group without headache was typically younger and not obese. The opening pressure and modified opening pressure were not clinically significant between the 2 groups.

  15. Intracranial Hypertension Without Papilledema in Children.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Roach, E Steve

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children. Charts of patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they had presence or absence of optic nerve edema at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test because of non-normality. A P-value of 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension, and 27 patients (17.8%) met the criteria of headache without optic nerve edema. There was no clinically significant difference in age, body mass index, opening pressure, and modified opening pressure between the 2 groups.

  16. Primary Intracranial Malignant Melanoma with Extracranial Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Kengo; Yoshimura, Chika; Kubo, Osami; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma (PIMM) with extracranial metastases. The patient was an 82-year-old woman diagnosed with PIMM under the left cerebellar tentorium. We performed a tumor resection followed by gamma knife surgery. An magnetic resonance imaging at 11 months after surgery showed a local intracranial recurrence. At 12 months, vertebral metastasis was suspected, and 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) showed multiple extracranial metastases. She died at 13 months after surgery. Although extracranial metastases of PIMM are extremely rare, we should carefully follow up extracranial metastases together with intracranial ones, especially by FDG-PET/CT, even at an early asymptomatic stage. PMID:28061499

  17. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Part 2. Microsurgical treatment of intracranial vertebrobasilar disease.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, L N; Martin, N A; Hadley, M N; Spetzler, R F; Budny, J; Carter, L P

    1987-05-01

    Posterior circulation transient ischemic attacks have an associated risk of subsequent infarction of approximately 5% per year. Intracranial vertebrobasilar thrombo-occlusive lesions appear particularly likely to result in repetitive ischemic symptoms and in infarction due to hemodynamic insufficiency. The authors present their experience with 45 patients with symptomatic intracranial vertebrobasilar vascular disease despite maximal medical therapy. The specific operative approaches for intracranial vertebral artery endarterectomy and extracranial to intracranial posterior circulation revascularization procedures are outlined.

  18. Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury Radiology Corner Case 27 Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial ...neck injuries. In particular, this case focuses on an intracranial vascular injury generated by a hand grenade with the diagnosis assisted by...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Severe Epistaxis from an Intracranial Vascular Bleed from Grenade Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  19. Monitoring intracranial pressure based on F-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ting; Tong, Xinglin; Chen, Guangxi

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial pressure is an important monitoring indicator of neurosurgery. In this paper we adopt all-fiber FP fiber optic sensor, using a minimally invasive operation to realize real-time dynamic monitoring intracranial pressure of the hemorrhage rats, and observe their intracranial pressure regularity of dynamic changes. Preliminary results verify the effectiveness of applications and feasibility, providing some basis for human brain minimally invasive intracranial pressure measurement.

  20. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  1. Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms in a patient with Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anthony C; Gemmete, Joseph J; Keegan, Catherine E; Witt, Cordelie E; Muraszko, Karin M; Than, Khoi D; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-11-01

    Roberts/SC phocomelia syndrome (RBS) is a rare but distinct genetic disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. It has been associated with microcephaly, craniofacial malformation, cavernous hemangioma, encephalocele, and hydrocephalus. There are no previously reported cases of RBS with intracranial aneurysms. The authors report on a patient with a history of RBS who presented with a spontaneous posterior fossa hemorrhage. Multiple small intracranial aneurysms were noted on a preoperative CT angiogram. The patient underwent emergency craniotomy for evacuation of the hemorrhage. A postoperative angiogram confirmed the presence of multiple, distal small intracranial aneurysms.

  2. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The...

  4. Elastase-induced intracranial aneurysms in hypertensive mice

    PubMed Central

    Nuki, Yoshitsugu; Tsou, Tsung-Ling; Kurihara, Chie; Kanematsu, Miyuki; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Hashimoto, Tomoki

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms of formation and growth of intracranial aneurysms are poorly understood. To investigate the pathophysiology of intracranial aneurysms, an animal model of intracranial aneurysm yielding high incidence of large aneurysm formation within a short incubation period is needed. We combined two well-known clinical factors associated with human intracranial aneurysms—hypertension and the degeneration of elastic lamina— to induce intracranial aneurysm formation in mice. Roles of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this model were investigated utilizing doxycycline, a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor, and MMP knockout mice. Hypertension was induced by continuous infusion of angiotensin-II for two weeks. The disruption of elastic lamina was achieved by a single stereotaxic injection of elastase into the cerebrospinal fluid at the right basal cistern. 77% of the mice that received 35 milli-units of elastase and 1000 ng/kg/min angiotensin-II developed intracranial aneurysms in two weeks. There were dose-dependent effects of elastase and angiotensin-II on the incidence of aneurysms. Histologically, intracranial aneurysms observed in this model closely resembled human intracranial aneurysms. Doxycycline, a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor, reduced the incidence of aneurysm to 10%. MMP-9 knockout mice, but not MMP-2 knockout mice, had reduced the incidence of intracranial aneurysms. In summary, a stereotaxic injection of elastase into the basal cistern in hypertensive mice resulted in intracranial aneurysms that closely resembled human intracranial aneurysms. The intracranial aneurysm formation in this model appeared to be dependent on MMP activation. PMID:19884566

  5. Intracranial Vertebral Artery Dissections: Evolving Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M.S.; Amenta, P.S.; Starke, R.M.; Jabbour, P.M.; Gonzalez, L.F.; Tjoumakaris, S.I.; Flanders, A.E.; Rosenwasser, R.H.; Dumont, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intracranial vertebral artery dissection (VAD) represents the underlying etiology in a significant percentage of posterior circulation ischemic strokes and subarachnoid hemorrhages. These lesions are particularly challenging in their diagnosis, management, and in the prediction of long-term outcome. Advances in the understanding of underlying processes leading to dissection, as well as the evolution of modern imaging techniques are discussed. The data pertaining to medical management of intracranial VADs, with emphasis on anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, is reviewed. Surgical intervention is discussed, including, the selection of operative candidates, open and endovascular procedures, and potential complications. The evolution of endovascular technology and techniques is highlighted. PMID:23217643

  6. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  7. Communicating Hydrocephalus Associated with Intracranial Schwannoma Treated by Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Man Kyu; Choi, Seok Keun; Park, Bong Jin; Lim, Young Jin

    2016-05-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been established as an effective and safe treatment for intracranial schwannoma. However, serious complications can occur after GKRS, including hydrocephalus. The pathophysiology and risk factors of this disorder are not yet fully understood. The objective of the study was to assess potential risk factors for hydrocephalus after GKRS. We retrospectively reviewed the medical radiosurgical records of 244 patients who underwent GKRS to treat intracranial schwannoma. The following parameters were analyzed as potential risk factors for hydrocephalus after GKRS: age, sex, target volume, irradiation dose, prior tumor resection, treatment technique, and tumor enhancement pattern. The tumor enhancement pattern was divided into 2 groups: group A (homogeneous enhancement) and group B (heterogeneous or rim enhancement). Of the 244 patients, 14 of them (5.7%) developed communicating hydrocephalus. Communicating hydrocephalus occurred within 2 years after GKRS in most patients (92.8%). No significant association was observed between any of the parameters investigated and the development of hydrocephalus, with the exception of tumor enhancement pattern. Group B exhibited a statistically significant difference by univariate analysis (P = 0.002); this difference was also significant by multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). Because hydrocephalus is curable, patients should be closely monitored for the development of this disorder after GKRS. In particular, patients with intracranial schwannomas with irregular enhancement patterns or cysts should be meticulously observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  9. Thermoelectric Performance Enhancement of CeFe4Sb12 p-Type Skutterudite by Disorder on the Sb4 Rings Induced by Te Doping and Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liangwei; Yang, Junyou; Jiang, Qinghui; Xiao, Ye; Luo, Yubo; Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Skutterudites have attracted a lot of attention because of the intrinsic voids in their crystal structure. However, another important structural feature of p-type skutterudites seems to have been ignored, namely the nearly square four-membered antimony rings. To explore the influence of substitution of Te for Sb on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties, a series of p-type skutterudites with composition CeFe4Sb12- x Te x with x = 0, 0.1, and 0.2 have been synthesized. The electrical resistivity decreases while the Seebeck coefficient increases with Te doping. In addition, due to disturbance of the Sb4 rings and extra phonon scattering by nanopores, the lattice thermal conductivity is reduced. The thermoelectric figure of merit for the CeFe4Sb11.9Te0.1 compound reaches 0.76 at 773 K, being about 61% higher than that of the CeFe4Sb12 sample.

  10. Intracranial vessel wall imaging for evaluation of steno-occlusive diseases and intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Huston, John; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Lehman, Vance T

    2017-03-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases have traditionally been classified, diagnosed and managed based on their luminal characteristics. However, over the past several years, several advancements in MRI techniques have ushered in high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI), enabling evaluation of intracranial vessel wall pathology. These advancements now allow us to differentiate diseases which have a common angiographic appearance but vastly different natural histories (i.e. moyamoya versus atherosclerosis, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome versus vasculitis, stable versus unstable intracranial aneurysms). In this review, we detail the anatomical, histopathological and imaging characteristics of various intracranial steno-occlusive diseases and types of intracranial aneurysms and describe the role that HR-VWI can play in diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment.

  11. B-Ring-Aryl Substituted Luotonin A Analogues with a New Binding Mode to the Topoisomerase 1-DNA Complex Show Enhanced Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    González-Ruiz, Víctor; Pascua, Irene; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Ribelles, Pascual; Bianchini, Giulia; Sridharan, Vellaisamy; Iniesta, Pilar; Ramos, M. Teresa; Olives, Ana I.; Martín, M. Antonia; Menéndez, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 inhibition is an important strategy in targeted cancer chemotherapy. The drugs currently in use acting on this enzyme belong to the family of the camptothecins, and suffer severe limitations because of their low stability, which is associated with the hydrolysis of the δ-lactone moiety in their E ring. Luotonin A is a natural camptothecin analogue that lacks this functional group and therefore shows a much-improved stability, but at the cost of a lower activity. Therefore, the development of luotonin A analogues with an increased potency is important for progress in this area. In the present paper, a small library of luotonin A analogues modified at their A and B rings was generated by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate-catalyzed Friedländer reactions. All analogues showed an activity similar or higher than the natural luotonin A in terms of topoisomerase 1 inhibition and some compounds had an activity comparable to that of camptothecin. Furthermore, most compounds showed a better activity than luotonin A in cell cytotoxicity assays. In order to rationalize these results, the first docking studies of luotonin-topoisomerase 1-DNA ternary complexes were undertaken. Most compounds bound in a manner similar to luotonin A and to standard topoisomerase poisons such as topotecan but, interestingly, the two most promising analogues, bearing a 3,5-dimethylphenyl substituent at ring B, docked in a different orientation. This binding mode allows the hydrophobic moiety to be shielded from the aqueous environment by being buried between the deoxyribose belonging to the G(+1) guanine and Arg364 in the scissile strand and the surface of the protein and a hydrogen bond between the D-ring carbonyl and the basic amino acid. The discovery of this new binding mode and its associated higher inhibitory potency is a significant advance in the design of new topoisomerase 1 inhibitors. PMID:24830682

  12. Postoperative Aseptic Intracranial Granuloma: The Possible Influence of Fluid Hemostatics

    PubMed Central

    Ganau, Mario; Nicassio, Nicola; Tacconi, Leonello

    2012-01-01

    Background. Numerous reports have demonstrated how postoperative intracranial granulomas can often mimic neoplasm clinically, radiologically, and even macroscopically. Herein we present an unusual case of postsurgical intracranial aseptic granuloma secondary to a chronic inflammatory reaction without any identifiable retained foreign body. Case Description. A 71-year-old patient started complaining of severe headache seven months after surgical excision of WHO Grade I right frontal falx meningioma. CT and MRI scans disclosed a contrast-enhanced lesion with diffuse mass effect in the previous surgical site. The lesion was resected; intraoperative finding and histological specimens led to the diagnosis of postoperative granuloma, likely expression of a glial reaction to the fluid absorbable hemostatics applied in the surgical site after meningioma excision. The possible granuloma-inducing materials and the timing of granuloma formation are discussed. Conclusion. A comprehensive analysis of clinical and neuroradiological data, as well as results of blood tests including positive and negative acute phase proteins, is mandatory to raise the suspicion of postoperative granuloma. The treatment options should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, with a conservative attitude being the one of choice only for patients without progressive neurological deficit. Alternatively, aggressive surgical treatment and histopathological examination should be advocated. PMID:22924150

  13. [Computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal neuroma].

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Wang, D; Deng, K

    1993-12-01

    CT scans of 12 cases of intracranial trigeminal neuroma were presented. Three of the neuromas were located in petrous apex-middle cranial fossa, two in posterior cranial fossa, and 7 in both the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The tumors appeared hypo- and isodense on the plain CT scan. After contrast infusion, all tumors were well circumscribed with marked enhancement, which was homogeneous, inhomogeneous or circular. None of the trigeminal neuroma had surrounding brain edema. Of 12 cases, 10 showed change of cranial bones, which included dilatation of Meckle's cave and destructions of petrous apex, clivus and the bottom of middle cranial fossa. The tumor in one case extended to paranasopharyngeal space from the bottom of middle cranial fossa, Various features of trigeminal neuroma on CT were reviewed. Also presented were the author's experiences in differentiating intracranial trigeminal neuroma from meningiom, from pituitary adenoma spreading to parasella and glioma adjacent to cranial bottom in middle cranial fossa, and from acoustic neuroma, meningioma, cholesteatoma in cerebellopontine angle.

  14. Intracranial arterial stenoses: current viewpoints, novel approaches, and surgical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Nestor R; Liebeskind, David S; Dusick, Joshua R; Mayor, Fernando; Saver, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    Ten percent of all strokes occurring in the USA are caused by intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS). Symptomatic IAS carries one of the highest rates of recurrent stroke despite intensive medical therapy (25 % in high-risk groups). Clinical results for endovascular angioplasty and stenting have been disappointing. The objectives of this study were to review the contemporary understanding of symptomatic IAS and present potential alternative treatments to resolve factors not addressed by current therapies. We performed a literature review on IAS pathophysiology, natural history, and current treatment. We present an evaluation of the currently deficient aspects in its treatment and explore the role of alternative surgical approaches. There is a well-documented interrelation between hemodynamic and embolic factors in cerebral ischemia caused by IAS. Despite the effectiveness of medical therapy, hemodynamic factors are not addressed satisfactorily by medications alone. Collateral circulation and severity of stenosis are the strongest predictors of risk for stroke and death. Indirect revascularization techniques, such as encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis, offer an alternative treatment to enhance collateral circulation while minimizing risk of hemorrhage associated with hyperemia and endovascular manipulation, with promising results in preliminary studies on chronic cerebrovascular occlusive disease. Despite improvements in medical management for IAS, relevant aspects of its pathophysiology are not resolved by medical treatment alone, such as poor collateral circulation. Surgical indirect revascularization can improve collateral circulation and play a role in the treatment of this condition. Further formal evaluation of indirect revascularization for IAS is a logical and worthy step in the development of intracranial atherosclerosis treatment strategies.

  15. Metastatic Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma to the Spinal Column: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Myung Sung; Rho, Young Joon; Song, Sang Woo; Roh, Hong Gee; Lim, So-Dug

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare brain tumor with aggressive biologic behavior associated with high recurrence rate and often with extracranial metastasis. The most common sites of extracranial metastasis of the intracranial HPC are the long bones, lung, liver and abdominal cavity in the order of frequencies. Extracranial metastases usually occur long after the initial diagnosis of the primary tumor. Metastatic intracranial HPC to the vertebra has been rarely reported. We present a case of intracranial HPC metastasized to the L2 vertebral body 13 years after multiple surgical resections and radiotherapy of the primary intracranial HPC. PMID:27867924

  16. Intracranial extra-skeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Reyaz, Nadeem; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma is a very rare and uncommon entity that affects young adults. We came across one such patient who presented with severe headache and intermittent nausea and vomiting. The clinical, radiological preoperative diagnosis was a meningioma, on histological examination it turned out to be mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of tentorial region in posterior fossa, uncommon site for this entity.

  17. Differentiating Concussion From Intracranial Pathology in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Andrea; Livingston, Scott C

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Scenario: A cerebral concussion is a traumatically induced transient disturbance of brain function characterized by a complex pathophysiologic process and is classified as a subset of mild traumatic brain injury. The occurrence of intracranial lesions after sport-related head injury is relatively uncommon, but the possibility of serious intracranial injury (ICI) should be included in the differential diagnosis. ICIs are potentially life threatening and necessitate urgent medical management; therefore, prompt recognition and evaluation are critical to proper medical management. One of the primary objectives of the initial evaluation is to determine if the concussed athlete has an acute traumatic ICI. Athletic trainers must be able promptly recognize clinical signs and symptoms that will enable them to accurately differentiate between a concussion (ie, a closed head injury not associated with significant ICI) and an ICI. The identification of predictors of intracranial lesions is, however, relatively broad. Focused Clinical Question: Which clinical examination findings (ie, clinical signs and symptoms) indicate possible intracranial pathology in individuals with acute closed head injuries?

  18. Isotope cisternography in patients with intracranial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Kawano, H.; Handa, Y.; Kabuto, M.; Noguchi, Y.; Shirasaki, H.

    1986-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow (CSF) was studied using isotope cisternography in 52 patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), all of whom showed acute transient rises of ICP, i.e., plateau waves, in their continuous ICP recordings. The patients were assigned to two groups. Group I was comprised of 23 patients without hydrocephalus and high ICP resulting from brain tumors, benign intracranial hypertension, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Group II included 29 patients with either communicating hydrocephalus or high ICP resulting from rupture of intracranial aneurysm. Plateau waves were frequently observed in patients with baseline pressures ranging from 21 to 40 mmHg in both groups. The isotope cisternographic pattern in the Group I patients showed a large accumulation of radioactivity over the cerebral convexities, while that in the Group II patients revealed a complete obstruction of the subarachnoid space over both cerebral convexities. The isotope clearance from the intracranial CSF showed a marked delay in both groups of patients with one exception. The results suggest that, in the limited range of increased ICP caused by delayed CSF absorption, plateau waves are most evident regardless of the isotope cisternographic pattern.

  19. ECT in patients with intracranial masses.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Keith G; Perry, Candace Lynn; Sutor, Bruce; Moore, Katherine M

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe the electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatment of seven patients who had intracranial masses or mass effect and one patient who was status post mass resection. None suffered any neurological deterioration during ECT. They provide recommendations for clinical practice with such patients.

  20. Varied computed tomographic appearance of intracranial cryptococcosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, S.H.; Jacoby, C.G.

    1982-06-01

    CT findings in 12 cases of intracranial cryptococcal infection were reviewed. Five patients had a normal scan. Seven patients had communicating or noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Additional findings included meningeal opacification, cerebritis, abscess, and granuloma. Although not specific for cryptococcosis, the CT scan is helpful for evaluating and following the status of the ventricles, subarachnoid spaces, and meninges.

  1. Acute recurrent haemorrhage of an intracranial meningioma.

    PubMed

    Bellut, David; Nern, Christian; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Könü, Dilek; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Krayenbühl, Niklaus

    2011-07-01

    Meningioma-associated haemorrhages are rare. To our knowledge this is the first report of a patient with an acute two-stage haemorrhage of a benign intracranial meningioma (World Health Organization grade I) verified by cranial CT scan and histopathological examination. Early surgery with complete tumour removal led to a good outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracranial haematoma resulting from lightning stroke.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Pillai, M; Krishna Das, K V

    1991-05-01

    Intra-cerebral haemorrhage due to lightning stroke is extremely rare. We report a 45 year old woman who developed intracranial haemorrhage due to a direct lightning stroke. This was proved by CT scan. The haematoma was evacuated surgically, resulting in full neurological recovery of the patient.

  3. Uranus Tenth Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    On Jan. 23, 1986, NASA Voyager 2 discovered a tenth ring orbiting Uranus. The tenth ring is about midway between the bright, outermost epsilon ring and the next ring down, called delta. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00035

  4. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  5. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  6. Biological versus prosthetic ring in mitral-valve repair: enhancement of mitral annulus dynamics and left-ventricular function with pericardial annuloplasty at long term.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, V; Campana, M; Scotti, C; Domenighini, D; Totaro, P; Coletti, G; Pagani, M; Lorusso, R

    2000-04-01

    The effects of different annuloplasty rings on mitral annulus dynamics and left-ventricular (LV) function after mitral-valve repair (MVR) are still controversial. This study sought to compare biological versus prosthetic rigid rings for annular remodelling in MVR at long term. Forty-four consecutive patients were retrospectively enrolled. All patients had isolated posterior-leaflet prolapse and underwent identical surgical mitral-valve reconstruction (quadrangular resection of the posterior leaflet associated with annuloplasty). Twenty-three patients underwent mitral annuloplasty with an autologous pericardial ring (group I), whereas 21 patients had MVR with a Carpentier-Edwards rigid ring (group II). No differences existed between the groups in terms of pre-operative patient profile. Post-operative LV systolic indices have been assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography at rest and during supine bicycle exercise. Mitral annular motion has been examined by means of the extent of mitral annulus systolic excursion (MASE), as measured in four longitudinal LV segments (anterior, inferior, septal and lateral). Mean and peak trans-mitral flow velocities (TMFV) have been also evaluated by continuous-wave Doppler. The mean follow-up did not differ between the groups, those being 41+/-12 months in group I (range17-65 months) and 46+/-15 months in group II (range 23-83 months), respectively. Post-operative echocardiographic study did not show significant mitral regurgitation at rest or at peak exercise in any patient. ANOVA analysis for repeated measures showed a significant interaction in peak TMFV (F((1,42))=5.23; P=0.03), and in left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; F((1,42))=7.61, P=0.01). The analysis of contrasts showed a significant increase in TMFV in both groups (group I from 1.22+/-0.22 to 1.79+/-0.32 m/s, t=-8.8, P<0.0001; and group II from 1.19+/-0.17 to 1.96+/-0.33 m/s, t=-12.8, P<0.0001). Recruitment of LVEF reserve during exercise was observed only in

  7. Clinical practice guideline for the management of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Woong; Seo, Jung Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Suh, Sang-Il

    2014-09-01

    An intracranial aneurysm, with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is a relevant health problem. The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a critical concern for individual health; even an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is an anxious condition for the individual. The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the management of intracranial aneurysms, with or without rupture. We performed an extensive literature search, using Medline. We met in person to discuss recommendations. This document is reviewed by the Task Force Team of the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology (KSIN). We divided the current guideline for ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) and unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). The guideline for RIAs focuses on diagnosis and treatment. And the guideline for UIAs focuses on the definition of a high-risk patient, screening, principle for treatment and selection of treatment method. This guideline provides practical, evidence-based advice for the management of patients with an intracranial aneurysm, with or without rupture.

  8. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  9. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Julia E.; Reem, Rachel E.; Aylward, Shawn C.; Rogers, David L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3–18) were found to have a unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (n = 2) and infection (n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H2O (range: 21–65 cm H2O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27928378

  10. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Don't worry - you are not the only one who thought this was a nice amateur photo of planet Saturn, Lord of the Rings in our Solar System! But then the relative brightness and positions of the moons may appear somewhat unfamiliar... and the ring system does look unusually bright when compared to the planetary disk...?? Well, it is not Saturn, but Uranus , the next giant planet further out, located at a distance of about 3,000 million km, or 20 times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. The photo shows Uranus surrounded by its rings and some of the moons, as they appear on a near-infrared image that was obtained in the K s -band (at wavelength 2.2 µm) with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) . The exposure was made on November 19, 2002 (03:00 hrs UT) during a planetary research programme. The observing conditions were excellent (seeing 0.5 arcsec) and the exposure lasted 5 min. The angular diameter of Uranus is about 3.5 arcsec. The observers at ISAAC were Emmanuel Lellouch and Thérése Encrenaz of the Observatoire de Paris (France) and Jean-Gabriel Cuby and Andreas Jaunsen (both ESO-Chile). The rings The rings of Uranus were discovered in 1977, from observations during a stellar occultation event by astronomer teams at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) and the Perth Observatory (Australia). Just before and after the planet moved in front of the (occulted) star, the surrounding rings caused the starlight to dim for short intervals of time. Photos obtained from the Voyager-2 spacecraft in 1986 showed a multitude of very tenuous rings. These rings are almost undetectable from the Earth in visible light. However, on the present VLT near-infrared picture, the contrast between the rings and the planet is strongly enhanced. At the particular wavelength at which this observation was made, the infalling sunlight is almost completely absorbed by gaseous methane present in the planetary atmosphere

  11. Computed tomography of intracranial ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, J.D.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-six patients with ependymoma were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) over a period of 5 1/2 years. The usual CT appearance was an isodense, partially calcified mass, capable of contrast enhancement, occurring in the posterior fossa (73%) in an infant or child (77%). Outcome remains poor despite modern diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  12. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  13. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; Cirillo, L; Leonardi, M; Muto, M

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3-p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3-p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2 gene

  14. Intracranial hypertension secondary to high dose cytosine arabinoside - A case study.

    PubMed

    Nurgat, Z A; Alzahrani, H; Lawrence, M; Mannan, A; Ashour, M; Rasheed, W; Aljurf, M

    2017-05-01

    We report a rare case of intracranial hypertension following high dose cytosine arabinoside (HiDAC) in a 20-year-old man, with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A five drug induction protocol for ALL was initiated; post induction consolidation was with HiDAC (3 g/m(2) IV every 12 h on days 1, 3 and 5). Post consolidation, cytogenetic remission was attained and he received an intensification and maintenance regimen for ALL, for a period of approximately 24 months. Four months following the completion of his treatment, the patient relapsed within the central nervous system (CNS). Intravenous salvage chemotherapy was initiated using a combination of fludarabine 30 mg/m(2), followed by cytarabine 2 g/m(2) 4 h later on days 1 through 5 (FA). On day # 23 of FA, he developed a severe headache. A gadolinium-enhanced brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed increased intracranial pressure. On day # 25, ophthalmology examination suggested bilateral papilledema. He was started on acetazolamide 250 mg twice daily. He had spontaneous resolution of his symptoms. The patient had no recurrence of papilledema or any other neurological symptoms. Intracranial hypertension secondary to HiDAC, is an exceedingly rare complication and is not regularly associated as a common side effect of cytarabine administration. Prompt action in diagnosing and treating intracranial hypertension will save the patient from consequences, such as loss of vision, that are prevalent in this condition.

  15. Novel Application of Postmortem CT Angiography for Evaluation of the Intracranial Vascular Anatomy in Cadaver Heads.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Ruben P A; van der Zwan, Albert; Bleys, Ronald L A W; Regli, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Postmortem CT angiography is a common procedure used to visualize the entire human vasculature. For visualization of a specific organ's vascular anatomy, casting is the preferred method. Because of the permanent and damaging nature of casting, the organ cannot be further used as an experimental model after angiography. Therefore, there is a need for a minimally traumatic method to visualize organ-specific vascular anatomy. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a contrast enhancement technique that is capable of visualizing the intracranial vascular anatomy while preserving the anatomic integrity in cadaver heads. Seven human heads were used in this study. Heads were prepared by cannulating the vertebral and internal carotid arteries. Contrast agent was injected as a mixture of tap water, polyethylene glycol 600, and an iodinated contrast agent. Postmortem imaging was executed on a 64-MDCT scanner. Primary image review and 3D reconstruction were performed on a CT workstation. Clear visualization of the major cerebral arteries and smaller intracranial branches was achieved. Adequate visualization was obtained for both the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation. The minimally traumatic angiography method preserved the vascular integrity of the cadaver heads. A novel application of postmortem CT angiography is presented here. The technique can be used for radiologic evaluation of the intracranial circulation in cadaver heads. After CT angiography, the specimen can be used for further experimental or laboratory testing and teaching purposes.

  16. The atrzf1 mutation of the novel RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase increases proline contents and enhances drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun-Woo; Min, Ji-Hee; Chung, Moon-Soo; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2013-04-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to proteins plays a fundamental role in the regulation of cellular function through biological events involving abiotic or biotic stress responses, immune responses, and apoptosis. Here, we characterize the biological function of the Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) in dehydration response. AtRZF1 was significantly reduced by drought stress. The atrzf1 mutant was less sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type during early seedling development, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing AtRZF1 were hypersensitive, indicating that AtRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the AtRZF1 gene was very significantly influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, membrane ion leakage and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. AtRZF1 is a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase, and its conserved C3H2C3-type RING domain is likely important for the biological function of AtRZF1 in drought response. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase AtRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development.

  17. Cystic meningioma: unusual imaging appearance of a common intracranial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Kennith F.; Finn, S. Sam; Snipes, George J.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system that account for approximately 15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common extra-axial neoplasm. Most meningiomas are benign, although atypical and malignant meningiomas also exist. Typical imaging characteristics include a well-circumscribed, homogeneously enhancing, extra-axial mass on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of an associated cyst is an uncommon imaging feature that may make it difficult to distinguish the tumor from a primary intra-axial glial neoplasm. The presence of peritumoral edema can also be a misleading finding. We present a case of a woman who presented with a history of multiple recent falls, decreased energy, and increased somnolence and was found to have a “cystic meningioma.” Typical imaging characteristics, histologic subtypes, treatment, and prognosis are also discussed. PMID:21240328

  18. [Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak may cause intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ingelise

    2015-01-05

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is often misinterpreted as migraine or tension headache. This type of headache is, however, orthostatic and resolves in supine position. CT scan/MRI of the brain has characteristic findings, enhancement of the pachymeninges and bilateral hygroma. An extreme situation of a 70-year-old woman with sagging midbrain is described in this case report. Although this type of headache may be caused by a dural fistula with spinal fluid leak it is not necessary to locate the lesion with myelografi/MR. Timely treatment with an epidural blood patch at any lumbal level could prevent potentially life-threatening complications and the headache resolved within hours/few days.

  19. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    glance for the duration of 12/24 hours. 3) For real-time ICU management it is important to show a quick overview of the patient in the unit (12...Vital Signs Data Recorder (VSDR) to capture continuous VS from patients. Pre- hospital LSI (fluid bolus, chest decompress, intubation , CPR etc) and those...MR images were taken using a 2D rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) sequence (TRffE=5500/9.5 ms) for anatomic reference. A point

  20. Future studies of planetary rings by space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent space probe observations of the rings of Jupiter and Saturn have furnished a substantial enhancement of the current understanding of the outer planets' rings. Voyager 2 offers further opportunities for the study of the Neptune and Uranus ring systems. The Galileo mission to Jupiter furnishes the first opportunity for long term space probe studies of a planetary ring system. It is suggested that an appropriately instrumented Saturn orbiter would not only provide a similar opportunity for the study of the Saturn rings, but may also be the only means by which to adequately address the nature of the diverse phenomena displayed by this prototypical planetary ring system.

  1. Image based numerical simulation of hemodynamics in a intracranial aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Kallmes, David; Cloft, Harry; Lewis, Debra; Dai, Daying; Ding, Yonghong; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2007-11-01

    Image-based numerical simulations of hemodynamics in a intracranial aneurysm are carried out. The numerical solver based on CURVIB (curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method) approach developed in Ge and Sotiropoulos, JCP 2007 is used to simulate the blood flow. A curvilinear grid system that gradually follows the curved geometry of artery wall and consists of approximately 5M grid nodes is constructed as the background grid system and the boundaries of the investigated artery and aneurysm are treated as immersed boundaries. The surface geometry of aneurysm wall is reconstructed from an angiography study of an aneurysm formed on the common carotid artery (CCA) of a rabbit and discretized with triangular meshes. At the inlet a physiological flow waveform is specified and direct numerical simulations are used to simulate the blood flow. Very rich vortical dynamics is observed within the aneurysm area, with a ring like vortex sheds from the proximal side of aneurysm, develops and impinge onto the distal side of the aneurysm as flow develops, and destructs into smaller vortices during later cardiac cycle. This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  2. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  3. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  4. Pituitary apoplexy syndrome as the manifestation of intracranial tuberculoma

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Patil, Tushar B; Lalla, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy syndrome is characterised by acute neuro-ophthalmological features and usually occurs due to bleeding in a pituitary adenoma. It is an unusual presentation of tuberculoma, as only few similar cases have been reported previously. A 17-year-old girl presented with headache, vomiting, altered sensorium and vision loss. MRI of the brain revealed ring enhancing sellar lesions with other enhancing lesions and leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid microscopy, biochemistry and PCR for tuberculosis confirmed tubercular meningitis. The patient was treated with antituberculous therapy and was asymptomatic at the end of treatment. PMID:24675800

  5. Interventions for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Piper, Rory J; Kalyvas, Aristotelis V; Young, Adam M H; Hughes, Mark A; Jamjoom, Aimun A B; Fouyas, Ioannis P

    2015-08-07

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) has an estimated incidence of one to three people per 100,000 people per year, and occurs most commonly in obese, young women. IIH is associated with severe morbidity, notably due to a significant threat to sight and severe headache. Several different management options have been proposed. Conservative measures centre on weight loss. Pharmacological therapy includes use of diuretics. Refractory and sight-threatening cases demand surgical intervention, most often in the form of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion or optic nerve sheath fenestration. Other treatments include venous sinus stenting and bariatric surgery. To assess the effects of any intervention for IIH in any patient group. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015 Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 22 July 2015. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which any intervention was compared to placebo, or to another form of treatment, for people with a clinical diagnosis of IIH. Two review authors independently assessed the search results for trials to be included in the review. We resolved any discrepancies by third party decision. We identified two completed RCTs (enrolling a total of 211 participants and conducted in the UK and US) and two ongoing trials that met the inclusion criteria. Both completed trials compared acetazolamide to placebo, in conjunction with a weight loss intervention in

  6. Comparative in vitro and in vivo studies on long-wavelength photosensitizers derived from bacteriopurpurinimide and Bacteriochlorin p6: fused imide ring enhances the in vivo PDT efficacy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yihui; Potter, William R; Missert, Joseph R; Morgan, Janet; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2007-01-01

    In situ conversion of bacteriochlorophyll-a, present in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rb. sphaeroides) gave bacteriopurpurin-18 in modest yield, which in a sequence of reactions was converted into two series of bacteriochlorins: bacteriopurpurinimide and bacteriopurpurin p6 with and without a fused imide ring system, respectively. To determine the effect of overall lipophilicity in photosensitizing efficacy, these bacteriochlorins were independently reacted with HBr gas and subsequently treated with various alkyl alcohols to afford the corresponding alkyl ether derivatives as diastereomeric mixtures (the R- and S-isomers were obtained in almost equal ratios). Between the two series of bacteriochlorins, the bacteriopurpurinimides containing a fused imide ring system were found to be more effective in vivo (C3H mice bearing RIF tumors). To investigate the effect of the presence of the chiral center at position 3 of the most effective purpurinimide 9 [3(1'-heptyloxy)ethyl-3-deacetyl-bacteriopurpurin-18-N-hexylimide propyl ester], the acetyl group was replaced with a hydroxymethyl substituent and converted into 3(1'-decyloxy)methyl-3-deacetyl-purpurin-18-N-hexylimide methyl ester 26 with a similar lipophilicity. Interestingly, compared to 26, the bacteriopurpurinimide 9 was found to be more effective, suggesting that the chiral center at position 3 certainly plays an important role in photosensitizing activity. Among a series of alkyl ether analogues, between the PDT efficacy and the lipophilicity (log P and log D) calculated by computational methods (PALLAS program), a parabolic relationship was observed to some extent. However, it was limited to a particular series, e.g., compounds with similar log P values between bacteriopurpurinimides and bacteriochlorin e6 did not produce similar in vivo efficacy. As expected, within a series, a linear relationship was observed between the log P values and the HPLC retention times of the photosensitizers. Some of the mitochondrial

  7. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  8. Method for noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrasonic-based method for continuous, noninvasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement and monitoring is described. The stress level in the skull bone is affected by pressure. This also changes the interfacial conditions between the dura matter and the skull bone. Standing waves may be set up in the skull bone and the layers in contact with the bone. At specific frequencies, there are resonance peaks in the response of the skull which can be readily detected by sweeping the excitation frequency on an excitation transducer in contact with a subject's head, while monitoring the standing wave characteristics from the signal received on a second, receiving transducer similarly in contact with the subject's head. At a chosen frequency, the phase difference between the excitation signal and the received signal can be determined. This difference can be related to the intracranial pressure and changes therein.

  9. Intracranial aneurysm formation after radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kamide, Tomoya; Mohri, Masanao; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of an intracranial aneurysm after radiotherapy is rare but secondary effect of cranial irradiation in a primary disease treatment. Case Description: The patient was a 17-year-old male adolescent who was diagnosed as having a posterior fossa medulloblastoma when he was 8 years old. He had undergone tumor resection with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm was identified by magnetic resonance imaging 8 years after radiotherapy and grew rapidly throughout the next 1 year. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping and was discharged without deficit. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates that physicians caring for patients who have undergone intracranial radiotherapy should carefully consider the possibility of an aneurysmal formation when conducting follow-up imaging. PMID:27999713

  10. Statistical Correlations Between Near-Infrared Luminosities and Ring Sizes in Field Ringed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wentao

    2008-01-01

    Statistically complete samples of inner-pseudo-, inner-, and outer-ringed galaxies can be extracted from the Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies. Redshifts and near-infrared (NIR) photometric data are available for the samples, allowing the derivation of the statistical correlations between the total NIR luminosities (L NIR) and the projected ring major axes in the physical scale (D) for these galaxies. For any of the three types of rings, the correlations are approximately L NIR vprop D 1.2 among the early-type ringed galaxies (the most commonly observed ringed galaxies). The correlations among late-type ringed galaxies appear significantly different. The results contradict the previous suggestion by Kormendy (1979, ApJ, 227, 714), who gave LB vprop D 2 (LB : B-band galaxy luminosity). The relations can be used in future to test theoretical simulations of dynamical structures of ringed galaxies as well as those of ring formation under the framework of cosmological models. Currently the results indicate at most small differences in the relative contributions of disk components to total galaxy masses and in the initial disk velocity dispersions between commonly observed ringed galaxies of similar type. The correlations also suggest a new approach to effectively use ring sizes as tertiary cosmological distance indicators, to help enhance the reliability of the measurement of the Hubble Constant.

  11. Intracranial aneurysm risk factor genes: relationship with intracranial aneurysm risk in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L T; Wei, F J; Zhao, Y; Zhang, Z; Dong, W T; Jin, Z N; Gao, F; Gao, N N; Cai, X W; Li, N X; Wei, W; Xiao, F S; Yue, S Y; Zhang, J N; Yang, S Y; Li, W D; Yang, X Y

    2015-06-18

    Few studies have examined the genes related to risk fac-tors that may contribute to intracranial aneurysms (IAs). This study in Chinese patients aimed to explore the relationship between IA and 28 gene loci, proven to be associated with risk factors for IA. We recruited 119 patients with aneurysms and 257 controls. Single factor and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of IA and IA rup-ture with risk factors. Twenty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 22 genes were genotyped for the patient and control groups. SNP genotypes and allele frequencies were analyzed by the chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis identified hypertension as a factor that increased IA risk (P = 1.0 x 10(-4); OR, 2.500; 95%CI, 1.573-3.972); IA was associated with two SNPs in the TSLC2A9 gene: rs7660895 (P = 0.007; OR, 1.541; 95%CI, 1.126-2.110); and in the TOX gene: rs11777927 (P = 0.013; OR, 1.511; 95%CI, 1.088-2.098). Subsequent removal of the influence of family relationship identified between 12 of 119 patients enhanced the significant association of these SNPs with IA (P = 0.001; OR, 1.691; 95%CI, 1.226-2.332; and P = 0.006; OR, 1.587; 95%CI, 1.137-2.213 for rs7660895 and rs11777927, respectively). Fur-thermore, the minor allele of rs7660895 (A) was also associated with IA rupture (P = 0.007; OR, 2.196; 95%CI, 1.230-3.921). Therefore, hypertension is an independent risk factor for IA. Importantly, the TSL-C2A9 (rs7660895) and TOX (rs11777927) gene polymorphisms may be associated with formation of IAs, and rs7660895 may be associated with IA rupture.

  12. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  13. Minimally Invasive Diagnosis of Secondary Intracranial Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Healy, G. M.; Redmond, C. E.; Stocker, E.; Connaghan, G.; Skehan, S. J.; Killeen, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are an aggressive group of non-Hodgkin lymphoid malignancies which have diverse presentation and can have high mortality. Central nervous system relapse is rare but has poor survival. We present the diagnosis of primary mandibular DLBCL and a unique minimally invasive diagnosis of secondary intracranial recurrence. This case highlights the manifold radiological contributions to the diagnosis and management of lymphoma. PMID:28018686

  14. Hereditary folate malabsorption with extensive intracranial calcification.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ikhlas; Mukhtar, Gousia; Iqbal, Javed; Ali, Syed Wajid

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common accompaniment of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and neurodegenerative disorders. A 4-year-old boy with chronic megaloblastic anemia, global developmental delay, seizures, intracranial calcification and new onset neuro-regression. A diagnosis of hereditary folate malabsorption was made, and he was put on oral and injectable folinic acid. Marked improvement at 6 month follow up. Hereditary folate malabsorption should be suspected in any child having megaloblastic anemia and neuro degeneration disorder.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of intracranial immature teratoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is toexplore the clinical features, treatment and prognosis of intracranial immature teratomas. The clinical data, serum levels of tumor markers, treatment regimens and prognosis of 15 patients with intracranial immature teratomas were reviewed retrospectively. In patients whose plasma alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG) were determined, AFP and beta-HCG were elevated in 57.1 and 16.7% of the cases, respectively. All patients received surgical treatment. The tumor was totally removed in 12 cases, subtotally in 2, and partially in 1 case. After surgery, of the 15 patients, 9 received radiotherapy, 4 gamma knife surgery and 7 chemotherapy. Thirteen patients were followed up. Compared to the common 5-year survival rate of 40%, in patients who received gamma knife surgery, the 5-year survival rate after surgery was 100%, which is better than the 5-year survival rate of patients who did not receive gamma knife surgery (p = 0.0049). Postoperative radiotherapy and chemical therapy had no significant impact on the 5-year survival rate (p > 0.05). The prognosis of intracranial immature teratomas is poor. The detection of their clinical manifestation, the analysis of imaging features and the serum levels of tumor markers are helpful in diagnosing intracranial teratomas. The total removal of the tumor is important to cure the disease. We did not see a difference in outcome between patients who received postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy and those who did not. Regular follow-up MRI examinations are necessary so that the conditions of the patients can be closely monitored. If a patient has residual or recurrent tumor after surgery, gamma knife surgery can be effective. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. New Faint Ring-Like Structures Found in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Larios, G.; Santamaría, E.; Marquez-Lugo, A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sabin, L.

    2014-04-01

    Many PNe show rings and shells related to the remnants of the circumstellar envelopes of the asymptotic giant branch phase (AGB). After an extensive search in the HST and Spitzer archives we found ring-like structures in several PNe. Following the image analysis described by Corradi et al. (2004), and unsharp masking techniques it was possible to effectively remove the underlying halo emission, enhancing the ring structures. We mention in the results some hypotheses about the origins of these rings.

  17. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  18. Intracranial bacterial infections of oral origin.

    PubMed

    Moazzam, Alan A; Rajagopal, Sowmya M; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Zada, Gabriel; Habibian, Mina

    2015-05-01

    Brain abscesses are rare but potentially deadly complications of odontogenic infections. This phenomenon has been described mainly in the form of case reports, as large-scale studies are difficult to perform. We compiled a total of 60 previously published cases of such a complication to investigate the predisposing factors, microbiology, and clinical outcomes of intracranial abscesses of odontogenic origin. A systematic review of the literature using the PubMed database was performed. Men accounted for 82.1% of cases, and the mean age was 42.1 years. Caries with periapical involvement and periodontitis were the two most common intra-oral sources, and wisdom tooth extraction was the most common preceding dental procedure. In 56.4% of cases, there were obvious signs of dental disease prior to development of intracranial infection. Commonly implicated microorganisms included Streptococcus viridans (especially the anginosus group), Actinomyces, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens. There was an 8.3% mortality rate. Intracranial abscesses can form anywhere within the brain, and appear unrelated to the side of dental involvement. This suggests that hematogenous spread is the most likely route of dissemination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    IZUMI, Takashi; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Of the patients enrolled in the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET), a surveillance study in Japanese, 1133 patients who underwent intracranial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)/stenting for intracranial stenosis during the period from 2005 to 2009 were investigated. A technical success was achieved in 98.3% of the patients, and 70.5% and 7.5% had a residual stenosis of < 30% and ≥ 50%, respectively. The incidence of ischemic complications and hemorrhagic complications was as low as 7.7% and 2.5%, respectively, but tended to increase in patients who underwent stenting. While a significant correlation with ischemic complications was observed in previously untreated patients and patients who underwent stenting followed by post-dilatation, a significant correlation with hemorrhagic complications was observed in patients who received emergency treatment and those treated between 24 hours and 14 days of the onset. Flexible intracranial stents are expected to contribute to improvement in the treatment outcome. PMID:24390191

  20. The Technique of Endovascular Intracranial Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Connors, John J.; Wojak, Joan C.; Hoppe, Blaine H.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis was traditionally believed to carry a risk of stroke of 8% to 22% per annum. The annualized stroke rate in the recent stenting and aggressive medical management for preventing stroke in intracranial stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial medical management arm was 12.2%. This trial was halted due to excessive periprocedural events in the stent arm. This stroke rate is still unacceptably, high and a treatment strategy is still needed. SAMMPRIS has no bearing on angioplasty alone. Angioplasty alone has always been our primary intervention for intracranial atherosclerosis and remains so to this day due to its relative simplicity, low complication rate, and efficacy. We have, however, made adjustments to our patient management regimen based on the results of SAMMPRIS. This paper outlines our current patient selection, procedural technique, and post-procedure management. The complications we have encountered while developing our technique are described along with how to avoid them and how to manage them. Our most recent results (since previous publications) are also discussed. PMID:25505444

  1. Fractionated radiotherapy and radiosurgery of intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Biau, J; Khalil, T; Verrelle, P; Lemaire, J-J

    2015-06-19

    This review focuses on the role of radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in the management of intracranial meningiomas, which are the most common benign intracranial tumors. Whenever feasible, surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment in effective health care treatment where modern radiotherapy plays an important role. Irradiation can be proposed as first-line treatment, as adjuvant treatment, or as a second-line treatment after recurrence. Stereotactic radiosurgery consists of delivering, a high-dose of radiation with high precision, to the tumor in a single-fraction with a minimal exposure of surrounding healthy tissue. Stereotactic radiosurgery, especially with the gamma knife technique, has reached a high level of success for the treatment of intracranial meningiomas with excellent local control and low morbidity. However, stereotactic radiosurgery is limited by tumor size,<3-4cm, and location, i.e. reasonable distance from the organs at risk. Fractionated radiation therapy is an interesting alternative (5 to 6weeks treatment time) for large inoperable tumors. The results of fractionated radiation therapy seem encouraging as regards both local control and morbidity although long-term prospective studies are still needed.

  2. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo; Grabowski, Mathew M; Juthani, Rupa; Sharma, Mayur; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Chao, Samuel; Suh, John; Mohammadi, Alireza; Barnett, Gene H

    2016-09-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become a treatment option for intracranial hemangioblastomas, especially in patients with poor clinical status and also high-risk surgical candidates. The objective of this study was to analyze clinical outcome and tumor control rates. Retrospective chart review revealed 12 patients with a total of 20 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with GKRS from May 1998 until December 2014. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to calculate the actuarial local tumor control rates and rate of recurrence following GKRS. Univariate analysis, including log rank test and Wilcoxon test were used on the Kaplan-Meier plots to evaluate the predictors of tumor progression. Two-tailed p value of <0.05 was considered as significant. Median follow-up was 64months (2-184). Median tumor volume pre-GKRS was 946mm(3) (79-15970), while median tumor volume post-GKRS was 356mm(3) (30-5404). Complications were seen in two patients. Tumor control rates were 100% at 1year, 90% at 3years, and 85% at 5years, using the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no statistically significant univariate predictors of progression identified, although there was a trend towards successful tumor control in solid tumors (p=0.07). GKRS is an effective and safe option for treating intracranial hemangioblastoma with favorable tumor control rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xun; Xu, Tao; Ding, Xuan; Wang, Wenlei; Liu, Zhi; Qin, Huaihai

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated the results of endovascular embolization of multiple intracranial aneurysms. A retrospective hospital chart and radiograph review were made of all patients with multiple intracranial aneurysms seen between March 2010 and January 2011. Ten patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, four with mass effect, two with brain ischemia and twenty were incidental. These 36 patients harbored 84 aneurysms, 63 of which were treated with endovascular techniques, two by surgical clipping, and 19 were left untreated. Of the coil-treated lesions, a complete endovascular occlusion was achieved in 54 aneurysms (85.7%), and eight (12.7%) presented neck remnants with one (1.6%) stented only. Twenty-six patients (72.2%) underwent coil embolization of more than one aneurysm in the first session. Follow-up angiographic studies in 31 patients demonstrated an unchanged or improved result in 93.0% of the aneurysms (53 lesions) and coil compaction in 7.0% (four lesions). The overall clinical outcome was excellent in 33 patients (91.7%), good in one (2.8%) and fair in two (5.5%). Endovascular techniques may be a particularly suitable method for treating multiple intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25207907

  4. Changes in intracranial pressure associated with chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Turner, Dennis A; Bennett, Stacey; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2007-01-01

    Management of intracranial hypertension is pivotal in the care of brain-injured patients. We report the case of a patient with both a closed head injury and anoxic encephalopathy, who subsequently experienced episodes of refractory intracranial hypertension. The patient's care was complicated by the development of a pneumonia, which required frequent turning of the patient and chest physiotherapy. Conventional wisdom suggests that these interventions may stimulate the patient and worsen intracranial pressure, and therefore should be avoided. Our observations on this patient, however, contradict this belief. This single-subject study presents data to support the use of chest physiotherapy in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension. Further, the evidence is compelling that a randomized-controlled trial is indicated to test the hypothesis that chest physiotherapy may actually result in short-term resolution of high intracranial pressure, and thus provide one more clinical tool in the management of elevated intracranial pressure.

  5. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  6. Rings Through Atmosphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-26

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks toward the limb of Saturn and, on the right of this image, views part of the rings through the planet atmosphere. Saturn atmosphere can distort the view of the rings from some angles.

  7. Wavy, Wiggly Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-23

    The constant change in Saturn wavy, wiggly F ring is on display in this image obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The image shows a view looking directly down onto the ring with the planet removed from the center.

  8. Saturn Rings in Infrared

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-11

    This mosaic of Saturn rings was acquired by NASA Cassini visual and infrared mapping spectrometer instrument on Sept. 15, 2006, while the spacecraft was in the shadow of the planet looking back towards the rings

  9. The Inner Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-02-01

    The Cassini spacecraft looks toward the innermost region of Saturn rings, capturing from right to left the C and B rings. The dark, inner edge of the Cassini Division is just visible in the lower left corner

  10. A New Classification System is Helpful in Diagnosing Intracranial Complications of Acute Mastoiditis in CT.

    PubMed

    Saat, R; Kurdo, G; Brandstack, N; Laulajainen-Hongisto, A; Jero, J; Markkola, A

    2017-08-11

    To assess the usefulness of the new computed tomography (CT) classification criteria proposed by Horowitz et al. and their effect on inter-observer agreement when estimating intracranial complications of acute mastoiditis. In this study 53 contrast-enhanced CT scans of patients with acute mastoiditis were each retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists, using two different assessment criteria for intracranial complications. According to the new criteria, intracranial CT findings in the perisinuous area were graded into four classes (I normal, II linear halo, III nodular halo ≤4 mm thick and IV nodular halo >4 mm thick), where classes III and IV indicate a high risk for epidural abscesses. Inter-reader agreement was estimated by weighted kappa analysis for both methods. With the old method, epidural abscesses were suspected in six and venous sinus thrombosis in five patients. With the new method, high-risk perisinuous lesions (classes III or IV) were detected in 11 patients, and sinus thrombosis outside the perisinuous area in 3 patients. All epidural abscesses were in the perisinuous area. Of the patients four, in whom intracranial pathology was not suspected with the old method, fell into the high-risk group (class III) according to the new method. All class IV lesions were also determined to be pathological with the old method. The inter-observer agreement (weighted kappa) rose from 0.21 (old method) to 0.80 (new method) when assessing epidural abscesses and from 0.44 (old method) to 0.85 (new method) when assessing sinus thrombosis. The new assessment method raised the inter-observer agreement for detection of intracranial acute mastoiditis complications, namely epidural abscesses and venous sinus thrombosis.

  11. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  12. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  13. Intracranial periventricular supratentorial intraparenchymal schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anshul; Sharma, Divyam; Dhillon, Gurupal Singh; Chhabra, Satnam Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraparenchymal schwannomas in the central nervous system are very rare. Because most of these are benign, complete excision is the treatment of choice. Further, their radiological findings are difficult to differentiate from glioma. Because Schwann cells are not indigenous to cerebral parenchyma, a lot of speculation has been attached to their origin. Case Description: We report one such rare case of a 17-year-old male who presented to us with a history of headache and vomiting. Neuroradiological findings were suggestive of left temporoparietal solid cystic lesion with enhancement of solid component, suggestive of high grade glioma. Conclusion: Intraoperative impression was that of a low-grade glioma but histopathological features were represented as schwannoma. PMID:28144475

  14. Modules over hereditary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Tuganbaev, A A

    1998-04-30

    Let A be a hereditary Noetherian prime ring that is not right primitive. A complete description of {pi}-injective A-modules is obtained. Conditions under which the classical ring of quotients of A is a {pi}-projective A-module are determined. A criterion for a right hereditary right Noetherian prime ring to be serial is obtained.

  15. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  16. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  17. Eyeing the E Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-24

    NASA Cassini spacecraft takes a look at Saturn diffuse E ring which is formed from icy material spewing out of the south pole of the moon Enceladus. The E ring is seen nearly edge-on from slightly above the northern side of Saturn ring plane.

  18. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  19. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  20. Dusty D Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-24

    Saturn D ring is easy to overlook since it trapped between the brighter C ring and the planet itself. In this view from NASA Cassini spacecraft, all that can be seen of the D ring is the faint and narrow arc as it stretches from top right of the ima

  1. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  2. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  3. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Usefulness of intracranial pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Horcajadas Almansa, Angel; Román Cutillas, Ana; Jorques Infante, Ana; Ruiz Gómez, José; Busquier, Heriberto

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas are rather common in daily practice. The aim of the surgical treatment is closure of the leak, but recurrences are quite frequent. The association between spontaneous CSF fistulas and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is not uncommon, and this is probably the cause of the low rate of success of the surgical treatment. Symptoms of IIH associated with spontaneous CSF fistula are atypical, and diagnosis is often missed. Continuous intracranial pressure monitoring is very useful in the diagnosis of chronic IIH and in patients with spontaneous CSF fistula, as it helps in making decisions on the treatment of these patients.

  4. Patterns and Implications of Intracranial Arterial Remodeling in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ye; Anwar, Zeeshan; Intrapiromkul, Jarunee; liu, Li; Zeiler, Steven R.; Leigh, Richard; Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Wasserman, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preliminary studies suggest ntracranial arteries are capable of accommodating plaque formation by remodeling. We sought to study the ability and extent of intracranial arteries to remodel using 3D high-resolution black blood MRI (BBMRI) and investigate its relation to ischemic events. Methods 42 patients with cerebrovascular ischemic events underwent 3D time-of-flight MRA and contrast-enhanced BBMRI examinations at 3T for intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Each plaque was classified by location (e.g., posterior vs. anterior circulation) and its likelihood to have caused a stroke identified on MRI (culprit, indeterminate, or non-culprit). Lumen area (LA), outer wall area (OWA), and wall area (WA) were measured at the lesion and reference sites. Plaque burden was calculated as WA divided by OWA. The arterial remodeling ratio (RR) was calculated as OWA at the lesion site divided by OWA at the reference site, after adjusting for vessel tapering. Arterial remodeling was categorized as positive if RR >1.05, intermediate if 0.95≤RR ≤ 1.05, and negative if RR <0.95. Results 137 plaques were identified in 42 patients (37% [50] posterior, 63% [87] anterior). Compared with anterior circulation plaques, posterior circulation plaques had a larger plaque burden (77.7±15.7 vs. 69.0±14.0, p=0.008), higher RR (1.14±0.38 vs. 0.95±0.32, p=0.002), and more often exhibited positive remodeling (54.0% vs.29.9%, p=0.011). Positive remodeling was marginally associated with downstream stroke presence when adjusted for plaque burden (OR 1.34, 95% CI: 0.99–1.81). Conclusions Intracranial arteries remodel in response to plaque formation, and posterior circulation arteries have a greater capacity for positive remodeling and, consequently, may more likely elude angiographic detection. Arterial remodeling may provide insight into stroke risk. PMID:26742795

  5. [Prolonged hypothermia in refractory intracranial hypertension. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rovegno, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, José Luis; Mellado, Patricio; Andresen, Max

    2012-02-01

    The use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation is a standard clinical practice, however its use for neuroprotection has been extended to other conditions. We report a 23-year-old male with intracranial hypertension secondary to a parenchymal hematoma associated to acute hydrocephalus. An arterial malformation was found and embolized. Due to persistent intracranial hypertension, moderate hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C was started. After 12 hours of hypothermia, intracranial pressure was controlled. After 13 days of hypothermia a definitive control of intracranial pressure was achieved. The patient was discharged 40 days after admission, remains with a mild hemiparesia and is reassuming his university studies.

  6. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  7. Saddle-shaped mitral valve annuloplasty rings experience lower forces compared with flat rings.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Morten O; Jensen, Henrik; Smerup, Morten; Levine, Robert A; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nielsen, Sten L

    2008-09-30

    New insight into the 3D dynamic behavior of the mitral valve has prompted a reevaluation of annuloplasty ring designs. Force balance analysis indicates correlation between annulus forces and stresses in leaflets and chords. Improving this stress distribution can intuitively enhance the durability of mitral valve repair. We tested the hypothesis that saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings have superior uniform systolic force distribution compared with a nonuniform force distribution in flat annuloplasty rings. Sixteen 80-kg pigs had a flat (n=8) or saddle-shaped (n=8) mitral annuloplasty ring implanted. Mitral annulus 3D dynamic geometry was obtained with sonomicrometry before ring insertion. Strain gauges mounted on dedicated D-shaped rigid flat and saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings provided the intraoperative force distribution perpendicular to the annular plane. Average systolic annular height to commissural width ratio before ring implantation was 14.0%+/-1.6%. After flat and saddle shaped ring implantation, the annulus was fixed in the diastolic (9.0%+/-1.0%) and systolic (14.3%+/-1.3%) configuration, respectively (P<0.01). Force accumulation was seen from the anterior (0.72N+/-0.14N) and commissural annular segments (average 1.38N+/-0.27N) of the flat rings. In these segments, the difference between the 2 types of rings was statistically significant (P<0.05). The saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings did not experience forces statistically significantly larger than zero in any annular segments. Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings provide superior uniform annular force distribution compared to flat rings and appear to represent a configuration that minimizes out-of-plane forces that could potentially be transmitted to leaflets and chords. This may have important implications for annuloplasty ring selections.

  8. Effects of Reynolds and Womersley Numbers on the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Womersley numbers on the hemodynamics of two simplified intracranial aneurysms (IAs), that is, sidewall and bifurcation IAs, and a patient-specific IA are investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For this purpose, we carried out three numerical experiments for each IA with various Reynolds (Re = 145.45 to 378.79) and Womersley (Wo = 7.4 to 9.96) numbers. Although the dominant flow feature, which is the vortex ring formation, is similar for all test cases here, the propagation of the vortex ring is controlled by both Re and Wo in both simplified IAs (bifurcation and sidewall) and the patient-specific IA. The location of the vortex ring in all tested IAs is shown to be proportional to Re/Wo2 which is in agreement with empirical formulations for the location of a vortex ring in a tank. In sidewall IAs, the oscillatory shear index is shown to increase with Wo and 1/Re because the vortex reached the distal wall later in the cycle (higher resident time). However, this trend was not observed in the bifurcation IA because the stresses were dominated by particle trapping structures, which were absent at low Re = 151.51 in contrast to higher Re = 378.79. PMID:27847544

  9. Ring modulators with enhanced efficiency based on standing-wave operation on a field-matched, interdigitated p-n junction.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Fabio; Zeng, Xiaoge; Wade, Mark T; Popović, Miloš A

    2016-11-28

    We propose ring modulators based on interdigitated p-n junctions that exploit standing rather than traveling-wave resonant modes to improve modulation efficiency, insertion loss and speed. Matching the longitudinal nodes and antinodes of a standing-wave mode with high (contacts) and low (depletion regions) carrier density regions, respectively, simultaneously lowers loss and increases sensitivity significantly. This approach permits further to relax optical constraints on contacts placement and can lead to lower device capacitance. Such structures are well-matched to fabrication in advanced microelectronics CMOS processes. Device architectures that exploit this concept are presented along with their benefits and drawbacks. A temporal coupled mode theory model is used to investigate the static and dynamic response. We show that modulation efficiencies or loss Q factors up to 2 times higher than in previous traveling-wave geometries can be achieved leading to much larger extinction ratios. Finally, we discuss more complex doping geometries that can improve carrier dynamics for higher modulation speeds in this context.

  10. Addressing Structural Flexibility at the A-Ring on Salvinorin A: Discovery of a Potent Kappa Opioid Agonist with Enhanced Metabolic Stability.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Alexander M; Crowley, Rachel Saylor; Paton, Kelly F; Biggerstaff, Andrew; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Day, Victor W; Kivell, Bronwyn M; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2017-04-04

    Previous structure-activity studies on the neoclerodane diterpenoid salvinorin A have demonstrated the importance of the acetoxy functionality on the A-ring in its activity as a kappa opioid receptor agonist. Few studies have focused on understanding the role of conformation in these interactions. Herein we describe the synthesis and evaluation of both flexible and conformationally restricted compounds derived from salvinorin A. One such compound, spirobutyrolactone (14), was synthesized in a single step from salvinorin B and had similar potency and selectivity to salvinorin A (EC50 = 0.6 ± 0.2 nM at κ >10,000 nM at μ and δ). Microsomal stability studies demonstrated that 14 was more metabolically resistant than salvinorin A. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties revealed similar in vivo effects between 14 and salvinorin A. To our knowledge, this study represents the first example of bioisosteric replacement of an acetate group by a spirobutyrolactone to produce a metabolically resistant derivative.

  11. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  12. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  13. DOD SPHERES-RINGS Test Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025915 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  14. Hypoactive-hypoalert behaviour and thalamic hypometabolism due to intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Seamus; Flynn, Peter; Hughes, Simon; Spence, Wendy; McCarron, Mark Owen

    2017-08-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with a 9-year history of a hypoalert hypoactive behaviour syndrome, caused by the deep brain swelling variant of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Along with apathy with retained cognition, he had stable ataxia, impaired upgaze and episodes of central apnoea. MRI brain showed a sagging brainstem, pointed ventricles and reduced angle between the vein of Galen and the straight sinus, but no meningeal enhancement or subdural collections. A dopamine transporter scan showed preganglionic dopamine receptor deficiency; a fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography scan showed bilateral hypothalamic hypometabolism. This variant of spontaneous intracranial hypotension may alter deep brain functioning within the basal ganglia and thalamus, causing the hypoactive-hypoalert behaviour phenotype. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Intracranial Aneurysms of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Relevance.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Newman, Nancy J; Barrow, Daniel L; Biousse, Valérie

    2017-06-29

    Intracranial saccular aneurysms are acquired lesions that often present with neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques, endovascular treatments, and neurocritical care have improved the optimal management of symptomatic unruptured aneurysms, but whether the chosen treatment has an impact on neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes remains debated. A review of the literature focused on neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and treatment of intracranial aneurysms with specific relevance to neuro-ophthalmologic outcomes was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. Cavernous sinus aneurysms were not included in this review. Surgical clipping vs endovascular coiling for aneurysms causing third nerve palsies was compared in 13 retrospective studies representing 447 patients. Complete recovery was achieved in 78% of surgical patients compared with 44% of patients treated with endovascular coiling. However, the complication rate, hospital costs, and days spent in intensive care were reported as higher in surgically treated patients. Retrospective reviews of surgical clipping and endovascular coiling for all ocular motor nerve palsies (third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerves) revealed similar results of complete resolution in 76% and 49%, respectively. Improvement in visual deficits related to aneurysmal compression of the anterior visual pathways was also better among patients treated with clipping than with coiling. The time to treatment from onset of visual symptoms was a predictive factor of visual recovery in several studies. Few reports have specifically assessed the improvement of visual deficits after treatment with flow diverters. Decisions regarding the choice of therapy for intracranial aneurysms causing neuro-ophthalmologic signs ideally should be made at high-volume centers with access to both surgical and endovascular treatments. The status of the patient, location of the aneurysm, and experience of the treating physicians

  16. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  17. Focal Seizures Induced by Intracranial Electroencephalogram Grids

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mesha-Gay; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a unique, but important seizure variant directly related to placement of subdural grids. Two distinct epileptogenic zones were identified, one which correlated with the patient’s baseline seizures and a separate zone associated with atypical semiology and localization. Inspection of this zone at surgery revealed cortical deformation from the grid itself. The patient underwent successful surgical resection of the primary epileptogenic zone, but not that of the atypical zone. She remains seizure free at two years following surgery. Recognition of grid-induced seizures is important as they may confound the interpretation of intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG) and mislead resective surgery. PMID:27896038

  18. Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery: concepts and techniques.

    PubMed

    De Salles, Antonio A F; Gorgulho, Alessandra A; Pereira, Julio L B; McLaughlin, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was conceptualized to treat functional diseases of the brain. The need for devices capable of molding the radiation dose to the nuances of intracranial lesions and yet preserve brain function became a challenge. Several devices capable of performing radiosurgery of high quality became commercially available, each with advantages and disadvantages. Speed of radiosurgery delivery for cost effectiveness and comfort for the patient are currently the main developments in the field. Nuances of these devices, procedural steps of radiosurgery, and the team approach of radiosurgery are discussed in this article.

  19. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-10-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting.

  20. Infectious intracranial aneurysms: triage and management.

    PubMed

    Gulek, Bernice G; Rapport, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysms are a rare but serious potential complication of subacute endocarditis. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent devastating neurological deficits and mortality. Because nurse practitioners' roles expand into acute care as well as urgent care settings, they are frequently involved in the care of this population. Identifying the patients at risk, ordering appropriate studies, and initiating goal directed therapy are vital to outcomes. For nurse practitioners who are involved in care of neuroscience populations, it is important to be familiar with disease processes. This article provides a literature review of the topic, explores diagnostic methods, discusses management strategies, and presents an illustrative case.

  1. Spatial contrast sensitivity in benign intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Koudstaal, P J; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-01-01

    Spatial Contrast Sensitivity (CS) was studied in 20 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). At presentation CS loss was found in 43% of the eyes, and impairment of visual acuity attributed to BIH in only 16%. Nine patients had blurred vision or visual obscurations, all of whom had abnormal CS. The clinical application of CS measurement in BIH for monitoring the progression or regression of the disease is illustrated by serial measurements in 11 patients. Progressive visual loss in longstanding papilloedema and improvement of visual function in subsiding papilloedema can occur without any change in Snellen acuity or visual field charting. PMID:3225588

  2. Subject-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Hernandez, Monica; Frangi, Alejandro; Putman, Christopher; Pergolizzi, Richard; Burgess, James

    2004-04-01

    Characterization of the blood flow patterns in cerebral aneurysms is important to explore possible correlations between the hemodynamics conditions and the morphology, location, type and risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For this purpose, realistic patient-specific models are constructed from computed tomography angiography and 3D rotational angiography image data. Visualizations of the distribution of hemodynamics forces on the aneurysm walls as well as the intra-aneurysmal flow patterns are presented for a number of cerebral aneurysms of different sizes, types and locations. The numerical models indicate that there are different classes of intra-aneurysmal flow patterns, that may carry different risks of rupture.

  3. Monitoring and interpretation of intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Czosnyka, M; Pickard, J

    2004-01-01

    Although there is no "Class I" evidence, ICP monitoring is useful, if not essential, in head injury, poor grade subarachnoid haemorrhage, stroke, intracerebral haematoma, meningitis, acute liver failure, hydrocephalus, benign intracranial hypertension, craniosynostosis etc. Information which can be derived from ICP and its waveforms includes cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), regulation of cerebral blood flow and volume, CSF absorption capacity, brain compensatory reserve, and content of vasogenic events. Some of these parameters allow prediction of prognosis of survival following head injury and optimisation of "CPP-guided therapy". In hydrocephalus CSF dynamic tests aid diagnosis and subsequent monitoring of shunt function. PMID:15145991

  4. Intracranial blister aneurysms: clip reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo; McCracken, D Jay

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial blister aneurysms are difficult to treat cerebrovascular lesions that typically affect the anterior circulation. These rare aneurysms can lead to acute rupture which usually cannot be treated via endovascular methods, but still require urgent surgical intervention. Surgical options are limited given their unique pathology and often require a combination of wrapping and clip reconstruction. In this video we present two patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured blister aneurysms. We demonstrate several surgical techniques for repairing the vascular defect with and without intraoperative rupture. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/nz-JM45uKQU.

  5. Intracranial germ cell tumor mimicking anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Andreu Martínez, F J; Martínez Mateu, J M

    2006-12-01

    We report on a case of a 23 year-old female diagnosed as having a germ-cell tumour located in the sellar region. The patient referred anorexia, psychic disorders, weight loss of 15 kilograms and secondary amenorrhea during the previous three years. This is the reason why the patient was diagnosed as having anorexia nervosa. Subsequently, the patient presented some endocrine dysfunction. MRI revealed the existence of a lesion located in suprasellar and hypothalamic regions. This case shows that the presence of intracranial tumours next to the hypothalamus must be borne in mind as a rare but real possibility in cases of anorexia nervosa, specially in those non-typical cases.

  6. Surge in the Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-29

    An ethereal, glowing spot appears on Saturn's B ring in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. There is nothing particular about that place in the rings that produces the glowing effect -- instead, it is an example of an "opposition surge" making that area on the rings appear extra bright. An opposition surge occurs when the Sun is directly behind the observer looking toward the rings. The particular geometry of this observation makes the point in the rings appear much, much brighter than would otherwise be expected. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 28 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini wide-angle camera on June 26, 2016. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 940,000 miles (1.5 million kilometers) from the rings and at a Sun-ring-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 0 degrees. Image scale on the rings at center is 56 miles (90 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20496

  7. Traceable Ring Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Koutarou

    The ring signature allows a signer to leak secrets anonymously, without the risk of identity escrow. At the same time, the ring signature provides great flexibility: No group manager, no special setup, and the dynamics of group choice. The ring signature is, however, vulnerable to malicious or irresponsible signers in some applications, because of its anonymity. In this paper, we propose a traceable ring signature scheme. A traceable ring scheme is a ring signature except that it can restrict “excessive” anonymity. The traceable ring signature has a tag that consists of a list of ring members and an issue that refers to, for instance, a social affair or an election. A ring member can make any signed but anonymous opinion regarding the issue, but only once (per tag). If the member submits another signed opinion, possibly pretending to be another person who supports the first opinion, the identity of the member is immediately revealed. If the member submits the same opinion, for instance, voting “yes” regarding the same issue twice, everyone can see that these two are linked. The traceable ring signature can suit to many applications, such as an anonymous voting on a BBS. We formalize the security definitions for this primitive and show an efficient and simple construction in the random oracle model.

  8. Design of the Vitesse Intracranial Stent Study for Ischemic Therapy (VISSIT) trial in symptomatic intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zaidat, Osama O; Castonguay, Alicia C; Fitzsimmons, Brian-Fred; Woodward, Britton Keith; Wang, Zhigang; Killer-Oberpfalzer, Monika; Wakhloo, Ajay; Gupta, Rishi; Kirshner, Howard; Eliasziw, Misha; Thomas Megerian, J; Shetty, Sujith; Yoklavich Guilhermier, Meg; Barnwell, Stanley; Smith, Wade S; Gress, Daryl R

    2013-10-01

    Patients with high-grade symptomatic intracranial stenosis (≥ 70%) have an increased risk of recurrent stroke despite medical treatment with antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. Intracranial stenting has been proposed as a viable treatment option for this high-risk patient population; however, evaluation of this therapy in randomized multicenter trials is needed. In this article, we present the design and methods of the Vitesse Intracranial Stent Study for Ischemic Therapy (VISSIT) trial for symptomatic intracranial stenosis. The VISSIT trial is a randomized control study designed to evaluate the safety, probable benefit, and effectiveness of the PHAROS Vitesse neurovascular balloon-expandable stent system plus medical therapy versus medical therapy alone in patients with cerebral or retinal ischemia due to neurovascular stenosis (≥ 70%) for preventing the primary composite end point: stroke in the same territory (distal to the target lesion) as the presenting event within 12 months of randomization or hard transient ischemic attack in the same territory (distal to the target lesion) as the presenting event from day 2 through month 12 postrandomization. Enrollment began in February 2009 and was halted in January 2012 with 112 subjects enrolled into the study. Clinical follow-up will continue for the planned period of 12 months postrandomization. The VISSIT trial may provide valuable insight into the use of balloon-expandable intracranial stent as a treatment option for high-risk patients. Lessons learned from this trial may better guide future clinical trial design on best patient selection, stenting techniques, and periprocedural management. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect.

  10. Assessing Intracranial Vascular Compliance Using Dynamic Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y.; Smith, Robert X.; Jog, Mayank; Langham, Michael; Krasileva, Kate; Chen, Yufen; Ringman, John M.; Wang, Danny J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular compliance (VC) is an important marker for a number of cardiovascular diseases and dementia, which is typically assessed in central and peripheral arteries indirectly by quantifying pulse wave velocity (PWV), and/or pulse pressure waveform. To date, very few methods are available for the quantification of intracranial VC. In the present study, a novel MRI technique for in-vivo assessment of intracranial VC was introduced, where dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were synchronized with the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. VC is defined as the ratio of change in arterial cerebral blood volume (ΔCBV) and change in arterial pressure (ΔBP). Intracranial VC was assessed in different vascular components using the proposed dynamic ASL method. Our results show that VC mainly occurs in large arteries, gradually decreases in small arteries and arterioles. The comparison of intracranial VC between young and elderly subjects shows that aging is accompanied by a reduction of intracranial VC, in good agreement with the literature. Furthermore, a positive association between intracranial VC and cerebral perfusion measured using pseudo-continuous ASL with 3D GRASE MRI was observed independent of aging effects, suggesting loss of VC is associated with a decline in perfusion. Finally, a significant positive correlation between intracranial and central (aortic arch) VC was observed using an ungated phase-contrast 1D projection PWV technique. The proposed dynamic ASL method offers a promising approach for assessing intracranial VC in a range of cardiovascular diseases and dementia. PMID:26364865

  11. Intracranial hypertension in subarachnoid hamorrhage: outcome after decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Holsgrove, D T; Kitchen, W J; Dulhanty, L; Holland, J P; Patel, H C

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension can occur following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). It can be treated with decompressive craniectomy (DC) with the aim of reducing intracranial pressure, increasing cerebral perfusion and reducing further morbidity and mortality. We studied the outcome of patients undergoing DC following SAH at our institution, to ascertain whether the use of this treatment can be rationalized.

  12. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620 Section 882.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The device...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620 Section 882.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The device...

  14. Poland syndrome with intracranial germ cell tumor in a child.

    PubMed

    Elli, Murat; Oğur, Gönül; Dağdemir, Ayhan; Pinarli, Güçlü; Ceyhan, Meltem; Dağçinar, Adnan

    2009-01-01

    Poland syndrome is an uncommon unilateral deformity of chest wall and upper extremity with variable manifestations. Although numerous case reports of Poland syndrome associated with malignancies have been published, intracranial germ cell tumor in Poland syndrome has not been previously reported. The authors describe a 15-year-old male patient with intracranial germ cell tumor and Poland syndrome.

  15. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  16. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    2002-11-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  17. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  18. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  19. Intracranial physiological calcifications evaluated with cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Sedghizadeh, P P; Nguyen, M; Enciso, R

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cone beam CT (CBCT) scans for the presence of physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. CBCT scans from male and female patients that met our ascertainment criteria were evaluated retrospectively (n=500) for the presence of either physiological or pathological intracranial calcifications. Out of the 500 patients evaluated, 176 had evidence of intracranial physiological calcification (35.2% prevalence), and none had evidence of pathological calcification. There was a 3:2 male-to-female ratio and no ethnic predilection; the ages of affected patients ranged from 13 years to 82 years with a mean age of 52 years. The majority of calcifications appeared in the pineal/habenular region (80%), with some also appearing in the choroid plexus region bilaterally (12%), and a smaller subset appearing in the petroclinoid ligament region bilaterally (8%). Intracranial physiological calcifications can be a common finding on CBCT scans, whereas pathological intracranial calcifications are rare.

  20. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  1. Ring Details on Display

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft showcases some of the amazingly detailed structure of Saturn's rings. The rings are made up of many smaller ringlets that blur together when seen from a distance. But when imaged up close, the rings' structures display quite a bit of variation. Ring scientists are debating the nature of these features -- whether they have always appeared this way or if their appearance has evolved over time. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 4 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2016. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 283,000 miles (456,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 32 degrees. Image scale is 17 miles (27 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20506

  2. The prevalence of intracranial complications in pediatric frontal sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hamdy El-; Malik, Anita C; Aronyk, Keith; Ledi, Edmund; Bhargava, Ravi

    2006-08-01

    Intracranial extension of infection represents a serious complication of sinusitis but with no clearly documented prevalence. The frontal sinus with its unique anatomical characteristics, has been singled out as a catalyst for intracranial spread, but without solid evidence. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of intracranial complications in pediatric acute frontal sinusitis and to test the claimed association. A retrospective chart review of all children (intracranial infections were excluded. Data collected included demographics, sinuses involved, intracranial complications and their types, aspects of management, imaging, and mortality. In our search 466 patients were included. Of these, 386 did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the 80 remaining patients, 10 had no films or imaging data available for analysis. The 70 included patients ranged in age from 7 months to 15 years (mean 8.8, median 10). Forty-nine (70%) were males. Twenty-six required medical treatment and 44 (62.9%) required surgical therapy in addition. Forty-nine had orbital complications and 8 (11.4%) had intracranial complications. There was no mortality. The eight patients with intracranial complications ranged in age from 3 to 14 years (mean 12). Six were males. Of the 23 patients with frontal sinus involvement, 7 (30.4%) had intracranial complications. The odds ratio for developing intracranial complications if the frontal sinus was involved in the inflammatory process was 20 (95% CI 2.30-176.4). There is a high probability of developing intracranial complications in children who present with acute frontal sinusitis to a tertiary care hospital. This should prompt all involved

  3. Saturn's rings - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2005-08-01

    Saturn's rings embody in their diversity the entire spectrum of ring properties seen across the outer solar system, and remain unique in fundamental ways. The Voyager flybys revealed their complexity in 1980-1981, while groundbased and HST observations have provided important new insights since that time. Since July 2004, when it skimmed only tens of thousands of km over the unlit face of the rings - collecting unique remote and in-situ observations as it entered orbit - Cassini has been fulfilling the long-held dream of understanding Saturn's rings in depth. As of this meeting, if all continues as planned, seven orbits designed specifically with ring observations in mind will have been completed - each providing even better geometric opportunities than an entire Voyager flyby (to a spacecraft with far more powerful instruments than Voyager). Even these represent only a fraction of what the complete mission will tell us about the rings. This talk will review the key properties of the rings, highlight the themes and new insights emerging from recent studies, and serve as a context for new results presented at the meeting. The key properties include the relationship of the rings to their close-in and embedded moons; the composition of the rings and its spatial variation; and the complex radial and vertical structure of the rings, as related to local particle sizes and mass density. The main themes are that several evolutionary processes cause all these to vary - we think substantially - with time, and that the rings may be much younger than Saturn. To achieve our goal of understanding the origin of the rings, we must start from an in-depth characterization of their current state, and peer back through their extensive evolution. Cassini observations, and their theoretical analysis, will ultimately make this possible.

  4. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  5. Diabetes mitigates the recovery following intracranial hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenzeng; Yuan, Yunchao; Wang, Feng; Qi, Yuepeng; Han, Haie; Wu, Jianliang; Zhang, Gengshen; Yang, Lijun

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a common subtype of stroke with high morbidity and mortality. However, few studies have examined the effects of diabetes on the recovery from ICH-induced brain injury. Therefore, we examined the effects of diabetes on protein levels of aquaporins, neuronal loss, angiogenesis, blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity, and neurological deficits following intra-DH collagenase-induced ICH in the hippocampus. We found that diabetic rats exhibited enhanced AQP9 expression in the hippocampus relative to non-diabetic rats, which was associated with increased behavioral deficits. Additionally, ICH induced neovascularization, proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and hippocampal neuronal loss. However, ICH-induced neovascularization and proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells was severely impaired in diabetic rats. Furthermore, ICH-induced hippocampal neuronal loss was exaggerated in diabetic rats. Finally, ICH impaired BBB integrity in the ipsilateral hemisphere, which was increased in diabetic rats. Taken together, the attenuated brain angiogenesis, increased hippocampal neuronal loss, and impaired BBB integrity in diabetic rats after ICH were associated with enhanced AQP9 expression. This may suggest that AQP9 is one of the underlying mechanisms that can mitigate the recovery from ICH in diabetic populations.

  6. Neuroblastoma with intracranial involvement: an ENSG Study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P J; Eden, T

    1992-01-01

    We report the experience of the European Neuroblastoma Study Group (ENSG) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement of neuroblastoma. Among this series of intensively treated patients, CNS neuroblastoma was diagnosed by computerised tomography (CT) scanning, rather than by autopsy. Cranial disease occurred in 5% of ENSG patients. Of 11 patients with intracranial disease, 4 had disease in the posterior fossa, a site rarely reported previously. Furthermore, 5 cases had CNS metastases at a time when there was no detectable disease elsewhere, rather than as part of extensive relapse. The pattern of disease we observed, at least for those with parenchymal disease, is in keeping with arterial spread. Although CT scanning is the optimal modality for identifying CNS disease, 2 cases had normal head CT scans prior to the onset of CNS disease. As most patients had symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (RICP) at the time the CNS disease was diagnosed, there does not seem to be any indication for routine CT scanning of the head at diagnosis, but this should be performed as soon as any symptoms or signs appear. With patients living longer with their disease, vigilance must be maintained during follow-up.

  7. Anticoagulation-related intracranial extracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Mattle, H; Kohler, S; Huber, P; Rohner, M; Steinsiepe, K F

    1989-01-01

    From January 1981 to June 1986 116 patients with anticoagulation-related intracranial haemorrhage were referred to hospital. Seventy six of these haemorrhages were extracerebral, 69 were in the subdural and seven in the subarachnoid space. No epidural haemorrhages were identified. Compared with non-anticoagulation-related haematomas, the risk of haemorrhage was calculated to be increased fourfold in men and thirteenfold in women. An acute subdural haematoma, mostly due to contusion, was more frequently accompanied by an additional intracerebral haematoma than a chronic subdural haematoma. Trauma was a more important factor in acute subdural haematomas than in chronic. Almost half of the patients (48%) had a history of hypertension, more than a third (35%) had heart disease and about one fifth (18%) were diabetic. Headache was the most frequent initial symptom. Later decreased level of consciousness and focal neurological signs exceeded the frequency of headache. Three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage and nine patients with acute subdural haematomas died, while those with chronic subdural haematomas all survived and had at the most mild, non-disabling sequelae. Myocardial infarction (22%), pulmonary embolism (20%), and arterial disease (20%) were the most frequent reasons for anticoagulant treatment. Critical review based on established criteria for anticoagulation treatment suggests there was no medical reason to treat a third of these patients. The single most useful measure that could be taken to reduce the risk of anticoagulation-induced intracranial haemorrhage would be to identify patients who are being unnecessarily treated and to discontinue anticoagulants. PMID:2769275

  8. A comparative study of physiologic intracranial calcifications.

    PubMed

    Abbassioun, K; Aarabi, B; Zarabi, M

    1978-04-01

    It has been the impression of clinicians that pineal calcification is infrequent in Shiraz, Iran. In order to evaluate this clinical impression 2000 consecutive skul X-rays taken at Saadi Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, were reviewed for the presence of physiologic intracranial calcifications. The incidence of these clasifications in male and female in consecutive age groups of 10 years from 0 to over 70 years of age were assessed and compared with previous reports from other countries. The average incidence of pineal calcification for those over 20 years of age was 18.29% in this study compared with 55% in the U.S.A. The incidence of calcification in the choroid plexus and the falx cerebri was also considerably less than previously reported. The literature is reviewed and the possible causes for the geographical differences in the reported frequency of physiologic intracranial calcifications is discussed. It is possible that racial and dietary factors may be significant in the variation in the incidence of pineal and other cranial calcifications noted in different countries. Within a population group, age and sex are additional factors.

  9. A Histoenzymatic Study of Human Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Henry F.

    1972-01-01

    A light microscopy study on the localization of enzyme activity within atherosclerotic human intracranial arteries was performed on autopsy material obtained within 4 hours of death. The data suggests that the atherosclerotic process first goes through a proliferative phase and then a degenerative phase culminating in the formation of a plaque. In the proliferative phase, smooth muscle cell proliferation has formed a thickened intima. Tetrazolium reductase, adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and adenosine monophosphatase (AMPase) activities are present in these cells, while all dehydrogenases and acid phosphatase activities were weak or not present. As the degenerative phase commences, an area of necrosis, lipid and macrophage accumulation is formed on the lumen side of the elastica. This area increases in size until a plaque is formed. Unsaturated polar and nonpolar lipid, cholesterol, α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and AMPase activities are associated with these areas and in foam cells, which are often found in the thickened intima of the proliferative phase. Tetrazolium reductase and ATPase activities decrease in the thickened intima as the area of necrosis increases in size, while dehydrogenase activity, except that for α-glycerophosphate, remains low or not present. Patterns of enzyme alterations for various stages of the disease process in intracranial arteries, the aorta and coronary arteries suggest a similar, if not identical, progression of the atherosclerotic process, irrespective of known differences in the prevalence of atherosclerosis. ImagesFig 2Fig 3Fig 5Fig 1Fig 4 PMID:4260721

  10. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  11. Biosurgical Hemostatic Agents in Neurosurgical Intracranial Procedures.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Callovini, Giorgio; Alfieri, Alex

    2017-02-07

    Intraoperative hemostasis during neurosurgical procedures is one of the most important aspects of intracranial surgery. Hemostasis is mandatory to keep a clean operative field and to prevent blood loss and postoperative hemorrhage. In neurosurgical practice, biosurgical hemostatic agents have proved to be extremely useful to complete the more classic use of electrocoagulation. During recent years, many biosurgical topical hemostatic agents were created. Although routinely used during neurosurgical procedures, there is still a great deal of confusion concerning optimal use of these products, because of the wide range of products, as absorbable topical agents, antifibrinolytics agents, fibrin sealants and hemostatic matrix, which perform their hemostatic action in different ways. The choice of the hemostatic agent and the strategy for local hemostasis are correlated with the neurosurgical approach, the source of bleeding, and the neurosurgeon's practice. In this study, the authors review all the different sources of bleeding during intracranial surgical approaches and analyze how to best choose the right topical hemostatic agent to stop bleeding, from the beginning of the surgical approach to the end of the extradural hemostasis after dural closure, along all the steps of the neurosurgical procedure.

  12. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-06

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory.

  13. Severe intracranial haemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Morais, Sofia; Sevivas, Teresa; Veiga, Ricardo; Salvado, Ramon; Taborda, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a rare (1/1000–5000 births) life-threatening disorder, caused by fetomaternal incompatibility for a fetal human platelet alloantigen inherited from the father, with production of maternal alloantibodies against fetal platelets, leading to severe thrombocytopenia and potential bleeding. Intracranial haemorrhage is the most feared complication. This report presents the case of a term newborn infant, born from caesarean section after a normal pregnancy, presenting signs of skin bleeding with different ages. Obstetric history included a previous spontaneous abortion after amniocentesis. Severe thrombocytopenia (4×109/l platelets) was found and brain ultrasound showed multiple intracranial haemorrhages. Human platelet antigen (HPA) phenotyping showed maternal negative HPA-1a and paternal positive HPA-1a platelets. Strongly positive anti-HPA-1a and weakly positive anti-human leukocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Multiple platelet transfusions, intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid were given but favourable response was accomplished only after a compatible platelet transfusion. Brain MRI showed multiple subacute and chronic haemorrhages. PMID:22679192

  14. A dimensionless parameter for classifying hemodynamics in intracranial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a disease with high rates of mortality. Given the risk associated with the aneurysm surgery, quantifying the likelihood of aneurysm rupture is essential. There are many risk factors that could be implicated in the rupture of an aneurysm. However, the most important factors correlated to the IA rupture are hemodynamic factors such as wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) which are affected by the IA flows. Here, we carry out three-dimensional high resolution simulations on representative IA models with simple geometries to test a dimensionless number (first proposed by Le et al., ASME J Biomech Eng, 2010), denoted as An number, to classify the flow mode. An number is defined as the ratio of the time takes the parent artery flow transports across the IA neck to the time required for vortex ring formation. Based on the definition, the flow mode is vortex if An>1 and it is cavity if An<1. We show that the specific definition of Le et al. works for sidewall but needs to be modified for bifurcation aneurysms. In addition, we show that this classification works on three-dimensional geometries reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography of human subjects. Furthermore, we verify the correlation of IA flow mode and WSS/OSI on the human subject IA. This work was supported partly by the NIH grant R03EB014860, and the computational resources were partly provided by CCR at UB. We thank Prof. Hui Meng and Dr. Jianping Xiang for providing us the database of aneurysms and helpful discussions.

  15. Follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated by flow diverter: comparison of three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) and contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) sequences with digital subtraction angiography as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Attali, Jonathan; Benaissa, Azzedine; Soize, Sébastien; Kadziolka, Krzysztof; Portefaix, Christophe; Pierot, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated by flow diverter with MRI is complicated by imaging artifacts produced by these devices. This study compares the diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) and contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) at 3 T for the evaluation of aneurysm occlusion and parent artery patency after flow diversion treatment, with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the gold standard. Patients treated with flow diverters between January 2009 and January 2013 followed by MRA at 3 T (3D-TOF-MRA and CE-MRA) and DSA within a 48 h period were included in a prospective single-center study. Aneurysm occlusion was assessed with full and simplified Montreal scales and parent artery patency with three-grade and two-grade scales. Twenty-two patients harboring 23 treated aneurysms were included. Interobserver agreement using simplified scales for occlusion (Montreal) and parent artery patency were higher for DSA (0.88 and 0.61) and CE-MRA (0.74 and 0.55) than for 3D-TOF-MRA (0.51 and 0.02). Intermodality agreement was higher for CE-MRA (0.88 and 0.32) than for 3D-TOF-MRA (0.59 and 0.11). CE-MRA yielded better accuracy than 3D-TOF-MRA for aneurysm remnant detection (sensitivity 83% vs 50%; specificity 100% vs 100%) and for the status of the parent artery (specificity 63% vs 32%; sensitivity 100% vs 100%). At 3 T, CE-MRA is superior to 3D-TOF-MRA for the evaluation of aneurysm occlusion and parent artery patency after flow diversion treatment. However, intraluminal evaluation remains difficult with MRA regardless of the sequence used. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Tiny Mimas, Huge Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-28

    Saturn's icy moon Mimas is dwarfed by the planet's enormous rings. Because Mimas (near lower left) appears tiny by comparison, it might seem that the rings would be far more massive, but this is not the case. Scientists think the rings are no more than a few times as massive as Mimas, or perhaps just a fraction of Mimas' mass. Cassini is expected to determine the mass of Saturn's rings to within just a few hundredths of Mimas' mass as the mission winds down by tracking radio signals from the spacecraft as it flies close to the rings. The rings, which are made of small, icy particles spread over a vast area, are extremely thin -- generally no thicker than the height of a house. Thus, despite their giant proportions, the rings contain a surprisingly small amount of material. Mimas is 246 miles (396 kilometers) wide. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 6 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in red light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on July 21, 2016. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 564,000 miles (907,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 31 degrees. Image scale is 34 miles (54 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20509

  17. Faint D Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-27

    Not all of Saturn's rings are created equal: here the C and D rings appear side-by-side, but the C ring, which occupies the bottom half of this image, clearly outshines its neighbor. The D ring appears fainter than the C ring because it is comprised of less material. However, even rings as thin as the D ring can pose hazards to spacecraft. Given the high speeds at which Cassini travels, impacts with particles just fractions of a millimeter in size have the potential to damage key spacecraft components and instruments. Nonetheless, near the end of Cassini's mission, navigators plan to thread the spacecraft's orbit through the narrow region between the D ring and the top of Saturn's atmosphere. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 12 degrees below the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 11, 2015. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 372,000 miles (599,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 133 degrees. Image scale is 2.2 miles (3.6 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/pia18313

  18. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  19. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  20. Jupiter Ring Halo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-26

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age. Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal "halo" is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest being

  1. Viscosity in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Shu, F. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of estimating the viscosity in Saturn's rings from the damping rate of waves observed to be propagating within the rings is discussed. The wavetrains of attempts using spiral density waves as a diagnostic suffer significant complications that compromise the interpretations. A method that considers the damping of spiral bending waves was used to deduce a kinematic viscosity of 260 (+150, -100) sqcm/sec for the middle of the A ring where bending waves are excited by the 5:3 vertical resonance with Mimas. This value implies upper limits on the particle velocity dispersion and local ring thickness of 0.4 cm/sec and 30 m, respectively.

  2. Molecular MRI of intracranial thrombus in a rat ischemic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Ritika; Ay, Ilknur; Dai, Guangping; Kim, Young Ro; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial thrombus is a principal feature in most ischemic stroke, and thrombus location and size may correlate with outcome and response to thrombolytic therapy. EP-2104R, a fibrin-specific molecular MR agent, was previously shown to enhance extracranial thrombi in animal models and recently, in clinical trials. The purpose of this work was to determine if a fibrin-specific molecular MR probe could noninvasively characterize intracranial thrombi. Methods Embolic stroke was induced in adult rats by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery with an aged thrombus. Diffusion weighted imaging, time of flight angiography, and high resolution three dimensional T1-weighted MRI were performed at 4.7T prior to and following contrast agents EP-2104R (10 µmol/kg, n=6) or Gd-DTPA (200 µmol/kg, control, n=5). Gd levels in thrombus, brain, and blood were determined by ex vivo elemental analysis. Results In all animals, MR angiography revealed a flow deficit and diffusion-weighted imaging showed a hyperintensity consistent with ischemia. EP-2104R-enhanced MRI resulted in visualization of all occlusive thrombi (6/6) as well as vessel wall enhancement in all 6 animals with high contrast to noise relative to blood (10.7 post EP-2104R vs. 0.54 pre, p<0.0001). Gd-DTPA injected animals showed no occlusive thrombus or vessel wall enhancement (0/5). The concentration of Gd in the thrombus post-EP2104 was 18 times that in the blood pool. Conclusions EP-2104R enhanced MRI successfully identifies intracranial thrombus in a rat embolic stroke model. PMID:20395615

  3. Microwave Observations on Saturn's Main Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhimeng; Hayes, Alexander; Janssen, Michael A.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; de Pater, Imke; Dunn, David; Hedman, Matthew M.; Estrada, Paul R.

    2016-10-01

    Despite considerable study, Saturn's rings continue to challenge current theories for their provenance. Water ice comprises the bulk of Saturn's rings, yet it is the small fraction of non-icy material that is arguably more valuable in revealing clues about the system's origin and age. Herein, we present new measurements of the non-icy material fraction in Saturn's main rings, determined from microwave observations obtained by Cassini Radar and EVLA.Our Cassini Radar observations in the C Ring show an exceptionally high brightness at near-zero azimuthal angles, suggesting a high porosity of 70%-75% for the particles. Furthermore, most regions in the C ring contain about 1-2% silicates while with an enhanced abundance concentrated in the middle C ring reaching a maximum of 6%-11%. We proposed that the C ring has been continuously polluted by meteoroid bombardment for 15-90Myr, while the middle C ring was further contaminated by an incoming Centaur disrupted by Saturn tidal force. Owing to the B ring's high opacity, the particles there are likely to have 85% - 90% porosity, with corresponding non-icy material fractions of ~ 0.3% - 0.5% in the inner and outer B ring, and ~0.1% - 0.2% in the middle regions. For the A ring interior to the Encke gap, the derived non-icy material is ~0.2% - 0.3% everywhere for porosities ranging from 55% - 90%. Finally, our results for the Cassini Division indicate a non-icy material fraction of ~1% - 2% similar to most regions in the C ring, except that the Cassini Division particles are more likely to contain ~ 90% porosity due to the high opacity there. Our results here further support the idea that Saturn's rings may be less than 150 Myr old suggesting an origin scenario in which the rings are derived from the relatively recent breakup of an icy moon.Furthermore, we calibrated and analyzed multi-wavelengths EVLA observation at wavelengths ranging from 0.7cm to 13cm. As the array operates in a wavelength regime where the absorption

  4. Feasibility of using the Vero SBRT system for intracranial SRS.

    PubMed

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Poels, Kenneth; Simon, Viorica; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-06

    The Vero SBRT system was benchmarked in a planning study against the Novalis SRS system for quality of delivered dose distributions to intracranial lesions and assessing the Vero system's capacity for SRS. A total of 27 patients with one brain lesion treated on the Novalis system, with 3 mm leaf width MLC and C-arm gantry, were replanned for Vero, with a 5 mm leaf width MLC mounted on an O-ring gantry allowing rotations around both the horizontal and vertical axis. The Novalis dynamic conformal arc (DCA) planning included vertex arcs, using 90° couch rotation. These vertex arcs cannot be reproduced with Vero due to the mechanical limitations of the O-ring gantry. Alternative class solutions were investigated for the Vero. Additionally, to distinguish between the effect of MLC leaf width and different beam arrangements on dose distributions, the Vero class solutions were also applied for Novalis. In addition, the added value of noncoplanar IMRT was investigated in this study. Quality of the achieved dose distributions was expressed in the conformity index (CI) and gradient index (GI), and compared using a paired Student's t-test with statistical significance for p-values ≤ 0.05. For lesions larger than 5 cm3, no statistical significant difference in conformity was observed between Vero and Novalis, but for smaller lesions, the dose distributions showed a significantly better conformity for the Novalis (ΔCI = 13.74%, p = 0.0002) mainly due to the smaller MLC leaf width. Using IMRT on Vero reduces this conformity difference to nonsignificant levels. The cutoff for achieving a GI around 3, characterizing a sharp dose falloff outside the target volume was 4 cm3 for Novalis and 7 cm3 for Vero using DCA technique. Using noncoplanar IMRT, this threshold was reduced to 3 cm3 for the Vero system. The smaller MLC and the presence of the vertex fields allow the Novalis system to better conform the dose around the lesion and to obtain steeper dose falloff outside the lesion

  5. Modified spiral wound retaining ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A spiral wound retaining ring with angled ends is described. The ring is crimped at the same angle as the ring ends to maintain a constant thickness dimension. The angling of the ends of the ring and crimp allow the ends to be positioned closer together while maintaining enough clearance to enable insertion and removal of the ring. By reducing the separation distance between the ends a stronger ring results since the double layer area of the ring is maximized.

  6. Primary Intracranial Sarcoma Presenting as Chronic Subdural Fluid Collections in a Child.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad A; Fung, Kar-Ming; Tullos, Hurtis J; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y; Gunda, Divya; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2016-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma in the pediatric population often results from trauma. Asymptomatic and benign-appearing subdural collections are generally managed conservatively without operative intervention. Primary intracranial sarcomas are uncommon entities. Diagnosis of sarcoma can be difficult because these lesions often manifest as apparent hematoma. Presented is the case of a primary intracranial mucoid spindle cell sarcoma that arose in a child with a history of benign-appearing bilateral subdural fluid collections in the setting of nonaccidental trauma. The patient was initially managed conservatively because her neurological examination result was normal and her subdural collections decreased in size on repeated imaging. The collections did not resolve completely. Years later, she exhibited weakness, seizure, and an increase in the size of her subdural fluid collection. Subdural drainage was attempted without significant effect. Cytologic assessment of fluid was negative for malignant cells. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple enhancing masses along the subdural collection. The patient eventually underwent craniotomy in which a diagnosis of sarcoma was obtained. Pathological and radiographic findings as well as oncological management are reviewed. The authors also review the natural history and treatment of primary intracranial sarcoma in the pediatric population. Early contrasted magnetic resonance imaging should be obtained in patients with subdural fluid collections that appear asymmetric or do not resolve in the expected time course, despite having a normal neurologic examination result. Negative cytologic assessment does not exclude sarcoma diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inner B Ring Terminus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-21

    This mosaic, part of a larger mosaic of images captured by NASA Cassini Orbiter just hours before exact equinox at Saturn, shows that the spiral corrugation in the planet’s inner rings continues right up to the inner B ring.

  8. Neptune's ring system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C. C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Lissauer, J. J.; Esposito, L. W.

    The authors review the current state of knowledge regarding the structure, particle properties, kinematics, dynamics, origin, and evolution of the Neptune rings derived from Earth-based and Voyager data. Neptune has a diverse system of five continuous rings - 2 broad (Galle and Lassell) and 3 narrow (Adams, Le Verrier, and Arago) - plus a narrow discontinuous ring sharing the orbit of one of its ring-region satellites, Galatea. The outermost Adams ring contains the only arcs observed so far in Voyager images. The five arcs vary in angular extent from ≡1° to ≡10°, and exhibit internal azimuthal structure with typical spatial scales of ≡0.5°. All five lie within ≡40° of longitude. Dust is present throughout the Neptune system and measureable quantities of it were detected over Neptune's north pole. The Adams ring (including the arcs) and the Le Verrier ring contain a significant fraction of dust. The Neptune ring particles are probably red, and may consist of ice "dirtied" with silicates and/or some carbon-bearing material. A kinematic model for the arcs derived from Voyager data, the arcs' physical characteristics, and their orbital geometry and phasing are all roughly in accord with single-satellite arc shepherding by Galatea, though the presence of small kilometer-sized bodies embedded either within the arcs or placed at their Lagrange points may explain some inconsistencies with this model.

  9. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  10. Uranus Ring System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This image captured by NASA's Voyager 2 in 1986 revealed a continuous distribution of small particles throughout the Uranus ring system. This unique geometry, the highest phase angle at which Voyager imaged the rings, allowed us to see lanes of fine dust. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00142

  11. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  12. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  13. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  14. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  15. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  16. Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowed area to stretch the ring. Sometimes, a balloon is placed in the area and inflated, to help widen the ring. Outlook (Prognosis) Swallowing problems may return. You may need repeat treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you ...

  17. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  18. Rings of Neptune

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-25

    These two 591-second exposures of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the NASA Voyager 2 wide-angle camera on Aug. 26, 1989. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged.

  19. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  20. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  1. A-ring Propeller

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-26

    A propeller-shaped structure, created by an unseen moon, can be seen in Saturn A ring and looks like a small, dark line interrupting the bright surrounding ring material in the upper left of this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  2. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  3. High Agatston Calcium Score of Intracranial Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) calcification on cognitive impairment is uncertain. Our objective was to investigate whether intracranial ICA calcification is a significant cognitive predictor for cognitive impairment. Global cognition and degrees of intracranial ICA calcification of 579 subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Agatston calcium scoring method, respectively. Other risk factors for cognitive impairment, including age, education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index, were documented and analyzed for their associations with cognitive function. In univariate analyses, older age, lower education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and higher intracranial ICA Agatston scores were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. In ordinal logistic regression, only age and total intracranial ICA Agatston score were significant risk factors for cognitive impairment. After adjustment for the other documented risk factors, subjects were 7% (95% CI: 5–10; P < 0.001) and 6% (95% CI: 0–13; P = 0.04) more likely to have lower cognitive category with every year increment of age and every 100-point increment of the total intracranial ICA Agatston score respectively. These results suggest an important role of the intracranial ICA calcification on cognitive impairment. PMID:26426620

  4. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Debette, Stéphanie; Compter, Annette; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M; Majersik, Jennifer J; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M; Naggara, Olivier; Béjot, Yannick; Cole, John W; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Welleweerd, Janna C; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F; Pereira, Vitor M; Bersano, Anna; Touzé, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S; Worrall, Bradford B; Chabrier, Stéphane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with mass effect, mostly on the brainstem. Although intracranial artery dissection is less common than cervical artery dissection in adults of European ethnic origin, intracranial artery dissection is reportedly more common in children and in Asian populations. Risk factors and mechanisms are poorly understood, and diagnosis is challenging because characteristic imaging features can be difficult to detect in view of the small size of intracranial arteries. Therefore, multimodal follow-up imaging is often needed to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment of intracranial artery dissections is empirical in the absence of data from randomised controlled trials. Most patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage undergo surgical or endovascular treatment to prevent rebleeding, whereas patients with intracranial artery dissection and cerebral ischaemia are treated with antithrombotics. Prognosis seems worse in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage than in those without.

  5. Postural Effects on Intracranial Pressure as Assessed Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Hargens, Alan R.; Ballard, R. E.; Shuer, L. M.; Cantrell, J. H.; Yost, W. T.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of whole body tilting on intracranial compliance and pressure in six healthy volunteers by using a noninvasive ultrasonic device. Subjects were randomly tilted up or down sequentially at 60 degree, 30 degree head-up, supine, and 15 degree head-down position for one minute at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure with a finger pressure cuff and changes in intracranial distance with an ultrasonic device. The device measures skull movement on the order of micro-meter. Our ultrasound technique demonstrates that skull movement is highly correlated (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.77) with intracranial pressure variations due to cerebral arterial pulsation. The amplitudes of arterial pressure (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.99 and those of intracranial distance changes (r$(circumflex){2}$=0.87) associated with one cardiac cycle were inversely correlated with the angle of tilt. The ratio of pulsation amplitudes for intracranial distance over arterial pressure also showed a significant increase as the angle of tilt was lowered (p=0.003). Thus, postural changes alter intracranial compliance in healthy volunteers and intracranial volume-buffering capacity is reduced in head-down position.

  6. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Gerard; Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%-6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms.

  7. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Kieburtz, Karl D.; Corbett, James J.; Feldon, Steven E.; Friedman, Deborah I.; Katz, David M.; Keltner, John L.; Schron, Eleanor B.; McDermott, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, there are no large prospective cohorts of untreated patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) to characterize the disease. OBJECTIVE To report the baseline clinical and laboratory features of patients enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We collected data at baseline from questionnaires, examinations, automated perimetry, and fundus photography grading. Patients (n = 165) were enrolled from March 17, 2010, to November 27, 2012, at 38 academic and private practice sites in North America. All participants met the modified Dandy criteria for IIH and had a perimetric mean deviation between −2 dB and −7 dB. All but 4 participants were women. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Baseline and laboratory characteristics. RESULTS The mean (SD) age of our patients was 29.0 (7.4) years and 4 (2.4%) were men. The average (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 39.9 (8.3). Headache was the most common symptom (84%). Transient visual obscurations occurred in 68% of patients, back pain in 53%, and pulse synchronous tinnitus in 52%. Only 32% reported visual loss. The average (SD) perimetric mean deviation in the worst eye was −3.5 (1.1) dB, (range, −2.0 to −6.4 dB) and in the best eye was −2.3 (1.1) dB (range, −5.2 to 0.8 dB). A partial arcuate visual field defect with an enlarged blind spot was the most common perimetric finding. Visual acuity was 85 letters or better (20/20) in 71% of the worst eyes and 77% of the best eyes. Quality of life measures, including the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire–25 and the Short Form–36 physical and mental health summary scales, were lower compared with population norms. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial represents the largest prospectively analyzed cohort of untreated patients with IIH. Our data show

  8. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  9. Intracranial structural alteration predicts treatment outcome in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hanna; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2017-01-01

    Background Intracranial structural dislocation in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) can be measured by various intracranial angles and distances. We aimed to identify the clinical significance of structural dislocation in relation to treatment outcome in patients with SIH. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we identified patients with SIH who received an epidural blood patch (EBP) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2005 to March 2015. Structural dislocation in pretreatment MRIs of SIH patients was assessed by measuring tonsillar herniation, mamillopontine distance, the angle between the vein of Galen and straight sinus (vG/SS angle), the pontomesencephalic angle, and the lateral ventricular angle. After the first EBP, poor response was defined as the persistence of symptoms that prompted a repeat EBP. Results Out of the 95 patients included, 31 (32.6%) showed poor response. Among the radiological markers of structural dislocation, the vG/SS angle was associated with poor response (49.82 ± 16.40° vs 66.58 ± 26.08°, p = 0.002). Among clinical variables, premorbid migraine ( p = 0.036) was related to poor response. In multivariate analysis, reduced vG/SS angle was independently associated with poor response (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01 - 1.07] per 1° decrease, p = 0.006). In 23 patients who underwent MRI after successful treatment, the vG/SS angle significantly increased after the EBP ( p < 0.001, by paired t-test), while two patients with aggravation or recurrence showed a further reduction of their vG/SS angles. Conclusions Intracranial structural dislocation, measured by the vG/SS angle, is associated with poor response to the first EBP in patients with SIH. Successful treatment can reverse the structural dislocation.

  10. Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Different manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure?

    PubMed

    Higgins, J Nicholas P; Pickard, John D; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-08-01

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each - fatigue and headache - are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations? We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome. We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Complex technical methodologies and their applications in the surgery of intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, T C; Rabb, C; Apuzzo, M L

    1994-04-01

    , [and] (3) increased refinement of technical adjuvants--both physical and molecular." The end point of these technical advances is to improve precision and safety and will enhance the outcome in each surgical procedure so that one day we will be able to operate on patients with intracranial lesions with minimal morbidity.

  12. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  13. Jupiter Ring, With Orion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-25

    As NASA's Juno spacecraft flew through the narrow gap between Jupiter's radiation belts and the planet during its first science flyby, Perijove 1, on August 27, 2016, the Stellar Reference Unit (SRU-1) star camera collected the first image of Jupiter's ring taken from the inside looking out. The bright bands in the center of the image are the main ring of Jupiter's ring system. While taking the ring image, the SRU was viewing the constellation Orion. The bright star above the main ring is Betelgeuse, and Orion's belt can be seen in the lower right. Juno's Radiation Monitoring Investigation actively retrieves and analyzes the noise signatures from penetrating radiation in the images of the spacecraft's star cameras and science instruments at Jupiter. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21644

  14. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. Headache improvement after intracranial endovascular procedures in Chinese patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linjing; Wang, Yunxia; Zhang, Qingkui; Ge, Wei; Wu, Xiancong; Di, Hai; Wang, Jun; Cao, Xiangyu; Li, Baomin; Liu, Ruozhuo; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a long-term improvement in headache of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) treated with intracranial endovascular procedures. Using a prospective design, consecutive patients with UIAs with neuroendovascular treatment from January 2014 to December 2014 were asked to participate. Headache outcomes were established before aneurysm treatment and for 6 months following treatment. Factors associated with different headache outcomes were investigated. Ultimately, 58 patients completed the 6-month follow-up. In total, 29 patients had preoperative headache. Six months after the intracranial endovascular procedure, 13 patients (44.8%) stated that their headaches were relieved after endovascular treatment; headache in 1 patient improved slightly, and 12 reported disappearance of headache and marked improvement. Overall, the mean headache scores of 29 patients improved on the self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) after endovascular treatment (6.00 vs. 2.30; P < 0.001). Patients with pretreatment tension-type headache, more severe headaches, stent-assisted coiling, and stent implantation of the aneurysm were the important disadvantage for patients in improvement of post-procedure headache. Treatment of UIAs resulted in relief of headaches in about half of patients who had headaches pre-operatively. PMID:28178166

  16. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt for intracranial hypertension in cryptococcal meningitis without hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Panayota; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal; Gomori, John M; Cohen, José E

    2012-08-01

    The use of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt to treat uncontrollable intracranial hypertension in patients with cryptococcal meningitis without hydrocephalus is somewhat unusual and still largely unreported. However, uncontrollable intracranial hypertension without hydrocephalus in these patients is a potentially life-threatening condition. Early diagnosis and shunt placement are essential to improve survival and neurological function. We report uncontrollable intracranial hypertension without hydrocephalus in a 23-year-old woman, which was successfully managed by VP shunt placement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intracranial calcified pseudocyst reaction to a shunt catheter.

    PubMed

    Yowtak, June; Hughes, Douglas; Heger, Ian; Macomson, Samuel D

    2014-02-01

    A 9-year-old boy with spina bifida, Chiari II malformation, and hydrocephalus presented with signs of increased intracranial pressure consistent with a shunt malfunction. Radiological investigations revealed an intracranial calcified lesion along the ventricular catheter. A shunt tap revealed a translucent milky white fluid. The patient underwent a ventriculostomy and, eventually, a shunt revision. Pathology findings were consistent with the formation of dystrophic calcification and a pseudocyst around the shunt catheter. Postoperatively, the patient returned to his neurological baseline. This is, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the first report of an intracranial calcified pseudocyst in a patient with normal renal function.

  18. Chondroma of Cerebral Falx: A Rare Intracranial Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Awan, Liaqat Mahmood; Niaz, Azam; Amin; Vohra, Anjum Habib

    2015-10-01

    Chondromas are benign tumors which mostly occur in extremities but also sometimes in the cranium. Intracerebral chondroma is rare condition. Most intracranial chondromas arise from skull base, but chondroma of falx origin is a rare entity and mostly occurs in relation with syndromic disorders such as Mafucci's syndrome or Ollier's syndrome. Here, we report a rare case of falcine intracranial chondroma in a young man who presented with headaches and weakness of lower extremities and no signs of any syndromic disorder. The purpose of this case report was to raise awareness about intracranial chondromas. Chondroma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of calcified masses arising from the falx.

  19. The Case for Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Ryan A.; Marks, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24782816

  20. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Hyun; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Yoon Jin; Nam, Sang Ook

    2014-06-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is defined as increased intracranial pressure of unknown origin. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a rare condition in adolescence. We report the case of a 14-year-old girl with sudden onset of decreased visual acuity, headache and menstrual irregularity. Clinical neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbit were normal. Lumbar puncture demonstrated an increased opening pressure of 31 cm H2O. Gynecologic investigation indicated PCOS. Her symptoms improved with medical and surgical treatment for the underlying PCOS.

  1. Prenatally Diagnosed Aggressive Intracranial Immature Teratoma-Clinicopathological Correlation.

    PubMed

    Nariai, Hiroki; Price, Dana E; Jada, Ajit; Weintraub, Lauren; Weidenheim, Karen M; Gomes, William A; Levy, Adam S; Abbott, Rick; Malbari, Fatema

    2016-01-01

    To describe clinicopathological correlation of congenital intracranial immature teratoma. A retrospective case analysis from a tertiary medical center. We report a case of an intracranial immature teratoma detected prenatally at 35 weeks of gestation. The tumor showed rapid growth, causing acute hydrocephalus requiring subsequent ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Resective surgery was performed within 2 weeks after birth. The infant died at day of life 29. Histological examination revealed an immature teratoma, with high MIB1/Ki-67 proliferation index. Intracranial immature teratoma with high MIB1/Ki-67 proliferation index may serve as an independent poor prognostic factor.

  2. Mechanical seal having a double-tier mating ring

    DOEpatents

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Somanchi, Anoop K.

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method to enhance the overall performance of mechanical seals in one of the following ways: by reducing seal face wear, by reducing the contact surface temperature, or by increasing the life span of mechanical seals. The apparatus is a mechanical seal (e.g., single mechanical seals, double mechanical seals, tandem mechanical seals, bellows, pusher mechanical seals, and all types of rotating and reciprocating machines) comprising a rotating ring and a double-tier mating ring. In a preferred embodiment, the double-tier mating ring comprises a first and a second stationary ring that together form an agitation-inducing, guided flow channel to allow for the removal of heat generated at the seal face of the mating ring by channeling a coolant entering the mating ring to a position adjacent to and in close proximity with the interior surface area of the seal face of the mating ring.

  3. The unusual angiographic course of intracranial pseudoaneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zanaty, Mario; Chalouhi, Nohra; Jabbour, Pascal; Starke, Robert M.; Hasan, David

    2015-01-01

    Although rare, traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms remain one of the most difficult vascular lesions to diagnose and treat. A 55-year-old male patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal resection for a pituitary macroadenoma. The operation was complicated by an arterial bleed. The initial angiogram revealed pseudoaneurysm of the anterior choroidal artery. Although the pseudoaneurysm completely disappeared on the second angiogram, it was surprisingly found to have enlarged on the third angiogram. The lesion was successfully treated with flow-diversion using a pipeline embolization device. The present case demonstrates that the natural history of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms may be unpredictable and misleading. Traumatic pseudoaneurysms should, therefore, be carefully followed when conservative treatment is elected or when the lesion seems to have spontaneously regressed. Flow-diversion seems to be a reasonable treatment option. PMID:26425168

  4. Intracranial drug delivery for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Robert Loch; Leung, Ming; Tice, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tice and colleagues pioneered site-specific, sustained-release drug delivery to the brain almost 30 years ago. Currently there is one drug approved for use in this manner. Clinical trials in subarachnoid hemorrhage have led to approval of nimodipine for oral and intravenous use, but other drugs, such as clazosentan, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and magnesium, have not shown consistent clinical efficacy. We propose that intracranial delivery of drugs such as nimodipine, formulated in sustained-release preparations, are good candidates for improving outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage because they can be administered to patients that are already undergoing surgery and who have a self-limited condition from which full recovery is possible.

  5. Intracranial granular cell tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Liu, Chen-I; Liang, Sao-Ling; Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Huang, Sun-Chau; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Lin, Yung-Chang

    2004-01-01

    A 12-year-old female miniature poodle showed a 3-month history of neurological signs. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a high intensity tumor mass in the right cerebral hemisphere with compression of the lateral ventricle. At necropsy, a 2 x 3 cm white, friable mass was found in the right ventral pyriform lobe. Microscopically, the tumor cells were large, polygonal to round cells supported by a sparse fibrovascular stroma. The tumor cells typically possessed finely granular, pale eosinophilic cytoplasm with strongly positive periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction. The tumor cells were immunopositive for vimentin, NSE and S-100. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells showed large amounts of granules in the cytoplasm, and absence of basement membrane. Based on the above-mentioned findings, the intracranial granular cell tumor was diagnosed.

  6. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Intracranial pressure was raised by expansion of a supratentorial subdural ballon in anaesthetized baboons. Pressures were measured at several sites, both supratentorial and infratentorial, and cerebral blood flow was measured in each cerebral hemisphere separately. Pressures recorded from the right and left lateral ventricles corresponded closely throughout. Highly significant correlations were also obtained between the pressures in the right and left subdural spaces and the mean intraventricular pressure. There was, thus, no evidence of intracompartmental pressure gradients within the supratentorial space. Pressure gradients did, however, develop between the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments in the majority of experiments, although the level of supratentorial pressure at which this occurred, varied. Despite the presence of a large mass lesion over the right cerebral hemisphere, no significant differences developed between levels of cerebral blood flow in the two hemispheres, although flow in the right hemisphere remained consistently slightly lower than that in the left after the ballon was inserted. PMID:4836754

  7. Endoscope-Assisted Microneurosurgery for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato J.; Di Cola, Francesco; Raysi Dehcordi, Soheila; Ricci, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The endovascular techniques has widely changed the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. However surgery still represent the best therapeutic option in case of broad-based and complex lesions. The combined use of endoscopic and microsurgical techniques (EAM) may improve surgical results. Objective: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the advantages and limits of EAM for intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Between January 2002 and December 2012, 173 patients, harboring 206 aneurysms were surgically treated in our department with the EAM technique. One hundred and fifty-seven aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 49 were in the posterior circulation. Standard tailored approaches, based on skull base surgery principles, were chosen. The use of the endoscope included three steps: initial inspection, true operative time, and final inspection. For each procedure, an intraoperative video and an evaluation schedule were prepared, to report surgeons’ opinions about the technique itself. In the first cases, we always used the endoscope during surgical procedures in order to get an adequate surgical training. Afterwards we became aware in selecting cases in which to apply the endoscopy, as we started to become familiar with its advantages and limits. Results: After clipping, all patients were undergone postoperative cerebral angiography. No surgical mortality related to EAM were observed. Complications directly related to endoscopic procedures were rare. Conclusion: Our retrospective study suggests that endoscopic efficacy for aneurysms is only scarcely influenced by the preoperative clinical condition (Hunt–Hess grade), surgical timing, presence of blood in the cisterns (Fisher grade) and/or hydrocephalus. However the most important factors contributing to the efficacy of EAM are determined by the anatomical locations and sizes of the lesions. Furthermore, the advantages are especially evident using dedicated scopes and holders, after an

  8. Atypical causes of nontraumatic intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno; Archavlis, Eleftherios

    2009-05-01

    To analyze the management and outcome of patients presenting with atypical causes of intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We performed a review of our last 820 nontraumatic-SAH patients and analyzed the management and outcome of patients where the SAH origin was not a ruptured aneurysm. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to assess outcome 3 months after event. Thirty-two patients had atypical causes of SAH. In 15 patients with Hunt and Hess (H&H) scores from 1 to 3 without focal neurological deficit (FND), 8 perimesencephalic non-aneurysmal SAH, 4 blood coagulation disorders, 1 sinus thrombosis, 1 vasculitis, and 1 unknown-origin-SAH (UOS) were diagnosed. Fourteen (93%) of these 15 patients were conservatively treated. In 17 patients with H&H scores from 3 to 5 and FND, 8 tumors, 1 cavernoma, 1 sinus thrombosis, 1 arteriovenous malformation, 1 blood coagulation disorders, 2 UOS, and 3 dural fistulas were diagnosed. Fifteen (88%) of these 17 patients were interventionally treated. The neurological condition 3 months later was good (GOS 4 and 5) in 12 of the 15 cases (80%) admitted with low-H&H scores, as well as in 13 of the 17 cases (76%) admitted with high-H&H scores. Three patients died and four developed a severe disability. Patients presenting with atypical causes of SAH and high-H&H scores at admission are likely to harbor an intracranial organic process producing the bleeding. Despite this poor initial condition, their 3-month outcome can be similar to those of patients with low-H&H scores if the origin of the bleeding is properly treated.

  9. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  10. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  11. Endoscope-assisted microsurgery for intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kalavakonda, Chandrasekar; Sekhar, Laligam N; Ramachandran, Pranatartiharan; Hechl, Peter

    2002-11-01

    We discuss the role of the endoscope in the microsurgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms, analyzing its benefits, risks, and disadvantages. This was a prospective study of 55 patients with 79 aneurysms, treated between July 1998 and June 2001, for whom the endoscope was used as an adjunct in the microsurgical treatment of their lesions. Seventy-one aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation, and eight were located in the posterior circulation. Thirty-seven patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Eighteen patients had unruptured aneurysms, of whom 5 presented with mass effect, 2 presented with transient ischemic attacks, and 11 were without symptoms. In all cases, the endoscope was used in addition to microsurgical dissection and clipping (sometimes before clipping, sometimes during clipping, and always after clipping), for observation of the neck anatomic features and perforators and verification of the optimal clip position. Intraoperative angiography was performed for all patients after aneurysm clipping. In the majority of cases, the endoscope was very useful for the assessment of regional anatomic features. It allowed better observation of anatomic features, compared with the microscope, for 26 aneurysms; in 15 cases, pertinent anatomic information could be obtained only with the endoscope. The duration of temporary clipping of the parent artery was significantly reduced for two patients. The clip was repositioned because of a residual neck or inclusion of the parent vessel during aneurysm clipping in six cases, and the clip position was readjusted because of compression of the optic nerve in one case. One patient experienced a small aneurysm rupture that was directly related to use of the endoscope, but this was easily controlled, with no sequelae. For many patients, the combination of the neuro-endoscope and the micro-Doppler probe made intraoperative angiography redundant. "Endoscope-assisted microsurgery" is a major advance in the

  12. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  13. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  14. Highly accelerated intracranial 4D flow MRI: evaluation of healthy volunteers and patients with intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Koskas, Louise; Faraji, Farshid; Kao, Evan; Wang, Yan; Haraldsson, Henrik; Kefayati, Sarah; Zhu, Chengcheng; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Saloner, David

    2017-08-07

    To evaluate an accelerated 4D flow MRI method that provides high temporal resolution in a clinically feasible acquisition time for intracranial velocity imaging. Accelerated 4D flow MRI was developed by using a pseudo-random variable-density Cartesian undersampling strategy (CIRCUS) with the combination of k-t, parallel imaging and compressed sensing image reconstruction techniques (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). Four-dimensional flow data were acquired on five healthy volunteers and eight patients with intracranial aneurysms using CIRCUS (acceleration factor of R = 4, termed CIRCUS4) and GRAPPA (R = 2, termed GRAPPA2) as the reference method. Images with three times higher temporal resolution (R = 12, CIRCUS12) were also reconstructed from the same acquisition as CIRCUS4. Qualitative and quantitative image assessment was performed on the images acquired with different methods, and complex flow patterns in the aneurysms were identified and compared. Four-dimensional flow MRI with CIRCUS was achieved in 5 min and allowed further improved temporal resolution of <30 ms. Volunteer studies showed similar qualitative and quantitative evaluation obtained with the proposed approach compared to the reference (overall image scores: GRAPPA2 3.2 ± 0.6; CIRCUS4 3.1 ± 0.7; CIRCUS12 3.3 ± 0.4; difference of the peak velocities: -3.83 ± 7.72 cm/s between CIRCUS4 and GRAPPA2, -1.72 ± 8.41 cm/s between CIRCUS12 and GRAPPA2). In patients with intracranial aneurysms, the higher temporal resolution improved capturing of the flow features in intracranial aneurysms (pathline visualization scores: GRAPPA2 2.2 ± 0.2; CIRCUS4 2.5 ± 0.5; CIRCUS12 2.7 ± 0.6). The proposed rapid 4D flow MRI with a high temporal resolution is a promising tool for evaluating intracranial aneurysms in a clinically feasible acquisition time.

  15. How does the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata) flash its blue rings?

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Bell, George R R; Kuzirian, Alan M; Allen, Justine J; Hanlon, Roger T

    2012-11-01

    The blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata), one of the world's most venomous animals, has long captivated and endangered a large audience: children playing at the beach, divers turning over rocks, and biologists researching neurotoxins. These small animals spend much of their time in hiding, showing effective camouflage patterns. When disturbed, the octopus will flash around 60 iridescent blue rings and, when strongly harassed, bite and deliver a neurotoxin that can kill a human. Here, we describe the flashing mechanism and optical properties of these rings. The rings contain physiologically inert multilayer reflectors, arranged to reflect blue-green light in a broad viewing direction. Dark pigmented chromatophores are found beneath and around each ring to enhance contrast. No chromatophores are above the ring; this is unusual for cephalopods, which typically use chromatophores to cover or spectrally modify iridescence. The fast flashes are achieved using muscles under direct neural control. The ring is hidden by contraction of muscles above the iridophores; relaxation of these muscles and contraction of muscles outside the ring expose the iridescence. This mechanism of producing iridescent signals has not previously been reported in cephalopods and we suggest that it is an exceptionally effective way to create a fast and conspicuous warning display.

  16. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  17. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  18. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  19. Gored of the Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-09

    Prometheus is caught in the act of creating gores and streamers in the F ring. Scientists believe that Prometheus and its partner-moon Pandora are responsible for much of the structure in the F ring as shown by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The orbit of Prometheus (53 miles, or 86 kilometers across) regularly brings it into the F ring. When this happens, it creates gores, or channels, in the ring where it entered. Prometheus then draws ring material with it as it exits the ring, leaving streamers in its wake. This process creates the pattern of structures seen in this image. This process is described in detail, along with a movie of Prometheus creating one of the streamer/channel features, in PIA08397. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 8.6 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Feb. 11, 2014. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.3 million miles (2.1 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 147 degrees. Image scale is 8 miles (13 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18270

  20. Primary intracranial solitary leptomeningeal glioma: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, K; Shimura, T; Mizutani, N; Koide, A; Yamagiwa, O; Mori, F; Nishiyama, K; Tanaka, R; Takahashi, H

    2002-01-01

    Primary intracranial solitary leptomeningeal gliomas are exceedingly rare. We, therefore, performed a detailed clinical, radiological and pathological analysis to better characterize these tumors in 3 patients (33- and 72-year-old men and a 72-year-old woman). Two of the tumors were located in the frontal region and 1 in the temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well circumscribed large lesion (maximal diameter 4 - 6 cm) with peritumoral edema, mixed low- and isosignal intensity on T1-weighted images, hypersignal intensity on T2-weighted images and non-homogeneous contrast enhancement. External carotid angiography demonstrated a vascular supply to these tumors via branches of the middle meningeal artery. Gross total resection was achieved in all patients. The pathological diagnosis was glioblastoma in 2 patients and oligodendroglioma in 1. The MIB-1 nuclear labeling index ranged from 11.8% - 23.6% (mean 18.2%). Local tumor recurrence was documented in 2 patients after 8 and 11 months, respectively. The other patient with glioblastoma developed a metastasis to the femur 39 months after craniotomy. A definitive diagnosis can be made by careful radiological assessment and histopathological examination.

  1. Enigmatic intracranial cyst causing diplopia and trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Pelluru, Pavan Kumar; Rajesh, Alugolu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression by intracranial cystic lesions can cause cranial nerve palsies and bony changes. With the advent of imaging techniques, grossly accurate diagnosis is possible. However, few cases do surprise the clinicians both intra, and postoperatively. A 27-year-old male presented to us with complaints of double vision for 4 months followed by sharp, shooting pain in the left V1 and V2 distribution for 1-month duration, on examination, he had left lateral palsy and decreased pin prick and temperature sensation in V1 distribution. On computed tomography scan, a cystic lesion noted which is isodense in the middle cranial fossa with erosion of the underlying bone. On magnetic resonance imaging lesion was iso to hyperintense on T1-Weighted and hyperintense on T2-Weighted, brilliantly enhancing on contrast administration. Provisional diagnosis was trigeminal schwannoma, left temporal craniotomy and total excision of the cyst done. Histopathological examination showed cyst wall lined with collagen. Postoperatively patient neuralgic pain subsided with persisting sixth nerve palsy. PMID:26425164

  2. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  3. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  4. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  5. Dynamics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.

    1991-02-01

    The modeling of the dynamics of particle collisions within planetary rings is discussed. Particles in the rings collide with one another because they have small random motions in addition to their orbital velocity. The orbital speed is roughly 10 km/s, while the random motions have an average speed of about a tenth of a millimeter per second. As a result, the particle collisions are very gentle. Numerical analysis and simulation of the ring dynamics, performed with the aid of a supercomputer, is outlined.

  6. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  7. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  8. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  9. Lyme disease-related intracranial hypertension in children: clinical and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Obeid, Rawad; Zuccoli, Giulio; Cleves-Bayon, Catalina; Nowalk, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a tick-borne infection that is endemic to multiple areas of the United States. Patients with LD may present with sign and symptoms of intracranial hypertension (IH). The objective of this study is to evaluate the history, clinical findings, CSF analysis, and brain imaging results in pediatric patients with increased intracranial pressure secondary to LD. A retrospective database search was performed using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9/10 codes to identify patients diagnosed with LD and IH between 2004 and 2014 at a tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging data for each patient were reviewed. Seven patients met inclusion criteria; mean age was 9.6 years (standard deviation 4.0 years); 4/7 patients were male. Average body mass index was 18.8 kg/m(2) (standard deviation 3.0 kg/m(2)). Fever was present in four patients. Four had a history of LD related erythema migrans. All had elevated CSF opening pressure with leukocytosis and lymphocytic predominance. MRI obtained in six patients showed contrast enhancement of various cranial nerves. Tentorial enhancement was noted in all patients. In addition, patients had widening of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve protrusion, and flattening of the posterior globe consistent with increased intracranial pressure. All patients had resolution of their symptoms after initiation of antibiotic therapy. In endemic areas, LD should be included in the differential of IH. MRI can help distinguish IH due to LD from its idiopathic form due to the presence of tentorial and cranial nerve enhancement in the former in addition to abnormal CSF showing leukocytosis with lymphocyte predominance.

  10. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Secondary to Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often idiopathic. We report on a patient presenting with symptomatic intracranial hypotension and pain radiating to the right leg caused by a transdural lumbar disc herniation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed classic signs of intracranial hypotension, and an additional spinal MR confirmed a lumbar transdural herniated disc as the cause. The patient was treated with a partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy. We were able to find the source of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and packed it with epidural glue and gelfoam. Postoperatively, the patient's headache and log radiating pain resolved and there was no neurological deficit. Thus, in this case, lumbar disc herniation may have been a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. PMID:20157378

  11. Slit ventricle syndrome: a case report of intermittent intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Vernier, Eric; Ravenscroft, Sheri; Schwartz, Lauren; Oleske, James; Ming, Xue

    2013-06-01

    Slit ventricle syndrome is a rare condition whereby brain compliance is reduced and can be associated with intermittent intracranial hypertension. A 19-year-old male with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for congenital hydrocephalus presented with a 1-day history of headache and drowsiness-symptoms from which he suffered in many recurrent episodes over the past 5 years. The improvement of headaches without surgical intervention led to the diagnosis of migraine. During this hospitalization, episodes of intermittent intracranial hypertension were documented along with the remission and relapse of the symptoms. While the patient's intracranial pressure was within normal range in over 90% of his monitoring period, which postponed shunting, replacement of his ventriculoperitoneal shut eventually resolved his symptoms. Slit ventricle syndrome with reduced ventricular compliances should be considered in patients with clinical evidence of intermittent intracranial hypertension and small ventricular size. The authors advocate shunt replacement as an appropriate treatment for this condition.

  12. Adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing a bifocal intracranial germinoma.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Julie; Potorac, Iulia; Lutteri, Laurence; Gennigens, Christine; Martin, Didier; Daly, Adrian F; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Tshibanda, Luaba; Beckers, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of intracranial tumors in which impaired antidiuretic hormone secretion is associated with the loss of thirst sensation. Here, we present the case of a patient with bifocal intracranial germinoma, diagnosed due to symptoms mainly caused by adipsic diabetes insipidus. This is, to our knowledge, the first case of adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing an intracranial germinoma reported in the literature. We describe the diagnostic procedures and the three-year follow-up of this patient. Management of intracranial germ-cell tumors is made complex by the wide range of histological features. Although germinomas have a generally better prognosis than most nongerminomatous tumors, they can have severe or even life-threatening presentations. Adipsic diabetes insipidus is one such severe presentation and its rarity can make it difficult to recognize and manage. Awareness of this potential entity is therefore important for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Ohtahara syndrome associated with hemimegalencephaly and intracranial lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K.; Bhat, Ashwini; Bhat, Maya; Ramaswamy, Premalatha

    2015-01-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a disorder of cortical malformation and is associated with various disorders including various neurocutaneous syndromes and many seizure types. We present a case of hemimegalencephaly associated with Ohtahara syndrome and intracranial and facial lipoma. PMID:26167232

  14. Ohtahara syndrome associated with hemimegalencephaly and intracranial lipoma.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Bhat, Ashwini; Bhat, Maya; Ramaswamy, Premalatha

    2015-01-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a disorder of cortical malformation and is associated with various disorders including various neurocutaneous syndromes and many seizure types. We present a case of hemimegalencephaly associated with Ohtahara syndrome and intracranial and facial lipoma.

  15. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  16. Intracranial Meningioma Diagnosed during Pregnancy Caused Maternal Death

    PubMed Central

    Kurdoglu, Zehra; Cetin, Orkun; Gulsen, Ismail; Bulut, M. Deniz

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumors are rarely diagnosed during pregnancy. Accelerated growth of intracranial meningiomas during pregnancy sometimes requires urgent surgical intervention. We describe a 41-year-old pregnant woman with severe neurological decompensation requiring immediate neurosurgery. Cesarean section resulted in maternal death. Meningioma diagnosed during a viable pregnancy should be managed according to the severity of maternal neurological symptoms and gestational age of pregnancy. Early intervention for intracranial tumors during pregnancy may save maternal and fetal lives. PMID:25295061

  17. Chronic Meningitis Complicating Intracranial Hypertension in Neurobrucellosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Betul; Nacaroglu, Senay Asik; Coskun, Cigdem; Kuscu, Demet Yandım; Onder, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    In neurobrucellosis, even though meningitis is encountered frequently, chronic intracranial hypertension is a rare manifestation. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for the prevention of permanent visual loss secondary to poststasis optic atrophy in these cases. We report a case that presented with permanent visual loss secondary to intracranial hypertension in neurobrucellosis. Our goal is to draw attention to the consideration of neurobrucellosis in cases with papilla stasis, even in the absence of neurological findings in endemic areas.

  18. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  19. [Congenital anomalies of cerebral artery and intracranial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, K; Ito, Z; Hen, R; Uemura, K; Matsuoka, S

    1976-02-01

    It is well known that congenital anomalies such as polycystic kidney, aortic coarctation, Marfan syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome are apt to be complicated by intracranial aneurysms. In this report we attempt to reveal the relation and incidence between cerebrovascular anomalies and intracranial aneurysms. The etiology of aneurysms has been discussed, too. 12 cases of persistent trigeminl artery, 2 cases of persistent hypoglossal artery and 11 cases of fenestration were obtained from 3841 patients who were angiographically examined in our clinic for 5 years. The incidence is 0.31%, 0.05% and 0.29%, respectively. Persistent trigeminal arteries were complicated by 2 cases of intracranial aneurysms and one case of arterivenous malformations (AVM), persistent hypoglossal arteries were complicated by one case of aneurysm, and fenestrations were complicated by 2 cases of aneurysms and one case of AVM. One case of congenital agenesis of right internal carotid artery was obtained which was complicated by aneurysm of anterior communicating artery. Totally, 8 cases of aneurysms and AVM were obtained from 26 cases of cerebrovascular anomalies (incidence 30.8%). On the other hand, thalamic or caudate hemorrhage revealed the highest incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms among intracerebral hematomas (10.7%). Compared with the incidence of aneurysms between cerebro vascular anomalies (30.8%) and thalamic or caudate hemorrhage (10.7%), the difference is statistically signigicant (P less than 0.05). The cause of intracranial aneurysm has not yet been clarified. But it is well accepted that the defect of tunica media vasorum is most responsible factor as to the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms. We concluded that the genetic error of cerebral vessels including defect of media caused intracranial aneurysms, and this result was supported from the evidence that cerebrovascular anomalies showed statistically high incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms.

  20. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Intracranial Hypertension and Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Sustained intracranial hypertension and acute brain herniation are “brain codes,” signifying catastrophic neurological events that require immediate recognition and treatment to prevent irreversible injury and death. As in cardiac arrest, a brain code mandates the organized implementation of a stepwise management algorithm. The goal of this emergency neurological life support protocol is to implement an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of patients with intracranial hypertension and/or herniation. PMID:26438459