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Sample records for intractable disease state

  1. [Global strategy for rare and intractable diseases].

    PubMed

    Kawashima Kodama, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    The progress has been made in research on rare and intractable diseases, for which new drug development has long been limited due to rarity, by establishing a global network in recent years. In Japan, the countermeasure of rare and intractable diseases has been implemented under national policy outline as an integrated strategy since 1972, including surveys and research, construction of medical facilities, reducing burden of medical expenses for patients, and enhancement of welfare and improving QOL of patients. Along with legislation or regulation of orphan drugs development, treatment and care for rare diseases have been emphasized in each national healthcare system globally. In the US, the Office of Rare Diseases was established under NIH in 1989 and European countries also started collaboration for rare disease projects with their own national plans in 1999. As a platform of rare diseases patients, healthcare professionals, researchers, pharmaceutical industry, and policy makers, Orphanet has a well-designed website which networks them. In Japan, there are urgent needs for global standard patient registration system and strengthening global collaboration for developing treatment and care for the patients of rare and intractable diseases, which needs more cooperative relations with patient organizations and pharmaceutical industry within country.

  2. [Estimated numbers of patients with intractable respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Tatsumi, K; Osamu, O; Tanabe, N; Kimura, H; Kuriyama, T; Tamakoshi, A; Kawamura, T; Ohno, Y

    1998-12-01

    To estimate the number of patients with intractable respiratory diseases, we conducted a two-stage nationwide epidemiological survey in 1997. The first survey was performed at randomly sampled hospitals to identify the number of patients treated. The second survey sought detailed clinico-epidemiological data on the patients reported in the first survey. The response rates were 54% for the first survey and 62% for the second. Based on the survey findings, we derived the following nationwide estimates: 450 patients (95% confidence interval: 360-530) with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension; 230 (200-260) with primary pulmonary hypertension; 180 (150-210) with obesity-associated hypoventilation syndrome; 40 (30-50) with primary alveolar hypoventilation syndrome; 160 (140-180) with histiocytosis X; and 190 (150-230) with juvenile pulmonary emphysema.

  3. National Registry of Designated Intractable Diseases in Japan: Present Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    KANATANI, Yasuhiro; TOMITA, Naoko; SATO, Yoko; ETO, Akiko; OMOE, Hiroe; MIZUSHIMA, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Japan promotes research related to intractable diseases and financially supports patients with these diseases. Intractable diseases are designated as those that fulfill the following criteria: (1) rarity (affecting less than 0.1% of the population in Japan), (2) unknown etiology, (3) lack of effective treatment, (4) necessity of long-term treatment, and (5) existence of objective diagnostic criteria and not necessarily equal to rare diseases in other countries. The construction of a national database is required to promote research to clarify the pathogenesis of these diseases and to develop pharmaceutical products and medical devices. The Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare launched an online registration system in 2001, but many problems associated with gathering and utilizing information on patients with intractable diseases remain. In this paper, we describe the present status of the national registry of designated intractable diseases in Japan and discuss future prospects. PMID:27666154

  4. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  5. Preliminary observation with dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Neff, Guy W; O'Brien, Christopher B; Reddy, K Rajender; Bergasa, Nora V; Regev, Arie; Molina, Enrique; Amaro, Rafael; Rodriguez, Miguel J; Chase, VeEtta; Jeffers, Lennox; Schiff, Eugene

    2002-08-01

    Pruritus due to cholestatic liver disease can be particularly difficult to manage and frequently is intractable to a variety of medical therapies. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) for intractable cholestatic related pruritus (ICRP) that has failed conventional (and unconventional) remedies. Three patients were evaluated for plasmapheresis because of ICRP. All 3 patients had previously been extensively treated with standard therapies for ICRP including: diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, cholestyramine, rifampicin, phenobarbital, doxepin, naltrexone, UV therapy, and topical lotions. Even multiple courses of plasmapheresis were performed without any benefit for the intractable pruritus. All patients reported significant decreases in their quality of life, including lack of sleep, depression, inability to work, and suicidal ideations. All patients were started on 5 mg of delta-9-THC (Marinol) at bedtime. All 3 patients reported a decrease in pruritus, marked improvement in sleep, and eventually were able to return to work. Resolution of depression occurred in two of three. Side effects related to the drug include one patient experiencing a disturbance in coordination. Marinol dosage was decreased to 2.5 mg in this patient with resolution of symptoms. The duration of antipruritic effect is approximately 4-6 hrs in all three patients suggesting the need for more frequent dosing. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol may be an effective alternative in patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus.

  6. Intractable colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Aytaç; Kuloğlu, Zarife; Doğu, Figen; İkincioğulları, Aydan; Ensari, Arzu; Çiftçi, Ergin; Kansu, Aydan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an autosomal recessive or X-linked disorder caused by NADPH oxidase deficiency leading to an impaired ability of reactive superoxide anion and metabolite formation and recurring severe bacterial and fungal infections, with a high mortality rate. Diarrhea, colitis, ileus, perirectal abscess formation and anal fissures are reported gastrointestinal findings in these patients. We report a case of intractable colitis associated with CGD in a young girl.

  7. Albumin liver dialysis as pregnancy-saving procedure in cholestatic liver disease and intractable pruritus.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Maud; Revaux, Aurelie; Francoz, Claire; Ducarme, Guillaume; Brechignac, Sabine; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Uzan, Michele; Ganne-Carrie, Nathalie

    2008-11-14

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC3) is a rare cholestatic liver disease. Such liver disease can get worse by female hormone disorder. Albumin dialysis or Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) has been reported to reverse severe cholestasis-linked pruritus. Here, we report the first use of MARS during a spontaneous pregnancy and its successful outcome in a patient with PFIC3 and intractable pruritus. Albumin dialysis could be considered as a pregnancy-saving procedure in pregnant women with severe cholestasis and refractory pruritus.

  8. Resting-State Functional MR Imaging for Determining Language Laterality in Intractable Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Douw, Linda; Leveroni, Catherine L; Buchbinder, Bradley R; Greve, Douglas N; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To measure the accuracy of resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in determining hemispheric language dominance in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies against the results of an intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects gave signed informed consent. Data in 23 patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All 23 patients were candidates for epilepsy surgery and underwent both IAP and resting-state functional MR imaging as part of presurgical evaluation. Language dominance was determined from functional MR imaging data by calculating a laterality index (LI) after using independent component analysis. The accuracy of this method was assessed against that of IAP by using a variety of thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using leave-one-out cross validation. Spatial maps of language components were qualitatively compared among each hemispheric language dominance group. Results Measurement of hemispheric language dominance with resting-state functional MR imaging was highly concordant with IAP results, with up to 96% (22 of 23) accuracy, 96% (22 of 23) sensitivity, and 96% (22 of 23) specificity. Composite language component maps in patients with typical language laterality consistently included classic language areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, the posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the inferior parietal lobule, while those of patients with atypical language laterality also included non-classical language areas such as the superior and middle frontal gyri, the insula, and the occipital cortex. Conclusion Resting-state functional MR imaging can be used to measure language laterality in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  9. Oral Mycostatin as a possible alternative treatment for intractable Ménière's disease: preliminary cohort study.

    PubMed

    Leong, A C; Pothier, D D; Rutka, J A

    2014-03-19

    Background: The potential efficacy of antifungal agents (e.g. Mycostatin) in treating acute attacks of Ménière's disease was first suggested in 1983 but few data have been published. Oral Mycostatin has been used as second-line medical treatment for intractable Ménière's disease at our institution for many years. Objective: This preliminary cohort study investigated the role of oral Mycostatin in intractable Ménière's disease. Methods: A retrospective review of patients with intractable Ménière's disease who started oral Mycostatin treatment between 2010 and 2012 was conducted. Results: Of 256 patients presenting with vertiginous disorders, 26 had definite Ménière's disease and had not responded to standard first-line treatment. Following oral Mycostatin treatment, improvements were reported for vertigo (n = 8), aural fullness (n = 7), tinnitus (n = 3) and subjective hearing loss (n = 3). Half of those with symptom improvement persisted with oral Mycostatin for two years and continued to remain asymptomatic. Conclusion: The use of oral Mycostatin to alleviate symptoms of intractable Ménière's disease showed promising results in this case series. Mycostatin may offer a safe and useful alternative for the management of Ménière's disease for patients with chronic unremitting symptoms in whom first-line treatment options have failed.

  10. Case report: a case of intractable Meniere's disease treated with autogenic training

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Kunihiro, Takanobu; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Background Psychological stress plays an important role in the onset and course of Meniere's disease. Surgical therapy and intratympanic gentamicin treatment are options for cases that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. Psychotherapy, however, including autogenic training (AT), which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of AT in a subject suffering from intractable Meniere's disease. Case presentation A 51-year-old male patient has suffered from fluctuating right sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo since 1994. In May 2002, he was first admitted to our hospital due to a severe vertigo attack accompanied by right sensorineural hearing loss. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the right side was observed. Since April 2004, he has experienced vertigo spells with right-sided tinnitus a few times per month that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. After four months, tympanic tube insertion was preformed in the right tympanic membrane. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone was ineffective. He refused Meniett therapy and intratympanic gentamicin injection. In addition to his vertigo spells, he suffered from insomnia, tinnitus, and anxiety. Tranquilizers such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants such as serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) failed to stop the vertigo and only slightly improved his insomnia. In December 2006, the patient began psychological counseling with a psychotherapist. After brief psychological counseling along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), he began AT. He diligently and regularly continued his AT training in his home according to a written timetable. His insomnia, tinnitus, and vertigo spells disappeared within a few weeks after only four psychotherapy sessions. In order to master the six standard formulas of AT, he underwent two more sessions. Thereafter, he underwent follow-up for 9 months with no additional treatment. He is now

  11. Intractable paroxysmal sneezing.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Pushkas; Browning, Simon T

    2002-11-01

    Intractable paroxysmal sneezing is a rare disease primarily affecting teenage girls. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl who demonstrated the classical features of intractable paroxysmal sneezing of psychogenic origin. Most of the reported cases are psychogenic in origin, but a number of other conditions may cause intractable paraoxysmal sneeze. Apart from a detailed history, clinical examination and relevant investigations, topical nasal anaesthesia should be tried for control of symptoms--that will help to differentiate psychogenic sneezing from organic sneezing. A timely diagnosis can avoid unnecessary medical trials, parental anxiety and poor school performance, as most of the patients are very young.

  12. [Delivery of medical care to the neurological intractable diseases at home].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Mieko

    2009-11-01

    It is the case of the great difficulties for patients living with neurological intractable diseases to visit outpatient when the diseases are in the progressive stage. The national nursing care insurance was matured and the revised medical insurance system led to open the local supportive clinic for home care in 2006. It has set easier access to medical care at home. This is encouraging for patients who wish to continue to live with their families at their long time home. The medical care at home is where the attending physician has to demonstrate the expertise of how to assemble in- and out- interdisciplinary medical team. Moving a hospital room simply into at home does not made a medical care at home. You have to begin recognizing what gaps needed to fill in between a hospital room and at home. This is the area beyond what a family doctor single-handedly deals with due to the nature of the diseases. The dual attending physician set-up is desirable including a family doctor and a specialist.

  13. The Government's role in regulating, coordinating, and standardizing the response to Alzheimer's disease: Anticipated international cooperation in the area of intractable and rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong

    2016-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has emphasized that aging of the population is inextricably linked to many other global public health issues, such as universal health coverage, non-communicable diseases, and disability. However, Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) estimates that 46.8 million elderly people worldwide were living with dementia in 2015. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and is the main cause of cognitive impairment. AD will affect 5-7 out of every 100 older adults who are age 60 years or over. In response to the serious challenge posed by AD, governments are expected to play an important role in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AD. As specific examples, i) the Japanese Government has instituted and supported regulations to encourage the development of AD drugs in order to accelerate research and development of innovative drugs; ii) the United States Government has cooperated with multiple partners such as non-governmental organizations in the response to AD; iii) Chinese governmental measures have standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment as part of the response to AD, including eligible patients, diagnostic criteria, therapeutic schedules, drug selection, and required inspections; iv) with political support from member governments, the European Union has issued guidelines and conducted clinical studies on medicines for the treatment of AD in order to ascertain the various stages of the disease and the relevance of biomarkers. AD is an intractable disease, so different countries need to share clinic trial information and cooperate in the conduct of those trials. International cooperation will play a key role in the response to other intractable and rare diseases.

  14. The Government's role in regulating, coordinating, and standardizing the response to Alzheimer's disease: Anticipated international cooperation in the area of intractable and rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qi; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Summary The World Health Organization (WHO) has emphasized that aging of the population is inextricably linked to many other global public health issues, such as universal health coverage, non-communicable diseases, and disability. However, Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) estimates that 46.8 million elderly people worldwide were living with dementia in 2015. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and is the main cause of cognitive impairment. AD will affect 5–7 out of every 100 older adults who are age 60 years or over. In response to the serious challenge posed by AD, governments are expected to play an important role in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AD. As specific examples, i) the Japanese Government has instituted and supported regulations to encourage the development of AD drugs in order to accelerate research and development of innovative drugs; ii) the United States Government has cooperated with multiple partners such as non-governmental organizations in the response to AD; iii) Chinese governmental measures have standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment as part of the response to AD, including eligible patients, diagnostic criteria, therapeutic schedules, drug selection, and required inspections; iv) with political support from member governments, the European Union has issued guidelines and conducted clinical studies on medicines for the treatment of AD in order to ascertain the various stages of the disease and the relevance of biomarkers. AD is an intractable disease, so different countries need to share clinic trial information and cooperate in the conduct of those trials. International cooperation will play a key role in the response to other intractable and rare diseases. PMID:27904818

  15. Social support associated with quality of life in home care patients with intractable neurological disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Tomoko; Ando, Eriko; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate what kinds of social supports contribute to the higher quality of life (QOL) of home care patients with intractable neurological disease. We investigated the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) and social supports to 74 patients with intractable neurological disease in a city of the Aichi prefecture, Japan. Association between WHOQOL and social supports was examined using multiple logistic regression analyses adjusting activities of daily living (ADL). High WHOQOL scores were associated with "attending patient gatherings held by the public health center," "having someone who will listen empathically to anxieties or troubles," and ADL. Physical health was associated with ADL, while psychological well-being was related to "having a hobby," "having someone who will listen," and "having a hospital for admission in emergencies." Patients not having someone who will listen were more likely to participate in the gatherings. The present findings suggest that having someone who will provide emotional support is important for home care patients with neurological diseases. Patient gatherings held by the public health center were expected to provide patients with emotional support.

  16. Perceptions regarding a range of work-related issues and corresponding support needs of individuals with an intractable disease

    PubMed Central

    Imahashi, Kumiko; Fukatsu, Reiko; Nakajima, Yasoichi; Nakamura, Megumi; Ito, Tateo; Horigome, Mariko; Haruna, Yuichiro; Noda, Tatsuya; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2016-01-01

    Summary A number of persons with an intractable disease (ID) experience work-related problems that could lead to job loss. The aim of this study was to ascertain perceptions regarding a range of work-related issues and corresponding support needs of individuals with an ID. Potential participants were people ages 15 to 64 with one of the 130 intractable chronic diseases designated in the Act to Comprehensively Support the Daily and Social Activities of Persons with Disabilities (Comprehensive Support for the Disabled Act). Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. With the assistance of patients' organizations, 3,000 questionnaires were mailed to potential participants. Questions included demographic characteristics, family concerns, employment/supported employment, work accommodations, and other aspects of life. Responses were received from 889 (29.6%) participants, and respondents had 57 IDs. Forty-six-point-seven percent of respondents reported being unemployed due to fatigue and/or long-term treatment. Nearly half of the unemployed respondents reported that they had been unable to work despite their willingness to do so. Common requests for accommodation included flexible work hours, working at home, and job/workplace modifications. Only 30% of respondents knew about job training programs and supported work available for persons with disabilities. The results of the study are relevant for employees, employers, and occupational health/human resource professionals. The issue of reasonable accommodations for persons with an ID needs to be addressed in future research in order to promote continued work by those persons. PMID:27672543

  17. Open microsurgical autograft of adrenal medulla to the right caudate nucleus in two patients with intractable Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Madrazo, I; Drucker-Colín, R; Díaz, V; Martínez-Mata, J; Torres, C; Becerril, J J

    1987-04-02

    Recent experimental studies and one clinical case have suggested that grafting tissue from the adrenal medulla into the brain may ameliorate the signs of Parkinson's disease. We describe the treatment of two young patients (35 and 39 years old) with intractable and incapacitating Parkinson's disease, in whom fragments of the adrenal medulla were autotransplanted to the right caudate nucleus. Clinical improvement was noted in both patients at 15 and 6 days (respectively) after implantation and has continued in both. Rigidity and akinesia had virtually disappeared in the first patient at 10 months after surgery, and his tremor was greatly reduced. A similar degree of improvement was present in the second patient at three months. We conclude that autografting of the adrenal medulla to the right caudate nucleus was associated with a marked improvement in the signs of Parkinson's disease in two patients, but our results are preliminary and further work is necessary to see whether this procedure will be applicable over the long term in other types of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  18. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  19. [The Terminal Phase of an Intractable Neurological Disease from the Viewpoint of Nursing Care: The Importance of the Promotion of a Barrier-Free Mind for ALS Care].

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koko

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a particularly serious intractable neurological disease. Patients with ALS have high mortality rates if they are not put on an artificial respirator. Even with an artificial respirator, individuals with ALS are forced to witness their own physical deterioration. Because 24 hour care is usually required, an intense relationship ofter develops between patients with ALS and family caregivers. This relationship forms an invisible barrier and can impede a smooth introduction of external services. As a result, there can be a degradation in the quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the voluntary efforts of patients and family caregivers in order to break down this barrier and to discuss what types of care support are available to promote barrier-free minds.

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt for the Treatment of Intractable Ascites in a Patient with Polycystic Liver Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramipour, Phillip F.; Festa, Steven; Biswal, Rajiv; Wachsberg, Ronald H.

    2000-03-15

    Though polycystic liver disease (PCLD) has historically been considered a contraindication to TIPS, we present a case where technically successful shunt creation was achieved without the need for modification of the standard TIPS procedure, as was required in a previous report.

  1. Metabolic treatments for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Sarah A; Hartman, Adam L

    2011-09-01

    When a child on anticonvulsant medications continues to have seizures, what other options should be considered? Over the past 100 years, dietary therapies for the treatment of intractable epilepsy have become more widely recognized, and their use has continued to expand throughout the world. An increasing number of studies has shown efficacy of these metabolic treatments in improving seizure control. Currently, 4 types of dietary therapy are available in the clinic: the classic long chain fatty acid "ketogenic" diet, the medium chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, and the low glycemic index treatment. These therapies should be considered earlier in the treatment of intractable epilepsy because they offer a different approach to treatment that has proven efficacious, tolerable, and cost-effective.

  2. Mining disease state converters for medical intervention of diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guozhu; Duan, Lei; Tang, Changjie

    2010-02-01

    In applications such as gene therapy and drug design, a key goal is to convert the disease state of diseased objects from an undesirable state into a desirable one. Such conversions may be achieved by changing the values of some attributes of the objects. For example, in gene therapy one may convert cancerous cells to normal ones by changing some genes' expression level from low to high or from high to low. In this paper, we define the disease state conversion problem as the discovery of disease state converters; a disease state converter is a small set of attribute value changes that may change an object's disease state from undesirable into desirable. We consider two variants of this problem: personalized disease state converter mining mines disease state converters for a given individual patient with a given disease, and universal disease state converter mining mines disease state converters for all samples with a given disease. We propose a DSCMiner algorithm to discover small and highly effective disease state converters. Since real-life medical experiments on living diseased instances are expensive and time consuming, we use classifiers trained from the datasets of given diseases to evaluate the quality of discovered converter sets. The effectiveness of a disease state converter is measured by the percentage of objects that are successfully converted from undesirable state into desirable state as deemed by state-of-the-art classifiers. We use experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of our algorithm and to show its effectiveness. We also discuss possible research directions for extensions and improvements. We note that the disease state conversion problem also has applications in customer retention, criminal rehabilitation, and company turn-around, where the goal is to convert class membership of objects whose class is an undesirable class.

  3. [Clinical managements for intractable pneumothorax with interstitial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, H; Kurihara, M

    2011-04-01

    Intractable pneumothorax with interstitial pneumonia (IP) is famous for the disease finally to lead to death in case of persistent air leakage. It is because severe infection, respiratory insufficiency and tissue healing insufficiency by treatments with steroid hormones and immune-suppressants on IP. Pleurodesis is generally performed although the effect of it is questionable. It is important to stop immune-suppressants and reduce steroid hormones before the treatments to succeed in thoracoscopic surgery and thoracographic fibrin glue sealing method (TGF) if possible. Less invasive interventional treatments like TGF are recommendable because intractable pneumothorax with IP is in the high risk group to need to avoid surgery. Hand suturing, looping, covering and putting TachoComb on the air leak point instead of end-stapling should be performed in order to stop air leakage when forced to choose thoracoscopic surgery.

  4. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  5. Intractable diarrhoea of infancy and latent otomastoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Salazar de Sousa, J; da Silva, A; da Costa Ribeiro, V

    1980-01-01

    In 16 infants with intractable diarrhoea, latent otomastoiditis was found in 9 (3 at necropsy and 6 at myringotomy-antrotomy). In 5 of the 6 operated group, surgery was followed by a striking cessation of the diarrhoea and with weight gain. It is concluded that (1) latent otomastoiditis may be a perpetuating factor in intractable diarrhoea; (2) myringotomy-antrotomy should be considered if other forms of treatment have failed, and especially if there is leucocytosis; (3) mastoiditis with diffuse osteitis seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:7458392

  6. Diagnostic surgical neuropathology of intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Arai, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Komori, Takashi; Yagishita, Akira; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2007-12-01

    As neurosurgical treatments have been increasingly applied to patients who have intractable epilepsy, much knowledge on pathological changes in surgically removed brain tissues have become clearer in recent years, as well as on the neuroimaging findings which are analyzed with a variety of techniques, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in combination with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM), statistical parametric mapping (SPM), subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) and/or PET-guided intraoperative navigation system, as mentioned in detain in another article in this issue by Maehara et al. Representative and relatively common diseases, treated by epilepsy-surgery, are as follows; hippocampal sclerosis, amygdaloid sclerosis, coarse and macroscopic brain malformation (focal cortical dysplasia, hemimegalencephaly, tuberous sclerosis), tumors (dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, ganglioglioma, etc.), destructive lesions and the others. It is a fact, however, that there remains many problems in the diagnostic criteria or histological grading systems, especially in various cortical dysplasias described above. On the other hand, histologically minor but clinically serious lesions have become to be known through careful observations on surgically removed tissues which showed no neuroradiological findings. A good well-known example is microdysgenesis of the cerebrum which is characterized by the presence of both the white mater ectopic neurons and the vascular meandering abnormalities with glial satellitosis. There must be another important histological phenotypes of microdysgenesis, except the above-mentioned ones, that are not yet established at present. Therefore, it is believed that there remains various problems on the diagnostic neuropathology of epileptic lesions with or without neuroimaging findings in which

  7. Efficacy of the Atkins diet as therapy for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kossoff, Eric H; Krauss, Gregory L; McGrogan, Jane R; Freeman, John M

    2003-12-23

    The ketogenic diet is effective for treating seizures in children with epilepsy. The Atkins diet can also induce a ketotic state, but has fewer protein and caloric restrictions, and has been used safely by millions of people worldwide for weight reduction. Six patients, aged 7 to 52 years, were started on the Atkins diet for the treatment of intractable focal and multifocal epilepsy. Five patients maintained moderate to large ketosis for periods of 6 weeks to 24 months; three patients had seizure reduction and were able to reduce antiepileptic medications. This provides preliminary evidence that the Atkins diet may have a role as therapy for patients with medically resistant epilepsy.

  8. Summary of notifiable diseases --- United States, 2005.

    PubMed

    McNabb, Scott J N; Jajosky, Ruth Ann; Hall-Baker, Patsy A; Adams, Deborah A; Sharp, Pearl; Anderson, Willie J; Javier, Aponte J; Jones, Gerald J; Nitschke, David A; Worshams, Carol A; Richard, Roland A

    2007-03-30

    The Summary of Notifiable Diseases --- United States, 2005 contains the official statistics, in tabular and graphic form, for the reported occurrence of nationally notifiable infectious diseases in the United States for 2005. Unless otherwise noted, the data are final totals for 2005 reported as of June 30, 2006. These statistics are collected and compiled from reports sent by state health departments to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), which is operated by CDC in collaboration with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). The Summary is available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/summary.html. This site also includes publications from previous years.

  9. State electronic disease surveillance systems --- United States, 2007 and 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-10-21

    The National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) is a web-based infrastructure for public health surveillance data exchange between CDC and the 50 states. In 2007, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) conducted an assessment to evaluate states' electronic disease surveillance capacity. In 2010, CSTE conducted a follow-up assessment to evaluate the operational status and progress of integration, interoperability, and capacity of state electronic disease surveillance systems. This report summarizes the results of that assessment, which indicated a 17.5% increase from 40 states in 2007 to 47 states in 2010 with fully operational general communicable disease (GCD) electronic surveillance systems, a 211.5% increase from 13 to 39 states in the number of systems that were interoperable, a 22.4% increase from 23 to 34 states in the number with integrated systems, and a 20.0% increase to 42 states with the capacity to receive electronic laboratory reports (ELRs). New Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rules for meaningful use of health information technology encourage data exchange between electronic health record systems and public health agencies, including submission of ELRs. To meet national goals for health information exchange to improve population health, variation in disease surveillance systems should decrease, and functionality should increase.

  10. State-level Zoonotic Disease Surveillance in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Scotch, Matthew; Rabinowitz, Peter; Brandt, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Summary Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, yet recent commissions have highlighted deficiencies in their surveillance. We conducted a survey to understand the needs of state agencies for zoonotic disease surveillance. The findings will hopefully support the development of biomedical informatics applications that can link animal and human data for surveillance. PMID:21824354

  11. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  12. Late-onset of immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked syndrome (IPEX) with intractable diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zama, Daniele; Cocchi, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo; Specchia, Fernando; Alvisi, Patrizia; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lima, Mario; Pession, Andrea

    2014-10-18

    The syndrome of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. Diarrhea, diabetes and dermatitis are the hallmark of the disease, with a typical onset within the first months of life. We describe the case of a twelve-year old male affected by a very late-onset IPEX with intractable enteropathy, which markedly improved after starting Sirolimus as second-line treatment. This case suggests that IPEX should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of watery intractable diarrhea, despite its unusual onset.

  13. Intractable Seizures and Rehabilitation in Ciguatera Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Derian, Armen; Khurana, Seema; Rothenberg, Joshua; Plumlee, Charles

    2016-08-31

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most frequently reported seafood toxin illness associated with the ingestion of contaminated tropical fish. Diagnosis relies on a history of recent tropical fish ingestion and subsequent development of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological symptoms. Ciguatera poisoning usually has a self-limited time course, and its management involves symptomatic control and supportive care. This case report presents an uncommon case of ciguatera poisoning with prolonged intractable seizures refractory to standard antiseizure medications. The patient also had significant functional decline that responded to rigorous inpatient rehabilitation not previously described in literature.

  14. Summary of Notifiable Diseases, United States, 1993.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    fever , and typhus fever (tick-borne) as Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). The tables show the number of cases of notifiable...United States. N EngI J Med 1987;316:421-8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Burgdorfer W, Anacker FL, eds. Rickettsiae and Rickettsial Diseases...55 17 * Rocky Mountain spotted fever . SUMMARY TABLES —1993 NOTIFIABLE DISEASES — reported cases, by geographic division and area,

  15. Study on expression of laminin in patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan; Feng, Yun; Pang, Jia-Rong; Tang, Mei; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Jia-Quan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined differences in serum laminin expression in patients with intractable epilepsy. Our results suggest that elevated laminin may contribute to the pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy. ELISA and western blots were used to measure laminin in the serum of 30 intractable epilepsy patients, 46 nonintractable epilepsy patients, and 20 normal subjects. By ELISA, serum laminin levels were greater in intractable epilepsy patients (177.396 +/- 30.602) and nonintractable epilepsy patients (121.915 +/- 35.215) than in normal control subjects (67.474 +/- 7.197); laminin was significantly greater in the intractable epilepsy group than in the nonintractable epilepsy group. In western blots, the optical density ratio of laminin to ss-actin was 0.871 +/- 0.032 for the intractable epilepsy group, 0.686 +/- 0.017 for the nonintractable epilepsy group, and 0.385 +/- 0.024 for the normal control group. The optical density ratios of the intractable and nonintractable epilepsy groups were higher than those for the normal control group, and the intractable epilepsy group was even greater than the nonintractable epilepsy group. Thus, laminin is significantly increased in epilepsy patients, and this increase is more profound in intractable epilepsy patients.

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amar, Arun Paul

    2007-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation is a safe and reliable treatment adjunct for patients with medically intractable epilepsy. It is both a preventive and abortive form of therapy, potentially effective against both partial and generalized seizures in adults and children. Vagus nerve stimulation also has a number of serendipitous effects on mood, memory and attention, and has been approved for the treatment of refractory depression. Owing to its pleiotropic effects, it also holds promise for several other diseases. Its principal limitations are its unknown mechanism of action, the low likelihood of complete cure and the inability to predict which patients will derive substantial benefit. This article reviews the theoretical rationale, practical background and clinical applications of vagus nerve stimulation therapy.

  17. The diabetes disease state management exemplar.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Lynne; Carter, Becky; Helsley, Anne; Ernest, Janice K; Friesner, Dan

    2010-01-01

    One relatively new method of providing care to patients with chronic disease is disease state management (DSM). Diabetes is particularly interesting to study because it is not only one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, but it is also a disease for which DSM is highly cost effective. Similarly, registered nurses represent the group of practitioners most likely to provide a comprehensive set of DSM activities. This experiment was conducted in fall 2005 at a nationally recognized diabetes center which is affiliated with a large, full service medical center. The results suggest at least three forms of content delivery--in-class, at-home study packets, and online modules--are all equally effective at enhancing diabetes DSM knowledge.

  18. The Gandhi Technique: A New Procedure for Intractable Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiff, Neil P.; Belson, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Notes problem of treating clients with intractable difficulties. Presents Gandhi Technique as simple, dramatic and seemingly effective procedure to resolve intractable difficulties. Describes technique and its application in different cases. Discusses several theories which may account for the efficacy of the technique. Proposes that Gandhi…

  19. Serum hypercoagulability states in Coats’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Fariba; Shields, Carol L; Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Nili Ahmadabadi, Mehdi; Morsali, Fatemeh; Sabour, Siamak

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum hypercoagulability state and common viral and protozoan infections in Coats’ disease versus a normal control group. Materials and methods In this comparative case series, 22 consecutive patients with Coats’ disease and 19 non-Coats’ patients undergoing lensectomy for congenital, traumatic, or senile cataract between January 2011 and June 2014 were included. Laboratory data for hypercoagulability states and common viral and protozoan infections were investigated. Results The mean age for the Coats’ group was 14.5 years (median 8 years, range: 2 months to 59 years), and for the control group it was 30.6 years (median 17 years, range: 2–82 years). In patients aged 10 years or younger, anticytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G (IgG) (P≤0.01), homocysteine (P=0.03), and serum beta globulin (P<0.001) were associated with Coats’ disease. In those older than 10 years, higher serum protein S (P=0.04), beta globulin (P=0.05), and gamma globulin (P=0.04) were related to Coats’ diagnosis. After adjusting for sex and age as confounding factors, only beta globulin was found to be associated with Coats’ disease in logistic regression analysis (odds ratio: 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.0–3.1, P=0.02). Conclusion Serum beta globulin levels appear to be elevated in patients with Coats’ disease. PMID:28223774

  20. Intractable sneezing: is it always psychogenic?

    PubMed

    Sulemanji, Mustafa N; Kanbur, Nuray O; Derman, Orhan; Pehlivantürk, Berna; Hoşal, Sefik A; Sekerel, Bülent E

    2011-01-01

    Intractable sneezing is not a commonly encountered disorder. The clinical presentation of such patients may cause the physician to undertake several tests before making a diagnosis. Are the performed analytic tests a waste of the health service funds or are they really sufficient? In this case, after undergoing several tests to rule out potential causes of the prevailing symptoms, psychiatric evaluation revealed a triggering event that contributed to the diagnosis of psychogenic sneezing. This specific case demonstrates why the diagnosis of psychogenic sneezing is difficult. An overwhelming number of such patients may be linked to a psychogenic cause; nevertheless, organic lesions or causes should be carefully excluded. Addressing the psychosocial issues through psychotherapy and coincidental use of locally administered anesthesia assisted in resolving the symptoms.

  1. Oral Azithromycin for Treatment of Intractable Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Yoon Seok

    2011-01-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic cutaneous disorder that primarily occurs on the convex surfaces of the central face and is often characterized by exacerbations and remissions. A case of a 52-yr-old woman visited our clinic in February 2008 complaining typical features of rosacea including multiple pinhead to rice-sized erythematous papules. We applied various conventional treatments including topical benzoyl peroxide and metronidazole as well as oral metronidazole, isotretinoin, and doxycycline. The lesions were not controlled but were rather aggravated by complications from these treatments. Therefore, we prescribed oral azithromycin, which has anti-inflammatory effects and reduces reactive oxygen species. Ten weeks after the administration of oral azithromycin, 500 mg per day for 2 weeks, the lesions had mostly disappeared and no specific side effects related to the azithromycin were noted. Oral azithromycin dosing 500 mg/day for 2 weeks is effective for treatment of intractable rosacea. PMID:21532865

  2. Microcatheter Embolization of Intractable Idiopathic Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, Martti; Seppaenen, Seppo; Laranne, Jussi; Kuoppala, Katriina

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of microcatheter embolization in the treatment of intractable idiopathic epistaxis. Methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent microcatheter embolization in 1991-1998. We evaluated retrospectively the technical and clinical outcome, the number of complications, the duration of embolization in each case, and the number of blood transfusions needed. All embolizations were done with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) equipment. The procedure was carried out under local anesthesia using transfemoral catheterization, except in one case where the translumbar route was used. Tracker 18 or 10 microcatheters were advanced as far as possible to the distal branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles were used for embolization in most cases, while platinum coils or a combination of these two materials were occasionally used. The primary outcome was always assessed immediately by angiography. Follow-up data were obtained from patient records, by interviewing patients on the telephone or by postal questionnaires when necessary. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. Results: The embolization was technically successful in all 37 cases. A curative outcome was achieved in 33 cases (89%). The mean duration of the procedure was 110 min. Four patients (8%) had mild transient complications, but no severe or persistent complications were encountered. Twenty-three patients needed a blood transfusion. Slight rebleeding occurred in three patients during the follow-up; all responded to conservative treatment. One patient suffered two episodes of rebleeding within 2 months after primary embolization. Re-embolizations successfully stopped the bleeding. Conclusion: Embolization is the primary invasive modality for treating intractable idiopathic epistaxis. It proved both safe and effective over a relatively long follow-up.

  3. Prominent emerging diseases within the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cipriano, R.C.; Bowser, A.; Dove, A.; Goodwin, A.; Puzach, C.; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript reviews disease syndromes that have become significant aquatic animal health issues within the United States since 2003. The emergence of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) disease among wild fish in the Great Lakes is probably the most problematic and political issue. The emergence of this pathogen resulted in the issuance of a 2006 VHSV Federal order that placed restrictions on the movement of certain species of fish in the eight states that border the Great Lakes (New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin and Minnesota) as well as the movement of live fish into the United States from the Ontario and Quebec Provinces, Canada. Spring Viremia of Carp (SVC) was identified for the first times in the United States during 2002. It was diagnosed as the source of mortality among koi at a private facility in North Carolina as well as from feral carp in Cedar Lake (WI). In 2004, Koi Herpesvirus (KHV) killed 8,000 adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Chadakoin River (NY); it reoccurred the next year within Chautauqua Lake (NY), killing an estimated 25,000 carp (20–30 lbs. apiece). During the summers of 2007 and 2008, KHV epizootics also occurred among carp in Ontario (Canada). Finally, outbreaks of epizootic shell disease in American lobster (Homarus americanus) have generated concern along the southern New England coast and eastern Long Island Sound. The prevalence and severity of shell disease have increased within inshore areas of southern New England and resulted in significant decreases in lobster catches and marketability.

  4. State of the art: von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    James, A H; Eikenboom, J; Federici, A B

    2016-07-01

    The State of the Art in von Willebrand disease (VWD) has been impacted not only by discoveries in the field of haemostasis, but also by changes in practice in other fields. The development of bleeding assessment tools has led to the clarification of bleeding symptoms and phenotype in VWD. New discoveries in the biology and genetics of von Willebrand factor (VWF) are challenging our existing diagnostics and classification(s). An improved understanding of reproductive physiology and the pathology of VWD along with changing obstetric, gynaecologic and haemostatic therapies necessitate an evolving response to the care of women with VWD. The survival of patients with autoimmune disease, malignancies and congenital heart disease along with increasing use of circulatory support devices and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is increasing the prevalence of acquired von Willebrand syndrome. In each of these challenges, there are opportunities to improve the care of our patients with VWD.

  5. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  6. Cell mechanics and human disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Subra

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will provide summary of our very recent studies exploring the effects of biochemical factors, influenced by foreign organisms or in vivo processes, on intracellular structural reorganization, single-cell mechanical response and motility of a population of cells in the context of two human diseases: malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites that invade red blood cells, and gastrointestinal cancer metastasis involving epithelial cells. In both cases, particular attention will be devoted to systematic changes induced in specific molecular species in response to controlled alterations in disease state. The role of critical proteins in influencing the mechanical response of human red bloods during the intra-erythrocytic development of P. falciparum merozoites has also been assessed quantitatively using specific protein knock-out experiments by recourse to gene inactivation methods. Single-cell mechanical response characterization entails such tools as optical tweezers and mechanical plate stretchers whereas cell motility assays and cell-population biorheology characterization involves microfluidic channels. The experimental studies are accompanied by three-dimensional computational simulations at the continuum and mesoscopic scales of cell deformation. An outcome of such combined experimental and computational biophysical studies is the realization of how chemical factors influence single-cell mechanical response, cytoadherence, the biorheology of a large population of cells through microchannels representative of in vivo conditions, and the onset and progression of disease states.

  7. Intractable yawning associated with mature teratoma of the supramedial cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Saura, Hiroaki; Beppu, Takaaki; Matsuura, Hideki; Asahi, Shigeki; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Makoto; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2014-08-01

    Yawning occurs in various conditions such as hypoxia, epilepsy, and sleep disorders including sleep apnea. Intractable yawning associated with a brain tumor has been rarely reported. A 19-year-old woman presented with intractable yawning. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumor in the supramedial cerebellum that compressed the dorsal side of the midbrain and upper pons. After subtotal removal of the tumor, the yawning completely disappeared. Postoperative MRI showed resolution of compression of the brainstem. The tumor was histologically diagnosed as a mature teratoma. The present case suggested that the intractable yawning resulted from the tumor compressing the dorsal side of the junction between the midbrain and pons.

  8. Potential Use and Challenges of Functional Connectivity Mapping in Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Constable, Robert Todd; Scheinost, Dustin; Finn, Emily S.; Shen, Xilin; Hampson, Michelle; Winstanley, F. Scott; Spencer, Dennis D.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess functional connectivity in the human brain and its application in intractable epilepsy. This approach has the potential to predict outcomes for a given surgical procedure based on the pre-surgical functional organization of the brain. Functional connectivity can also identify cortical regions that are organized differently in epilepsy patients either as a direct function of the disease or through indirect compensatory responses. Functional connectivity mapping may help identify epileptogenic tissue, whether this is a single focal location or a network of seizure-generating tissues. This review covers the basics of connectivity analysis and discusses particular issues associated with analyzing such data. These issues include how to define nodes, as well as differences between connectivity analyses of individual nodes, groups of nodes, and whole-brain assessment at the voxel level. The need for arbitrary thresholds in some connectivity analyses is discussed and a solution to this problem is reviewed. Overall, functional connectivity analysis is becoming an important tool for assessing functional brain organization in epilepsy. PMID:23734143

  9. Mechanisms of Cachexia in Chronic Disease States.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia and cachexia are muscle wasting syndromes associated with aging and with many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF), diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). While mechanisms are complex, these conditions are often accompanied by elevated angiotensin II (Ang II). Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. It was found that Ang II infusion in rodents leads to skeletal muscle wasting. Ang II increases cytokines and circulating hormones, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A and glucocorticoids, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II-induced muscle wasting is caused by alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling, enhanced muscle protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome system and decreased appetite resulting from the downregulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides, such as Npy and orexin. Ang II also inhibits 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity and disrupts normal energy balance via the activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2Cα. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits skeletal muscle stem (satellite) cell proliferation, leading to lowered muscle regenerative capacity. Distinct satellite cell angiotensin receptor subtypes have different effects on different stages of differentiation and are critical for the regulation of muscle regeneration. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in mechanisms underlying cachexia in chronic disease states, and it is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with diseases such as CHF and CKD.

  10. Insulin receptors in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, G; Taylor, S I; Dons, R F; Gorden, P

    1983-03-01

    The binding of insulin to its receptor has been studied under various physiological and pathological conditions. Quantitative studies have involved human circulating cells such as monocytes and erythrocytes, adipocytes, placental cells, and cultured cells such as fibroblasts and transformed lymphocytes. In animals, other target tissues such as liver and muscle have been studied and correlated with the human studies. Various physiological conditions such as diurnal rhythm, diet, age, exercise and the menstrual cycle affect insulin binding; in addition, many drugs perturb the receptor interaction. Disease affecting the insulin receptor can be divided into five general categories: (1) Receptor regulation--this involves diseases characterized by hyper- or hypoinsulinaemia. Hyperinsulinaemia in the basal state usually leads to receptor 'down' regulation as seen in obesity, type II diabetes, acromegaly and islet cell tumours. Hypoinsulinaemia such as seen in anorexia nervosa or type I diabetes may lead to elevated binding. (2) Antireceptor antibodies--these immunoglobulins bind to the receptor and competitively inhibit insulin binding. They may act as agonists, antagonists or partial agonists. (3) Genetic diseases which produce fixed alterations in both freshly isolated and cultured cells. (4) Diseases of receptor specificity where insulin may bind with different affinity to its own receptor or related receptors such as receptors for insulin-like growth factors. (5) Disease of affinity modulation where physical factors such as pH, temperature, ions, etc. may modify binding. In this review, we have considered primarily abnormality in insulin receptor binding. There are numerous other functions of the receptor such as coupling and transmission of the biological signal. These mechanisms are frequently referred to as postreceptor events, but more properly should be referred to as postbinding events since the receptor subserves other functions in addition to recognition and

  11. Epidemiology of Lyme disease in low-incidence states.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Brett, Meghan; Matthias, James; Stanek, Danielle; Springs, Chasisity Brown; Marsden-Haug, Nicola; Oltean, Hanna; Baker, JoDee Summers; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S; Hinckley, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the U.S. Surveillance data from four states with a low-incidence of Lyme disease was evaluated. Most cases occurred after travel to high-incidence Lyme disease areas. Cases without travel-related exposure in low-incidence states differed epidemiologically; misdiagnosis may be common in these areas.

  12. [Juvenile haemochromatosis presenting as intractable congestive heart failure].

    PubMed

    Vas, Katalin; Hubay, Marta; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Zoltán, Sápi; Jánosi, András

    2005-12-18

    Juvenile haemochromatosis is an autosomal, recessive inherited iron metabolism disorder. The rapid deterioration and malignant prognosis differentiate juvenile haemochromatosis from hereditary haemochromatosis. The authors summarize the history of a 25 year old man, who worked in Hungary as a guest worker living in Romania. No significant illness has occurred in his previous history. The abdominal pain was his first symptom and he was treated in different institutions, where cholecystitis, alcoholic hepatic disease, hepatic cirrhosis were considered as a cause of his symptoms. Some weeks later atrial tachycardia, and congestive heart failure were observed and he was sent to our Cardiology Department. The echocardiography revealed diffuse hypokinesis, serious systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction: 21%), grade II mitral and tricuspid insufficiency with pulmonary hypertension. Considering the rapid deterioration of his cardiac function, myocarditis was suspected. Myocardial biopsy and coronary arteriography were performed. Coronary arteries were normal. Ventricular fibrillation occurred during coronary arteriography. Myocardial biopsy revealed juvenile haemochromatosis. Special laboratory examinations (transferrin saturation) were made after biopsy, that also confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile haemochromatosis. Cardiac transplantation was planned. Some days after the diagnosis was made the patient died of cardiogenic shock and intractable heart failure. Autopsy revealed hypogonadism and serious haemochromatosis in different parenchymal organs. Juvenile haemochromatosis should be considered in every young patient with congestive heart failure of unknown etiology.

  13. Update on the use of rituximab for intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Looney, R John

    2009-01-01

    It has been 3 years since rituximab, a mouse x human chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that selectively depleted B cells, was approved by the FDA for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with an inadequate response to anti-TNF therapies. Since approval rituximab has become a part of standard treatment, and additional data have become available on long-term efficacy and safety both from clinical trials and from post-marketing surveillance. In open long-term follow-up from clinical trials, patients treated with multiple courses of rituximab continued to respond in terms of signs and symptoms, and damage assessed radiographically was significantly inhibited. Moreover, the rate of serious infectious events was not increased as the number of courses increased. However, because of case reports of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients treated with rituximab for non-malignant conditions, a black box warning has been added. Studies on the immunologic correlates of response to rituximab treatment including B cell subsets in peripheral blood and synovial biopsies are providing clues into how rituximab works for autoimmune disease. However, at this time we are not able to explain why some patients do not respond and cannot predict who will respond. Future challenges for the further development of rituximab for intractable RA will be discussed. PMID:27789983

  14. Summary of Notifiable Diseases, United States. Volume 45, Number 53.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-31

    States, 1996 (continued) Measles Meningo- coccal disease Mumps Pertussis Plague Polio - myelitis, Area Indigenous Imported* paralytic UNITED...disease Hansen disease (leprosy) Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome Hemolytic uremic syndrome, post-diarrheal Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis, C/ non ...A, non -B HIV infection, pediatric Legionellosis Lyme disease Malaria Measles (Rubeola) Meningococcal disease Mumps Pertussis Plague

  15. Intractable itch relieved by 4-phenylbutyrate therapy in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1), an inherited liver disease caused by mutations in ATP8B1, progresses to severe cholestasis with a sustained intractable itch. Currently, no effective therapy has been established for PFIC1. Decreased function of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) in hepatocytes is suggested to be responsible for the severe cholestasis observed in PFIC1. We found a previously unidentified pharmacological effect of 4-phenylbutyrate (4PB) that increases the expression and function of BSEP. Here, we tested 4PB therapy in three patients with PFIC1. Methods The therapeutic potency of 4PB in these patients was tested by oral administration of this drug with gradually increasing dosage (200, 350, and 500 mg/kg/day) for 6 months. Biochemical, histological, and clinical data were collected. Results 4PB therapy had no beneficial effect on the patients’ liver functions, as assessed by biochemical and histological analyses, despite an increase in hepatic BSEP expression. However, therapy with 4PB at a dosage of 350 or 500 mg/kg/day significantly relieved the intractable itch. Serum levels of potential pruritogens in cholestasis were much higher than the reference ranges during the 4PB therapy. Conclusions 4PB therapy may be a new medication for patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus and may improve quality of life for patients and their families. PMID:25022842

  16. Grey matter heterotopia: an unusual association of intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Stafford Johnson, D B; Brennan, P; Dwyer, A J; Toland, J

    1997-01-01

    Heterotopic grey matter is an abnormality of neuronal migration that has been reported in association with refractory epilepsy. In this study we reviewed the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging records of all patients undergoing MR scanning for evaluation of intractable epilepsy and identified sixteen patients who had grey matter heterotopia. The distribution of the grey matter heterotopia was periventricular in 9 patients, laminar in 3 and was in a "band" form in 4 patients. Congenital anomalies associated with grey matter heterotopia in this study included polymicrogyria in one patient and absence of the corpus callosum in 2 patients. Grey matter heterotopia is an important MR finding in patients with intractable epilepsy.

  17. Expression of laminin β1 and integrin α2 in the anterior temporal neocortex tissue of patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-feng; Mo, Xue-an; Li, Jing-mei; Yuan, Jie; Zheng, Jin-ou; Feng, Yun; Tang, Mei

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the expression of laminin β1 and integrin α2 in the anterior temporal neocortex tissue of patients with intractable epilepsy and explored the role of these molecules in the pathogenesis of this disease. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to test the expression of laminin β1 and integrin α2 in samples (from the brain bank of our department, n=32) of surgically removed anterior temporal neocortex tissues from intractable epilepsy patients, and the results were compared with those of controls (n=10). We found that laminin β1 and integrin α2 protein expression was significantly increased in the anterior temporal neocortex as compared with controls (immunohistochemistry optical density: laminin β1 = 0.36 ± 0.01 vs. 0.10 ± 0.03 for control; integrin α2=0.42 ± 0.02 vs. 0.04 ± 0.01 for control; p<.05). Immunofluorescence staining indicated that laminin β1 and integrin α2 accumulated in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, with strong fluorescence intensity in the anterior temporal neocortex tissue of patients with intractable epilepsy. Thus, our work demonstrates that laminin β1 and integrin α2 expression is elevated in the anterior temporal neocortex tissue from patients with intractable epilepsy.

  18. Early Career Teacher Attrition: New Thoughts on an Intractable Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Andrea; Riley, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Early career exit from teaching has reached epidemic proportions and appears intractable. Previous attempts to find solutions are yet to make much of an inroad. The aim of the research was to discover what nine beginning teachers required to remain in the classroom, by adopting a phenomenological approach. The authors identified participants'…

  19. Rethinking intractable conflict: the perspective of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Vallacher, Robin R; Coleman, Peter T; Nowak, Andrzej; Bui-Wrzosinska, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Intractable conflicts are demoralizing. Beyond destabilizing the families, communities, or international regions in which they occur, they tend to perpetuate the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Although the common factors and processes associated with intractable conflicts have been identified through research, they represent an embarrassment of riches for theory construction. Thus, the current task in this area is integrating these diverse factors into an account that provides a coherent perspective yet allows for prediction and a basis for conflict resolution in specific conflict settings. We suggest that the perspective of dynamical systems provides such an account. This article outlines the key concepts and hypotheses associated with this approach. It is organized around a set of basic questions concerning intractable conflict for which the dynamical perspective offers fresh insight and testable propositions. The questions and answers are intended to provide readers with basic concepts and principles of complexity and dynamical systems that are useful for rethinking the nature of intractable conflict and the means by which such conflict can be transformed.

  20. Geographic Distribution and Expansion of Human Lyme Disease, United States.

    PubMed

    Kugeler, Kiersten J; Farley, Grace M; Forrester, Joseph D; Mead, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease occurs in specific geographic regions of the United States. We present a method for defining high-risk counties based on observed versus expected number of reported human Lyme disease cases. Applying this method to successive periods shows substantial geographic expansion of counties at high risk for Lyme disease.

  1. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney diseases, obesity, weight and more Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Health tips from Dr. Griffin Rodgers, Director ... Research Metabolic Clinical Research Unit Volunteers Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Expand Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Archive Broadcasting ...

  2. [Management of intractable cancer pain: from intrathecal morphine to cell allograft].

    PubMed

    Lazorthes, Y; Sallerin, B; Verdie, J C; Sol, J C; Duplan, H; Tkaczuk, J; Tafani, M; Bastide, R; Bes, J C

    2000-11-01

    The durable effectiveness of intrathecal morphine administration is well established for the management of intractable cancer pain, after failure of systemic opioids, secondary to the persistence of non-reversible undesirable side effects. Many patients are referred to late in the disease course. This conservative method to control pain of malignant origin must not be reserved for last resort treatment for terminal patients. Intra-cerebro-ventricular morphine administration is a very effective and generally safe method for controlling intractable cancer pain. Because of the chronic implantation of an intra-ventricular catheter this method is somewhat invasive. Its indications remain a simple and effective alternative when the topography of nociceptive pain is diffuse or cephalic. In clinical practice, intrathecal and/or intra-cerebro-ventricular administration of opioids is limited by cost, the need for specialized maintenance and mechanical malfunctions if implantable drug delivery systems, or by the risk of bacterial contamination and ambulatory constraints when repeated daily injections via an intrathecal access port are used. To answer these limitations, cell therapy using intrathecal chromaffin cell allograft is a promising approach for the management of cancer pain refractory to traditional drug therapy and pain lesion surgery. The basic rationale and preclinical studies on experimental pain models have enabled starting prospective clinical trials. Prior to transplantation, handling and preparation of the chromaffin tissue is critical for allograft viability. The initial results of clinical trials with human chromaffin cell grafts from intractable cancer pain have reported long-lasting pain relief, in correlation with met-enkephalin release into the CSF. Convincing evidence will require controlled studies. The limitations of this innovative cell therapy and especially the lack of human adrenal gland availability point to the need for new sources of cells

  3. Role of biologics in intractable urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Andrew; Bulkhi, Adeeb; Casale, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common condition faced by many clinicians. CU has been estimated to affect approximately 0.5%–1% of the population, with nearly 20% of sufferers remaining symptomatic 20 years after onset. Antihistamines are the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, nearly half of these patients will fail this first-line therapy and require other medication, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Recent advances in our understanding of urticarial disorders have led to more targeted therapeutic options for CU and other urticarial diseases. The specific biologic agents most investigated for antihistamine-refractory CU are omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Of these, the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab is the best studied, and has recently been approved for the management of CU. Other agents, such as interleukin-1 inhibitors, have proved beneficial for Schnitzler syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), diseases associated with urticaria. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU. PMID:25926715

  4. Cinacalcet Reduces Serum Calcium Concentrations in Patients with Intractable Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Marcocci, Claudio; Chanson, Philippe; Shoback, Dolores; Bilezikian, John; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano; Orgiazzi, Jacques; Henzen, Christoph; Cheng, Sunfa; Sterling, Lulu Ren; Lu, John; Peacock, Munro

    2009-01-01

    Context: Patients with persistent primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) after parathyroidectomy or with contraindications to parathyroidectomy often require chronic treatment for hypercalcemia. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the ability of the calcimimetic, cinacalcet, to reduce serum calcium in patients with intractable PHPT. Design: This was an open-label, single-arm study comprising a titration phase of variable duration (2–16 wk) and a maintenance phase of up to 136 wk. Setting: The study was conducted at 23 centers in Europe, the United States, and Canada. Patients: The study included 17 patients with intractable PHPT and serum calcium greater than 12.5 mg/dl (3.1 mmol/liter). Intervention: During the titration phase, cinacalcet dosages were titrated every 2 wk (30 mg twice daily to 90 mg four times daily) for 16 wk until serum calcium was 10 mg/dl or less (2.5 mmol/liter). If serum calcium increased during the maintenance phase, additional increases in the cinacalcet dose were permitted. Main Outcome Measure: The primary end point was the proportion of patients experiencing a reduction in serum calcium of 1 mg/dl or greater (0.25 mmol/liter) at the end of the titration phase. Results: Mean ± sd baseline serum calcium was 12.7 ± 0.8 mg/dl (3.2 ± 0.2 mmol/liter). At the end of titration, a 1 mg/dl or greater reduction in serum calcium was achieved in 15 patients (88%). Fifteen patients (88%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, none of which were serious. The most common adverse events were nausea, vomiting, and paresthesias. Conclusions: In patients with intractable PHPT, cinacalcet reduces serum calcium, is generally well tolerated, and has the potential to fulfill an unmet medical need. PMID:19470620

  5. Intractable ascites in systemic mastocytosis treated by portal diversion.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, P; Smadja, C; Szekely, A M; Delage, Y; Calmus, Y; Poupon, R; Franco, D

    1987-02-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with intractable ascites due to systemic mastocytosis. The diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis was established by histology of the bone marrow which showed mast cell infiltration and fibrosis. Ascites was related to portal hypertension which was documented by esophageal varices at endoscopy and by an increase of wedged-free hepatic venous pressure gradient. Liver biopsy disclosed dense fibrosis of hepatic arterial and portal venule walls, resulting in complete obstruction of some portal radicles. Peliosis hepatis and fibrous deposits in the walls of hepatic venules were also present. Because of intractable ascites and significant malnutrition, a portacaval shunt was performed which cleared ascites and dramatically improved the general condition of the patient.

  6. Lyme Disease Coinfections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Adam J; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease in North America is caused by infection with the spirochetal bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus ticks. These ticks also have the potential to transmit a rapidly expanding list of other pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, deer tick (Powassan) virus, Borrelia miyamotoi, and the Ehrlichia muris-like organism. Coinfections with B burgdorferi and these other agents are often difficult to diagnose and may go untreated, and thus contribute significantly to patient morbidity and mortality from tick-borne infections.

  7. Changes in mental state and behaviour in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Clare M; Parkinson, Ellice G; Rickards, Hugh E

    2016-11-01

    Changes in mental state and behaviour have been acknowledged in Huntington's disease since the original monograph in 1872 provided evidence of disinhibition and impaired social cognition. Behavioural problems can manifest before obvious motor symptoms and are frequently the most disabling part of the illness. Although pharmacological treatments are used routinely for psychiatric difficulties in Huntington's disease, the scientific evidence base for their use is somewhat sparse. Moreover, effective treatments for apathy and cognitive decline do not currently exist. Understanding the social cognitive impairments associated with Huntington's disease can assist management, but related therapeutic interventions are needed. Future research should aim to design rating scales for behaviour and mental state in Huntington's disease that can detect change in clinical trials. Generally, communication and understanding of behaviour and mental state in Huntington's would be enhanced by a clear conceptual framework that unifies ideas around movement, cognition, emotion, behaviour, and mental state, reflecting both the experience of the patient and their underlying neuropathology.

  8. PET MRI Coregistration in Intractable Epilepsy and Gray Matter Heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Seniaray, Nikhil; Jain, Anuj

    2017-03-01

    A 25-year-old woman with intractable seizures underwent FDG PET/MRI for seizure focus localization. MRI demonstrated bilateral carpetlike nodular subependymal gray matter and asymmetrical focal dilatation in the right temporal horn. PET/MRI showed increased FDG within subependymal gray matter with significant hypometabolism in right anterior temporal lobe. EEG and ictal semiology confirmed the right temporal seizure origin. This case highlights the importance of identification of gray matter heterotopia on FDG PET/MRI.

  9. [Chronic venous disease. A state of art].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2010-01-24

    Chronic venous disease affecting one-third of the European population has a considerable socioeconomic impact. There is increasing evidence, that the structural remodelling of the vein wall is caused by two etiological factors: the disturbed flow patterns in cosequence of the high venous pressure and a progressive inflammatory cascade. In the microcirculation the trapping of the white cells and the leukocyte-endothelium interaction lead to skin changes and leg ulcer. The CEAP classification has been adopted world-wide to faciliate the uniform communication and the description of all classes of the disease. For the practising physician the duplex scan is a valuable instrument to provide correct diagnosis and to guide the treatment. This ultrasound technique gives lot of useful information about the venous system of the lower leg, helps to identify the presence and sites of the reflux and the potential occlusion of the proximal veins. The possible treatments are the followings: conservative basis therapy - including compression, venoactive drugs, venous excersises, giving advice to patients and health care - as well as surgery and sclerotherapy. New promising therapeutic procedures, such as endovenous operations with radiofrequency or laser and foam sclerotherapy are spreading rapidly all over the world.

  10. Stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Homma, Junpei; Kameyama, Shigeki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ueno, Takehiko; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2007-08-01

    Management of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy remains controversial. We have used stereotactic thermocoagulation for treatment of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy since 1997. Herein, we review our experience in five cases to clarify the usefulness of this treatment. A total of five patients with hypothalamic hamartoma were treated by stereotactic thermocoagulation at our hospital during the period October 1997 through February 2004. In all patients, the hamartoma was less than 10mm in diameter and was located on the floor of the third ventricle with sessile attachment to the wall. To identify ictal onset, chronic intracranial electroencephalography was performed in three patients with the use of a depth electrode implanted in the hamartoma. Attempts were made to induce gelastic seizure by electrical stimulation of the hamartoma in three patients. After magnetic resonance imaging-guided targeting, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the boundary between the hamartoma and normal hypothalamus was performed to achieve disconnection effects. Marked reductions in seizure frequency were obtained in all cases, with three patients becoming seizure-free after the procedure. No intraoperative complications occurred except in one patient who experienced acute and transient panidrosis with hot flushes during coagulation. Our results suggest that stereotactic thermocoagulation of hypothalamic hamartoma is an acceptable treatment option for patients with intractable gelastic seizures.

  11. Indicators for chronic disease surveillance - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Holt, James B; Huston, Sara L; Heidari, Khosrow; Schwartz, Randy; Gollmar, Charles W; Tran, Annie; Bryan, Leah; Liu, Yong; Croft, Janet B

    2015-01-09

    Chronic diseases are an important public health problem, which can result in morbidity, mortality, disability, and decreased quality of life. Chronic diseases represented seven of the top 10 causes of death in the United States in 2010 (Murphy SL, Xu J, Kochanek KD. Deaths: final data for 2010. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2013;6. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/nvsr61_04.pdf Adobe PDF file). Chronic diseases and risk factors vary by geographic area such as state and county, where essential public health interventions are implemented. The chronic disease indicators (CDIs) were established in the late 1990s through collaboration among CDC, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and the Association of State and Territorial Chronic Disease Program Directors (now the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors) to enable public health professionals and policymakers to retrieve data for chronic diseases and risk factors that have a substantial impact on public health. This report describes the latest revisions to the CDIs, which were developed on the basis of a comprehensive review during 2011-2013. The number of indicators is increasing from 97 to 124, with major additions in systems and environmental indicators and additional emphasis on high-impact diseases and conditions as well as emerging topics.

  12. De novo mutations of KIAA2022 in females cause intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Iris M; Helbig, Katherine L; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Møller, Rikke S; Velinov, Milen; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Marsh, Eric; Helbig, Ingo; Devinsky, Orrin; Tang, Sha; Mefford, Heather C; Myers, Candace T; van Paesschen, Wim; Striano, Pasquale; van Gassen, Koen; van Kempen, Marjan; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Piard, Juliette; Minassian, Berge A; Nezarati, Marjan M; Pessoa, André; Jacquette, Aurelia; Maher, Bridget; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Warde, Marie Therese Abi; De St Martin, Anne; Chelly, Jamel; van ‘t Slot, Ruben; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Brilstra, Eva H; Koeleman, Bobby P C

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in the KIAA2022 gene have been reported in male patients with X-linked intellectual disability, and related female carriers were unaffected. Here, we report 14 female patients who carry a heterozygous de novo KIAA2022 mutation and share a phenotype characterised by intellectual disability and epilepsy. Methods Reported females were selected for genetic testing because of substantial developmental problems and/or epilepsy. X-inactivation and expression studies were performed when possible. Results All mutations were predicted to result in a frameshift or premature stop. 12 out of 14 patients had intractable epilepsy with myoclonic and/or absence seizures, and generalised in 11. Thirteen patients had mild to severe intellectual disability. This female phenotype partially overlaps with the reported male phenotype which consists of more severe intellectual disability, microcephaly, growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms and, less frequently, epilepsy. One female patient showed completely skewed X-inactivation, complete absence of RNA expression in blood and a phenotype similar to male patients. In the six other tested patients, X-inactivation was random, confirmed by a non-significant twofold to threefold decrease of RNA expression in blood, consistent with the expected mosaicism between cells expressing mutant or normal KIAA2022 alleles. Conclusions Heterozygous loss of KIAA2022 expression is a cause of intellectual disability in females. Compared with its hemizygous male counterpart, the heterozygous female disease has less severe intellectual disability, but is more often associated with a severe and intractable myoclonic epilepsy. PMID:27358180

  13. Typhoid fever as a triggering factor in acute and intractable bronchial asthma attack.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Surachmanto, Eko E; Datau, E A

    2013-10-01

    Typhoid fever is an enteric infection caused by Salmonella typhi. In Indonesia, typhoid fever is endemic with high incidence of the disease. In daily practice we frequently have patients with bronchial asthma, and it is becoming worse when these patients get typhoid fever. After oral ingestion, Salmonella typhi invades the the intestine mucosa after conducted by microbial binding to epithelial cells, destroying the microfold cells (M cell) then passed through the lamina propria and detected by dendritic cells (DC) which express a variety of pathogen recognition receptors on the surfaces, including Toll-Like Receptor (TLR). expressed on macrophages and on intestinal epithelial cells inducing degradation of IB, and translocation of NF-B (Nuclear Factor-Kappa Beta). This process initiates the induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression profile adhesion molecules, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and other proteins that induce and perpetuate the inflammation in host cells then will induce acute ant intractable attack of bronchial asthma. The role of typhoid fever in bronchial asthma, especially in persons with acute attack of bronchial asthma, is not well understood. In this article, we will discuss the role of typhoid fever in the bronchial asthma patients which may cause bronchial asthma significantly become more severe even triggering the acute and intractable attack of bronchial asthma. This fact makes an important point, to treat completely the typhoid fever in patients with bronchial asthma.

  14. Effect of molecular adsorbent recirculating system in hepatitis C virus-related intractable pruritus.

    PubMed

    Doria, Cataldo; Mandalá, Lucio; Smith, Jan; Vitale, Claudio H; Lauro, Augusto; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Marino, Ignazio R; Foglieni, Carlo Scotti; Magnone, Mario; Scott, Victor L

    2003-04-01

    Intractable pruritus is more common in cholestatic liver diseases and may be the presenting symptom and/or major complaint of hepatitis C and/or hepatitic C virus-related cirrhosis. From September 2000 to May 2002, three patients affected by intractable pruritus secondary to hepatitis C cirrhosis that failed medical treatment were treated with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS). MARS is an artificial liver support system that aims to clear the blood of metabolic waste products normally metabolized by the liver. Each patient underwent seven MARS sessions. Liver function tests, the 36-Item Short Form quality-of-life test, visual analog scale for itching, and bile acid measurement in the serum, albumin circuit and ultrafiltrate were performed before and after each MARS session. Moreover, at hospital admission, each patient underwent a psychological workup and abdominal imaging study. Subjective improvement in pruritus and quality of life, along with a decrease in serum bile acid concentration, was observed in every patient; no patient underwent retreatment and/or liver transplantation up to a 9-month follow-up. One patient died 201 days after MARS treatment. Although we observed a decreased level of serum bile acids, one cannot conclude that this was the mechanism of action for the reduction in pruritus intensity in patients in our series. Different toxins and/or a placebo effect might have had a role in this setting.

  15. Drug-usage evaluation by disease state: developing protocols.

    PubMed

    Enlow, M L

    1996-07-01

    The Joint Commission definition of drug-usage evaluation (DUE) also applies to DUE by disease state. The criteria for disease process selection, key processes being evaluated, methods to develop initial DUE protocols, and DUE validation and approval processes are reviewed. The treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is a disease state DUE performed at Saint Joseph Health Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The preliminary protocol was developed by a collaborative network of clinical pharmacists in the metropolitan area. Outcome measures were included in the evaluation. The results were used as baseline data in the development of a pneumonia clinical pathway.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  17. Status of state electronic disease surveillance systems--United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    2009-07-31

    The National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) is a web-based system that uses standard health information technology (IT) codes to integrate disease surveillance systems, enabling them to transfer public health, laboratory, and clinical data securely from health-care providers to public health departments. Each jurisdictions' system consists of a base system and modules that can be used for specific surveillance purposes. States also use NEDSS-like or other electronic systems to conduct surveillance on specific diseases or conditions. Until recently, no assessment had been done to describe the status and characteristics of state electronic disease surveillance systems. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) conducted such an assessment in August 2007 in all 50 states. This report presents the results of that assessment, which indicated that, in 2007, state electronic disease surveillance systems varied widely and were in various stages of implementation. Each state had either custom-built systems or purchased systems that were customizable, with associated disease modules to meet its own surveillance needs. As interoperability becomes the standard for electronic data sharing, more states will face customization costs and the need to hire more technical specialists who can manage health information and exchange. Further collaboration and support from surveillance and health-care IT stakeholders with public health will be needed to improve the efficacy and quality of electronic disease surveillance systems.

  18. Estimating the Burden of Chagas Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Umeh, Chukwuemeka A.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wirtz, Veronika J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been growing awareness of the significant burden of Chagas disease in the United States (US). However, epidemiological data on both prevalence and access to care for this disease are limited. The objective of this study is to provide an updated national estimate of Chagas disease prevalence, the first state-level estimates of cases of T. cruzi infection in the US and to analyze these estimates in the context of data on confirmed cases of infection in the US blood supply. Methods In this study, we calculated estimates of the state and national prevalence of Chagas disease. The number of residents originally from Chagas disease endemic countries were computed using data on Foreign-Born Hispanic populations from the American Community Survey, along with recent prevalence estimates for Chagas disease in Latin America from the World Health Organization that were published in 2006 and updated in 2015. We then describe the distribution of estimated cases in each state in relation to the number of infections identified in the donated blood supply per data from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks). Findings The results of this analysis offer an updated national estimate of 238,091 cases of T. cruzi infection in the United States as of 2012, using the same method as was used by Bern and Montgomery to estimate cases in 2005. This estimate indicates that there are 62,070 cases less than the most recent prior estimate, though it does not include undocumented immigrants who may account for as many as 109,000 additional cases. The state level results show that four states (California, Texas, Florida and New York) have over 10,000 cases and an additional seven states have over 5,000 cases. Moreover, since 2007, the AABB has reported 1,908 confirmed cases of T. cruzi infection identified through screening of blood donations. Conclusions This study demonstrates a substantial burden of Chagas disease in the US, with state

  19. Progress in improving state and local disease surveillance--United States, 2000-2005.

    PubMed

    2005-08-26

    In September 2000, states began receiving federal funding to plan and implement integrated electronic systems for disease surveillance. CDC and state and local health departments had recognized the importance of such systems and of uniform standards to improve the usefulness of public health surveillance and the timeliness of response to outbreaks of disease. Previously, state health departments received most case-report forms by mail and then entered the data into computer systems, sometimes weeks after the cases of notifiable disease had occurred, including cases that warranted immediate public health investigation or intervention. In addition, depending on the disease, only 10%-85% of cases were reported, and more than 100 different systems were used to transmit these reports from the states to CDC (CDC, unpublished data, 2005). This report summarizes progress since the initial funding in 2000 in improving state and local disease surveillance through secure, Internet-based data entry and automated electronic laboratory results (ELR) reporting. Both are components of the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS), the surveillance and monitoring component of the broader Public Health Information Network (PHIN) initiative. Local, state, and national public health officials should continue to improve the timeliness and completeness of disease surveillance.

  20. Intractable hiccups caused by esophageal diverticular candidiasis in an immunocompetent adult: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yahata, Shinsuke; Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Kushida, Saeko; Nishisaki, Hogara; Akita, Hozuka

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Various causes of intractable hiccups have been reported; however, to the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of either intractable hiccups due to esophageal candidiasis in an immunocompetent adult or improvement following antifungal therapy. Case presentation An 87-year-old man presented with intractable hiccups. Although the patient was immunocompetent, he used proton pump inhibitors. An esophagogastroduodenos-copy revealed several white deposits throughout the esophagus and extensive white deposits in the midesophageal diverticulum. A mucosal culture showed candidiasis, which was suspected to be the cause of the intractable hiccups. After oral fluconazole had been prescribed, the candidiasis resolved and the hiccups improved. Therefore, we concluded that esophageal diverticular candidiasis was the cause of his intractable hiccups. Conclusion Physicians should consider esophageal candidiasis as one of the differential diagnoses for intractable hiccups, even in immunocompetent adults. PMID:28243153

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron and copper disease states

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, F.W.; Hutchison, J.; Mallard, J.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    The tissue levels of paramagnetic ions are an important factor in the determination of T/sub 1/ values as observed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The increased levels of iron present in human disease states such as hemochromatosis lead to decreased T/sub 1/ values. The mean liver T/sub 1/ of three patients with iron storage disease was determined to be 130 msec, significantly different from the value of 154 msec, the mean for 14 normal controls. Whether NMR will be able to detect the increased copper levels in liver and brain in Wilson disease remains for further clinical trials to evaluate. NMR imaging, however, does serve as a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of states of iron overload and as a technique to follow progression of disease or response to medical therapy.

  2. Holistic approach to treatment of intractable central neuropathic itch.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ashley R; Tegeler, Charles; Burdette, Jonathan; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2011-05-01

    Central neuropathic itch can be a lifelong debilitating condition and treatment challenge. We report a patient with a traumatic brain injury with severe intractable pruritus who failed extensive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment but responded to a holistic approach using healing touch. We discuss the complexity of this type of neuropathic itch and present a holistic approach as an adjunct to therapy in reducing itch intensity. This case presentation along with the literature discussed suggests a therapeutic strategy for the management of complicated central neuropathic itch.

  3. Intractable pain due to rectus abdominis intramuscular haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Scozzari, G; Reddavid, R; Conti, L; Trombetta, F; Toppino, M; Sandrucci, S

    2014-08-01

    Haemangiomas are tumours of vascular origin accounting for approximately 7 % of all benign tumours. Three types of haemangioma have been described according to the vessel type involved: capillary, cavernous and mixed. Intramuscular haemangiomas (IMHs) are infrequent, accounting for less than 1 % of all haemangiomas and are mostly located in the extremities and the trunk. Intramuscular haemangiomas of the rectus abdominis muscle are extremely rare, with only one previous case reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge. In this report, we present the case of a patient with intractable pain related to IMHs of the rectus abdominis and we analyse diagnostic assessment and surgical management of the condition.

  4. Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0009 TITLE: Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 26 Dec 2014- 25 Dec 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory...effective treatment for intractable phantom limb pain following a traumatic limb amputation. There is currently no reliable treatment for phantom limb pain

  5. Variability among states in investigating foodborne disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Jones, Timothy F; Rosenberg, Lauren; Kubota, Kristy; Ingram, L Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Over 1,100 foodborne disease outbreaks cause over 23,000 illnesses in the United States annually, but the rates of outbreaks reported and successful investigation vary dramatically among states. We used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's outbreak reporting database, Association of Public Health Laboratories' PulseNet laboratory subtyping network survey and Salmonella laboratory survey, national public health surveillance data, and national surveys to examine potential causes of this variability. The mean rate of reporting of Salmonella outbreaks was higher in states requiring submission of all isolates to the state public health laboratory, compared to those that do not (5.9 vs. 4.1 per 10 million population, p=0.0062). Rates of overall outbreak reporting or successful identification of an etiology or food vehicle did not correlate at the state level with population, rates of sporadic disease reporting, health department organizational structure, or self-reported laboratory or epidemiologic capacity. Foodborne disease outbreak surveillance systems are complex, and improving them will require a multi-faceted approach to identifying and overcoming barriers.

  6. Haloperidol: a possible medication for the treatment of exacerbation of intractable psychogenic sneezing.

    PubMed

    Guner, Sukru Nail; Gokcen, Cem; Gokturk, Bahar; Topal, Ozgul

    2010-10-01

    Sneezing is one of the physiological defense mechanisms that develops generally due to nasal irritation. But intractable sneezing episodes are uncommon and generally detected among the adolescents. It is difficult to distinguish physiologic sneezing from psychogenic sneezing. Herein, we report a 12-year-old girl who was complaint with intractable sneezing. She was diagnosed as intractable psychogenic sneezing and haloperidol treatment was started. All symptoms had resolved completely within 2 weeks. As a result, haloperidol can be considered as a different treatment modality for intractable psychogenic sneezing.

  7. Intractable hypoglycaemia in a patient with advanced carcinoid syndrome successfully treated with hepatic embolization.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Angelos; Mansoor, Was; Lawrance, Jeremy; Trainer, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A male patient presented at the age of 54 years with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET). He was managed with interferon and multiple courses of MIBG therapy which controlled his disease for about seven years. He then developed symptomatic hypoglycaemia which resolved with the introduction of somatostatin analogue treatment and further therapeutic MIBG. However, three years later he was admitted to hospital with severe and intractable hypoglycaemia, which persisted despite treatment with dietary manipulation, diazoxide, long-acting octreotide injections, intravenous infusion of dextrose and octreotide and everolimus. Bland hepatic embolization was attempted as a last resort and resulted in prompt and dramatic improvement of his condition with no hypoglycaemia for five months. We recommend that hepatic embolization should be considered in patients with advanced and metastatic NETs accompanied by refractory hypoglycaemia, with the aim of symptomatic relief and palliation, and possibly some survival benefit.

  8. A rare case intractable diarrhea secondary to Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus coinfection

    PubMed Central

    John, Santhosh Gheevarghese; Dominguez, Cristian; Chandiramani, Vijay; Vemulappalli, Tejo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 63 Final Diagnosis: Cytomegalo virus (CMV) infection Symptoms: Diarrhea Medication:— Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Coinfection with cytomegalovirus in a patient with Clostridium difficile persistent diarrhea and colitis can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Case Report: A 63-year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip, status post surgical resection and currently on chemoradiation presented with intractable diarrhea and abdominal pain. Initial workup showed Clostridium difficile diarrhea with pancolitis. Diarrhea persisted despite being on antibiotics and bacteriological cure for C. difficile. Further noninvasive work up revealed associated cytomegalovirus infection, and patient had a dramatic response to ganciclovir without any relapse. Conclusions: Physicians should be cognizant about other causes of diarrhea and colitis in immunocompromised patient when treatment for primary diagnosis fails to resolve their symptoms. PMID:24298304

  9. Motive attribution asymmetry for love vs. hate drives intractable conflict.

    PubMed

    Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L; Ginges, Jeremy

    2014-11-04

    Five studies across cultures involving 661 American Democrats and Republicans, 995 Israelis, and 1,266 Palestinians provide previously unidentified evidence of a fundamental bias, what we term the "motive attribution asymmetry," driving seemingly intractable human conflict. These studies show that in political and ethnoreligious intergroup conflict, adversaries tend to attribute their own group's aggression to ingroup love more than outgroup hate and to attribute their outgroup's aggression to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Study 1 demonstrates that American Democrats and Republicans attribute their own party's involvement in conflict to ingroup love more than outgroup hate but attribute the opposing party's involvement to outgroup hate more than ingroup love. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate this biased attributional pattern for Israelis and Palestinians evaluating their own group and the opposing group's involvement in the current regional conflict. Study 4 demonstrates in an Israeli population that this bias increases beliefs and intentions associated with conflict intractability toward Palestinians. Finally, study 5 demonstrates, in the context of American political conflict, that offering Democrats and Republicans financial incentives for accuracy in evaluating the opposing party can mitigate this bias and its consequences. Although people find it difficult to explain their adversaries' actions in terms of love and affiliation, we suggest that recognizing this attributional bias and how to reduce it can contribute to reducing human conflict on a global scale.

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Hippocampal MRI Assessments in Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Kaur, Amarpreet

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To acquire normative data of hippocampal volumes and T2 relaxation times, to evaluate and compare qualitative and quantitative assessments in evaluating hippocampi in patients with different durations of intractable epilepsy, and to propose an imaging protocol based on performance of these techniques. Methods. MRI analysis was done in 50 nonepileptic controls and 30 patients with intractable epilepsy on 1.5T scanner. Visual assessment and hippocampal volumetry were done on oblique coronal IR/T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images, respectively. T2 relaxation times were measured using 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. Volumetric data was normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Patients were divided into temporal (n = 20) and extratemporal (n = 10) groups based on clinical and EEG localization. Results. In controls, right hippocampal volume was slightly more than the left with no effect of age or gender. In TLE patients, hippocampal volumetry provided maximum concordance with EEG. Visual assessment of unilateral pathology concurred well with measured quantitative values but poorly in cases with bilateral pathologies. There were no significant differences of mean values between extratemporal group and controls group. Quantitative techniques detected mild abnormalities, undetected on visual assessment. Conclusions. Quantitative techniques are more sensitive to diagnose bilateral and mild unilateral hippocampal abnormalities. PMID:23984369

  11. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  12. Periodontal Disease and Oral Hygiene Among Children. United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Statistical data presented on periodontal disease and oral hygiene among noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States are based on a probability sample of approximately 7,400 children involved in a national health survey during 1963-65. The report contains estimates of the Periodontal Index (PI) and the Simplified Oral Hygiene…

  13. Health costs of occupational disease in New York State.

    PubMed

    Fahs, M C; Markowitz, S B; Fischer, E; Shapiro, J; Landrigan, P J

    1989-01-01

    Occupational diseases and deaths are costly events. They are responsible for: 1) direct medical costs; 2) indirect costs, resulting from lost production, foregone opportunities, and diminished investment; and 3) non-economic costs, including pain and suffering, disrupted careers, and devastated families. To develop a partial estimate of the total costs of occupational disease in New York State, we have examined four categories of illness: occupational cancer, chronic respiratory disease and the pneumoconioses, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease, and end-stage renal failure. We base our partial estimate on the human capital approach to the costs of these illnesses. Using the best measures available, including both incidence and prevalence statistics, mortality records, and a variety of financial data, we employ two cost accounting techniques of the human capital approach, the incidence method, and the prevalence method. Our analysis shows that these four occupational illnesses are costing New York over $600 million per year. This figure is a pragmatic but conservative, lower-bound estimate of the relative magnitude of total economic costs of occupational disease in New York State. The largest proportion of these costs (80%) is due to occupational cancer. The failure of the health care system to recognize the costs of occupational disease precludes recognition of the economic benefits which would result from preventing these illnesses. This study, it is hoped, will stimulate advances in epidemiological and economic approaches to resolve this important measurement problem.

  14. Phospholipids of the lung in normal, toxic, and diseased states

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, T.; Ohno, K.

    1981-01-01

    The highly pulmonary concentration of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine (dipalmitoyllecithin) and its implication as an important component of lung surfactant have promoted investigation of phospholipid metabolism in the lung. This review will set the contents including recent informations for better understanding of phospholipid metabolism of the lung in normal state (physiological significances of lung phospholipids, characteristics of phospholipids in lung tissue and alveolar washing, biosynthetic pathways of dipalmitoyllecithin, etc.) as well as in toxic states (pulmonary oxygen toxicity, etc.) and in diseased states (idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, etc.) Since our main concern has been to clarify the most important route for supplying dipalmitoyllecithin, this review will be focused upon the various biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of different molecular species of lecithin and their potential significance in the normal, toxic, and diseased lungs.

  15. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water, United States 2009-2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite advancements in water management and sanitation, waterborne disease outbreaks continue to occur in the United States. CDC collects data on waterborne disease outbreaks submitted from all states and territories* through the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance Syst...

  16. West nile virus and other arboviral diseases - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2014-06-20

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States. However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease (i.e., meningitis, encephalitis, and acute flaccid paralysis). This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2013 for WNV and other nationally notifiable arboviruses, excluding dengue. Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia reported 2,469 cases of WNV disease. Of these, 1,267 (51%) were classified as WNV neuroinvasive disease, for a national incidence of 0.40 per 100,000 population. After WNV, the next most commonly reported cause of arboviral disease was La Crosse virus (LACV) (85 cases), followed by Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), Powassan virus (POWV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) (eight). WNV and other arboviruses continue to cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons annually. Maintaining surveillance remains important to help direct and promote prevention activities.

  17. Progress Toward Eliminating Hepatitis A Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Trudy V; Denniston, Maxine M; Hill, Holly A; McDonald, Marian; Klevens, Monina R; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Nelson, Noele P; Iskander, John; Ward, John D

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) disease disproportionately affects adolescents and young adults, American Indian/Alaska Native and Hispanic racial/ethnic groups, and disadvantaged populations. During 1996-2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) made incremental changes in hepatitis A (HepA) vaccination recommendations to increase coverage for children and persons at high risk for HAV infection. This report examines the temporal association of ACIP-recommended HepA vaccination and disparities (on the absolute scale) in cases of HAV disease and on seroprevalence of HAV-related protection (measured as antibody to HAV [anti-HAV]). ACIP-recommended childhood HepA vaccination in the United States has eliminated most absolute disparities in HAV disease by age, race/ethnicity, and geographic area with relatively modest ≥1-dose and ≥2-dose vaccine coverage. However, the increasing proportion of cases of HAV disease among adults with identified and unidentified sources of exposure underscores the importance of considering new strategies for preventing HAV infection among U.S. adults. For continued progress to be made toward elimination of HAV disease in the United States, additional strategies are needed to prevent HAV infection among an emerging population of susceptible adults. Notably, HAV infection remains endemic in much of the world, contributing to U.S. cases through international travel and the global food economy.

  18. Peace Education in Societies Involved in Intractable Conflicts: Direct and Indirect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Tal, Daniel; Rosen, Yigal

    2009-01-01

    The present article deals with the crucial question: Can peace education facilitate change in the sociopsychological infrastructure that feeds continued intractable conflict and then how the change can be carried? Intractable conflicts still rage in various parts of the globe, and they not only cause local misery and suffering but also threaten…

  19. West nile virus disease and other arboviral diseases - United States, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-07-13

    Arthropodborne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. Symptomatic infections most often manifest as a systemic febrile illness and, less commonly, as neuroinvasive disease (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis). West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States. However, several other arboviruses also cause seasonal outbreaks and sporadic cases. In 2011, CDC received reports of 871 cases of nationally notifiable arboviral diseases (excluding dengue); etiological agents included WNV (712 cases), La Crosse virus (LACV) (130), Powassan virus (POWV) (16), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) (six), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) (four), and Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) (three). Of these, 624 (72%) were classified as neuroinvasive disease, for a national incidence of 0.20 per 100,000 population. WNV and other arboviruses continue to cause focal outbreaks and severe illness in substantial numbers of persons in the United States.

  20. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  1. Intractable chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy treated successfully with ciclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, M; Tatsumoto, M; Susuki, K; Hirata, K; Yuki, N

    2005-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a heterogeneous disorder and both clinical course and response to treatment vary widely. Because of the propensity for relapse, CIDP requires maintenance therapy after the initial response to treatment. There is no consensus regarding this in the published literature. Present report: A patient with CIDP was treated with oral prednisolone and cyclophosphamide pulse therapy but required repeated plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Treatment with ciclosporin freed the patient from repeated IVIg administration. Therapeutic responses in 14 subsequent cases including three patients who showed improvement with ciclosporin are also presented along with an algorithm of the authors' suggested protocol for treatment. Conclusion: Ciclosporin should be considered for patients with intractable CIDP who require repeated IVIg. PMID:16024890

  2. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  3. The effect of leucotomy in intractable adolescent weight phobia (primary anorexia nervosa)

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, A. H.; Kalucy, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is best construed as a phobic avoidance response to the psychosocial maturational implications of adolescent weight. Within this state, surrender to the impulse to eat and consequent weight gain is associated with panic, depression and sometimes specific intense fear of loss of control. So long as the avoidance posture can be maintained the experience of such turmoil is largely avoided. Complicated ritualistic behaviour may arise to promote and secure the posture. However, its unrewarding and lonely nature still increasingly leaves the individual liable to the experience of depression. Established treatment procedures often assist recovery from the illness but intractable cases arise and it is amongst these that the majority of deaths occur either from inanition or suicide. The basis for the changes characteristically induced by leucotomy is complex. The procedure often leads to reduced tension and release of appetitive behaviour. This is taken to be due to some direct effect of the cerebral lesion and possibly the intervention may also be construed by some patients as a licence to behave differently. In patients with anorexia nervosa such appetitive release can be expected to promote considerable weight gain. However, the adverse psychological implications of such weight gain for the patient do not appear always to be so immediately or easily relieved. They may still experience panic, shame or depression and new patterns of social avoidance, or vomiting behaviour may develop. Intensive help of a psychotherapeutic and rehabilitative kind is then still required if the patient is to have the best chance of adjusting healthily to her newly found potential for a more normal nutritional status. Four patients who have undergone such treatment are described in this paper. It is concluded that leucotomy has a small but definite place in the treatment of patients with intractable anorexia nervosa. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4806268

  4. Resting-state functional brain networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Hugo C; Segura, Bàrbara; Junque, Carme

    2015-10-01

    The network approach is increasingly being applied to the investigation of normal brain function and its impairment. In the present review, we introduce the main methodological approaches employed for the analysis of resting-state neuroimaging data in Parkinson's disease studies. We then summarize the results of recent studies that used a functional network perspective to evaluate the changes underlying different manifestations of Parkinson's disease, with an emphasis on its cognitive symptoms. Despite the variability reported by many studies, these methods show promise as tools for shedding light on the pathophysiological substrates of different aspects of Parkinson's disease, as well as for differential diagnosis, treatment monitoring and establishment of imaging biomarkers for more severe clinical outcomes.

  5. [Use of fecal microbial transplantations for disease states in Israel].

    PubMed

    Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-03-01

    The enteric microbial population (microbiota) has a tremendous impact on our health and multiple disease states are associated with an alteration of the enteric microbial profile. It has been suggested that fecal microbial transplantation (FMT)--a transfer of fecal microbiota from a healthy donor to a sick person, may be beneficial for the treatment of certain diseases such as obesity, diabetes and inflammatory bowel diseases. Currently, this treatment has been approved in Israel, as well as in other countries, for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI). The establishment of a stool bank from healthy donors makes this therapy available and easy to use. The rationale for using FMT for RCDI, and the methods for its performance and for choosing patients and donors, along with the open questions and the future for this therapy, are presented in the current editorial.

  6. Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2011-09-09

    Foodborne agents cause an estimated 48 million illnesses annually in the United States, including 9.4 million illnesses from known pathogens. CDC collects data on foodborne disease outbreaks submitted from all states and territories through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. During 2008, the most recent year for which data are finalized, 1,034 foodborne disease outbreaks were reported, which resulted in 23,152 cases of illness, 1,276 hospitalizations, and 22 deaths. Among the 479 outbreaks with a laboratory-confirmed single etiologic agent reported, norovirus was the most common, accounting for 49% of outbreaks and 46% of illnesses. Salmonella was the second most common, accounting for 23% of outbreaks and 31% of illnesses. Among the 218 outbreaks attributed to a food vehicle with ingredients from only one of 17 defined food commodities, the top commodities to which outbreaks were attributed were poultry (15%), beef (14%), and finfish (14%), whereas the top commodities to which outbreak-related illnesses were attributed were fruits and nuts (24%), vine-stalk vegetables (23%), and beef (13%). Outbreak surveillance provides insights into the agents that cause foodborne illness, types of implicated foods, and settings where transmission occurs. Public health, regulatory, and food industry professionals can use this information to target prevention efforts against pathogens and foods that cause the most foodborne disease outbreaks.

  7. Electric impedance microflow cytometry for characterization of cell disease states.

    PubMed

    Du, E; Ha, Sungjae; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Chandrakasan, Anantha P

    2013-10-07

    The electrical properties of biological cells have connections to their pathological states. Here we present an electric impedance microflow cytometry (EIMC) platform for the characterization of disease states of single cells. This platform entails a microfluidic device for a label-free and non-invasive cell-counting assay through electric impedance sensing. We identified a dimensionless offset parameter δ obtained as a linear combination of a normalized phase shift and a normalized magnitude shift in electric impedance to differentiate cells on the basis of their pathological states. This paper discusses a representative case study on red blood cells (RBCs) invaded by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Invasion by P. falciparum induces physical and biochemical changes on the host cells throughout a 48-h multi-stage life cycle within the RBC. As a consequence, it also induces progressive changes in electrical properties of the host cells. We demonstrate that the EIMC system in combination with data analysis involving the new offset parameter allows differentiation of P. falciparum infected RBCs from uninfected RBCs as well as among different P. falciparum intraerythrocytic asexual stages including the ring stage. The representative results provided here also point to the potential of the proposed experimental and analysis platform as a valuable tool for non-invasive diagnostics of a wide variety of disease states and for cell separation.

  8. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Campbell, Ian M; Baggett, Brett C; Soens, Zachry T; Rao, Mitchell M; Hixson, Patricia M; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Beaudet, Arthur L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R

    2013-09-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles.

  9. Atypical language laterality is associated with large-scale disruption of network integration in children with intractable focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M; Morgan, Benjamin R; Doesburg, Sam M; Taylor, Margot J; Pang, Elizabeth W; Donner, Elizabeth; Go, Cristina Y; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter

    2015-04-01

    Epilepsy is associated with disruption of integration in distributed networks, together with altered localization for functions such as expressive language. The relation between atypical network connectivity and altered localization is unknown. In the current study we tested whether atypical expressive language laterality was associated with the alteration of large-scale network integration in children with medically-intractable localization-related epilepsy (LRE). Twenty-three right-handed children (age range 8-17) with medically-intractable LRE performed a verb generation task in fMRI. Language network activation was identified and the Laterality index (LI) was calculated within the pars triangularis and pars opercularis. Resting-state data from the same cohort were subjected to independent component analysis. Dual regression was used to identify associations between resting-state integration and LI values. Higher positive values of the LI, indicating typical language localization were associated with stronger functional integration of various networks including the default mode network (DMN). The normally symmetric resting-state networks showed a pattern of lateralized connectivity mirroring that of language function. The association between atypical language localization and network integration implies a widespread disruption of neural network development. These findings may inform the interpretation of localization studies by providing novel insights into reorganization of neural networks in epilepsy.

  10. Impact of noncommunicable diseases in the State of Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaabi, Salma Khalaf; Atherton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This study, commissioned by the Supreme Council of Health in the State of Qatar, focuses on the main noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally and regionally, in order to gauge their potential impact on Qatar. The research shows that the Gulf Cooperation Council is projected to be affected dramatically by NCDs in the coming years. The top five NCDs that will affect Qatar in terms of economic burden and disability-adjusted life years are cardiovascular diseases, mental health and behavioral disorders, cancer, respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Whilst these diseases have diverse effects on patients, their causes can be traced to “… common lifestyle-related, or behavioral, risk factors such as tobacco use, a diet heavy in fat, and physical inactivity”. The total direct and indirect costs to the Gulf Cooperation Council calculated for the above five NCDs were $36.2 billion in 2013, which equates to 150% of the officially recorded annual health care expenditure. If this trajectory is maintained, spending per head of population in Qatar will reach $2,778 by 2022. These figures demonstrate not only the potential financial impact of the main NCDs, but also give an idea of how the current health system is working to address them. PMID:26170702

  11. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  12. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E; Szarka, András

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease.

  13. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  14. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Engleman, E.G.; Calin, A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-10-22

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (total dose, 2000 rad) in an uncontrolled feasibility study, as an alternative to long-term therapy with cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. During a follow-up period of five to 18 months after total lymphoid irradiation, there was a profound and sustained suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and in vitro lymphocyte function, as well as an increase in the ratio of Leu-2 (suppressor/cytotoxic) to Leu-3 (helper) T cells in the blood. Persistent circulating suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response and of pokeweek mitogen-induced immunoglobulin secretion developed in most patients. In nine of the 11 patients, these changes in immune status were associated with relief of joint tenderness and swelling and with improvement in function scores. Maximum improvement occurred approximately six months after irradiation and continued for the remainder of the observation period. Few severe or chronic side effects were associated with the radiotherapy.

  15. Trigeminal branch stimulation for the treatment of intractable craniofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason A; Mejia Munne, Juan C; Winfree, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Trigeminal branch stimulation has been used in the treatment of craniofacial pain syndromes. The risks and benefits of such an approach have not been clearly delineated in large studies, however. The authors report their experience in treating craniofacial pain with trigeminal branch stimulation and share the lessons they have learned after 93 consecutive electrode placements. METHODS A retrospective review of all patients who underwent trigeminal branch electrode placement by the senior author (C.J.W.) for the treatment of craniofacial pain was performed. RESULTS Thirty-five patients underwent implantation of a total of 93 trial and permanent electrodes between 2006 and 2013. Fifteen patients who experienced improved pain control after trial stimulation underwent implantation of permanent stimulators and were followed for an average of 15 months. At last follow-up 73% of patients had improvement in pain control, whereas only 27% of patients had no pain improvement. No serious complications were seen during the course of this study. CONCLUSIONS Trigeminal branch stimulation is a safe and effective treatment for a subset of patients with intractable craniofacial pain.

  16. Emergent bronchofiberoptic bronchial occlusion for intractable pneumothorax with severe emphysema.

    PubMed

    Okada, S; Kano, K; Yamauchi, H; Satoh, S

    1998-11-01

    Emergent bronchofiberoptic bronchial occlusion using fibrin glue and woven polyglycolic acid mesh for persistent pneumothorax with severe emphysema is described. A 74-year-old man who had severe pulmonary dysfunction accompanying chronic emphysema was admitted with a complaint of sudden severe dyspnea. The chest X-ray on admission revealed collapse of the right lung. The patient was placed on a mechanical ventilator because of acute respiratory failure. In spite of continuous suction through a chest drainage tube, air leakage persisted. On the seventh hospital day, subcutaneous emphysema was apparent in the face and scrotum in addition to the chest. First, a double-lumen catheter was inserted into the right B5 bronchus, and fibrin glue was infused into the drainage bronchus via the double-lumen catheter. However, the procedure failed. Next, a combination of fibrin glue and woven polyglycolic acid mesh which had been cut into small pieces was introduced and pushed into the B5 bronchus using forceps. The air leakage stopped immediately after the administration. This procedure is simple and a minimally invasive method for the treatment of intractable pneumothorax in a compromised patient on a mechanical ventilator.

  17. Briquet syndrome in a man with chronic intractable pain.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, J M; Baiardi, J J; Long, D M

    1980-09-01

    A 51-year-old man was admitted for evaluation and treatment of scrotal pain of 20 years' duration following unilateral orchiectomy for right testicular injury. Past attempts had failed to provide definitive or persistent relief. Physical examination and investigations were unremarkable. Psychiatric assessment revealed an angry, depressed man with a drasmatic, hypermasculine manner and hysterical and obsessive personality traits. Review of systems with a structured interview indicated that the patient had numerous medically unexplained symptoms and that he fulfilled both the Feighner and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 3rd edition (DSM-III) diagnostic criteria for Briquet syndrome. The case is important because it demonstrates the usefulness of recognizing Briquet syndrome in patients with the single presenting complaint of chronic, intractable pain, and the fact that Briquet syndrome, commonly considered a female disorder, can occur in men regardless of sexual orientation and in the absence of expected compensation. In addition, the case confirms the utility of a structured interview and defined criteria for making the diagnosis of Briquet syndrome.

  18. Solid-State Structure of Abeta (Ab) in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junxia; Dong, Xing-Qi; Zhang, Jian-Jun

    2017-02-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become the most common neurodegenerative disease. The deposition of amyloid fibrils in the brain is one of the characteristics of AD. The fibrils are composed of amyloid-b peptide (Ab). Ab is produced through a series event of protease cleavage of a transmembrane protein called β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) which is commonly expressed in the brain. The production of Ab and its propensity to aggregation to form oligomers and fibrils are believed to initiate a sequence of events that lead to AD dementia. The production of Ab is influenced by the transmembrane domain (TM) structure of APP. The structure variety of different Ab assemblies including oligomers and fibrils may result in different neurotoxicity to the brain. Therefore, enormous work has been carried out to study the structure of APP TM and various Ab assemblies. Solid-state NMR has advantages in studying immobile protein structures with large molecular weight. In this review, solid-state NMR structure of APP TM and different Ab assemblies will be discussed, especially various Ab amyloid fibril structures. This structural information greatly enhanced our understanding in AD, providing fundamental knowledge that will help in finding a treatment for AD.

  19. Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks --- United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    2010-08-13

    Foodborne agents cause an estimated 76 million illnesses annually in the United States. Outbreak surveillance provides insights into the causes of foodborne illness, types of implicated foods, and settings of foodborne infections that can be used in food safety strategies to prevent and control foodborne disease. CDC collects data on foodborne disease outbreaks submitted from all states and territories. This report summarizes epidemiologic data for the 1,097 reported outbreaks occurring during 2007 (the most recent finalized data), which resulted in 21,244 cases of foodborne illness and 18 deaths. Among the 497 foodborne outbreaks with a laboratory-confirmed single etiologic agent reported, norovirus was the most common cause, followed by Salmonella. Among the 18 reported deaths, 11 were attributed to bacterial etiologies (five Salmonella, three Listeria monocytogenes, two Escherichia coli O157:H7, and one Clostridium botulinum), two to viral etiologies (norovirus), and one to a chemical (mushroom toxin). Four deaths occurred in outbreaks with unknown etiologies. Among the 235 outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, poultry (17%), beef (16%), and leafy vegetables (14%) were most often the cause of illness. Public health, regulatory, and agricultural professionals can use this information when creating targeted control strategies and to support efforts to promote safe food preparation practices among food employees and the public.

  20. [Disseminated metastatic tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata presenting intractable hiccups. A case report].

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichirou

    2011-04-01

    We report the case of disseminated metastatic tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata presenting intractable hiccups. A 73-year-old man has a history of for metastatic lung tumor of the left tempral lobe. Although 3 surgeries and 4 radiotherapies were performed in the last 8 years, residual tumor grew slowly. He presented with intractable hiccups. His hiccups continued for 30 minutes, sometimes for 3 hours with obstruction of eating. Contrast-enhanced Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated the dissemination of metastatic lung tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata and ventral surface of midbrain. Some literatures reported the patients with intractable hiccups caused by dorsal medullary lesions. Therefore, we thought that the small disseminated tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata caused the hiccups. Evaluation of dorsal medullay area by MR imaging is important to reveal the cause of intractable hiccups.

  1. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized study comparing 750-rad treatment with 2,000-rad treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanly, J.G.; Hassan, J.; Moriarty, M.; Barry, C.; Molony, J.; Casey, E.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with 750-rad or 2,000-rad lymphoid irradiation in a randomized double-blind comparative study. Over a 12-month followup period, there was a significant improvement in 4 of 7 and 6 of 7 standard parameters of disease activity following treatment with 750 rads and 2,000 rads, respectively. Transient, short-term toxicity was less frequent with the lower dose. In both groups, there was a sustained peripheral blood lymphopenia, a selective depletion of T helper (Leu-3a+) lymphocytes, and reduced in vitro mitogen responses. These changes did not occur, however, in synovial fluid. These results suggest that 750-rad lymphoid irradiation is as effective as, but less toxic than, that with 2,000 rads in the management of patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Expiratory model-based method to monitor ARDS disease state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Model-based methods can be used to characterise patient-specific condition and response to mechanical ventilation (MV) during treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Conventional metrics of respiratory mechanics are based on inspiration only, neglecting data from the expiration cycle. However, it is hypothesised that expiratory data can be used to determine an alternative metric, offering another means to track patient condition and guide positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) selection. Methods Three fully sedated, oleic acid induced ARDS piglets underwent three experimental phases. Phase 1 was a healthy state recruitment manoeuvre. Phase 2 was a progression from a healthy state to an oleic acid induced ARDS state. Phase 3 was an ARDS state recruitment manoeuvre. The expiratory time-constant model parameter was determined for every breathing cycle for each subject. Trends were compared to estimates of lung elastance determined by means of an end-inspiratory pause method and an integral-based method. All experimental procedures, protocols and the use of data in this study were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Liege Medical Faculty. Results The overall median absolute percentage fitting error for the expiratory time-constant model across all three phases was less than 10 %; for each subject, indicating the capability of the model to capture the mechanics of breathing during expiration. Provided the respiratory resistance was constant, the model was able to adequately identify trends and fundamental changes in respiratory mechanics. Conclusion Overall, this is a proof of concept study that shows the potential of continuous monitoring of respiratory mechanics in clinical practice. Respiratory system mechanics vary with disease state development and in response to MV settings. Therefore, titrating PEEP to minimal elastance theoretically results in optimal PEEP selection. Trends matched clinical

  3. Partial internal biliary diversion: a solution for intractable pruritus in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Ramaswamy; Suresh, Natarajan; Sathiyasekeran, Malathi; Ramachandran, Priya

    2011-01-01

    Biliary diversion offers a potential option for intractable pruritus in children with chronic cholestatic disorders. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is an inherited disorder of impaired bile acid transport and excretion, which presents with jaundice and pruritus in the first few months of life and progresses to cirrhosis by infancy or adolescence. We report a child with PFIC type 1 who underwent internal biliary diversion for intractable pruritus and was relieved of his symptoms.

  4. Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain With Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0009 TITLE: Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain With Ambulatory Continuous...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 26 Dec 2013 – 25 Dec 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain With Ambulatory...AKAs, and phantom pain in multiple locations • Approval received by National Amputee Coalition research committee to advertise in their website, e

  5. Using the Disease State Fingerprint Tool for Differential Diagnosis of Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Ruiz, Miguel Ángel; Hall, Anette; Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Husso, Minna; Hänninen, Tuomo; Vanninen, Ritva; Liu, Yawu; Hallikainen, Merja; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Remes, Anne M.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Soininen, Hilkka; Hartikainen, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease State Index (DSI) and its visualization, Disease State Fingerprint (DSF), form a computer-assisted clinical decision making tool that combines patient data and compares them with cases with known outcomes. Aims To investigate the ability of the DSI to diagnose frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods The study cohort consisted of 38 patients with FTD, 57 with AD and 22 controls. Autopsy verification of FTD with TDP-43 positive pathology was available for 14 and AD pathology for 12 cases. We utilized data from neuropsychological tests, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission tomography, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and the APOE genotype. The DSI classification results were calculated with a combination of leave-one-out cross-validation and bootstrapping. A DSF visualization of a FTD patient is presented as an example. Results The DSI distinguishes controls from FTD (area under the receiver-operator curve, AUC = 0.99) and AD (AUC = 1.00) very well and achieves a good differential diagnosis between AD and FTD (AUC = 0.89). In subsamples of autopsy-confirmed cases (AUC = 0.97) and clinically diagnosed cases (AUC = 0.94), differential diagnosis of AD and FTD performs very well. Conclusions DSI is a promising computer-assisted biomarker approach for aiding in the diagnostic process of dementing diseases. Here, DSI separates controls from dementia and differentiates between AD and FTD. PMID:27703465

  6. The LeVeen shunt in the elective treatment of intractable ascites in cirrhosis. A prospective study on 140 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, C; Franco, D

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and forty patients with an intractable ascites complicating a chronic liver disease received a peritoneovenous shunt (PVS) using the LeVeen valve. Operative mortality was ten per cent but was 25% in patients with severe liver failure. Intraoperative drainage of ascites sharply decreased postoperative complications and mortality. One-year actuarial survival rate was 81.4%, respectively 77.7%, 61.3%, and 24.7% in patients with good liver function and moderate or severe liver failure. Variceal hemorrhage occurred in 11 patients and late infection in another 11 patients. Thirty-eight patients (30.5%) had recurrence of ascites. This was mostly due to an obstruction on the venous side of the shunt. An elective portacaval shunt had to be done in 23 patients for recurrence of ascites or variceal bleeding. Among the 57 patients still alive at time of writing, 51 were free of ascites. These results suggest that PVS is an efficient operation. This procedure may be largely indicated in the selected and small group of cirrhotic patients with true intractable ascites and moderate or no liver insufficiency. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. PMID:3977450

  7. Melatonin and sleep-related problems in children with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Elkhayat, Hamed A; Hassanein, Sahar M; Tomoum, Hoda Y; Abd-Elhamid, Iman A; Asaad, Tarek; Elwakkad, Amany S

    2010-04-01

    Children with epilepsy have high rates of sleep problems. Melatonin has been advocated in treatment of sleep disorders, and its beneficial effect has been confirmed in insomnia. The aim of this study was to assess melatonin levels in children with intractable epilepsy and its relation to pattern of sleep and characteristics of seizure disorder, as well as the effect of melatonin therapy on those parameters. The study was conducted on 23 children with intractable epilepsy and 14 children with controlled seizures. Patients were evaluated by psychometric sleep assessment and assay of diurnal and nocturnal melatonin levels. Children with intractable epilepsy received oral melatonin before bedtime. They were reassessed after 3 months. Children with intractable epilepsy had higher scores for each category of sleep walking, forcible teeth grinding, and sleep apnea. At the end of therapeutic trial, patients with intractable epilepsy exhibited significant improvement in bedtime resistance, sleep duration, sleep latency, frequent nocturnal arousals, sleep walking, excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal enuresis, forcible teeth grinding, sleep apnea, and Epworth sleepiness scores. There was also significant reduction in seizure severity. Thus, use of melatonin in patients with intractable seizures was associated with improvement of both many sleep-related phenomena and the severity of seizures.

  8. Characteristics and safety assessment of intractable proteins in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Dean F; Bannon, Gary A; Delaney, Bryan F; Graser, Gerson; Hefford, Mary; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Lee, Thomas C; Madduri, Krishna M; Pariza, Michael; Privalle, Laura S; Ranjan, Rakesh; Saab-Rincon, Gloria; Schafer, Barry W; Thelen, Jay J; Zhang, John X Q; Harper, Marc S

    2014-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops may contain newly expressed proteins that are described as "intractable". Safety assessment of these proteins may require some adaptations to the current assessment procedures. Intractable proteins are defined here as those proteins with properties that make it extremely difficult or impossible with current methods to express in heterologous systems; isolate, purify, or concentrate; quantify (due to low levels); demonstrate biological activity; or prove equivalency with plant proteins. Five classes of intractable proteins are discussed here: (1) membrane proteins, (2) signaling proteins, (3) transcription factors, (4) N-glycosylated proteins, and (5) resistance proteins (R-proteins, plant pathogen recognition proteins that activate innate immune responses). While the basic tiered weight-of-evidence approach for assessing the safety of GM crops proposed by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) in 2008 is applicable to intractable proteins, new or modified methods may be required. For example, the first two steps in Tier I (hazard identification) analysis, gathering of applicable history of safe use (HOSU) information and bioinformatics analysis, do not require protein isolation. The extremely low level of expression of most intractable proteins should be taken into account while assessing safety of the intractable protein in GM crops. If Tier II (hazard characterization) analyses requiring animal feeding are judged to be necessary, alternatives to feeding high doses of pure protein may be needed. These alternatives are discussed here.

  9. Recovery of heavy metals from intractable wastes: A thermal approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The generation of industrial solid wastes containing leachable species of environmental concern is a problem for developing and developed nations alike. These materials arise from direct processing of mineral ores, from production of metals and minerals, from manufacturing operations, and from air and water pollution treatment processes. The general characteristics that make these wastes intractable is that their content of hazardous species is not easily liberated from the waste yet is not bound so tightly that they are safe for landfill disposal or industrial use. The approach taken in this work is a thermal treatment that separates the inorganic contaminants from the wastes. The objective is to provide recovery and reuse of both the residual solids and liberated contaminants. The results from operating this technique using two very different types of waste are described. The reasons that the process will work for a wide variety of wastes are explored. By using the knowledge of the thermodynamic stability of the phases found from the characterization analyses, a thermal regime was found that allowed separation of the contaminants without capturing the matrix materials. Bench scale studies were carried out using a tube furnace. Samples of the wastes were heated in crucible boats from 750 to 1150{degrees}C in the presence of various chlorinating agents. The offgas contained 90{sup +}% of the targeted contaminants despite their complex matrix form. The residue was free of contamination. As a result of the efficient concentrating mechanism of the process, the contaminants in the offgas solids are attractive for reuse in metallurgical industries. As an additional benefit, the organic contaminants of the residues were eliminated. Dioxin traces in the solids before treatment were absent after treatment. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Intractable sacroiliac joint pain treated with peripheral nerve field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortty, Shushovan; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Deepak; Rudraraju, Sruthi

    2016-01-01

    As many as 62% low back pain patients can have sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain. There is limited (to poor) evidence in regards to long-term pain relief with therapeutic intra-articular injections and/or conventional (heat or pulsed) radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) for SIJ pain. We report our pain-clinic experience with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for two patients of intractable SIJ pain. They had reported absence of long-term pain relief (pain relief >50% for at least 2 weeks postinjection and at least 3 months post-RFA) with SIJ injections and SIJ RFAs. Two parallel permanent 8-contact subcutaneous stimulating leads were implanted under the skin overlying their painful SIJ. Adequate stimulation in the entire painful area was confirmed. For implantable pulse generator placement, a separate subcutaneous pocket was made in the upper buttock below the iliac crest level ipsilaterally. During the pain-clinic follow-up period, the patients had reduced their pain medications requirements by half with an additional report of more than 50% improvement in their functional status. The first patient passed away 2 years after the PNFS procedure due to medical causes unrelated to his chronic pain. The second patient has been comfortable with PNFS-induced analgesic regimen during her pain-clinic follow-up during last 5 years. In summary, PNFS can be an effective last resort option for SIJ pain wherein conventional interventional pain techniques have failed, and analgesic medication requirements are escalating or causing unwarranted side-effects. PMID:27625495

  11. Efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Tanay, A.; Field, E.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.; Brown, B.W.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-six patients participated in a randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation in the treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis. All 26 patients, for whom therapy with gold compounds and penicillamine had failed, would ordinarily have been considered candidates for cytotoxic or antimetabolite drug therapy. Thirteen patients randomly assigned to receive full-dose total lymphoid irradiation (2000 rad) and 11 patients assigned to receive control low-dose total lymphoid irradiation (200 rad) completed radiotherapy. Alleviation of joint disease activity was significantly greater in the high-dose group as judged by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, and functional assessment (global composite score) at 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The high-dose group had a marked reduction in both T-lymphocyte function and numbers, but this finding was not observed in the low-dose group. Complications seen in the high-dose but not low-dose group included transient neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, pericarditis, and pleurisy.

  12. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis: effects on the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J G; Hassan, J; Moriarty, M; Whelan, A; Feighery, C; Bresnihan, B

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors (RF's) were studied in 20 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following total doses of 750 rad or 2,000 rad lymphoid irradiation. Over a 12 month follow up period there was no consistent change in absolute serum or synovial fluid levels, or in synovial membrane production of either total IgG, IgA or IgM, or the corresponding RF fractions. The invitro production of immunoglobulins and IgM RF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also unaltered, except for one patient who had a dramatic rise in IgM RF production. Over the same period there was a significant overall reduction in disease activity following both doses of radiotherapy. It is concluded that the clinical response which occurs following lymphoid irradiation is not due to a reduction in RF production. Furthermore, the production of RF's appears to be unaffected by the changes in T cell immunity which occur following lymphoid irradiation. PMID:4085151

  13. Risk of Importing Zoonotic Diseases through Wildlife Trade, United States

    PubMed Central

    Schloegel, Lisa M.; Daszak, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The United States is the world’s largest wildlife importer, and imported wild animals represent a potential source of zoonotic pathogens. Using data on mammals imported during 2000–2005, we assessed their potential to host 27 selected risk zoonoses and created a risk assessment that could inform policy making for wildlife importation and zoonotic disease surveillance. A total of 246,772 mammals in 190 genera (68 families) were imported. The most widespread agents of risk zoonoses were rabies virus (in 78 genera of mammals), Bacillus anthracis (57), Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (48), Echinococcus spp. (41), and Leptospira spp. (35). Genera capable of harboring the greatest number of risk zoonoses were Canis and Felis (14 each), Rattus (13), Equus (11), and Macaca and Lepus (10 each). These findings demonstrate the myriad opportunities for zoonotic pathogens to be imported and suggest that, to ensure public safety, immediate proactive changes are needed at multiple levels. PMID:19891857

  14. Evaluating an interprofessional disease state and medication management review model.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Forman, Dawn; Hughes, Jeffery

    2014-03-01

    There is lack of literature data reporting an incorporation of medication management reviews in students' interprofessional education (IPE) and practice programs in aged care settings. This pilot study reports how an interprofessional disease state and medication management review program (DSMMR) was established in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. Students from the professions of nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy focused on a wellness check in the areas of cognition, falls and continence while integrating a medication management review. Students' attitudes were explored using a pre- and post-placement questionnaire. Students indicated positive experience with the IPE DSMMR program which also resulted in their positive attitudinal shift towards IPE and practice. These findings indicated that aged care can be a suitable setting for student interprofessional programs focusing on DSMMR.

  15. Anonymous predictive testing for Huntington's disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Visintainer, C L; Matthias-Hagen, V; Nance, M A

    2001-01-01

    The widespread use of a predictive genetic test for Huntington's disease (HD) since 1993 has brought to the forefront issues regarding genetic privacy. Although the possibility of anonymous genetic testing has been discussed, its use in the United States has not been described previously. We review the experiences of 11 genetics specialists with anonymous predictive testing for HD. We found that more men than women requested anonymous testing, for reasons that more often related to personal privacy than to insurance or discrimination concerns. A number of approaches to anonymity were used, and genetics specialists varied in the degree to which they were comfortable with the process. A number of legal, medical, and practical questions are raised, which will require resolution if anonymous testing is to be performed with a greater frequency in the future.

  16. Probiotics and prebiotics: role in clinical disease states.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Walker, W Allan

    2005-01-01

    Parents of pediatric patients are seeking alternatives to conventional therapy in the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal disease states because of therapeutic failures caused by the increased incidence of antibiotic resistance. One such alternative is the use of probiotics and prebiotics to stimulate health-promoting indigenous flora to affect pathogen colonization and expression of disease. Probiotics are live flora given in oral quantities that allow for colonization of the colon. Probiotics are given as functional foods or dietary supplements, and function to activate the mucosal immune system and prevent pathogen colonization and translocation by strengthening the mucosal barrier, interfering with pathogen colonization, and in some instances, producing secretory antibacterial substances. Prebiotics are nondigestible carbohydrates, principally oligosoccharides, that are fermented by colonic commensals, stimulating their proliferation and producing short-chain fatty acids. Both protective nutrients have been shown to reduce the incidence and severity of infantile diarrhea, particularly rotaviral gastroenteritis, prevent antibiotic-induced diarrhea, and prevent and treat intestinal food allergy. With additional multicenter clinical trial confirmations, these substances may become routine in the care of infants and young children.

  17. Automated mechanical ventilation: adapting decision making to different disease states.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Zahonero, S; Gottlieb, D; Haberthür, C; Guttmann, J; Möller, K

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce a novel methodology for adapting and upgrading decision-making strategies concerning mechanical ventilation with respect to different disease states into our fuzzy-based expert system, AUTOPILOT-BT. The special features are: (1) Extraction of clinical knowledge in analogy to the daily routine. (2) An automated process to obtain the required information and to create fuzzy sets. (3) The controller employs the derived fuzzy rules to achieve the desired ventilation status. For demonstration this study focuses exclusively on the control of arterial CO(2) partial pressure (p(a)CO(2)). Clinical knowledge from 61 anesthesiologists was acquired using a questionnaire from which different disease-specific fuzzy sets were generated to control p(a)CO(2). For both, patients with healthy lung and with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the fuzzy sets show different shapes. The fuzzy set "normal", i.e., "target p(a)CO(2) area", ranges from 35 to 39 mmHg for healthy lungs and from 39 to 43 mmHg for ARDS lungs. With the new fuzzy sets our AUTOPILOT-BT reaches the target p(a)CO(2) within maximal three consecutive changes of ventilator settings. Thus, clinical knowledge can be extended, updated, and the resulting mechanical ventilation therapies can be individually adapted, analyzed, and evaluated.

  18. Tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease under resting-state and stress-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Ji; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Sang Kyong; Park, Hyeyoung; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Han Byul; Jeon, Beom S; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-15

    Tremor characteristics-amplitude and frequency components-are primary quantitative clinical factors for diagnosis and monitoring of tremors. Few studies have investigated how different patient's conditions affect tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we analyzed tremor characteristics under resting-state and stress-state conditions. Tremor was recorded using an accelerometer on the finger, under resting-state and stress-state (calculation task) conditions, during rest tremor and postural tremor. The changes of peak power, peak frequency, mean frequency, and distribution of power spectral density (PSD) of tremor were evaluated across conditions. Patients whose tremors were considered more than "mild" were selected, for both rest (n=67) and postural (n=25) tremor. Stress resulted in both greater peak powers and higher peak frequencies for rest tremor (p<0.001), but not for postural tremor. Notably, peak frequencies were concentrated around 5 Hz under stress-state condition. The distributions of PSD of tremor were symmetrical, regardless of conditions. Tremor is more evident and typical tremor characteristics, namely a lower frequency as amplitude increases, are different in stressful condition. Patient's conditions directly affect neural oscillations related to tremor frequencies. Therefore, tremor characteristics in PD should be systematically standardized across patient's conditions such as attention and stress levels.

  19. Cardiovascular Disease in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Balfour, Pelbreton C.; Ruiz, John M.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Allison, Matthew A.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality in the United States and Western world for all groups with one exception: CVDs are the number 2 cause of death for Hispanics/Latinos behind cancer with overall cancer rates lower for Latinos relative to non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). Despite a significantly worse risk factor profile marked by higher rates of traditional and non-traditional determinants, some CVD prevalence and mortality rates are significantly lower among Latinos relative NHWs. These findings support a need for greater understanding of CVDs specifically among Latinos in order to better document prevalence, appropriately model risk and resilience, and improve targeting of intervention efforts. The current aim is to provide a state-of-the-science review of CVDs amongst Latinos including a review of the epidemiological evidence, risk factor prevalence, and evaluation of the breadth and quality of the data. Questions concerning the generalizability of current risk models, the Hispanic paradox as it relates to CVDs, contributing psychosocial and sociocultural factors, and future directions are discussed. PMID:27429866

  20. Contribution of Alzheimer disease to mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Leurgans, Sue E.; Hebert, Liesi E.; Scherr, Paul A.; Yaffe, Kristine; Bennett, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the burden of mortality attributable to Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia in the United States. Methods: Data came from 2,566 persons aged 65 years and older (mean 78.1 years) without dementia at baseline from 2 cohort studies of aging with identical annual diagnostic assessments of dementia. Because both studies require organ donation, ascertainment of mortality was complete and dates of death accurate. Mortality hazard ratios (HRs) after incident AD dementia were estimated per 10-year age strata from proportional hazards models. Population attributable risk percentage was derived to estimate excess mortality after a diagnosis of AD dementia. The number of excess deaths attributable to AD dementia in the United States was then estimated. Results: Over an average of 8 years, 559 participants (21.8%) without dementia at baseline developed AD dementia and 1,090 (42.4%) died. Median time from AD dementia diagnosis to death was 3.8 years. The mortality HR for AD dementia was 4.30 (confidence interval = 3.33, 5.58) for ages 75–84 years and 2.77 (confidence interval = 2.37, 3.23) for ages 85 years and older (too few deaths after AD dementia in ages 65–74 were available to estimate HR). Population attributable risk percentage was 37.0% for ages 75–84 and 35.8% for ages 85 and older. An estimated 503,400 deaths in Americans aged 75 years and older were attributable to AD dementia in 2010. Conclusions: A larger number of deaths are attributable to AD dementia in the United States each year than the number (<84,000 in 2010) reported on death certificates. PMID:24598707

  1. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water — United States 2011-2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in water management and sanitation have reduced waterborne disease in the United States, although outbreaks continue to occur. Public health agencies in the U.S. states and territories* report information on waterborne disease outbreaks to the CDC Waterborne Disease and ...

  2. Helicobacter pylori and Antibiotic Resistance, A Continuing and Intractable Problem.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Bin; Dai, Jinfeng

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen with a high global prevalence, is the causative pathogen for multiple gastrointestinal diseases, especially chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric malignancies. Antibiotic therapies remain the mainstay for H. pylori eradication; however, this strategy is hampered by the emergence and spread of H. pylori antibiotic resistance. Exploring the mechanistic basis of this resistance is becoming one of the major research questions in contemporary biomedical research, as such knowledge could be exploited to devise novel rational avenues for counteracting the existing resistance and devising strategies to avoid the development of a novel anti-H. pylori medication. Encouragingly, important progress in this field has been made recently. Here, we attempt to review the current state and progress with respect to the molecular mechanism of antibiotic resistance for H. pylori. A picture is emerging in which mutations of various genes in H. pylori, resulting in decreased membrane permeability, altered oxidation-reduction potential, and a more efficient efflux pump system. The increased knowledge on these mechanisms produces hope that antibiotic resistance in H. pylori can ultimately be countered.

  3. Chikungunya virus disease outbreak in Yap State, Federated States of Micronesia

    PubMed Central

    Pastula, Daniel M.; Hancock, W. Thane; Bel, Martin; Biggs, Holly; Marfel, Maria; Lanciotti, Robert; Laven, Janeen; Chen, Tai-Ho; Staples, J. Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus is a mosquito-borne alphavirus which causes an acute febrile illness associated with polyarthralgia. Beginning in August 2013, clinicians from the Yap State Department of Health in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) identified an unusual cluster of illness which was subsequently confirmed to be chikungunya virus disease. Chikungunya virus disease previously had not been recognized in FSM. Methodology/Principal findings Information from patients presenting to healthcare facilities was collected and analyzed. During August 11, 2013, to August 10, 2014, a total of 1,761 clinical cases were reported for an attack rate of 155 clinical cases per 1,000 population. Among residents of Yap Main Island, 3% were hospitalized. There were no deaths. The outbreak began on Yap Main Island and rapidly spread throughout Yap Main Island and to three neighboring islands. Conclusions/Significance Chikungunya virus can cause explosive outbreaks with substantial morbidity. Given the increasing globalization of chikungunya virus, strong surveillance systems and access to laboratory testing are essential to detect outbreaks. PMID:28248978

  4. Botulinum Toxin A Injection into the Subscapularis Muscle to Treat Intractable Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injection into the subscapularis muscle on intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. Methods Six stroke patients with intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain were included. Botulinum toxin A was injected into the subscapularis muscle. Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Pain-free range of motion was assessed for shoulder abduction and external rotation. The spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator was measured using the modified Ashworth scale. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and, if possible, 8 weeks. Results Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was improved (p=0.004) after botulinum toxin injection into the subscapularis muscle. Restricted shoulder abduction (p=0.003), external rotation (p=0.005), and spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator (p=0.005) were also improved. Improved hemiplegic shoulder pain was correlated with improved shoulder abduction (r=–1.0, p<0.001), external rotation (r=–1.0, p<0.001), and spasticity of the internal rotator (r=1.0, p<0.001). Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection into the subscapularis muscle appears to be valuable in the management of intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:27606265

  5. United States medical students’ knowledge of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Brian J.; Usita, Paula M.; Edland, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A knowledge gap exists between general physicians and specialists in diagnosing and managing Alzheimer disease (AD). This gap is concerning due to the estimated rise in prevalence of AD and cost to the health care system. Medical school is a viable avenue to decrease the gap, educating future physicians before they specialize. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge level of students in their first and final years of medical school. Methods: Fourteen participating United States medical schools used e-mail student rosters to distribute an online survey of a quantitative cross-sectional assessment of knowledge about AD; 343 students participated. Knowledge was measured using the 12-item University of Alabama at Birmingham AD Knowledge Test for Health Professionals. General linear models were used to examine the effect of demographic variables and previous experience with AD on knowledge scores. Results: Only 2.5% of first year and 68.0% of final year students correctly scored ten or more items on the knowledge scale. Personal experience with AD predicted higher knowledge scores in final year students (P= 0.027). Conclusion: Knowledge deficiencies were common in final year medical students. Future studies to identify and evaluate the efficacy of AD education programs in medical schools are warranted. Identifying and disseminating effective programs may help close the knowledge gap. PMID:23750313

  6. Precipitation and the occurrence of lyme disease in the Northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Bunnell, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of Lyme disease is a growing concern in the United States, and various studies have been performed to understand the factors related to Lyme disease occurrence. In the United States, Lyme disease has occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States. Positive correlations between the number of cases of Lyme disease reported in the northeastern United States during the 1992-2002 period indicate that late spring/early summer precipitation was a significant climate factor affecting the occurrence of Lyme disease. When late spring/early summer precipitation was greater than average, the occurrence of Lyme disease was above average, possibly due to increased tick activity and survival rate during wet conditions. Temperature did not seem to explain the variability in Lyme disease reports for the northeastern United States. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  7. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOS...

  8. Testing practices and volume of non-Lyme tickborne diseases in the United States.

    PubMed

    Connally, Neeta P; Hinckley, Alison F; Feldman, Katherine A; Kemperman, Melissa; Neitzel, David; Wee, Siok-Bi; White, Jennifer L; Mead, Paul S; Meek, James I

    2016-02-01

    Large commercial laboratories in the United States were surveyed regarding the number of specimens tested for eight tickborne diseases in 2008. Seven large commercial laboratories reported testing a total of 2,927,881 specimens nationally (including Lyme disease). Of these, 495,585 specimens (17%) were tested for tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. In addition to large commercial laboratories, another 1051 smaller commercial, hospital, and government laboratories in four states (CT, MD, MN, and NY) were surveyed regarding tickborne disease testing frequency, practices, and results. Ninety-two of these reported testing a total of 10,091 specimens for four tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. We estimate the cost of laboratory diagnostic testing for non-Lyme disease tickborne diseases in 2008 to be $9.6 million. These data provide a baseline to evaluate trends in tickborne disease test utilization and insight into the burden of these diseases.

  9. Children and End-State Renal Disease (ERSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I'm outside the U.S. Children & End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) How to tell if your child ... Social Security card CMS Form 2728 ("End-Stage Renal Disease Medical Evidence Report Medicare Entitlement and/or ...

  10. Expression of laminin beta1 in hippocampi of patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan; Wang, Xue-feng; Mo, Xue-an; Sun, Hong-bin; Li, Jin-mei; Zeng, Yan; Lin, Tao; Yuan, Jie; Xi, Zhi-qin; Zhu, Xi; Zheng, Jin-ou

    2008-10-10

    We investigated laminin beta1 expression in the hippocampi of patients with intractable epilepsy and explored the role of laminin beta1 in the pathogenesis of this condition. Fluorescence quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to measure laminin beta1 expression in surgically removed hippocampi of patients with intractable epilepsy, and the results were compared with control hippocampi. Fluorescence quantitative PCR showed increased expression of laminin beta1 mRNA in patient hippocampi compared with control tissues. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that laminin beta1 protein expression was significantly increased in patient hippocampi, and immunofluorescence microscopy showed accumulation of laminin beta1 in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of patient hippocampi. These findings were confirmed by Western blotting of protein preparations from patient hippocampi. Elevated expression of laminin beta1 mRNA and protein in the hippocampus suggests that laminin beta1 may play a role in the development of epileptic seizures in patients with intractable epilepsy.

  11. Intractable diarrhoea caused by cytomegalovirus enterocolitis in an immunocompetent term neonate.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Maria, Arti; Goyal, Deepak; Verma, Arushi

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection mainly affects preterm and immunocompromised infants and usually manifest as rash, pneumonia, hepatospleenomegaly or encephalitis. To our knowledge intractable diarrhoea at two weeks of age caused by postnatally acquired CMV in immunocompetent term neonate is not reported. An unusual case of postnatally acquired CMV enterocolitis manifesting as protracted diarrhoea in an immunocompetent baby in neonatal period is reported. We conclude that CMV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intractable diarrhoea in neonatal period and treatment with intravenous ganciclovir for CMV enterocolitis is not only indicated but is therapeutic.

  12. State Quitlines and Cessation Patterns Among Adults With Selected Chronic Diseases in 15 States, 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Zbikowski, Susan M.; Mahoney, Lisa; Deprey, Mona; Mowery, Paul; Cerutti, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The death rate of people who have a chronic disease is lower among former smokers than current smokers. State tobacco cessation quitlines are available for free in every state. The objective of our study was to compare demographic characteristics, use of quitline services, and quit rates among a sample of quitline callers. Methods We used data from 15 states on tobacco users aged 18 or older who enrolled with a quitline between October 1, 2005, and May 31, 2008; 9 states also provided data from 7-month follow-up surveys. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare callers by disease status. Results Among 195,057 callers, 32.3% reported having 1 or more of the following chronic diseases: 17.7%, asthma; 5.9%, coronary artery disease; 11.1%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and 9.3%, diabetes; 9.0% had 2 or more chronic diseases. Callers who had a chronic disease were older and better educated; more likely to be female, have Medicaid or other health insurance, and have used tobacco for 20 years or more; and less likely to quit smoking (22.3%) at 7 months than callers who had none of these chronic diseases (29.7%). Conclusion About one-third of tobacco users who call state quitlines have a chronic disease, and those who have a chronic disease are less likely to quit using tobacco. Continued efforts are needed to ensure cessation treatments are reaching tobacco users who have a chronic disease and to develop and test ways to increase quit rates among them. PMID:23137862

  13. Gene expression analysis on anterior temporal neocortex of patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhi-Qin; Xiao, Fei; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Liang; Quan, Feng-Yin; Liu, Guang-Wei

    2009-11-01

    To elucidate the molecular basis of intractable epilepsy (IE), we used a whole-genome transcriptomic approach to identify genes involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Using a complementary DNAs microarray representing 4096 human genes, we analyzed differential gene expression in the anterior temporal neocortex (ATN) of IE patients relative to control patients who had an operation to relieve head trauma-related intracranial pressure. The results were validated by real-time fluorescence-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The expression of 143 genes (3.5%) was significantly altered in IE patients. Thirty-seven genes (26%) were reduced relative to controls, and 106 (74%) were elevated (more than twofold change vs. controls), including genes involved in immunity, signal transduction, apoptosis, stress, synaptic plasticity, structural, and cellular reorganization, among other processes. Results for 13 of the 14 differentially expressed genes tested by FQ-PCR were consistent with the microarray. Twelve abnormally expressed cytoskeletal genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. Expression of 11 was significantly higher in the ATN of IE patients than in controls. Gene products altered in IE, namely HSPBAP1, TRAP220, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), were tested by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. GSK-3beta and CDK5 levels were significantly higher in the ATN of IE patients. Our gene chip data are generally in agreement with the published findings on epilepsy. Thus, gene chips may serve as a screening tool to elucidate the pathophysiology of IE. Investigation of some of these newly identified genes should enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of epileptogenesis.

  14. State of progress in treating cystic fibrosis respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), there has been tremendous progress in the care of patients with this disease. New therapies have entered the market and are part of the standard treatment of patients with CF, and have been associated with marked improvement in survival. Now there are even more promising therapies directed at different components of the pathophysiology of this disease. In this review, our current knowledge of the pathophysiology of lung disease in patients with CF is described, along with the current treatment of CF lung disease, and the therapies in development that offer great promise to our patients. PMID:22883684

  15. A sterile-female technique proposed for control of Striga hermonthica and other intractable weeds: Advantages, shortcomings, and risk management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds have posed intractable challenges to farmers since the dawn of agriculture. This article describes in detail a proposed control strategy based on the introduction of genes conferring female-sterility into the genomes of intractable target weeds. Spread of these genes through target populations...

  16. Safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition for intractable childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2012-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition in patients with intractable childhood epilepsy. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition was given to 10 patients who were unable to absorb nutrients through the intestinal tract because of various gastrointestinal disorders and required complete bowel rest. This nutrition consisted of conventional intravenous fat emulsion (20% Lipision) plus dextrose and amino acid (6% Trophamine) hyperalimentation in a 4:1 (or 3:1) lipid to non-lipid ratio, infused during the bowel rest. If the ketogenic parenteral nutrition allowed normal daily functioning or resolved the underlying problems, we soon changed it to the enteral ketogenic diet (KD). The mean (±SD) duration of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition was 4.1 (±1.5) days. Although a brief span of several days, all patients could maintain ketosis and the efficacy of the previous enteral KD during the ketogenic parenteral nutrition. Complications included elevated aspartate aminotransferase and/or alanine aminotransferase in one patient. Amylase and lipase increased in one patient. Serum triglyceride level increased to the level of 1885 mg/dl in one patient, but normalized in one week after discontinuation of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition and resuming of the enteral KD. Nine patients (90%) remained on the enteral KD after the ketogenic parenteral nutrition (the mean follow-up period was 9 months), including 2 patients who successfully completed the diet with seizure free state. Only one patient discontinued the ketogenic parenteral nutrition because of persistent increase of the amylase and lipase levels. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition proved to be a relatively safe short-term method of continuing KD to maintain ketosis for seizure control, while patients were unable to absorb nutrients through their intestinal tract.

  17. Phenytoin (Dilantin) and acupuncture therapy in the treatment of intractable oral and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Winston I; Lu, Gabriel P

    2011-01-01

    Phenytoin is an anti-convulsant and anti-arrhythmic medication. Manufactured by various pharmaceutical companies with various brand names, phenytoin (PHT) is also known as Dilantain, Hydantoin or Phenytek in the United States; Dilantain or Remytoine in Canada; Epamin, Hidantoina in Mexico; and Fenidatoin or Fenitron or other names elsewhere in the world. Phenytoin (PHT) is especially useful for patients suffering from intractable oral and facial pain especially those who exhibit anger, stress, depression and irrational emotions commonly seen in the patients with oral and facial pain. When used properly, Phenytoin is also an effective anxiolysis drug in addition to its theraputic effects on pain and can be used alone or, even better, if combined with other compatible sedatives. Phenytoin is particularly valuable when combined with acupuncture for patients with trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyneal neuralgia, Bell's palsy, and some other facial paralysis and pain. It also has an advantage of keeping the patient relatively lucid after treatment. Either PHT or acupuncture alone can benefit patients but the success of treatment outcome may be limited. We found by combining both acupuncture and PHT with Selective Drug Uptake Enhancement by stimulating middle finger at the first segment of ventral (palmar) and lateral surfaces, as well as prescribing PHT with the dosage predetermined for each patient by Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT), the treatment outcome was much better resulted with less recurrence and intensity of pain during episodes of attack. Patients with Bell's palsy were most benefited by acupuncture therapy that could completely get rid of the illness.

  18. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000–2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  19. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months.

  20. Growth Failure in Children with Intractable Epilepsy Is Not Due to Increased Resting Energy Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergqvist, A. G. Christina; Trabulsi, Jillian; Schall, Joan I.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE) of children with intractable epilepsy (IE) compared with healthy children, and to determine factors that contribute to the pattern of REE. REE, growth status, and body composition were assessed in 25 prepubertal children with IE (15 males, 10 females; mean age 5y 5mo [SD 2y…

  1. Fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis for intractable bleeding from the liver or spleen during liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong-Hwan; Song, Gi-Won; Ha, Tae-Yong; Jwa, Eun-Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension induces congestion of the liver and spleen, thus any capsular or parenchymal injury to these organs can produce intractable bleeding which generally is not easily controlled. To cope with intractable bleeding such as being encountered during liver transplantation, we developed an infiltrating hemostasis technique as a conceptual shift from conventional application methods, in which fibrin glue is locally injected into the bleeding area on the liver or spleen. This technique, which uses a fibrin glue kit (2 ml kit; Greenplast, Green Cross, Seoul, Korea), consists of inserting the needle 0.5-1 cm deep at the bleeding point, forcefully injecting 1 ml of fibrin glue contained in the fibrin glue kit, and then slowly withdrawing the needle with continuous forceful injection of the remaining 1 ml of fibrin glue. We have successfully performed this procedure in 6 cases of living donor liver transplantation and in 2 cases of non-transplant resection of the cirrhotic livers with hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique was also successfully applied to one liver transplant recipient in which intractable bleeding occurred from a small laceration at the spleen. Our fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis would be indicated to intractable bleeding from the hepatic or splenic cut surface. In such a situation, it would be applicable as a second-line rescue method for hemostasis. PMID:28261700

  2. Secondary Voice Restoration After Laryngotracheal Separation (LTS) for Dysphagia with Intractable Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Katrien; Huvenne, Wouter; De Loof, Marie; Deron, Philippe; Viaene, Annick; Duprez, Fréderic; Vermeersch, Hubert

    2015-12-01

    Intractable aspiration is a serious, often life-threatening condition due to its potential impact on pulmonary function. Aspiration requires therapeutic measures, starting with conservative management but often necessitating surgical treatment. The basic surgical principle is to separate the alimentary and respiratory tracts through a variety of procedures which, unfortunately, nearly all result in the loss of phonation, with the exception of total laryngectomy (TL) which includes the placement of an indwelling voice prosthesis. In this study, we present a modified laryngotracheal separation (LTS) technique that, we believe, offers multiple advantages compared to standard TL. After reviewing the medical records of 35 patients with intractable aspiration who have undergone LTS, we describe the surgical technique and present the postoperative result. In a second surgical procedure about two months following LTS, we aimed to achieve voice restoration by placement of an indwelling voice prosthesis. Intractable aspiration was successfully treated in all patients. Placement of an indwelling voice prosthesis during a second operation was successful in 15 patients, representing the largest reported cohort thus far. LTS is a reliable surgical technique to treat intractable aspiration, with restoration of oral intake, thereby improving the general condition and quality of life of these unfortunate patients. Furthermore, voice restoration can be achieved in selected patients, by placement of a voice prosthesis.

  3. Fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis for intractable bleeding from the liver or spleen during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Song, Gi-Won; Ha, Tae-Yong; Jwa, Eun-Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Portal hypertension induces congestion of the liver and spleen, thus any capsular or parenchymal injury to these organs can produce intractable bleeding which generally is not easily controlled. To cope with intractable bleeding such as being encountered during liver transplantation, we developed an infiltrating hemostasis technique as a conceptual shift from conventional application methods, in which fibrin glue is locally injected into the bleeding area on the liver or spleen. This technique, which uses a fibrin glue kit (2 ml kit; Greenplast, Green Cross, Seoul, Korea), consists of inserting the needle 0.5-1 cm deep at the bleeding point, forcefully injecting 1 ml of fibrin glue contained in the fibrin glue kit, and then slowly withdrawing the needle with continuous forceful injection of the remaining 1 ml of fibrin glue. We have successfully performed this procedure in 6 cases of living donor liver transplantation and in 2 cases of non-transplant resection of the cirrhotic livers with hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique was also successfully applied to one liver transplant recipient in which intractable bleeding occurred from a small laceration at the spleen. Our fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis would be indicated to intractable bleeding from the hepatic or splenic cut surface. In such a situation, it would be applicable as a second-line rescue method for hemostasis.

  4. Lessons to Be Learned From Research on Peace Education in the Context of Intractable Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupermintz, Haggai; Salomon, Gavriel

    2005-01-01

    Recent research on peace education entails important practical lessons about educational work in regions of intractable conflict. Peace education in this context must deal with collective narratives and deeply rooted historical memories and societal beliefs. Research findings from a series of studies with Israeli and Palestinian students and…

  5. Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Resulting from Uterine Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Superselective Arteriographic Embolization via the Collateral Route

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Oztuerk, M. Halil; Guergen, Fatma; Soylu, Serra O.; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2007-04-15

    We present a patient with intractable postpartum hemorrhage resulting from uterine artery pseudoaneurysm despite bilateral hypogastric artery ligation who was successfully treated by an endovascular approach via the collateral route. Although there is a good argument for postponing surgery until transcatheter embolization has been attempted, this case shows that embolization can still be successful even if the iliac vessels have been ligated.

  6. Developing Agency through Peacebuilding in the Midst of Intractable Conflict: The Case of Israel and Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plonski, Sharri

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of "peacebuilding islands" within civil society as potential agents of transformation in the midst of intractable conflict. Focusing on the particular case of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the argument stems from a deconstruction of the legacy of national myopia perpetuated through social and…

  7. Factors contributing to decline in foodborne disease outbreak reports, United States.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Maho; Manikonda, Karunya; Murthy, Bhavini P; Gould, L Hannah

    2014-09-01

    The number of foodborne disease outbreaks reported in the United States declined substantially in 2009, when the surveillance system transitioned from reporting only foodborne disease outbreaks to reporting all enteric disease outbreaks. A 2013 survey found that some outbreaks that would have been previously reported as foodborne are now reported as having other transmission modes.

  8. Projections of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset.

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, R; Gray, S; Kawas, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to project the future prevalence and incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States and the potential impact of interventions to delay disease onset. METHODS: The numbers of individuals in the United States with Alzheimer's disease and the numbers of newly diagnosed cases that can be expected over the next 50 years were estimated from a model that used age-specific incidence rates summarized from several epidemiological studies, US mortality rates, and US Bureau of the Census projections. RESULTS: in 1997, the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States was 2.32 million (range: 1.09 to 4.58 million); of these individuals, 68% were female. It is projected that the prevalence will nearly quadruple in the next 50 years, by which time approximately 1 in 45 Americans will be afflicted with the disease. Currently, the annual number of new incident cases in 360,000. If interventions could delay onset of the disease by 2 years, after 50 years there would be nearly 2 million fewer cases than projected; if onset could be delayed by 1 year, there would be nearly 800,000 fewer prevalent cases. CONCLUSIONS: As the US population ages, Alzheimer's disease will become an enormous public health problem. interventions that could delay disease onset even modestly would have a major public health impact. PMID:9736873

  9. Mechanisms of dopamine transporter regulation in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roxanne A; Foster, James D

    2013-09-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) controls the spatial and temporal dynamics of DA neurotransmission by driving reuptake of extracellular transmitter into presynaptic neurons. Many diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with abnormal DA levels, implicating DAT as a factor in their etiology. Medications used to treat these disorders and many addictive drugs target DAT and enhance dopaminergic signaling by suppressing transmitter reuptake. We now understand that the transport and binding properties of DAT are regulated by complex and overlapping mechanisms that provide neurons with the ability to modulate DA clearance in response to physiological demands. These processes are controlled by endogenous signaling pathways and affected by exogenous transporter ligands, demonstrating their importance for normal neurotransmission, drug abuse, and disease treatments. Increasing evidence supports the disruption of these mechanisms in DA disorders, implicating dysregulation of transport in disease etiologies and suggesting these processes as potential points for therapeutic manipulation of DA availability.

  10. International Disease Surveillance: United States Government Goals and Paths Forward

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Biosurveillance Advisory Subcommittee ( NBAS ) have called upon the USG to enhance national security by strengthening its engagement with international... NBAS issued a report in 2009 that called upon the USG to develop a comprehensive strategy for disease surveillance and to improve coordination of...efforts among U.S. agencies.4 The NBAS proposed that the White House create an Interagency Disease Surveillance Coordination Committee, which would

  11. Calcified cysticercotic lesions and intractable epilepsy: a cross sectional study of 512 patients

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, T R; Zanello, P A; Dalmagro, C L; Araújo, D; Santos, A C; Bianchin, M M; Alexandre, V; Walz, R; Assirati, J A; Carlotti, C G; Takayanagui, O M; Sakamoto, A C; Leite, J P

    2006-01-01

    Background Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of epilepsy in developing countries and is endemic in Brazil. To test the hypothesis that the aetiological profile of patients with intractable epilepsy in Brazil includes neurocysticercosis, we conducted a cross sectional study investigating the aetiology of intractable epilepsy. Methods A total of 512 patients evaluated at the outpatient clinic for intractable epilepsy at the Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine were included in the survey. Medical intractability was determined on the basis of seizure incidence and severity, and response to appropriate epilepsy management. Neuroimaging included brain CT with non‐contrasted and contrasted phases and high resolution MRI. Patients were divided into neurocysticercosis and non‐neurocysticercosis groups according to previous diagnostic criteria. Results The most common epileptogenic lesions were mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS; 56.0%), malformations of cortical development (12.1%), and brain tumours (9.9%). Neuroimaging was normal in 8.7% of patients. Calcifications were found in 27% of patients and were significantly more common in patients with MTS than in those without MTS (p<0.001). Isolated neurocysticercosis was found in only eight patients (1.56%). Conclusions These data suggest that neurocysticercosis is an uncommon cause of intractable epilepsy, even in an endemic region such as Brazil, and that it may only represent a coexistent pathology. However, an analysis of our findings reveals that neurocysticercosis was more common in patients with MTS. This finding could suggest either that there is a cause‐effect relationship between MTS and neurocysticercosis, or that MTS and neurocysticercosis co‐vary with a missing variable, such as socio‐economic status. PMID:16543527

  12. A State-Wide Research Network for Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Bachman, D. L.; Stuckey, M.; Ebeling, M.; Wagner, M. T.; Evans, W. J.; Hirth, V.; Walker, A.; Joglekar, R.; Faison, W.

    2014-03-13

    The Specific Aim of the proposal was to develop an administrative structure that will facilitate the development of AD research across the state of SC by providing key services such as (but not limited to) seeking funding research opportunities, financial tracking, regulatory management, central recruitment, training for investigators and coordinators, data collection, data storing, and data processing to researchers across the state.

  13. Economic Burden of Disease-Associated Malnutrition at the State Level

    PubMed Central

    Goates, Scott; Du, Kristy; Braunschweig, Carol A.; Arensberg, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-associated malnutrition has been identified as a prevalent condition, particularly for the elderly, which has often been overlooked in the U.S. healthcare system. The state-level burden of community-based disease-associated malnutrition is unknown and there have been limited efforts by state policy makers to identify, quantify, and address malnutrition. The objective of this study was to examine and quantify the state-level economic burden of disease-associated malnutrition. Methods Direct medical costs of disease-associated malnutrition were calculated for 8 diseases: Stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Coronary Heart Failure, Breast Cancer, Dementia, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Depression, and Colorectal Cancer. National disease and malnutrition prevalence rates were estimated for subgroups defined by age, race, and sex using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey. State prevalence of disease-associated malnutrition was estimated by combining national prevalence estimates with states’ demographic data from the U.S. Census. Direct medical cost for each state was estimated as the increased expenditures incurred as a result of malnutrition. Principal Findings Direct medical costs attributable to disease-associated malnutrition vary among states from an annual cost of $36 per capita in Utah to $65 per capita in Washington, D.C. Nationally the annual cost of disease-associated malnutrition is over $15.5 billion. The elderly bear a disproportionate share of this cost on both the state and national level. Conclusions Additional action is needed to reduce the economic impact of disease-associated malnutrition, particularly at the state level. Nutrition may be a cost-effective way to help address high health care costs. PMID:27655372

  14. Association of Heart Block with Uncommon Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  15. [Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease): state of the art].

    PubMed

    Zerbino, D D; Zimba, E A; Bagry, N N

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) is systemic vasculitis with predominant development of thrombotic occlusions of small-to-medium diameter arteries of distal portions of both upper and lower limbs. A distinctive feature of Buerger's disease from other vasculitides is the involvement of the venous bed into the pathological process in the form of migrating thrombophlebitis. The disease is encountered more often in young adult males, predominantly tobacco smokers. The clinical pattern is presented by symptoms of increasing insufficiency of blood supply of tissues of extremities. The diagnosis is made by means of ruling out other vascular diseases (atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, systemic diseases of connective tissue, hypercoagulation conditions) based on clinical and laboratory findings, as well as modern methods of visualization, including multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography. Of special importance is a pathomorphological examination aimed at detecting the signs specific for Buerger's disease: arteries showing intimal hyperplasia (from stenosis to complete obliteration according to the capillary angiomatosis type, vascular "recalibration", obliteration of lumens by thrombi, lack of calcification of the tunica media; venous alterations are presented by panphlebitis with intimal hyperplasia, and occlusion with thrombi. Treatment is aimed at eliminating the aetiological stimulus (i. e, smoking), improving blood circulation by means of regular, dosed physical exercises, and administration of anti-ischaemic agents (analogues of prostaglandins, calcium channel antagonists, antiaggregants and anticoagulants). Failure of conservative treatment failed should be followed by making a decision to perform revascularization (endovascular interventions, bypass reconstructive operations, arterialization of the venous blood flow of the foot, resection of the posterior tibial veins, transplantation of the greater omentum onto the crus).

  16. Family history and disease outcomes in patients with Crohn’s disease: A comparison between China and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Qi; Hu, Jun; Al Kazzi, Elie S; Akhuemonkhan, Eboselume; Zhi, Min; Gao, Xiang; de Paula Pessoa, Raquel Holand; Ghazaleh, Sami; Cornelius, Tuhina; Sabunwala, Suhel Abbas; Ghadermarzi, Shadi; Tripathi, Kartikeya; Lazarev, Mark; Hu, Pin-Jin; Hutfless, Susan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the differences in family history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and clinical outcomes among individuals with Crohn’s disease (CD) residing in China and the United States. METHODS We performed a survey-based cross-sectional study of participants with CD recruited from China and the United States. We compared the prevalence of IBD family history and history of ileal involvement, CD-related surgeries and IBD medications in China and the United States, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS We recruited 49 participants from China and 145 from the United States. The prevalence of family history of IBD was significantly lower in China compared with the United States (China: 4.1%, United States: 39.3%). The three most commonly affected types of relatives were cousin, sibling, and parent in the United States compared with child and sibling in China. Ileal involvement (China: 63.3%, United States: 63.5%) and surgery for CD (China: 51.0%, United States: 49.7%) were nearly equivalent in the two countries. CONCLUSION The lower prevalence of familial clustering of IBD in China may suggest that the etiology of CD is less attributed to genetic background or a family-shared environment compared with the United States. Despite the potential difference in etiology, surgery and ileal involvement were similar in the two countries. Examining the changes in family history during the continuing rise in IBD may provide further insight into the etiology of CD. PMID:27867689

  17. Intractable metabolic acidosis in a patient with colovesical fistula.

    PubMed

    Pillinger, Toby; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Jones, Gregory; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-11-23

    A 58-year-old female presented with urosepsis and faecaluria secondary to a colovesical fistula of diverticular aetiology. A plan was made for surgical repair of the fistula. Preoperatively the patient developed a hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis, with hyperkalaemia and hyponatraemia. Renal function was normal, and a short synachten test ruled out Addison's disease. Postoperatively her acid-base physiology normalised in the absence of medical management, demonstrating that surgical intervention was responsible for resolution of the patient's metabolic acidosis. The mechanisms by which colovesical pathophysiology causes hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis are discussed. Although diverticular disease is the most common cause of colovesical fistulae, this is the first report of such fistulae causing metabolic acidosis.

  18. [The state of vector-borne diseases in Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, F

    2000-01-01

    From epidemiological point of view, Indonesia is an extremely interesting area owing its insular structure and ecological, anthropological, cultural and economical diversity. As everywhere, vector-borne diseases are the result of complex and variable epidemiological systems, subject both to biogeographical rules and human activity. Two main arboviroses are present in Indonesia: dengue and Japanese encephalitis. Dengue appears as an endemoepidemic disease and is mostly circumscribed to urban areas. Haemorrhagic cases were first observed in 1968; since then, the incidence has been constantly increasing and the disease is now one of the principal causes of child lethality. Japanese encephalitis is a rural endemic disease transmitted by rice-field mosquitoes; its incidence remains relatively low since pigs, which are usual link-hosts for the virus, are uncommon in this mainly Muslem country. Human clinical cases are recorded from non-Muslem islands such as Bali or Irian Jaya which raises the question of immunisation for travellers. Recently, Japanese encephalitis was observed on east of the Wallace line which had been considered as the eastern cut-off line. Malaria is common throughout the country, Plasmodium vivax being the most frequent species. Some of the Anopheline vectors are related to brackish water as are coastal species; others have been favoured by rice growing. Several species bite and rest outdoors, rendering control measures complex. Moreover, chloroquine resistance is increasing in both P. falciparum and P. vivax. All three filaria species responsible for human lymphatic filariasis exist in Indonesia. Bancroft filariasis is present in rather limited foci on most of the islands; malayan filariasis is very prevalent on many islands, mostly in coastal areas, and Timor filariasis exist only on a few small islands. These parasitic diseases are cumulative and do not practically endanger the health of travellers. In the past, plague was common on Java island

  19. State of non-communicable diseases in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) is still unknown in Nepal. The Ministry of Health and Population, Government of Nepal has not yet formulated policy regarding NCDs in the absence of evidence based finding. The study aims to find out the hospital based prevalence of NCDs in Nepal, thus directing the concerned authorities at policy level. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted to identify the hospital based prevalence of 4 NCDs (cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), wherein 400 indoor patients admitted during 2009 were randomly selected from each of the 31 selected health institutions which included all non-specialist tertiary level hospitals outside the Kathmandu valley (n = 25), all specialist tertiary level hospitals in the country (n = 3) and 3 non-specialist tertiary level hospitals inside the Kathmandu valley. In case of Kathmandu valley, 3 non-specialist health institutions- one central hospital, one medical college and one private hospital were randomly selected. The main analyses are based on the 28 non-specialist hospitals. Univariate (frequency and percentage) and bivariate (cross-tabulation) analysis were used. Results In non-specialist institutions, the hospital based NCD prevalence was 31%. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (43%) was the most common NCD followed by cardiovascular disease (40%), diabetes mellitus (12%) and cancer (5%). Ovarian (14%), stomach (14%) and lung cancer (10%) were the main cancers accounting for 38% of distribution. Majority of CVD cases were hypertension (47%) followed by cerebrovascular accident (16%), congestive cardiac failure (11%), ischemic heart disease (7%), rheumatic heart disease (5%) and myocardial infarction (2%). CVD was common in younger age groups while COPD in older age groups. Majority among males (42%) and females (45%) were suffering from COPD. Conclusions The study was able to reveal that Nepal is also

  20. Foodborne (1973-2013) and Waterborne (1971-2013) Disease Outbreaks - United States.

    PubMed

    Dewey-Mattia, Daniel; Roberts, Virginia A; Vieira, Antonio; Fullerton, Kathleen E

    2016-10-14

    CDC collects data on foodborne and waterborne disease outbreaks reported by all U.S. states and territories through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (FDOSS) (http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/fdoss/surveillance/index.html) and the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance), respectively. These two systems are the primary source of national data describing the number of reported outbreaks; outbreak-associated illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths; etiologic agents; water source or implicated foods; settings of exposure; and other factors associated with recognized foodborne and waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States.

  1. Transcending intractable conflict in health care: an exploratory study of communication and conflict management among anesthesia providers.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Jessica Katz

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the contrast between the longstanding, intractable conflict between two anesthesia providers and the cooperation of many individual nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologists working side-by-side to provide safe, effective anesthesia. Analysis of interview transcripts reveals that communication among anesthesia nurses and anesthesiologists may enact or transcend the conflict. This article proposes recommendations for improving communication between anesthesiologists and certified registered nurse anesthetists in particular and de-escalating intractable conflict in general. It also contributes to communication theory in intractable conflict by examining how individual, interpersonal conflict management interactions lead to either transcendence or enactment of the larger group conflict.

  2. Transglutaminase 2 Inhibitors and their Therapeutic Role in Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Matthew; Khosla, Chaitan

    2007-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multi-domain, multi-functional enzyme that post-translationally modifies proteins by catalyzing the formation of intermolecular isopeptide bonds between glutamine and lysine side-chains. It plays a role in diverse biological functions, including extracellular matrix formation, integrin mediated signaling, and signal transduction involving 7-transmembrane receptors. While some of the roles of TG2 under normal physiological conditions remain obscure, the protein is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of several unrelated diseases including celiac sprue, neurodegenerative diseases, and certain types of cancer. A variety of small molecule and peptidomimetic inhibitors of the TG2 active site have been identified. Here we summarize the biochemistry, biology, pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of human TG2. PMID:17582505

  3. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease: state-of-the-art treatments for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Michael R

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacological and surgical treatments offer symptomatic benefits to patients with Parkinson's disease; however, as the condition progresses, patients experience gradual worsening in symptom control, with the development of a range of disabling complications. In addition, none of the currently available therapies have convincingly shown disease-modifying effects - either in slowing or reversing the disease. These problems have led to extensive research into the possible use of gene therapy as a treatment for Parkinson's disease. Several treatments have reached human clinical trial stages, providing important information on the risks and benefits of this novel therapeutic approach, and the tantalizing promise of improved control of this currently incurable neurodegenerative disorder.

  4. Idiopathic Intractable Diarrhoea Leading to Torsade de Pointes

    PubMed Central

    Mouyis, Kyriacos; Okonko, Darlington; Missouris, Constantinos G.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old lady was admitted to our hospital with a 3-year history of noninfective diarrhoea and recurrent syncopal events over the last 3 months. Her initial electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed trigeminy and prolonged QTc interval. She had a structurally normal heart with no coronary artery disease. Investigations revealed low potassium at 3.0 mmol/L. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggested a possible diagnosis of diverticulitis. Soon after admission she had an unresponsive episode with spontaneous recovery. Telemetry and Holter analysis confirmed multiple episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (Torsade de Pointes). Following electrolyte supplementation the episodes of polymorphic VT improved. Due to the protracted nature of the diarrhoea, the recurrent syncopal events, and recurrent hypokalaemia documented over recent years, an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) was sanctioned by the multidisciplinary team (MDT). In summary, chronic diarrhoea may result in life threatening polymorphic VT due to hypokalaemia and QTc prolongation. In these patients an ICD may be considered. PMID:27313906

  5. Nanoimaging in cardiovascular diseases: Current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Suryyani; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati Dharmapal

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been integrated into healthcare system in terms of diagnosis as well as therapy. The massive impact of imaging nanotechnology has a deeper intervention in cardiology i.e. as contrast agents, to target vulnerable plaques with site specificity and in a theranostic approach to treat these plaques, stem cell delivery in necrotic myocardium, etc. Thus cardiovascular nanoimaging is not limited to simple diagnosis but also can help real time tracking during therapy as well as surgery. The present review provides a comprehensive description of the molecular imaging techniques for cardiovascular diseases with the help of nanotechnology and the potential clinical implications of nanotechnology for future applications. PMID:25963489

  6. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE DISEASE AND OUTBREAK ASSOCIATED WITH RECREATIONAL WATER - UNITED STATES 2003-2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1971, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting da...

  7. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Lesioning of the Phrenic Nerve in a Patient with Intractable Hiccup

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keum Nae; Park, In Kyung; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2010-01-01

    Persistent and intractable hiccups (with respective durations of more than 48 hours and 1 month) can result in depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, dehydration, weight loss, malnutrition, and aspiration syndromes. The conventional treatments for hiccups are either non-pharmacological, pharmacological or a nerve block treatment. Pulsed radiofrequency lesioning (PRFL) has been proposed for the modulation of the excited nervous system pathway of pain as a safe and nondestructive treatment method. As placement of the electrode in close proximity to the targeted nerve is very important for the success of PRFL, ultrasound appears to be well suited for this technique. A 74-year-old man suffering from intractable hiccups that had developed after a coronary artery bypass graft and had continued for 7 years was referred to our pain clinic. He had not been treated with conventional methods or medications. We performed PRFL of the phrenic nerve guided by ultrasound and the hiccups disappeared. PMID:20830266

  8. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Treatment of Chronic Intractable Anorectal Pain -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kyung Seung; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Hue Jung; Lee, Min Hye; Kim, Dong Hee

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent methodological advancement of the practical pain medicine, many cases of the chronic anorectal pain have been intractable. A 54-year-old female patient who had a month history of a constant severe anorectal pain was referred to our clinic for further management. No organic or functional pathology was found. In spite of several modalities of management, such as medications and nerve blocks had been applied, the efficacy of such treatments was not long-lasting. Eventually, she underwent temporary then subsequent permanent sacral nerve stimulation. Her sequential numerical rating scale for pain and pain disability index were markedly improved. We report a successful management of the chronic intractable anorectal pain via permanent sacral nerve stimulation. But further controlled studies may be needed. PMID:20552076

  9. Intra-abdominal abscess and intractable sinus - a rare late complication after splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Badri; Hampton, James

    2017-01-01

    Intra-abdominal abscess and an intractable abdominal wall sinus forty years after splenectomy is rare, which has not been described previously in the surgical literature. We report the management of a patient who had presented with an intractable sinus on his left hypochondrium forty years after having undergone splenectomy and cholecystectomy, which persisted for more than two years despite repeated surgery and courses of antibiotics and compromised quality of life significantly from pain. A sinogram and computerised tomographic scan followed by exploration and laying open of the sinus delivered multiple silk sutures used for ligation of splenic pedicle, led to complete resolution of the sinus. It is important to avoid using non-absorbable silk sutures during splenectomy when splenectomy is undertaken in a contaminated field. Appropriate imaging and exploration is mandatory for its resolution. PMID:28138442

  10. Mirror movements following cortical resection of polymicrogyria in a child with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    RamachandranNair, Rajesh; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Ochi, Ayako; Rutka, James; Donner, Elizabeth J

    2006-02-01

    Mirror movements may be congenital or acquired. There are few reports of acquired mirror movements in pediatric patients. Further, mirror movements in children with epilepsy have rarely been reported. A 9-year old male, with intractable partial epilepsy resulting from polymicrogyria of the right hemisphere, underwent cortical resection of the right frontotemporoparietal region for a malformation of cortical development. He developed left hemiplegia and mirror movements in the left hand in the postoperative period. Four months after surgery, he remained seizure-free with mild residual left-sided hemiplegia and persistent mirror movements. Mechanisms postulated for mirror movements include aberrant pyramidal tract development and transcallosal inhibitory pathways. The latter mechanism might have contributed to the mirror movements observed in this child. This study is the first report of mirror movements following focal cortical resection for intractable epilepsy due to polymicrogyria.

  11. The adrenal gland: common disease states and suspected new applications.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Linda S

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal gland, while small in size, provides a major punch to human metabolism. The interplay between the adrenal cortex hormones aldosterone and cortisol provides needed regulation to human metabolism. Aldosterone regulates the body sodium content affecting blood pressure thru fluid-volume regulation by the kidney. Cortisol, also from the adrenal cortex, contributes to regulation of glucose and protein metabolism. Diseases like addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome that affect the normal levels of these hormones can lead to serious pathologies that need to be detected thru clinical laboratory testing. The inner core of the adrenal gland, called the medulla, houses the catecholamine epinephrine, a fast acting neuropeptide hormone that can influence body action and energy levels quickly. The pheochromocytomas pathology of the adrenal medulla adversely affects the medulla hormones and needs to be recognized by clinical laboratory testing. The overview of the adrenal gland and its potential pathologies needs to be looked at anew in relation to post-traumatic stress disorder to find any linkage that may aid in the treatment and cure of our affected military soldiers. This interrelationship between cortisol and epinephrine in PTSD should be closely evaluated to determine if the suspected linkages are significant.

  12. Welding occupations and mortality from Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases among United States men, 1985-1999.

    PubMed

    Stampfer, Meir J

    2009-05-01

    Metal welding produces gaseous fumes that contain manganese, resulting in potential occupational exposure to welders. It has been hypothesized that occupational exposure among welders could increase risk of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. The present study examines welding occupation and mortality from neurodegenerative diseases among men in the United States using the National Cause of Death databases 1985 to 1999. Information was abstracted from death certificates for states that collected data on occupation. Of 4,252,490 men who died during the study period, 107,773 had welding-related occupations. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate mortality odds ratios (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for odds of dying from Parkinson's disease or other neurodegenerative diseases among men who were welders as compared with men of other occupations, adjusting for attained age, race, region of residence, and year of death. During the study period, 49,174 deaths were attributed to Parkinson's disease, 54,892 to Alzheimer's disease, and 19,018 to presenile dementia. There was no evidence of an increased odds of Parkinson's disease mortality among welders as compared with men with other occupations (MOR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.78-0.88). Furthermore, welding occupation was unrelated to the odds of mortality from Alzheimer's disease (MOR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.89-1.00) or presenile dementia (MOR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.87-1.06). Earlier research suggested that welding exposures could predispose individuals to earlier onset Parkinson's disease. However, there was no evidence in this data of an increased mortality odds ratio associated with welding occupations among men younger than 65 (MOR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.74-1.44); while there was a suggestion of a lower odds Parkinson's disease death among men age 65 years and older (MOR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.77-0.88). Data from this large study do not support an association between welding occupations and death

  13. Cinacalcet hydrochloride relieves hypercalcemia in Japanese patients with parathyroid cancer and intractable primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Miura, Daishu; Katagiri, Makoto; Nakashima, Noriaki; Ohishi, Hiroko; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Tominaga, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-21

    Pharmacological treatment of hypercalcemia is essential for patients with parathyroid carcinoma and intractable primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Use of the calcimimetic cinacalcet hydrochloride (cinacalcet) is an option to treat such patients. We investigated the efficacy and safety of cinacalcet in Japanese patients with parathyroid carcinoma and intractable PHPT. Five Japanese patients with parathyroid carcinoma and two with intractable PHPT were enrolled in an open-label, single-arm study consisting of titration and maintenance phases. Cinacalcet doses were titrated until the albumin-corrected serum calcium concentration decreased to 10.0 mg/dL or less or until dose escalation was considered not necessary or feasible. Serum calcium concentration at the baseline was 12.1 ± 1.3 mg/dL (mean ± standard deviation; range 10.4-14.6 mg/dL) and decreased to 10.1 ± 1.6 mg/dL (range 8.6-13.3 mg/dL) at the end of the titration phase with cinacalcet at a dosage of up to 75 mg three times a day. At the end of the titration phase, at least a 1 mg/dL reduction in serum calcium concentration from the baseline was observed in five patients (three with carcinoma and two with PHPT), and it decreased to the normocalcemic range in five patients (three with carcinoma and two with PHPT). Common adverse events were nausea and vomiting. One patient discontinued participation in the study because of an adverse event, liver disorder. Cinacalcet effectively relieved hypercalcemia in 60% of the Japanese patients with parathyroid carcinoma and might be effective in those with intractable PHPT. The drug might be tolerable and safe at a dosage of at most 75 mg three times a day.

  14. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  15. Percutaneous cyanoacrylate glue injection into the renal pseudoaneurysm to control intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Lal, Anupam; Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  16. Can We Break Intractability Using Randomization or the Average Case Setting?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    Although the physicists at Los Alamos did not know about computational complexity, they realized they could not solve certain problems. This led to the...fined below, this has led to proven (not conjectured) intractability and unsolvability results which we’ll describe in Section 2. Because of the basic...winthtinith inJtegration probles, randomizaein s rprncate. wormselortutio roat inteation, a ot- thskid) makes the computautional Rtandomizhatriponakmlt(ivaa

  17. Kissing Bugs in the United States: Risk for Vector-Borne Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Stephen A; Dorn, Patricia L; Mosbacher, Mark; Schmidt, Justin O

    2014-01-01

    Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States. Their home ranges may be expanding northward, perhaps as a consequence of climate change. At least eight of the species, perhaps all, are reported to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Because humans are encroaching on kissing bug habitat, there is concern for vector-transmitted Chagas disease in the United States. To date, documented autochthonous cases of Chagas in humans in the United States are rare. Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America. We review the biology, behavior, and medical importance of kissing bugs and the risk they pose for transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species. PMID:25574143

  18. Kissing bugs in the United States: risk for vector-borne disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Stephen A; Dorn, Patricia L; Mosbacher, Mark; Schmidt, Justin O

    2014-01-01

    Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States. Their home ranges may be expanding northward, perhaps as a consequence of climate change. At least eight of the species, perhaps all, are reported to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Because humans are encroaching on kissing bug habitat, there is concern for vector-transmitted Chagas disease in the United States. To date, documented autochthonous cases of Chagas in humans in the United States are rare. Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America. We review the biology, behavior, and medical importance of kissing bugs and the risk they pose for transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species.

  19. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  20. Intractable hiccup as the presenting symptom of cavernous hemangioma in the medulla oblongata: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Jung, Min-Young; Jung, Shin

    2014-06-01

    A case of intractable hiccup developed by cavernous hemangioma in the medulla oblongata is reported. There have been only five previously reported cases of medullary cavernoma that triggered intractable hiccup. The patient was a 28-year-old man who was presented with intractable hiccup for 15 days. It developed suddenly, then aggravated progressively and did not respond to any types of medication. On magnetic resonance images, a well-demarcated and non-enhancing mass with hemorrhagic changes was noted in the left medulla oblongata. Intraoperative findings showed that the lesion was fully embedded within the brain stem and pathology confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. The hiccup resolved completely after the operation. Based on the presumption that the medullary cavernoma may trigger intractable hiccup by displacing or compression the hiccup arc of the dorsolateral medulla, surgical excision can eliminate the symptoms, even in the case totally buried in brainstem.

  1. Disease causing mutations of troponin alter regulated actin state distributions.

    PubMed

    Chalovich, Joseph M

    2012-12-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated primarily through the action of tropomyosin and troponin that are bound to actin. Activation requires Ca(2+) binding to troponin and/or binding of high affinity myosin complexes to actin. Mutations within components of the regulatory complex may lead to familial cardiomyopathies and myopathies. In several cases examined, either physiological or pathological changes in troponin alter the distribution among states of actin-tropomyosin-troponin that differ in their abilities to stimulate myosin ATPase activity. These observations open possibilities for managing disorders of the troponin complex. Furthermore, analyses of mutant forms of troponin give insights into the regulation of striated muscle contraction.

  2. Disease management: state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, E P; Sclar, D A

    1999-03-01

    Disease management (DM) programs have become common in health systems, especially in managed care organizations and hospitals. These programs are designed to improve both the quality of care and the efficiency of health care delivery. However, there may be controversy about the most important outcomes to consider. Furthermore, the effectiveness of DM initiatives is largely undocumented in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to review the issues, methods, and outcomes involved in creating and instituting DM programs. To improve DM efforts within health systems, constructive relationships with practitioners need to be built by involving important individuals early in the process. It is hoped that evidence-based guidelines will further enhance DM efforts. Beneficial DM initiatives require a multidisciplinary focus of cooperation and willingness to share data between distinct professional groups. More thorough analysis of DM programs is needed in many health systems.

  3. Altered Resting State Brain Networks in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Göttlich, Martin; Münte, Thomas F.; Heldmann, Marcus; Kasten, Meike; Hagenah, Johann; Krämer, Ulrike M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to dysfunctional cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical loops. In addition to the characteristic motor symptoms, PD patients often show cognitive impairments, affective changes and other non-motor symptoms, suggesting system-wide effects on brain function. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph-theory based analysis methods to investigate altered whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity in PD patients (n = 37) compared to healthy controls (n = 20). Global network properties indicated less efficient processing in PD. Analysis of brain network modules pointed to increased connectivity within the sensorimotor network, but decreased interaction of the visual network with other brain modules. We found lower connectivity mainly between the cuneus and the ventral caudate, medial orbitofrontal cortex and the temporal lobe. To identify regions of altered connectivity, we mapped the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity both on ROI- and on voxel-level across the brain. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients showed lower connectedness in the medial and middle orbitofrontal cortex. The degree of connectivity was also decreased in the occipital lobe (cuneus and calcarine), but increased in the superior parietal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, supramarginal gyrus and supplementary motor area. Our results on global network and module properties indicated that PD manifests as a disconnection syndrome. This was most apparent in the visual network module. The higher connectedness within the sensorimotor module in PD patients may be related to compensation mechanism in order to overcome the functional deficit of the striato-cortical motor loops or to loss of mutual inhibition between brain networks. Abnormal connectivity in the visual network may be related to adaptation and compensation processes as a consequence of

  4. Effects of landscape fragmentation and climate on Lyme disease incidence in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phoebe Minh; Waller, Lance

    2013-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most frequently reported vector borne illness in the United States, and incidences are increasing steadily year after year. This study explores the influence of landscape (e.g., land use pattern and landscape fragmentation) and climatic factors (e.g., temperature and precipitation) at a regional scale on Lyme disease incidence. The study area includes thirteen states in the Northeastern United States. Lyme disease incidence at county level for the period of 2002-2006 was linked with several key landscape and climatic variables in a negative binomial regression model. Results show that Lyme disease incidence has a relatively clear connection with regional landscape fragmentation and temperature. For example, more fragmentation between forests and residential areas results in higher local Lyme disease incidence. This study also indicates that, for the same landscape, some landscape variables derived at a particular scale show a clearer connection to Lyme disease than do others. In general, the study sheds more light on connections between Lyme disease incidence and climate and landscape patterns at the regional scale. Integrating findings of this regional study with studies at a local scale will further refine understanding of the pattern of Lyme disease as well as increase our ability to predict, prevent, and respond to disease.

  5. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Andrew J; Moore, Sean M; Sampson, Kevin M; Beard, Charles B; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2015-07-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4-0.5 weeks earlier for 2025-2040 (p<0.05), and 0.7-1.9 weeks earlier for 2065-2080 (p<0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0-3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2-2.3 weeks) by 2065-2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions.

  6. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Andrew J.; Moore, Sean M.; Sampson, Kevin M.; Beard, Charles B.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4–0.5 weeks earlier for 2025–2040 (p < 0.05), and 0.7–1.9 weeks earlier for 2065–2080 (p < 0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0–3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2–2.3 weeks) by 2065–2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions. PMID:26025268

  7. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, A. J.; Moore, S. M.; Sampson, K. M.; Beard, C. B.; Eisen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. Lyme disease occurrence is highly seasonal and the annual springtime onset of cases is modulated by meteorological conditions in preceding months. A meteorological-based empirical model for Lyme disease onset week in the United States is driven with downscaled simulations from five global climate models and four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios to project the impacts of 21st century climate change on the annual onset week of Lyme disease. Projections are made individually and collectively for the 12 eastern States where >90% of cases occur. The national average annual onset week of Lyme disease is projected to become 0.4-0.5 weeks earlier for 2025-2040 (p<0.05), and 0.7-1.9 weeks earlier for 2065-2080 (p<0.01), with the largest shifts for scenarios with the highest greenhouse gas emissions. The more southerly mid-Atlantic States exhibit larger shifts (1.0-3.5 weeks) compared to the Northeastern and upper Midwestern States (0.2-2.3 weeks) by 2065-2080. Winter and spring temperature increases primarily cause the earlier onset. Greater spring precipitation and changes in humidity partially counteract the temperature effects. The model does not account for the possibility that abrupt shifts in the life cycle of Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in the eastern United States, may alter the disease transmission cycle in unforeseen ways. The results suggest 21st century climate change will make environmental conditions suitable for earlier annual onset of Lyme disease cases in the United States with possible implications for the timing of public health interventions.

  8. Intractable Acute Pain Related to Fluoroquinolone-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Arash; Onyima, Chiemeka; Dukewich, Matthew; Gupta, Anita

    2017-03-30

    Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics, used for various infectious etiologies. These antibiotics carry the possibility of the serious adverse effect of peripheral neuropathy, with a true incidence not known owing to its rare existence. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has required alterations to drug labels to highlight this adverse effect of fluoroquinolones. This is a case report of a single patient at an inpatient neurology service at an urban academic medical center in the United States. The patient is a 20-year-old male, with well-controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus, presenting with a short duration of bilateral lower extremity pain following a 10-day course of levofloxacin for suspected epididymitis. The patient was initially diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome and treated with a variety of pain medications, including lidocaine infusions, hydromorphone, methadone, and ketamine infusions. After review of the patient's history and limited response to medical management, the patient's condition was reclassified as an adverse effect from fluoroquinolone treatment. Pain of unknown etiology can be perplexing, both for the physician and the patient. Reporting of similar incidents attributed to medication adverse effects will increase the awareness of this type of neuropathy, avoid future cases of misdiagnosis, and enable early detection and treatment.

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-10-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular

  10. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders in State Mental Hospitals: Data from a Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moak, Gary S.; Fisher, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Reports data from nationwide survey of state mental hospitals, providing exploratory look at patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders currently residing in state hospitals. Describes admissions trends, reasons for admission, and sources of referral. Discusses civil commitment of nursing home patients with dementing illnesses and…

  11. [Some immunological aspects in the reaccional states of Hansen disease].

    PubMed

    Rada, Elsa; Nacarid, Aranzazu; Convit, Jacinto

    2005-12-01

    The crucial clinical problem in leprosy is represented by episodes of intense inflammation that produce nerve damage. When Mycobacterium leprae has been eliminated by means of antibiotics, the death of the bacteria is not a complete solution to the damage caused in nerves. Two of the more frequent immunopathological phenomena in Hansen's disease are Type I, reactions, known as Reversal Reactions (RR), and Type II reactions, of which the most frequent and well known are those called Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL). Type II reactions have been defined as an immunologic complication in multibacillary patients. Both types of reactions are accompanied mainly by the increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, INF-gamma, IL-10, IL-12, among others. In a retrospective analysis of a population of 150 patients of the Central Service of Dermatology, Institute of Biomedicine, where these patients were subjected to Multidrug Therapy (MDT) and MDT + inmunotherapy (IMT), both groups presented type II reactions, but the group that additionally received inmunotherapy also presented type I reactions. In the group of patients that presented ENL, it appeared to be associated with the large amount of bacilli in their lesions.

  12. Putting chronic disease on the map: building GIS capacity in state and local health departments.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Casper, Michele; Tootoo, Joshua; Schieb, Linda

    2013-06-20

    Techniques based on geographic information systems (GIS) have been widely adopted and applied in the fields of infectious disease and environmental epidemiology; their use in chronic disease programs is relatively new. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is collaborating with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the University of Michigan to provide health departments with capacity to integrate GIS into daily operations, which support priorities for surveillance and prevention of chronic diseases. So far, 19 state and 7 local health departments participated in this project. On the basis of these participants' experiences, we describe our training strategy and identify high-impact GIS skills that can be mastered and applied over a short time in support of chronic disease surveillance. We also describe the web-based resources in the Chronic Disease GIS Exchange that were produced on the basis of this training and are available to anyone interested in GIS and chronic disease (www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/maps/GISX). GIS offers diverse sets of tools that promise increased productivity for chronic disease staff of state and local health departments.

  13. Trends in mortality from skin diseases in the United States: skin infectious diseases are claiming more lives.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Alan B

    2016-07-15

    BackgroundAlthough there has been some excellent work published on the mortality from non-neoplastic skin disease In the United States, further analysis of trends is limited.MethodsData from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for mortality abstracted from Death Certificates was obtained from the WONDER (wide-ranging online data for epidemiologic research) system from 1999 to 2014. Categorical variables were analyzed with Excel 2013 data analysis software using Chi-squared tests whereas regression was performed for trends.ResultsCrude death rates were highest in the South, especially in Mississippi and Louisiana. This work also confirmed that Blacks or African Americans had higher risk of death from skin disease, whereas Hispanic or Latinos had lower risk. Overall mortality from non-neoplastic diseases is increasing over time and significant increases in mortality from infectious and papulosquamous diseases were observed, whereas there appears to be decreasing mortality from dermatitis and miscellaneous skin disorders (ICD-10-CM L80-90).ConclusionsMortality is increasing from non-neoplastic diseases, especially infectious and papulosquamous diseases. Demographic factors such age race and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity also confer differential risk.

  14. A Chronic Disease State Simulation in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Cindy Leslie A.; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a chronic disease state simulation in an ambulatory care elective course and to assess the simulation’s impact on students’ perceptions of their empathy toward patients and of their counseling skills. Design. The chronic disease state simulation occurred over 2 weeks. Students alternated playing the role of patient and pharmacist. As patients, students adhered to medication regimens, lifestyle modifications, and blood glucose or blood pressure monitoring. As pharmacists, students conducted patient interviews, and provided education and counseling. Empathy and counseling skills were assessed through course surveys, written reflections, and SOAP notes. Assessment. Results from a cohort of 130 students indicated the simulation enhanced students’ perceptions of their abilities to empathize with and counsel patients with chronic diseases. Conclusion. The chronic disease state simulation provides a novel approach to develop skills needed for working with complex patient cases in ambulatory care settings. PMID:26839423

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging brain findings in a case of aquaporin-4 antibody-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, presenting with intractable vomiting and hiccups

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Prerna; Rajasekaran, Muthusubramanian; Pandey, Salil; Gurusamy, Gnanashanmugam; Balalakshmoji, Devanand; Rathinasamy, Rajakumar

    2017-01-01

    Neuromyelitisoptica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS) were once considered to be differing manifestation of same auto immune disease, NMO predominantly involving the optic nerve and cord. Now with discovery of NMO antibody the concept has changed and a spectrum of disorders with lesions in brain has been identified. Occasionally, brain may be the first or the only site of involvement in these disorders hence it is essential to be aware of this spectrum. The brain lesions in NMO/NMOSD may be located in characteristic regions and present with symptoms mimicking non neurological disease. We herein present a case of an adult female who was admitted with intractable vomiting and hiccups; subsequently on MRI brain found to have very tiny demyelinating foci in Area Postrema. PMID:28149102

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging brain findings in a case of aquaporin-4 antibody-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, presenting with intractable vomiting and hiccups.

    PubMed

    Garg, Prerna; Rajasekaran, Muthusubramanian; Pandey, Salil; Gurusamy, Gnanashanmugam; Balalakshmoji, Devanand; Rathinasamy, Rajakumar

    2017-01-01

    Neuromyelitisoptica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS) were once considered to be differing manifestation of same auto immune disease, NMO predominantly involving the optic nerve and cord. Now with discovery of NMO antibody the concept has changed and a spectrum of disorders with lesions in brain has been identified. Occasionally, brain may be the first or the only site of involvement in these disorders hence it is essential to be aware of this spectrum. The brain lesions in NMO/NMOSD may be located in characteristic regions and present with symptoms mimicking non neurological disease. We herein present a case of an adult female who was admitted with intractable vomiting and hiccups; subsequently on MRI brain found to have very tiny demyelinating foci in Area Postrema.

  17. Study and analysis of the state of rare disease research in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Cui, Yazhou; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pang, Jingxiang; Zhang, Xiumei; Xu, Shuangqing; Han, Jinxiang

    2012-11-01

    As the world's most populous country, China has the world's largest number of rare disease groups in terms of prevalence. However, the country has no system of registering cases of most rare diseases, so there is very little documented information on the epidemiology of those diseases. The purpose of this study was to study the state of rare disease research and survey doctors in Shandong Province regarding their level of awareness of rare diseases. Types of rare diseases and numbers of cases were tallied and their geographical distribution over the decades was analyzed. Eight hundred and twenty-four doctors in tertiary hospitals and maternity and child care hospitals were surveyed by questionnaire. Data were descriptively analyzed and a map of disease distribution was created. Articles about rare diseases were retrieved from the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database to provide pertinent data. This study yielded 5,749 cases of 323 different types of rare diseases. The survey found that doctors lack awareness of research on rare diseases. An authoritative and information-rich platform for rare disease research is urgently needed. Key steps are to study epidemiological and statistical techniques and then obtain available data to provide a basis for the definition and regulation of rare diseases in China.

  18. Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata

    PubMed Central

    Closek, Collin J; Sunagawa, Shinichi; DeSalvo, Michael K; Piceno, Yvette M; DeSantis, Todd Z; Brodie, Eoin L; Weber, Michele X; Voolstra, Christian R; Andersen, Gary L; Medina, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Coral diseases impact reefs globally. Although we continue to describe diseases, little is known about the etiology or progression of even the most common cases. To examine a spectrum of coral health and determine factors of disease progression we examined Orbicella faveolata exhibiting signs of Yellow Band Disease (YBD), a widespread condition in the Caribbean. We used a novel combined approach to assess three members of the coral holobiont: the coral-host, associated Symbiodinium algae, and bacteria. We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. 16S ribosomal RNA gene microarrays (PhyloChips) and O. faveolata complimentary DNA microarrays revealed the bacterial community structure and host transcriptional response, respectively. A distinct bacterial community structure marked each health state. Diseased samples were associated with two to three times more bacterial diversity. HD samples had the highest bacterial richness, which included components associated with HH and DD, as well as additional unique families. The host transcriptome under YBD revealed a reduced cellular expression of defense- and metabolism-related processes, while the neighboring HD condition exhibited an intermediate expression profile. Although HD tissue appeared visibly healthy, the microbial communities and gene expression profiles were distinct. HD should be regarded as an additional (intermediate) state of disease, which is important for understanding the progression of YBD. PMID:24950107

  19. [Epidemiologic knowledge and current situation of Chagas disease in the state of Jalisco, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lozano-Kasten, Felipe; Magallón-Gastélum, Ezequiel; Soto-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Kasten-Monges, Marina; Bosseno, Marie-France; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Chagas disease in the state of Jalisco, Mexico was described for the first time in 1967; however, knowledge on the disease remains in a slow process. Between 1967 and 2006, the disease was described in its acute and chronic forms. The vector species have been identified, and the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has been isolated and genetically characterized. Also, the magnitude of the infection in humans has been determined through serological studies of different populations as well as of blood donors. The up-to-dateness of knowledge of the disease in the state of Jalisco, unveils a necessity of increased research on the epidemiology of Chagas disease as well as on clinical studies to assess the health of individuals and the populations.

  20. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%–40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%–100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  1. Raccoon Roundworm Infection Associated with Central Nervous System Disease and Ocular Disease - Six States, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Anita D; Abanyie, Francisca; Blumberg, Dean; Chin-Hong, Peter; Coulter, Katrina S; Cunningham, Dennis; Huskins, W Charles; Langelier, Charles; Reid, Michael; Scott, Brian J; Shirley, Debbie-Ann; Babik, Jennifer M; Belova, Aleksandra; Sapp, Sarah G H; McAuliffe, Isabel; Rivera, Hilda N; Yabsley, Michael J; Montgomery, Susan P

    2016-09-09

    Baylisascaris procyonis, predominantly found in raccoons, is a ubiquitous roundworm found throughout North America. Although raccoons are typically asymptomatic when infected with the parasite, the larval form of Baylisascaris procyonis can result in fatal human disease or severe neurologic outcomes if not treated rapidly. In the United States, Baylisascaris procyonis is more commonly enzootic in raccoons in the midwestern and northeastern regions and along the West Coast (1). However, since 2002, infections have been documented in other states (Florida and Georgia) and regions (2). Baylisascariasis is not a nationally notifiable disease in the United States, and little is known about how commonly it occurs or the range of clinical disease in humans. Case reports of seven human baylisascariasis cases in the United States diagnosed by Baylisascaris procyonis immunoblot testing at CDC are described, including review of clinical history and laboratory data. Although all seven patients survived, approximately half were left with severe neurologic deficits. Prevention through close monitoring of children at play, frequent handwashing, and clearing of raccoon latrines (communal sites where raccoons defecate) are critical interventions in curbing Baylisascaris infections. Early treatment of suspected cases is critical to prevent permanent sequelae.

  2. Lack of Evidence of Increased West Nile Virus Disease Severity in the United States in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Nicole P.; Staples, J. Erin; Delorey, Mark J.; Fischer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, West Nile virus (WNV) causes annual seasonal outbreaks that fluctuate in size and scope. There was a large multistate outbreak of WNV in 2012, with more human disease cases reported nationally than any year since 2003. We evaluated national surveillance data to determine if the higher number of WNV cases reported in 2012 was associated with changes in the epidemiology or severity of disease compared with 2004–2011. Despite an increased incidence of neuroinvasive disease in 2012, national surveillance data showed no evidence of changes in epidemiology or increased disease severity compared with the previous 8 years. PMID:24218412

  3. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  4. Rhabdomyolysis After Cooked Seafood Consumption (Haff Disease) in the United States vs China

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Haff disease is a syndrome of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis that occurs after eating cooked seafood. Methods For this descriptive analytical article, a literature search identified the scientific articles on Haff disease and/or rhabdomyolysis after eating cooked seafood in the United States and China. Analysis of those articles focused on identifying the seafood vectors of Haff disease, describing the most commonly recurring clinical and laboratory manifestations of Haff disease, and comparing the Haff disease toxidrome with other similar seafood-borne toxidromes. Statistically significant differences were determined using unpaired t tests and Fisher exact tests. Results Twenty-nine confirmed cases of Haff disease were identified in the United States, and 60 cases were identified in China during 1984-2014. Most of the US cases followed consumption of buffalo fish, and most of the Chinese cases followed consumption of freshwater pomfret. However, Haff disease also followed consumption of the same species of boiled crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in the United States (n=9) and China (n=6). US patients with crayfish-transmitted Haff disease reported significantly more nausea with and without vomiting, chest pain, body and back pain, dyspnea, and diaphoresis than the Chinese patients and were more frequently misdiagnosed as having myocardial infarctions. Conclusion The bioaccumulation of a new, heat-stable freshwater and/or brackish/saltwater algal toxin, similar to palytoxin but primarily myotoxic and not neurotoxic, is suspected of causing Haff disease. At present, only the rapid identification of the seafood vectors of Haff disease will limit disease outbreaks and prevent further cases. PMID:26130980

  5. Screening of inherited metabolic abnormalities in 56 children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAOMING; LI, RUI; CHEN, SHENGZHI; SANG, YAN; ZHAO, JIAQIANG

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common children's neural disease that is largely controlled by anti-epileptic drugs. Nevertheless, children experience repeated attacks that develop into intractable epilepsy (IE). The aim of the present study was to examine the inherited metabolic abnormalities in children with IE to provide early etiological and symptomatic treatment. Urine and blood samples of 56 children with IE served as the experimental group and 56 cases of children with IE, who were successfully treated served as the control group, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry for the metabolic screening of amino, organic, and fatty acids. Urine routine, hepatic function, blood biochemistry, imageology of encephalon and brain stem-evoked potential (auditory and optical) were also examined. Of the 27 IE children confirmed as abnormal in urine and blood screening, there were 19 cases (70.3%) of hypoevolutism or retrogression of intelligence and motor function, 15 cases (55.5%) of brain stem-evoked potential and of encephalic computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormality, 6 cases (22.2%) of abnormal family history and of abnormal blood biochemistry and blood gas analysis, and 5 cases (18.5%) with skin change and of abnormal hepatic function. Of the 27 cases, 11 cases (19.6%) were diagnosed with inherited metabolic diseases. Among the children in the control group, 3 cases showed abnormal urine test results, one of which had family history, one had hypoevolutism or retrogression of intelligence and motor function, one had brain stem-evoked potential and encephalic CT or MRI abnormality, while two of the 3 cases had inherited metabolic abnormalities. The correlation analysis revealed that abnormal urine test was significantly correlated with inherited metabolic abnormalities (P<0.05). Of the 56 IE patients, 25 cases (44.6%) were identified as abnormal under urine screening, and of the 25 cases, 6 cases had simple

  6. Effects of climate on variability in Lyme disease incidence in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Subak, Susan

    2003-03-15

    Numbers of reported Lyme disease cases have increased dramatically over the past decade in the northeastern United States, but the year-to-year variability is sizable (average standard deviation approximately 30% of the mean). An improved understanding of the causes of such variability would aid in prevention and control of the disease, which is transmitted by a spirochete carried in the "black-legged" tick, Ixodes scapularis. In this study, the variability in reported Lyme disease incidence between 1993 and 2001 in seven northeastern US states was analyzed as an outcome of weather variability. For all seven states analyzed, significant (p < 0.05) positive relations were found for the correlation of early summer disease incidence with the June moisture index (Palmer Hydrological Drought Index) in the region 2 years previously. The correlations may reflect enhanced nymph tick survival in wetter conditions. Few significant relations were found with same-year moisture index, which suggests that moisture has a greater effect on nymph tick survival following the insect's blood meal than before. In some states, significant correlations were observed related to warmer winter weather a year and a half prior to disease incidence, which may have been due to higher survival and activity levels of the white-footed mouse, the main host for Lyme disease-infected ticks.

  7. Challenges in Designing a National Surveillance Program for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Hutfless, Susan; Kappelman, Michael D.; Khalili, Hamed; Kaplan, Gil; Bernstein, Charles N.; Colombel, Jean Frederic; Herrinton, Lisa; Velayos, Fernando; Loftus, Edward V.; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Chan, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S.; Atreja, Ashish; Shah, Samir A.; Rothman, Kenneth; Leleiko, Neal S.; Bright, Renee; Boffetta, Paolo; Myers, Kelly D.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the history of US government funding for surveillance programs in IBD, provides current estimates of the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the United States (US), and enumerates a number of challenges faced by current and future IBD surveillance programs. A rationale for expanding the focus of IBD surveillance beyond counts of incidence and prevalence, in order to provide a greater understanding of the burden of IBD, disease etiology and pathogenesis, is provided. Lessons learned from other countries are summarized, as well as potential resources that may be used to optimize a new form of IBD surveillance in the US. A consensus recommendation on the goals and available resources for a new model for disease surveillance are provided. This new model should focus upon “surveillance of the burden of disease,” including 1) natural history of disease and 2) outcomes and complications of the disease and/or treatments. PMID:24280882

  8. A Qualitative Study of State-level Zoonotic disease surveillance in New England

    PubMed Central

    Scotch, Matthew; Mattocks, Kristin; Rabinowitz, Peter; Brandt, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases transmittable between animals and humans and outbreaks of these diseases in animals can signify that humans are also infected (or vice-versa). Thus, communication between animal and human health agencies is critical for surveillance. Understanding how these agencies conduct surveillance and share information is important for development of successful automated zoonotic monitoring systems. Individual interviews were conducted with 13 professionals who perform animal or human zoonotic disease surveillance in one of the New England states. Questions centered on existing surveillance methods, collaborations between animal and human health agencies, and technological and data needs. The results showed that agencies routinely communicate over suspected zoonotic disease cases yet there are barriers preventing automated electronic linking of health data of animals and humans. These include technological barriers and barriers due sensitivity and confidentiality of information. Addressing these will facilitate development of electronic systems for integrating animal and human zoonotic disease surveillance data. PMID:20163575

  9. Three decades of meningococcal disease in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Puricelli, Rubens C B; Kupek, Emil; Westrupp, Maria Helena Bittencourt

    2004-06-01

    Consolidation of data on meningococcal disease surveillance for the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, has provided new insight about the evolution of this disease during the period of 1971-2000. A descriptive epidemiological study, based on retrospective analysis of all cases of meningococcal disease notified in the state of Santa Catarina, linked the surveillance data from the Secretary of the State of Health, magnetic tape records and the data from the national surveillance of diseases of obligatory notification. Following World Health Organization guidelines, cumulative incidence exceeding five cases per 100,000 inhabitants was considered indicative of an epidemic. Official population data from the Fundação Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística were used for the incidence denominator. During the 1971-2000 period, 7,893 cases and 1,354 deaths caused by meningococcal disease were reported. This corresponds to a mean of 263 cases and 45 deaths per year, with a mean incidence of 6.4 cases per 100,000 inhabitants and a fatality rate of 17.2%. Three distinct epidemiological periods were identified, two of which can be considered epidemic. Two of three distinct epidemiological periods were characterized by an epidemic of meningococcal disease, covering 20 of the 30 years analyzed. Identification of the epidemics and preventive actions, such as vaccination and health education, contributed to the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to this disease.

  10. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Perea, Anna E; Pastula, Daniel M; Mead, Paul S

    2015-11-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions.

  11. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E; Auwaerter, Paul G; Fowler, Vance G; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K; Gaines, David N

    2015-12-01

    Background.  The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods.  We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results.  There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions.  The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years.

  12. Jamestown Canyon Virus Disease in the United States-2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Pastula, Daniel M; Hoang Johnson, Diep K; White, Jennifer L; Dupuis, Alan P; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin

    2015-08-01

    Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) is a mosquito-borne orthobunyavirus in the California serogroup that can cause an acute febrile illness, meningitis, or meningoencephalitis. We describe epidemiologic and clinical features for JCV disease cases occurring in the United States during 2000-2013. A case of JCV disease was defined as an acute illness in a person with laboratory evidence of a recent JCV infection. During 2000-2013, we identified 31 cases of JCV disease in residents of 13 states. The median age was 48 years (range, 10-69) and 21 (68%) were male. Eleven (35%) case patients had meningoencephalitis, 6 (19%) meningitis, 7 (23%) fever without neurologic involvement, and 7 (23%) had an unknown clinical syndrome. Fifteen (48%) were hospitalized and there were no deaths. Health-care providers and public health officials should consider JCV disease in the differential diagnoses of viral meningitis and encephalitis, obtain appropriate specimens for testing, and report cases to public health authorities.

  13. West Nile virus and other arboviral diseases--United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-06-28

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States. However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis, and acute flaccid paralysis). In 2012, CDC received reports of 5,780 nationally notifiable arboviral disease cases (excluding dengue). A large multistate outbreak of WNV disease accounted for 5,674 (98%) of reported cases, the highest number reported since 2003. Other reported etiologies included Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), Powassan virus (POWV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), and California serogroup viruses such as La Crosse virus (LACV) and Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV). Arboviruses continue to cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons in the United States. Maintaining surveillance remains important to identify outbreaks and guide prevention efforts.

  14. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    viral vector; neurogenesis; i nflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: Progress during the reporting year is congruent with...in which we can test the effects of somatostatin gene delivery on aberrant neurogenesis, n euroinflammation and learning and memory . The studies

  15. Translational Advancement of Somatostatin Gene Delivery for Disease Modification and Cognitive Sparing in Intractable Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration;  hippocampus ,  memory 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...associated viral vector; neurogenesis; inflammation; neurodegeneration; hippocampus , memory 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project...generation in  hippocampus , with a bias toward non­neuronal phenotypes, and somatostatin gene  delivery uniformly suppressed this regardless of therapeutic

  16. Evaluation of intrathecal drug delivery system for intractable pain in advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuyue; He, Liangliang; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Xiuhua; Yang, Zhanmin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pain is prevalent in advanced malignancies; however, some patients cannot get adequate pain relief by conservative routes of analgesic administration or experience serious side effects related to high dose of opioids. For those who have exhausted multimodal conservative analgesic, intrathecal drug delivery is an alternative intervention for truly effective pain management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) for the treatment of intractable pain in advanced cancer patients. A prospective cohort study was performed between July 2015 and October 2016. Fifty-three patients undergoing intractable cancer-related pain or intolerable drug-related adverse effects were recruited and received IDDS therapy with a patient-controlled intrathecal analgesia pump. The assessment was conducted during admission, in titration period, and followed up monthly to death by scheduled refill visits. Pain numeric rating scale scores, comprehensive toxicity scores, quality of life scores, systemic opioid use (basal and breakthrough dose), intrathecal morphine use (basal and patient-controlled intrathecal analgesia dose), and complications were recorded to evaluate the curative effect and safety. Between baseline and all subsequent follow-ups, statistically significant decreases in pain numeric rating scale scores and comprehensive toxicity scores were verified. A statistical improvement in quality of life scores was found after starting IDDS therapy. Both basal and breakthrough doses of systemic opioid showed a significant decrease during the follow-up period. And there was a modest escalation in the intrathecal morphine dose throughout the duration of study. No infective, device-related, and catheter-related complications were observed. The findings showed that IDDS therapy allowed for rapid and highly effective pain relief with less toxicity in comparison to conservative medications. Patients with

  17. Epidemiology of HIV-Associated Lung Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Meghan; Brooks, John T; Kaplan, Jonathan E

    2016-04-01

    The epidemiology of HIV infection and its pulmonary complications in the United States has evolved significantly over nearly 20 years since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy. While infectious complications are less of a threat to patients whose immune systems have been restored, many HIV-infected persons in the United States remain at high risk for opportunistic infection because they are unaware of their HIV infection, have difficulty maintaining linkage to care, or maintain inadequate viral control. Bacterial pneumonia and Pneumocystis pneumonia remain significantly more prevalent among HIV-infected persons, and together with seasonal influenza are areas where public health efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy, appropriate prophylaxis, and vaccination may decrease burden of disease. Noninfectious pulmonary complications of chronic HIV infection are increasingly recognized in the United States and elsewhere. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, sleep-disordered breathing, and primary lung cancer may all be more common among persons with HIV; of concern, disease burden in U.S. HIV-infected persons may be underestimated due to lack of diagnostic testing for these conditions. Smoking is among the most prevalent preventable causes of morbidity and mortality affecting persons living with HIV infection, and has particular import to pulmonary disease. As of 2009, 42% of HIV-infected adults in medical care in the United States smoked tobacco (over twice the national rate in the general population). Successful efforts to promote smoking cessation among HIV-infected persons are of critical importance to decrease the burden of chronic pulmonary disease.

  18. From psychosurgery to neuromodulation: deep brain stimulation for intractable Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Irene; Podoll, Klaus; Janouschek, Hildegard; Michel, Tanja M; Sheldrick, Abigail J; Schneider, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. It is often associated with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, self-injurious behaviour and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In intractable patients, neuromodulation using deep brain stimulation (DBS) has widely replaced psychosurgery. Three different key structures are defined for DBS, the medial portion of the thalamus, the globus pallidus internus and the anterior limb of the internal capsule/nucleus accumbens. This is a comprehensive overview on the effect of DBS on motor and non-motor symptoms using different case series and two larger studies.

  19. Transforaminal 5% phenol neurolysis for the treatment of intractable cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Philip, Cyril N; Ghaly, Ramsis F; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2010-01-01

    This is the first case report of using a transforaminal approach for phenol administration. A 76-yr-old patient with a history of leiomyosarcoma and multiple metastatic lesions had unremitting pain in the right thoracic and lumbar regions and had prohibitive opioid-induced side effects. The patient underwent phenol neurolysis using a transforaminal approach in 2 stages at 3 levels (L3-4, L1-2, and T12-L1). The patient had complete resolution of pain, without any complications, and opioid treatment was nearly discontinued. Transforaminal phenol neurolysis is a reasonable treatment option for patients suffering from intractable pain for whom conventional therapies have proven ineffective.

  20. A general resolution of intractable problems in polynomial time through DNA Computing.

    PubMed

    Sanches, C A A; Soma, N Y

    2016-12-01

    Based on a set of known biological operations, a general resolution of intractable problems in polynomial time through DNA Computing is presented. This scheme has been applied to solve two NP-Hard problems (Minimization of Open Stacks Problem and Matrix Bandwidth Minimization Problem) and three co-NP-Complete problems (associated with Hamiltonian Path, Traveling Salesman and Hamiltonian Circuit), which have not been solved with this model. Conclusions and open questions concerning the computational capacity of this model are presented, and research topics are suggested.

  1. The burden of infectious diseases in the Brazilian Southern state of Santa Catarina.

    PubMed

    Traebert, Jefferson; Nickel, Daniela A; Traebert, Eliane; Escalante, Juan J C; Schneider, Ione J C

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are still significant causes of deaths in Brazil. The objective of this study was to estimate the burden of selected infectious diseases in the Brazilian Southern state of Santa Catarina in 2011. An ecological study was conducted. The infectious diseases included were HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Chagas disease, diarrheal diseases and other infectious diseases. Data were collected from official health information systems. Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) were estimated by the sum of Years of Life Lost (YLL) and Years Lived with Disability (YLD). 45,237.33 DALYs were estimated, with a rate of 685.46 DALYs per 100,000 population. 92.9% was due to YLL and 7.1% to YLD. Men and the age range of 0-4 years presented higher burden. The highest burden was attributed to HIV/AIDS. There was a high concentration of burden rates in the coast regions of the state. It could be concluded that more than 90% of the burden was attributed to the early mortality component. The highest burden was observed among men, children under 5 years of age and at the coast regions of the state. The highest levels of burden were due to HIV/AIDS.

  2. Diseases at the livestock-wildlife interface: status, challenges, and opportunities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan S; Farnsworth, Matthew L; Malmberg, Jennifer L

    2013-06-01

    In the last half century, significant attention has been given to animal diseases; however, our understanding of disease processes and how to manage them at the livestock-wildlife interface remains limited. In this study, we conduct a systematic review of the scientific literature to evaluate the status of diseases at the livestock-wildlife interface in the United States. Specifically, the goals of the literature review were three fold: first to evaluate domestic animal diseases currently found in the United States where wildlife may play a role; second to identify critical issues faced in managing these diseases at the livestock-wildlife interface; and third to identify potential technical and policy strategies for addressing these issues. We found that of the 86 avian, ruminant, swine, poultry, and lagomorph diseases that are reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), 53 are present in the United States; 42 (79%) of these have a putative wildlife component associated with the transmission, maintenance, or life cycle of the pathogen; and 21 (40%) are known to be zoonotic. At least six of these reportable diseases-bovine tuberculosis, paratuberculosis, brucellosis, avian influenza, rabies, and cattle fever tick (vector control)-have a wildlife reservoir that is a recognized impediment to eradication in domestic populations. The complex nature of these systems highlights the need to understand the role of wildlife in the epidemiology, transmission, and maintenance of infectious diseases of livestock. Successful management or eradication of these diseases will require the development of cross-discipline and institutional collaborations. Despite social and policy challenges, there remain opportunities to develop new collaborations and new technologies to mitigate the risks posed at the livestock-wildlife interface.

  3. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2015-07-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States. We found that disease prevalence depended primarily on tree size, tree allometry, and spatial variation in precipitation, while mortality depended on tree size, allometry, competition, spatial variation in summer temperature, and both temporal and spatial variation in summer precipitation. Disease prevalence was highest in large trees with low slenderness found on dry sites. For healthy trees, mortality decreased with diameter, slenderness, and temporal variation in summer precipitation, but increased with competition and spatial variation in summer temperature. Mortality of diseased trees decreased with diameter and aspen relative basal area and increased with mean summer temperature and precipitation. Disease infection increased aspen mortality, especially in trees of intermediate size and trees on plots at climatic extremes (i.e., cool, wet and warm, dry climates). By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate

  4. Effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Polastri, Paula F; Baptista, André M; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Beretta, Victor S; Gobbi, Lilian T B

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nineteen people with PD and 11 neurologically healthy individuals performed three standing task conditions: bipedal standing, tandem and unipedal adapted standing; the individuals with PD performed the tasks in ON and OFF medication state. The participants with PD were distributed into 2 groups according to disease severity: unilateral group (n=8) and bilateral group (n=11). The two PD groups performed the evaluations both under and without the medication. Two force plates were used to analyze the posture. The symmetric index was calculated for various of center of pressure. ANOVA one-way (groups) and two-way (PD groups×medication), with repeated measures for medication, were calculated. For main effects of group, the bilateral group was more asymmetric than CG. For main effects of medication, only unipedal adapted standing presented effects of PD medication. There was PD groups×medication interaction. Under the effects of medication, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area than the bilateral group in unipedal adapted standing. In addition, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of mean velocity, RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area in unipedal standing and area in tandem adapted standing after a medication dose. Postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks was dependent on disease severity and medication state in people with PD. The bilateral group presented higher postural control asymmetry than the control and unilateral groups in challenging postural tasks. Finally, the medication dose was able to reduce postural control asymmetry in the unilateral group during challenging postural tasks.

  5. Blood cytokine, chemokine and gene expression in cholestasis patients with intractable pruritus treated with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Lisboa, Luiz F; Asthana, Sonal; Kremer, Andreas E; Swain, Mark; Bagshaw, Sean M; Gibney, Noel; Karvellas, Constantine J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is an albumin-dialysis modality that has been investigated predominantly in patients with acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure. OBJECTIVES: To report the clinical efficacy and safety of MARS therapy for intractable pruritus in cholestasis patients with stable chronic liver disease, characterizing the impact of MARS on cytokine levels and on the transcriptome in the blood compartment. METHODS: MARS therapy was performed on three patients with cholestatic liver disease using 8 h runs for two consecutive days. The expression levels of 65 cytokines/chemokines and 24,000 genes were profiled by Luminex (Luminex Corporation, USA) and microarray, respectively. RESULTS: A quality-of-life assessment demonstrated a marked improvement during therapy, which was sustained in two of three patients. No bleeding or infectious complications were observed. Bile acid levels were markedly reduced following MARS (mean [± SD] pretreatment 478.9±112.2 μmol/L versus post-treatment 89.7±68.8 μmol/L). Concordant decreases in cytokine/chemokine levels were noted for interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 (p40), RANTES, tranforming growth factor-alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and thrombopoietin following MARS. On microarray profiling, biologically relevant concordant changes among all patients were evident for 20 different genes (10 upregulated and 10 downregulated). The upregulation of several potentially immune suppressive/regulatory genes (eg, early growth response 3 [EGR-3], ephrin-A2 [EFNA2] and serum amyloid A1 [SAA1]), concurrent with downregulation of genes involved in innate immunity (eg, toll-like receptor 4 interactor with leucine-rich repeats [TRIL]) and inflammation (eg, ephrin receptor B1 [EPHB1]), was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This investigative approach offers new insights into intractable pruritus and suggests future therapeutic targets. The clinical benefit of MARS in cholestasis patients with

  6. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs∗2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs∗3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the

  7. Virus diseases of the salmonidae in the western United States. I. Etiology and epizootiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1965-01-01

    The history of fish diseases in western United States shows an increasing awareness that viruses could cause epizootics in fish. Fishery biologists bunked first, for protozoan and metazoan parasites, then for bacteria, and if none could be identified assumed that the mortalities were attributable to nutritional deficiency, Microbiologists in general were cognizant of virus diseases in other animals and investigators of fish diseases were alert to the possibility that piscine epizootics could be of similar cause. In 1950 an epizootic occurred in sockeye salmon (Gncorhynchus norkm) that was shown to have a viral etiologic agent.In recent years, with increasing frequency, we have been able to demonstrate a virus utiology for epizootics and panzootics in trout and salmon in several states in the West.  FIGURE 1 is a map showing the location of epizootics of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN), Sacramento River chinook disease (SRCD), Oregon sockeye disease (OSD), and Columbia River sockeye disease (CRSDJ. The pathology and immunopathology of these are discussed in detail in other reports. The present report was initiated as a review of the literature concerning the diseases and to present in brief a description of their etiologic agents.

  8. A comparative study of high-dose hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and transarterial chemoembolization using doxorubicin for intractable, advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Jin Dong; Park, Jun Yong; Han, Kwang Hyub; Woo, Hyun Young; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kim, Sang Gyune; Kim, Young Seok; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Um, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has long been used as a palliative therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). High-dose hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) has showed favorable outcomes in patients with intractable, advanced HCC. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of high-dose HAIC and conventional TACE using doxorubicin for advanced HCC. Methods The high-dose HAIC group comprised 36 patients who were enrolled prospectively from six institutions. The enrollment criteria were good liver function, main portal vein invasion (including vascular shunt), infiltrative type, bilobar involvement, and/or refractory to prior conventional treatment (TACE, radiofrequency ablation, or percutaneous ethanol injection), and documented progressive disease. Patients received 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 on days 1~3) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 on day 2 every 4 weeks) via an implantable port system. In the TACE group, 31 patients with characteristics similar to those in the high-dose HAIC group were recruited retrospectively from a single center. Patients underwent a transarterial infusion of doxorubicin every 4~8 weeks. Results Overall, 6 patients (8.9%) achieved a partial response and 20 patients (29.8%) had stable disease. The objective response rate (complete response+partial response) was significantly better in the high-dose HAIC group than in the TACE group (16.7% vs. 0%, P=0.030). Overall survival was longer in the high-dose HAIC group than in the TACE group (median survival, 193 vs. 119 days; P=0.026). There were no serious adverse effects in the high-dose HAIC group, while hepatic complications occurred more often in the TACE group. Conclusions High-dose HAIC appears to improve the tumor response and survival outcome compared to conventional TACE using doxorubicin in patients with intractable, advanced HCC. PMID:21415578

  9. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Since 1978, CDC, EPA, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) to capture data on waterborne disease outbreaks associated with recreational water. WBDOSS is the prima...

  10. Long-term follow-up of chronic spinal cord stimulation for medically intractable orthostatic tremor.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Sauer, Tamara; Baezner, Hansjoerg; Wolf, Marc E; Saryyeva, Assel; Schrader, Christoph; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K

    2016-11-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) is a rare form of tremor occurring in the legs when standing upright. Medical treatment frequently is unsatisfactory, thus in selected cases, surgical treatment, such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or thalamic deep brain stimulation has been proposed. We report the long-term results (follow-up (FU) 34-133 months) of SCS in four patients with medically intractable OT. Outcome was assessed by recording the time tolerated to stand still pre- and post-operatively and by a patient self-rating (PSR) scale (0 = poor to 6 = excellent). Furthermore, surface electromyography (EMG) recordings of different leg muscles were performed to estimate tremor activity with and without SCS post-operatively. With chronic SCS, all four patients showed an improvement of unsteadiness occurring in the presence of stimulation-induced paraesthesia of the legs. The mean standing time improved from 51 s (SD 47 s, range 4-120 s) pre-operatively to 220 s (SD 184 s, range 10-480 s) with SCS at last available FU. Tremor activity in the EMG of the anterior tibial muscle was reduced by 30-60 % with SCS compared with off SCS. PSR score was 4 or 5 in three patients and 3 in the other. In conclusion, SCS is an effective long-term treatment option in patients with otherwise intractable OT.

  11. A Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for sampling from distributions with intractable normalizing constants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Faming; Jin, Ick-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    Simulating from distributions with intractable normalizing constants has been a long-standing problem in machine learning. In this letter, we propose a new algorithm, the Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings (MCMH) algorithm, for tackling this problem. The MCMH algorithm is a Monte Carlo version of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. It replaces the unknown normalizing constant ratio by a Monte Carlo estimate in simulations, while still converges, as shown in the letter, to the desired target distribution under mild conditions. The MCMH algorithm is illustrated with spatial autologistic models and exponential random graph models. Unlike other auxiliary variable Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms, such as the Møller and exchange algorithms, the MCMH algorithm avoids the requirement for perfect sampling, and thus can be applied to many statistical models for which perfect sampling is not available or very expensive. The MCMH algorithm can also be applied to Bayesian inference for random effect models and missing data problems that involve simulations from a distribution with intractable integrals.

  12. Endoscopic ligation of the internal maxillary artery for treatment of intractable posterior epistaxis.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, J B; Caldarelli, D D; Panje, W R

    1998-02-01

    Lack of universal success with both transantral ligation of the internal maxillary artery and percutaneous embolization of the distal branches of the internal maxillary distribution has led to consideration of alternative techniques to control intractable posterior epistaxis. One such technique takes advantage of advances in endoscopic technology and instrumentation, as well as a nearly constant anatomic configuration. The internal maxillary artery divides into terminal branches within the pterygomaxillary fossa, sending branches through the bony maxilla to exit the posterolateral nasal wall in the posterior aspect of the middle meatus. Endoscopic identification and ligation of these terminal branches of the internal maxillary artery (the sphenopalatine and nasopalatine arteries) as they exit the maxilla has been performed on 10 patients with a 100% success rate and no morbidity or mortality associated with the procedure. These results compare favorably to the average reported success rates of 89% for transantral ligation and 94% for percutaneous embolization, and average complication rates of 28% and 27%, respectively. This endonasal procedure has been performed for spontaneous epistaxis as well as postsurgical nasal bleeding with equal success. The ascending scale of treatment previously outlined in the literature may be amended, as a potentially definitive procedure is available, and we believe that this technique is easier to perform, has less associated morbidity, and has equal efficacy in comparison to transantral ligation or percutaneous embolization in the treatment of intractable posterior epistaxis.

  13. Efficacy and safety of zonisamide in Thai children and adolescents with intractable seizures.

    PubMed

    Thampratankul, Lunliya; Khongkhatithum, Chaiyos; Visudtibhan, Anannit

    2015-03-01

    This retrospective study examined the efficacy and safety of zonisamide for Thai children and adolescents with intractable seizures. The medical records of 24 patients (13 male, 11 female), aged 2 to 18 years (median 11.5, mean 10.4) who received zonisamide were reviewed. The underlying illness, etiology of epilepsy, seizure types, previous and concomitant antiepileptic drugs, dosage, and adverse effects of the drug were collected. Zonisamide's efficacy was evaluated on the basis of seizure reduction rates. At final evaluation, 7 patients were still taking zonisamide from 4.7 to 10.3 mg/kg/d (median 8). One patient became seizure-free and the other 6 experienced favorable seizure control. The median duration of zonisamide therapy was 23.75 months (range 20.5-25 months). Minor adverse effects were reported in 41.6% of patients during the first 3 months of therapy. Zonisamide is an option for the treatment of intractable seizures with favorable seizure control in children and adolescents.

  14. FACTS ON THE MAJOR KILLING AND CRIPPLING DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES TODAY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Health Education Committee, Inc., New York, NY.

    MAJOR CAUSES OF DEATH AND DISABILITY, RESULTS OF MEDICAL RESEARCH, LIFE EXPECTANCY FIGURES, COST OF ILLNESS TO THE UNITED STATES, AND GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES IN MEDICINE AND HEALTH ARE PRESENTED TABULARLY AND GRAPHICALLY IN QUESTION AND ANSWER FORM. FOR EACH OF 14 MAJOR DISEASES, PERTINENT FACTS ARE LISTED ABOUT INCIDENCE, COST, DEATH RATE,…

  15. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES AND FUTURE DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Environmental Exposures and Future Disease States

    John C. Rockett, Chad R. Blystone, Amber K. Goetz, Rachel N. Murrell, Hongzu Ren, Judith E. Schmid, Jessica Stapelfeldt, Lillian F. Strader, Kary E. Thompson, Douglas B. T...

  16. SURVEILLANCE FOR WATERBORNE-DISEASE OUTBREAKS - UNITED STATES, 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for the occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs).This surv...

  17. GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING TOXIC EXPOSURES AND DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Toxic Exposures and Disease States
    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, USEPA, ...

  18. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Salinas, Jorge L; McDonald, Robert W; Sheth, Anandi N; Fairley, Jessica K

    2015-11-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas.

  19. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Kristoffer E.; Salinas, Jorge L.; McDonald, Robert W.; Sheth, Anandi N.; Fairley, Jessica K.

    2015-01-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas. PMID:26304919

  20. State of World Allergy Report 2008: Allergy and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the incidence of allergies and allergic diseases is on the rise globally. As an international umbrella organization for regional and national allergy and clinical immunology societies, the World Allergy Organization is at the forefront of a combined united effort across nations and organizations to address this global concern by promoting the science of allergy and clinical immunology, and advancing exchange of information. The World Allergy Organization's State of World Allergy Reports will provide a biennial review of allergic diseases worldwide, consider their medical and socioeconomic contexts, and propose effective approaches to addressing these problems. In this first State of World Allergy Report 2008, experts from different regions of the world have attempted to define the extent of the global allergy problem, examine recent trends, and provide a framework for the collaboration among world medicine, science, and government agencies that is needed to address the rapidly developing issues associated with allergy and allergic diseases. PMID:23282447

  1. Protein expression of phospho-lim kinase-1 in patients and an experimental rat model with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Wang, Heng; Yuan, Jinxian; Wu, Xuling; Huang, Yunyi; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Yangmei

    2015-01-01

    Lim kinase-1 (LIMK1) plays a critical role in dendritic spine morphogenesis and brain function. The protein expression pattern of phospho-LIMK1 (p-LIMK1), the active form of LIMK1, in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), however, is unknown. Here we measured p-LIMK1 protein expression in thirty temporal neocortex tissue samples from intractable TLE patients, fifteen histologically normal temporal neocortex tissue samples from trauma patients without epilepsy, in the hippocampi of lithium chloride/pilocarpine-induced TLE rats, and in controls. We found that p-LIMK1 was expressed mainly in the cytoplasm of neurons. The protein expression of p-LIMK1 was significantly higher in the TLE patients and rats than in the control groups. Our results suggest that p-LIMK1 might be involved in the pathogenesis of intractable TLE. PMID:25785037

  2. Curative effect and costs of surgical and gamma knife treatments on intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Z T; Chen, Q X

    2015-07-31

    This study aimed to investigate the curative effect and costs of surgical and gamma knife treatments on intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis. The subjects comprised patients who suffered from intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis and received treatment in the Department of Neurosurgery of our hospital between 2010 and 2011. After obtaining their consent, patients were evaluated and selected to receive surgical or gamma knife treatments. In the surgical group, the short-term curative rate was 92.60% and the average cost was US$ 1311.50 while in the gamma knife group, the short-term curative rate was 53.79%, and the average cost was US$ 2786.90. Both surgical and gamma knife treatments of intractable epilepsy caused by temporal-hippocampal sclerosis are safe and effective, but the short-term curative effect of surgical treatment is better than that of gamma knife, and its cost is lower.

  3. West Nile Virus and Other Nationally Notifiable Arboviral Diseases - United States, 2015.

    PubMed

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin

    2017-01-20

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. The leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States is West Nile virus (WNV) (1). Other arboviruses, including La Crosse, St. Louis encephalitis, Jamestown Canyon, Powassan, and eastern equine encephalitis viruses, also cause sporadic cases and outbreaks. This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2015 for nationally notifiable arboviruses. It excludes dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses, which are primarily nondomestic viruses typically acquired through travel (and are addressed in other CDC reports). In 2015, 45 states and the District of Columbia (DC) reported 2,282 cases of domestic arboviral disease. Among these cases, 2,175 (95%) were WNV disease and 1,455 (67%) of those were classified as neuroinvasive disease (meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis). The national incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease was 0.45 cases per 100,000 population. Because arboviral diseases continue to cause serious illness, maintaining surveillance is important to direct prevention activities such as reduction of vector populations and screening of blood donors.

  4. Necrotic arachnidism and intractable pain from recluse spider bites treated with lumbar sympathetic block: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiaobin; AuBuchon, Jacob; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Kirby, John P

    2011-06-01

    Brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) spider bites mainly occur in the southern and Midwestern United States. The clinical manifestation of brown recluse spider bites varies from skin irritation, a small area of tissue damage to neuropathic pain, necrotic arachnidism and severe systemic reactions such as acute renal failure and even death. Treatment is controversial and nonspecific. We describe a case of extensive right lower extremity tissue necrosis and intractable neuropathic pain treated with lumbar sympathetic block in a patient with a documented brown recluse spider bite. Both his pain and tissue necrosis improved significantly with lumbar sympathetic block with local anesthetic. After a series of lumbar sympathetic blocks, his symptoms resolved and lower extremity wound healed rapidly. We discuss the benefit of sympathetic blockade not only for neuropathic pain but also possibly as a treatment for necrotic arachnidism from a brown recluse spider bite.

  5. State Dementia Plans and the Alzheimer's Disease Movement: Framing Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Motivation.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Charlotte E; Welleford, E Ayn; Netting, F Ellen

    2015-08-28

    An interpretive analysis of 38 state dementia plans compares similarities and differences in diagnostic framing (problem identification/trends/issues), prognosis framing (addressing the problem), and motivational framing (calls for action) across plans. In framing diagnosis, only 6 plans used dementia alone in their titles. In framing prognosis and the subsequent call to action, state plans were consistent in their dire prognostications about the progressive and fatal consequences of the disease with a primary focus on the cost. Motivational language mirrored that of the Alzheimer's Disease (AD) Movement, from raising awareness to using inflammatory words to incite action. The language used set up the frame for clinical interventions that may not distinguish between types of dementia and could undercut the provision of person-centered care, shifts the victimization focus from persons with AD to caregivers and ultimately the state, and may subintentionally reflect cultural biases.

  6. Evaluation of demographic characteristics, and general disease state of patients affliated with home health care unit of Malatya State Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Oksuz, Ersoy; Onat, Elif; Shahzadi, Andleeb; Yazici, Zeliha; Cetin, Cumali

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Home Health Care Unit a unit provides health services for elderly, bedridden and individuals with chronic diseases at home along within the frame of the diagnosis, and treatments of the relevant experts. Therefore, it is intended to reduce the probable physical and emotional burden related to the patient that arise by commuting to the hospital, to increase the number of empty beds for other patients and to improve the living standard by reducing the risk of hospital infection. In this study, the demographic characteristics of housebound patients, their general disease and its relationship with age and gender was investigated. METHODS: The following study was performed on 626 active patients of Malatya State Hospital Home Health Care Unit from January to November 2014. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel Program. RESULTS: The study included 60.5% (n=379) female and 39.5% (n=247) male patients. The highest group consisted of patients with 80 years or above 37.7% (n=236). Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (n=95; 25.0%), senility (n=56; 14.8%) and Alzheimer’s disease (n=50; 13.2%) were commonly observed in women. Male patients had CVD (n=54; 21.8%), femur fracture or gonarthrosis which required surgery (n=28; 11.3%), and fracture due to trauma or traffc accidents (n=28; 11.3%), senility and Alzheimer’s disease (n=218.5%). CONCLUSION: In recent years home health care units became even more important after the gradual increase in the elderly population and injuries due to accidents. This study can help to provide home health care units in a more effcient manner by educating the staff and relatives who take care of the patients. PMID:28058324

  7. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease. PMID:26097778

  8. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease.

  9. Emerging Capripoxvirus disease outbreaks in Himachal Pradesh, a northern state of India.

    PubMed

    Verma, S; Verma, L K; Gupta, V K; Katoch, V C; Dogra, V; Pal, B; Sharma, M

    2011-02-01

    Both sheep and goat pox are contagious viral diseases and affect small ruminants and are caused by sheep pox virus and goat pox virus respectively that belong to genus Capripoxvirus of Poxviridae family. Huge economic losses emanating from the disease outbreaks are the results of the wool and hide damage, subsequent production losses and also the morbidities and mortalities associated with the disease. This communication highlights clinico-epidemiological observations from the two sheep pox and one goat pox outbreaks. Grossly, multisystemic nodular lesions, mucopurulent nasal discharges and respiratory symptoms were observed in the affected animals. The morbidity, mortality and case fatality rates were 5.18%, 2.45% and 32.37%, respectively. Histopathological, haematological, molecular and serological techniques and also isolation of virus in embryonated chicken eggs were used for the diagnosis of the diseases. The spatial distribution of the disease signifies the role of common pasturelands used for grazing the animals while temporally all three outbreaks occurred in winters and were probably associated with cold stress and fodder scarcity. This is the first recorded report of Capripoxvirus infection in recent times and it highlights the disease as one of the emerging diseases in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh in India.

  10. Validation of disease states in schizophrenia: comparison of cluster analysis between US and European populations

    PubMed Central

    Thokagevistk, Katia; Millier, Aurélie; Lenert, Leslie; Sadikhov, Shamil; Moreno, Santiago; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Background There is controversy as to whether use of statistical clustering methods to identify common disease patterns in schizophrenia identifies patterns generalizable across countries. Objective The goal of this study was to compare disease states identified in a published study (Mohr/Lenert, 2004) considering US patients to disease states in a European cohort (EuroSC) considering English, French, and German patients. Methods Using methods paralleling those in Mohr/Lenert, we conducted a principal component analysis (PCA) on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items in the EuroSC data set (n=1,208), followed by k-means cluster analyses and a search for an optimal k. The optimal model structure was compared to Mohr/Lenert by assigning discrete severity levels to each cluster in each factor based on the cluster center. A harmonized model was created and patients were assigned to health states using both approaches; agreement rates in state assignment were then calculated. Results Five factors accounting for 56% of total variance were obtained from PCA. These factors corresponded to positive symptoms (Factor 1), negative symptoms (Factor 2), cognitive impairment (Factor 3), hostility/aggression (Factor 4), and mood disorder (Factor 5) (as in Mohr/Lenert). The optimal number of cluster states was six. The kappa statistic (95% confidence interval) for agreement in state assignment was 0.686 (0.670–0.703). Conclusion The patterns of schizophrenia effects identified using clustering in two different data sets were reasonably similar. Results suggest the Mohr/Lenert health state model is potentially generalizable to other populations. PMID:27386054

  11. A preliminary spatial analysis of diagnosed stroke disease in Osun state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adzandeh, Ayila Emmanuel; Awope, John; Oviasu, Osaretin Isoken

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There have been a number of clinical studies on diagnosed Stroke disease. However, there have been few studies on the geographical disparities for stroke. This study investigates the spatial pattern of stroke disease reflecting socio-demographic characteristics in the State. Methods Stroke patients' admissions for 22 years (from 1990 to 2012) were examined. Their socio-demographic characteristics were extracted from their health records and analyzed. The location of the stroke patients were categorized by Local Governments Areas (LGAs). Spatial maps were generated and produced in a Geographical Information System (GIS) environment. It involves the analysis of the distribution of stroke cases in relation to their underlying population to determine the areas of high and low density of diagnosed cases across the state. Results The result highlighted the spatial distribution of diagnosed stroke cases and also highlighted the areas of concern regarding their spatial distribution within the state. Social inequalities in stroke were persistent as incidence rates in urban areas (North) were around 3 times higher than in the rural areas (South). However, this could be due to better healthcare access in the urban areas than in the rural areas as there were disparities in the distribution of healthcare facilities involved in administering care to stroke patients in Osun State. Conclusion The outcome of this study appears to indicate that spatial inequalities in the access to Stroke healthcare is a concern that needs to be addressed in order to manage the disease adequately. PMID:28250887

  12. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  13. Intracerebroventricular Pain Treatment with Analgesic Mixtures including Ziconotide for Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Staquet, Héléne; Dupoiron, Denis; Nader, Edmond; Menei, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of opioids for control of intractable cancer pain has been used since 1982. We present here our experience of intracerebroventricular administration of pain treatments including ziconotide associated with morphine and ropivacaine for patients resistant to a conventional approach, with nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed pain. These clinical cases were conducted with patients suffering from refractory pain, more than 6/10 on a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) while on high-dose medical treatment and/or intolerance with significant side effects from oral medication. The baseline study visit included a physical examination and an assessment of pain intensity on a NPRS. Under general anesthesia, a neuronavigation device was used to place the catheter on the floor of the third ventricle, supported by an endoscope. Then, drugs were injected in the cerebroventricular system, through a pump (external or subcutaneous). The primary objective was to measure pain evaluation with ICV treatment after a complete withdrawal of other medications.Four patients were enrolled: 3 with intractable cancer pain and one with central neuropathic pain. The median NPRS at baseline was 9.5 [8.5; 19]. The mean NPRS after one month was 3.5 [3; 4.5]. Ziconotide was initiated at 0.48 µg/d and up to a median of 1.2 µg/d [1.0; 1.56]. The median dose of morphine and ropivacaine used initially was respectively 0.36 mg/d [0.24; 0.66] up to 0.6 mg/d [0.45; 4.63] and 1.2 mg/d [0; 2.4] up to 2.23 mg/d [1.2; 3.35]. Minor side effects were initially observed but transiently. One psychiatric agitation required discontinuation of ziconotide infusion. For intractable pain, using ziconotide by intracerebroventricular infusion seems safe and efficient, specifically for chronic neoplastic pain of cervicocephalic, thoracic, or diffuse origin and also for pain arising from a central neuropathic mechanism.

  14. The burden of disease and injury in the United States 1996

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Catherine M; McKenna, Matthew T; Begg, Stephen; Tomijima, Niels; Majmudar, Meghna; Bulzacchelli, Maria T; Ebrahim, Shahul; Ezzati, Majid; Salomon, Joshua A; Gaber Kreiser, Jessica; Hogan, Mollie; Murray, Christopher JL

    2006-01-01

    Background Burden of disease studies have been implemented in many countries using the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY) to assess major health problems. Important objectives of the study were to quantify intra-country differentials in health outcomes and to place the United States situation in the international context. Methods We applied methods developed for the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) to data specific to the United States to compute Disability-Adjusted Life Years. Estimates are provided by age and gender for the general population of the United States and for each of the four official race groups: White; Black; American Indian or Alaskan Native; and Asian or Pacific Islander. Several adjustments of GBD methods were made: the inclusion of race; a revised list of causes; and a revised algorithm to allocate cardiovascular disease garbage codes to ischaemic heart disease. We compared the results of this analysis to international estimates published by the World Health Organization for developed and developing regions of the world. Results In the mid-1990s the leading sources of premature death and disability in the United States, as measured by DALYs, were: cardiovascular conditions, breast and lung cancers, depression, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol use and abuse. In addition, motor vehicle-related injuries and the HIV epidemic exacted a substantial toll on the health status of the US population, particularly among racial minorities. The major sources of death and disability in these latter populations were more similar to patterns of burden in developing rather than developed countries. Conclusion Estimating DALYs specifically for the United States provides a comprehensive assessment of health problems for this country compared to what is available using mortality data alone. PMID:17049081

  15. Epidemiology of Kawasaki disease in Asia, Europe, and the United States.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Ritei; Belay, Ermias D

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis that mainly affects children younger than 5 years. Although Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki first reported KD over 40 years ago, the cause of the disease remains unknown. Currently, KD has been diagnosed in more than 60 countries, including those in Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa, as well as in North America and Europe. The purpose of this review is to describe the epidemiologic features of KD--particularly its incidence, seasonality, and the occurrence of coronary artery abnormalities--primarily in Japan and the United States, but also in Europe and other Asian countries.

  16. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A; Madoff, David C

    2015-07-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  17. Chagas disease in Spain, the United States and other non-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Gascon, Joaquim; Bern, Caryn; Pinazo, María-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Due to recent trends in migration, there are millions of people from Chagas disease-endemic countries now living in North America, Europe, Australia and Japan, including thousands of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Most infected individuals are not aware of their status. Congenital, transfusion- and/or transplant-associated transmission has been documented in the United States, Spain, Canada and Switzerland; most instances likely go undetected. High priorities include the implementation of appropriate screening, evaluation and clinical management, and better assessment of the true burden associated with this disease.

  18. Changing trends in carrier screening for genetic disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Shivani B; Lazarin, Gabriel A; Goldberg, James D

    2015-10-01

    Genetic disease is the leading cause of infant death in the United States, accounting for approximately 20% of annual infant mortality. Advances in genomic medicine and technological platforms have made possible low cost, pan-ethnic expanded genetic screening that enables obstetric care providers to offer screening for over 100 recessive genetic diseases. However, the rapid integration of genomic medicine into routine obstetric practice has raised some concerns about the practical implementation of such testing. These changing trends in carrier screening, along with concerns and potential solutions, will be addressed.

  19. The Disease Burden Attributable to Smoking in the State Of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil in 2000

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Andreia Ferreira; Valente, Joaquim Gonçalves; Leite, Iuri Costa

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Smoking is one of the main risk factors for morbidity and mortality. An estimated 59 million (4.4%) disability-adjusted life years were lost due to smoking throughout the world in 2000. OBJECTIVE To estimate the disease burden attributable to smoking in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the year 2000. METHODS Based on estimates of smoking prevalence and relative death risks, the smoking-attributable fraction was calculated for each selected cause, by age and gender. The disease burden attributable to smoking was estimated by multiplying the fractions by the corresponding disability-adjusted life years. RESULTS In the State of Rio de Janeiro, 7% of all disability-adjusted life years were due to smoking. For individuals 30 or more years old, the fraction increased to 10.6% (13.6% in males and 7.5% in females). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and tracheal, bronchial, and lung cancer accounted for 32.2%, 15.7%, 13.2%, and 11.1% of the estimated total DALYs, respectively, amounting to 72.2% of the smoking-attributable disease burden. DISCUSSION Limitations related to parameter estimates were not unique to this study, and therefore should not compromise the comparability of our results. Outcomes were similar to those obtained in other countries, despite methodological differences. CONCLUSION Smoking is an important risk factor and places a significant disease burden on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, showing a pattern similar to that observed in high income countries. PMID:18438576

  20. Sickle cell disease painful crisis and steady state differentiation by proton magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Adolfo A; Cabal, Carlos A; Lores, Manuel A; Losada, Jorge; Pérez, Enrique R

    2009-01-01

    The delay time of the Hb S polymerization process was investigated in 63 patients with sickle cell disease during steady state and 10 during painful crisis starting from spin-spin proton magnetic resonance (PMR) time behavior measured at 36 degrees C and during spontaneous deoxygenation. We found a significant decrease of delay time as a result of the crisis (36 +/- 10%) and two well-differentiated ranges of values for each state: 273-354 min for steady state and 166-229 min for crisis with an uncertainty region of 15%. It is possible to use PMR as an objective and quantitative method in order to differentiate both clinical conditions of the sickle cell patient, but a more clear differentiation can be established comparing the delay time (td) value of one patient during crisis with his own td value during steady state.

  1. Assessment of Climate-sensitive Infectious Diseases in the Federated States of Micronesia

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Lachlan; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Pretrick, Moses; Iddings, Steven; Pavlin, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background: The health impacts of climate change are an issue of growing concern in the Pacific region. Prior to 2010, no formal, structured, evidence-based approach had been used to identify the most significant health risks posed by climate change in Pacific island countries. During 2010 and 2011, the World Health Organization supported the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) in performing a climate change and health vulnerability and adaptation assessment. This paper summarizes the priority climate-sensitive health risks in FSM, with a focus on diarrheal disease, its link with climatic variables and the implications of climate change. Methods: The vulnerability and adaptation assessment process included a review of the literature, extensive stakeholder consultations, ranking of climate-sensitive health risks, and analysis of the available long-term data on climate and climate-sensitive infectious diseases in FSM, which involved examination of health information data from the four state hospitals in FSM between 2000 and 2010; along with each state’s rainfall, temperature and El Niño-Southern Oscillation data. Generalized linear Poisson regression models were used to demonstrate associations between monthly climate variables and cases of climate-sensitive diseases at differing temporal lags. Results: Infectious diseases were among the highest priority climate-sensitive health risks identified in FSM, particularly diarrheal diseases, vector-borne diseases and leptospirosis. Correlation with climate data demonstrated significant associations between monthly maximum temperature and monthly outpatient cases of diarrheal disease in Pohnpei and Kosrae at a lag of one month and 0 to 3 months, respectively; no such associations were observed in Chuuk or Yap. Significant correlations between disease incidence and El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycles were demonstrated in Kosrae state. Conclusions: Analysis of the available data demonstrated significant associations

  2. People efficiently explore the solution space of the computationally intractable traveling salesman problem to find near-optimal tours.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Daniel E; Parada, Víctor

    2010-07-29

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution ("good" edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges ("bad" edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants "ran out of ideas." In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics.

  3. Historical Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Human Chagas Disease in Texas and Recommendations for Enhanced Understanding of Clinical Chagas Disease in the Southern United States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Aguilar, David; Hotez, Peter J; Murray, Kristy O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a "silent killer," it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden. Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications.

  4. Nigrostriatal dopamine-independent resting-state functional networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jee Hyun; Cha, Jungho; Lee, Jae Jung; Baek, Gwang-Min; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Hong, Jin Yong; Shin, Na-Young; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2015-10-01

    As an indicator of synchronous neural activity, resting-state functional networks are influenced by neuropathological and neurochemical changes in degenerative diseases. To further advance understanding about neurochemical and neuropathological basis for resting-state functional maps, we performed a comparative analysis of resting-state functional connectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and drug induced parkinsonism (DIP). Resting-state neuroimaging data were analyzed with a seed-based approach to investigate striatocortical functional connectivity and cortical functional connectivity within the default mode network, executive control network, and the dorsal attention network. The striatal subregions were divided into the more or less affected sides in terms of dopamine transporter uptake. Compared with DIP, PD exhibited an increased cerebellar connectivity from the more affected side of the caudate and the less affected sides of the anterior and the posterior putamen. Additionally, PD showed increased functional connectivity in the anterior prefrontal areas from the more affected side of the anterior putamen and from the less affected side of the posterior putamen. However, PD exhibited decreased cortical functional connectivity from the posterior cingulate cortex in the left temporal area. Finally, DIP patients showed decreased cortical functional connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in frontal and parietal areas compared with PD patients. In summary, the present study demonstrates that PD patients exhibited a unique resting state functional connectivity that may be associated with PD-related pathological changes beyond the dopaminergic system, whereas DIP patients showed altered functional connectivity within executive control network.

  5. The management and treatment of children with Fabry disease: A United States-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Robert J; Jefferies, John L; Laney, Dawn A; Lawson, Victoria H; Mauer, Michael; Taylor, Matthew R; Wilcox, William R

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease is an inherited X-linked disorder that presents during childhood in male and female patients. Young patients may initially experience pain, hypohidrosis, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Other manifestations of Fabry disease, such as renal and cardiac disease, manifest later in adolescence or adulthood. In the pediatric population, renal damage is typically subclinical and identifiable only through biopsy. Specialists from the United States with expertise in Fabry disease convened during 2013-2014 in order to develop these consensus guidelines about the management and treatment of children with Fabry disease. The presence of symptoms in boys and girls of any age is an indication to begin therapy. Early treatment before the onset of potentially irreversible vital organ pathology is ideal. Asymptomatic children with Fabry mutations should be followed closely for the development of renal, cardiac, neurological, or gastrointestinal signs, symptoms, or laboratory changes, which would warrant treatment initiation. A comprehensive care plan should be implemented by the treating physicians to guide the management of children with Fabry disease.

  6. Impact of heart disease and quality of care on minority populations in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth N.; Guendelman, Mayadallia; Leong, Benjamin S.; Hogan, Sara; Dennison, Adrienne

    2006-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death across all populations in the United States. In 1985, the Secretary's Task Force on Black and Minority Health recognized the existence of widespread health disparities for heart disease and related risk factors among minorities in America. Inequalities in heart health and healthcare continue to exist. This review compares measures of heart disease and healthcare for white, African-American, Asian/Pacific Islander, American-Indian/Alaska-Native and Hispanic/Latino populations. Lack of healthcare data for minorities continues to be a barrier to understanding the nature and extent of heart disease and related risk factors for these groups. In combination with programs that address preventive measures to reduce risk factors for heart disease, the integration of quality improvement measures has developed as an important strategy for reducing cardiovascular health disparities. Improved data collection and reporting, enhanced use of information technology, and promotion of cultural competency hold potential for improving the quality of cardiac care and reducing health disease for all Americans. PMID:17052047

  7. Dynamic statistical parametric mapping for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalographic spikes in patients with intractable frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J.; von Pechmann, Deidre; Wakeman, Daniel G.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Liu, Hesheng; Madsen, Joseph R.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical value of spatiotemporal source analysis for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ictal MEG and simultaneous scalp EEG was recorded in five patients with medically intractable frontal lobe epilepsy. Dynamic statistical parametric maps (dSPMs) were calculated at the peak of early ictal spikes for the purpose of estimating the spatiotemporal cortical source distribution. DSPM solutions were mapped onto a cortical surface, which was derived from each patient's MRI. Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) were calculated using a single-dipole model for comparison with dSPMs. In all patients, dSPMs tended to have a localized activation, consistent with the clinically-determined ictal onset zone, whereas most ECDs were considered to be inappropriate sources according to their goodness-of-fit values. Analyzing ictal MEG spikes by using dSPMs may provide useful information in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. PMID:19394198

  8. Dynamic statistical parametric mapping for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalographic spikes in patients with intractable frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J; von Pechmann, Deidre; Wakeman, Daniel G; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Liu, Hesheng; Madsen, Joseph R; Bourgeois, Blaise F; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical value of spatiotemporal source analysis for analyzing ictal magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ictal MEG and simultaneous scalp EEG was recorded in five patients with medically intractable frontal lobe epilepsy. Dynamic statistical parametric maps (dSPMs) were calculated at the peak of early ictal spikes for the purpose of estimating the spatiotemporal cortical source distribution. DSPM solutions were mapped onto a cortical surface, which was derived from each patient's MRI. Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) were calculated using a single-dipole model for comparison with dSPMs. In all patients, dSPMs tended to have a localized activation, consistent with the clinically determined ictal onset zone, whereas most ECDs were considered to be inappropriate sources according to their goodness-of-fit values. Analyzing ictal MEG spikes by using dSPMs may provide useful information in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

  9. Successful management of intractable cryptosporidial diarrhea with intravenous octreotide, a somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed

    Kreinik, G; Burstein, O; Landor, M; Bernstein, L; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1991-06-01

    A 38-year-old man with AIDS and intractable large-volume diarrhea due to a cryptosporidial infection was successfully treated with intravenous octreotide, a somatostatin analogue. The volume of diarrhea, 10-12 liters with 8-13 movements per day, was reduced to three to four semi-formed to formed stools per day when the patient was treated with 400 micrograms intravenous octreotide daily. The patient's intravenous hyperalimentation was discontinued and he returned to oral feeding. He quickly regained his normal weight and has now resumed his normal activities. For those patients who cannot tolerate subcutaneous administration, intravenous octreotide therapy may not only be life-saving but may also markedly increase the quality of life. Roxithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, was also administered to this patient with cryptosporidiosis but efficacy was not demonstrated.

  10. Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J; Halperin, Eran

    2015-04-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace.

  11. [A case of intractable epilepsy showing frequent gelastic seizures by administration of clobazam].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Toshiyuki; Miura, Hisao; Sunaoshi, Wataru; Hosoda, Nozomi; Takei, Kenji; Katayama, Fumihiko

    2003-09-01

    A 13-year-old boy patient had severe mental retardation and spastic quadriplegia due to fetal distress and hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in the perinatal period. He suffered from West syndrome at the age of 7 months, and subsequently was diagnosed as having symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. His intractable epileptic seizures were not controlled by combination of various antiepileptic drugs. After prescribing nitrazepam and zonisamide for more than 1 year, we added clobazam (CLB), which has been marketed in Japan since 2000, to this combination therapy. After the introduction of CLB, tonic seizures disappeared. However, gelastic seizures laughing with a stiff face and a wry mouth appeared frequently before falling asleep, and sleep disturbance worsened subsequently. It has not been reported previously that gelastic seizures are a side effect of CLB, although irritability and sleep disturbance have been described.

  12. Effectiveness of cerebral hemispherotomy for improving behavioral disorders associated with intractable post-traumatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Morino, Michiharu; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Ohata, Kenji; Hara, Mitsuhiro

    2006-04-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with intractable post-traumatic seizures after suffering cerebral contusion in a traffic accident at age 5 years. Cerebral hemispherotomy was performed to transect the neuronal fibers to interrupt connections between seizure foci in wide areas of the brain, and to minimize the resected brain parenchyma. His seizures resolved and behavioral disorders improved, which had been impaired since age 8 years. Increased glucose metabolism in the normal frontal lobe detected by interictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography was correlated with the improvements in behavioral disorders. These findings suggest that the effects of seizures may be reversible in brain areas connected with, but remote from, the epileptogenic cortex.

  13. Intrastromal corneal tattooing as treatment in a case of intractable strabismic diplopia (double binocular vision).

    PubMed

    Laria, Carlos; Alió, Jorge L; Piñero, David N

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 29 man complaining of intractable diplopia during the last 5 years. He had undergone several surgical procedures for the treatment of his infantile strabismus since age 6 years. After surgery, the patient had been treated on 4 occasions with Botox. He also performed antisuppression exercises to encourage binocular vision. On our examination, the patient showed a 20/20 visual acuity in both eyes and a strabismic dysfunction with slight alphabet pattern, which induced a disturbing constant diplopia. Several treatment options were considered as occlusion therapy or cosmetic contact lenses, but they were not used because they were not acceptable esthetically or not tolerated. Finally, an optical penalization was induced by means of a black corneal tattooing placed at the centre of the cornea. The patient was followed for a period of 18 months, showing a complete elimination of diploia with esthetical acceptance and no inflammatory signs.

  14. Melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs contributes to the intractability of malignant melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin G.; Valencia, Julio C.; Lai, Barry; Zhang, Guofeng; Paterson, Jill K.; Rouzaud, François; Berens, Werner; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Garfield, Susan H.; Leapman, Richard D.; Hearing, Vincent J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2006-06-01

    Multidrug resistance mechanisms underlying the intractability of malignant melanomas remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the development of multidrug resistance in melanomas involves subcellular sequestration of intracellular cytotoxic drugs such as cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin; CDDP). CDDP is initially sequestered in subcellular organelles such as melanosomes, which significantly reduces its nuclear localization when compared with nonmelanoma/KB-3-1 epidermoid carcinoma cells. The melanosomal accumulation of CDDP remarkably modulates melanogenesis through a pronounced increase in tyrosinase activity. The altered melanogenesis manifested an 8-fold increase in both intracellular pigmentation and extracellular transport of melanosomes containing CDDP. Thus, our experiments provide evidence that melanosomes contribute to the refractory properties of melanoma cells by sequestering cytotoxic drugs and increasing melanosome-mediated drug export. Preventing melanosomal sequestration of cytotoxic drugs by inhibiting the functions of melanosomes may have great potential as an approach to improving the chemosensitivity of melanoma cells. cancer | melanosomes | skin | tumor therapy | multidrug resistance

  15. Perceptions of a Changing World Induce Hope and Promote Peace in Intractable Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J.; Halperin, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  16. The relationship between coagulation state and inflammatory bowel disease: current understanding and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Koutroubakis, Ioannis E

    2015-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with a hypercoagulable state and subsequently with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE in IBD is characterized by a high recurrence rate and is associated with the disease activity. Acquired endothelial dysfunction, abnormalities of platelets, activation of coagulation system and impaired fibrinolysis are the main changes in the coagulation state in IBD. The development of VTE in IBD has been considered to be the result of multiple interactions between acquired and inherited risk factors. The treatment of VTE in IBD patients is recommended to be similar and to follow the same protocols as for non-IBD patients. In the clinical practice, the management of IBD patients and especially the hospitalized patients should include thromboprophylaxis.

  17. A rare case of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor combined with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis and intractable seizures

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jee-Yeon; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Seokho

    2016-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome that affects ectomesodermal tissues (skin, eyes, adipose tissue, and brain). The neurologic manifestations associated with ECCL are various including seizures. However, ECCL patients very rarely develop brain tumors that originate from the neuroepithelium. This is the first described case of ECCL in combination with dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) that presented with intractable seizures. A 7-year-old girl was admitted to our center because of ECCL and associated uncontrolled seizures. She was born with right anophthalmia and lipomatosis in the right temporal area and endured right temporal lipoma excision at 3 years of age. Seizures began when she was 3 years old, but did not respond to multiple antiepileptic drugs. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed at 8 and 10 years of age revealed an interval increase of multifocal hyperintense lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, periventricular white matter, and, especially, the right temporal area. A nodular mass near the right hippocampus demonstrated the absence of N-acetylaspartate decrease on brain MR spectroscopy and mildly increased methionine uptake on brain positron emission tomography, suggesting low-grade tumor. Twenty-four-hour video electroencephalographic monitoring also indicated seizures originating from the right temporal area. Right temporal lobectomy was performed without complications, and the nodular lesion was pathologically identified as DNET. The patient has been seizure-free for 14 months since surgery. Although ECCL-associated brain tumors are very rare, careful follow-up imaging and surgical resection is recommended for patients with intractable seizures. PMID:28018467

  18. Immediate and long term outcome after infrathalamic and thalamic lesioning for intractable Tourette's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Babel, T; Warnke, P; Ostertag, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The surgical treatment of intractable Tourette's syndrome is controversial. Experience with 17 consecutive patients treated between 1970 and 1998 is reviewed and the efficacy and safety of surgical treatment is assessed.
METHODS—These patients were retrospectively reclassified into subtypes according to the protocol of the Tourette's Syndrome Study Group. One patient was excluded from the study. Ventriculography based stereotactic zona incerta (ZI) and ventrolateral/ lamella medialis thalamotomy (VL/LM) were performed on all patients. The preoperative, postoperative, and late tic severities were assessed by the tic severity rating scale. The median follow up of 11 patients (65%) was 7 years (range 3.5-17 years) and six patients were lost to long term follow up.
RESULTS—Median age was 23 years (range 11-40) at the time of surgery. Median duration of illness was 14 years (range 3-33). The mean preoperative motor and vocal tic severities were estimated to be 4.44 (SD 0.63) and 3.81 (SD 0.66), respectively. Unilateral ZI lesioning and VL/LM lesioning selected by asymmetry of symptoms provide an effective control of tic severity (p motor and vocal<0.001). In attenuation of contralateral symptoms, a second surgical intervention in the relevant side could reduce tic severity sufficiently (p motor<0.01; p vocal<0.005). Transient complications occurred in 68% of patients. Only one permanent complication was registered in six patients followed up after unilateral surgery. Two out of five patients followed up after bilateral surgery had disabling side effects of surgery.
CONCLUSIONS—ZI and VL/LM lesioning provide a significant long term reduction of tic severity in intractable Tourette's syndrome. Adequate selection of the side of first intervention might prevent the patient from increased risk of bilateral surgery.

 PMID:11309463

  19. Physical Feature Encoding and Word Recognition Abilities Are Altered in Children with Intractable Epilepsy: Preliminary Neuromagnetic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Pardos, Maria; Korostenskaja, Milena; Xiang, Jing; Fujiwara, Hisako; Lee, Ki H.; Horn, Paul S.; Byars, Anna; Vannest, Jennifer; Wang, Yingying; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of language function is critical for children with intractable epilepsy under consideration for epilepsy surgery. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy by using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten children with intractable epilepsy (M/F 6/4, mean ± SD 13.4 ± 2.2 years) were matched on age and sex to healthy controls. Common nouns were presented simultaneously from visual and auditory sensory inputs in “match” and “mismatch” conditions. Neuromagnetic responses M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 with latencies of ~100 ms, ~150 ms, ~250 ms, ~350 ms, and ~450 ms, respectively, elicited during the “match” condition were identified. Compared to healthy children, epilepsy patients had both significantly delayed latency of the M1 and reduced amplitudes of M3 and M5 responses. These results provide neurophysiologic evidence of altered word recognition in children with intractable epilepsy. PMID:26146459

  20. Implementation of a drug-use and disease-state management program.

    PubMed

    Skledar, S J; Hess, M M

    2000-12-15

    A drug-use and disease-state management (DUDSM) program was instituted in 1996 at a teaching hospital associated with a large nonprofit health care system. The program's goals are to optimize pharmacotherapeutic regimens, evaluate health outcomes of identified disease states, and evaluate the economic impact of pharmacotherapeutic options for given disease states by developing practice guidelines. Through a re-engineering process, resources within the pharmacy department were identified that could be devoted to the DUDSM program, including the use of clinical pharmacy specialists, promotion of staff pharmacists into the DUDSM program, a pharmacy technician, and information systems support. A strength of the program is its systematic approach for developing and implementing new initiatives, as well as monitoring compliance with all initiatives on an ongoing basis. The initiative-design process incorporates continuous quality improvement principles, outcome design and evaluation, competency assessment for all pharmacists, multidisciplinary collaboration, and sophisticated information systems. Seventy-five initiatives have been implemented, ranging from simple dose-optimization strategies for specific drugs to complicated practice guidelines for managing specific disease states. Improved patient outcomes have been documented, including reduced length of stay, postsurgical wound infection, adverse drug reactions, and medication errors. Documented cost savings exceeded $4 million annually for fiscal years 1996-97 through 1999-2000. Overall compliance with DUDSM initiatives exceeds 80%, and physician service profiling has been initiated to monitor variant prescribing. The DUDSM program has successfully integrated practice guidelines into therapeutic decision-making, resulting in improved patient-care outcomes and cost savings.

  1. 78 FR 66938 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention--State, Tribal, Local and Territorial (STLT) Subcommittee In... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the following meeting of the aforementioned...

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease in United States Hispanics: A Growing Public Health Problem

    PubMed Central

    Lora, Claudia M.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Kusek, John W.; Porter, Anna; Ricardo, Ana C.; Go, Alan S.; Lash, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Hispanics is higher than non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for kidney failure. Likely contributing factors to this burden of disease include diabetes and metabolic syndrome, both are common among Hispanics. Access to health care, quality of care, and barriers due to language, health literacy and acculturation may also play a role. Despite the importance of this public health problem, only limited data exist about Hispanics with CKD. We review the epidemiology of CKD in US Hispanics, identify the factors that may be responsible for this growing health problem, and suggest gaps in our understanding which are suitable for future investigation. PMID:20073150

  3. Automatic assessment of the motor state of the Parkinson's disease patient--a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel methodology in which the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) data processed with a rule-based decision algorithm is used to predict the state of the Parkinson's Disease patients. The research was carried out to investigate whether the advancement of the Parkinson's Disease can be automatically assessed. For this purpose, past and current UPDRS data from 47 subjects were examined. The results show that, among other classifiers, the rough set-based decision algorithm turned out to be most suitable for such automatic assessment. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1563339375633634. PMID:22340508

  4. Epigenetics and its role in periodontal diseases: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Lena; Castilho, Rogerio M; Giannobile, William V

    2015-04-01

    The immune response to oral bacteria and the subsequent activation of inflammatory signaling is not only dependent on genetic factors. The importance of so-called epigenetic mechanisms presents additional regulatory pathways of genes involved in maintaining chronic inflammation, including gingivitis and periodontitis. The term epigenetics relates to changes in gene expression that are not encoded in the DNA sequence itself and include chemical alterations of DNA and its associated proteins. These changes lead to remodeling of the chromatin and subsequent activation or inactivation of a gene. Epigenetic mechanisms have been found to contribute to disease, including cancer and autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In this state-of-the art review, the authors provide the latest findings on the involvement of epigenetic modifications in the development of periodontal disease and present emerging therapeutic strategies aimed at epigenetic targets (epidrugs) associated with the disruption of tissue homeostasis and the development of periodontitis.

  5. International care models for chronic kidney disease: methods and economics--United States.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, there is a major chronic kidney disease (CKD) problem with over 8 million adults having stage 3 or 4 CKD. There is good medical evidence that many of these patients can benefit from focused interventions. And while there are strong theoretical reasons to believe these interventions are cost-effective, there are little published data to back up this assertion. However, despite the lack of financial data proving cost-effectiveness and against the background of a disorganized health care system in the US, some models of CKD care are being employed. At the present time, the most comprehensive models of care in the US are emerging in vertically integrated health care programs. Other models of care are developing in the setting of managed care health plans that employ CKD disease management programs, either developed internally or in partnership with renal disease management companies.

  6. Human Risk of Infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme Disease Agent, in Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Cislo, Paul; Brinkerhoff, Robert; Hamer, Sarah A.; Rowland, Michelle; Cortinas, Roberto; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Melton, Forrest; Hickling, Graham J.; Tsao, Jean I.; Bunikis, Jonas; Barbour, Alan G.; Kitron, Uriel; Piesman, Joseph; Fish, Durland

    2012-01-01

    The geographic pattern of human risk for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the tick-borne pathogen that causes Lyme disease, was mapped for the eastern United States. The map is based on standardized field sampling in 304 sites of the density of Ixodes scapularis host-seeking nymphs infected with B. burgdorferi, which is closely associated with human infection risk. Risk factors for the presence and density of infected nymphs were used to model a continuous 8 km×8 km resolution predictive surface of human risk, including confidence intervals for each pixel. Discontinuous Lyme disease risk foci were identified in the Northeast and upper Midwest, with a transitional zone including sites with uninfected I. scapularis populations. Given frequent under- and over-diagnoses of Lyme disease, this map could act as a tool to guide surveillance, control, and prevention efforts and act as a baseline for studies tracking the spread of infection. PMID:22302869

  7. Heart Disease and Cancer Deaths — Trends and Projections in the United States, 1969–2020

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robert N.; Coleman King, Sallyann M.; Soman, Ashwini; Thompson, Trevor D.; Hong, Yuling; Moller, Bjorn; Leadbetter, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart disease and cancer are the first and second leading causes of death in the United States. Age-standardized death rates (risk) have declined since the 1960s for heart disease and for cancer since the 1990s, whereas the overall number of heart disease deaths declined and cancer deaths increased. We analyzed mortality data to evaluate and project the effect of risk reduction, population growth, and aging on the number of heart disease and cancer deaths to the year 2020. Methods We used mortality data, population estimates, and population projections to estimate and predict heart disease and cancer deaths from 1969 through 2020 and to apportion changes in deaths resulting from population risk, growth, and aging. Results We predicted that from 1969 through 2020, the number of heart disease deaths would decrease 21.3% among men (–73.9% risk, 17.9% growth, 34.7% aging) and 13.4% among women (–73.3% risk, 17.1% growth, 42.8% aging) while the number of cancer deaths would increase 91.1% among men (–33.5% risk, 45.6% growth, 79.0% aging) and 101.1% among women (–23.8% risk, 48.8% growth, 76.0% aging). We predicted that cancer would become the leading cause of death around 2016, although sex-specific crossover years varied. Conclusion Risk of death declined more steeply for heart disease than cancer, offset the increase in heart disease deaths, and partially offset the increase in cancer deaths resulting from demographic changes over the past 4 decades. If current trends continue, cancer will become the leading cause of death by 2020. PMID:27854420

  8. Zika Virus Disease in Travelers Returning to the United States, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Morgan J; Fischer, Marc; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga I; Laven, Janeen J; Lanciotti, Robert S; Staples, J Erin

    2016-07-06

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that typically causes a mild febrile illness with rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis. Zika virus has recently caused large outbreaks of disease in southeast Asia, Pacific Ocean Islands, and the Americas. We identified all positive Zika virus test results performed at U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2010 to 2014. For persons with test results indicating a recent infection with Zika virus, we collected information on demographics, travel history, and clinical features. Eleven Zika virus disease cases were identified among travelers returning to the United States. The median age of cases was 50 years (range: 29-74 years) and six (55%) were male. Nine (82%) cases had their illness onset from January to April. All cases reported a travel history to islands in the Pacific Ocean during the days preceding illness onset, and all cases were potentially viremic while in the United States. Public health prevention messages about decreasing mosquito exposure, preventing sexual exposure, and preventing infection in pregnant women should be targeted to individuals traveling to or living in areas with Zika virus activity. Health-care providers and public health officials should be educated about the recognition, diagnosis, and prevention of Zika virus disease.

  9. West Nile Virus and Other Nationally Notifiable Arboviral Diseases - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc

    2015-09-04

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected mosquitoes and ticks. West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of domestically acquired arboviral disease in the United States (1). However, several other arboviruses also cause sporadic cases and seasonal outbreaks. This report summarizes surveillance data reported to CDC in 2014 for WNV and other nationally notifiable arboviruses, excluding dengue. Forty-two states and the District of Columbia (DC) reported 2,205 cases of WNV disease. Of these, 1,347 (61%) were classified as WNV neuroinvasive disease (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis), for a national incidence of 0.42 cases per 100,000 population. After WNV, the next most commonly reported cause of arboviral disease was La Crosse virus (80 cases), followed by Jamestown Canyon virus (11), St. Louis encephalitis virus (10), Powassan virus (8), and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (8). WNV and other arboviruses cause serious illness in substantial numbers of persons each year. Maintaining surveillance programs is important to help direct prevention activities.

  10. Population dynamics of epidemic and endemic states of drug-resistance emergence in infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Knipl, Diána; Röst, Gergely

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistance during treatment of many infectious diseases continue to degrade our ability to control and mitigate infection outcomes using therapeutic measures. While the coverage and efficacy of treatment remain key factors in the population dynamics of resistance, the timing for the start of the treatment in infectious individuals can significantly influence such dynamics. We developed a between-host disease transmission model to investigate the short-term (epidemic) and long-term (endemic) states of infections caused by two competing pathogen subtypes, namely the wild-type and resistant-type, when the probability of developing resistance is a function of delay in start of the treatment. We characterize the behaviour of disease equilibria and obtain a condition to minimize the fraction of population infectious at the endemic state in terms of probability of developing resistance and its transmission fitness. For the short-term epidemic dynamics, we illustrate that depending on the likelihood of resistance development at the time of treatment initiation, the same epidemic size may be achieved with different delays in start of the treatment, which may correspond to significantly different treatment coverages. Our results demonstrate that early initiation of treatment may not necessarily be the optimal strategy for curtailing the incidence of resistance or the overall disease burden. The risk of developing drug-resistance in-host remains an important factor in the management of resistance in the population. PMID:28097052

  11. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Saraiva, Maria Graças Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  12. The economic and clinical burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Blissett, Deirdre; Blissett, Robert; Henry, Linda; Stepanova, Maria; Younossi, Youssef; Racila, Andrei; Hunt, Sharon; Beckerman, Rachel

    2016-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. There is uncertainty around the economic burden of NAFLD. We constructed a steady-state prevalence model to quantify this burden in the United States and Europe. Five models were constructed to estimate the burden of NAFLD in the United States and four European countries. Models were built using a series of interlinked Markov chains, each representing age increments of the NAFLD and the general populations. Incidence and remission rates were calculated by calibrating against real-world prevalence rates. The data were validated using a computerized disease model called DisMod II. NAFLD patients transitioned between nine health states (nonalcoholic fatty liver, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH], NASH-fibrosis, NASH-compensated cirrhosis, NASH-decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, post-liver transplant, and death). Transition probabilities were sourced from the literature and calibrated against real-world data. Utilities were obtained from NAFLD patients using the Short Form-6D. Costs were sourced from the literature and local fee schedules. In the United States, over 64 million people are projected to have NAFLD, with annual direct medical costs of about $103 billion ($1,613 per patient). In the Europe-4 countries (Germany, France, Italy, and United Kingdom), there are ∼52 million people with NAFLD with an annual cost of about €35 billion (from €354 to €1,163 per patient). Costs are highest in patients aged 45-65. The burden is significantly higher when societal costs are included.

  13. Identification of predictive biomarkers of disease state in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hailemariam, D; Mandal, R; Saleem, F; Dunn, S M; Wishart, D S; Ametaj, B N

    2014-05-01

    In dairy cows, periparturient disease states, such as metritis, mastitis, and laminitis, are leading to increasingly significant economic losses for the dairy industry. Treatments for these pathologies are often expensive, ineffective, or not cost-efficient, leading to production losses, high veterinary bills, or early culling of the cows. Early diagnosis or detection of these conditions before they manifest themselves could lower their incidence, level of morbidity, and the associated economic losses. In an effort to identify predictive biomarkers for postpartum or periparturient disease states in dairy cows, we undertook a cross-sectional and longitudinal metabolomics study to look at plasma metabolite levels of dairy cows during the transition period, before and after becoming ill with postpartum diseases. Specifically we employed a targeted quantitative metabolomics approach that uses direct flow injection mass spectrometry to track the metabolite changes in 120 different plasma metabolites. Blood plasma samples were collected from 12 dairy cows at 4 time points during the transition period (-4 and -1 wk before and 1 and 4 wk after parturition). Out of the 12 cows studied, 6 developed multiple periparturient disorders in the postcalving period, whereas the other 6 remained healthy during the entire experimental period. Multivariate data analysis (principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis) revealed a clear separation between healthy controls and diseased cows at all 4 time points. This analysis allowed us to identify several metabolites most responsible for separating the 2 groups, especially before parturition and the start of any postpartum disease. Three metabolites, carnitine, propionyl carnitine, and lysophosphatidylcholine acyl C14:0, were significantly elevated in diseased cows as compared with healthy controls as early as 4 wk before parturition, whereas 2 metabolites, phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C42:4 and

  14. Health state values for use in the economic evaluation of treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shearer, James; Green, Colin; Ritchie, Craig W; Zajicek, John P

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic, progressive, neurodegenerative disease that places a heavy burden on people with the condition, their families and carers, health care systems and society in general. Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in patients deteriorates as the cognitive, behavioural and functional symptoms of AD develop. The human and financial cost of AD is forecast to grow rapidly as populations age, and those responsible for planning and financing health care face the challenge of allocating increasingly scarce resources against current and future interventions targeted towards AD. These include calls for early detection and diagnosis, preventative strategies, new medications, residential care, supportive care, and meeting the needs of carers as well as patients. Health care funders in many health systems now require a demonstration of the value of new interventions through a comparison of benefits in terms of improvements in HR-QOL and costs relative to those of competing or existing practices. Changes in HR-QOL provide the basis for the calculation of the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), a key outcome used in economic evaluations to compare treatments within and between different disease conditions. The objective of this systematic review was to provide a summary of the published health state values (utilities) for AD patients and their carers that are currently available to estimate QALYs for use in health economic evaluations of interventions in AD. The health care literature was searched for articles published in English between 2000 and 2011, using keywords and variants including 'quality-adjusted life years', 'health state indicators', 'health utilities' and the specific names of generic measures of HR-QOL and health state valuation techniques. Databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, NHS EED, PsycINFO and ISI Web of Science. This review identified 12 studies that reported utility values associated with health states in AD. Values

  15. Dyskinesia and motor state detection in Parkinson's disease patients with a single movement sensor.

    PubMed

    Samà, A; Pérez-Lopez, C; Romagosa, J; Rodríguez-Martín, D; Català, A; Cabestany, J; Pérez-Martínez, D A; Rodríguez-Molinero, A

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that alters the patients' motor performance. Patients suffer many motor symptoms: bradykinesia, dyskinesia and freezing of gait, among others. Furthermore, patients alternate between periods in which they are able to move smoothly for some hours (ON state), and periods with motor complications (OFF state). An accurate report of PD motor states and symptoms will enable doctors to personalize medication intake and, therefore, improve response to treatment. Additionally, real-time reporting could allow an automatic management of PD by means of an automatic control of drug-administration pump doses. Such a system must be able to provide accurate information without disturbing the patients' daily life activities. This paper presents the results of the MoMoPa study classifying motor states and dyskinesia from 20 PD patients by using a belt-worn single tri-axial accelerometer. The algorithms obtained will be validated in a further study with 15 PD patients and will be enhanced in the REMPARK project.

  16. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  17. Vitamin D and chronic diseases: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Altieri, Barbara; Annweiler, Cedric; Balercia, Giancarlo; Pal, H B; Boucher, Barbara J; Cannell, John J; Foresta, Carlo; Grübler, Martin R; Kotsa, Kalliopi; Mascitelli, Luca; März, Winfried; Orio, Francesco; Pilz, Stefan; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to provide the current state of the art regarding the role of vitamin D in chronic diseases (osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, dementia, autism, type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, male and female fertility). The document was drawn up by panelists that provided their contribution according to their own scientific expertise. Each scientific expert supplied a first draft manuscript on a specific aspect of the document's topic that was subjected to voting by all experts as "yes" (agreement with the content and/or wording) or "no" (disagreement). The adopted rule was that statements supported by ≥75 % of votes would be immediately accepted, while those with <25 % would be rejected outright. Others would be subjected to further discussion and subsequent voting, where ≥67 % support or, in an eventual third round, a majority of ≥50 % would be needed. This document finds that the current evidence support a role for vitamin D in bone health but not in other health conditions. However, subjects with vitamin D deficiency have been found to be at high risk of developing chronic diseases. Therefore, although at the present time there is not sufficient evidence to recommend vitamin D supplementation as treatment of chronic diseases, the treatment of vitamin D deficiency should be desiderable in order to reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases.

  18. Fine-scale predictions of distributions of Chagas disease vectors in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Cárdenas, Jorge; Gonzalez Bravo, Francisco Ernesto; Salazar Schettino, Paz Maria; Gallaga Solorzano, Juan Carlos; Ramírez Barba, Ector; Martinez Mendez, Joel; Sánchez-Cordero, V; Peterson, A Townsend; Ramsey, J M

    2005-11-01

    One of the most daunting challenges for Chagas disease surveillance and control in Mexico is the lack of community level data on vector distributions. Although many states now have assembled representative domestic triatomine collections, only two triatomine specimens had been collected and reported previously from the state of Guanajuato. Field personnel from the state's Secretaría de Salud conducted health promotion activities in 43 of the 46 counties in the state and received donations of a total of 2,522 triatomine specimens between 1998 and 2002. All specimens were identified, and live insects examined for Trypanosoma cruzi. In an effort to develop fine-scale distributional data for Guanajuato, collection localities were georeferenced and ecological niches were modeled for each species by using evolutionary-computing approaches. Five species were collected: Triatoma mexicana (Herrich-Schaeffer), Triatoma longipennis (Usinger), Triatoma pallidipennis (Stål), Triatoma barberi (Usinger), and Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) from 201 communities located at elevations of 870-2,200 m. Based on collection success, T. mexicana had the broadest dispersion, although niche mapping indicates that T. barberi represents the greatest risk for transmission of Chagas disease in the state. T. dimidiata was represented in collections by a single adult collected from one village outside the predicted area for all species. For humans, an estimated 3,755,380 individuals are at risk for vector transmission in the state, with an incidence of 3,500 new cases per year; overall seroprevalences of 2.6% indicate that 97,640 individuals are infected with T. cruzi at present, including 29,300 chronic cases.

  19. Gamma Oscillations in the Hyperkinetic State Detected with Chronic Human Brain Recordings in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman; Wang, Sarah S.; Ziman, Nathan; Ostrem, Jill L.; San Luciano, Marta; Galifianakis, Nicholas B.; Starr, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperkinetic states are common in human movement disorders, but their neural basis remains uncertain. One such condition is dyskinesia, a serious adverse effect of medical and surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). To study this, we used a novel, totally implanted, bidirectional neural interface to obtain multisite long-term recordings. We focus our analysis on two patients with PD who experienced frequent dyskinesia and studied them both at rest and during voluntary movement. We show that dyskinesia is associated with a narrowband gamma oscillation in motor cortex between 60 and 90 Hz, a similar, though weaker, oscillation in subthalamic nucleus, and strong phase coherence between the two. Dyskinesia-related oscillations are minimally affected by voluntary movement. When dyskinesia persists during therapeutic deep brain stimulation (DBS), the peak frequency of this signal shifts to half the stimulation frequency. These findings suggest a circuit-level mechanism for the generation of dyskinesia as well as a promising control signal for closed-loop DBS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Oscillations in brain networks link functionally related brain areas to accomplish thought and action, but this mechanism may be altered or exaggerated by disease states. Invasive recording using implanted electrodes provides a degree of spatial and temporal resolution that is ideal for analysis of network oscillations. Here we used a novel, totally implanted, bidirectional neural interface for chronic multisite brain recordings in humans with Parkinson's disease. We characterized an oscillation between cortex and subcortical modulators that is associated with a serious adverse effect of therapy for Parkinson's disease: dyskinesia. The work shows how a perturbation in oscillatory dynamics might lead to a state of excessive movement and also suggests a possible biomarker for feedback-controlled neurostimulation to treat hyperkinetic disorders. PMID:27307233

  20. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking Water - United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Beer, Karlyn D; Gargano, Julia W; Roberts, Virginia A; Hill, Vincent R; Garrison, Laurel E; Kutty, Preeta K; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Wade, Timothy J; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Yoder, Jonathan S

    2015-08-14

    Advances in water management and sanitation have substantially reduced waterborne disease in the United States, although outbreaks continue to occur. Public health agencies in the U.S. states and territories* report information on waterborne disease outbreaks to the CDC Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance/index.html). For 2011-2012, 32 drinking water-associated outbreaks were reported, accounting for at least 431 cases of illness, 102 hospitalizations, and 14 deaths. Legionella was responsible for 66% of outbreaks and 26% of illnesses, and viruses and non-Legionella bacteria together accounted for 16% of outbreaks and 53% of illnesses. The two most commonly identified deficiencies† leading to drinking water-associated outbreaks were Legionella in building plumbing§ systems (66%) and untreated groundwater (13%). Continued vigilance by public health, regulatory, and industry professionals to identify and correct deficiencies associated with building plumbing systems and groundwater systems could prevent most reported outbreaks and illnesses associated with drinking water systems.

  1. Estimates of incidence and costs of intestinal infectious diseases in the United States.

    PubMed

    Garthright, W E; Archer, D L; Kvenberg, J E

    1988-01-01

    The incidence of acute episodes of intestinal infectious diseases in the United States was estimated through analysis of community-based studies and national interview surveys. Their differing results were reconciled by adjusting the study population age distributions in the community-based studies, by excluding those cases that also showed respiratory symptoms, and by accounting for structural differences in the surveys. The reconciliation process provided an estimate of 99 million acute cases of either vomiting or diarrhea, or both, each year in this country, half of which involved more than a full day of restricted activity. The analysis was limited to cases of acute gastrointestinal diseases with vomiting or diarrhea but without respiratory symptoms. Physicians were consulted for 8.2 million illnesses; 250,000 of these required hospitalization. In 1985, hospitalizations incurred $560 million in medical costs and $200 million in lost productivity. Nonhospitalized cases (7.9 million) for which physicians were consulted incurred $690 million in medical costs and $2.06 billion in lost productivity. More than 90 million cases for which no physician was consulted cost an estimated $19.5 billion in lost productivity. The estimates excluded such costs as death, pain and suffering, lost leisure time, financial losses to food establishments, and legal expenses. According to these estimates, medical costs and lost productivity from acute intestinal infectious diseases amount to a minimum of about $23 billion a year in the United States.

  2. Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks--United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-01-25

    Known pathogens cause an estimated 9.4 million foodborne illnesses annually in the United States. CDC collects data on foodborne disease outbreaks submitted by all states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico through CDC's Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Data reported for each outbreak include the number of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths; the etiologic agent; the implicated food vehicle; and other factors involved in food preparation and consumption. During 2009-2010, a total of 1,527 foodborne disease outbreaks (675 in 2009 and 852 in 2010) were reported, resulting in 29,444 cases of illness, 1,184 hospitalizations, and 23 deaths. Among the 790 outbreaks with a single laboratory-confirmed etiologic agent, norovirus was the most commonly reported, accounting for 42% of outbreaks. Salmonella was second, accounting for 30% of outbreaks. Among the 299 outbreaks attributed to a food composed of ingredients from one of 17 predefined, mutually exclusive food commodities, those most often implicated were beef (13%), dairy (12%), fish (12%), and poultry (11%). The commodities in the 299 outbreaks associated with the most illnesses were eggs (27% of illnesses), beef (11%), and poultry (10%). Public health, regulatory, and food industry professionals can use this information when creating targeted control strategies along the farm-to-table continuum for specific agents, specific foods, and specific pairs of agents and foods. This information also supports efforts to promote safe food-handling practices among food workers and the public.

  3. Effects of noise on a computational model for disease states of mood disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias Huber, Martin; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Braun, Hans Albert; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are currently proposed to explain the progressive course of recurrent mood disorders starting with isolated episodes and ending with accelerated irregular (``chaotic") mood fluctuations. Such a low-dimensional disease model is attractive because of its principal accordance with biological disease models, i.e. the kindling and biological rhythms model. However, most natural systems are nonlinear and noisy and several studies in the neuro- and physical sciences have demonstrated interesting cooperative behaviors arising from interacting random and deterministic dynamics. Here, we consider the effects of noise on a recent neurodynamical model for the timecourse of affective disorders (Huber et al.: Biological Psychiatry 1999;46:256-262). We describe noise effects on temporal patterns and mean episode frequencies of various in computo disease states. Our simulations demonstrate that noise can cause unstructured randomness or can maximize periodic order. The frequency of episode occurence can increase with noise but it can also remain unaffected or even can decrease. We show further that noise can make visible bifurcations before they would normally occur under deterministic conditions and we quantify this behavior with a recently developed statistical method. All these effects depend critically on both, the dynamic state and the noise intensity. Implications for neurobiology and course of mood disorders are discussed.

  4. Motor neuron disease mortality rates in U.S. states are associated with well water use

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Gary G.; Klug, Marilyn G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease with an unknown cause and invariably fatal outcome. We sought to evaluate a correlation between motor neuron disease (MND) mortality rates and residential radon levels that was previously reported for counties in the United Kingdom. We examined the relationships between age-adjusted MND mortality rates in U.S. states with residential radon levels, well water use, and other variables using structural equation modeling. We observed a significant correlation between MND mortality rates and radon levels. However, in structural equation models, radon did not have a significant, direct effect on MND mortality rates. Conversely, MND mortality rates were significantly and directly predicted by race and by the percentage of the population of each state using well water (p < 0.001 and p = 0.022). We observed similar, significant effects for well water use and MND mortality for males and females separately (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we hypothesize that the association of MND mortality rates with well water use reflects contamination of wells with Legionella, a bacterium common in well water that is known to cause neurologic disease. A Legionella hypothesis is a biologically plausible cause of ALS and suggests new avenues for etiologic research. PMID:27324739

  5. Motor neuron disease mortality rates in U.S. states are associated with well water use.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary G; Klug, Marilyn G

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease with an unknown cause and invariably fatal outcome. We sought to evaluate a correlation between motor neuron disease (MND) mortality rates and residential radon levels that was previously reported for counties in the United Kingdom. We examined the relationships between age-adjusted MND mortality rates in U.S. states with residential radon levels, well water use, and other variables using structural equation modeling. We observed a significant correlation between MND mortality rates and radon levels. However, in structural equation models, radon did not have a significant, direct effect on MND mortality rates. Conversely, MND mortality rates were significantly and directly predicted by race and by the percentage of the population of each state using well water (p < 0.001 and p = 0.022). We observed similar, significant effects for well water use and MND mortality for males and females separately (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we hypothesize that the association of MND mortality rates with well water use reflects contamination of wells with Legionella, a bacterium common in well water that is known to cause neurologic disease. A Legionella hypothesis is a biologically plausible cause of ALS and suggests new avenues for etiologic research.

  6. Electroencephalographic prodromal markers of dementia across conscious states in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Latreille, Véronique; Carrier, Julie; Gaudet-Fex, Benjamin; Rodrigues-Brazète, Jessica; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease, electroencephalographic abnormalities during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep (spindles) were found to be predictive biomarkers of dementia. Because rapid eye movement sleep is regulated by the cholinergic system, which shows early degeneration in Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment, anomalies during this sleep stage might mirror dementia development. In this prospective study, we examined baseline electroencephalographic absolute spectral power across three states of consciousness (non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, and wakefulness) in 68 non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease and 44 healthy controls. All participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recordings and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Power spectral analyses were performed on standard frequency bands. Dominant occipital frequency during wakefulness and ratios of slow-to-fast frequencies during rapid eye movement sleep and wakefulness were also computed. At follow-up (an average 4.5 years after baseline), 18 patients with Parkinson's disease had developed dementia and 50 patients remained dementia-free. In rapid eye movement sleep, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed, at baseline, higher absolute power in delta and theta bands and a higher slowing ratio, especially in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions, compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, lower baseline sigma power in parietal cortical regions also predicted development of dementia. During wakefulness, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed lower dominant occipital frequency as well as higher delta and slowing ratio compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. At baseline, higher slowing ratios in temporo-occipital regions during rapid eye movement sleep were associated with poor performance on visuospatial tests in

  7. Onchocerciasis in Plateau State; Nigeria: ecological background, local disease perception & treatment; and vector/parasite dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nwoke, B E; Onwuliri, C O; Ufomadu, G O

    1992-01-01

    The physico-biological ecological complex in Plateau State has by definition increased the potential of most rivers to support the breeding and dispersal of vector species as well as human acquisition and dissemination of the disease for several months in a year. Though villagers in endemic areas are of the know of the nuisance of blackfly bites, but the majority of them lacked the aetiological knowledge of onchocercal lesion. Hence disease management is misdirected towards consulting the oracle and appeasing the gods. The vectors of onchocerciasis in Plateau State, S. damnosum, and S. sirbanum are wet season breeders with their peak biting density occurring at the height of rainy season. However, biting flies carry more infective parasites at the beginning and end of rain. These vectors exhibit bimodal biting activity: a small one in the morning hours and a pronounced evening peak. Biting activity is at least influenced by two major climatic factors; illumination and temperature. However, the fastest changing climatic factor relative to an increase in the biting activity of flies was illumination. Microfilarial load in the skin of patients does not significantly change throughout the year or when biopsies are taken under shade throughout the day. Extreme temperatures, however, have significant reducing effect on the skin microfilarial. The epidemiological relevance of these in the ongoing MECTIZAN delivery in the State are discussed.

  8. Congenital toxoplasmosis in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil: a neglected infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Carellos, E V M; Caiaffa, W T; Andrade, G M Q; Abreu, M N S; Januário, J N

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the distribution of congenital toxoplasmosis in the state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil and describe the demographic and socioeconomic profile of the municipalities associated with the disease. An ecological study was conducted using socioeconomic indicators of a database (MGSSRI) created by Fundação João Pinheiro (a government technical support agency of Minas Gerais), in order to show the development of the municipalities in the state. The prevalence of toxoplasmosis was the outcome and the items of the MGSSRI were the explanatory variables. Of 146,307 newborns screened (November 2006 to May 2007), 190 had congenital toxoplasmosis, yielding a prevalence of 1·3/1000, ranging from 0 to 76·9/1000 in the municipalities. The multivariate model indicated a higher occurrence of toxoplasmosis in municipalities with smaller populations and worse indexes of tax performance. Congenital toxoplasmosis appears to be a neglected disease in the state of Minas Gerais, given the high prevalence found and its concentration in municipalities with worse socioeconomic indexes.

  9. Long-term seizure and psychosocial outcomes of vagus nerve stimulation for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Schultz, Lonni; Mohanarangan, Karthik; Gaddam, Aryamaan; Schwalb, Jason M; Spanaki-Varelas, Marianna

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a widely used adjunctive treatment option for intractable epilepsy. Most studies have demonstrated short-term seizure outcomes, usually for up to 5 years, and thus far, none have reported psychosocial outcomes in adults. We aimed to assess long-term seizure and psychosocial outcomes in patients with intractable epilepsy on VNS therapy for more than 15 years. We identified patients who had VNS implantation for treatment of intractable epilepsy from 1997 to 2013 at our Comprehensive Epilepsy Program and gathered demographics including age at epilepsy onset and VNS implantation, epilepsy type, number of antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs) and seizure frequency before VNS implantation and at the last clinic visit, and the most recent stimulation parameters from electronic medical records (EMR). Phone surveys were conducted by research assistants from May to November 2014 to determine patients' current seizure frequency and psychosocial metrics, including driving, employment status, and use of antidepressants. Seizure outcomes were based on modified Engel classification (I: seizure-free/rare simple partial seizures; II: >90% seizure reduction (SR), III: 50-90% SR, IV: <50% SR; classes I to III (>50% SR)=favorable outcome). A total of 207 patients underwent VNS implantation, 15 of whom were deceased at the time of the phone survey, and 40 had incomplete data for medical abstraction. Of the remaining 152, 90 (59%) were contacted and completed the survey. Of these, 51% were male, with the mean age at epilepsy onset of 9.4 years (range: birth to 60 years). There were 35 (39%) patients with extratemporal epilepsy, 19 (21%) with temporal, 18 (20%) with symptomatic generalized, 5 (6%) with idiopathic generalized, and 13 (14%) with multiple types. Final VNS settings showed 16 (18%) patients with an output current >2 mA and 14 (16%) with rapid cycling. Of the 80 patients with seizure frequency information, 16 (20%) had a modified Engel class I outcome, 14

  10. Experimental and Imaging Techniques for Examining Fibrin Clot Structures in Normal and Diseased States

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Natalie K.; Keegan, Philip M.; Platt, Manu O.; Averett, Rodney D.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is an extracellular matrix protein that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of blood clots. Much research has been done on fibrin in the past years to include the investigation of synthesis, structure-function, and lysis of clots. However, there is still much unknown about the morphological and structural features of clots that ensue from patients with disease. In this research study, experimental techniques are presented that allow for the examination of morphological differences of abnormal clot structures due to diseased states such as diabetes and sickle cell anemia. Our study focuses on the preparation and evaluation of fibrin clots in order to assess morphological differences using various experimental assays and confocal microscopy. In addition, a method is also described that allows for continuous, real-time calculation of lysis rates in fibrin clots. The techniques described herein are important for researchers and clinicians seeking to elucidate comorbid thrombotic pathologies such as myocardial infarctions, ischemic heart disease, and strokes in patients with diabetes or sickle cell disease. PMID:25867016

  11. Systemic complement profiling in multiple sclerosis as a biomarker of disease state

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, G; Hakobyan, S; Hirst, CL; Harris, CL; Loveless, S; Mitchell, JP; Pickersgill, TP; Robertson, NP

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of significant and dynamic systemic activation and upregulation of complement in multiple sclerosis (MS), which may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the pathological role of complement in MS and the potential role for complement profiling as a biomarker of MS disease state. Methods: Key components of the classical, alternative and terminal pathways of complement were measured in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS in different clinical phases of disease and in matched controls. Results: Increased plasma levels of C3 (p<0.003), C4 (p<0.001), C4a (p<0.001), C1 inhibitor (p<0.001), and factor H (p<0.001), and reduced levels of C9 (p<0.001) were observed in MS patients compared with controls. Combined profiling of these analytes produced a statistical model with a predictive value of 97% for MS and 73% for clinical relapse when combined with selected demographic data. CSF-plasma correlations suggested that source of synthesis of these components was both systemic and central. Conclusion: These data provide further evidence of alterations in both local and systemic expression and activation of complement in MS and suggest that complement profiling may be informative as a biomarker of MS disease, although further work is needed to determine its use in distinguishing MS from its differential. PMID:22354735

  12. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Patrícia da Silva; RAMOS, Eliezer Lucas Pires; GÓMEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, César; FERREIRA, Gabriela Lícia Santos; REZENDE-OLIVEIRA, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results. PMID:27049698

  13. Diseases Attributable to Asbestos Exposure: Years of Potential Life Lost, United States, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Ki Moon; Mazurek, Jacek M.; Wood, John M.; Hendricks, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although asbestos use has been restricted in recent decades, asbestos-associated deaths continue to occur in the United States. Objectives We evaluated premature mortality and loss of potentially productive years of life attributable to asbestos-associated diseases. Methods Using 1999–2010 National Center for Health Statistics mortality data, we identified decedents aged ≥25 years whose death certificate listed asbestosis and malignant mesothelioma as the underlying cause of death. We computed years of potential life lost to life expectancy (YPLL) and to age 65 (YPLL65). Results During 1999–2010, a total of 427,005 YPLL and 55,184 YPLL65 were attributed to asbestosis (56,907 YPLL and 2,167 YPLL65), malignant mesothelioma (370,098 YPPL and 53,017 YPLL65). Overall and disease-specific asbestos-attributable total YPLL and YPLL65 and median YPLL and YPLL65 per decedent did not change significantly from 1999 to 2010. Conclusions The continuing occurrence of asbestos-associated diseases and their substantial premature mortality burden underscore the need for maintaining prevention efforts and for ongoing surveillance to monitor temporal trends in these diseases. PMID:24108494

  14. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil*, **

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Glênio César Nunes; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici; Ferrer, Kelian Tenfen; Traebert, Jefferson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the burden of disease due to tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2009. METHODS: This was an epidemiological study with an ecological design. Data on tuberculosis incidence and mortality were collected from specific Brazilian National Ministry of Health databases. The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was based on the calculation of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). The DALYs were estimated by adding the years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Absolute values were transformed into rates per 100,000 population. The rates were calculated by gender, age group, and health care macroregion. RESULTS: The burden of disease due to tuberculosis was 5,644.27 DALYs (92.25 DALYs/100,000 population), YLLs and YLDs respectively accounting for 78.77% and 21.23% of that total. The highest rates were found in males in the 30-44 and 45-59 year age brackets, although that was not true in every health care macroregion. Overall, the highest estimated burden was in the Planalto Norte macroregion (179.56 DALYs/100,000 population), followed by the Nordeste macroregion (167.07 DALYs/100,000 population). CONCLUSIONS: In the majority of the health care macroregions of Santa Catarina, the burden of disease due to tuberculosis was concentrated in adult males, the level of that concentration varying among the various macroregions. PMID:24626271

  15. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patrícia da Silva; Ramos, Eliezer Lucas Pires; Gómez-Hernández, César; Ferreira, Gabriela Lícia Santos; Rezende-Oliveira, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results.

  16. Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Patients with Long-Term Remission of Cushing's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Werff, Steven J A; Pannekoek, J Nienke; Andela, Cornelie D; Meijer, Onno C; van Buchem, Mark A; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Mast, Roos C; Biermasz, Nienke R; Pereira, Alberto M; van der Wee, Nic J A

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid disturbance can be a cause of psychiatric symptoms. Cushing's disease represents a unique model for examining the effects of prolonged exposure to high levels of endogenous cortisol on the human brain as well as for examining the relation between these effects and psychiatric symptomatology. This study aimed to investigate resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the limbic network, the default mode network (DMN), and the executive control network in patients with long-term remission of Cushing's disease. RSFC of these three networks of interest was compared between patients in remission of Cushing's disease (n=24; 4 male, mean age=44.96 years) and matched healthy controls (n=24; 4 male, mean age=46.5 years), using probabilistic independent component analysis to extract the networks and a dual regression method to compare both groups. Psychological and cognitive functioning was assessed with validated questionnaires and interviews. In comparison with controls, patients with remission of Cushing's disease showed an increased RSFC between the limbic network and the subgenual subregion of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as well as an increased RSFC of the DMN in the left lateral occipital cortex. However, these findings were not associated with psychiatric symptoms in the patient group. Our data indicate that previous exposure to hypercortisolism is related to persisting changes in brain function. PMID:25652248

  17. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  18. Denman Island disease in Washington State, USA: distribution and prevalence in Pacific and Olympia oysters.

    PubMed

    Elston, Ralph; Friedman, Carolyn; Gustafson, Lori; Meyer, Gary; Rogers, Russell

    2015-05-21

    We sampled over 2400 wild, feral, and cultured Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas and Olympia oysters Ostrea lurida in Washington State, USA, from 2002 to 2006 to estimate the prevalence of infection with Mikrocytos mackini, the causative agent of Denman Island disease. Both histology and qualitative PCR methods were used. Estimates of true prevalence of M. mackini infection in C. gigas, after accounting for imperfect test sensitivity, ranged from mean values of 0 to 10.0% by histology and 0 to 8.4% based on pooled PCR samples. M. mackini was not detected in any of the O. lurida samples. Results suggest a lower prevalence of the pathogen and severity of this oyster disease in Washington than that indicated in previous reports from British Columbia, Canada, potentially attributable to higher seawater temperatures in the Washington sample locations.

  19. Ebola virus disease: What clinicians in the United States need to know

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, William A.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Tauxe, Robert V.

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014 the World Health Organization was notified of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the forest region of Guinea. Over the subsequent 8 months, this outbreak has become the most devastating Ebola epidemic in history with 21,296 infections and 8,429 deaths. The recent introduction of Ebola into noncontiguous countries including the United States from infected travelers highlights the importance of preparedness of all healthcare providers. Early identification and rapid isolation of patients suspected of being infected with Ebola virus is critical to limiting the spread of this virus. Additionally, enhanced understanding of Ebola case definitions, clinical presentation, treatment and infection control strategies will improve the ability of healthcare providers to safe care for patients with Ebola virus disease. PMID:26116335

  20. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  1. [On the Differential Diagnosis of Intractable Psychogenic Chronic Cough: Neuropathic Larynx Irritable - Gabapentin's Antitussive Action].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Ossowski, A; Schubert, M; Gall, H; Steinkamp, I; Richter, L E; Khalil-Boutros, Y; Nefedev, A; Kuhlmann, R

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 76 year old female inpatient who suffered from a chronic intractable cough which arose simultaneously to a severe major depression and was secondary to an exorbitant psychological distress. Chronic cough had never been experienced before and was initially considered to have a mere psychogenic origin since a comprehensive and guideline-based diagnostic screening did not reveal any underlying somatic cause. However, several factors cast doubt on the solitary psychic genesis of the chronic cough: i) occurrence immediately after a penetrant cold, ii) embedding in other complaints of laryngeal hyperreagibility (larynx irritable), such as persistent globus pharyngeus sensation, throat clearing and episodic dysphonia, iii) first occurrence on old life, iv) erupting from sleep as well, v) persistence despite remission of the major depression, and v) no sustaining benefit from specific psychotherapy and speech therapy. Therefore, diagnostics were extended to apparative tools for objective evaluation of swallowing by using fiberoptic videoendoscopic (FEES) and videofluoroscopic (VFS) techniques, which revealed signs of laryngeal neuropathy but without evidence of penetration or aspiration. A co-existing small goiter and an impaired glucose tolerance along with a putative intracellular vitamin B12 or folate deficiency (as indirectly derived from an apparent hyperhomocysteinemia) were assumed to be responsible for the neuropathy and underwent specific treatments. The impaired glucose tolerance and putative vitamin deficit were compatible with a distal symmetric sensorimotoric, even subclinical polyneuropathy of the lower extremities. The larynx irritable improved under gabapentin being confirmed by drug removals several times, and finally calmed down almost completely under gabapentin, which was in line with the scant literature of this topic. Re-examination of the larynx per FEES nine months later showed no deficits any more under the well

  2. Cognitive states influence dopamine-driven aberrant learning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Mueller, Andrea A; Brown, Darin R; Janowich, Jacqueline R; Story-Remer, Jacqueline H; Wegele, Ashley; Richardson, Sarah Pirio

    2017-03-20

    Individual differences in dopaminergic tone underlie tendencies to learn from reward versus punishment. These effects are well documented in Parkinson's patients, who vacillate between low and high tonic dopaminergic states as a function of medication. Yet very few studies have investigated the influence of higher-level cognitive states known to affect downstream dopaminergic learning in Parkinson's patients. A dopamine-dependent cognitive influence over learning would provide a candidate mechanism for declining cognitive integrity and motivation in Parkinson's patients. In this report we tested the influence of two high-level cognitive states (cost of conflict and value of volition) that have recently been shown to cause predictable learning biases in healthy young adults as a function of dopamine receptor subtype and dopaminergic challenge. It was hypothesized that Parkinson's patients OFF medication would have an enhanced cost of conflict and a decreased value of volition, and that these effects would be remediated or reversed ON medication. Participants included N = 28 Parkinson's disease patients who were each tested ON and OFF dopaminergic medication and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. The expected cost of conflict effect was observed in Parkinson's patients OFF versus ON medication, but only in those that were more recently diagnosed (<5 years). We found an unexpected effect in the value of volition task: medication compromised the ability to learn from difficult a-volitional (instructed) choices. This novel finding was also enhanced in recently diagnosed patients. The difference in learning biases ON versus OFF medication between these two tasks was strongly correlated, bolstering the idea that they tapped into a common underlying imbalance in dopaminergic tone that is particularly variable in earlier stage Parkinsonism. The finding that these decision biases are specific to earlier but not later stage disease may offer a chance for future studies to

  3. Oxidative stress markers in hypertensive states of pregnancy: preterm and term disease.

    PubMed

    Kurlak, Lesia O; Green, Amanda; Loughna, Pamela; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Discussion continues as to whether de novo hypertension in pregnancy with significant proteinuria (pre-eclampsia; PE) and non-proteinuric new hypertension (gestational hypertension; GH) are parts of the same disease spectrum or represent different conditions. Non-pregnant hypertension, pregnancy and PE are all associated with oxidative stress. We have established a 6 weeks postpartum clinic for women who experienced a hypertensive pregnancy. We hypothesized that PE and GH could be distinguished by markers of oxidative stress; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and antioxidants (ferric ion reducing ability of plasma; FRAP). Since the severity of PE and GH is greater pre-term, we also compared pre-term and term disease. Fifty-eight women had term PE, 23 pre-term PE, 60 had term GH and 6 pre-term GH, 11 pre-existing (essential) hypertension (EH) without PE. Limited data were available from normotensive pregnancies (n = 7) and non-pregnant controls (n = 14). There were no differences in postpartum TBARS or FRAP between hypertensive states; TBARS (P = 0.001) and FRAP (P = 0.009) were lower in plasma of non-pregnant controls compared to recently-pregnant women. Interestingly FRAP was higher in preterm than term GH (P = 0.013). In PE and GH, TBARS correlated with low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (P = 0.036); this association strengthened with inclusion of EH (P = 0.011). The 10 year Framingham index for cardiovascular risk was positively associated with TBARS (P = 0.003). Oxidative stress profiles do not differ between hypertensive states but appear to distinguish between recently-pregnant and non-pregnant states. This suggests that pregnancy may alter vascular integrity with changes remaining 6 weeks postpartum. LDL-cholesterol is a known determinant of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease and we have shown this association to be present in hypertensive pregnancy further emphasizing that such a pregnancy may be revealing a pre

  4. Kinetics of drug action in disease states: towards physiology-based pharmacodynamic (PBPD) models.

    PubMed

    Danhof, Meindert

    2015-10-01

    Gerhard Levy started his investigations on the "Kinetics of Drug Action in Disease States" in the fall of 1980. The objective of his research was to study inter-individual variation in pharmacodynamics. To this end, theoretical concepts and experimental approaches were introduced, which enabled assessment of the changes in pharmacodynamics per se, while excluding or accounting for the cofounding effects of concomitant changes in pharmacokinetics. These concepts were applied in several studies. The results, which were published in 45 papers in the years 1984-1994, showed considerable variation in pharmacodynamics. These initial studies on kinetics of drug action in disease states triggered further experimental research on the relations between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Together with the concepts in Levy's earlier publications "Kinetics of Pharmacologic Effects" (Clin Pharmacol Ther 7(3): 362-372, 1966) and "Kinetics of pharmacologic effects in man: the anticoagulant action of warfarin" (Clin Pharmacol Ther 10(1): 22-35, 1969), they form a significant impulse to the development of physiology-based pharmacodynamic (PBPD) modeling as novel discipline in the pharmaceutical sciences. This paper reviews Levy's research on the "Kinetics of Drug Action in Disease States". Next it addresses the significance of his research for the evolution of PBPD modeling as a scientific discipline. PBPD models contain specific expressions to characterize in a strictly quantitative manner processes on the causal path between exposure (in terms of concentration at the target site) and the drug effect (in terms of the change in biological function). Pertinent processes on the causal path are: (1) target site distribution, (2) target binding and activation and (3) transduction and homeostatic feedback.

  5. Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G Marshall; Mehta, Aneesh K; Varkey, Jay B; Brantly, Kent; Plyler, Lance; McElroy, Anita K; Kraft, Colleen S; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina; Ströher, Ute; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ribner, Bruce S

    2014-12-18

    West Africa is currently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history. Two patients with EVD were transferred from Liberia to our hospital in the United States for ongoing care. Malaria had also been diagnosed in one patient, who was treated for it early in the course of EVD. The two patients had substantial intravascular volume depletion and marked electrolyte abnormalities. We undertook aggressive supportive measures of hydration (typically, 3 to 5 liters of intravenous fluids per day early in the course of care) and electrolyte correction. As the patients' condition improved clinically, there was a concomitant decline in the amount of virus detected in plasma.

  6. Alcohol policy and sexually transmitted disease rates--United States, 1981-1995.

    PubMed

    2000-04-28

    In the United States, adolescents and young adults are at higher risk for acquiring sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) than older adults. In addition, young persons who drink alcohol may be more likely than persons who abstain to participate in high-risk sexual activity, such as unprotected sexual intercourse or multiple sexual partners. If alcohol consumption promotes risky sexual behavior (disinhibition caused by the effects of alcohol), state government alcohol policies, such as alcohol taxation and minimum legal drinking age requirements, might reduce STD incidence among adolescents and young adults. Higher alcohol taxes and increases in the minimum legal drinking age have been associated with lower incidences of adverse alcohol-related health outcomes (e.g., motor-vehicle crash-related deaths, liver cirrhosis, suicide, and violent crime, including domestic violence). This report summarizes the findings of a study that suggest higher alcohol taxes and higher minimum legal drinking ages are associated with lower STD incidence among certain age groups.

  7. Systems for rapidly detecting and treating persons with ebola virus disease--United States.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Lisa M; Jamieson, Denise J; Jernigan, John A; Van Beneden, Chris A; Kosmos, Christine; Harvey, Melissa Cole; Pietz, Harald; Bertolli, Jeanne; Perz, Joseph F; Whitney, Cynthia G; Halpin, Alison Sheehan-Laufer; Daley, W Randolph; Pesik, Nicki; Margolis, Gregg S; Tumpey, Abbigail; Tappero, Jordan; Damon, Inger

    2015-03-06

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CDC, other U.S. government agencies, the World Health Organization (WHO), and international partners are taking multiple steps to respond to the current Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa to reduce its toll there and to reduce the chances of international spread. At the same time, CDC and HHS are working to ensure that persons who have a risk factor for exposure to Ebola and who develop symptoms while in the United States are rapidly identified and isolated, and safely receive treatment. HHS and CDC have actively worked with state and local public health authorities and other partners to accelerate health care preparedness to care for persons under investigation (PUI) for Ebola or with confirmed Ebola. This report describes some of these efforts and their impact.

  8. Under-reporting of pelvic inflammatory disease in Hawaii: a comparison of state surveillance and hospitalization data.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Misty; Sentell, Tetine; Katz, Alan R

    2014-04-01

    Hawaii is one of only 19 states for which pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a mandated notifiable disease. In order to assess the completeness of PID reporting, we compared the number of hospitalized PID cases in the state of Hawaii with the total number of PID cases reported to the Hawaii State Department of Health surveillance system from 2007 through 2010. While 828 unique PID cases were diagnosed in Hawaii hospitals, only 240 unique PID cases were reported through the state's surveillance system. Severe PID underreporting was seen despite mandatory reporting laws.

  9. [RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PREVALENCE OF CHRONIC NONINFECTIOUS DISEASES AND ELECTROPHYSICAL STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Stekhin, A A; Yakovleva, G V; Karasev, A K; Marasanov, A V; Iksanova, T I; Ryabikov, V V

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there is evaluated the relationship of features of electronic state of the environment with a level of chronic, noninfectious diseases (CNID) in the regions of Russia, obtained on the basis of the monitoring measurements of the intensity of natural background electronic Bose condensate (BEBC) of natural ecosystems in a number of Russian regions and seas of the Arctic Ocean. The assessment of BEBC was implemented on results of measurements of redox state of distilled water being in the contact with natural water. The equilibrium redox state of distilled water, determined by the influx of electrons (quantum reduction) outside, is proportional to the intensity of BEBC. The obtained data attest to an increase in the intensity of the background of EBC in Siberia regions and, especially, within the limits ofwaters of Lake Baikal (the redox potential of the surface water in the lake ~ -70mV). Also there is observed a strong dependence of the background EBC in the latitudinal direction. Low levels of background EBC were noted in the Arkhangelsk region and the north-eastern Chukotka. Functioning of international systems of plasma sounding of ionosphere (such systems as HAARP) were established to have a detrimental effect on the background EBC in these regions. According to the results of measurements of the relative values of intensities of natural background of Bose condensate of electrons there was constructed the dependence reflecting the relationship of the prevalence of noninfectious diseases in the regions of Russia with the redox state of distilled water which can be characterized as a significant (regression coefficient R2 = 0.78). The relationship between noninfectious diseases (NID, %) with the intensity of the background of EBC (Ib rel. units) is estimated by the equation: NID [%] = 0.24Eh [mV]-25, where Eh ~ I/Ib. Numerical evaluations show that an increase in the biosphere redox potential of water by 90mV leads to an increase of the primary

  10. Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Organic Foods in the United States.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R Reid; Zakhour, Christine M; Gould, L Hannah

    2016-11-01

    Consumer demand for organically produced foods is increasing in the United States as well as globally. Consumer perception often credits organic foods as being safer than conventionally produced foods, although organic standards do not directly address safety issues such as microbial or chemical hazards. We reviewed outbreaks reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System where the implicated food was reported to be organic. Information collected for each outbreak included the year, state, number of illnesses, pathogen, and implicated food. We identified 18 outbreaks caused by organic foods from 1992 to 2014, resulting in 779 illnesses, 258 hospitalizations, and 3 deaths; 56% of outbreaks occurred from 2010 to 2014. Nine outbreaks occurred in a single state, and nine outbreaks were multistate. Salmonella sp. (44% of outbreaks) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (33%) were the most commonly occurring pathogens. Eight of the outbreaks were attributed to produce items, four to unpasteurized dairy products, two to eggs, two to nut and seed products, and two to multi-ingredient foods. Fifteen (83%) outbreaks were associated with foods that were definitely or likely U.S. Department of Agriculture certified. More foodborne outbreaks associated with organic foods in the United States have been reported in recent years, in parallel with increases in organic food production and consumption. We are unable to assess risk of outbreaks due to organic foods compared with conventional foods because foodborne outbreak surveillance does not systematically collect food production method. Food safety requires focused attention by consumers, regardless of whether foods are produced organically or conventionally. Consumers should be aware of the risk of milk and produce consumed raw, including organic.

  11. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases and Malformations in Children in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Thais Rocha; Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiological profile of mortality in a population is important for the institution of measures to improve health care and reduce mortality Objective To estimate mortality rates and the proportional mortality from cardiovascular diseases and malformations of the circulatory system in children and adolescents. Methods This is a descriptive study of mortality from cardiovascular diseases, malformations of the circulatory system, from all causes, ill-defined causes and external causes in children and adolescents in the state of Rio de Janeiro from 1996 to 2012. Populations were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE) and deaths obtained from the Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System (DATASUS)/Ministry of Health. Results There were 115,728 deaths from all causes, 69,757 in males. The annual mortality from cardiovascular diseases was 2.7/100,000 in men and 2.6/100,000 in women. The annual mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was 7.5/100,000 in men and 6.6/100,000 in women. Among the specific causes of circulatory diseases, cardiomyopathies had the highest rates of annual proportional mortality, and from malformations of the circulatory system, it occurred due to unspecified malformations of the circulatory system, at all ages and in both genders. Conclusion Mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was most striking in the first years of life, while cardiovascular diseases were more relevant in adolescents. Low access to prenatal diagnosis or at birth probably prevented the proper treatment of malformations of the circulatory system. PMID:27192384

  12. Pathogens and diseases of freshwater mussels in the United States: Studies on bacterial transmission and depuration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starliper, Clifford E.; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are recognized as important contributors to healthy aquatic ecosystems, as well as bioindicators of environmental perturbations. Because they are sedentary, filter feeding animals and require hosts (i.e., fishes) to transform embryonic glochidia, mussels are susceptible to direct adverse environmental parameters, and indirect parameters that restrict the timely presence of the host(s). Their numbers have declined in recent decades to a point that this fauna is regarded as one of the most imperiled in North America. The most significant threat to populations of native unionids in recent years has been the introduction and spread of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha. Many federal and state agencies, and private interests are now engaged in mussel conservation efforts, including collecting selected imperiled species from impacted rivers and lakes and propagating them at refuges for future population augmentations. One essential consideration with mussel propagation and their intensive culture at refugia is the prevention of pathogen introductions and control of diseases. Currently, there are few reports of etiological agents causing diseases among freshwater mussels; however, because of increased observations of mussel die-offs in conjunction with transfers of live animals between natural waters and refugia, disease problems can be anticipated to emerge. This review summarizes research to develop bacterial isolation techniques, study pathogen transmission between fish and mussels, identify causes of seasonal mussel die-offs, and develop non-destructive methods for pathogen detection. These efforts were done to develop disease preventative techniques for use by resource managers to avoid potential large-scale disease problems in restoration and population augmentation efforts among imperiled populations.

  13. The transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infections virus and killer T cells (cellular response). The model represents molecules and cells with bitstrings. The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connected to spatial extension is lost, as is the oscillating feature. Thus the mean field approximation introduced with coupled maps destroys oscillations.

  14. Optimal set of EEG features for emotional state classification and trajectory visualization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, R; Murugappan, M; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Omar, Mohd Iqbal; Mohamad, Khairiyah; Palaniappan, R

    2014-12-01

    In addition to classic motor signs and symptoms, individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by emotional deficits. Ongoing brain activity can be recorded by electroencephalograph (EEG) to discover the links between emotional states and brain activity. This study utilized machine-learning algorithms to categorize emotional states in PD patients compared with healthy controls (HC) using EEG. Twenty non-demented PD patients and 20 healthy age-, gender-, and education level-matched controls viewed happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, and disgust emotional stimuli while fourteen-channel EEG was being recorded. Multimodal stimulus (combination of audio and visual) was used to evoke the emotions. To classify the EEG-based emotional states and visualize the changes of emotional states over time, this paper compares four kinds of EEG features for emotional state classification and proposes an approach to track the trajectory of emotion changes with manifold learning. From the experimental results using our EEG data set, we found that (a) bispectrum feature is superior to other three kinds of features, namely power spectrum, wavelet packet and nonlinear dynamical analysis; (b) higher frequency bands (alpha, beta and gamma) play a more important role in emotion activities than lower frequency bands (delta and theta) in both groups and; (c) the trajectory of emotion changes can be visualized by reducing subject-independent features with manifold learning. This provides a promising way of implementing visualization of patient's emotional state in real time and leads to a practical system for noninvasive assessment of the emotional impairments associated with neurological disorders.

  15. HSPBAP1 is found extensively in the anterior temporal neocortex of patients with intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhi-Qin; Sun, Ji-Jun; Wang, Xue-Feng; Li, Ming-Wei; Liu, Xian-Zeng; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Zhu, Xi; Xiao, Fei; Li, Jin-Mei; Gong, Yun; Guan, Li-Feng

    2007-09-01

    Heat Shock Protein BAP1 (heat shock 27-kDa-associated protein 1, HSPBAP1) inhibits the function of heat shock protein 27, which has a neuroprotective effect during experimentally induced epileptic neuropathology. In our study, fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, western blot were used to test the levels of HSPBAP1 mRNA and protein in surgical samples of the anterior temporal neocortex of patients with intractable epilepsy (IE) and normal controls samples. HSPBAP1 mRNA was abnormally expressed in the anterior temporal neocortex of patients with IE. Moreover, HSPBAP1 was found extensively in the cytoplasm of neurons and glial cells in all epilepsy specimens. Western blot showed a clear immunoreactive band of HSPBAP1 in IE specimens whereas it was absent in control specimens. The expression of HSPBAP1 mRNA and protein in the anterior temporal neocortex from patients with IE may play a role in the development of epileptic seizures in patients with cell loss in this brain region. Additional studies will be required to elucidate the mechanism by which HSPBAP1 affects brain function in IE.

  16. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption.

  17. The Laparoscopic Implantation of Neuroprothesis (LION) Procedure to Control Intractable Abdomino-Pelvic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Possover, Marc; Baekelandt, Jan; Chiantera, Vito

    2007-01-01

    Objective.  To present different aspects and advantages of the laparoscopic implantation of a peripheral nerve stimulator adjacent to the pelvic nerves, aimed at treating intractable pelvic neuralgia by means of neuromodulation-the laparoscopic implantation of neuroprothesis (LION) procedure. Materials and Methods.  We report here a series of three patients with different types and etiologies of chronic pelvic neuralgia who underwent laparoscopy for implantation of a peripheral nerve stimulator for neuromodulation, the first for neuromodulation of the ilioinguinal and pudendal nerves, the second for neuromodulation of the sciatic nerve, and the third for neuromodulation of the sacral nerve roots. In all three patients, the neuralgia was refractory to medical management and had profound socioeconomic consequences for the patients. Results.  Laparoscopic implantation of neuroelectrodes was successfully performed in all three patients and resulted significant diminution of pain without need for further medical treatment. Conclusions.  Laparoscopy allows optimal implantation of electrodes on all pelvic nerves through a minimally invasive approach. In addition, it permits new applications of neuromodulation for pelvic polyneuropathies or mononeuropathy, not covered by classical spinal cord or transcutaneous techniques.

  18. Successful resection of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with intractable gelastic seizures--by transcallosal subchoroidal approach.

    PubMed

    Bunyaratavej, Krishnapundha; Locharernkul, Chaichon; Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Khaoroptham, Surachai

    2006-08-01

    A 19-year old female with intractable gelastic seizures was found to have 0.7 x 1.8 x 1.8 cm elliptical mass on the floor of the third ventricle. The signal intensity on the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was consistent with the Hypothalamic Hamartoma (HH). Ictal EEG demonstrated rhythmic 7 Hz waves over Fp2, F4, and C4 with spreading to the right temporal region and then bilaterally. Ictal Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) showed hyperperfusion at hypothalamic and medial frontopolar regions. The patient underwent surgical resection using Trans Callosal Subchoroidal Approach (TCSA) to the third ventricle. Pathological finding confirmed the diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartoma. Following the operation, she has been seizure free up to 12 months. Thereafter, provoked seizures seldom occurred and there has been improvement in her memory, emotional control and independence. This appears to be the first report of this surgical approach for HH, which is less likely to disturb memory function compared to previously described interfoniceal approach.

  19. Occipital nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable chronic migraine headache: ONSTIM feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Joel R; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; McCarville, Sally; Sun, Mark; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medically intractable chronic migraine (CM) is a disabling illness characterized by headache ≥15 days per month. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, blinded, controlled feasibility study was conducted to obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in CM. Eligible subjects received an occipital nerve block, and responders were randomized to adjustable stimulation (AS), preset stimulation (PS) or medical management (MM) groups. Results: Seventy-five of 110 subjects were assigned to a treatment group; complete diary data were available for 66. A responder was defined as a subject who achieved a 50% or greater reduction in number of headache days per month or a three-point or greater reduction in average overall pain intensity compared with baseline. Three-month responder rates were 39% for AS, 6% for PS and 0% for MM. No unanticipated adverse device events occurred. Lead migration occurred in 12 of 51 (24%) subjects. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study offer promise and should prompt further controlled studies of ONS in CM. PMID:20861241

  20. Bilateral Thalamic Stimulation Induces Insomnia in Patients Treated for Intractable Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Bridoux, Agathe; Drouot, Xavier; Sangare, Aude; Al-ani, Tarik; Brignol, Arnaud; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Brugières, Pierre; Gouello, Gaëtane; Hosomi, Koichi; Lepetit, Hélène; Palfi, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the influence of acute bilateral ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) stimulation on sleep. Design: Three consecutive full-night polysomnography recordings were made in the laboratory. After the habituation night, a random order for night ON-stim and OFF-stim was applied for the second and third nights. Setting: Sleep disorders unit of a university hospital. Patients: Eleven patients with bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) for drug-resistant tremor. Measurements: Sleep measures on polysomnography. Results: Total sleep time was reduced during night ON-stim compared to OFF- stim, as well as rapid eye movement sleep percentage while the percentage of N2 increased. Wakefulness after sleep onset time was increased. Conclusion: Our results show that bilateral stimulation of the VIM nuclei reduces sleep and could be associated with insomnia. Citation: Bridoux A, Drouot X, Sangare A, Al-ani T, Brignol A, Charles-Nelson A, Brugières P, Gouello G, Hosomi K, Lepetit H, Palfi S. Bilateral thalamic stimulation induces insomnia in patients treated for intractable tremor. SLEEP 2015;38(3):473–478. PMID:25515098

  1. Epidemiological Investigation of Asymptomatic Dogs with Leishmania Infection in Southwestern China Where Visceral Leishmaniasis is Intractable

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gui-Hua; Yin, Kun; Zhong, Wei-Xia; Xiao, Ting; Wei, Qing-Kuan; Cui, Yong; Liu, Gong-Zhen; Xu, Chao; Wang, Hong-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Heishui county, located in northwest Sichuan province, southwestern China, is an endemic area of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and is the most intractable area. VL is never destroyed in it. Asymptomatic dogs (Leishmania parasites have been diagnosed but clinically healthy) are considered to be a potential reservoir host in zoonotic VL area, and most can lead to infection of individuals, that is a new challenge for controlling VL in humans. The present study aimed to assess the Leishmania infection rate of asymptomatic dogs in Heishui county. Total 105 asymptomatic domestic dogs were gathered from 4 districts in Heishui county to investigate the infection rate with serological and molecular methods based on ELISA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA(kDNA) PCR, respectively. Out of 105 dogs, 44 (41.9%) were positive by more than 1 method; 21 (20.0%) were positive by ELISA, and 30 (28.6%) were positive by kDNA-PCR. Our study showed that Leishmania infection of domestic dogs which is clinically healthy is prevalent in the studied district, and the asymptomatic dogs infected by Leishmania may be the primary reason for the prevalence of visceral leishmaniasis in the area. PMID:28095666

  2. Tactile Electrosurgical Ablation: A Technique for the Treatment of Intractable Heavy and Prolonged Menstrual Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El Saman, Ali M.; AbdelHafez, Faten F.; Zahran, Kamal M.; Saad, Hazem; Khalaf, Mohamed; Hussein, Mostafa; Hassanin, Ibrahim M. A.; Shugaa Al Deen, Saba M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the efficacy and safety of tactile electrosurgical ablation (TEA) in stopping a persistent attack of abnormal uterine bleeding not responding to medical and hormonal therapy. Methods. This is a case series of 19 cases with intractable abnormal uterine bleeding, who underwent TEA at the Women's Health Center of Assiut University. The outcomes measured were; patient's acceptability, operative time, complications, menstrual outcomes, and reintervention. Results. None of the 19 counseled cases refused the TEA procedure which took 6–10 minutes without intraoperative complications. The procedure was successful in the immediate cessation of bleeding in 18 out of 19 cases. During the 24-month follow-up period, 9 cases developed amenorrhea, 5 had scanty menstrual bleeding, 3 were regularly menstruating, 1 case underwent repeat TEA ablation, and one underwent a hysterectomy. Conclusions. TEA represents a safe, inexpensive, and successful method for management of uterine bleeding emergencies with additional long-term beneficial effects. However, more studies with more cases and longer follow-up periods are warranted. PMID:26294969

  3. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of intractable ventricular tachycardia in an infant following arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Costello, John P; He, Dingchao; Greene, Elizabeth A; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2014-01-01

    A full-term male neonate presented with cyanosis upon delivery and was subsequently diagnosed with d-transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and restrictive atrial septal defect. Following initiation of intravenous prostaglandins and balloon atrial septostomy, an arterial switch operation was performed on day 3 of life. The postoperative course was complicated by intractable ventricular tachycardia that was refractory to lidocaine, amiodarone, esmolol, fosphenytoin, and mexiletine drug therapy. Ventricular tachycardia was suppressed with overdrive atrial pacing but recurred upon discontinuation. Seven weeks postoperatively, radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed due to hemodynamically compromising persistent ventricular tachycardia refractory to medical therapy. The ventricular tachycardia was localized to the inferior-lateral right ventricular outlet septum. The procedure was successful without complications or recurrence. Antiarrhythmics were discontinued after the ablation procedure. Seven days after the ablation, a different, slower fascicular rhythm was noted to compete with the infant's sinus rhythm. This was consistent with the preablation amiodarone having reached subtherapeutic levels given its very long half-life. The patient was restarted on oral beta blockers and amiodarone. The patient was subsequently discharged home in predominantly sinus rhythm with intermittent fascicular rhythm.

  4. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-15

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy.

  5. The use of ketogenic diet in special situations: expanding use in intractable epilepsy and other neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The ketogenic diet has been widely used and proved to be effective for intractable epilepsy. Although the mechanisms underlying its anti-epileptic effects remain to be proven, there are increasing experimental evidences for its neuroprotective effects along with many researches about expanding use of the diet in other neurologic disorders. The first success was reported in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which the diet served as an alternative metabolic source. Many neurologic disorders share some of the common pathologic mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction, altered neurotransmitter function and synaptic transmission, or abnormal regulation of reactive oxygen species, and the role of the ketogenic diet has been postulated in these mechanisms. In this article, we introduce an overview about the expanding use and emerging trials of the ketogenic diet in various neurologic disorders excluding intractable epilepsy and provide explanations of the mechanisms in that usage. PMID:23049588

  6. Long term follow-up results of dorsal root entry zone lesions for intractable pain after brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

    PubMed

    Chen, H J; Tu, Y K

    2006-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion injury is one of the major complications after traffic, especially motorcycle accidents and machine injuries. Intractable pain and paralysis of the affected limbs are the major neurological deficits. During the past 18 years, we have encountered and treated more than 500 cases with brachial plexus avulsion injuries. Dorsal root entry zone lesions (DREZ) made by thermocoagulation were performed for intractable pain in 60 cases. Forty cases were under regular follow-up for 5-18 years. In early postoperative stage, the pain relief rate was excellent or good in 32 cases (80%). The pain relief rate dropped to 60% in 5 year follow-up period and only 9 cases (50%) had excellent or good result in 10 year follow-up. Reconstructive procedures were performed in almost all patients in the last 10 years. Dorsal root entry zone lesion is an effective procedure for pain control after brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

  7. Renal Embolization and Urothelial Sclerotherapy for Recurrent Obstructive Urosepsis and Intractable Haematuria from Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nicholas; Olayos, Elizabeth; Elmer, Sandra; Wong, Lih-Ming; Brooks, Duncan M; Jhamb, Ashu

    2016-03-01

    Management of intractable haematuria and obstructive urosepsis from upper tract urothelial carcinoma can be problematic in patients not suitable for surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Interventional radiology techniques provide alternative approaches in this setting, such as complete kidney embolization to cease urine output, percutaneous nephrostomy, antegrade injection of sclerotherapy agents and sterilisation of the upper collecting system. Related approaches have been successfully employed to sclerose renal cysts, lymphoceles, chyluria and intractable lower tract haemorrhage. No reports of percutaneous, antegrade sclerotherapy in the upper urinary tract have previously been published. We present a case of recurrent haematuria and obstructive urosepsis caused by invasive upper tract urothelial carcinoma in a non-operative patient, which was treated with renal embolisation and percutaneous upper tract urothelial sclerotherapy.

  8. Impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation on infectious disease hospitalization risk in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fisman, David N; Tuite, Ashleigh R; Brown, Kevin A

    2016-12-20

    Although the global climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, links between weather and infectious disease have received little attention in high income countries. The "El Niño Southern Oscillation" (ENSO) occurs irregularly and is associated with changing temperature and precipitation patterns. We studied the impact of ENSO on infectious diseases in four census regions in the United States. We evaluated infectious diseases requiring hospitalization using the US National Hospital Discharge Survey (1970-2010) and five disease groupings that may undergo epidemiological shifts with changing climate: (i) vector-borne diseases, (ii) pneumonia and influenza, (iii) enteric disease, (iv) zoonotic bacterial disease, and (v) fungal disease. ENSO exposure was based on the Multivariate ENSO Index. Distributed lag models, with adjustment for seasonal oscillation and long-term trends, were used to evaluate the impact of ENSO on disease incidence over lags of up to 12 mo. ENSO was associated more with vector-borne disease [relative risk (RR) 2.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-8.48] and less with enteric disease (0.73, 95% CI 0.62-0.87) in the Western region; the increase in vector-borne disease was attributable to increased risk of rickettsioses and tick-borne infectious diseases. By contrast, ENSO was associated with more enteric disease in non-Western regions (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02-1.15). The periodic nature of ENSO may make it a useful natural experiment for evaluation of the impact of climatic shifts on infectious disease risk. The impact of ENSO suggests that warmer temperatures and extreme variation in precipitation events influence risks of vector-borne and enteric disease in the United States.

  9. Impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation on infectious disease hospitalization risk in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fisman, David N.; Tuite, Ashleigh R.; Brown, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the global climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, links between weather and infectious disease have received little attention in high income countries. The “El Niño Southern Oscillation” (ENSO) occurs irregularly and is associated with changing temperature and precipitation patterns. We studied the impact of ENSO on infectious diseases in four census regions in the United States. We evaluated infectious diseases requiring hospitalization using the US National Hospital Discharge Survey (1970–2010) and five disease groupings that may undergo epidemiological shifts with changing climate: (i) vector-borne diseases, (ii) pneumonia and influenza, (iii) enteric disease, (iv) zoonotic bacterial disease, and (v) fungal disease. ENSO exposure was based on the Multivariate ENSO Index. Distributed lag models, with adjustment for seasonal oscillation and long-term trends, were used to evaluate the impact of ENSO on disease incidence over lags of up to 12 mo. ENSO was associated more with vector-borne disease [relative risk (RR) 2.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–8.48] and less with enteric disease (0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.87) in the Western region; the increase in vector-borne disease was attributable to increased risk of rickettsioses and tick-borne infectious diseases. By contrast, ENSO was associated with more enteric disease in non-Western regions (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02–1.15). The periodic nature of ENSO may make it a useful natural experiment for evaluation of the impact of climatic shifts on infectious disease risk. The impact of ENSO suggests that warmer temperatures and extreme variation in precipitation events influence risks of vector-borne and enteric disease in the United States. PMID:27791069

  10. Cat-Scratch Disease in the United States, 2005-2013.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Saha, Shubhayu; Mead, Paul S

    2016-10-01

    Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is mostly preventable. More information about the epidemiology and extent of CSD would help direct prevention efforts to those at highest risk. To gain such information, we reviewed the 2005-2013 MarketScan national health insurance claims databases and identified patients <65 years of age with an inpatient admission or outpatient visit that included a CSD code from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Incidence of CSD was highest among those who lived in the southern United States (6.4 cases/100,000 population) and among children 5-9 years of age (9.4 cases/100,000 population). Inpatients were significantly more likely than outpatients to be male and 50-64 years of age. We estimate that each year, 12,000 outpatients are given a CSD diagnosis and 500 inpatients are hospitalized for CSD. Prevention measures (e.g., flea control for cats) are particularly helpful in southern states and in households with children.

  11. Cat-Scratch Disease in the United States, 2005–2013

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shubhayu; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is mostly preventable. More information about the epidemiology and extent of CSD would help direct prevention efforts to those at highest risk. To gain such information, we reviewed the 2005–2013 MarketScan national health insurance claims databases and identified patients <65 years of age with an inpatient admission or outpatient visit that included a CSD code from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Incidence of CSD was highest among those who lived in the southern United States (6.4 cases/100,000 population) and among children 5–9 years of age (9.4 cases/100,000 population). Inpatients were significantly more likely than outpatients to be male and 50–64 years of age. We estimate that each year, 12,000 outpatients are given a CSD diagnosis and 500 inpatients are hospitalized for CSD. Prevention measures (e.g., flea control for cats) are particularly helpful in southern states and in households with children. PMID:27648778

  12. Epigenetic Modulators of Monocytic Function: Implication for Steady State and Disease in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Chung, Young Cheul; Gagnidze, Khatuna; Hajdarovic, Kaitlyn H.; Cole, Dan C.; Bulloch, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are necessary for the establishment of functional and phenotypic diversity in the populations of immune cells of the monocytic lineage. The epigenetic status of individual genes at different time points defines their transcriptional responses throughout development and in response to environmental stimuli. Epigenetic states are defined at the level of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications, as well as at the level of RNA base changes through RNA editing. Drawing from lessons regarding the epigenome and epitranscriptome of cells of the monocytic lineage in the periphery, and from recently published RNAseq data deriving from brain-resident monocytes, we discuss the impact of modulation of these epigenetic states and how they affect processes important for the development of a healthy brain, as well as mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and aging. An understanding of the varied brain responses and pathologies in light of these novel gene regulatory systems in monocytes will lead to important new insights in the understanding of the aging process and the treatment and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26834738

  13. Risk Factors for Intractable Ascites After Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Using Left Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Shinichi; Ishizaki, Yoichi; Yoshimoto, Jiro; Fujiwara, Noriko; Kawasaki, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Background Intractable ascites is one of the causes of graft loss after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a small graft. Identification of factors associated with increasing posttransplant ascites has important implications for prevention and treatment. Methods All 59 consecutive adult patients who underwent left lobe LDLT without portal inflow modulation between October 2002 and February 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with the average daily amount of ascites for 2 weeks after LDLT were assessed. Results The median daily amount of ascites during the 2 weeks was 1052 mL (range, 52-3480 mL). Although 16 of the 59 patients developed intractable ascites, exceeding 1500 mL daily (massive ascites group), the remaining 43 patients produced less than 1500 mL of ascites daily (nonmassive ascites group). The presence of pretransplant ascites (P = 0.001), albumin (P = 0.011), albumin/globulin ratio (P = 0.026), cold ischemia time (P = 0.004), operation time (P = 0.022), and pretransplant portal vein pressure (PVP) (P = 0.047) differed significantly between the 2 groups. Neither posttransplant PVP nor portal vein flow differed between the 2 groups. The variables associated with intractable ascites that remained significant after logistic regression analysis were pretransplant PVP (P = 0.047) and cold ischemia time (P = 0.049). After appropriate fluid resuscitation for intractable ascites, 58 (98%) of the 59 recipients were discharged from hospital after removal of the indwelling drains. Conclusions It is important to shorten the scold ischemia time to reduce massive ascites after LDLT. Pretransplant portal hypertension is more closely associated with ascites production than posttransplant hemodynamic status. PMID:28361122

  14. Localization of thoracic duct using heavily T2W MRI for intractable post-esophagectomy chylothorax—a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Chien; Yen, Yi-Ting; Chang, Ming-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Post-esophagectomy chylothorax is a rare yet serious complication. Herein we report the case of a patient with intractable post-esophagectomy chylothorax despite medical treatment with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide, as well as prophylactic and repeated thoracic duct mass ligation. The patient was eventually treated with localization of thoracic duct using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2W MRI), followed by video-assisted thoracoscopic thoracic duct ligation. PMID:28275492

  15. Association Between Vaccine Refusal and Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Varun K.; Bednarczyk, Robert A.; Salmon, Daniel A.; Omer, Saad B.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Parents hesitant to vaccinate their children may delay routine immunizations or seek exemptions from state vaccine mandates. Recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States have drawn attention to this phenomenon. Improved understanding of the association between vaccine refusal and the epidemiology of these diseases is needed. OBJECTIVE To review the published literature to evaluate the association between vaccine delay, refusal, or exemption and the epidemiology of measles and pertussis, 2 vaccine-preventable diseases with recent US outbreaks. EVIDENCE REVIEW Search of PubMed through November 30, 2015, for reports of US measles outbreaks that have occurred since measles was declared eliminated in the United States (after January 1, 2000), endemic and epidemic pertussis since the lowest point in US pertussis incidence (after January 1, 1977), and for studies that assessed disease risk in the context of vaccine delay or exemption. FINDINGS We identified 18 published measles studies (9 annual summaries and 9 outbreak reports), which described 1416 measles cases (individual age range, 2 weeks-84 years; 178 cases younger than 12 months) and more than half (56.8%) had no history of measles vaccination. Of the 970 measles cases with detailed vaccination data, 574 cases were unvaccinated despite being vaccine eligible and 405 (70.6%) of these had nonmedical exemptions (eg, exemptions for religious or philosophical reasons, as opposed to medical contraindications; 41.8%of total). Among 32 reports of pertussis outbreaks, which included 10 609 individuals for whom vaccination status was reported (age range, 10 days-87 years), the 5 largest statewide epidemics had substantial proportions (range, 24%–45%) of unvaccinated or undervaccinated individuals. However, several pertussis outbreaks also occurred in highly vaccinated populations, indicating waning immunity. Nine reports (describing 12 outbreaks) provided detailed vaccination data on

  16. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  17. Heterogeneity of Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Control Community Size, Research Productivity, and Arboviral Diseases Across the United States.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Gabriel L

    2016-05-01

    Multiple factors lead to extensive variation in mosquito and mosquito-borne virus control programs throughout the United States. This variation is related to differences in budgets, number of personnel, operational activities targeting nuisance or vector species, integration of Geographical Information Systems, and the degree of research and development to improve management interventions through collaboration with academic institutions. To highlight this heterogeneity, the current study evaluates associations among the size of a mosquito control community, the research productivity, and the mosquito-borne virus human disease burden among states within the continental United States. I used the attendance at state mosquito and vector control meetings as a proxy for the size of the mosquito control community in each state. To judge research productivity, I used all peer-reviewed publications on mosquitoes and mosquito-borne viruses using data originating in each state over a 5- and 20-yr period. Total neuroinvasive human disease cases caused by mosquito-borne viruses were aggregated for each state. These data were compared directly and after adjusting for differences in human population size for each state. Results revealed that mean meeting attendance was positively correlated with the number of publications in each state, but not after correcting for the size of the population in each state. Additionally, human disease cases were positively correlated with the number of publications in each state. Finally, mean meeting attendance and human disease cases were only marginally positively associated, and no correlation existed after correcting for human population size. These analyses indicated that the mosquito control community size, research productivity, and mosquito-borne viral human disease burden varied greatly among states. The mechanisms resulting in this variation were discussed and the consequences of this variation are important given the constantly

  18. Solid state (13)C NMR analysis of human gallstones from cancer and benign gall bladder diseases.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, K; Sonkar, Kanchan; Behari, Anu; Kapoor, V K; Sinha, Neeraj

    2009-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C cross polarized (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of human gall bladder stones collected from patients suffering from malignant and benign gall bladder disease was carried out which revealed different polymorphs of cholesterol in these stones. All gall bladder stones in present study had cholesterol as their main constituent. (13)C CP-MAS NMR analysis revealed three forms of cholesterol molecules in these stones, which are anhydrous form, monohydrate crystalline with amorphous form and monohydrate crystalline form. Our study revealed that stones collected from patients associated with chronic cholecystitis (CC) disease have mostly different polymorph of cholesterol than stones collected from patients associated with gall bladder cancer (GBC). Such study will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of formation of gallstones which are associated with different gall bladder diseases. This is the first study by solid state NMR revealing different crystal polymorphism of cholesterol in human gallstones, extending the applicability of (13)C CP-MAS NMR technique for the routine study of gallstones.

  19. Development of Obesity and Related Diseases in African Refugees After Resettlement to United States.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Corinne M; Chang, Yuchiao; Percac-Lima, Sanja

    2016-12-01

    Despite increases in obesity and related diseases in developing nations, initial refugee clinical visits do not address these issues. We explored the development of obesity and related diseases in a longitudinal prospective cohort of African refugees resettling in northeastern US. Using state Department of Health data, refugees were linked to a health system. Body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia status were extracted from charts. US regional controls from NAMCS/NHAMCS data were matched by age, sex, race, and visit year. African refugee BMI increased after resettlement at 1 (1.7 ± 2.9, p < 0.0001) and 5 years (3.1 ± 3.7, p < 0.0001), a different trend than matched regional controls (p = 0.01). Refugees had increased rates of diabetes (1.0 vs. 10.8 %, p < 0.0001), hypertension (16.7 vs. 21.6 %, p < 0.0001) and hyperlipidemia (3.9 vs. 10.8 %, p < 0.0001) at 5 years not observed in regional controls. Our findings emphasize the need for interventions during resettlement to prevent development of obesity and related disease in this vulnerable population.

  20. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PEA)-15: A potential therapeutic target in multiple disease states

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Fiona H.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15) is a cytoplasmic protein that sits at an important junction in intracellular signalling and can regulate diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation and apoptosis, dependent upon stimulation. Regulation of these processes occurs by virtue of the unique interaction of PEA-15 with other signalling proteins. PEA-15 acts as a cytoplasmic tether for the mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) preventing nuclear localisation. In order to release ERK1/2, PEA-15 requires to be phosphorylated via several potential pathways. PEA-15 (and its phosphorylation state) therefore regulates many ERK1/2-dependent processes, including proliferation, via regulating ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In addition, PEA-15 contains a death effector domain (DED) which allows interaction with other DED-containing proteins. PEA-15 can bind the DED-containing apoptotic adaptor molecule, Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) which is also dependent on the phosphorylation status of PEA-15. PEA-15 binding of FADD can inhibit apoptosis as bound FADD cannot participate in the assembly of apoptotic signalling complexes. Through these protein–protein interactions, PEA-15-regulated cellular effects have now been investigated in a number of disease-related studies. Changes in PEA-15 expression and regulation have been observed in diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurological disorders and the cardiovascular system. These changes have been suggested to contribute to the pathology related to each of these disease states. As such, new therapeutic targets based around PEA-15 and its associated interactions are now being uncovered and could provide novel avenues for treatment strategies in multiple diseases. PMID:24657708

  1. Abnormal expression of stathmin 1 in brain tissue of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fenghua; Hu, Yida; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Qiong; Zhang, Xiaogang; Luo, Jing; Xu, Yali; Wang, Xuefeng

    2012-09-01

    Microtubule dynamics have been shown to contribute to neurite outgrowth, branching, and guidance. Stathmin 1 is a potent microtubule-destabilizing factor that is involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics and plays an essential role in neurite elongation and synaptic plasticity. Here, we investigate the expression of stathmin 1 in the brain tissues of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and experimental animals using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and western blotting. We obtained 32 temporal neocortex tissue samples from patients with intractable TLE and 12 histologically normal temporal lobe tissues as controls. In addition, 48 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, including one control group and five groups with epilepsy induced by lithium chloride-pilocarpine. Hippocampal and temporal lobe tissues were obtained from control and epileptic rats on Days 1, 7, 14, 30, and 60 after kindling. Stathmin 1 was mainly expressed in the neuronal membrane and cytoplasm in the human controls, and its expression levels were significantly higher in patients with intractable TLE. Moreover, stathmin 1 was also expressed in the neurons of both the control and the experimental rats. Stathmin 1 expression was decreased in the experimental animals from 1 to 14 days postseizure and then significantly increased at Days 30 and 60 compared with the control group. Many protruding neuronal processes were observed in the TLE patients and in the chronic stage epileptic rats. These data suggest that stathmin 1 may participate in the abnormal network reorganization of synapses and contribute to the pathogenesis of TLE.

  2. Intractable episodic bradycardia resulting from progressive lead traction in an epileptic child with a vagus nerve stimulator: a delayed complication.

    PubMed

    Clark, Aaron J; Kuperman, Rachel A; Auguste, Kurtis I; Sun, Peter P

    2012-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used as palliation for adult and pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy who are not candidates for curative resection. Although the treatment is generally safe, complications can occur intraoperatively, perioperatively, and in a delayed time frame. In the literature, there are 2 reports of pediatric patients with implanted VNS units who had refractory bradycardia that resolved after the stimulation was turned off. The authors report the case of a 13-year-old boy with a history of vagus nerve stimulator placement at 2 years of age, who developed intractable episodic bradycardia that persisted despite the cessation of VNS and whose imaging results suggested vagus nerve tethering by the leads. He was subsequently taken to the operating room for exploration, where it was confirmed that the stimulator lead was exerting traction on the vagus nerve, which was displaced from the carotid sheath. After the vagus nerve was untethered and the leads were replaced, the bradycardia eventually resolved with continual effective VNS therapy. When placing a VNS unit in a very young child, accommodations must be made for years of expected growth. Delayed intractable bradycardia can result from a vagus nerve under traction by tethered stimulator leads.

  3. Intractable hiccup caused by medulla oblongata lesions: a study of an autopsy patient with possible neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Zen; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Uchihara, Toshiki; Nakamura, Ayako; Haga, Chie; Yokota, Osamu; Ishizu, Hideki; Taki, Kazuhiro; Arai, Tetsuaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2009-10-15

    We report the first autopsy verification of medulla oblongata lesions involving bilateral nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) as a cause of intractable hiccup in an autopsy patient. The female patient first developed pain and weakness in the lower limbs and urinary incontinence at age 48, and was given a diagnosis of myelitis. Intractable hiccup was accompanied by urinary retention on the third attack. She died of respiratory failure when the fifth attack occurred at age 51. Autopsy disclosed severe involvement of the medulla oblongata and entire spinal cord. Optic nerve lesions were also identified unexpectedly. Dual involvement of the optic nerve and spinal cord, necrotic spinal cord lesions involving not only myelin but also neurons and axon, and marked extension of the spinal cord lesions in both the longitudinal and transverse directions suggested the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica rather than multiple sclerosis. Although animal experiments have shown that NTS is a critical structure in the hiccup reflex, we demonstrated for the first time the involvement of the NTS in an autopsy patient with intractable hiccup.

  4. Ozone, Fine Particulate Matter, and Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease Mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yongping; Balluz, Lina; Strosnider, Heather; Wen, Xiao Jun; Li, Chaoyang; Qualters, Judith R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Short-term effects of air pollution exposure on respiratory disease mortality are well established. However, few studies have examined the effects of long-term exposure, and among those that have, results are inconsistent. Objectives To evaluate long-term association between ambient ozone, fine particulate matter (PM2.5, particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 µm or less), and chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) mortality in the contiguous United States. Methods We fit Bayesian hierarchical spatial Poisson models, adjusting for five county-level covariates (percentage of adults aged ≥65 years, poverty, lifetime smoking, obesity, and temperature), with random effects at state and county levels to account for spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence. Measurements and Main Results We derived county-level average daily concentration levels for ambient ozone and PM2.5 for 2001–2008 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s down-scaled estimates and obtained 2007–2008 CLRD deaths from the National Center for Health Statistics. Exposure to ambient ozone was associated with an increased rate of CLRD deaths, with a rate ratio of 1.05 (95% credible interval, 1.01–1.09) per 5-ppb increase in ozone; the association between ambient PM2.5 and CLRD mortality was positive but statistically insignificant (rate ratio, 1.07; 95% credible interval, 0.99–1.14). Conclusions This study links air pollution exposure data with CLRD mortality for all 3,109 contiguous U.S. counties. Ambient ozone may be associated with an increased rate of death from CLRD in the contiguous United States. Although we adjusted for selected county-level covariates and unobserved influences through Bayesian hierarchical spatial modeling, the possibility of ecologic bias remains. PMID:26017067

  5. The politics of health mobilization in the United States: The promise and pitfalls of "disease constituencies".

    PubMed

    Epstein, Steven

    2016-09-01

    A critical review of recent literature on U.S. social movements concerned with matters of health and illness prompts reconsideration of the prevailing conception of such movements as necessarily isolated and particularistic. With a focus on disease-constituency-based mobilization-presently the most potent model of efficacious activism to be found in the domain of health and illness in the United States-I argue that such activism may tend in two directions: a specific response to an imminent disease threat, and a bridging of collective action frames and identities that can lead to connections across differences and broader mobilization. Case studies have demonstrated how patient activism has affected the management of illness, attitudes and practices of health professionals, research practices, processes of innovation, state policies, and corporate behavior. Through close analysis of patient group mobilization and its distinctive orientation toward knowledge and expertise, I argue that patient groups in practice may connect with or influence one another or a range of other forms of mobilization in relation to health, and I examine the "linkage mechanisms"-spillover, coalition, and frame amplification-by which this can occur. Rather than imagine a stark opposition between particularistic, single-issue health politics, on the one hand, and universalistic efforts to transform the meaning and practice of health and health care in the United States, on the other, I propose closer attention to the potentially Janus-faced character of many health movement organizations and the ways in which they may look either inward or outward.

  6. Parkinson's disease-related network topographies characterized with resting state functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Vo, An; Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Peng, Shichun; Mattis, Paul J; Skidmore, Frank M; Ma, Yilong; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2017-02-01

    Spatial covariance mapping can be used to identify and measure the activity of disease-related functional brain networks. While this approach has been widely used in the analysis of cerebral blood flow and metabolic PET scans, it is not clear whether it can be reliably applied to resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data. In this study, we present a novel method based on independent component analysis (ICA) to characterize specific network topographies associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Using rs-fMRI data from PD and healthy subjects, we used ICA with bootstrap resampling to identify a PD-related pattern that reliably discriminated the two groups. This topography, termed rs-MRI PD-related pattern (fPDRP), was similar to previously characterized disease-related patterns identified using metabolic PET imaging. Following pattern identification, we validated the fPDRP by computing its expression in rs-fMRI testing data on a prospective case basis. Indeed, significant increases in fPDRP expression were found in separate sets of PD and control subjects. In addition to providing a similar degree of group separation as PET, fPDRP values correlated with motor disability and declined toward normal with levodopa administration. Finally, we used this approach in conjunction with neuropsychological performance measures to identify a separate PD cognition-related pattern in the patients. This pattern, termed rs-fMRI PD cognition-related pattern (fPDCP), was topographically similar to its PET-derived counterpart. Subject scores for the fPDCP correlated with executive function in both training and testing data. These findings suggest that ICA can be used in conjunction with bootstrap resampling to identify and validate stable disease-related network topographies in rs-fMRI. Hum Brain Mapp 38:617-630, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Quantitative characteristics of the foot-and-mouth disease carrier state under natural conditions in India.

    PubMed

    Hayer, S S; Ranjan, R; Biswal, J K; Subramaniam, S; Mohapatra, J K; Sharma, G K; Rout, M; Dash, B B; Das, B; Prusty, B R; Sharma, A K; Stenfeldt, C; Perez, A; Rodriguez, L L; Pattnaik, B; VanderWaal, K; Arzt, J

    2017-03-02

    The goal of this study was to characterize the properties and duration of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) carrier state and associated serological responses subsequent to vaccination and naturally occurring infection at two farms in northern India. Despite previous vaccination of cattle in these herds, clinical signs of FMD occurred in October 2013 within a subset of animals at the farms containing juvenile-yearling heifers and steers (Farm A) and adult dairy cattle (Farm B). Subsequent to the outbreak, FMD virus (FMDV) asymptomatic carriers were identified in both herds by seroreactivity to FMDV non-structural proteins and detection of FMDV genomic RNA in oropharyngeal fluid. Carriers' seroreactivity and FMDV genome detection status were subsequently monitored monthly for 23 months. The mean extinction time of the carrier state was 13.1 ± 0.2 months, with extinction having occurred significantly faster amongst adult dairy cattle at Farm B compared to younger animals at Farm A. The rate of decrease in the proportion of carrier animals was calculated to be 0.07 per month. Seroprevalence against FMDV non-structural proteins decreased over the course of the study period, but was found to increase transiently following repeated vaccinations. These data provide novel insights into viral and host factors associated with the FMDV carrier state under natural conditions. The findings reported herein may be relevant to field veterinarians and governmental regulatory entities engaged in FMD response and control measures.

  8. Pediatric Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in the United States in the Era of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in children under 5 years of age. In the United States, 90% of invasive pneumococcal infections in children are caused by 13 serotypes of S. pneumoniae. The licensure (in 2000) and subsequent widespread use of a heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) have had a significant impact on decreasing the incidence of serious invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in all age groups, especially in children under 2 years of age. However, the emergence of replacement non-PCV7 serotypes, especially serotype 19A, has resulted in an increase in the incidence of serious and invasive infections. In 2010, a 13-valent PCV was licensed in the United States. However, the impact that this vaccine will have on IPD remains to be seen. The objectives of this review are to discuss the epidemiology of serious and invasive pneumococcal infections in the United States in the PCV era and to review some of the pneumococcal vaccines that are in development. PMID:22763632

  9. Hospitalization of the Elderly in the United States for Nonspecific Gastrointestinal Diseases: A Search for Etiological Clues

    PubMed Central

    Jagai, Jyotsna S.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.; Naumova, Elena N.

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of hospitalization among the elderly in the United States caused by gastrointestinal diseases between 1991 and 2004 increased dramatically, especially hospitalization of elderly individuals with nonspecific diagnoses. We analyzed 6 640 304 gastrointestinal disease–associated hospitalization records in this 14-year period by comparing the peak times of nonspecific gastrointestinal diseases with those of specific diseases. We found that most nonspecific gastrointestinal diseases peak concurrently with viral enteritis, suggesting a lack of diagnostic testing for viruses, which may adversely affect the efficiency of prevention, surveillance, and treatment efforts. PMID:21653903

  10. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem.

    PubMed

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection.

  11. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem

    PubMed Central

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection. PMID:27603778

  12. Schizophrenia: a systematic review of the disease state, current therapeutics and their molecular mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Shin, J K; Malone, D T; Crosby, I T; Capuano, B

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of schizophrenia, one of the most debilitating mental illnesses, began by the serendipitous discovery of chlorpromazine. Since then, researchers have endeavored to find the cause of the illness but it remains unresolved. As a result, literature on the etiology of schizophrenia is littered with hypotheses and theories that are constantly reviewed, modified and rejected. Two hypotheses, however, have withstood the test of time and serve as the basis for the drug treatment, namely the dopamine and serotonin hypotheses. This review introduces the disease state, summarizes in detail the two leading hypotheses on schizophrenia, presents drugs that are currently available for treatment, and discusses some of the promising drug candidates based on their pre and early clinical trial results.

  13. The TAR model: use of therapeutic state transitions for quality assurance reporting in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, R; Warren, J; Kenealy, T

    2007-01-01

    Chronic disease management represents one of the challenges for health informatics and demands the appropriate application of information technology for improved patient care. This paper presents an approach to quality assurance reporting wherein the recommendations of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are considered in the context of empirical therapeutic state-transitions (in terms of changes in individual patient prescriptions over time). We apply a Transition-based Audit Report (TAR) model to antihypertensive prescribing and related data as stored in a New Zealand General Practice Management System database. The results provide a set of quality indicators and specific patient cohorts for potential practice quality improvement with strong linkage to the selected guidelines and observed practice patterns. We see the TAR model primarily as a tool to enable internal quality improvement efforts, but also to be of relevance for focusing pay-for-performance programs.

  14. State of the Art Review: Depression, Stress, Anxiety, and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beth E; Edmondson, Donald; Kronish, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    The notion that psychological states can influence physical health is hardly new, and perhaps nowhere has the mind-body connection been better studied than in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, large prospective epidemiologic studies and smaller basic science studies have firmly established a connection between CVD and several psychological conditions, including depression, chronic psychological stress, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety. In addition, numerous clinical trials have been conducted to attempt to prevent or lessen the impact of these conditions on cardiovascular health. In this article, we review studies connecting depression, stress/PTSD, and anxiety to CVD, focusing on findings from the last 5 years. For each mental health condition, we first examine the epidemiologic evidence establishing a link with CVD. We then describe studies of potential underlying mechanisms and finally discuss treatment trials and directions for future research.

  15. Diseases diagnosed in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) of the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Davidson, W R; Nettles, V F; Couvillion, C E; Howerth, E W

    1985-10-01

    Diagnostic findings are presented on 139 sick or dead wild turkeys examined during the period 1972 through 1984. Turkeys originated from eight southeastern states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia) and included 31 turkeys categorized as capture-related mortalities and 108 turkeys categorized as natural mortalities. Frequent diagnoses (greater than or equal to 10% of case accessions) in the natural mortality group were trauma, avian pox, and histomoniasis. Less frequent diagnoses (less than or equal to 4% of case accessions) included malnutrition/environmental stress syndrome, coligranuloma-like condition, crop impaction, bumblefoot, organophosphate toxicosis, infectious sinusitis, a lympho-proliferative disease, salmonellosis, aspergillosis, toxoplasmosis, crop trichomoniasis, and melorheostosis.

  16. Isolation and transmission of the Lyme disease spirochete from the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J H; Chandler, F W; Luttrell, M P; James, A M; Stallknecht, D E; McGuire, B S; Hutcheson, H J; Cummins, G A; Lane, R S

    1993-08-01

    The isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) from the southeastern United States is reported. Three isolates, two from cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus) and one from the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), were recovered from Sapelo Island, Georgia, in July and September 1991. The spirochetes were characterized by indirect fluorescent antibody assay using a battery of five monoclonal antibodies, by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) of whole cell lysates, and by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using primers for three DNA target sequences found in B. burgdorferi reference strain B-31. Transmission experiments indicate that the three Georgia isolates can infect experimentally inoculated hamsters and mice. Tick transmission of one of the isolates has been attempted so far; I. scapularis transmitted isolate SI-1 from hamsters to mice, but the lone-star tick, Amblyomma americanum, did not.

  17. [Hansen's disease, exclusion and prejudice: life histories of women at Santa Catarina State].

    PubMed

    Martins, Patrícia Vieira; Caponi, Sandra

    2010-06-01

    This article describes historical notes about leprosy, from the discovery of the bacillus to the treatment done today. In this text we try to analyze the perception of some women, former leprosy patients, residents of Santa Teresa Hospital, located in the city of São Pedro de Alcântara, Santa Catarina State, on the stigma, prejudice and exclusion they suffered and still suffer today. We used the oral history of three women for research purposes and we found as a result of this "excluding" treatment over the years, that it built some kind of rejection about the disease. The search and affirmation of the identity of the stigmatized subject has become a constant. The model of social acceptance and the fact of being recognized as different and not discriminated is the main issue.

  18. State of the Art Review: Depression, Stress, Anxiety, and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Kronish, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    The notion that psychological states can influence physical health is hardly new, and perhaps nowhere has the mind-body connection been better studied than in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, large prospective epidemiologic studies and smaller basic science studies have firmly established a connection between CVD and several psychological conditions, including depression, chronic psychological stress, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety. In addition, numerous clinical trials have been conducted to attempt to prevent or lessen the impact of these conditions on cardiovascular health. In this article, we review studies connecting depression, stress/PTSD, and anxiety to CVD, focusing on findings from the last 5 years. For each mental health condition, we first examine the epidemiologic evidence establishing a link with CVD. We then describe studies of potential underlying mechanisms and finally discuss treatment trials and directions for future research. PMID:25911639

  19. [Study of literature on disease in the Rongchengshi of the Warring States].

    PubMed

    Luo, Bao-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Many scholars have studied and disputed over the names of diseases recorded in Rongchengshi, bamboo slips of the Chu kingdon in the Warring States collected in the Shanghai Museum. According to comments of scholars and other literature it could be concluded: JinLong in slip 2 and AnLong in slip 36 means deaf-mutism; MaoFa in slip 2 means blindness; PiBi in slip 2 means lameness; ZhangZhe in slip 2 means persons who are strong and tall; An in slip 3 that it is the variant form of Ying, which means thyroid enlargement; Lou in slip 2 it means kyphosis of the spine; Xia in slip 3 it means pruritus and scabies; Δ in slip 36 means blindness; and Shang in slip 37 means bald head.

  20. Ebola virus disease: What clinicians in the United States need to know.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Uyeki, Timothy M; Tauxe, Robert V

    2015-08-01

    In March 2014 the World Health Organization was notified of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the forest region of Guinea. As of May 2015, the outbreak had become the most devastating EVD epidemic in history with more than 27,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. The introduction of EVD into noncontiguous countries, including the United States, from infected travelers highlights the importance of preparedness of all health care providers. Early identification and rapid isolation of patients suspected with EVD is critical to limiting the spread of Ebola virus. Additionally, enhanced understanding of EVD case definitions, clinical presentation, treatment procedures, and infection control strategies will improve the ability of health care workers to provide safe care for patients with EVD.

  1. Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease: A Prodrome or a State of Resilience?

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, I.; Troncoso, J.

    2012-01-01

    Neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the neuropathological hallmarks of AD, are not limited to individuals with dementia. These pathologic changes can also be present in the brains of cognitively normal older adults – a condition we defined as Asymptomatic AD (ASYMAD). Although it remains unclear whether these individuals would remain clinically normal with longer survival, they seem to be able to compensate for or delay the appearance of dementia symptoms. Here, we provide a historical background and highlight the combined clinical, pathologic and morphometric evidence related to ASYMAD. Understanding the nature of changes during this apparently asymptomatic state may shed light on the mechanisms that forestall the progression of the disease and allow for maintenance of cognitive health, an important area of research that has been understudied relative to the identification of risks and pathways to negative health outcomes. PMID:21222594

  2. Prediction of Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparison of Disease State Index and IMPACT Calculator.

    PubMed

    Liedes, Hilkka; Mattila, Jussi; Lingsma, Hester; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David; Tenovuo, Olli; van Gils, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability, especially in young adults. A reliable prediction of outcome after TBI is of great importance in clinical practice and research. We aimed to compare performance of the well-established IMPACT calculator and an alternative method, Disease State Index (DSI), in the prediction of six-month outcome after TBI. Performance of the models was evaluated using 2036 patients with moderate or severe TBI from the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) database. Prediction performance of both models was similar. The models with more variables provided better performance than the simpler models. This study showed that the DSI is a valid tool with efficient visualizations that can help clinicians with their decision making process in clinical practice.

  3. Trends in hospitalization with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-United States, 1990-2005.

    PubMed

    Brown, David W; Croft, Janet B; Greenlund, Kurt J; Giles, Wayne H

    2010-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and a major cause of morbidity and disability. To update national estimates and examine trends for hospitalization with COPD between 1990 and 2005, we analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The results indicated that an estimated 715,000 hospitalizations with COPD, or 23.6 per 10,000 population, occurred during 2005, an increase in the number and the rate of COPD hospitalizations since 1990 (370,000 hospitalizations; rate = 15.9 per 10,000 population). To reverse increases in the number of COPD hospitalizations and decrease the burden of COPD, public health programs should continue focused efforts to reduce total personal exposure to tobacco smoke, including passive smoke exposure; to occupational dusts and chemicals; and to other indoor and outdoor air pollutants linked to COPD.

  4. Epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998-2010.

    PubMed

    Grass, Julian E; Gould, L Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E

    2013-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998-2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities.

  5. Evaluation of a disease state management guideline for urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Zmarlicka, Monika T; Cardwell, Sophia M; Crandon, Jared L; Nicolau, David P; McClure, Mitchell H; Nailor, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) disease state management guideline, including risk-based antimicrobial recommendations, Foley catheter management and transitions of care, was implemented. This study evaluated the outcomes associated with implementation of the guideline. A retrospective study was conducted between 1 July 2013 and 30 September 2013 (pre-implementation) and between 1 July 2014 and 30 September 2014 (post-implementation). Symptomatic patients treated for UTI within 24 h with an identified pathogen were included. Risk-based patient groups were community-acquired UTI, healthcare-associated UTI, or extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) history in prior 12 months. Recommended antimicrobials were ceftriaxone, cefepime ± vancomycin, or doripenem ± vancomycin, respectively. Given the low post-implementation guideline adherence, pre- and post-groups were combined to evaluate potential guideline value. Length of stay (LOS) decreased when guidelines were followed [5 (IQR 4-7) days vs. 6 (IQR 4-8) days; P = 0.03] or appropriate therapy (according to in vitro susceptibilities) was given [5 (IQR 4-7) days vs. 6 (IQR 4-9) days; P = 0.03]. Those receiving guideline-recommended antimicrobials were more likely to have appropriate therapy within 24 h (84.4% vs. 64.2%; P <0.001). On multivariate analysis, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and admission from home were associated with longer and shorter LOS, respectively. Despite less than anticipated adherence, these data suggest that the established disease state management guideline can improve outcomes in patients admitted with UTI.

  6. Resting-State Network Disruption and APOE Genotype in Alzheimer's Disease: A lagged Functional Connectivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Canuet, Leonides; Tellado, Ivan; Couceiro, Veronica; Fraile, Carmen; Fernandez-Novoa, Lucia; Ishii, Ryouhei; Takeda, Masatoshi; Cacabelos, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Background The apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE-4) is associated with a genetic vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and with AD-related abnormalities in cortical rhythms. However, it is unclear whether APOE-4 is linked to a specific pattern of intrinsic functional disintegration of the brain after the development of the disease or during its different stages. This study aimed at identifying spatial patterns and effects of APOE genotype on resting-state oscillations and functional connectivity in patients with AD, using a physiological connectivity index called “lagged phase synchronization”. Methodology/Principal Findings Resting EEG was recorded during awake, eyes-closed state in 125 patients with AD and 60 elderly controls. Source current density and functional connectivity were determined using eLORETA. Patients with AD exhibited reduced parieto-occipital alpha oscillations compared with controls, and those carrying the APOE-4 allele had reduced alpha activity in the left inferior parietal and temporo-occipital cortex relative to noncarriers. There was a decreased alpha2 connectivity pattern in AD, involving the left temporal and bilateral parietal cortex. Several brain regions exhibited increased lagged phase synchronization in low frequencies, specifically in the theta band, across and within hemispheres, where temporal lobe connections were particularly compromised. Areas with abnormal theta connectivity correlated with cognitive scores. In patients with early AD, we found an APOE-4-related decrease in interhemispheric alpha connectivity in frontal and parieto-temporal regions. Conclusions/Significance In addition to regional cortical dysfunction, as indicated by abnormal alpha oscillations, there are patterns of functional network disruption affecting theta and alpha bands in AD that associate with the level of cognitive disturbance or with the APOE genotype. These functional patterns of nonlinear connectivity may potentially represent

  7. [Study on Brain Functional Connectivity Using Resting State Electroencephalogram Based on Synchronization Likelihood in Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Jingjing; Zheng, Xuyuan

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease with progressive cognitive dysfunction as the main feature. How to identify the early changes of cognitive dysfunction and give appropriate treatments is of great significance to delay the onset of dementia. Some other researches have shown that AD is associated with abnormal changes of brain networks. To study human brain functional connectivity characteristics in AD, 16 channels electroencephalogram (EEG) were recorded under resting and eyes-closed condition in 15 AD patients and 15 subjects in the control group. The synchronization likelihood of the full-band and alpha-band (8-13 Hz) data were evaluated, which resulted in the synchronization likelihood coefficient matrices. Considering a threshold T, the matrices were converted into binary graphs. Then the graphs of two groups were measured by topological parameters including the clustering coefficient and global efficiency. The results showed that the global efficiency of the network in full-band EEG was significantly smaller in AD group for the values of T = 0.06 and T = 0.07, but there was no statistically significant difference in the clustering coefficients between the two groups for the values of T (0.05-0.07). However, the clustering coefficient and global efficiency were significantly lower in AD patients at alpha-band for the same threshold range than those of subjects in the control group. It suggests that there may be decreases of the brain connectivity strength in AD patients at alpha-band of the resting-state EEG. This study provides a support for quantifying functional brain state of AD from the brain network perspective.

  8. Interaction between psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in celiac disease patients in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    GARUD, S.; LEFFLER, D.; DENNIS, M.; EDWARDS-GEORGE, J.; SARYAN, D.; SHETH, S.; SCHUPPAN, D.; JAMMA, S.; KELLY, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Previous studies yielded conflicting results regarding the presence of an association between celiac disease (CD) and psychiatric disorders including depression. This association has not been studied in the United States. Aim To determine the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in patients with CD in the US compared to control groups. Methods In a case control study, the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders was compared in 600 CD patients, 200 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and 200 healthy controls. Results The prevalence of depression in CD was 17.2% and was similar to that in IBS (18.5%, P = 0.74) and controls (16.0%, P = 0.79). Among CD patients, type I DM was identified as a significant risk factor for depression (P < 0.01) with 37% of patients with both CD and type I DM having clinical depression. Conclusion The prevalence of depression in CD is similar to that in other chronic gastrointestinal diseases and healthy controls. However, there is a markedly elevated risk of depression in patients with both type I DM and CD. Differing rates of type 1 DM among celiac populations may account for disparity in published rates of depression in patients with CD. PMID:19183153

  9. Modeling The Economic Burden Of Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases In The United States.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Sachiko; Portnoy, Allison; Getaneh, Hiwote; Clark, Samantha; Knoll, Maria; Bishai, David; Yang, H Keri; Patwardhan, Pallavi D

    2016-11-01

    Vaccines save thousands of lives in the United States every year, but many adults remain unvaccinated. Low rates of vaccine uptake lead to costs to individuals and society in terms of deaths and disabilities, which are avoidable, and they create economic losses from doctor visits, hospitalizations, and lost income. To identify the magnitude of this problem, we calculated the current economic burden that is attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases among US adults. We estimated the total remaining economic burden at approximately $9 billion (plausibility range: $4.7-$15.2 billion) in a single year, 2015, from vaccine-preventable diseases related to ten vaccines recommended for adults ages nineteen and older. Unvaccinated individuals are responsible for almost 80 percent, or $7.1 billion, of the financial burden. These results not only indicate the potential economic benefit of increasing adult immunization uptake but also highlight the value of vaccines. Policies should focus on minimizing the negative externalities or spillover effects from the choice not to be vaccinated, while preserving patient autonomy.

  10. Bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2000: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Sethi, S; Murphy, T F

    2001-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD.

  11. Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2000: a State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD. PMID:11292642

  12. Multimodal Regulation Orchestrates Normal and Complex Disease States in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Olivares, A M; Jelcick, A S; Reinecke, J; Leehy, B; Haider, A; Morrison, M A; Cheng, L; Chen, D F; DeAngelis, M M; Haider, N B

    2017-04-06

    Regulation of biological processes occurs through complex, synergistic mechanisms. In this study, we discovered the synergistic orchestration of multiple mechanisms regulating the normal and diseased state (age related macular degeneration, AMD) in the retina. We uncovered gene networks with overlapping feedback loops that are modulated by nuclear hormone receptors (NHR), miRNAs, and epigenetic factors. We utilized a comprehensive filtering and pathway analysis strategy comparing miRNA and microarray data between three mouse models and human donor eyes (normal and AMD). The mouse models lack key NHRS (Nr2e3, RORA) or epigenetic (Ezh2) factors. Fifty-four total miRNAs were differentially expressed, potentially targeting over 150 genes in 18 major representative networks including angiogenesis, metabolism, and immunity. We identified sixty-eight genes and 5 miRNAS directly regulated by NR2E3 and/or RORA. After a comprehensive analysis, we discovered multimodal regulation by miRNA, NHRs, and epigenetic factors of three miRNAs (miR-466, miR1187, and miR-710) and two genes (Ell2 and Entpd1) that are also associated with AMD. These studies provide insight into the complex, dynamic modulation of gene networks as well as their impact on human disease, and provide novel data for the development of innovative and more effective therapeutics.

  13. [Epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases in the mine area of Las Claritas, Bolivar State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    González-O, N; Rodríguez-Acosta, A

    2000-06-01

    The primordial objective of this study was to carry out an epidemiological analysis of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in terms of sensed morbidity and real morbidity in the mining region of "Las Claritas", Bolivar State, Venezuela, during the third trimester of 1998. The epidemiological characteristics of time, people and place are interlaced, giving a relationship included within the Epidemiological Triad, that represents this work's conceptual framework; defining both, the determinant and the conditioning factors of the presence of STDs in the zone. The clinical interrogatory was partially steered towards the participant's sensed morbidity. A mostly feminine population is described (65%), with a low scholarly level in the general population and a high index of foreigners among the evaluated patients; with 48.72% of stable unions in the interviewees. From 166 evaluated patients, 27.70% referred to have had some STD episode, being syphilis and blenorrhagia the most frequently reported. In the survey, there was a general hush concerning the presence of STDs; but, key informants such as the medicine retailers, revealed a higher presence of these diseases, which are wrongly treated by automedication. These are important results, since they let opened a space for the epidemiological evaluation in the zone, in the various health, sanitary, environmental and social aspects and mainly, by the individual's quality of life expectations.

  14. Computationally Simple Analysis of Matched, Outcome-Based Studies of Ordinal Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Betensky, Rebecca A.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nutt, Catherine L.; Batchelor, Tracy T.

    2015-01-01

    Outcome-based sampling is an efficient study design for rare conditions, such as glioblastoma. It is often used in conjunction with matching, for increased efficiency and to potentially avoid bias due to confounding. A study was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) that involved retrospective sampling of glioblastoma patients with respect to multiple ordered disease states, as defined by three categories of overall survival time. To analyze such studies, we posit an adjacent categories logit model and exploit its allowance for prospective analysis of a retrospectively sampled study and its advantageous removal of set and level specific nuisance parameters through conditioning on sufficient statistics. This framework allows for any sampling design and is not limited to one level of disease within each set, as is the development of Mukherjee et al. [1]. We describe how this ordinal conditional model can be fit using standard conditional logistic regression procedures. We consider an alternative pseudo-likelihood approach that potentially offers robustness under partial model misspecification at the expense of slight loss of efficiency under correct model specification for small sample sizes. We apply our methods to the MGH glioblastoma study. PMID:25900819

  15. Bluetongue disease and seroprevalence in South American camelids from the northwestern region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew J; Stanton, James B; Evermann, James F; Fry, Lindsay M; Ackerman, Melissa G; Barrington, George M

    2015-03-01

    In late summer/early fall of 2013, 2 South American camelids from central Washington were diagnosed with fatal bluetongue viral disease, an event which is rarely reported. A 9-year-old intact male llama (Lama glama), with a 1-day history of anorexia, recumbency, and dyspnea before death. Abundant foam discharged from the mouth and nostrils, and the lungs were severely edematous on postmortem examination. Histologically, there was abundant intra-alveolar edema with fibrin. Hemorrhage and edema disrupted several other organs. Bluetongue viral RNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and serotype 11 was identified by sequencing a segment of the VP2 outer capsid gene. Approximately 1 month later, at a site 150 miles north of the index case, a 2-year-old female alpaca with similar, acutely progressive clinical signs was reported. A postmortem examination was performed, and histologic lesions from the alpaca were similar to those of the llama, and again serotype 11 was detected by PCR. The occurrence of bluetongue viral infection and disease is described in the context of seasonal Bluetongue virus activity within the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada.

  16. Maternal blood viscosity and perinatal outcome in steady-state homozygous sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Pepple, Dagogo J; Mullings, Anthony M; Reid, Harvey L

    2013-06-30

    Homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS) is a complicating factor in pregnancy resulting in perinatal morbidity and mortality. One of the hallmarks of sickle cell disease is increased whole blood viscosity. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the maternal blood viscosity on perinatal outcome in steady-state homozygous sickle disease in 19 women admitted to the labor ward of the University Hospital of the West Indies, Mona. Whole blood viscosity was measured with the Wells-Brookfield viscometer at 370C at low (23 sec-1) and high (230 sec-1) shear rates. Measurements were done at native hematocrit. Perinatal outcome was classified as adverse if there was one or more of the following: admission to nursery, birth weight less than 2.5 kg, 5 minute Apgar score less than 7, caesarean section for fetal distress, perinatal death or death before discharge from nursery. The whole blood viscosity value (mean ± SD) at low shear rate was 2.04 ± 0.55 mPa.s and 2.96 ± 0.80 mPa.s at high shear rate. The hematocrit was 25.13 ± 4.18%. The perinatal outcome was good in 10 (53%) subjects and adverse in 9 (47%) subjects. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of adverse perinatal outcome between women with low and high blood viscosities in either the low or high shear rates. Similarly, low or high hematocrit did not significantly affect the incidence of adverse perinatal outcome. This could be attributed to their similarity in the whole blood viscosity and hematocrit values.

  17. Meteorological conditions associated with increased incidence of West Nile virus disease in the United States, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Micah B; Monaghan, Andrew J; Hayden, Mary H; Eisen, Rebecca J; Delorey, Mark J; Lindsey, Nicole P; Nasci, Roger S; Fischer, Marc

    2015-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Annual seasonal outbreaks vary in size and location. Predicting where and when higher than normal WNV transmission will occur can help direct limited public health resources. We developed models for the contiguous United States to identify meteorological anomalies associated with above average incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease from 2004 to 2012. We used county-level WNV data reported to ArboNET and meteorological data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. As a result of geographic differences in WNV transmission, we divided the United States into East and West, and 10 climate regions. Above average annual temperature was associated with increased likelihood of higher than normal WNV disease incidence, nationally and in most regions. Lower than average annual total precipitation was associated with higher disease incidence in the eastern United States, but the opposite was true in most western regions. Although multiple factors influence WNV transmission, these findings show that anomalies in temperature and precipitation are associated with above average WNV disease incidence. Readily accessible meteorological data may be used to develop predictive models to forecast geographic areas with elevated WNV disease risk before the coming season.

  18. Meteorological Conditions Associated with Increased Incidence of West Nile Virus Disease in the United States, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Micah B.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Hayden, Mary H.; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Delorey, Mark J.; Lindsey, Nicole P.; Nasci, Roger S.; Fischer, Marc

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Annual seasonal outbreaks vary in size and location. Predicting where and when higher than normal WNV transmission will occur can help direct limited public health resources. We developed models for the contiguous United States to identify meteorological anomalies associated with above average incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease from 2004 to 2012. We used county-level WNV data reported to ArboNET and meteorological data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. As a result of geographic differences in WNV transmission, we divided the United States into East and West, and 10 climate regions. Above average annual temperature was associated with increased likelihood of higher than normal WNV disease incidence, nationally and in most regions. Lower than average annual total precipitation was associated with higher disease incidence in the eastern United States, but the opposite was true in most western regions. Although multiple factors influence WNV transmission, these findings show that anomalies in temperature and precipitation are associated with above average WNV disease incidence. Readily accessible meteorological data may be used to develop predictive models to forecast geographic areas with elevated WNV disease risk before the coming season. PMID:25802435

  19. Zika Virus Disease Cases - 50 States and the District of Columbia, January 1-July 31, 2016.

    PubMed

    Walker, William L; Lindsey, Nicole P; Lehman, Jennifer A; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Rabe, Ingrid B; Hills, Susan L; Martin, Stacey W; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin

    2016-09-16

    Zika virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus primarily transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes (1). Zika virus infections have also been documented through intrauterine transmission resulting in congenital infection; intrapartum transmission from a viremic mother to her newborn; sexual transmission; blood transfusion; and laboratory exposure (1-5). Most Zika virus infections are asymptomatic (1,6). Clinical illness, when it occurs, is generally mild and characterized by acute onset of fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, or nonpurulent conjunctivitis. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause adverse outcomes such as fetal loss, and microcephaly and other serious brain anomalies (1-3). Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare autoimmune condition affecting the peripheral nervous system, also has been associated with Zika virus infection (1). Following the identification of local transmission of Zika virus in Brazil in May 2015, the virus has continued to spread throughout the Region of the Americas, and travel-associated cases have increased (7). In 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (8). As of September 3, 2016, a total of 2,382 confirmed and probable cases of Zika virus disease with symptom onset during January 1-July 31, 2016, had been reported from 48 of 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Most cases (2,354; 99%) were travel-associated, with either direct travel or an epidemiologic link to a traveler to a Zika virus-affected area. Twenty-eight (1%) cases were reported as locally acquired, including 26 associated with mosquito-borne transmission, one acquired in a laboratory, and one with an unknown mode of transmission. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with compatible clinical signs or symptoms who traveled to or reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission or who had unprotected sex with someone who traveled to those areas. Health

  20. SIR model on a dynamical network and the endemic state of an infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, M.; Fabricius, G.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we performed a numerical study of an epidemic model that mimics the endemic state of whooping cough in the pre-vaccine era. We considered a stochastic SIR model on dynamical networks that involve local and global contacts among individuals and analysed the influence of the network properties on the characterization of the quasi-stationary state. We computed probability density functions (PDF) for infected fraction of individuals and found that they are well fitted by gamma functions, excepted the tails of the distributions that are q-exponentials. We also computed the fluctuation power spectra of infective time series for different networks. We found that network effects can be partially absorbed by rescaling the rate of infective contacts of the model. An explicit relation between the effective transmission rate of the disease and the correlation of susceptible individuals with their infective nearest neighbours was obtained. This relation quantifies the known screening of infective individuals observed in these networks. We finally discuss the goodness and limitations of the SIR model with homogeneous mixing and parameters taken from epidemiological data to describe the dynamic behaviour observed in the networks studied.

  1. Complexity of resting-state EEG activity in the patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the abnormal brain activities in the early stage of Parkinson's disease (PD), the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals were recorded with 20 channels from non-dementia PD patients (18 patients, 8 females) and age matched healthy controls (18 subjects, 8 females) during the resting state. Two methods based on the ordinal patterns of the recorded series, i.e., permutation entropy (PE) and order index (OI), were introduced to characterize the complexity of the cortical activities for two groups. It was observed that the resting-state EEG of PD patients showed lower PE and higher OI than healthy controls, which indicated that the early-stage PD caused the reduced complexity of EEG. We further applied two methods to determine the complexity of EEG rhythms in five sub-bands. The results showed that the gamma, beta and alpha rhythms of PD patients were characterized by lower PE and higher OI, i.e., reduced complexity, than healthy subjects. No significant differences were observed in theta or delta rhythms between two groups. The findings suggested that PE and OI were promising methods to detect the abnormal changes in the dynamics of EEG signals associated with early-stage PD. Further, such changes in EEG complexity may be the early markers of the cortical or subcortical dysfunction caused by PD.

  2. [Particular evolution of the thyroid state in Grave's disease: two cases].

    PubMed

    Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Néjib; Khairi, Karima; Hadj Ali, Inçaf; Turki, Sami; Ben Maïz, Hédi

    2003-09-01

    We report two cases of Grave's disease (GD) caracterized by the succession of hypothyroid and hyperthyroid states. Case 1: A 32 years old woman, has presented initially a typical GD with hyperthyroidism. Grave's ophtalmopathy and homogenous goiter. Four months later, she presented a spontaneous hypothyroidism necessiting treatment with thyroxine and a severe myasthenia gravis. More later (6 months), she experienced symptoms of hyperthyroidism after thymectomy. The level of anti-thyrotropin-receptor antibodies (TSab) was very high (141 UI/I, NV < 10). Case 2: A 29 years old woman has been treated by thyroxine (150 microg/day) for a primary hypothyroidism. Ten months later, she presented symptoms of hyperthyroidism even after stoppage of thyroxine. TSH value was decreased (TSH < 0.05 microU/ml) and FT4 level was raised (FT4 = 25.5 pmol/l). The thyroid antibodies were positive. We discuss, after review of the litterature, the physiopathological mecanisms of these changes in the thyroid state, particularly the role of the blocking and stimulating anti-thyrotropin-receptor antibodies.

  3. A Mathematical Model with Quarantine States for the Dynamics of Ebola Virus Disease in Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Gideon A.

    2016-01-01

    A deterministic ordinary differential equation model for the dynamics and spread of Ebola Virus Disease is derived and studied. The model contains quarantine and nonquarantine states and can be used to evaluate transmission both in treatment centres and in the community. Possible sources of exposure to infection, including cadavers of Ebola Virus victims, are included in the model derivation and analysis. Our model's results show that there exists a threshold parameter, R 0, with the property that when its value is above unity, an endemic equilibrium exists whose value and size are determined by the size of this threshold parameter, and when its value is less than unity, the infection does not spread into the community. The equilibrium state, when it exists, is locally and asymptotically stable with oscillatory returns to the equilibrium point. The basic reproduction number, R 0, is shown to be strongly dependent on the initial response of the emergency services to suspected cases of Ebola infection. When intervention measures such as quarantining are instituted fully at the beginning, the value of the reproduction number reduces and any further infections can only occur at the treatment centres. Effective control measures, to reduce R 0 to values below unity, are discussed. PMID:27579053

  4. Limits to Causal Inference with State-Space Reconstruction for Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Cobey, Sarah; Baskerville, Edward B

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are notorious for their complex dynamics, which make it difficult to fit models to test hypotheses. Methods based on state-space reconstruction have been proposed to infer causal interactions in noisy, nonlinear dynamical systems. These "model-free" methods are collectively known as convergent cross-mapping (CCM). Although CCM has theoretical support, natural systems routinely violate its assumptions. To identify the practical limits of causal inference under CCM, we simulated the dynamics of two pathogen strains with varying interaction strengths. The original method of CCM is extremely sensitive to periodic fluctuations, inferring interactions between independent strains that oscillate with similar frequencies. This sensitivity vanishes with alternative criteria for inferring causality. However, CCM remains sensitive to high levels of process noise and changes to the deterministic attractor. This sensitivity is problematic because it remains challenging to gauge noise and dynamical changes in natural systems, including the quality of reconstructed attractors that underlie cross-mapping. We illustrate these challenges by analyzing time series of reportable childhood infections in New York City and Chicago during the pre-vaccine era. We comment on the statistical and conceptual challenges that currently limit the use of state-space reconstruction in causal inference.

  5. Relation between Resting State Front-Parietal EEG Coherence and Executive Function in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Hiroko; Akimoto, Takayoshi; Shiota, Hiroshi; Kamei, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the relation between executive dysfunction (ED) in Parkinson's disease (PD) and resting state functional connectivity evaluated using electroencephalography (EEG) coherence. Methods. Sixty-eight nondemented sporadic PD patients were assessed using the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) to evaluate executive function. EEG coherence in the left frontoparietal electrode pair (F3-P3) and the right frontoparietal electrode pair (F4-P4) was analyzed in the alpha and theta range. The BADS scores were compared across the coherence groups, and the multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the contribution of confounders. Results. The standardized BADS score was significantly lower in the low F3-P3 coherence group in the alpha range (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.032), though there was no difference between F4-P4 coherence group in the alpha range, F3-P3, and F4-P4 coherence groups in the theta range and the standardized BADS score. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the significant relation between the F3-P3 coherence group in alpha range and age-controlled standardized BADS score (p = 0.039, 95% CI = 1.002–1.062). Conclusion. The decrease in resting state functional connectivity between the frontal and parietal cortices especially in the left side is related to ED in PD. PMID:27433473

  6. Altered Resting State Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Mild to Moderate Stage Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by dopamine depletion in the striatum. One consistent pathophysiological hallmark of PD is an increase in spontaneous oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical networks. We evaluated these effects using resting state functional connectivity MRI in mild to moderate stage Parkinson's patients on and off l-DOPA and age-matched controls using six different striatal seed regions. We observed an overall increase in the strength of cortico-striatal functional connectivity in PD patients off l-DOPA compared to controls. This enhanced connectivity was down-regulated by l-DOPA as shown by an overall decrease in connectivity strength, particularly within motor cortical regions. We also performed a frequency content analysis of the BOLD signal time course extracted from the six striatal seed regions. PD off l-DOPA exhibited increased power in the frequency band 0.02–0.05 Hz compared to controls and to PD on l-DOPA. The l-DOPA associated decrease in the power of this frequency range modulated the l-DOPA associated decrease in connectivity strength between striatal seeds and the thalamus. In addition, the l-DOPA associated decrease in power in this frequency band correlated with the l-DOPA associated improvement in cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that PD and l-DOPA modulate striatal resting state BOLD signal oscillations and cortico-striatal network coherence. PMID:21206528

  7. State-of-the-art of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease research in 2008

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne V

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are two of the leading causes of chronic intestinal conditions in the world. This issue of World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG) presents a series of papers from world experts who discuss the current knowledge and opinions on these important conditions. Although great strides have been made in the diagnosis, treatment and pathology of IBS and IBD; much has yet to be explained. The etiologies and risk factors of these multifactorial conditions remain elusive. Specific diagnostic biomarkers need to be developed and safer treatments developed. The burden of IBS and IBD on the healthcare system is felt with repeated medical care visits and high costs. IBS and IBD patients can account for 30%-50% of office visits at gastroenterology services/clinics. Over one million people have IBD in the United States, with 30 000 new cases being diagnosed every year. One-quarter million people in the UK are afflicted with IBD. The cost of medical care in the United States for IBD is estimated to be $1.8 billion/year. PMID:18461647

  8. Limits to Causal Inference with State-Space Reconstruction for Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are notorious for their complex dynamics, which make it difficult to fit models to test hypotheses. Methods based on state-space reconstruction have been proposed to infer causal interactions in noisy, nonlinear dynamical systems. These “model-free” methods are collectively known as convergent cross-mapping (CCM). Although CCM has theoretical support, natural systems routinely violate its assumptions. To identify the practical limits of causal inference under CCM, we simulated the dynamics of two pathogen strains with varying interaction strengths. The original method of CCM is extremely sensitive to periodic fluctuations, inferring interactions between independent strains that oscillate with similar frequencies. This sensitivity vanishes with alternative criteria for inferring causality. However, CCM remains sensitive to high levels of process noise and changes to the deterministic attractor. This sensitivity is problematic because it remains challenging to gauge noise and dynamical changes in natural systems, including the quality of reconstructed attractors that underlie cross-mapping. We illustrate these challenges by analyzing time series of reportable childhood infections in New York City and Chicago during the pre-vaccine era. We comment on the statistical and conceptual challenges that currently limit the use of state-space reconstruction in causal inference. PMID:28030639

  9. Infectious disease surveillance in the United States and the United Kingdom: from public goods to the challenges of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Sorenson, Corinna

    2011-02-01

    Infectious diseases are a long-standing and continuing threat to health and welfare, with their containment dependent on national disease surveillance and response capacities. This article discusses infectious disease surveillance in the United States and the United Kingdom, examining historical national traditions for identifying and controlling infectious disease risks and how globalization and technical advances have influenced the evolution of their respective approaches. The two systems developed in different but parallel ways. In the United States, surveillance remained quite localized at the state level until the early twentieth century and still retains many of those features. The U.K. approach became centralized from the latter part of the nineteenth century and has principally remained so. In both cases, disease surveillance was traditionally conceived as a public good, where national or local authorities held sovereign rights and power to protect public health. With the increasing globalized nature of infectious disease, such notions shifted toward surveillance as a global public good, with countries responding in turn by creating new global health governance arrangements and regulations. However, the limitations of current surveillance systems and the strong hold of national interests place into question the provision of surveillance as a global public good. These issues are further highlighted with the introduction of new surveillance technologies, which offer opportunities for improved disease detection and identification but also create potential tensions between individual rights, corporate profit, equitable access to technology, and national and global public goods.

  10. Intractable depression successfully treated with a combination of autogenic training and high-dose antidepressant in department of otorhinolaryngology: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients suffering from ear discomfort are commonly encountered in the department of otolaryngology. If various clinical examinations do not reveal any objective findings, then the patients are referred to the department of internal medicine or psychiatry. Psychotherapy is recommended in some cases. This paper describes the successful administration of autogenic training in a patient suffering from ear discomfort due to major depression. Case presentation We present a case of intractable depression that was successfully treated with a combination of psychotherapy, administered by a clinical psychologist, and high-dose antidepressant. The patient was a 36-year-old female with hearing discomfort in her left ear. In 2003, she experienced insomnia and an appetite loss, and her condition was diagnosed as major depression along with an avoidant personality disorder. Her depression has not been improved with antidepressant treatment for 3 years in department of psychosomatic medicine. She was referred to our department because of ear discomfort in her left ear. There was no abnormality in her physical examinations. She wanted to be treated in department of otorhinolaryngology. We increased the dose of fluvoxamine maleate up to 200 mg/day, and introduced cognitive therapy and autogenic training by a clinical psychologist. Eventually, her depressive state as well as the hearing complaint was markedly alleviated. Conclusion Autogenic training can be a viable and acceptable treatment option for patients who fail to respond to other therapies. This case emphasizes the importance of autogenic training as a method to control physical symptom of depression. PMID:20184684

  11. Clustering of Five Health-Related Behaviors for Chronic Disease Prevention Among Adults, United States, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Janet B.; Wheaton, Anne G.; Kanny, Dafna; Cunningham, Timothy J.; Lu, Hua; Onufrak, Stephen; Malarcher, Ann M.; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Giles, Wayne H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Five key health-related behaviors for chronic disease prevention are never smoking, getting regular physical activity, consuming no alcohol or only moderate amounts, maintaining a normal body weight, and obtaining daily sufficient sleep. The objective of this study was to estimate the clustering of these 5 health-related behaviors among adults aged 21 years or older in each state and the District of Columbia and to assess geographic variation in clustering. Methods We used data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to assess the clustering of the 5 behaviors among 395,343 BRFSS respondents aged 21 years or older. The 5 behaviors were defined as currently not smoking cigarettes, meeting the aerobic physical activity recommendation, consuming no alcohol or only moderate amounts, maintaining a normal body mass index (BMI), and sleeping at least 7 hours per 24-hour period. Prevalence of having 4 or 5 of these behaviors, by state, was also examined. Results Among US adults, 81.6% were current nonsmokers, 63.9% obtained 7 hours or more sleep per day, 63.1% reported moderate or no alcohol consumption, 50.4% met physical activity recommendations, and 32.5% had a normal BMI. Only 1.4% of respondents engaged in none of the 5 behaviors; 8.4%, 1 behavior; 24.3%, 2 behaviors; 35.4%, 3 behaviors; and 24.3%, 4 behaviors; only 6.3% reported engaging in all 5 behaviors. The highest prevalence of engaging in 4 or 5 behaviors was clustered in the Pacific and Rocky Mountain states. Lowest prevalence was in the southern states and along the Ohio River. Conclusion Additional efforts are needed to increase the proportion of the population that engages in all 5 health-related behaviors and to eliminate geographic variation. Collaborative efforts in health care systems, communities, work sites, and schools can promote all 5 behaviors and produce population-wide changes, especially among the socioeconomically disadvantaged. PMID:27236381

  12. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  13. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  14. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  15. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, PLEUROPNEUMONIA, RINDERPEST, AND CERTAIN OTHER COMMUNICABLE DISEASES...

  16. Virus diseases of salmonidae in the western United States. II. Aspects of pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasutake, W.T.; Parisot, T.J.; Klontz, G.W.

    1965-01-01

    This study was undertaken to initiate a series concerning pathogeneses of infectious diseases of salmonids.  The two viral diseases covered in this paper are the Oregon sockeye disease (OSD) and Sacramento River chinook disease (SRCD). Some preliminary data on pathology of the corresponding material from the hatchery epizootics will also be described and discussed.

  17. An observational study of the temporal and spatial patterns of Marek's-disease-associated leukosis condemnation of young chickens in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease, a disease primarily affecting immature chickens, is a worldwide problem that has on at least three occasions threatened the poultry industry in the United States. A rich dataset to study the epidemiology of this disease is available because the United States Department of Agricultu...

  18. Proinflammatory and Prothrombotic State in Subjects with Different Glucose Tolerance Status before Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Isordia-Salas, Irma; Galván-Plata, María Eugenia; Leaños-Miranda, Alfredo; Aguilar-Sosa, Eberth; Anaya-Gómez, Francisco; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Santiago-Germán, David

    2014-01-01

    Background. Inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and atherothrombosis. Aim. To determine differences in levels of proinflammatory and prothrombotic markers such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and fibrinogen in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), prediabetes, and T2DM and to establish their relationship with other cardiovascular risk factors before clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease. Methods. We conducted a nonrandomized, cross-sectional assay in a hospital at México City. The levels of hs-CRP and fibrinogen were measured and compared according to glucose tolerance status. Results. We enrolled 1047 individuals and they were distributed into NGT n = 473, pre-DM n = 250, and T2DM n = 216. There was a statistical difference between NGT and T2DM groups for fibrinogen (P = 0.01) and hs-CRP (P = 0.05). Fibrinogen and hs-CRP showed a significant positive correlation coefficient (r = 0.53, P<0.0001). In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, the variability in fibrinogen levels was explained by age, HbA1c, and hs-CRP (adjusted R2 = 0.31, P<0.0001), and for hs-CRP it was explained by BMI and fibrinogen (adjusted R2 = 0.33, P<0.0001). Conclusion. Inflammation and prothrombotic state are present in people with T2DM lacking cardiovascular disease. Fibrinogen and Hs-CRP are positively correlated. Fibrinogen and hs-CRP concentrations are predominantly determined by BMI rather than glucose levels. PMID:24772446

  19. Intradural approach to selective stimulation in the spinal cord for treatment of intractable pain: design principles and wireless protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M. A.; Utz, M.; Brennan, T. J.; Dalm, B. D.; Viljoen, S.; Jeffery, N. D.; Gillies, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    We introduce an intradural approach to spinal cord stimulation for the relief of intractable pain, and describe the biophysical rationale that underlies its design and performance requirements. The proposed device relies on wireless, inductive coupling between a pial surface implant and its epidural controller, and we present the results of benchtop experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency-modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between micro-coil antennae scaled to the ≈ 1 cm dimensions of the implant, at power levels of about 5 mW. Plans for materials selection, microfabrication, and other aspects of future development are presented and discussed.

  20. Spinal cord stimulation for intractable chronic upper abdominal pain: a case report of the first patient in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahrouqi, Haitham; Munro, Zea; Acland, Richard H; MacFarlane, Martin R

    2012-12-14

    We present the first patient in New Zealand to undergo Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) for intractable upper abdominal pain. The patient was a 53-year-old man with a 20-year history of debilitating upper abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic divisum. Prior to the SCS, he was prescribed 680 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day. Despite the intense analgesia, he still suffered monthly attacks of upper abdominal pain requiring hospitalisation. Nine months after implanting a Spinal Cord Stimulator, the monthly attacks ceased, his background pain was effectively controlled and the need for opioids decreased to 510 mg of morphine sulphate equi-analgesia a day.

  1. Percutaneous transhepatic obliteration and percutaneous transhepatic sclerotherapy for intractable hepatic encephalopathy and gastric varices improves the hepatic function reserve.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toru; Imai, Michitaka; Ko, Masayoshi; Sato, Hiroki; Nozawa, Yujiro; Sano, Tomoe; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO) and percutaneous transhepatic sclerotherapy (PTS) are widely performed as an emergency measure in cases of variceal hemorrhage and intractable hepatic encephalopathy. The PTO/PTS technique is capable of directly blocking the blood supply in cases in which balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) is not effective, or in cases with complicated collateral flow. Although PTO/PTS is not currently the first choice due to the invasiveness of transhepatic puncture, this procedure can modify the blood flow in an antegrade manner. The present study examined the changes in hepatic function reserve following PTO/PTS for intractable hepatic encephalopathy and/or gastric varices. In total, the study included 37 patients (mean age, 61.75±12.77 years; age range, 32-88 years; male to female ratio, 23:14) with a variety of gastrorenal shunts, or B-RTO-intractable hepatic encephalopathy and gastric varices without gastrorenal shunts. The patients underwent PTO/PTS by embolizing a microcoil or injection of a sclerosing agent (5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol). Alterations in hepatic function reserve prior to and following the procedure were compared. The patients were treated for hepatic encephalopathy in 11 patients, gastric varices in 19 patients, and both conditions in 7 patients. The results indicated that the blood ammonia level improved from 135.76±75.23 mg/dl to 88.00±42.16 and 61.81±33.75 mg/dl at 3 and 6 months after therapy, respectively. In addition, the Child-Pugh score improved from 8.48±2.01 prior to therapy to 7.70±1.84 and 7.22±2.01 at 3 and 6 months after the procedure, respectively. Although there was a concern that PTO/PTS may cause complications due to an increase in portal venous pressure (PVP) arising from shunt occlusion, no severe complications were observed. In conclusion, for patients with various gastrorenal shunts or those with B-RTO-intractable hepatic encephalopathy and gastric

  2. Information processing in micro and meso-scale neural circuits during normal and disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Francisco

    techniques. We show that we can further reduce the dimensionality of these networks by identifying 'key-interactions' that are informative of the overall subnetwork state at any given point in time. This study highlights that redundancy in ECoG data can be exploited to identify low-dimensional representation of brain-wide subnetworks. Taken together, these studies represent the development of multiple technological and analytical techniques aimed at understanding how information is processed and modulated at emergent circuit and network levels as well as understanding their dysfunction in a neuropsychiatric disease state.

  3. Early-Life State-of-Residence Characteristics and Later Life Hypertension, Diabetes, and Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Ellen A.; Modrek, Sepideh; Mokyr Horner, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Benjamin; Costello, Sadie; Cantley, Linda F.; Slade, Martin D.; Cullen, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined how state characteristics in early life are associated with individual chronic disease later in life. Methods. We assessed early-life state of residence using the first 3 digits of social security numbers from blue- and white-collar workers from a US manufacturing company. Longitudinal data were available from 1997 to 2012, with 305 936 person-years of observation. Disease was assessed using medical claims. We modeled associations using pooled logistic regression with inverse probability of censoring weights. Results. We found small but statistically significant associations between early-state-of-residence characteristics and later life hypertension, diabetes, and ischemic heart disease. The most consistent associations were with income inequality, percentage non-White, and education. These associations were similar after statistically controlling for individual socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and current state characteristics. Conclusions. Characteristics of the state in which an individual lives early in life are associated with prevalence of chronic disease later in life, with a strength of association equivalent to genetic associations found for these same health outcomes. PMID:26066927

  4. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Ford, Earl S; Croft, Janet B; Merrick, Melissa T; Rolle, Italia V; Giles, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population. Materials and methods Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10), living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81), witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72), and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80) during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs. Reporting ≥5 ACEs (PR =2.08, 95% CI: 1.55, 2.80) compared to none was associated with a higher likelihood of COPD among women only. Conclusion ACEs are related to COPD, especially among women. These findings underscore the need for further research that examines sex-specific differences and the possible mechanisms linking ACEs and COPD. This work adds to a growing body of research suggesting that ACEs may contribute to health problems later in life and suggesting a need for program and policy solutions. PMID:25298732

  5. Low-frequency fluctuation amplitude analysis of resting-state fMRI in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloigner, Julie; Kim, Yeun; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease may result in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are no dependable biomarkers to predict impending strokes. In this study, we analyzed neuronal processes at resting state and more particularly how this disease affects the default mode network. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations was used to reflect areas of spontaneous BOLD signal across brain regions. We compared the activations of sickle cell disease patients to a control group using variance analysis and t-test. Significant regional differences among the two groups were observed, especially in the default mode network areas and cortical regions near large cerebral arteries. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes activation modifications near vessels, and these changes could be used as a biomarker of the disease.

  6. The Discovery of Novel Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Biomarkers in Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular Disease: The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Metzinger, Laurent; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in western countries and also responsible of a huge burden in terms of disability, functional decline, and healthcare costs. Biomarkers are measurable biological elements that reflect particular physiological or pathological states or predisposition towards diseases and they are currently widely studied in medicine and especially in CD. In this context, biomarkers can also be used to assess the severity or the evolution of several diseases, as well as the effectiveness of particular therapies. Genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have opened new windows on disease phenomena and may permit in the next future an effective development of novel diagnostic and prognostic medicine in order to better prevent or treat CD. This review will consider the current evidence of novel biomarkers with clear implications in the improvement of risk assessment, prevention strategies, and medical decision making in the field of CD. PMID:27298828

  7. Resting-state frontostriatal functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease-related apathy.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Segura, Bàrbara; Garrido-Millan, Jose Luis; Marti, Maria-José; Compta, Yaroslau; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Tolosa, Eduardo; Junque, Carme

    2015-04-15

    One of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) is apathy, affecting between 23% and 70% of patients and thought to be related to frontostriatal dopamine deficits. In the current study, we assessed functional resting-state frontostriatal connectivity and structural changes associated with the presence of apathy in a large sample of PD subjects and healthy controls, while controlling for the presence of comorbid depression and cognitive decline. Thirty-one healthy controls (HC) and 62 age-, sex-, and education-matched PD patients underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Apathy symptoms were evaluated with the Apathy Scale (AS). The 11 Beck Depression Inventory-II items that measure dysphoric mood symptoms as well as relevant neuropsychological scores were used as nuisance factors in connectivity analyses. Voxel-wise analyses of functional connectivity between frontal lobes (limbic, executive, rostral motor, and caudal motor regions), striata (limbic, executive, sensorimotor regions), and thalami were performed. Subcortical volumetry/shape analysis and fronto-subcortical voxel-based morphometry were performed to assess associated structural changes. Twenty-five PD patients were classified as apathetic (AS > 13). Apathetic PD patients showed functional connectivity reductions compared with HC and with non-apathetic patients, mainly in left-sided circuits, and predominantly involving limbic striatal and frontal territories. Similarly, severity of apathy negatively correlated with connectivity in these circuits. No significant effects were found in structural analyses. Our results indicate that the presence of apathy in PD is associated with functional connectivity reductions in frontostriatal circuits, predominating in the left hemisphere and mainly involving its limbic components.

  8. Classification of Single Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Individuals from Cortical Sources of Resting State EEG Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Triggiani, Antonio I.; Lizio, Roberta; Cordone, Susanna; Tattoli, Giacomo; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Ferri, Raffaele; Nobili, Flavio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Millán-Calenti, José C.; Buján, Ana; Tortelli, Rosanna; Cardinali, Valentina; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Giannini, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pantaleo; Armenise, Silvia; Buenza, Grazia; Scianatico, Gaetano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; del Percio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown abnormal power and functional connectivity of resting state electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in groups of Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy elderly (Nold) subjects. Here we tested the best classification rate of 120 AD patients and 100 matched Nold subjects using EEG markers based on cortical sources of power and functional connectivity of these rhythms. EEG data were recorded during resting state eyes-closed condition. Exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) estimated the power and functional connectivity of cortical sources in frontal, central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic regions. Delta (2–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha 1 (8–10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5–13 Hz), beta 1 (13–20 Hz), beta 2 (20–30 Hz), and gamma (30–40 Hz) were the frequency bands of interest. The classification rates of interest were those with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) higher than 0.7 as a threshold for a moderate classification rate (i.e., 70%). Results showed that the following EEG markers overcame this threshold: (i) central, parietal, occipital, temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 1 current density; (ii) central, parietal, occipital temporal, and limbic delta/alpha 2 current density; (iii) frontal theta/alpha 1 current density; (iv) occipital delta/alpha 1 inter-hemispherical connectivity; (v) occipital-temporal theta/alpha 1 right and left intra-hemispherical connectivity; and (vi) parietal-limbic alpha 1 right intra-hemispherical connectivity. Occipital delta/alpha 1 current density showed the best classification rate (sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 78%, accuracy of 75.5%, and AUROC of 82%). These results suggest that EEG source markers can classify Nold and AD individuals with a moderate classification rate higher than 80%. PMID:26941594

  9. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector- and rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, D J; Reiter, P; Ebi, K L; Yap, W; Nasci, R; Patz, J A

    2001-01-01

    Diseases such as plague, typhus, malaria, yellow fever, and dengue fever, transmitted between humans by blood-feeding arthropods, were once common in the United States. Many of these diseases are no longer present, mainly because of changes in land use, agricultural methods, residential patterns, human behavior, and vector control. However, diseases that may be transmitted to humans from wild birds or mammals (zoonoses) continue to circulate in nature in many parts of the country. Most vector-borne diseases exhibit a distinct seasonal pattern, which clearly suggests that they are weather sensitive. Rainfall, temperature, and other weather variables affect in many ways both the vectors and the pathogens they transmit. For example, high temperatures can increase or reduce survival rate, depending on the vector, its behavior, ecology, and many other factors. Thus, the probability of transmission may or may not be increased by higher temperatures. The tremendous growth in international travel increases the risk of importation of vector-borne diseases, some of which can be transmitted locally under suitable circumstances at the right time of the year. But demographic and sociologic factors also play a critical role in determining disease incidence, and it is unlikely that these diseases will cause major epidemics in the United States if the public health infrastructure is maintained and improved. PMID:11359689

  10. Tick-borne bacterial, rickettsial, spirochetal, and protozoal infectious diseases in the United States: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jarrett R; Warmack, Scott; Gubbins, Paul O

    2005-02-01

    Approximately 900 tick species exist worldwide, and they parasitize a variety of mammals, including humans; thus, ticks play a significant role in the transmission of infectious diseases. In the United States, tick-borne diseases are seasonally and geographically distributed; they typically occur during spring and summer but can occur throughout the year. Tick-borne diseases are endemic to a variety of geographic regions of the United States, depending on the species of tick commonly found in a specific locale. Specific tick-borne diseases are difficult to diagnose. Most patients have vague constitutional symptoms and nonspecific laboratory findings. Initially, serologic methods are of little benefit because they lack sensitivity early in the disease course. Therefore, a thorough history and physical examination are necessary for establishing a diagnosis. Antimicrobial regimens for tick-borne infections are poorly studied but well established. Tetracyclines and rifampin form the cornerstones of therapy for most tick-borne infections, but these agents may not be suitable for all patient populations. Therefore, no single agent can be chosen empirically to treat all tick-borne diseases. Because pharmacists are the most accessible health care providers, they are often asked how to treat tick-borne diseases. Thus, practitioners should be familiar with the ticks that inhabit their locale.

  11. Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery after Ebola Virus Disease and Implications for Infection Control in Obstetric Services, United States.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Amanda; Jamieson, Denise J; Kpaduwa, Julius; Schrier, Sarah; Kim, Moon; Green, Nicole M; Ströher, Ute; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bell, Michael; Rollin, Pierre E; Mascola, Laurene

    2016-07-01

    Many of the survivors of the 2014-2015 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in western Africa were women of childbearing age. Limited clinical and laboratory data exist that describe these women's pregnancies and outcomes. We report the case of an EVD survivor who became pregnant and delivered her child in the United States, and we discuss implications of this case for infection control practices in obstetric services. Hospitals in the United States must be prepared to care for EVD survivors.

  12. Surveillance and monitoring of white-tailed deer for chronic wasting disease in the northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Tyler S.; Schuler, Krysten L.; Walter, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease that affects both wild and captive cervid populations. In the past 45 y, CWD has spread from northern Colorado to all bordering states, as well as the midwestern United States (Midwest) and northeastern United States (Northeast), Canada, and South Korea. Because CWD is a relatively new issue for wildlife management agencies in the Northeast, we surveyed a representative (e.g., cervid biologist, wildlife veterinarian) from 14 states to gain a better understanding of state-specific surveillance measures. Between 2002 and 2012, New York (37,093) and Pennsylvania (35,324) tested the greatest number of harvested white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus in the Northeast. Additionally, the 14 states surveyed have tested 121,730 harvested deer, or approximately 15,216/y, since CWD was first detected in 2005. The most common tissues used by agencies in the Northeast for testing were retropharyngeal lymph nodes, which have been determined to be the most reliable in detecting CWD in cervids. Understanding CWD surveillance efforts at a regional scale can help to provide guidance for the development of new surveillance plans or the improvement of existing ones. Furthermore, collaborations among state and regional agencies in the Northeast may attempt to identify deficiencies in surveillance by state or subregion.

  13. Redox state and O2*- production in neutrophils of Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Chiara; Favilli, Fabio; Catarzi, Serena; Marcucci, Tommaso; Fazi, Marilena; Tonelli, Francesco; Vincenzini, Maria T; Iantomasi, Teresa

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the intracellular redox state and respiratory burst (RB) in neutrophils of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The intracellular redox state and RB in neutrophils was assessed by the superoxide anion (O2*-) production induced in these cells after stimulation by various factors related to the molecular mechanisms that, if altered, may be responsible for an abnormal immune response. This can, in part, cause the onset of inflammation and tissue damage seen in CD. This study demonstrated a decreased glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio index of an increased oxidative state in CD patient neutrophils. Moreover, our findings showed a decrease in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha)- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced O2*- production in CD patient neutrophils adherent to fibronectin as compared with controls. A decreased adhesion was also demonstrated. For this reason, the involvement of altered mechanisms of protein kinase C (PKC) and beta-integrin activation in CD patient neutrophils is suggested. These data also showed that the harmful effects of TNF-alpha cannot be caused by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by neutrophils. Decreased cell viability after a prolonged time of adhesion (20 hrs) was also measured in CD patient neutrophils. The findings of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a compound recently used in CD therapy, is able to activate the RB for a prolonged time both in control and CD patient neutrophils. Increased viability of CD patient neutrophils caused by GM-CSF stimulation was also observed. In conclusion, our results indicate that decreased O2*- production and adhesion, caused, in part, by an anomalous response to TNF-alpha, together with low GSH level and low cell viability, may be responsible for the defective neutrophil function found in CD patients. This can contribute to the

  14. Clinical Management of Ebola Virus Disease in the United States and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Uyeki, Timothy M.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Davey, Richard T.; Liddell, Allison M.; Wolf, Timo; Vetter, Pauline; Schmiedel, Stefan; Grünewald, Thomas; Jacobs, Michael; Arribas, Jose R.; Evans, Laura; Hewlett, Angela L.; Brantsaeter, Arne B.; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Rapp, Christophe; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Gutman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Available data on the characteristics of patients with Ebola virus disease (EVD) and clinical management of EVD in settings outside West Africa, as well as the complications observed in those patients, are limited. Methods We reviewed available clinical, laboratory, and virologic data from all patients with laboratory-confirmed Ebola virus infection who received care in U.S. and European hospitals from August 2014 through December 2015. Results A total of 27 patients (median age, 36 years [range, 25 to 75]) with EVD received care; 19 patients (70%) were male, 9 of 26 patients (35%) had coexisting conditions, and 22 (81%) were health care personnel. Of the 27 patients, 24 (89%) were medically evacuated from West Africa or were exposed to and infected with Ebola virus in West Africa and had onset of illness and laboratory confirmation of Ebola virus infection in Europe or the United States, and 3 (11%) acquired EVD in the United States or Europe. At the onset of illness, the most common signs and symptoms were fatigue (20 patients [80%]) and fever or feverishness (17 patients [68%]). During the clinical course, the predominant findings included diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia; 14 patients (52%) had hypoxemia, and 9 (33%) had oliguria, of whom 5 had anuria. Aminotransferase levels peaked at a median of 9 days after the onset of illness. Nearly all the patients received intravenous fluids and electrolyte supplementation; 9 (33%) received noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation; 5 (19%) received continuous renal-replacement therapy; 22 (81%) received empirical antibiotics; and 23 (85%) received investigational therapies (19 [70%] received at least two experimental interventions). Ebola viral RNA levels in blood peaked at a median of 7 days after the onset of illness, and the median time from the onset of symptoms to clearance of viremia was 17.5 days. A total of 5 patients died, including 3 who had

  15. Undernutrition state in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A critical appraisal on diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Akner, Gunnar; Larsson, Kjell

    2016-08-01

    'Undernutrition state' (UNS) is an ominous condition, in particular when associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this review we discuss pathophysiological mechanisms and how UNS is defined and diagnosed. It seems unlikely that COPD-patients with established UNS have similar potential of reversibility (treatability) upon nutrition interventions as patients at a risk of developing such a condition, i.e. patients with low energy/nutrient intake, since pathophysiological, biochemical and metabolic conditions may differ substantially. We summarize the results of 7 of 17 published randomized controlled trials of nutritional supplementation in COPD-patients with defined UNS in the latest Cochrane review (2012). We thus excluded 10 of 17 trials included in review (2012), mostly because those studies also included patients with 'risk of' UNS. The seven included trials exhibit extensive heterogeneity for all studied variables. Most studies did not show beneficial effects of nutritional supplementation, although some reported minor increase in body weight and physical function of unclear clinical relevance. In contrast to the Cochrane review we conclude that it is difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding the effect of nutritional supplements in patients with COPD and UNS. Improved knowledge in this area is of utmost importance and some factors which should be considered in future studies are suggested.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne disease outbreaks: United States, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Grass, J E; Richardson, L C; Nisler, A L; Bicknese, A S; Gould, L H

    2017-03-01

    Although most non-typhoidal Salmonella illnesses are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment is critical for invasive infections. To describe resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne outbreaks in the United States, we linked outbreaks submitted to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System to isolate susceptibility data in the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Resistant outbreaks were defined as those linked to one or more isolates with resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Multidrug resistant (MDR) outbreaks had at least one isolate resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Twenty-one per cent (37/176) of linked outbreaks were resistant. In outbreaks attributed to a single food group, 73% (16/22) of resistant outbreaks and 46% (31/68) of non-resistant outbreaks were attributed to foods from land animals (P < 0·05). MDR Salmonella with clinically important resistance caused 29% (14/48) of outbreaks from land animals and 8% (3/40) of outbreaks from plant products (P < 0·01). In our study, resistant Salmonella infections were more common in outbreaks attributed to foods from land animals than outbreaks from foods from plants or aquatic animals. Antimicrobial susceptibility data on isolates from foodborne Salmonella outbreaks can help determine which foods are associated with resistant infections.

  17. Role of cilia in normal pancreas function and in diseased states.

    PubMed

    diIorio, Philip; Rittenhouse, Ann R; Bortell, Rita; Jurczyk, Agata

    2014-06-01

    Primary cilia play an essential role in modulating signaling cascades that shape cellular responses to environmental cues to maintain proper tissue development. Mutations in primary cilium proteins have been linked to several rare developmental disorders, collectively known as ciliopathies. Together with other disorders associated with dysfunctional cilia/centrosomes, affected individuals have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, neurologic disorders, and diabetes. In pancreatic tissues, cilia are found exclusively in islet and ductal cells where they play an essential role in pancreatic tissue organization. Their absence or disorganization leads to pancreatic duct abnormalities, acinar cell loss, polarity defects, and dysregulated insulin secretion. Cilia in pancreatic tissues are hubs for cellular signaling. Many signaling components, such as Hh, Notch, and Wnt, localize to pancreatic primary cilia and are necessary for proper development of pancreatic epithelium and β-cell morphogenesis. Receptors for neuroendocrine hormones, such as Somatostatin Receptor 3, also localize to the cilium and may play a more direct role in controlling insulin secretion due to somatostatin's inhibitory function. Finally, unique calcium signaling, which is at the heart of β-cell function, also occurs in primary cilia. Whereas voltage-gated calcium channels trigger insulin secretion and serve a variety of homeostatic functions in β-cells, transient receptor potential channels regulate calcium levels within the cilium that may serve as a feedback mechanism, regulating insulin secretion. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the role of primary cilia in normal pancreas function and in the diseased state.

  18. [Description of chagas disease in the Valle de Iguala, Guerrero state, Mexico- Marco].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Flores, Marco Antonio; Valle-De La Cruz, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    There are reports regarding the presence of triatomine vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, and infected individuals on the coast and zones south of the State of Guerrero, Mexico. Nonetheless, there are no completed reports in the Valley of Iguala. To know with greater precision endemic zones, seropositive individuals and their health condition, T. cruzi-infected triatomines and characteristics of dwellings were studied. Seroprevalence was 1.8% by indirect ELISA and latex agglutination techniques were carried out in serum of 450 individuals of three municipalities of the Valley of Iguala. We reported presence of triatomine and conditions of dwellings. Of 71 triatomines collected, 38.2% were infected with T. cruzi. Triatoma pallidipennis was the only triatomine species found. No seropositive persons presented intestinal, or cardiac problems. The greatest percentage of infected triatomines was observed in rural zones as compared to urban. Results suggest considerable risk of infection in the Valley of Iguala but studies regarding the infectivity capacity of T. cruzi strains are required.

  19. Resting-state functional connectivity of dentate nucleus is associated with tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huizi; Chen, Huimin; Fang, Jinping; Gao, Liyan; Ma, Lingyan; Wu, Tao; Hou, Yanan; Zhang, Jiarong; Feng, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit has been indicated important for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the role of dentate nucleus (DN) in parkinsonian tremor remains unclear. To investigate whether DN plays a role in PD tremor, we recruited 50 PD and 29 age-matched health controls (HC). The patients were divided into tremor-dominant (TD) and non-tremor-dominant (NTD) groups. We collected resting-state fMRIs data for each subject. The bilateral DN was then chosen as the region of interest to examine PD tremor-related network changes, as well as its correlation with tremor severity. Voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis revealed that the bilateral DN had higher connectivity with the bilateral cerebellar anterior lobe, and had lower connectivity with the bilateral prefrontal cortex in TD compared to the HC and NTD groups. Functional connectivity of the bilateral DN with the bilateral cerebellar posterior lobe was also higher in TD than NTD group. Functional connectivity between the bilateral DN and the bilateral cerebellar posterior lobe showed positive correlation with tremor severity, while that between the bilateral DN and the bilateral prefrontal cortex displayed negative correlation. Our study demonstrates higher dentato-cerebellar connectivity and lower dentato-prefrontal connectivity in TD patients, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of PD tremor. And we conclude that DN might be associated with the pathogenesis of PD tremor.

  20. Cannabinoid drugs and enhancement of endocannabinoid responses: strategies for a wide array of disease states.

    PubMed

    Karanian, David A; Bahr, Ben A

    2006-09-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system has revealed potential avenues to treat many disease states. Medicinal indications of cannabinoid drugs including compounds that result in enhanced endocannabinoid responses (EER) have expanded markedly in recent years. The wide range of indications covers chemotherapy complications, tumor growth, addiction, pain, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, inflammation, eating disorders, age-related neurodegenerative disorders, as well as epileptic seizures, traumatic brain injury, cerebral ischemia, and other excitotoxic insults. Indeed, a great effort has led to the discovery of agents that selectively activate the cannabinoid system or that enhance the endogenous pathways of cannabinergic signaling. The endocannabinoid system is comprised of three primary components: (i) cannabinoid receptors, (ii) endocannabinoid transport system, and (iii) hydrolysis enzymes that break down the endogenous ligands. Two known endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), are lipid molecules that are greatly elevated in response to a variety of pathological events. This increase in endocannabinoid levels is suggested to be part of an on-demand compensatory response. Furthermore, activation of signaling pathways mediated by the endogenous cannabinoid system promotes repair and cell survival. Similar cell maintenance effects are elicited by EER through inhibitors of the endocannabinoid deactivation processes (i.e., internalization and hydrolysis). The therapeutic potential of the endocannabinoid system has yet to be fully determined, and the number of medical maladies that may be treated will likely continue to grow. This review will underline studies that demonstrate medicinal applications for agents that influence the endocannabinoid system.

  1. Complexity analysis of resting-state MEG activity in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos; Olde Dubbelink, Kim T E; Stam, Cornelis J; Abásolo, Daniel; Berendse, Henk W; Hornero, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze resting-state brain activity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a degenerative disorder of the nervous system. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were recorded with a 151-channel whole-head radial gradiometer MEG system in 18 early-stage untreated PD patients and 20 age-matched control subjects. Artifact-free epochs of 4 s (1250 samples) were analyzed with Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), applying two- and three-symbol sequence conversion methods. The results showed that MEG signals from PD patients are less complex than control subjects' recordings. We found significant group differences (p-values <0.01) for the 10 major cortical areas analyzed (e.g., bilateral frontal, central, temporal, parietal, and occipital regions). In addition, using receiver-operating characteristic curves with a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, a classification accuracy of 81.58% was obtained. In order to investigate the best combination of LZC results for classification purposes, a forward stepwise linear discriminant analysis with leave-one out cross-validation was employed. LZC results (three-symbol sequence conversion) from right parietal and temporal brain regions were automatically selected by the model. With this procedure, an accuracy of 84.21% (77.78% sensitivity, 90.0% specificity) was achieved. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness of LZC to detect an abnormal type of dynamics associated with PD.

  2. Multiscale entropy analysis of resting-state magnetoencephalogram with tensor factorisations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Javier; Acar, Evrim; Fernández, Alberto; Bro, Rasmus

    2015-10-01

    Tensor factorisations have proven useful to model amplitude and spectral information of brain recordings. Here, we assess the usefulness of tensor factorisations in the multiway analysis of other brain signal features in the context of complexity measures recently proposed to inspect multiscale dynamics. We consider the "refined composite multiscale entropy" (rcMSE), which computes entropy "profiles" showing levels of physiological complexity over temporal scales for individual signals. We compute the rcMSE of resting-state magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings from 36 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 26 control subjects. Instead of traditional simple visual examinations, we organise the entropy profiles as a three-way tensor to inspect relationships across temporal and spatial scales and subjects with multiway data analysis techniques based on PARAFAC and PARAFAC2 factorisations. A PARAFAC2 model with two factors was appropriate to account for the interactions in the entropy tensor between temporal scales and MEG channels for all subjects. Moreover, the PARAFAC2 factors had information related to the subjects' diagnosis, achieving a cross-validated area under the ROC curve of 0.77. This confirms the suitability of tensor factorisations to represent electrophysiological brain data efficiently despite the unsupervised nature of these techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neural data analysis'.

  3. The Foot-and-Mouth Disease Carrier State Divergence in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Rekant, Steven I.; Pacheco, Juan M.; Smoliga, George R.; Hartwig, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Luis L.

    2016-01-01

    . IMPORTANCE The existence of a prolonged, asymptomatic carrier state is a political impediment for control and potential eradication of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). When FMD outbreaks occur, they are often extinguished by massive depopulation of livestock due to the fear that some animals may have undiagnosed subclinical infection, despite uncertainty over the biological relevance of FMD virus (FMDV) persistence. The work described here elucidates aspects of the FMDV carrier state in cattle which may facilitate identification and/or abrogation of asymptomatic FMDV infection. The divergence between animals that clear infection and those that develop persistent infection was demonstrated to occur earlier than previously established. The host antiviral response in tissues maintaining persistent FMDV was downregulated, whereas upregulation of IFN-λ mRNA was found in the epithelium of cattle that had recently cleared the infection. This suggests that the clearing of FMDV infection is associated with an enhanced mucosal antiviral response, whereas FMDV persistence is associated with suppression of the host antiviral response. PMID:27147736

  4. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  5. 9 CFR 53.2 - Determination of existence of disease; agreements with States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... poultry) disease prevention, control, and eradication. ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of existence of disease... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY...

  6. Surveillance for Waterborne Disease Outbreaks and Other Health Events Associated with Recreational Water -United States, 2007-2008*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problem/Condition: Since 1978, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have collaborated on the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) for collecting and reporting data on occurrences and causes...

  7. Virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from cormorant and gull species in the states of the Atlantic Flyway in 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) have been the causative agent for die-offs of juvenile double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the northern border-states focused around the Great Lakes of the U.S. in years past. However, the most recent die-off has included not only great cormorants (P...

  8. First report of zebra chip disease and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum on potatoes in Oregon and Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August of 2011, potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers grown in the lower Columbia Basin of southern Washington State and northern Oregon were observed with internal discolorations suggestive of the zebra chip disease (ZC). Symptoms included brown spots, streaks, and stripes in and near the vascular ...

  9. Upregulation of liprin-α1 protein in the temporal neocortex of intractable epileptic patients and experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huan; Wang, Linyuan; Xiao, Fei; Huang, Zuchun; Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Chunlei; Han, Yanbing; Tao, Shuxin; Yang, Hui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2011-08-01

    Intractable epilepsy (IE) patients have synaptic dysfunction. However, the exact mechanism of synaptic function needs further elucidation. The aim of this study was to use immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting to investigate the expression of the Liprin-α1 protein, one of the synapse-associated proteins, in human IE brain tissues and experimental rats and to discuss the possible role of Liprin-α1 in IE. We selected 30 temporal neocortical tissue samples from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 10 histologically normal temporal lobes from controls. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into seven groups; one control group and six groups with epilepsy induced by lithium-pilocarpine administration. Temporal lobe tissues were taken from controls and from rats at 1, 3, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days postseizure. Liprin-α1 was mainly expressed in neurons of human controls and TLE patients and was significantly higher in TLE patients than in controls. Liprin-α1 was also expressed in neurons of control and experimental rats and it was significantly higher in experimental rats than in the control group. The expression of Liprin-α1 in animals in the experimental group gradually increased from Days 1 to 30 postseizure induction and reached a stable level when spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) appeared. These results suggest that an increased expression of Liprin-α1 in the brain may be associated with human IE.

  10. [Selection of drugs suitable for the treatment of intractable chronic pain patients by using drug challenge tests].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kazuo; Arita, Hideko; Nagase, Masaki; Ide, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi; Hayashida, Masakazu

    2008-05-01

    Intractable chronic pain is very difficult to treat. Nowadays, small amounts of drugs, that have different actions on the mechanism of pain relief are administered intravenously, and the effects of the test drugs on individual chronic pain patients are investigated by using the evaluation method of the visual analogue scale (VAS). This will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of pain in each chronic pain patient. Based on this information, drugs that are effective for the treatment of individual chronic pain patients can be prescribed. Drugs that are used for the drug challenge tests are phentolamine, barbiturate, morphine, lidocaine, ketamine, benzodiazepine, adenosine-3-phosphate (ATP), neurotropine, and prostaglandine E1. Phentolamine is effective for the management of sympathetically maintained pain. Barbiturate and morphine are effective for the treatment of deafferentation pain and nociceptive pain, respectively. Lidocaine is effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain; ketamine, for allodynia; and benzodiazepine, for anxiety-related pain. ATP exerts a positive effect in total pain management. Neurotropine and prostaglandine E1 are effective for the management of neuropathic pain and ischemic pain, respectively. These tests aid in the selection of drugs that maybe useful for the treatment of intractable chronic pain in patients.

  11. Spinal Cauda Equina Stimulation for Alternative Location of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Intractable Phantom Limb Pain Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pil Moo; So, Yun; Park, Jung Min; Park, Chul Min; Kim, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Jae Hun

    2016-04-01

    Phantom limb pain is a phenomenon in which patients experience pain in a part of the body that no longer exists. In several treatment modalities, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been introduced for the management of intractable post-amputation pain. A 46-year-old male patient complained of severe ankle and foot pain, following above-the-knee amputation surgery on the right side amputation surgery three years earlier. Despite undergoing treatment with multiple modalities for pain management involving numerous oral and intravenous medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency (RF) treatment, the effect duration was temporary and the decreases in the patient's pain score were not acceptable. Even the use of SCS did not provide completely satisfactory pain management. However, the trial lead positioning in the cauda equina was able to stimulate the site of the severe pain, and the patient's pain score was dramatically decreased. We report a case of successful pain management with spinal cauda equina stimulation following the failure of SCS in the treatment of intractable phantom limb pain.

  12. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Chuuk: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Shomour, Moria; Marar, Julio; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Chuuk and describes the burdens due to selected NCDs (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 9.2% decline in the total population between 2000 and 2010. Findings of medical and health data reveal that diabetes, myocardial infarction, and septicemia are the leading causes of death and lower limb surgical procedures and amputations was a major problem that was addressed with a foot care education program to prevent amputations. No data were available on the prevalence of diabetes among the population of Chuuk. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCDs. There is a lack of policy and procedure manuals, coordination among providers, and common standards of care. There is no functional data system to identify and track patients with diabetes and other chronic diseases. Priority issues and problems were identified for the clinical, administrative, and data systems.

  13. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tolenoa, Nena; Taulung, Livinson; Mongkeya, Maria; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae and describes the burdens due to NCDs, including diabetes, and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 13.9% decline in the population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to nutrition and metabolic diseases followed by diseases of the circulatory system. Data from selected community programs show that the prevalence of overweight and obese participants ranged between 82% and 95% and the rate of reported diabetes ranged from 13% to 14%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified that need to be addressed to begin to mitigate the burdens of NCDs among the residents of Kosrae State. PMID:23900387

  14. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Tolenoa, Nena; Taulung, Livinson; Mongkeya, Maria; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae and describes the burdens due to NCDs, including diabetes, and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 13.9% decline in the population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to nutrition and metabolic diseases followed by diseases of the circulatory system. Data from selected community programs show that the prevalence of overweight and obese participants ranged between 82% and 95% and the rate of reported diabetes ranged from 13% to 14%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified that need to be addressed to begin to mitigate the burdens of NCDs among the residents of Kosrae State.

  15. Chagas Disease Screening in Maternal Donors of Publicly Banked Umbilical Cord Blood, United States

    PubMed Central

    Gilner, Jennifer B.; Hernandez, Jose; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Heine, R. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    To assess patterns of Chagas disease, we reviewed results of screening umbilical cord blood from a US public cord blood bank during 2007–2014. Nineteen maternal donors tested positive for Trypanosoma cruzi parasites (0.04%). Because perinatal transmission of Chagas disease is associated with substantial illness, targeted prenatal programs should screen for this disease. PMID:27433974

  16. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Diseases of Youths and Access to Health Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Price, James H.; Braun, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are 1.5 to 2.0 times more likely than whites to have most of the major chronic diseases. Chronic diseases are also more common in the poor than the nonpoor and this association is frequently mediated by race/ethnicity. Specifically, children are disproportionately affected by racial/ethnic health disparities. Between 1960 and 2005 the percentage of children with a chronic disease in the United States almost quadrupled with racial/ethnic minority youth having higher likelihood for these diseases. The most common major chronic diseases of youth in the United States are asthma, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, dental disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, mental illness, cancers, sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and a variety of genetic and other birth defects. This review will focus on the psychosocial rather than biological factors that play important roles in the etiology and subsequent solutions to these health disparities because they should be avoidable and they are inherently unjust. Finally, this review examines access to health services by focusing on health insurance and dental insurance coverage and access to school health services. PMID:24175301

  17. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the

  18. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2015-01-01

    By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate risk to greater risk. For spatial variation in summer temperature, disease exposed lower risk populations to greater mortality probabilities, but the magnitude of this exposure depended on summer precipitation. Furthermore, the importance of diameter and slenderness in mediating responses to climate supports the increasing emphasis on trait variation in studies of ecological responses to global change.

  19. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art - part two.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of early diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors.

  20. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art - part one.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of previously diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors.

  1. Status of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C.; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L.; Ramirez, Sarah M.; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA’s 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Methods Writing group members were nominated by the AHA’s Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before

  2. Detection and molecular characterization of Newcastle disease virus in peafowl (Pavo cristatus) in Haryana State, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aman; Maan, Sushila; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Rana, Virender Pratap; Jindal, Naresh; Batra, Kanisht; Ghosh, Arnab; Mishra, Shiv Kumar; Kapoor, Sanjay; Maan, Narender Singh

    2013-12-01

    Present study was undertaken to investigate the cause of deaths of peafowls in Haryana State. In total, 145 birds were sick and 28 birds were reported dead during July to September 2012. Some of the sick birds were showing signs of shaking of heads, torticollis and paresis. Blood and cloacal swab samples from sick birds along with brain and intestinal tissues from dead birds were collected for further investigation. Although post-mortem examination showed no typical lesions of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) yet raised HI tires against NDV in some serum samples and clinical signs indicated the presence of NDV. One of the brain tissues (NDV/IND2012/01) from the field case was processed and adapted to Vero cell line for virus isolation. The fusion (F) gene based nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) confirmed the presence of NDV in all field samples and cell culture isolate. Sequencing of the partial F gene amplicons (216 bp) using the PCR primers as sequencing primers confirmed the PCR results. The deduced amino acid sequences of partial F gene were found to have the amino acid motif (111)GRRQKR/F(117) in the fusion protein cleavage site (FPCS). This amino acid motif is indicative of the velogenic nature of these NDVs. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the virus belonged to class II genotype VII very closely related to virus isolates originated from outbreaks in Western Europe, Israel, Indonesia, Taiwan and India. Phylogenetic grouping of the virus and sequence of FPCS is indicative of pathogenic potential of virus strain circulating in peacocks in Haryana.

  3. Regional Disparities in Mortality after Ischemic Heart Disease in a Brazilian State from 2006 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Luciano; Zanini, Vanessa; Batilana, Adelia Portero; de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Nihei, Oscar Kenji; de Barros Carvalho, Maria Dalva

    2013-01-01

    Background High technology in the field of interventional cardiology applied in tertiary hospitals has brought enormous benefits in the treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, IHD mortality rates remain high. We analyzed the relationship between IHD mortality rate and the socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic conditions in 399 cities in Parana state, Brazil, from 2006 to 2010. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and evaluated through Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis. GeoDa™ was used to analyze 29.351 deaths across 399 cities. We found a positive spatial autocorrelation regarding IHD mortality (I = 0.5913, p = 0.001). There was a significant positive association between each of three socioeconomic and demographic indicators and IHD mortality rate: Population Elderly Index (I = 0.3436), Illiteracy Rate (I = 0.1873) and City Development Index (I = 0.0900). In addition, two indicators presented significant negative association with IHD mortality rate: Adjusted Population Size (I = −0.1216) and Gross Domestic Product (I = −0.0864). We also found a positive association between IHD mortality rates and the geographic distances between patients’ city of residence and their corresponding regional referral centers in interventional cardiology (I = 0.3368). Cities located within Regional Health Units with Reference Interventional Cardiology Center presented a significantly lower average specific mortality rate by IHD. The high mortality rate by IHD within the Regional Health Units was not restricted to socioeconomic and demographic variables, but dependent on the distance between each city and their reference interventional cardiology center. Conclusions We conclude that geographic factors play a significant role in IHD mortality within cities. These findings have important policy implications regarding the geographic

  4. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity and Connectivity in Depressed Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Song, Xiaopeng; Li, Erfeng; Liu, Jiajia; Yuan, Yonggui; Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the neurophysiological mechanisms of depression in PD are poorly understood. The current study attempted to examine disrupted spontaneous local brain activities and functional connectivities that underlie the depression in PD. We recruited a total of 20 depressed PD patients (DPD), 40 non-depressed PD patients (NDPD) and 43 matched healthy controls (HC). All the subjects underwent neuropsychological tests and resting-state fMRI scanning. The between-group differences in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of BOLD signals were examined using post-hoc tests after the analysis of covariance. Compared with the NDPD and HC, the DPD group showed significantly increased ALFF in the left median cingulated cortex (MCC). The functional connectivity (FC) between left MCC and all the other voxels in the brain were then calculated. Compared with the HC and NDPD group, the DPD patients showed stronger FC between the left MCC and some of the major nodes of the default mode network (DMN), including the post cingulated cortex/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. Correlation analysis revealed that both the ALFF values in the left MCC and the FC between the left MCC and the nodes of DMN were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. Moreover, higher local activities in the left MCC were associated with increased functional connections between the MCC and the nodes of DMN in PD. These abnormal activities and connectivities of the limbic-cortical circuit may indicate impaired high-order cortical control or uncontrol of negative mood in DPD, which suggested a possible neural mechanism of the depression in PD.

  5. Safety Profile of Nifurtimox for Treatment of Chagas Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Colin J.; Hernandez, Salvador; Olmedo, Wilman; Abuhamidah, Adieb; Traina, Mahmoud I.; Sanchez, Daniel R.; Soverow, Jonathan; Meymandi, Sheba K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nifurtimox is 1 of only 2 medications available for treating Chagas disease (CD) and currently the only drug available in the United States, but its safety and tolerance have not been extensively studied. This is the first study to evaluate tolerance of nifurtimox in US patients with CD. Methods. This investigation assessed side effects in a sample of 53 patients with CD, all Latin American immigrants, who underwent treatment with nifurtimox (8–10 mg/kg in 3 daily doses for 12 weeks) from March 2008 to July 2012. The frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) was recorded. Results. A total of 435 AEs were recorded; 93.8% were mild, 3.0% moderate, and 3.2% severe. Patients experienced a mean of 8.2 AEs; the most frequent were anorexia (79.2%), nausea (75.5%), headache (60.4%), amnesia (58.5%), and >5% weight loss (52.8%). Eleven patients (20.8%) were unable to complete treatment. Experiencing a moderate or severe AE (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; P < .05) and Mexican nationality (OR, 2.29; P < .05) were significant predictors of treatment discontinuation, but sex and cardiac progression at baseline were not. Patients who did not complete treatment experienced nearly 3 times more AEs per 30-day period (P = .05). Conclusions. Nifurtimox produces frequent side effects, but the majority are mild and can be managed with dose reduction and/or temporary suspension of medication. The high frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms and weight loss mirrors results from prior investigations. Special attention should be paid during the early stages of treatment to potentially severe symptoms including depression, rash, and anxiety. PMID:27432838

  6. Recommendations for the use of eliglustat in the treatment of adults with Gaucher disease type 1 in the United States.

    PubMed

    Balwani, Manisha; Burrow, Thomas Andrew; Charrow, Joel; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Kaplan, Paige; Kishnani, Priya S; Mistry, Pramod; Ruskin, Jeremy; Weinreb, Neal

    2016-02-01

    In Gaucher disease, deficient activity of acid β-glucosidase results in accumulation of its substrates, glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, within the lysosomes of cells primarily in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and occasionally the lung. The multisystem disease is predominantly characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and skeletal disease. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human acid β-glucosidase has been the first-line therapy for Gaucher disease type 1 for more than two decades. Eliglustat, a novel oral substrate reduction therapy, was recently approved in the United States and the European Union as a first-line treatment for adults with Gaucher disease type 1. Eliglustat inhibits glucosylceramide synthase, thereby decreasing production of the substrate glucosylceramide and reducing its accumulation. Although existing recommendations for the care of patients with Gaucher disease remain in effect, unique characteristics of eliglustat require additional investigation and monitoring. A panel of physicians with expertise in Gaucher disease and experience with eliglustat in the clinical trials provide guidance regarding the use of eliglustat, including considerations before starting therapy and monitoring of patients on eliglustat therapy.

  7. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Jacob, Jesse T; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Wu, Henry M; Fairley, Jessica K

    2016-03-01

    Background.  Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods.  A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized,