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Sample records for intradermally injected syngeneic

  1. Mathematical modeling of clearing liquid drop diffusion after intradermal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    The mathematical model of clearing agent diffusion after intradermal injection has been developed. Skin was presented as multilayer medium, but one layer with proper boundary conditions is considered. Analytical solution of the boundary problem for small and large time intervals is obtained.

  2. Rejection of intradermally injected syngeneic tumor cells from mice by specific elimination of tumor-associated macrophages with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, followed by induction of CD11b(+)/CCR3(-)/Gr-1(-) cells cytotoxic against the tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Ibata, Minenori; Yu, Zhiqian; Shikama, Yosuke; Endo, Yasuo; Miyauchi, Yasunori; Nakamura, Masanori; Tashiro-Yamaji, Junko; Miura-Takeda, Sayako; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Okada, Masashi; Ueda, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ryotaro

    2009-12-01

    Tumor cell expansion relies on nutrient supply, and oxygen limitation is central in controlling neovascularization and tumor spread. Monocytes infiltrate into tumors from the circulation along defined chemotactic gradients, differentiate into tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and then accumulate in the hypoxic areas. Elevated TAM density in some regions or overall TAM numbers are correlated with increased tumor angiogenesis and a reduced host survival in the case of various types of tumors. To evaluate the role of TAMs in tumor growth, we here specifically eliminated TAMs by in vivo application of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (DMDP)-containing liposomes to mice bearing various types of tumors (e.g., B16 melanoma, KLN205 squamous cell carcinoma, and 3LL Lewis lung cancer), all of which grew in the dermis of syngeneic mouse skin. When DMDP-liposomes were injected into four spots to surround the tumor on day 0 or 5 after tumor injection and every third day thereafter, both the induction of TAMs and the tumor growth were suppressed in a dose-dependent and injection number-dependent manner; and unexpectedly, the tumor cells were rejected by 12 injections of three times-diluted DMDP-liposomes. The absence of TAMs in turn induced the invasion of inflammatory cells into or around the tumors; and the major population of effector cells cytotoxic against the target tumor cells were CD11b(+) monocytic macrophages, but not CCR3(+) eosinophils or Gr-1(+) neutrophils. These results indicate that both the absence of TAMs and invasion of CD11b(+) monocytic macrophages resulted in the tumor rejection.

  3. Spontaneous rejection of intradermally transplanted non-engineered tumor cells by neutrophils and macrophages from syngeneic strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Minenori; Takahashi, Takeshi; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Shogo; Tashiro-Yamaji, Junko; Okada, Masashi; Ueda, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ryotaro

    2011-10-01

    It is not surprising that tumors arising spontaneously are rarely rejected by T cells, because in general they lack molecules to elicit a primary T-cell response. In fact, cytokine-engineered tumors can induce granulocyte infiltration leading to tumor rejection. In the present study, we i.d. injected seven kinds of non-engineered tumor cells into syngeneic strains of mice. Three of them (i.e. B16, KLN205, and 3LL cells) continued to grow, whereas four of them (i.e. Meth A, I-10, CL-S1, and FM3A cells) were spontaneously rejected after transient growth or without growth. In contrast to the i.d. injection of B16 cells into C57BL/6 mice, which induces infiltration of TAMs into the tumors, the i.d. injection of Meth A cells into BALB/c mice induced the invasion of cytotoxic inflammatory cells, but not of TAMs, into or around the tumors leading to an IFN-γ-dependent rejection. On day 5, the cytotoxic activity against the tumor cells reached a peak; and the effector cells were found to be neutrophils and macrophages. The i.d. Meth A or I-10 cell-immunized, but not non-immunized, mice rejected i.p.- or i.m.-transplanted Meth A or I-10 cells without growth, respectively. The main effector cells were CTLs; and there was no cross-sensitization between these two kinds of tumor cells, suggesting specific rejection of tumor cells by CTLs from i.d. immunized mice. These results indicate that infiltration of cytotoxic myeloid cells (i.e. neutrophils and macrophages, but not TAMs) into or around tumors is essential for their IFN-γ-dependent spontaneous rejection.

  4. MIGRATION OF INTRADERMALLY INJECTED QUANTUM DOTS TO SENTINEL ORGANS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Gopee, Neera V.; Roberts, Dean W.; Webb, Peggy; Cozart, Christy R.; Siitonen, Paul H.; Warbritton, Alan R.; Yu, William W.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Walker, Nigel J.; Howard, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Topical exposure to nanoscale materials is likely from a variety of sources including sunscreens and cosmetics. Because the in vivo disposition of nanoscale materials is not well understood, we have evaluated the distribution of quantum dots (QD) following intradermal injection into female SKH-1 hairless mice as a model system for determining tissue localization following intradermal infiltration. The QD [CdSe core, CdS capped, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated, 37 nm diameter, 621 nm fluorescence emission] were injected intradermally on the right dorsal flank. Within minutes following intradermal injection, the highly UV fluorescent QD could be observed moving from the injection sites apparently through the lymphatic duct system to regional lymph nodes. Residual fluorescent QD remained at the site of injection until necropsy at 24 hours. Quantification of cadmium and selenium levels after 0, 4, 8, 12 or 24 hours in multiple tissues, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed a time-dependent loss of cadmium from the injection site, and accumulation in the liver, regional draining lymph nodes, kidney, spleen, and hepatic lymph node. Fluorescence microscopy corroborated the ICP-MS results regarding the tissue distribution of QD. The results indicated that (a) intradermally injected nanoscale QD remained as a deposit in skin and penetrated the surrounding viable subcutis, (b) QD were distributed to draining lymph nodes through the subcutaneous lymphatics and to the liver and other organs, and (c) sentinel organs are effective locations for monitoring transdermal penetration of nanoscale materials into animals. PMID:17404394

  5. Hollow microneedles for intradermal injection fabricated by sacrificial micromolding and selective electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Norman, James J; Choi, Seong-O; Tong, Nhien T; Aiyar, Avishek R; Patel, Samirkumar R; Prausnitz, Mark R; Allen, Mark G

    2013-04-01

    Limitations with standard intradermal injections have created a clinical need for an alternative, low-cost injection device. In this study, we designed a hollow metal microneedle for reliable intradermal injection and developed a high-throughput micromolding process to produce metal microneedles with complex geometries. To fabricate the microneedles, we laser-ablated a 70 μm × 70 μm square cavity near the tip of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) microneedles. The master structure was a template for multiple micromolded poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) replicas. Each replica was sputtered with a gold seed layer with minimal gold deposited in the cavity due to masking effects. In this way, nickel was electrodeposited selectively outside of the cavity, after which the polymer replica was dissolved to produce a hollow metal microneedle. Force-displacement tests showed the microneedles, with 12 μm thick electrodeposition, could penetrate skin with an insertion force 9 times less than their axial failure force. We injected fluid with the microneedles into pig skin in vitro and hairless guinea pig skin in vivo. The injections targeted 90 % of the material within the skin with minimal leakage onto the skin surface. We conclude that hollow microneedles made by this simple microfabrication method can achieve targeted intradermal injection.

  6. Best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular needle injections.

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Yvan; Hauri, Anja; Chiarello, Linda; Catlin, Mary; Stilwell, Barbara; Ghebrehiwet, Tesfamicael; Garner, Julia

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw up evidence-based guidelines to make injections safer. METHODS: A development group summarized evidence-based best practices for preventing injection-associated infections in resource-limited settings. The development process included a breakdown of the WHO reference definition of a safe injection into a list of potentially critical steps, a review of the literature for each of these steps, the formulation of best practices, and the submission of the draft document to peer review. FINDINGS: Eliminating unnecessary injections is the highest priority in preventing injection-associated infections. However, when intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections are medically indicated, best infection control practices include the use of sterile injection equipment, the prevention of contamination of injection equipment and medication, the prevention of needle-stick injuries to the provider, and the prevention of access to used needles. CONCLUSION: The availability of best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular injections will provide a reference for global efforts to achieve the goal of safe and appropriate use of injections. WHO will revise the best practices five years after initial development, i.e. in 2005. PMID:12973641

  7. Controlled Human Malaria Infection of Tanzanians by Intradermal Injection of Aseptic, Purified, Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Shekalaghe, Seif; Rutaihwa, Mastidia; Billingsley, Peter F.; Chemba, Mwajuma; Daubenberger, Claudia A.; James, Eric R.; Mpina, Maximillian; Ali Juma, Omar; Schindler, Tobias; Huber, Eric; Gunasekera, Anusha; Manoj, Anita; Simon, Beatus; Saverino, Elizabeth; Church, L. W. Preston; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Plowe, Christopher; Venkatesan, Meera; Sasi, Philip; Lweno, Omar; Mutani, Paul; Hamad, Ali; Mohammed, Ali; Urassa, Alwisa; Mzee, Tutu; Padilla, Debbie; Ruben, Adam; Lee Sim, B. Kim; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) by mosquito bite has been used to assess anti-malaria interventions in > 1,500 volunteers since development of methods for infecting mosquitoes by feeding on Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) gametocyte cultures. Such CHMIs have never been used in Africa. Aseptic, purified, cryopreserved Pf sporozoites, PfSPZ Challenge, were used to infect Dutch volunteers by intradermal injection. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess safety and infectivity of PfSPZ Challenge in adult male Tanzanians. Volunteers were injected intradermally with 10,000 (N = 12) or 25,000 (N = 12) PfSPZ or normal saline (N = 6). PfSPZ Challenge was well tolerated and safe. Eleven of 12 and 10 of 11 subjects, who received 10,000 and 25,000 PfSPZ respectively, developed parasitemia. In 10,000 versus 25,000 PfSPZ groups geometric mean days from injection to Pf positivity by thick blood film was 15.4 versus 13.5 (P = 0.023). Alpha-thalassemia heterozygosity had no apparent effect on infectivity. PfSPZ Challenge was safe, well tolerated, and infectious. PMID:25070995

  8. Intradermal glutamate and capsaicin injections: intra- and interindividual variability of provoked hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Matias; Lassen, Dorte; Andresen, Trine; Nielsen, Anders K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2014-06-01

    Intradermal injections of glutamate and capsaicin are attractive to use in human experimental pain models because hyperalgesia and allodynia mimic isolated aspects of clinical pain disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility of these models. Twenty healthy male volunteers (mean age 24 years; range 18-38 years) received intradermal injections of glutamate and capsaicin in the volar forearm. Magnitudes of secondary pinprick hyperalgesia and brush-evoked allodynia were investigated using von Frey filaments (gauges 10, 15, 60 and 100 g) and brush strokes. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia were quantified immediately after injection and after 15, 30 and 60 min. Two identical experiments separated by at least 7 days were performed. Reproducibility across and within volunteers (inter- and intra-individual variation, respectively) was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV). Secondary pinprick hyperalgesia was observed as a marked increase in the visual analogue scale (VAS) response to von Frey gauges 60 and 100 g (P < 0.001) after glutamate injection. For capsaicin, secondary pinprick hyperalgesia was detected with all von Frey gauges (P < 0.001). Glutamate evoked reproducible VAS response to all von Frey gauges (ICC > 0.60) and brush strokes (ICC > 0.83). Capsaicin injection was reproducible for secondary hyperalgesia (ICC > 0.70) and allodynia (ICC > 0.71). Intra-individual variability was generally lower for the VAS response to von Frey and brush compared with areas of secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, glutamate and capsaicin yield reproducible hyperalgesic and allodynic responses, and the present model is well suited for basic research, as well as for assessing the modulation of central phenomena.

  9. A blanching technique for intradermal injection of the hyaluronic acid Belotero.

    PubMed

    Micheels, Patrick; Sarazin, Didier; Besse, Stéphanie; Sundaram, Hema; Flynn, Timothy C

    2013-10-01

    With the proliferation of dermal fillers in the aesthetic workplace have come instructions from various manufacturers regarding dermal placement. Determination of injection needle location in the dermis has in large part been based on physician expertise, product and needle familiarity, and patient-specific skin characteristics. An understanding of the precise depth of dermal structures may help practitioners improve injection specificity. Unlike other dermal fillers that suggest intradermal and deep dermal injection planes, a new hyaluronic acid with a cohesive polydensified matrix may be more appropriate for the superficial dermis because of its structure and its high degree of integration into the dermis. To that end, the authors designed a small study to quantify the depth of the superficial dermis by means of ultrasound and histology. Using ultrasound resources, the authors determined the depths of the epidermis, the dermis, and the reticular dermis in the buttocks of six patients; the authors then extrapolated the depth of the superficial reticular dermis. Histologic studies of two of the patients showed full integration of the product in the reticular dermis. Following determination of injection depths and filler integration, the authors describe a technique ("blanching") for injection of the cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid into the superficial dermis. At this time, blanching is appropriate only for injection of the cohesive polydensified matrix hyaluronic acid known as Belotero Balance in the United States, although it may have applications for other hyaluronic acid products outside of the United States.

  10. Neutropenic responses to intradermal injections of Escherichia coli. Effects on the kinetics of polymorphonuclear leukocyte emigration.

    PubMed Central

    Cybulsky, M. I.; Cybulsky, I. J.; Movat, H. Z.

    1986-01-01

    Killed Escherichia coli organisms injected intradermally into rabbits induced significant neutropenia and provoked a rapid rise in body temperature. Both the magnitude and the duration of the neutropenia were dose-dependent. After recovery from neutropenia, the rabbits became refractory to its redevelopment when subsequently given an equivalent dose of E coli. The influence of neutropenia and the subsequent refractory period on the rate of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) emigration into inflammatory sites was examined. Killed E coli organisms (6 X 10(8) per site) were injected into two groups of 20 intradermal sites in each rabbit. The first group (Group F) preceded the second (Group S) by 6 hours. The kinetics of PMN emigration, quantitated with 51Cr-labeled cells, differed in the two groups. In Group S sites an intense PMN influx was measured at 0-4 hours, and subsequently the extent of PMN emigration rapidly declined. In Group F sites a minute PMN influx was detected during the first 4 hours, coinciding with a marked neutropenia. The maximal PMN influx into Group F sites was measured between 6 and 10 hours. Microscopic sections at 4 hours showed a scanty PMN infiltrate and numerous bacteria in the dermis of Group F sites, while extensive phagocytosis of bacteria by PMNs was apparent in Group S sites. By comparing the extent of bacterial phagocytosis in 4-hour-old sites with the magnitudes of PMN emigration between 6 and 10 hours in both groups, we concluded that the phagocytic elimination of killed E coli was not a major mechanism regulating the cessation of local PMN emigration. Instead, we propose that tachyphylaxis or desensitization of sites to inflammatory factors released from E coli is the responsible mechanism. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3524251

  11. Controlled Human Malaria Infections by Intradermal Injection of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Roestenberg, Meta; Bijker, Else M.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Billingsley, Peter F.; James, Eric R.; Bastiaens, Guido J. H.; Teirlinck, Anne C.; Scholzen, Anja; Teelen, Karina; Arens, Theo; van der Ven, André J. A. M.; Gunasekera, Anusha; Chakravarty, Sumana; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection with sporozoites is a standardized and powerful tool for evaluation of malaria vaccine and drug efficacy but so far only applied by exposure to bites of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-infected mosquitoes. We assessed in an open label Phase 1 trial, infection after intradermal injection of respectively 2,500, 10,000, or 25,000 aseptic, purified, vialed, cryopreserved Pf sporozoites (PfSPZ) in three groups (N = 6/group) of healthy Dutch volunteers. Infection was safe and parasitemia developed in 15 of 18 volunteers (84%), 5 of 6 volunteers in each group. There were no differences between groups in time until parasitemia by microscopy or quantitative polymerase chain reaction, parasite kinetics, clinical symptoms, or laboratory values. This is the first successful infection by needle and syringe with PfSPZ manufactured in compliance with regulatory standards. After further optimization, the use of such PfSPZ may facilitate and accelerate clinical development of novel malaria drugs and vaccines. PMID:23149582

  12. Injection of Syngeneic Murine Melanoma Cells to Determine Their Metastatic Potential in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Joshua J.; Cohessy, Sean; Wong, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 90% of human cancer deaths are linked to metastasis. Despite the prevalence and relative harm of metastasis, therapeutics for treatment or prevention are lacking. We report a method for the establishment of pulmonary metastases in mice, useful for the study of this phenomenon. Tail vein injection of B57BL/6J mice with B16-BL6 is among the most used models for melanoma metastases. Some of the circulating tumor cells establish themselves in the lungs of the mouse, creating "experimental" metastatic foci. With this model it is possible to measure the relative effects of therapeutic agents on the development of cancer metastasis. The difference in enumerated lung foci between treated and untreated mice indicates the efficacy of metastases neutralization. However, prior to the investigation of a therapeutic agent, it is necessary to determine an optimal number of injected B16-BL6 cells for the quantitative analysis of metastatic foci. Injection of too many cells may result in an overabundance of metastatic foci, impairing proper quantification and overwhelming the effects of anti-cancer therapies, while injection of too few cells will hinder the comparison between treated and controls. PMID:27285567

  13. Oral gabapentin and intradermal injection of lidocaine: is there any role in the treatment of moderate/severe tinnitus?

    PubMed

    Ciodaro, Francesco; Mannella, Valentina Katia; Cammaroto, Giovanni; Bonanno, Lilla; Galletti, Francesco; Galletti, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The objective of our work is to evaluate recovery induced by gabapentin alone and in association with intradermal infiltration of lidocaine in patients affected by moderate/severe tinnitus. Seventy-two patients suffering from moderate/severe unilateral non-pulsatile subjective tinnitus were enrolled. Severity and behaviour of tinnitus were assessed by Tinnitus handicap Index (THI) on the 8th, 22nd and 36th days from onset of therapy, and on the 3rd and 6th month after the end of therapy in patients treated with oral gabapentin (Group I), oral gabapentin and intradermal injection of lidocaine (Group II), and placebo (Group III) Significant differences in THI scores from the 8th day of therapy to the 22nd (p < 0.0001) and from the 22nd day to the 36th (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0004, respectively) were found in Group I and Group II. In Group II, another relevant decrease of THI scores from the 36th day of therapy to 3 months from the end of treatment (p = 0.0004) was found. A significant difference in THI scores between Group I and Group II was found after 8 days of treatment (p = 0.05) with a more relevant decrease registered in Group II; significant differences were also found in THI scores between Group I and Group III after 8 days of treatment (p = 0.01), with a more relevant decrease registered in Group III; significant differences in THI scores between Group II and Group III were found after 36 days of treatment (p = 0.009), 3 and 6 months after the end of therapy (p = 0.005 and p = 0.007, respectively), with a more relevant decrease registered in Group II. In conclusion, the use of gabapentin associated to lidocaine seems to be superior to placebo and gabapentin in relieving tinnitus.

  14. Preparation and validation of a skin model for the evaluation of intradermal powder injection devices.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yibin; Winter, Gerhard; Myschik, Julia

    2012-06-01

    A very promising novel needle-free application method is epidermal powder immunisation, a method delivering particulate vaccines into the viable epidermis of human skin where a dense network of immunocompetent cells resides. These antigen-presenting cells (Langerhans cells) are able to recognise antigens, process them and present them to naïve T-cells and induce effective immune responses. Powder injection devices are being developed, and their evaluation is essential before applying them on live animals and individuals. An appropriate skin model will accelerate the development of such injection devices. Different films made from gelatin, silicon and agar were prepared and investigated as skin model candidates for the evaluation of powder injection devices. The mechanical properties of the skin model candidates were measured with an indentation method using a texture analyser, and the results were compared to the properties of human skin and pig skin. The indentation behaviour of the model films and the biological skin samples suggest that gelatin films plasticised with glycerol are very well suitable for a skin model. The mechanical properties of gelatin based films can be tailored by changing the glycerol content in the film making it even possible to simulate human skin with different mechanical properties as the mechanical properties depend on the individual, age, sex and site of injection. The stability of the gelatin films was also investigated under long-term storage. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used as a novel tool to determine the depths and size of fluorescently labelled particles in the gelatin model. PMID:22484250

  15. Preparation and validation of a skin model for the evaluation of intradermal powder injection devices.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yibin; Winter, Gerhard; Myschik, Julia

    2012-06-01

    A very promising novel needle-free application method is epidermal powder immunisation, a method delivering particulate vaccines into the viable epidermis of human skin where a dense network of immunocompetent cells resides. These antigen-presenting cells (Langerhans cells) are able to recognise antigens, process them and present them to naïve T-cells and induce effective immune responses. Powder injection devices are being developed, and their evaluation is essential before applying them on live animals and individuals. An appropriate skin model will accelerate the development of such injection devices. Different films made from gelatin, silicon and agar were prepared and investigated as skin model candidates for the evaluation of powder injection devices. The mechanical properties of the skin model candidates were measured with an indentation method using a texture analyser, and the results were compared to the properties of human skin and pig skin. The indentation behaviour of the model films and the biological skin samples suggest that gelatin films plasticised with glycerol are very well suitable for a skin model. The mechanical properties of gelatin based films can be tailored by changing the glycerol content in the film making it even possible to simulate human skin with different mechanical properties as the mechanical properties depend on the individual, age, sex and site of injection. The stability of the gelatin films was also investigated under long-term storage. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used as a novel tool to determine the depths and size of fluorescently labelled particles in the gelatin model.

  16. Blockade of calcium channels can prevent the onset of secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    1997-06-01

    Intradermal capsaicin injection in humans results in primary hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli applied near the injection site, as well as secondary mechanical hyperalgesia (increased pain from noxious stimuli) and mechanical allodynia (pain from innocuous stimuli) in an area surrounding the site of primary hyperalgesia. This study in rats tested the hypothesis that the secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia observed following intradermal injection of capsaicin was dependent upon activation of voltage sensitive calcium channels in the spinal cord. Responses to application of von Frey filaments of 10 mN and 90 mN bending forces were tested in all rats before and after injection of capsaicin into the plantar surface of a hindpaw. Animals were pretreated with L-type (nifedipine), N-type (omega-conotoxin GVIA) or P-type (omega-agatoxin IVA) calcium channels blockers through a microdialysis fiber implanted in the spinal dorsal horn prior to the injection of capsaicin. None of the calcium channel blockers had any affect on normal sensory or motor responses. However, all three blockers dose dependently prevented the development of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. The threshold to mechanical stimulation with von Frey filaments was also increased significantly in animals treated with these calcium channel blockers when compared to articial cerebrospinal fluid control animals. These data suggest that calcium channels are important for the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia that occurs following capsaicin injection. PMID:9211477

  17. Positron Lymphography: Multimodal, High-Resolution, Dynamic Mapping and Resection of Lymph Nodes After Intradermal Injection of 18F-FDG

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Abou, Diane S.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Bartlett, Rachel M.; Huang, Ruimin; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Grimm, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays a critical role in the maintenance of healthy tissues. Its function is an important indicator of the presence and extent of disease. In oncology, metastatic spread to local lymph nodes (LNs) is a strong predictor of poor outcome. Clinical methods for the visualization of LNs involve regional injection and tracking of 99mTc-sulfur colloid (99mTc-SC) along with absorbent dyes. Intraoperatively, these techniques suffer from the requirement of administration of multiple contrast media (99mTc-SC and isosulfan blue), unwieldy γ-probes, and a short effective surgical window for dyes. Preclinically, imaging of transport through the lymphatics is further hindered by the resolution of lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT. We investigated multimodal imaging in animal models using intradermal administration of 18F-FDG for combined diagnostic and intraoperative use. PET visualizes LNs with high sensitivity and resolution and low background. Cerenkov radiation (CR) from 18F-FDG was evaluated to optically guide surgical resection of LNs. Methods Imaging of 18F-FDG uptake used PET and sensitive luminescent imaging equipment (for CR). Dynamic PET was performed in both sexes and multiple strains (NCr Nude, C57BL/6, and Nu/Nu) of mice. Biodistribution confirmed the uptake of 18F-FDG and was compared with that of 99mTc-SC. Verification of uptake and the ability to use 18F-FDG CR to guide nodal removal were confirmed histologically. Results Intradermal injection of 18F-FDG clearly revealed lymphatic vessels and LNs by PET. Dynamic imaging revealed rapid and sustained labeling of these structures. Biodistribution of the radiotracer confirmed the active transport of radioglucose in the lymphatics to the local LNs and over time into the general circulation. 18F-FDG also enabled visualization of LNs through CR, even before surgically revealing the site, and guided LN resection. Conclusion Intradermal 18F-FDG can enhance the preclinical investigation of the lymphatics

  18. Intradermal injection of an anti-Langerin-HIVGag fusion vaccine targets epidermal Langerhans cells in nonhuman primates and can be tracked in vivo.

    PubMed

    Salabert, Nina; Todorova, Biliana; Martinon, Frédéric; Boisgard, Raphaël; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Cosma, Antonio; Kortulewski, Thierry; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Chapon, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    The development of new immunization strategies requires a better understanding of early molecular and cellular events occurring at the site of injection. The skin is particularly rich in immune cells and represents an attractive site for vaccine administration. Here, we specifically targeted vaccine antigens to epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) using a fusion protein composed of HIV antigens and a monoclonal antibody targeting Langerin. We developed a fluorescence imaging approach to visualize, in vivo, the vaccine-targeted cells. Studies were performed in nonhuman primates (NHPs) because of their relevance as a model to assess human vaccines. We directly demonstrated that in NHPs, intradermally injected anti-Langerin-HIVGag specifically targets epidermal LCs and induces rapid changes in the LC network, including LC activation and migration out of the epidermis. Vaccine targeting of LCs significantly improved anti-HIV immune response without requirement of an adjuvant. Although the co-injection of the TLR-7/8 synthetic ligand, R-848 (resiquimod), with the vaccine, did not enhance significantly the antibody response, it stimulated recruitment of HLA-DR+ inflammatory cells to the site of immunization. This study allowed us to characterize the dynamics of early local events following the injection of a vaccine-targeted epidermal LCs and R-848. PMID:26678013

  19. The nature of tolerance in adult recipient mice made tolerant of alloantigens with supralethal irradiation followed by syngeneic bone marrow cell transplantation plus injection of F1 spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Y.; Himeno, K.; Mayumi, H.; Tokuda, N.; Nomoto, K. )

    1989-06-01

    The length of time after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution when tolerance to alloantigens can be induced in adult mice during T cell differentiation from bone marrow cells was studied by exposing those T cells to (recipient x donor)F1 spleen cells. Supralethally irradiated C3H/He Slc(C3H; H-2k) mice were reconstituted with 1 x 10(7) syngeneic T cell-depleted bone marrow cells and then injected intravenously with 5 x 10(7) (C3H x C57BL/6(B6))F1 (B6C3F1; H-2bxk) or (C3H x AKR/J(AKR))F1 (AKC3F1; H-2kxk) spleen cells at various intervals. In the fully allogeneic combination of B6C3F1----C3H, EL-4 tumor originating from B6 was accepted, and survival of grafted B6 skin was significantly prolonged in the tolerant C3H mice treated with irradiation on day -1 followed by injection of syngeneic bone marrow cells on day 0 plus B6C3F1 spleen cells on days 0, 5, or 10, in a tolerogen-specific manner. In the multiminor histocompatibility antigen-disparate combination of AKC3F1----C3H, AKR skin grafts were permanently accepted in the tolerant C3H mice treated with AKC3F1 spleen cells on days 0, 5, 10, or 15. Immunological parameters, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and delayed foot-pad reaction (DFR), were almost completely suppressed in C3H mice made tolerant of B6 or AKR antigens. A chimeric assay using a direct immunofluorescence method revealed that the tolerant C3H mice given B6C3F1 spleen cells on day 0 were mixed-chimeric for at least 8 weeks after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution, but not definitely chimeric thereafter. The C3H mice given AKC3F1 spleen cells on day 0 were chimeric even 43 weeks after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution, but the C3H mice given AKC3F1 spleen cells on day 15 showed temporal chimerism that disappeared within 43 weeks. The untolerant mice were never detectably chimeric.

  20. Response of immune response genes to adjuvants poly [di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)phosphazene] (PCEP), CpG oligodeoxynucleotide and emulsigen at intradermal injection site in pigs.

    PubMed

    Magiri, R B; Lai, K; Chaffey, A M; Wilson, H L; Berry, W E; Szafron, M L; Mutwiri, G K

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity. Despite being a critical vaccine component, the mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects are not fully understood and this is especially true when they are used in large animals. This lack of understanding limits our ability to design effective vaccines. In the present study, we administered polyphosphazene (PCEP), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG), emulsigen or saline via an intradermal injection into pigs and assessed the impact on the expression of reported 'adjuvant response genes' over time. CpG induced a strong upregulation of the chemokine CXL10 several 'Interferon Response Genes', as well as TNFα, and IL-10, and a down-regulation of IL-17 genes. Emulsigen upregulated expression of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5, proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, as well as TLR9, and several IFN response genes. PCEP induced the expression of chemokine CCL2 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. These results suggest that emulsigen and CpG may promote recruitment of innate immune cells and Th1 type cytokine production but that PCEP may promote a Th-2 type immune response through the induction of IL-6, an inducer of B cell activity and differentiation. PMID:27269793

  1. A new biolistic intradermal injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, M.; Doré, M.; Hébert, C.; Spooner, M.-F.; Marchand, S.; Côté, J.; Gobeil, F.; Rivest, M.; Lafrance, M.; Talbot, B. G.; Moutquin, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel intradermal needle-free drug delivery device which exploits the unsteady high-speed flow produced by a miniature shock tube to entrain drug or vaccine particles onto a skin target. A first clinical study of pain and physiological response of human subjects study is presented, comparing the new injector to intramuscular needle injection. This clinical study, performed according to established pain assessment protocols, demonstrated that every single subject felt noticeably less pain with the needle-free injector than with the needle injection. Regarding local tolerance and skin reaction, bleeding was observed on all volunteers after needle injection, but on none of the subjects following powder injection. An assessment of the pharmacodynamics, via blood pressure, of pure captopril powder using the new device on spontaneously hypertensive rats was also performed. It was found that every animal tested with the needle-free injector exhibited the expected pharmacodynamic response following captopril injection. Finally, the new injector was used to study the delivery of an inactivated influenza vaccine in mice. The needle-free device induced serum antibody response to the influenza vaccine that was comparable to that of subcutaneous needle injection, but without requiring the use of an adjuvant. Although no effort was made to optimize the formulation or the injection parameters in the present study, the novel injector demonstrates great promise for the rapid, safe and painless intradermal delivery of systemic drugs and vaccines.

  2. Delivery systems for intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Jarrahian, C; Zehrung, D; Mitragotri, S; Prausnitz, M R

    2012-01-01

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination can offer improved immunity and simpler logistics of delivery, but its use in medicine is limited by the need for simple, reliable methods of ID delivery. ID injection by the Mantoux technique requires special training and may not reliably target skin, but is nonetheless used currently for BCG and rabies vaccination. Scarification using a bifurcated needle was extensively used for smallpox eradication, but provides variable and inefficient delivery into the skin. Recently, ID vaccination has been simplified by introduction of a simple-to-use hollow microneedle that has been approved for ID injection of influenza vaccine in Europe. Various designs of hollow microneedles have been studied preclinically and in humans. Vaccines can also be injected into skin using needle-free devices, such as jet injection, which is receiving renewed clinical attention for ID vaccination. Projectile delivery using powder and gold particles (i.e., gene gun) have also been used clinically for ID vaccination. Building off the scarification approach, a number of preclinical studies have examined solid microneedle patches for use with vaccine coated onto metal microneedles, encapsulated within dissolving microneedles or added topically to skin after microneedle pretreatment, as well as adapting tattoo guns for ID vaccination. Finally, technologies designed to increase skin permeability in combination with a vaccine patch have been studied through the use of skin abrasion, ultrasound, electroporation, chemical enhancers, and thermal ablation. The prospects for bringing ID vaccination into more widespread clinical practice are encouraging, given the large number of technologies for ID delivery under development.

  3. Natural History of Mouse Syngeneic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jurin, Mislav; Drewinko, Benjamin

    1974-01-01

    The morphologic changes in lymphoreticular tissues and development of antitumor immune reactions of specific pathogen-free mice injected with syngeneic lymphoma cells were sequentially analyzed. The regional (right inguinal) lymph node demonstrated mild changes indicative of immunologic response. Systemic lymph nodes revealed a moderate degree of immune response on morphologic basis. The spleen was the site of marked activity, characterized by the presence of large pyroninophilic cells and germinal centers. Foci of necrosis in the local tumor accompanied by mature lymphocytes suggested cell-mediated immune rejection. Mice developed circulating antibodies 2 days after implantation. No antibodies were demonstrated attached to fresh tumor cells. Lymphocyte cytotoxic activity was demonstrated beginning on day 4. Both cytotoxic activity and circulating antibodies were no longer detectable after the third week following tumor implantation. Tumor-bearing mice also had an impaired capacity to mount a primary immune reaction to sheep red blood cells. The spleen demonstrated a marked loss of lymphocytes and the subsequent appearance of masses of amyloid material. It is suggested that amyloidosis in lymphoreticular organs is the result of a derangement in the immune response of the host following a prolonged and sustained antigenic stimulation. It appears that in syngeneic pathogen-free mice the spleen plays the major role in immune rejection mechanisms while the draining node only plays a modest role. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:4614670

  4. Acceptance of intradermal inactivated influenza vaccines among hospital staff following 2 seasonal vaccination campaigns

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Laura; Coleman, Brenda L; McGeer, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    After a Canadian hospital's official influenza vaccination campaign concluded in the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 influenza seasons, study nurses provided additional vaccination mobile cart hours and the added choice of an intradermal injection. An additional 2.1% of staff in the first and 1.4% in the second season were vaccinated during the study with 90–99% preferring the intradermal injection or having no preference. All 13 staff who attempted self-injection with the intradermal vaccine in 2012–2013 were successful on their first attempt. Offering alternatives to intramuscular vaccines may increase rates of vaccination. PMID:26378778

  5. Antigen-specific suppression in genetic responder mice to L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10 (GAT). Characterization of conventional and hybridoma-derived factors produced by suppressor T cells from mice injected as neonates with syngeneic GAT macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, C M; Pierce, C W

    1982-12-01

    Spleen cells from C57BL/10 mice injected with syngeneic B10 L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10 (GAT)-pulsed macrophages (GAT-M phi) within 18 h of birth were unable to respond to soluble GAT, GAT-methylated bovine serum albumin, or B10 GAT-M phi as adults. Spleen cells from these neonatally treated mice responded at control levels to GAT presented in allogeneic M phi and to sheep erythrocytes. Partially purified T cells from these neonatally treated mice suppressed responses by syngeneic virgin, but not primed, spleen cells in an antigen-specific manner and acted during the early phases of the response. These responder GAT-specific suppressor T cells (GAT-TSR) were sensitive to anti-Thy-1 + C and 500-rad irradiation and have the phenotype Ly-1-2+, I-J+; GAT-TSR cells can only suppress responses by spleen cells syngeneic with the GAT-TSR cells at the I-J subregion of H-2. Restimulation of these Ts cells with syngeneic GAT-M phi induces an antigen-specific suppressor factor within the supernatant fluid. The factor, GAT-TsFR, is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight between 48,000 and 63,000, as determined by gel filtration chromatography using isotonic buffers; it bears serologically detectable determinants encoded by the I-J subregion of the H-2 complex, has an antigen-binding site for GAT and L-glutamic acid50-L-tyrosine50, and shares idiotypic determinants with anti-GAT antibodies. The presence of GAT-TsFR in the first 36 h of in vitro culture is required for significant suppression. Furthermore, only responses by spleen cell syngeneic with the cells producing GAT-TsFR at the I-J subregion are suppressed. The fusion of GAT-TsFR-producing cells with BW5147 resulted in generation of two hybridomas with properties and characteristics identical to those of the conventional GAT-TsFR with one exception: conventional and hybridoma 372.D6.5 GAT-TsFR only suppress responses by spleen cells of the I-Jb haplotype, whereas suppression mediated by the second hybridoma

  6. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... animals. (3) Thirty-five days post-injection, the guinea pigs shall be used for tuberculin testing. (4... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic. 113.409 Section 113.409 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE,...

  7. TSG-6 released from intradermally injected mesenchymal stem cells accelerates wound healing and reduces tissue fibrosis in murine full-thickness skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yu; Jiang, Dongsheng; Sindrilaru, Anca; Stegemann, Agatha; Schatz, Susanne; Treiber, Nicolai; Rojewski, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Vander Beken, Seppe; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Böhm, Markus; Seitz, Andreas; Scholz, Natalie; Dürselen, Lutz; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Ignatius, Anita; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2014-02-01

    Proper activation of macrophages (Mφ) in the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing is essential for physiological tissue repair. However, there is a strong indication that robust Mφ inflammatory responses may be causal for the fibrotic response always accompanying adult wound healing. Using a complementary approach of in vitro and in vivo studies, we here addressed the question of whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-due to their anti-inflammatory properties-would control Mφ activation and tissue fibrosis in a murine model of full-thickness skin wounds. We have shown that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated protein 6 (TSG-6) released from MSCs in co-culture with activated Mφ or following injection into wound margins suppressed the release of TNF-α from activated Mφ and concomitantly induced a switch from a high to an anti-fibrotic low transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/TGF-β3 ratio. This study provides insight into what we believe to be a previously undescribed multifaceted role of MSC-released TSG-6 in wound healing. MSC-released TSG-6 was identified to improve wound healing by limiting Mφ activation, inflammation, and fibrosis. TSG-6 and MSC-based therapies may thus qualify as promising strategies to enhance tissue repair and to prevent excessive tissue fibrosis.

  8. Intradermal vaccination using the novel microneedle device MicronJet600: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Yotam; Kochba, Efrat; Hung, Ivan; Kenney, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Intradermal immunization has become a forefront of vaccine improvement, both scientifically and commercially. Newer technologies are being developed to address the need to reduce the dose required for vaccination and to improve the reliability and ease of injection, which have been major hurdles in expanding the number of approved vaccines using this route of administration. In this review, 7 y of clinical experience with a novel intradermal delivery device, the MicronJet600, which is a registered hollow microneedle that simplifies the delivery of liquid vaccines, are summarized. This device has demonstrated both significant dose-sparing and superior immunogenicity in various vaccine categories, as well as in diverse subject populations and age groups. These studies have shown that intradermal delivery using this device is safe, effective, and preferred by the subjects. Comparison with other intradermal devices and potential new applications for intradermal delivery that could be pursued in the future are also discussed. PMID:25745830

  9. Clinical usefulness of intradermal fluorescein and patent blue violet dyes for sentinel lymph node identification in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wells, S; Bennett, A; Walsh, P; Owens, S; Peauroi, J

    2006-06-01

    The first lymph node receiving drainage from a specific anatomic region is referred to as the sentinel lymph node (SLN). This study sought to evaluate the intradermal use of two dyes, patent blue violet (PBV) and fluorescein (FL), for SLN mapping in the dog. Multiple intradermal injections were performed in five healthy dogs using two dyes, PBV in 0.9% NaCl and FL in solutions of 0.9% NaCl and 6% hetastarch. Skin flaps were raised and followed to the first area of discrete stain uptake. Areas of uptake were identified as lymph nodes grossly and by cytology. Identification of a SLN for each area of intradermal injection was accomplished for 98% of the injection sites. Intradermal injections of both PBV and FL dyes produce readily visible staining of lymphatic vessels and SLNs in healthy dogs and are sufficient to allow ready identification of these structures during postmortem dissection.

  10. Therapy of a murine sarcoma using syngeneic monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Lankford, T.; Flynn, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    Syngeneic monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to Moloney sarcoma cells were produced by fusion of spleen cells from MSC regressor mice to myeloma SP2/0. MoAb 244-19A, an immunoglobulin G2b, bound to MSC cells and did not bind to two other sarcomas (K-BALB and Ha2), a carcinoma (Line 1), a fibroblast (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31) or a fibroblast infected with C-type virus (A31-Moloney leukemia virus). In contrast, MoAb 271-1A bound to the MSC and Ha2 sarcoma and line 1 carcinoma as well as to the normal and infected fibroblast cultures. Antibodies were tested for therapeutic effect using three schedules of antibody injection. Injection i.p. of ascites fluid containing 244-19A MoAb given on Days -1, 0, and +1 relative to tumor cell injection increased life span significantly over that of control animals given injections (P3, immunoglobulin G, or MoAb 271-1A) and produced some seven of 19, one of five, and one of five long-term survivors in three separate experiments. Antibody given to animals with established tumors (4 days after implantation) also prolonged life span significantly and produced three of nine long-term survivors. Antibody given to animals with very large tumor burdens (10 days after implantation) did not prolong life span significantly. Optimal dose, schedule, and mechanism studies concerning this therapy are in progress.

  11. A New Biolistic Intradermal Injector Based on a Miniature Shock Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, M.

    Intradermal powder injection is an emerging technology for the needlefree delivery of a potentially wide array of drugs and vaccines. Although needle injection of liquids is widespread principally because of its low cost, this delivery method is painful, generates dangerous medical waste and can cause contamination. Various technologies have been developed to address these shortcomings, amongst them creams, patches, inhalers and liquid jet injectors, each with their own severe limitations.

  12. A Weibull distribution model for intradermal administration of ceftazidime.

    PubMed

    Bressolle, F; Laurelli, J M; Gomeni, R; Bechier, J G; Wynn, N R; Galtier, M; Eledjam, J J

    1993-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of 1 g of ceftazidime administered intradermally was studied in seven healthy volunteers. The objective of the present study was to find the most appropriate mathematical model to describe the drug intake process. The concentration of ceftazidime in plasma was measured by HPLC. The disposition of the drug was described by a one-compartment pharmacokinetic model, with drug intake occurring by different processes: a zero-order process due to the administration and a first-order intake from the injection site to the systemic circulation. The Weibull model was considered as an approximation of the overall process. The mean Weibull parameters were td (time necessary to transfer 63% of the administered drug into the systemic circulation) of 2.75 +/- 0.75 h, and f (shape) of 1.04 +/- 0.15. The mean elimination half-life was 2.0 +/- 0.4 h. The area under the concentration versus time curve obtained in this study (139 +/- 46 mg.h/L) is very near to literature values reported after single intravenous doses of 1 g of ceftazidime, suggesting that the bioavailability of ceftazidime after intradermal administration may be approximately 100%. Moreover, the mean peak plasma concentration (37 +/- 16 mg/L) is in the same range as that reported in the literature after intramuscular administration of a single dose of 1 g. PMID:8289137

  13. Influence of glucocorticoids on a time-of-day-dependent variation in intradermal reactivity to histamine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shun; Shimizu, Sunao; Watanabe, Miwa; Osada, Hironari; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine daily variation in intradermal reactivity to histamine in dogs and to evaluate a potential influence of glucocorticoids on reactivity. Wheal sizes formed after intradermal injections of histamine were measured every 6 h during a single 24 h period in six healthy dogs. To determine whether glucocorticoids were implicated in daily variation, intradermal reactivity to histamine was evaluated at 9:00 h and at 21:00 h during a single day in dogs that received oral prednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) or oral trilostane (an inhibitor of endogenous glucocorticoid synthesis). Finally, the time required for the histamine reaction to diminish after an intravenous injection of hydrocortisone was also assessed. A significant time-of-day-dependent variation in intradermal reactivity to histamine was detected in dogs, with a larger wheal size observed at 9:00 h than at 21:00 h. Administration of prednisolone or trilostane disrupted this variation. Intradermal reactivity to histamine was significantly reduced 6 h after an intravenous injection of hydrocortisone. These results suggest that glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal glands could be involved in the regulation of daily variation in histamine-mediated reactions in dogs. PMID:27387732

  14. The intradermal test in the diagnosis of bilharziasis

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, J.

    1958-01-01

    The diagnosis of bilharziasis by detection of schistosome eggs in the urine or faeces of patients is often not possible in the later stages of the disease, when elimination of the eggs is rendered increasingly difficult. To overcome this difficulty, an immunological test has been developed, based on the cutaneous response to an injection of an antigen prepared from the cercariae, adult worms, eggs or miracidia of Schistosoma. In this paper, the author reviews the various procedures for obtaining the basic material for antigen preparation, describes briefly the method of preparation, outlines the nature and properties of the specific antigens, and discusses the skin-testing procedure, with special reference to the criteria for evaluating the results. He points out that the intradermal test may prove useful in epidemiological surveys as well as in the diagnosis of individual cases. PMID:13573119

  15. Toward intradermal vaccination: preparation of powder formulations by collapse freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Etzl, Elsa E; Winter, Gerhard; Engert, Julia

    2014-03-01

    Intradermal powder immunization is an emerging technique in vaccine delivery. The purpose of this study was to generate powder particles for intradermal injection by freeze-drying and subsequent cryo-milling. Two different freeze-drying protocols were compared, a moderate freeze-drying cycle and an aggressive freeze-drying cycle, which induced a controlled collapse of the sugar matrix. Ovalbumin served as model antigen. The influence of collapse drying and cryo-milling on particle morphology and protein stability was investigated. Cryo-milling generated irregularly shaped particles of size 20-70 µm. The recovery of soluble monomer of ovalbumin was not changed during freeze-drying and after cryo-milling, or after 12 months of storage at 2-8 °C. A slight increase in higher molecular weight aggregates was found in formulations containing the polymer dextran after 12 months of storage at 50 °C. Light obscuration measurements showed an increase in cumulative particle counts after cryo-milling that did not further increase during storage at 2-8 °C for 12 months. The applicability of the cryo-milling process to other therapeutic proteins was shown using recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. Collapse freeze-drying and subsequent cryo-milling allows the generation of particles suitable for intradermal powder injection.

  16. Intradermal administration of fluorescent contrast agents for delivery to axillary lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, John C.; Meric-Berstam, Funda; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Tan, I.-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Wagner, Jamie L.; Babiera, Gildy V.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-05-01

    In this proof-of-concept study we seek to demonstrate the delivery of fluorescent contrast agent to the tumor-draining lymph node basin following intraparenchymal breast injections and intradermal arm injection of micrograms of indocyanine green in 20 breast cancer patients undergoing complete axillary lymph node dissection. Individual lymph nodes were assessed ex vivo for presence of fluorescent signal. In all, 88% of tumor-negative lymph nodes and 81% of tumor-positive lymph nodes were fluorescent. These results indicate that future studies utilizing targeted fluorescent contrast agents may demonstrate improved surgical and therapeutic intervention.

  17. Assessment of acceptability and usability of new delivery prototype device for intradermal vaccination in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Van Mulder, Timothi J S; Verwulgen, Stijn; Beyers, Koen C L; Scheelen, Linda; Elseviers, Monique M; Van Damme, Pierre; Vankerckhoven, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the acceptability and usability of a newly developed intradermal prototype device, VAX-ID™, in healthy subjects. In April 2012 an investigational study was conducted in healthy subjects aged 18 to 65 y. To compare injection site and route of administration, subjects were allocated to 4 subgroups, either receiving subsequently 2 intradermal (ID) injections (one in the forearm and one in the deltoid) or an ID (forearm) and an intramuscular (IM) (deltoid) injection. All injections contained saline solution. Acceptability was assessed with a subjects' questionnaire and a daily electronic diary for 5 d. Usability was assessed with a vaccinators' questionnaire and an expert panel. A 10-point Visual Analog Scale was used to score several statements on usability and acceptability. A total of 102 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study (age: 19-63). No statistically significant differences were seen in demographic characteristics between the ID and IM groups. Anxiety before injection, pain during injection and duration of injection were rated significantly lower for ID compared to IM. One day after the injections, redness was reported more often after ID injection in the forearm versus ID in the deltoid; pain at injection site was reported significantly more often after IM vs. ID injection. The new VAX-ID prototype device was found easy to handle, easy to use and safe. The new VAX-ID prototype device was shown to have a high degree of acceptability as well as usability. Further studies with VAX-ID will be conducted using vaccine antigen allowing assessment of immunogenicity and safety. Additionally, these studies will help to further improve VAX-ID in terms of accuracy of delivered dose and feedback to the vaccinator. (NCT01963338).

  18. Vaccination of pigs against Aujeszky's disease by the intradermal route using live attenuated and inactivated virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vannier, P; Cariolet, R

    1989-09-01

    A study was undertaken of the protection induced by inactivated and live Aujeszky's disease virus vaccines. The vaccines were administered using a special device which, without the use of a needle, delivered the preparation intradermally. The trials were performed on 88 pigs which were vaccinated at the beginning of the fattening period both in experimental conditions and in pig herds. All the pigs were challenged at the end of the fattening period in isolation units. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the same vaccines injected intramuscularly. It was shown that vaccination via the intradermal route induced good protection in the vaccinated animals and was similar to that conferred by live virus vaccine injected intramuscularly. The results, with the inactivated virus vaccine, were not so good when it was injected via the intradermal route. Studies with intradermal vaccination showed no local lesion or very small nodules strictly localized to the dermis. The results also confirmed that the effects of challenge exposure depended on the health status of animals prior to infection and show the necessity to use a synthetic value (delta G) to interpret the data and mainly to compare the results objectively. In fattening pigs this vaccination procedure is attractive because (i) less animal constraint is needed than would be for intramuscular injections, (ii) injection can be checked by the presence of a visible papula at the site of inoculation and, (iii) pigs can be vaccinated in the ham while they are feeding. Injection without a needle also contributes to avoiding bacterial contamination under practical farm conditions of vaccination.

  19. Efficient induction of immune responses through intradermal vaccination with N-trimethyl chitosan containing antigen formulations.

    PubMed

    Bal, Suzanne M; Slütter, Bram; van Riet, Elly; Kruithof, Annelieke C; Ding, Zhi; Kersten, Gideon F A; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2010-03-19

    The function of N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) in dermal immunisation is unknown. Therefore we investigated the immunogenicity of both antigen-containing TMC nanoparticles and TMC/antigen solutions after intradermal injection. Nanoparticles were prepared with a size around 200 nm and a positive zetapotential. In vitro, TMC nanoparticles increased the uptake of OVA by dendritic cells (DCs) and both nanoparticles and TMC/OVA mixtures were able to induce upregulation of MHC-II, CD83 and CD86. These activated DCs could induce a Th2 biased T cell proliferation. A solution of plain OVA did not induce DC maturation or T cell proliferation. In vivo, mice were injected thrice with TMC based formulations containing either OVA or diphtheria toxoid (DT), a more relevant antigen. All TMC-containing formulations were able to increase the IgG titres compared to unadjuvanted antigen and induced a Th2 biased immune response. When using DT-containing TMC formulations, IgG titres and neutralising antibody titres could match up to those obtained after subcutaneous injection of DT-Alum. In conclusion, both soluble TMC/antigen mixtures and TMC nanoparticles are able to induce DC maturation and enhance immune responses after intradermal injection. This demonstrates that TMC functions as an immune potentiator for antigens delivered via the skin.

  20. The use of syngeneic cells producing human somatotropic hormone (hSTH) for immunization of mice and development of hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Panyutich, A V; Prassolov, V S; Shydlovskaya, E A; Reznikov, M V; Chumakov, P M; Voitenok, N N

    1990-08-01

    We studied the possibility of syngeneic cells expressing heterologous protein being used for sensitization of mice and production of hybridomas. Recombinant retroviral vector containing cloned human somatotropic hormone (hSTH) gene was used to express hSTH in BALB/3T3 cells. BALB/c mice were injected intrasplenically (i/s) or combination of intraperitoneally (i/p) and intrasplenically with hSTH-producing cells. Sensitized splenocytes were fused with myeloma cell P3X63-AgB.653. Screening for anti-hSTH hybridomas was performed by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Both single i/s injection of producer cells as well as combined i/s and i/p injections were effective for sensitization of splenocytes. Combined injection was effective for production of IgG and IgM secreting hybridomas. Single i/s injection led to generation of only IgM producing hybridomas. The results proved that syngeneic cells expressing genes of heterologous proteins can be used for splenocyte sensitization and hybridoma preparation.

  1. Acute phase serum proteins in syngeneic and allogeneic mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Waites, G T; Bell, A M; Bell, S C

    1983-01-01

    The levels of two murine acute phase proteins, serum amyloid P component (SAP) and haptoglobin, have been measured in the serum of C57BL/10 female mice during syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy. Both syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy resulted in alterations in the levels of these proteins as compared to those observed in virgin females. Syngeneic mating resulted in an increase in concentration of both proteins during the final 3 days of pregnancy. During allogeneic pregnancy, SAP levels, after a transient increase on day 4, rose from days 6-8 and, after remaining relatively stable, increased from day 12 to reach maximum levels on day 18 of pregnancy. Levels fell dramatically during the immediate post-partum period. In contrast, although levels of haptoglobin also increased from days 6-8, for the remainder of pregnancy these increased levels remained stable. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the mechanisms of regulation of acute phase reactants and the immunological relationship between the mother and fetus. PMID:6409477

  2. Comparison of the Immunogenicity and Safety of the Conventional Subunit, MF59-Adjuvanted, and Intradermal Influenza Vaccines in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Bin; Choi, Won Suk; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-01-01

    The influenza vaccination is known as the most effective method for preventing influenza infection and its complications in the elderly. Conventional subunit (Agrippal S1; Novartis), MF59-adjuvanted (Fluad; Novartis), and intradermal (IDflu15; Sanofi Pasteur) influenza vaccines are widely used throughout South Korea. However, few comparative studies evaluating the safety and immunogenicity of these vaccines are available. Prior to the beginning of the 2011-2012 influenza season, 335 healthy elderly volunteers randomly received one of three seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines, the conventional subunit, MF59-adjuvanted, or intradermal influenza vaccine. Serum hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody levels were measured at the time of vaccination and at 1 and 6 months after vaccination. Adverse events were recorded prospectively. A total of 113 conventional subunit, 111 MF59-adjuvanted, and 111 intradermal influenza vaccine volunteers were followed up during a 6-month postvaccination period. One month after vaccination, all three vaccines satisfied Committee for Medical Products for Human Use (CHMP) immunogenicity criteria for the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains but not for the B strain. Compared with the subunit vaccine, the intradermal vaccine exhibited noninferiority, while the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine exhibited superiority. Furthermore, the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine was more immunogenic against the A/H3N2 strain than was the subunit vaccine up to 6 months postvaccination. The most common local and systemic reactions to the conventional subunit, MF59-adjuvanted, and intradermal influenza vaccines were pain at the injection site (7.1%, 10.8%, and 6.3%, respectively) and generalized myalgia (0.9%, 8.1%, and 5.4%, respectively). Local and systemic reactions were similar among the three vaccine groups. MF59-adjuvanted vaccine exhibited superior immunogenicity compared with a conventional subunit vaccine and had a comparable safety profile. For older adults, the MF59-adjuvanted

  3. The evaluation of the effect of the venous tonic 263-E on capillary permeability in the rabbit after administration by intradermal and intravenous routes.

    PubMed

    Sim, A K; Haworth, D; Esteve, J; Rodriguez, L

    1981-01-01

    The effects of 2,5-dihydroxybenzene-1,4-disulphonic acid-bisdiethylamine salt (263-E) and trihydroxyethylrutoside (Vitamin P4) on capillary permeability have been compared in the rabbit. Both drugs were administered by intradermal and intravenous routes. Histamine and bradykinin were injected intradermally to increase permeability. 263-E was sown to be a potent inhibitor of permeability changes induced by histamine and bradykinin intravenous routes. Vitamin P4 maximally inhibited permeability at the lowest intravenous dose level but with increasing dose the inhibition became negligible. After intradernal administration, vitamin P4 did not inhibit permeability but potentiated the permeability response induced by histamine and bradykinin.

  4. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... from cultures of Pn, C, and Dt strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (supplied by Animal and Plant... Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The heat-killed sensitizing agent shall be injected in a volume of 0.5 ml per...

  5. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... from cultures of Pn, C, and Dt strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (supplied by Animal and Plant... Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The heat-killed sensitizing agent shall be injected in a volume of 0.5 ml per...

  6. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from cultures of Pn, C, and Dt strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (supplied by Animal and Plant... Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The heat-killed sensitizing agent shall be injected in a volume of 0.5 ml per...

  7. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... from cultures of Pn, C, and Dt strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (supplied by Animal and Plant... Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The heat-killed sensitizing agent shall be injected in a volume of 0.5 ml per...

  8. 9 CFR 113.406 - Tuberculin, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... from cultures of Pn, C, and Dt strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (supplied by Animal and Plant... Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The heat-killed sensitizing agent shall be injected in a volume of 0.5 ml per...

  9. Intradermal powder immunization with protein-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Weissmueller, Nikolas T; Schiffter, Heiko A; Pollard, Andrew J

    2013-06-01

    The central importance for global public health policy of delivering life-saving vaccines for all children makes the development of efficacious and safe needle-free alternatives to hypodermic needles, preferably in a thermostable form, a matter of pressing urgency. This paper comprehensively reviews past in vivo studies on intradermal powder immunization with vaccine formulations that do not require refrigeration. Particular emphasis is given to the immune response in relation to antigen adjuvantation. While needle-free intradermal delivery of vaccines induces a predominantly Th2-type immune response, adjuvants powerfully enhance and modulate the magnitude and nature of the elicited immune response at various effector sites.

  10. Intradermal test reactivity to Malassezia pachydermatis in healthy basset hounds and basset hounds with Malassezia dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bond, R; Patterson-Kane, J C; Lloyd, D H

    2002-07-27

    Nineteen healthy beagles, eight healthy basset hounds and 17 basset hounds with Malassezia dermatitis were tested intradermally with two extracts of M pachydermatis. One healthy beagle and two affected basset hounds showed wheal and flare reactions 15 minutes after the injection. Delayed reactions, consisting of erythematous macules and plaques, were commonly observed 24 hours after the injection in both the healthy and affected basset hounds, but occurred infrequently in the beagles. At 24 hours the diameters of the lesions in the healthy and affected basset hounds were significantly (P<0.01) greater than those in the healthy beagles, but the diameters in the healthy and affected basset hounds did not vary significantly. Delayed reactions in six of the basset hounds with Malassezia dermatitis were characterised histologically by superficial perivascular and periadnexal infiltrates of neutrophils and lymphocytes. PMID:12180658

  11. Rapid Intradermal Delivery of Liquid Formulations Using a Hollow Microstructured Array

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Scott A.; Ng, Chin-Yee; Simmers, Ryan; Moeckly, Craig; Brandwein, David; Gilbert, Tom; Johnson, Nathan; Brown, Ken; Alston, Tesha; Prochnow, Gayatri; Siebenaler, Kris

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The purpose of this work is to demonstrate rapid intradermal delivery of up to 1.5 mL of formulation using a hollow microneedle delivery device designed for self-application. Methods 3M’s hollow Microstructured Transdermal System (hMTS) was applied to domestic swine to demonstrate delivery of a variety of formulations including small molecule salts and proteins. Blood samples were collected after delivery and analyzed via HPLC or ELISA to provide a PK profile for the delivered drug. Site evaluations were conducted post delivery to determine skin tolerability. Results Up to 1.5 mL of formulation was infused into swine at a max rate of approximately 0.25 mL/min. A red blotch, the size of the hMTS array, was observed immediately after patch removal, but had faded so as to be almost indistinguishable 10 min post-patch removal. One-mL deliveries of commercial formulations of naloxone hydrochloride and human growth hormone and a formulation of equine anti-tetanus toxin were completed in swine. With few notable differences, the resulting PK profiles were similar to those achieved following subcutaneous injection of these formulations. Conclusions 3M’s hMTS can provide rapid, intradermal delivery of 300–1,500 µL of liquid formulations of small molecules salts and proteins, compounds not typically compatible with passive transdermal delivery. PMID:20582455

  12. Analysis of the absorption kinetics of macromolecules following intradermal and subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Mikolaj; Manser, Kimberly; Nissley, Becky P; Mitra, Amitava

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed rapid growth in the area of microneedle-assisted intradermal drug delivery. Several publications involving in vivo studies in humans and minipigs have demonstrated distinct change in pharmacokinetics of peptides and proteins following intradermal (ID) administration as compared to subcutaneous (SC) injections. Specifically, ID administration produced a "left-shift" in pharmacokinetic profiles i.e. shorter time to achieve maximum plasma concentrations (shorter Tmax), and often higher maximum plasma concentrations (higher Cmax), as compared to the SC route. In the present work differences in the kinetics of drug absorption after ID and SC administration were explored for eight peptides and proteins with the focus on obtaining quantitative information about the absorption process and identifying similarities and differences in the absorption behavior across compounds. We confirmed that systemic uptake, as judged by apparent absorption rate constants, was 2- to 20-fold higher from the dermis as compared to the subcutis. Additionally, shapes of time-resolved absorption rate profiles demonstrated notable differences in absorption kinetics between ID and SC routes. For both administration routes evaluated herein there was a general trend of small macromolecules absorbing at higher rates as compared to the large macromolecules.

  13. Facilitation of syngeneic stem cell engraftment by anti-class I monoclonal antibody pretreatment of unirradiated recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Voralia, M.; Semeluk, A.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1987-10-01

    We have established a murine model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation based on the use of monoclonal antibody as the sole conditioning regimen in unirradiated recipients. Administration of a single injection of monoclonal antibody directed against major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I determinants facilitated permanent hemopoietic stem cell engraftment without any apparent side-effects. Whereas untreated hosts exhibited a maximal chimerism of 15% at donor cell doses of up to 12 X 10(7) bone marrow cells, pretreatment by 2 mg of anti-class I antibody one week prior to transplantation of 3 X 10(7) syngeneic bone marrow cells resulted in a mean donor representation of about 80%. The antibody can be given up to four weeks prior to transplantation, and the degree of donor engraftment observed is a function of the dose of antibody administered. The fact that specific antibody enhanced engraftment in two strain combinations indicates that antibody is the active agent in facilitating engraftment and that facilitation is not strain-restricted. Anti-class I antibodies of the IgG2a, but not IgG1, isotype are effective in promoting engraftment. Although the isotype requirement suggests a role for antibody-mediated cytotoxicity in promoting stem cell engraftment, the extensive time-frame of facilitation suggests that other effects of the antibody may also be involved. The model of syngeneic bone marrow transplantation we describe here will be useful in studying the mechanisms regulating stem cell engraftment and may have potential clinical application as an approach to autologous marrow transplantation.

  14. Immunogenicity and safety of Intanza(®)/IDflu(®) intradermal influenza vaccine in South Korean adults: a multicenter, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hoon Han, Sang; Hee Woo, Jun; Weber, Francoise; Joo Kim, Woo; Ran Peck, Kyong; Il Kim, Sang; Hwa Choi, Young; Myung Kim, June

    2013-09-01

    Intanza(®)/IDflu(®) (Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon, France) is an intradermal inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine developed as an alternative to intramuscular influenza vaccine. The objective of this study was to confirm the immunogenicity and safety of Intanza/IDflu in South Korean adults. In a phase IV multicenter trial, South Korean adults 18-59 y old (n = 120) and ≥ 60 y old (n = 120) were randomized 1:1 to receive a single dose of Intanza/IDflu (9 µg for 18-59 y, 15 µg for ≥ 60 y) or trivalent intramuscular vaccine (Vaxigrip(®) 15 µg, Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon, France). Blood was collected on pre-vaccination (day 0) and on day 21. Hemagglutination inhibition titers, seroprotection rates and seroconversion rates were determined on day 21. Geometric mean titers, seroprotection and seroconversion rates were similar between the intradermal and intramuscular vaccines in both age groups for all three vaccine strains (A/H1N1, A/H3N2 and B). Both vaccines met Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use criteria for all three strains. Solicited systemic reactions of the intradermal groups were generally mild, transient, and similar to those of the intramuscular groups. Solicited injection site reactions were more frequent in the intradermal groups but were mostly mild, transient, and consisted mainly of pain, erythema, and pruritus. No treatment-related serious adverse events or other safety concerns were reported. These results confirm that Intanza/IDflu is an effective and well-tolerated alternative to IM influenza vaccination. (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT ID: NCT01215669).

  15. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  16. Intradermal Gene Immunization: The Possible Role of DNA Uptake in the Induction of Cellular Immunity to Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, Eyal; Carson, Dennis A.; Parker, Suezanne E.; Parr, Tyler B.; Abai, Anna M.; Aichinger, Gerald; Gromkowski, Stanislaw H.; Singh, Malini; Lew, Denise; Yankauckas, Michelle A.; Baird, Stephen M.; Rhodes, Gary H.

    1994-09-01

    The skin and mucous membranes are the anatomical sites where most viruses are first encountered by the immune system. Previous experiments have suggested that striated muscle cells are unique among mammalian cell types in their capacity to take up and express free DNA in the absence of a viral vector or physical carrier. However, we have found that mice injected into the superficial skin with free (naked) plasmid DNA encoding the influenza nucleoprotein gene had discrete foci of epidermal and dermal cells, including cells with dendritic morphology, that contained immunoreactive nucleoprotein antigen. A single intradermal administration of 0.3-15 μ g of free plasmid DNA induced anti-nucleoprotein-specific antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes that persisted for at least 68-70 weeks after vaccination. Intradermal gene administration induced higher antibody titers than did direct gene injection into skeletal muscle and did not cause local inflammation or necrosis. Compared with control animals, the gene-injected mice were resistant to challenge with a heterologous strain of influenza virus. These results indicate that the cells of the skin can take up and express free foreign DNA and induce cellular and humoral immune responses against the encoded protein. We suggest that DNA uptake by the skin-associated lymphoid tissues may play a role in the induction of cytotoxic T cells against viruses and other intracellular pathogens.

  17. An Intradermal Inoculation Model of Scrub Typhus in Swiss CD-1 Mice Demonstrates More Rapid Dissemination of Virulent Strains of Orientia tsutsugamushi

    PubMed Central

    Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Paris, Daniel H.; Chan, Teik-Chye; Jones, Margaret; Luce-Fedrow, Alison; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Anantatat, Tippawan; Turner, Gareth D. H.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an important endemic disease of the Asia-Pacific region caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. To develop an effective vaccine to prevent scrub typhus infection, a better understanding of the initial host-pathogen interaction is needed. The objective of this study was to investigate early bacterial dissemination in a CD-1 Swiss outbred mouse model after intradermal injection of O. tsutsugamushi. Three human pathogenic strains of O. tsutsugamushi (Karp, Gilliam, and Woods) were chosen to investigate the early infection characteristics associated with bacterial virulence. Tissue biopsies of the intradermal injection site and draining lymph nodes were examined using histology and immunohistochemistry to characterize bacterial dissemination, and correlated with quantitative real-time PCR for O. tsutsugamushi in blood and tissue from major organs. Soluble adhesion molecules were measured to examine cellular activation in response to infection. No eschar formation was seen at the inoculation site and no clinical disease developed within the 7 day period of observation. However, O. tsutsugamushi was localized at the injection site and in the draining lymph nodes by day 7 post inoculation. Evidence of leukocyte and endothelial activation was present by day 7 with significantly raised levels of sL-selectin, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1. Infection with the Karp strain was associated with earlier and higher bacterial loads and more extensive dissemination in various tissues than the less pathogenic Gilliam and Woods strains. The bacterial loads of O. tsutsugamushi were highest in the lungs and spleens of mice inoculated with Karp and Gilliam, but not Woods strains. Strains of higher virulence resulted in more rapid systemic infection and dissemination in this model. The CD-1 mouse intradermal inoculation model demonstrates features relevant to early scrub typhus infection in humans, including the development of regional lymphadenopathy, leukocyte activation and distant

  18. Comparison of the evolutionary distances among syngens and sibling species of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hori, Manabu; Tomikawa, Izumi; Przyboś, Ewa; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    The morphospecies of the genus Paramecium have several mating type groups, so-called syngens, composed of cells of complementary mating types. The Paramecium aurelia complex is composed of 15 sibling species assigned to the species from the syngen. To increase our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among syngen and sibling species of the genus Paramecium, we investigated the gene sequences of cytosol-type hsp70 from 7 syngens of Paramecium caudatum and 15 sibling species of P. aurelia. Molecular phylogenetic trees indicated that the P. aurelia complex could be divided into four lineages and separated into each sibling species. However, we did not find any obvious genetic distance among syngens of P. caudatum, and they could only be separated into two closely related groups. These results indicated that the concept of syngens in P. caudatum differs quite markedly from that of the P. aurelia complex. In addition, we also discuss the relationships among these species and other species, Paramecium jenningsi and Paramecium multimicronucleatum, which were once classified as varieties of P. aurelia.

  19. SynGenics Optimization System (SynOptSys)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventresca, Carol; McMilan, Michelle L.; Globus, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The SynGenics Optimization System (SynOptSys) software application optimizes a product with respect to multiple, competing criteria using statistical Design of Experiments, Response-Surface Methodology, and the Desirability Optimization Methodology. The user is not required to be skilled in the underlying math; thus, SynOptSys can help designers and product developers overcome the barriers that prevent them from using powerful techniques to develop better pro ducts in a less costly manner. SynOpt-Sys is applicable to the design of any product or process with multiple criteria to meet, and at least two factors that influence achievement of those criteria. The user begins with a selected solution principle or system concept and a set of criteria that needs to be satisfied. The criteria may be expressed in terms of documented desirements or defined responses that the future system needs to achieve. Documented desirements can be imported into SynOptSys or created and documented directly within SynOptSys. Subsequent steps include identifying factors, specifying model order for each response, designing the experiment, running the experiment and gathering the data, analyzing the results, and determining the specifications for the optimized system. The user may also enter textual information as the project progresses. Data is easily edited within SynOptSys, and the software design enables full traceability within any step in the process, and facilitates reporting as needed. SynOptSys is unique in the way responses are defined and the nuances of the goodness associated with changes in response values for each of the responses of interest. The Desirability Optimization Methodology provides the basis of this novel feature. Moreover, this is a complete, guided design and optimization process tool with embedded math that can remain invisible to the user. It is not a standalone statistical program; it is a design and optimization system.

  20. Immunization against strontium-90 induction of bone tumors with inactivated FBJ virus and irradiated syngeneic strontium-90-induced tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Triest, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    Three hundred six C57BL/6J female mice were subdivided into a control group left untreated and an experimental group treated intraperitoneally with 1.0 ..mu..Ci strontium-90/g of body weight at an age of 66 days. Treatments for the groups were as follows: none, 6 injections of formalin-inactivated FBJ viral preparation, 6 injections of active FBJ viral preparation, and 2 injections of 10,000 rad irradiated transplantable osteosarcoma previously induced in C57BL/6J mice by strontium-90. In addition to the above groups, two other groups were treated with respectively 0.032 and 0.10 ..mu..Ci strontium-90/g body weight in order to obtain information on the dose-response relationship between the injection of strontium-90 and the yield of bone tumors. In the groups not treated with strontium-90, only 1 bone tumor developed; this occurred in the group injected with FBJ virus. The incidence of bone tumors in the groups treated with 1.0 ..mu..Ci strontium-90 was significantly lower (18.5% or 18.2%) in the two groups that had received injections of inactivated FBJ virus or irradiated isogenic osteosarcoma when compared to the group left uninjected, which developed 43.5% tumors. In contrast, the strontium-90-treated group that also received injections of active FBJ virus developed 63.0% tumors. Only a single bone tumor developed in the groups treated solely with intermediate doses of strontium-90. The results indicate that immunization with inactivated FBJ virus or with irradiated syngeneic strontium-90-induced tumor cells can significantly decrease the development of strontium-90-induced tumors.

  1. Optimizing Intradermal Administration of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lyke, Kirsten E.; Laurens, Matthew B.; Strauss, Kathy; Adams, Matthew; Billingsley, Peter F.; James, Eric; Manoj, Anita; Chakravarty, Sumana; Plowe, Christopher V.; Li, Ming Lin; Ruben, Adam; Edelman, Robert; Green, Michael; Dube, Tina J.; Kim Lee Sim, B.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful tool to evaluate malaria vaccine and prophylactic drug efficacy. Until recently CHMI was only carried out by the bite of infected mosquitoes. A parenteral method of CHMI would standardize Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) administration, eliminate the need for expensive challenge facility infrastructure, and allow for use of many P. falciparum strains. Recently, intradermal (ID) injection of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ was shown to induce P. falciparum malaria; however, 100% infection rates were not achieved by ID injection. To optimize ID PfSPZ dosing so as to achieve 100% infection, 30 adults aged 18–45 years were randomized to one of six groups composed of five volunteers each. The parameters of dose (1 × 104 versus 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose per volunteer), number of injections (two versus eight), and aliquot volume per ID injection (10 μL versus 50 μL) were studied. Three groups attained 100% infection: 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 50 μL/2 doses, 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/2 doses, and 5 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/8 doses. The group that received 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose in eight 10 μL injections had a 100% infection rate and the shortest prepatent period (mean of 12.7 days), approaching the prepatent period for the current CHMI standard of five infected mosquitoes. PMID:26416102

  2. Optimizing Intradermal Administration of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Controlled Human Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Lyke, Kirsten E; Laurens, Matthew B; Strauss, Kathy; Adams, Matthew; Billingsley, Peter F; James, Eric; Manoj, Anita; Chakravarty, Sumana; Plowe, Christopher V; Li, Ming Lin; Ruben, Adam; Edelman, Robert; Green, Michael; Dube, Tina J; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2015-12-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful tool to evaluate malaria vaccine and prophylactic drug efficacy. Until recently CHMI was only carried out by the bite of infected mosquitoes. A parenteral method of CHMI would standardize Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) administration, eliminate the need for expensive challenge facility infrastructure, and allow for use of many P. falciparum strains. Recently, intradermal (ID) injection of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ was shown to induce P. falciparum malaria; however, 100% infection rates were not achieved by ID injection. To optimize ID PfSPZ dosing so as to achieve 100% infection, 30 adults aged 18-45 years were randomized to one of six groups composed of five volunteers each. The parameters of dose (1 × 10(4) versus 5 × 10(4) PfSPZ total dose per volunteer), number of injections (two versus eight), and aliquot volume per ID injection (10 μL versus 50 μL) were studied. Three groups attained 100% infection: 1 × 10(4) PfSPZ in 50 μL/2 doses, 1 × 10(4) PfSPZ in 10 μL/2 doses, and 5 × 10(4) PfSPZ in 10 μL/8 doses. The group that received 5 × 10(4) PfSPZ total dose in eight 10 μL injections had a 100% infection rate and the shortest prepatent period (mean of 12.7 days), approaching the prepatent period for the current CHMI standard of five infected mosquitoes.

  3. Successful radioimmunotherapy of established syngeneic rat colon carcinoma with 211At-mAb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most carcinomas are prone to metastasize despite successful treatment of the primary tumor. One way to address this clinical challenge may be targeted therapy with α-emitting radionuclides such as astatine-211 (211At). Radioimmunotherapy utilizing α-particle emitting radionuclides is considered especially suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters and single cells, although lesions of different sizes may also be present in the patient. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the toxicity and secondarily in vivo efficacy of a 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against colon carcinoma with tumor diameters of approximately 10 mm. Methods Eighteen rats with subperitoneal syngeneic colon carcinoma were allocated to three groups of six animals together with three healthy rats in each group. The groups were injected intravenously with either 150 μg of unlabeled mAbs (controls) or 2.5 or 5 MBq 211At-mAbs directed towards the Lewis Y antigen expressed on the cell membrane of several carcinomas. Tumor volume, body weight, and blood cell counts were monitored for 100 days after treatment. Results Local tumors were non-palpable in five out of six rats after treatment with both activities of 211At-mAbs, compared to one out of six in the control group. At the study end, half of the animals in each group given 211At-BR96 and one animal in the control group were free from disease. Radioimmunotherapy resulted in dose-dependent, transient weight loss and myelotoxicity. Survival was significantly better in the groups receiving targeted alpha therapy than in those receiving unlabeled mAbs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the possibility of treating small, solid colon carcinoma tumors with α-emitting radionuclides such as 211At bound to mAbs, with tolerable toxicity. PMID:23557183

  4. Lack of immune response to differentiated cells derived from syngeneic induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guha, Prajna; Morgan, John W; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Neil P; Boyd, Ashleigh S

    2013-04-01

    The prospects for using autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in cell replacement therapy have been tempered by evidence that undifferentiated, syngeneic mouse iPSCs are immunogenic upon transplantation. However, the immunogenicity of more therapeutically relevant differentiated cells remains unexplored. Here, we differentiated mouse iPSCs into embryoid bodies (EBs) or representative cell types spanning the three embryonic germ layers and assessed their immunogenicity in vitro and after their transplantation into syngeneic recipients. We found no evidence of increased T cell proliferation in vitro, rejection of syngeneic iPSC-derived EBs/tissue-specific cells (TSCs) after transplantation, or an antigen-specific secondary immune response. Thus, differentiated cells derived from syngeneic iPSCs do not appear to be rejected after transplantation. We also found little evidence of an immune response to undifferentiated, syngeneic iPSCs. Our data support the idea that differentiated cells generated from autologous iPSCs could be applied for cell replacement therapy without eliciting immune rejection.

  5. GM1 binding-deficient exotoxin is a potent noninflammatory broad spectrum intradermal immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zoeteweij, J Paul; Epperson, Diane E; Porter, Jackie D; Zhang, Chen X; Frolova, Olga Y; Constantinides, Anita P; Fuhrmann, Steven R; El-Amine, Moustapha; Tian, Jing-Hui; Ellingsworth, Larry R; Glenn, Gregory M

    2006-07-15

    Intradermal (i.d.) immunization is a promising route of vaccine administration. Suitable i.d. adjuvants are important to increase vaccine efficacy in poorly responding populations such as the elderly or for dose-sparing strategies in the face of vaccine shortages. Bacterial exotoxins, such as Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), exert strong immunostimulatory effects through binding to monosialoganglioside (GM1) cell surface receptors; however, injection is hampered by local inflammation. We demonstrate that the injection of LT formulations deficient in GM1 binding by mutation (LT(G33D)) or in vitro ligand coupling does not cause localized edema and inflammation in mice, yet these formulations retain potent adjuvant activity by enhancing functional Ab and cellular immune responses to coadministered Ags. Complete protection against in vivo lethal tetanus toxin challenge and the induction of Ag-specific CTL responses capable of killing target cells in vivo indicated in vivo efficacy of the induced immune responses. LT(G33D) proved superior to standard alum adjuvant regarding the magnitude and breadth of the induced immune responses. Immunizations in complex ganglioside knockout mice revealed a GM1-independent pathway of LT adjuvanticity. Immunostimulation by i.d. LT(G33D) is explained by its ability to induce migration of activated APCs to the proximal draining lymph nodes. LT(G33D) is a promising candidate adjuvant for human trials of parenteral vaccines in general and for current i.d. vaccine development in particular.

  6. [Studies on the intradermal reactions with the fractions of Ascaris lumbricoides

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Wook

    1967-06-01

    and kept in 30 degrees C incubator for 24 hours. Among of them, the active one was seleted and put to sudden freeze at -70 degrees C for 20 hours. the whole body was powdered in a dried condition and kept it in ampoule at -4 degrees C. a) Crude antigen: The ether extract of powdered Ascaris lumbrucoides were motared by adding veronal buffer solution (1:100) and kept in icebox for 48 hours. The suspension was diluted with veronal buffer solution in the ratio of 1:10,000. b) Protein antigen : This antigen was prepared by Chaffee's modified methods and ammonium sulfate extraction mehtod. c) Polysaccharide antigen: Chaffee's modified method and ethanol extration method were applied. d) Mixed antigen : The same amount of preparation of protein and polysaccharide antigen were mixed. C. Intrdermal test 1. The intradermal test : 0.02ml of natigen was injected on the anterior surface of the frearm in human and on the back in aninmal, with tuberculin syringe. The criteria of the skin reaction were determined as follows; wheal: -; 0-4mm, +/-; 5-7mm, +;8-9mm, +; 21-32mm, ++; 33-44mm, +++; 45-56mm, ++++; over 57mm, in diameter. D. Stool examination : All the stool examination was done by formalin-ether concectration(M.G.L) method. E.P.G (egg per gram) was also determined by Stoll's egg counting method. RESULT : The intradermal reaction after the injection of each antigen was observed at 15, 30, 60 minutes and 3, 24 hours. In 58 ascariasis cases, the peak of wheal was appeared at 30 minute; 93.0% with the crude antigen, 15.5% with the mixed antigen, 10.3% with the Protein antigen, but all were negative in the polysaccharide antigen. The erythema reaction paralledled, in general, to the wheal; 75.8% at 15 minutes, 72.5% at 30 minutes and 48.3% at 60 mintues, with the crude antigen. Only 3.4% showed erythema at 15,30, and 60 minutes int the case of mixed antigen, and 1.7% fo positive was appeared at 30 minutes in the case of protein antigen, but none was observed in the

  7. HER2/neu DNA vaccination by intradermal gene delivery in a mouse tumor model: Gene gun is superior to jet injector in inducing CTL responses and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Kobelt, Dennis; Hohn, Oliver; Vu, Minh D; Schlag, Peter M; Dörken, Bernd; Norley, Steven; Lipp, Martin; Walther, Wolfgang; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    DNA vaccines are potential tools for the induction of immune responses against both infectious disease and cancer. The dermal application of DNA vaccines is of particular interest since the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin are characterized by an abundance of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of our study was to compare tumor protection as obtained by two different methods of intradermal DNA delivery (gene gun and jet injector) in a well-established HER2/neu mouse tumor model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with a HER2/neu-coding plasmid by gene gun or jet injector. Mice were then subcutaneously challenged with HER2/neu(+) syngeneic D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Protection against subsequent challenges with tumor cells as well as humoral and T-cell immune responses induced by the vaccine were monitored. Gene gun immunization was far superior to jet injector both in terms of tumor protection and induction of HER2/neu-specific immune responses. After gene gun immunization, 60% of the mice remained tumor-free until day 140 as compared with 25% after jet injector immunization. Furthermore, gene gun vaccination was able to induce both a strong T(H)1-polarized T-cell response with detectable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a humoral immune response against HER2/neu, whereas the jet injector was not. Although the disadvantages that were associated with the use of the jet injector in our model may be overcome with methodological modifications and/or in larger animals, which exhibit a thicker skin and/or subcutaneous muscle tissue, we conclude that gene gun delivery constitutes the method of choice for intradermal DNA delivery in preclinical mouse models and possibly also for the clinical development of DNA-based vaccines.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Model of the Transport of Fast-Acting Insulin From the Subcutaneous and Intradermal Spaces to Blood.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dayu; Kulkarni, Sandip D; Chan, Alice; Keith, Stephen; Pettis, Ron; Kovatchev, Boris P; Farhi, Leon S; Breton, Marc D

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models describing the transport of insulin from the injection site to blood assist clinical decision making and are part of in silico platforms for developing and testing of insulin delivery strategies for treatment of patients with diabetes. The ability of these models to accurately describe all facets of the in vivo insulin transport is therefore critical for their application. Here, we propose a new model of fast-acting insulin analogs transport from the subcutaneous and intradermal spaces to blood that can accommodate clinically observed biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of injected insulin, 2 phenomena that are not captured by existing PK models. To develop the model we compare 9 insulin transport PK models which describe hypothetical insulin delivery pathways potentially capable of approximating biphasic appearance of exogenous insulin. The models are tested with respect to their ability to describe clinical data from 10 healthy volunteers which received 1 subcutaneous and 2 intradermal insulin injections on 3 different occasions. The optimal model, selected based on information and posterior identifiability criteria, assumes that insulin is delivered at the administrative site and is then transported to the bloodstream via 2 independent routes (1) diffusion-like process to the blood and (2) combination of diffusion-like processes followed by an additional compartment before entering the blood. This optimal model accounts for biphasic appearance and delayed clearance of exogenous insulin. It agrees better with the clinical data as compared to commonly used models and is expected to improve the in silico development and testing of insulin treatment strategies, including artificial pancreas systems. PMID:25759184

  9. Modification of growth of neuroblastoma cells in syngeneic mice by aldehyde-treated neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, L; Diamond, L; Revoltella, R

    1976-06-01

    Pretreatment of syngeneic strain A mice with aldehyde-fixed neuroblastoma cells (clone NB6R) almost completely protected the mice against challenge with viable NB6R cells. In contrast, tumor growth was enhanced in mice treated with fixed cells after challenge with viable cells.

  10. Autoimmune Hepatitis Induced by Syngeneic Liver Cytosolic Proteins Biotransformed by Alcohol Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Duryee, Michael J.; Willis, Monte S.; Tuma, Dean J.; Radio, Stanley J.; Hunter, Carlos D.; Schaffert, Courtney S.; Klassen, Lynell W.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Aldehydes that are produced following the breakdown of ethanol (acetaldehyde) and lipid peroxidation of membranes (malondialdehyde) have been shown to bind (adduct) proteins. Additionally, these two aldehydes can combine (MAA) on non-syngeneic and syngeneic proteins to initiate numerous immune responses to the unmodified part of the protein in the absence of an adjuvant. Therefore, these studies provide a potential mechanism for the development of antigen-specific immune responses resulting in liver damage should syngeneic liver proteins be adducted with MAA. Methods This study sought to test whether MAA modified syngeneic liver cytosolic proteins administered daily in the absence of adjuvant into C57BL/6 mice abrogates tolerance to initiate a MAA induced autoimmune-like hepatitis (MIAH). Results In mice immunized with MAA modified cytosols there was an increase in liver damage as assessed by AST/ALT levels that correlated with liver pathology scores and the presence of the pro-fibrotic factors; smooth muscle actin (SMA), TGF-β, and collagen. IgG antibodies and T-cell proliferative responses specific for cytosolic proteins were also detected. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were produced in the livers of animals exposed to MAA-modified cytosols. Finally, transfer of immunized T-cells to naïve animals caused biochemical and histological evidence of liver damage. Conclusions These data demonstrate that a disease with an autoimmune-like pathophysiology can be generated in this animal model using soluble MAA modified syngeneic liver cytosols as the immunogen. These studies provide insight into potential mechanism(s) that the metabolites of alcohol may play in contributing to the onset of an autoimmune-like disease in ALD patients. PMID:20860619

  11. Antibody response of patients after postexposure rabies vaccination with small intradermal doses of purified chick embryo cell vaccine or purified Vero cell rabies vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, D. J.; Banzhoff, A.; Nicolay, U.; Sirikwin, S.; Dumavibhat, B.; Tongswas, S.; Wasi, C.

    2000-01-01

    Although the introduction of tissue culture vaccines for rabies has dramatically improved the immunogenicity and safety of rabies vaccines, they are often prohibitively expensive for developing countries. To examine whether smaller doses of these vaccines could be used, we tested the safety and immunogenicity of purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) on 211 patients in Thailand with World Health Organization (WHO) category II and III exposures to rabies. The patients presented at two Thai hospitals and were randomized into three groups. Patients in Group 1 received 0.1 ml PCECV intradermally at two sites on days 0, 3, 7, and at one site on days 30 and 90. Group 2 was treated similarly, except that purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) was used instead of PCECV. Group 3 received 1.0 ml PCECV intramuscularly on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 30 and 90. After 0, 3, 7, 14, 30 and 90 days serum was collected from the subjects and the geometric mean titres (GMTs) of rabies virus neutralizing antibody determined. After 14 days the GMT of 59 patients vaccinated intradermally with PCECV was equivalent to that of patients who received PVRV. Adverse reactions were more frequent in patients who received vaccines intradermally, indicating the reactions were associated with the route of injection, rather than the vaccine per se. We conclude that PCECV is a safe and highly immunogenic vaccine for postexposure rabies vaccination when administered intradermally in 0.1-ml doses using the two-site method ("2,2,2,0,1,1") recommended by WHO. PMID:10859864

  12. Spinal neurons that contain gastrin-releasing peptide seldom express Fos or phosphorylate extracellular signal-regulated kinases in response to intradermal chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is thought to play a role in the itch evoked by intradermal injection of chloroquine. Although some early studies suggested that GRP was expressed in pruriceptive primary afferents, it is now thought that GRP in the spinal cord is derived mainly from a population of excitatory interneurons in lamina II, and it has been suggested that these are involved in the itch pathway. To test this hypothesis, we used the transcription factor Fos and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) to look for evidence that interneurons expressing GRP were activated following intradermal injection of chloroquine into the calf, in mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in these cells. Results Injection of chloroquine resulted in numerous Fos- or phospho-ERK (pERK) positive cells in the somatotopically appropriate part of the superficial dorsal horn. The proportion of all neurons in this region that showed Fos or pERK was 18% and 21%, respectively. However, among the GRP–EGFP, only 7% were Fos-positive and 3% were pERK-positive. As such, GRP–EGFP cells were significantly less likely than other neurons to express Fos or to phosphorylate ERK. Conclusions Both expression of Fos and phosphorylation of ERK can be used to identify dorsal horn neurons activated by chloroquine injection. However, these results do not support the hypothesis that interneurons expressing GRP are critical components in the itch pathway. PMID:27270268

  13. Delayed hypersensitivity to a corticosteroid suspension containing methylprednisolone. Two cases of conjunctival inflammation after retrobulbar injection.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C G; Robertson, D B

    1985-02-01

    Two patients with chronic iridocyclitis had a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, characterized by severe conjunctival inflammation, after retrobulbar injections with a commercial suspension of methylprednisolone acetate. Although patch test reactions to methylprednisolone at enhanced concentrations were negative, delayed hypersensitivity could be easily demonstrated by intradermal testing with this corticosteroid. Both patients also had concomitant delayed hypersensitivity to a proprietary preservative (myristyl gamma-picolinium chloride) in the commercial corticosteroid suspension, which was confirmed by intradermal testing. These observations (negative patch test reactions, positive intradermal test reactions) suggest that the route of administration may be an important determinant of antigenic hapten-protein complex formation and subsequent delayed hypersensitivity responses involving cutaneous or mucocutaneous tissue.

  14. Long-term anti-rabies antibody persistence following intramuscular or low-dose intradermal vaccination of young Vietnamese children.

    PubMed

    Vien, Nguyen Cong; Feroldi, Emmanuel; Lang, Jean

    2008-03-01

    Vietnamese children received purified Vero cell rabies vaccine 1 year after a primary series (Y0) and again 5 years later (Y5), either as intramuscular or 1/5th dose intradermal injections concomitant with diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and oral poliomyelitis vaccines. Antibody levels were assayed annually for 5 years. All subjects in both groups had anti-rabies antibody titres considered protective after the Y0 booster. Rabies seroprotection rates and geometric mean titres gradually decreased similarly in both groups. Seroprotection after the Y5 booster was 100% in both groups. Satisfactory immunogenicity, long-term antibody persistence and an anamnestic response were conferred by both routes, greatly simplifying any future post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:18191971

  15. Identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens through molecular markers--comparative analysis of three loci in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Potekhin, Alexey; Przyboś, Ewa; Rautian, Maria; Skoblo, Inna; Tarcz, Sebastian

    2012-09-01

    This is the first attempt to resolve the phylogenetic relationship between different syngens of Paramecium bursaria and to investigate at a molecular level the intraspecific differentiation of strains originating from very distant geographical locations. Herein we introduce a new collection of five P. bursaria syngens maintained at St Petersburg State University, as the international collection of syngens was lost in the 1960s. To analyze the degree of speciation within Paramecium bursaria, we examined 26 strains belonging to five different syngens from distant and geographically isolated localities using rDNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU) fragments, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), and H4 gene fragments. It was shown that P. bursaria strains of the same syngens cluster together in all three inferred molecular phylogenies. The genetic diversity among the studied P. bursaria strains based on rDNA sequences was rather low. The COI divergence of Paramecium bursaria was also definitely lower than that observed in the Paramecium aurelia complex. The nucleotide sequences of the H4 gene analyzed in the present study indicate the extent of genetic differences between the syngens of Paramecium bursaria. Our study demonstrates the diagnostic value of molecular markers, which are important tools in the identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens.

  16. The false-positive responses of analgesic drugs to the intradermal serotonin- and compound 48/80-induced scratches as an animal model of itch.

    PubMed

    Ilkaya, Fatih; Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Gunduz, Ozgur; Ide, Tayfun; Akar, Ahmet; Ulugol, Ahmet; Guzel, Hasan; Dogrul, Ahmet; Ucar, Durmus; Gunaydin, Caner

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal injection of pruritogens such as serotonin, histamine and compound 48/80 into the skin and then, the evaluation of the scratching behavior is the commonly used animal model to advance pruritic research and drug development. However, predictive validity of this model is poorly documented. There is a close interaction between itch and pain sensations with regard to mediation through an anatomically and functionally identical neuronal pathway. One approach is whether the existing animal model of itch differentiates itch or pain to show efficacy of clinically effective analgesic drugs as a back translation. In this study, we explored the effects of different group of analgesic drugs on serotonin and compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior in Balb-C mice. Serotonin (25 μg) and compound 48/80 (100 μg) was injected intradermally in a volume of 50 μl into the rostral part of skin on the back of male mice and scratches were counted for a 30-min observation period. Morphine (1, 3, 10 mg/kg), tramadol (20, 40, 80 mg/kg), cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 (0.1, 0.3, 1 mg/kg), paracetamol (100, 200, 300 mg/kg) and diclofenac (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to pruritogen injection. The analgesic drugs dose dependently blocked serotonin and compound 48/80-induced straching behavior with exerting complete inhibition at certain doses. Our data suggests that intradermal pruritogen-induced scratching models may not discriminate pain and itch sensations and give false positive results when standard analgesic drugs are used. PMID:27685776

  17. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling supports tumor progression of a mesenchymal-like mammary tumor cell line in a syngeneic murine model

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tanuka; Gu, Xiang; Yang, Junhua; Ellies, Lesley G; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that TGF-β functions as a tumor promoter in metastatic, mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells and that TGF-β inhibitors can effectively abrogate tumor progression in several of these models. Here we report a novel observation with the use of genetic and pharmacological approaches, and murine mammary cell injection models in both syngeneic and immune compromised mice. We found that TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) knockdown in the MMTV-PyMT derived Py8119, a mesenchymal-like murine mammary tumor cell line, resulted in increased orthotopic tumor growth potential in a syngeneic background and a similar trend in an immune compromised background. Systemic treatment with a small-molecule TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor induced a trend towards increased metastatic colonization of distant organs following intra cardiac inoculation of Py8119 cells, with little effect on the colonization of luminal-like Py230 cells, also derived from MMTV-PyMT tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that the attenuation of TGF-β signaling in mesenchymal-like mammary tumors does not necessarily inhibit their malignant potential, and anti-TGF-β therapeutic intervention requires greater precision in identifying molecular markers in tumors with an indication of functional TGF-β signaling. PMID:24368187

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Activation Rescues Impaired Antibody Response in Needle-free Intradermal DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Prabhu S.; Mishra, Ria; Badarinath, Krithika; Selvam, Deepak; Payeli, Sravan K.; Stout, Richard R.; Ranga, Udaykumar

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of plasmid DNA to the skin can target distinct subsets of dermal dendritic cells to confer a superior immune response. The needle-free immunization technology offers a reliable, safe and efficient means to administer intradermal (ID) injections. We report here that the ID injection of DNA vectors using an NF device (NF-ID) elicits a superior cell-mediated immune response, at much lesser DNA dosage, comparable in magnitude to the traditional intramuscular immunization. However, the humoral response is significantly impaired, possibly at the stage of B cell isotype switching. We found that the NF-ID administration deposits the DNA primarily on the epidermis resulting in a rapid loss of the DNA as well as the synthesized antigen due to the faster regeneration rate of the skin layers. Therefore, despite the immune-rich nature of the skin, the NF-ID immunization of DNA vectors may be limited by the impaired humoral response. Additional booster injections are required to augment the antibody response. As an alternative and a viable solution, we rescued the IgG response by coadministration of a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, among other adjuvants examined. Our work has important implication for the optimization of the emerging needle-free technology for ID immunization. PMID:27658623

  19. [Experience and discussion on the national standard Standardized Manipulation of Acupuncture and Moxibustion. Part 8: Intradermal Needle].

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Yuan, Cheng-Kai; Yin, Hai-Yan; Zeng, Fang; Tang, Yong; Yu, Shu-Guang

    2012-02-01

    Standardized Manipulation of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Part 8: Intradermal Needle was compiled with the following principles. The compiling standard, technical features and clinic manipulations of intradermal needle were taken as the basic principle for compiling. Literature research, expert survey and clinic practice verification were applied as the drafting methods. The key issues were focused on the relationship between standardization and individualization, normalization and effectiveness, qualification and quantification. And the postural selection, reinforcing and reducing manipulations, fixing materials and embedding duration involved in intradermal needling were emphasized particularly. At the same time, details and the future way of thinking of intradermal needle were expounded in this article as well. PMID:22493924

  20. Onset and duration of intradermal mixtures of bupivacaine and lidocaine with epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James B; Song, Juhee; Mahabir, Raman C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Bupivacaine and lidocaine are often used concurrently, in theory, to combine the more rapid onset of lidocaine and the longer duration of bupivacaine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this concept. METHODS: Twenty-five subjects were enrolled in a double-blinded, randomized block design study to evaluate the onset and duration of four different mixtures of lidocaine and bupivacaine with epinephrine. The study was designed to achieve 80% power to detect an effect size of 0.37 at 5% overall significance. The four mixtures tested were: 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine (1:200,000); 1% lidocaine with epinephrine (1:100,000); 0.125% bupivacaine and 0.5% lidocaine with epinephrine (1:150,000); and 0.25% bupivacaine and 1% lidocaine with epinephrine (1:150,000). Four intradermal injections were made in the volar forearms of each participant. Time to effect and duration were measured by sensation of a sharp skin prick. RESULTS: Mean time to onset ranged from 12 s to 29 s without statistical significance across all tested solutions (P=0.891). Mean duration of effect ranged from 6 h 38 min to 7 h 25 min with a statistically significant difference across the tested solutions (P=0.036). CONCLUSIONS: No statistical benefit was measured when comparing lidocaine with epinephrine, bupivacaine with epinephrine, and mixtures of these local anesthetics with regard to onset of action. While a statistical difference was observed in duration of effect, the clinical benefit measured was narrow. PMID:24431939

  1. Effect of an inactivated paratuberculosis vaccine on the intradermal testing of goats for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Christophe; Mercier, Pascale; Pellet, Marie-Pierre; Vialard, Jaquemine

    2012-03-01

    The effect of an inactivated paratuberculosis vaccine on the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in goats was investigated in a herd with a history of clinical paratuberculosis but which was free of TB. Cohorts of animals in 2006, 2008 and 2009, were vaccinated once at 1 month of age, and 50% of the 2006 cohort served as unvaccinated controls. The goats were aged 8 months, 20 months and 3.5 years old at the time of the survey. All animals were assessed using a single intradermal injection of bovine tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) (SID test), or using both bovine and avian PPD (CID test). An interferon (IFN)-γ assay using both bovine and avian PPD was carried out on the 2006 cohort and was interpreted according to three different 'cut-off' points. No unvaccinated (control) animals tested positive to any of the assays, confirming that the herd was TB-free. The SID test had a low specificity in vaccinated animals at 8 and 20 months of age, whereas the CID test demonstrated 100% specificity in animals ≥20 months-old. The specificity of IFN-γ assay was less than maximal for vaccinated animals 3.5 years old as small numbers of false positives were detected, although this depended on the chosen cut-off point. The study findings demonstrate that the use of an inactivated paratuberculosis vaccine in goats <1 month-old in a TB-free herd does not result in false positives to a CID test for TB when performed in animals ≥20 months-old.

  2. Head-to-head comparison of an intradermal and a virosome influenza vaccine in patients over the age of 60: evaluation of immunogenicity, cross-protection, safety and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Orsi, Andrea; de Florentiis, Daniela; Parodi, Valentina; Rappazzo, Emanuela; Coppelli, Martina; Durando, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo

    2013-03-01

    In the present study we first compare immunogenicity against vaccine and heterologous circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 strains, tolerability and safety of intradermal Intanza 15 μg and of virosomal adjuvanted, intramuscularly delivered influenza vaccine, Inflexal V, in healthy elderly volunteers. Five-hundred participants were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to the two vaccine groups to receive either one dose of Intanza 15 μg or Inflexal V vaccine. All subjects reported solicited local and systemic reactions occurred within 7 d after vaccination and unsolicited adverse events up to 21 d post-immunization and any serious adverse event appeared during the study. A subset of 55 participants was randomly selected for immunogenicity and cross-protection evaluations. Serum samples were collected before and 1 and 3 mo after immunization. Antibody responses were measured using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) against all viruses used in the study and neutralization (NT) assays against A(H1N1)pdm09 strains. At least one of the CHMP criteria for influenza vaccine approval in the elderly was met by virosomal vaccine against all the tested viruses; intradermal vaccine met all criteria against all strains. Several parameters of immune response against strains with a different antigenic pattern from that of vaccine A/California/04/09(H1N1)pdm09 were significantly higher in the intradermal vaccine group compared with the virosomal group. Safety and systemic tolerability of both vaccines were excellent, but injection site reactions occurred significantly more frequently in the intradermal vaccination group. Immunogenicity of Intanza 15 μg intradermal vaccine tended to be higher than that of Inflexal V against heterologous strains in healthy elderly.

  3. Expansion of natural killer cells in mice transgenic for IgM antibody to ganglioside GD2: demonstration of prolonged survival after challenge with syngeneic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Ikuo; Yoshida, Yukiko; Taya, Chouji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Karasuyama, Hajime; Tada, Nobuhiko; Furukawa, Koichi; Tai, Tadashi

    2003-08-01

    IgM antibodies to gangliosides, sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, have been shown to mediate anti-tumor effects in cancer patients with melanoma and neuroblastoma and to correlate with survival. Mechanisms by which the antibodies induce tumor suppression, however, have not been systematically studied. To investigate this point, we produced and characterized C57BL/6 mice transgenic for IgM antibody to ganglioside GD2. The transgenic (TG) mice showed high IgM, but not IgG antibody titers against GD2 in their sera. No significant clinical symptoms were observed. When EL4 cells, syngeneic T lymphoma that express ganglioside GD2, were injected into TG mice, prolonged survival was observed. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of EL4 cells was mediated with TG mice sera. Neither antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with their sera nor cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to EL4 cells was shown in TG mice. Spleen lymphocytes from TG mice had increased numbers of natural killer (NK) cells, but not T cells, B cells, or macrophages compared with wild-type mice. Depletion of NK cells with anti-asialo GM1 rabbit serum reduced or abrogated the observed anti-tumor effects, suggesting that NK cells play a major role in tumor eradication or suppression. NK cell activity in TG mice was much higher than wild-type mice. Moreover, TG mice showed prolonged survival after injection with syngeneic B16 melanoma cells, which express GM3, but not GD2 or GD3. Taking these results together, our studies demonstrate that the TG mice have significant anti-tumor characteristics, probably due to CDC and NK cell expansion and activation with anti-ganglioside GD2 antibody.

  4. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... animals. (3) Thirty-five days post-injection, the guinea pigs shall be used for tuberculin testing. (4... or minus 0.04 percent. A direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution shall...

  5. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... animals. (3) Thirty-five days post-injection, the guinea pigs shall be used for tuberculin testing. (4... or minus 0.04 percent. A direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution shall...

  6. Paralytic rabies following cat scratch and intra-dermal anti-rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Basavaraja, G V; Reddy, Hamsa; Ramaswamy, Premalatha

    2014-05-01

    Only few reports of failure of intradermal postexposure prophylaxis for rabies following cat scratch exist in the published literature. We are reporting such a case in a 15-year-old girl. The child had category III cat scratch on her face. She presented with progressive paralysis, finally developing quadriplegia and respiratory paralysis. Typical hydrophobia and aerophobia were absent. She received intra-dermal anti-rabies cell culture vaccine. She did not receive anti-rabies immunoglobulin. The girl succumbed on the 10(th) day of weakness. Diagnosis of rabies was confirmed by isolation of rabies virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid and skin biopsy sample by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

  7. Myeloid Cell Isolation from Mouse Skin and Draining Lymph Node Following Intradermal Immunization with Live Attenuated Plasmodium Sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Buckwalter, Matthew R; Gueirard, Pascale; Ménard, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Malaria infection begins when the sporozoite stage of Plasmodium is inoculated into the skin of a mammalian host through a mosquito bite. The highly motile parasite not only reaches the liver to invade hepatocytes and transform into erythrocyte-infective form. It also migrates into the skin and to the proximal lymph node draining the injection site, where it can be recognized and degraded by resident and/or recruited myeloid cells. Intravital imaging reported the early recruitment of brightly fluorescent Lys-GFP positive leukocytes in the skin and the interactions between sporozoites and CD11c(+) cells in the draining lymph node. We present here an efficient procedure to recover, identify and enumerate the myeloid cell subsets that are recruited to the mouse skin and draining lymph node following intradermal injection of immunizing doses of sporozoites in a murine model. Phenotypic characterization using multi-parametric flow cytometry provides a reliable assay to assess early dynamic cellular changes during inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. PMID:27286053

  8. Activation of autoreactive T-lymphocytes by cultured syngeneic glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Radeke, H H; Emmendörffer, A; Uciechowski, P; von der Ohe, J; Schwinzer, B; Resch, K

    1994-03-01

    The capacity of intrinsic, glomerular mesangial cells (MC) to cause an autoreactive response of syngeneic lymphocytes in vitro are presented. Initial experiments demonstrated the MHC class II dependent capacity of MC to present exogenous antigen to sensitized lymph node lymphocytes (LN) and to activate naive, allogeneic LN in the absence of a nominal antigen. However, the most striking finding of the present investigation was that mouse MC (C57BL/6 or DBA/2) augmented a significant activation of naive, syngeneic lymphocytes. The extent of the proliferative lymphocyte response was comparable to that observed after stimulation with allogeneic MC. Moreover, during syngeneic coculture substantial amounts of interferon bioactivity were generated. Equipotent concentrations of rm IFN-gamma were sufficient to induce class II MHC expression of mouse MC. In control experiments the macrophage cell line, IC-21 (C57BL/6), or freshly prepared DBA/2 mouse peritoneal macrophages did not elicit a syngeneic LN response. Using MC, which had not been pretreated, the MC-specific LN stimulation occurred after prolonged periods of coculture. The stimulation index (S.I.) was 9.77 after 144 hours compared with LN controls (S.I. = 1). However, a 48 hour pretreatment of MC with either rm IFN-gamma alone or in combination with rh TNF-alpha and/or the continuous presence of rm IL-1 alpha during coculture periods from 72 to 144 hours substantially enhanced the proliferative LN response. Analysis of non-adherent LN by flow cytometry (FACS) after 96 or 120 hours coculture with MC revealed an increased ratio of Thy1.2+ to B220+ cells with a predominant rise of L3T4+ T-helper cells compared to Lyt2+ cytotoxic T-cells. Furthermore, immune fluorescence microscopy showed that a fraction of Thy1.2+ lymphoblasts adhered to MC. FACS analysis of these adherent LN after detachment demonstrated that in comparison to cocultures with untreated MC, cocultures of LN with IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha pre-treated MC

  9. Improved Insulin Pharmacokinetics Using a Novel Microneedle Device for Intradermal Delivery in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Yotam; Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Currently available short-acting insulin analogs have slower absorption compared with endogenous insulin occasionally resulting in immediate postprandial hyperglycemia. Intradermal (ID) injection facilitates faster drug absorption and may result in improved insulin pharmacokinetics. Methods: Seventeen patients with type 2 diabetes were included in this single-center, pilot, open-label crossover study. Patients received 0.2 U/kg Insulin aspart ID injections using a MicronJet (MJ) needle and subcutaneous (SC) injections, using a conventional needle in a crossover design. Thirteen patients were studied under fasting conditions and four before a standard meal test. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile, as well as the safety and tolerability of injections, was compared. Results: Fourteen patients completed the study per-protocol. ID versus SC injection demonstrated significantly shorter Tmax (median 35 vs. 87.5 min [P < 0.001]), while the Cmax did not significantly differ (median 80 vs. 55 μU/mL [P = 0.085]). Median insulin area under the curve (AUC; 360 min) did not differ between the groups (9914 vs. 10,936 μU/mL/min [p = 0.077]), yet 0–60 min insulin AUC was higher with ID versus SC injection (mean ± SD 3821 ± 1429 vs. 2534 ± 737 μU/mL/min [p = 0.01]) and 4–6 h AUC was lower with ID versus SC injection (mean ± SD 2054 ± 858 vs. 2929 ± 1412 μU/mL/min [p = 0.02]). The relative bioavailability of the ID versus the SC insulin (AUCID/AUCSC) was similar (median 0.91 [95% confidence interval 0.73–1.27]). Conclusions: ID insulin injection delivered through an MJ needle demonstrated superior PK profile compared with conventional SC administration, including shorter Tmax and higher early and lower late exposure in patients with type 2 diabetes. This may help achieve better insulin coverage of meals and lower postprandial glucose excursions. PMID:27500713

  10. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  11. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont.

  12. Immunotherapy for neuroblastoma using syngeneic fibroblasts transfected with IL-2 and IL-12.

    PubMed

    Barker, S E; Grosse, S M; Siapati, E K; Kritz, A; Kinnon, C; Thrasher, A J; Hart, S L

    2007-07-16

    Cytokine-modified tumour cells have been used in clinical trials for immunotherapy of neuroblastoma, but primary tumour cells from surgical biopsies are difficult to culture. Autologous fibroblasts, however, are straightforward to manipulate in culture and easy to transfect using nonviral or viral vectors. Here we have compared the antitumour effect of fibroblasts and tumour cells transfected ex vivo to coexpress interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-12 in a syngeneic mouse model of neuroblastoma. Coinjection of cytokine-modified fibroblasts with Neuro-2A tumour cells abolished their in vivo tumorigenicity. Treatment of established tumours with three intratumoral doses of transfected fibroblasts showed a significant therapeutic effect with reduced growth or complete eradication of tumours in 90% of mice, associated with extensive leukocyte infiltration. Splenocytes recovered from vaccinated mice showed enhanced IL-2 production following Neuro-2A coculture, and increased cytotoxicity against Neuro-2A targets compared with controls. Furthermore, 100% of the tumour-free mice exhibited immune memory against tumour cells when rechallenged three months later. The potency of transfected fibroblasts was equivalent to that of tumour cells in all experiments. We conclude that syngeneic fibroblasts cotransfected with IL-2 and IL-12 mediate therapeutic effects against established disease, and are capable of generating immunological memory. Furthermore, as they are easier to recover and manipulate than autologous tumour cells, fibroblasts provide an attractive alternative immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  13. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont. PMID:27172712

  14. Safety of the intradermal Copenhagen 1331 BCG vaccine in neonates in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, P. M.; Chhagan, M. K.; Topley, J.; Coovadia, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of the intradermal Copenhagen BCG vaccine in neonates at different levels of delivery and neonatal units of the Durban Functional Region and surrounding regions. METHODS: A prospective study was carried out over a two-year period between July 1997 and June 1999. All neonates who had been vaccinated with the intradermal vaccine were evaluated at immunization clinics six weeks after immunization, or earlier if adverse effects occurred. FINDINGS: In total, 9763 neonates were examined: in 95.4% the vaccination scar had healed and 1.5% had no visible scar. Adverse events occurred in 3.1%. The proportion of neonates with no visible vaccination scars decreased over the study period, as did the number with adverse events. The lowest rate of adverse events and the highest rates of healed vaccination scars were seen in the tertiary hospital and regional and district hospitals that were in close proximity to the academic centre involved in this study. CONCLUSIONS: In the study sites, the transition from the percutaneous to intradermal route of administration of BCG vaccine was successful and took place without incurring unacceptably high rates of adverse events. To minimize adverse events, however, it is essential to continue training health personnel involved in implementing intradermal BCG vaccination programmes. PMID:11357213

  15. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen. PMID:26103689

  16. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen.

  17. Safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccine among HIV-infected adults: Conventional vaccine vs. intradermal vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Bin; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Choi, Hee Jung; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported poor immune responses to conventional influenza vaccines in HIV-infected individuals. This study sought to elicit more potent immunogenicity in HIV-infected adults using an intradermal vaccine compared with a conventional intramuscular vaccine. This multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted at 3 university hospitals during the 2011/2012 pre-influenza season. Three vaccines were used in HIV-infected adults aged 18 – 60 years: an inactivated intramuscular vaccine (Agrippal), a reduced-content intradermal vaccine (IDflu9μg) and a standard-content intradermal vaccine (IDflu15μg). Serum hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibodies and INF-γ ELISpot assay were measured at the time of vaccination and 1 month after vaccination. Adverse events were recorded for 7 d. A total of 28 Agrippal, 30 IDflu9μg, and 28 IDflu15μg volunteers were included in this analysis. One month after vaccination, the GMTs and differences in INF-γ ELISpot assay results were similar among the 3 groups. Seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates and mean fold increases (MFI) among the 3 groups were also similar, at approximately 80%, 50–60% and 2.5 – 10.0, respectively. All three vaccines satisfied the CHMP criteria for the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains, but not those for the B strain. In univariate analysis, no demographic or clinical factors, including age, CD4+ T-cell counts, HIV viral load, ART status and vaccine type, were related to failure to achieve seroprotection. The three vaccines were all well-tolerated and all reported reactions were mild to moderate. However, there was a tendency toward a higher incidence of local and systemic reactions in the intradermal vaccine groups. The intradermal vaccine did not result in higher immunogenicity compared to the conventional intramuscular vaccine, even with increased antigen dose. PMID:26431466

  18. Skin thickness in young infants and adolescents: Applications for intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Akihiko; Aizawa, Yuta; Sato, Isamu; Hirano, Harunobu; Sakai, Takatsugu; Mori, Masaaki

    2015-06-26

    As compared with standard intramuscular and subcutaneous vaccines, intradermal (ID) vaccines elicit a more potent immune response in both adults and children, with equivalent dosage or antigen dose sparing. Recently, various devices for ID injection have been developed; the length of needles ranges in 0.6-1.5 mm. However, skin thickness must be measured to determine optimal needle length for ID vaccines. Use of ID vaccines in infants and children is appealing because children require more vaccines than do adults; however, information on skin thickness in infants and children is limited. We used ultrasound echography to measure skin thickness in Japanese infants aged 2 months (n=78) and adolescents aged 13-15 years (n=82). Mean (range) deltoid and suprascapular skin thickness was 1.67 mm (1.16-2.39 mm) and 1.83 mm (1.24-2.60 mm), respectively, in infants and 1.81 mm (1.25-3.00 mm) and 2.43 mm (1.51-3.95 mm), respectively, in adolescents. Among infants who underwent re-measurement of skin thickness at age 6 months (n=11), mean deltoid skin thickness (1.84 mm) was significantly greater than at age 2 months (1.60 mm) (P<0.001). In contrast, no significant difference was observed in suprascapular skin thickness (1.79 mm vs. 1.67 mm, respectively; P=0.17). Gender was not associated with skin thickness in either age group. Skin thickness was positively correlated with body weight in adolescents (r=0.43, P<0.001 in deltoid region; r=0.30, P=0.01 in suprascapular region). In conclusion, this is the first study to evaluate skin thickness in different age groups of children, including at age 2 months. Skin thickness gradually increased from age 2 months to age 13-15 years, but no consistent trend was noted in analysis stratified by measurement site, gender, or age. These findings suggest that an appropriate length of ID device needle for infants and children is likely to be less than 1.2mm and a special device with shorter length of needle is warranted for infants and

  19. Comparison of the toxicity profiles of ISIS 1082 and ISIS 2105, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, following subacute intradermal administration in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Henry, S P; Grillone, L R; Orr, J L; Bruner, R H; Kornbrust, D J

    1997-01-15

    The systemic toxicity of two phosphorothioate oligonucleotides specific for herpes simplex viruses (ISIS 1082) and human papiloma virus (ISIS 2105) were evaluated following repeated intradermal injections of vehicle control, 0.33, 2.17, or 21.7 mg/kg daily to Sprague-Dawley rats (10/sex/group) for 14 days. Animals were sacrificed 1 day after the last dose, except for a portion of the ISIS 1082-treated animals (5/sex/group) which were maintained for an additional 14-day recovery period. The profile of alterations noted for both compounds was very similar. Other than local signs of irritation at the site of injection, there were no clinical signs of toxicity or treatment-related mortality, but there was a slight decrease in body weight gain for the 21.7 mg/kg dose groups. Alterations in hematology parameters included dose-dependent thrombocytopenia and anemia. Alterations in serum chemistry parameters were suggestive of mild alterations in hepatic metabolism, with increases in liver transaminases and bilirubin, along with decreases in albumin and cholesterol. Both spleen and liver weights were significantly elevated in a dose-dependent fashion. Histopathological alterations noted in liver, kidney, lung, injection site skin, and spleen were characterized as perivascular and interstitial infiltrates of macrophages and monocytes. Additional microscopic alterations in the spleen included mild lymphoid hyperplasia (seen in lymph nodes as well), and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Treatment-related cytopenias were likely related to mild, focal hypocellularity in the bone marrow. Alterations in ISIS 1082-treated animals were only partially reversed following the 14-day treatment-free period. In conclusion, repeated intradermal administration of ISIS 1082 and ISIS 2105 produced a similar spectrum of toxicities, with liver, kidney, spleen, and bone marrow being identified as target tissues.

  20. The effects of Sympathetic Outflow on Upregulation of Vanilloid Receptors TRPV1 in Primary Afferent Neurons Evoked by Intradermal Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Gong, Kerui; Lin, Qing

    2010-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a key nociceptive molecule located in primary afferent nociceptive neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for initiating neurogenic inflammation and pain. Our recent study demonstrates that up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors by intradermal injection of capsaicin is modulated by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) cascade. Neurogenic inflammation and pain resulting from capsaicin injection are sympathetically dependent, responding to norepinephrine, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and/or neuropeptide Y released from sympathetic efferents. In a rat model of acute neurogenic inflammatory pain produced by capsaicin injection, we used immunofluorescence and Western blots combined with pharmacology and surgical sympathectomies to analyze whether the capsaicin-evoked up-regulation of TRPV1 in DRG neurons is affected by sympathetic outflow by way of activating the PKC cascade. Sympathetic denervation reduced significantly the capsaicin-evoked expressions of TRPV1, calcitonin gene-related peptide and/or phosphorylated PKC and their co-expression. These reductions could be restored by exogenous pretreatment with an analog of ATP, α,β-methylene ATP. Inhibition of PKC with chelerythrine chloride prevented the ATP effect. Consistent results were obtained from experiments in which capsaicin-evoked changes in cutaneous inflammation (vasodilation and edema) were examined after sympathetic denervation, and the effects of the above pharmacological manipulations were evaluated. Our findings suggest that the capsaicin-evoked up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons is modulated sympathetically by the action of ATP released from sympathetic efferents to activate the PKC cascade. Thus, this study proposes a potential new mechanism of sympathetic modulation of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:20036240

  1. High Local Concentrations of Intradermal MSCs Restore Skin Integrity and Facilitate Wound Healing in Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Tobias; Mezger, Markus; Hausser, Ingrid; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Nyström, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is an incurable skin fragility disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, coding for the anchoring fibril protein collagen VII (C7). Life-long mechanosensitivity of skin and mucosal surfaces is associated with large body surface erosions, chronic wounds, and secondary fibrosis that severely impede functionality. Here, we present the first systematic long-term evaluation of the therapeutic potential of a mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy for DEB. Intradermal administration of MSCs in a DEB mouse model resulted in production and deposition of C7 at the dermal-epidermal junction, the physiological site of function. The effect was dose-dependent with MSCs being up to 10-fold more potent than dermal fibroblasts. MSCs promoted regeneration of DEB wounds via normalization of dermal and epidermal healing and improved skin integrity through de novo formation of functional immature anchoring fibrils. Additional benefits were gained by MSCs' anti-inflammatory effects, which led to decreased immune cell infiltration into injured DEB skin. In our setting, the clinical benefit of MSC injections lasted for more than 3 months. We conclude that MSCs are viable options for localized DEB therapy. Importantly, however, the cell number needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy excludes the use of systemic administration. PMID:25858020

  2. High Local Concentrations of Intradermal MSCs Restore Skin Integrity and Facilitate Wound Healing in Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Tobias; Mezger, Markus; Hausser, Ingrid; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Nyström, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is an incurable skin fragility disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, coding for the anchoring fibril protein collagen VII (C7). Life-long mechanosensitivity of skin and mucosal surfaces is associated with large body surface erosions, chronic wounds, and secondary fibrosis that severely impede functionality. Here, we present the first systematic long-term evaluation of the therapeutic potential of a mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy for DEB. Intradermal administration of MSCs in a DEB mouse model resulted in production and deposition of C7 at the dermal-epidermal junction, the physiological site of function. The effect was dose-dependent with MSCs being up to 10-fold more potent than dermal fibroblasts. MSCs promoted regeneration of DEB wounds via normalization of dermal and epidermal healing and improved skin integrity through de novo formation of functional immature anchoring fibrils. Additional benefits were gained by MSCs' anti-inflammatory effects, which led to decreased immune cell infiltration into injured DEB skin. In our setting, the clinical benefit of MSC injections lasted for more than 3 months. We conclude that MSCs are viable options for localized DEB therapy. Importantly, however, the cell number needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy excludes the use of systemic administration. PMID:25858020

  3. Mutational Analysis of Mating Type Inheritance in Syngen 4 of PARAMECIUM AURELIA

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Bruce C.

    1973-01-01

    Six genic mutations restricting clones to mating type VII (O) were isolated in syngen 4, Paramecium aurelia. The only three extensively tested were neither allelic nor closely linked. A second type of mutation, allelic to one of the O restricted mutants, was also found. Clones homozygous for this mutant gene were selfers, producing both O and E (VIII) mating types, but only when they were progeny of mating type E parental clones. While all seven mutant genes behaved as recessives in monohybrid crosses, clones heterozygous at two different loci often demonstrated an unanticipated phenotype: selfing. The significance of the findings is discussed in relation to mating type determination and the evolution of mating type systems. PMID:17248611

  4. Intradermal fractional booster dose of inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine with a jet injector in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Soonawala, Darius; Verdijk, Pauline; Wijmenga-Monsuur, Alienke J; Boog, Claire J; Koedam, Patrick; Visser, Leo G; Rots, Nynke Y

    2013-08-12

    For global eradication of poliomyelitis, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) needs to become available in all countries. Using fractional-doses (reduced-doses) may impact affordability and optimize the utilization of the production capacity. Intradermal administration has the potential to lower the dose without reducing immunogenicity. A needle-free jet injector may be a reliable way to administer vaccines intradermally. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the immunogenicity and tolerability of fractional-dose intradermal IPV (Netherlands Vaccine Institute, NVI) booster vaccination administered with a jet injector (PharmaJet) to full-dose and fractional-dose intramuscular vaccination with a needle and syringe. Immunogenicity was assessed by comparing the differences in the post-vaccination log2 geometric mean concentrations of neutralizing antibodies (GMC) between the study groups. A total of 125 Dutch adult volunteers with a well-documented vaccination history were randomized to one of four groups: full-dose intramuscular needle (IM-NS-0.5), full-dose intramuscular jet injector (IM-JI-0.5), 1/5th dose intramuscular needle (IM-NS-0.1), 1/5th dose intradermal jet injector (ID-JI-0.1). Vaccination with the JI was less painful (87% no pain) than vaccination with a NS (60% no pain), but caused more transient erythema (JI 85%, NS 24%) and swelling (JI 50%, NS 5%). Intradermal vaccination caused less vaccination site soreness (ID 16%, IM 52%). At baseline all subjects had seroprotective antibody concentrations. After 28 days, GMC were slightly lower in the ID-JI-0.1 group than in the reference group (IM-NS-0.5). The differences were not statistically significant, but the stringent non-inferiority criterion (i.e. a difference of 1 serum dilution in the microneutralization assay) was not met. After one year, differences in GMC were no longer apparent. In contrast, intramuscular vaccination with a fractional dose administered with a

  5. Priming with a Simplified Intradermal HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Regimen followed by Boosting with Recombinant HIV-1 MVA Vaccine Is Safe and Immunogenic: A Phase IIa Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Joachim, Agricola; Geldmacher, Christof; Mann, Philipp; Moshiro, Candida; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius; Maboko, Leonard; Missanga, Marco; Kaluwa, Bahati; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Podola, Lilly; Bauer, Asli; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Marovich, Mary; Moss, Bernard; Hoelscher, Michael; Gotch, Frances; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Stout, Richard; McCormack, Sheena; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Robb, Merlin L.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Bakari, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Intradermal priming with HIV-1 DNA plasmids followed by HIV-1MVA boosting induces strong and broad cellular and humoral immune responses. In our previous HIVIS-03 trial, we used 5 injections with 2 pools of HIV-DNA at separate sites for each priming immunization. The present study explores whether HIV-DNA priming can be simplified by reducing the number of DNA injections and administration of combined versus separated plasmid pools. Methods In this phase IIa, randomized trial, priming was performed using 5 injections of HIV-DNA, 1000 μg total dose, (3 Env and 2 Gag encoding plasmids) compared to two “simplified” regimens of 2 injections of HIV-DNA, 600 μg total dose, of Env- and Gag-encoding plasmid pools with each pool either administered separately or combined. HIV-DNA immunizations were given intradermally at weeks 0, 4, and 12. Boosting was performed intramuscularly with 108 pfu HIV-MVA at weeks 30 and 46. Results 129 healthy Tanzanian participants were enrolled. There were no differences in adverse events between the groups. The proportion of IFN-γ ELISpot responders to Gag and/or Env peptides after the second HIV-MVA boost did not differ significantly between the groups primed with 2 injections of combined HIV-DNA pools, 2 injections with separated pools, and 5 injections with separated pools (90%, 97% and 97%). There were no significant differences in the magnitude of Gag and/or Env IFN-γ ELISpot responses, in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses measured as IFN-γ/IL-2 production by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) or in response rates and median titers for binding antibodies to Env gp160 between study groups. Conclusions A simplified intradermal vaccination regimen with 2 injections of a total of 600 μg with combined HIV-DNA plasmids primed cellular responses as efficiently as the standard regimen of 5 injections of a total of 1000 μg with separated plasmid pools after boosting twice with HIV-MVA. Trial Registration World Health

  6. Covalently stabilized trimethyl chitosan-hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for nasal and intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Verheul, Rolf J; Slütter, Bram; Bal, Suzanne M; Bouwstra, Joke A; Jiskoot, Wim; Hennink, Wim E

    2011-11-30

    The physical stability of polyelectrolyte nanocomplexes composed of trimethyl chitosan (TMC) and hyaluronic acid (HA) is limited in physiological conditions. This may minimize the favorable adjuvant effects associated with particulate systems for nasal and intradermal immunization. Therefore, covalently stabilized nanoparticles loaded with ovalbumin (OVA) were prepared with thiolated TMC and thiolated HA via ionic gelation followed by spontaneous disulfide formation after incubation at pH 7.4 and 37°C. Also, maleimide PEG was coupled to the remaining thiol-moieties on the particles to shield their surface charge. OVA-loaded TMC/HA nanoparticles had a size of around 250-350nm, a positive zeta potential and OVA loading efficiencies up to 60%. Reacting the thiolated particles with maleimide PEG resulted in a slight reduction of zeta potential (from +7 to +4mV) and a minor increase in particle size. Stabilized TMC-S-S-HA particles (PEGylated or not) showed superior stability in saline solutions compared to non-stabilized particles (composed of nonthiolated polymers) but readily disintegrated upon incubation in a saline buffer containing 10mM dithiothreitol. In both the nasal and intradermal immunization study, OVA loaded stabilized TMC-S-S-HA particles demonstrated superior immunogenicity compared to non-stabilized particles (indicated by higher IgG titers). Intranasal, PEGylation completely abolished the beneficial effects of stabilization and it induced no enhanced immune responses against OVA after intradermal administration. In conclusion, stabilization of the TMC/HA particulate system greatly enhances the immunogenicity of OVA in nasal and intradermal vaccination.

  7. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Dominique N.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Lino, Christopher A.; McBride, Amber A.; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0–80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  8. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Dominique N; Kusewitt, Donna F; Lino, Christopher A; McBride, Amber A; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0-80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical.

  9. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Dominique N; Kusewitt, Donna F; Lino, Christopher A; McBride, Amber A; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0-80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  10. Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Vascularity of Intradermal and Intramuscular Human Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliksrud, Kristine; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: High interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in tumors has been shown to be associated with poor prognosis. Mechanisms underlying the intertumor heterogeneity in IFP were investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: A-07 melanoma xenografts were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly in BALB/c nu/nu mice. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors with a Millar catheter. Tumor blood perfusion and extracellular volume fraction were assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The necrotic fraction, vascular density, and vessel diameters of the tumors were determined by image analysis of histological preparations. Results: Significant intertumor heterogeneity in IFP, blood perfusion, and microvascular morphology was observed whether the tumors were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly. High IFP was mainly a consequence of high resistance to blood flow caused by low vessel diameters in either transplantation site. IFP decreased with increasing blood perfusion in intradermal tumors and increased with increasing blood perfusion in intramuscular tumors, mainly because the morphology of the tumor microvasculature differed systematically between the two tumor models. Conclusion: The potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the IFP of tumors may be limited because any relationship between IFP and blood perfusion may differ with the tumor growth site.

  11. Intradermal vaccination against hepatitis B virus infection in an endemic area (Nigeria), two year results.

    PubMed

    Ayoola, E A; Atoba, M A; Johnson, A O

    1986-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of hepatitis B vaccine (Hevac B) given intradermally, 125 Nigerians (aged 1 year to 45 years), who were negative for hepatitis B virus markers, and randomised into two groups were vaccinated. Group 1 (64 volunteers) was given 3 monthly doses of 2 micrograms vaccine mixed with adjuvant subcutaneously (Institut Pasteur Production-Hevac B) while group 2 (61 volunteers) received 3 doses of 2 micrograms non-adjuvated vaccine intradermally given 1 month apart. A month after the third dose 83 per cent of group 1, 71 per cent of group 2 showed positive response by developing antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen. The levels of antibody were significantly higher in group 1 at each stage of the follow-up period, including a month after a booster vaccination was given. The positive response was maintained in almost all the initial responders for the 24 month duration of the study. No significant side effect was documented in any of the participants. The results suggest that population at risk in developing countries could be protected with small doses of vaccine administered intradermally.

  12. Assessing biomarker syngeneity using branched alkanes with quaternary carbon (BAQCs) and other plastic contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, Jochen J.; Grosjean, Emmanuelle; Logan, Graham A.

    2008-02-01

    Biomarker molecules are valuable for the elucidation of ancient microbial ecosystems and the characterization of petroleum source rocks. For such studies, acquisition of reliable hydrocarbon data and proof of their syngeneity are essential. However, contamination of geological samples with anthropogenic petroleum products during drilling, storage and sampling can be particularly problematic because these hydrocarbons may over-print an original indigenous biomarker profile. To evaluate the extent of contamination of drill core and outcrop material, we studied the distribution of hydrocarbons in 26 rocks from different locations in the world. All rocks had petroleum products on their exterior surfaces. Twenty-two samples also contained surficial hydrocarbons derived from polyethylene plastic, including branched alkanes with quaternary carbon centers (BAQCs) and alkylcyclopentanes with pronounced even-over-odd carbon number preference. Using three examples from the Paleoproterozoic Tawallah and McArthur Groups in northern Australia, we show how indigenous biomarkers can be recognized by comparing hydrocarbon distributions between exterior rock surfaces and the rock interior, and how infiltration of allochthonous hydrocarbons can be assessed through the spatial distribution of characteristic polyethylene derived hydrocarbons in the rock. The methods outlined in this paper give confidence in the interpretation of biomarkers in particularly sensitive applications such as the first occurrences of certain organisms in the geological record and the provenance of organic matter in meteorites.

  13. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin.

  14. Effect of Modified Alkaline Supplementation on Syngenic Melanoma Growth in CB57/BL Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Canese, Rossella; Gugliotta, Alessio; Fidanza, Stefano; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Tumor extracellular acidity is a hallmark of malignant cancers. Thus, in this study we evaluated the effects of the oral administration of a commercially available water alkalizer (Basenpulver®) (BP) on tumor growth in a syngenic melanoma mouse model. The alkalizer was administered daily by oral gavage starting one week after tumor implantation in CB57/BL mice. Tumors were calipered and their acidity measured by in vivo MRI guided 31P MRS. Furthermore, urine pH was monitored for potential metabolic alkalosis. BP administration significantly reduced melanoma growth in mice; the optimal dose in terms of tolerability and efficacy was 8 g/l (p< 0.05). The in vivo results were supported by in vitro experiments, wherein BP-treated human and murine melanoma cell cultures exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell growth. This investigation provides the first proof of concept that systemic buffering can improve tumor control by itself and that this approach may represent a new strategy in prevention and/or treatment of cancers. PMID:27447181

  15. Sex differences in the MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    White-Gilbertson, Shai; Davis, Megan; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Kasman, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer has been widely used for more than 35 years. In humans, bladder cancer is one third as prevalent in women as in men, with a trend toward lower prevalence in parous compared to nulliparous women. Our objective was to determine if the MB49 bladder cancer model reproduces the sex differences observed in humans, and to determine its sensitivity to testosterone and the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). METHODS Male and female C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MB49 murine bladder cancer cells, and observed for tumor growth. MB49 dose responses to hCG and dihydrotestosterone were determined in vitro. RESULTS MB49 tumor growth was significantly greater in male mice than female mice. Pregnancy did not affect MB49 tumor growth in female mice. MB49 cells did not proliferate in response to hCG in vitro and the functional receptor for gonadotropins was absent. Dihydrotestosterone strongly stimulated growth of MB49 cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS The MB49 murine model of bladder cancer reproduced some aspects of the sex differences observed in humans. Our results suggest that testosterone may stimulate MB49 cell proliferation, which may explain the more rapid MB49 tumor growth observed in male mice. PMID:26998503

  16. Bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells infiltrate allogeneic and syngeneic transplants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Z; Enjoji, K; Tigges, J C; Toxavidis, V; Tchipashivili, V; Gong, W; Strom, T B; Koulmanda, M

    2014-12-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineage(negative) Sca-1(+) cKit(+) ("LSK") cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic "LSK" HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, "LSK" HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intramedullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs.

  17. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines. PMID:25746201

  18. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines.

  19. Should the General Practitioner Consider Mesotherapy (Intradermal Therapy) to Manage Localized Pain?

    PubMed

    Mammucari, Massimo; Maggiori, Enrica; Lazzari, Marzia; Natoli, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Wide variations in the types of pain and response to analgesic pharmacotherapy mean that a variety of treatment strategies are needed. One approach is mesotherapy (intradermal therapy). This consists of microinjections into the skin and is ideally suited to the management of localized pain. Advantages include increasing the duration of drug activity, reduced risk of adverse events and interactions, and possible synergy with other therapies. Mesotherapy provides general practitioners with another tool for the treatment of local pain. However, it is important to provide patients with full details of the pros and cons of this approach and obtain informed patient consent. PMID:27229350

  20. Doxil synergizes with cancer immunotherapies to enhance antitumor responses in syngeneic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Durham, Nicholas; Wetzel, Leslie; Rothstein, Raymond; Chesebrough, Jon; Holoweckyj, Nicholas; Zhao, Wei; Leow, Ching Ching; Hollingsworth, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Based on the previously described roles of doxorubicin in immunogenic cell death, both doxorubicin and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) were evaluated for their ability to boost the antitumor response of different cancer immunotherapies including checkpoint blockers (anti-PD-L1, PD-1, and CTLA-4 mAbs) and TNF receptor agonists (OX40 and GITR ligand fusion proteins) in syngeneic mouse models. In a preventative CT26 mouse tumor model, both doxorubicin and Doxil synergized with anti-PD-1 and CTLA-4 mAbs. Doxil was active when CT26 tumors were grown in immunocompetent mice but not immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that Doxil activity is increased in the presence of a functional immune system. Using established tumors and maximally efficacious doses of Doxil and cancer immunotherapies in either CT26 or MCA205 tumor models, combination groups produced strong synergistic antitumor effects, a larger percentage of complete responders, and increased survival. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies showed that Doxil treatment decreased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells and, in combination with anti-PD-L1, increased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells. In the tumor, Doxil administration increased CD80 expression on mature dendritic cells. CD80 expression was also increased on both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cells, suggesting that Doxil may induce these tumor-infiltrating cells to elicit a costimulatory phenotype capable of activating an antitumor T-cell response. These results uncover a novel role for Doxil in immunomodulation and support the use of Doxil in combination with checkpoint blockade or TNFR agonists to increase response rates and antitumor activity. PMID:26408258

  1. Doxil Synergizes with Cancer Immunotherapies to Enhance Antitumor Responses in Syngeneic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Durham, Nicholas; Wetzel, Leslie; Rothstein, Raymond; Chesebrough, Jon; Holoweckyj, Nicholas; Zhao, Wei; Leow, Ching Ching; Hollingsworth, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Based on the previously described roles of doxorubicin in immunogenic cell death, both doxorubicin and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) were evaluated for their ability to boost the antitumor response of different cancer immunotherapies including checkpoint blockers (anti–PD-L1, PD-1, and CTLA-4 mAbs) and TNF receptor agonists (OX40 and GITR ligand fusion proteins) in syngeneic mouse models. In a preventative CT26 mouse tumor model, both doxorubicin and Doxil synergized with anti–PD-1 and CTLA-4 mAbs. Doxil was active when CT26 tumors were grown in immunocompetent mice but not immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that Doxil activity is increased in the presence of a functional immune system. Using established tumors and maximally efficacious doses of Doxil and cancer immunotherapies in either CT26 or MCA205 tumor models, combination groups produced strong synergistic antitumor effects, a larger percentage of complete responders, and increased survival. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies showed that Doxil treatment decreased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells and, in combination with anti–PD-L1, increased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. In the tumor, Doxil administration increased CD80 expression on mature dendritic cells. CD80 expression was also increased on both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cells, suggesting that Doxil may induce these tumor-infiltrating cells to elicit a costimulatory phenotype capable of activating an antitumor T-cell response. These results uncover a novel role for Doxil in immunomodulation and support the use of Doxil in combination with checkpoint blockade or TNFR agonists to increase response rates and antitumor activity. PMID:26408258

  2. Hepatitis B vaccine by intradermal route in non responder patients: An update

    PubMed Central

    Filippelli, Martina; Lionetti, Elena; Gennaro, Alessia; Lanzafame, Angela; Arrigo, Teresa; Salpietro, Carmelo; La Rosa, Mario; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the main prophylactic measure to reduce the mortality caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in healthy subjects since the immune response to hepatitis B recombinant vaccination occurs in over 90% of general population. Individuals who develop an anti-HBs titer less than 10 mIU/mL after primary vaccination cycle are defined “no responders”. Many factors could cause a non response to the HBV vaccination, such as administration of the vaccine in buttocks, impaired vaccine storage conditions, drug abuse, smoking, infections and obesity. Moreover there are some diseases, like chronic kidney disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic liver disease, celiac disease, thalassaemia, type I diabetes mellitus, down’s syndrome and other forms of mental retardation that are characterized by a poorer response to HBV vaccination than healthy subjects. To date it is still unclear how to treat this group of patients at high risk of hepatitis B infection. Recent studies seem to indicate that the administration of HBV recombinant vaccine by the intradermal route is very effective and could represent a more useful strategy than intramuscular route. This review focuses on the use of anti hepatitis B vaccine by intradermal route as alternative to conventional intramuscular vaccine in all non responder patients. A comprehensive review of the literature using PubMed database, with appropriate terms, was undertaken for articles in English published since 1983. The literature search was undertaken in September 2013. PMID:25132754

  3. A Study about the Cause and Clinicopathologic Findings of Injection-Induced Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young-Jun; Sim, Woo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Cases of dermatitis induced by the injection of certain drugs have been reported. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the cause and clinicopathologic findings of injection-induced dermatitis, and to reveal whether the reaction has any relation to the patient's age, injection site, drug concentration, and time interval from the injection to the occurrence of the skin lesion. Methods In this study, we enrolled 10 patients who developed erythematous skin lesions after the injection of causative drugs. The lesions were compared to each other according to the injection site, time interval from the injection to the occurrence of the skin lesion, and clinical characteristics. We performed intradermal and patch tests in each patient with different concentrations of causative drugs. Results The most common causative drugs were diclofenac and vitamin K1. The eczematous type was the most frequent clinical type. The intradermal test showed more positive results than the patch test. The patch tests with diclofenac (as is, 2.5%, 5%, and 10%) and vitamin K1 (10%) were all negative in 10 patients. Furthermore, intradermal tests with diclofenac (as is) and vitamin K1 (0.1%, 1%, and 10%) were performed in 8 patients. Six patients had a positive reaction, consisting of erythema, induration, and vesiculation, after 1 and 2 days. Conclusion Our results showed that the most common causative agents were diclofenac and vitamin K1. Moreover, it seems that that intradermal test is more useful than the patch test in the diagnosis of injection-induced dermatitis. PMID:26719642

  4. Genetic susceptibility of the donor kidney contributes to the development of renal damage after syngeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, E A; van Dokkum, R P; Marquet, R L; Heemann, U W; de Bruin, R W; IJzermans, J N; Provoost, A P

    1999-06-01

    Solitary kidneys, especially in rats, appear vulnerable to develop functional and structural damage. However, differences in susceptibility exist between strains. It is not clear whether this is intrinsic to the kidney or due to environmental factors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in genetic susceptibility for renal damage. By transplanting different rat donor kidneys into a normotensive, histocompatible recipient, the kidneys were exposed to the same blood pressure profiles, metabolic and hormonal environment. Kidneys from young adult hypertensive fawn-hooded (FHH) rats, a strain showing early onset renal damage, normotensive, renal damage-resistant August x Copenhagen-Irish (ACI), and (ACI x FHH) F1 donors were transplanted into male F1 recipients. The native kidneys of the recipients were removed 1 week after transplantation. The results were mutually compared and to their unilaterally nephrectomized littermates. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and albuminuria (UaV) were determined at the time of transplantation and at 8 and 16 weeks. The histomorphologic analysis included the incidence of focal glomerulosclerosis (FGS), and determination of chronic transplant dysfunction according to the BANFF criteria. A negative impact of the transplantation technique in this syngeneic situation could not be detected as F1 transplants did not differ functionally and morphologically from their UNx controls. Transplanting an ACI kidney did not result in significant changes of SBP, UaV, and incidence of FGS compared to F1 transplants and ACI-UNx. In contrast, FHH kidneys did show a progressive increase of UaV and glomerulosclerosis and a significantly higher BANFF score, whereas the SBP did not differ from F1 transplants. The moderate hypertension seen in FHH did not travel with the kidney. Compared to the FHH-UNx rats, transplantation of a FHH kidney did significantly attenuate the increase of UaV and FGS. The susceptibility of

  5. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors.

  6. Evaluation of locomotor function and microscopic structure of the spinal cord in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis following treatment with syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Nilesh Kumar; Bindal, Umesh; Eng Hwa, Wong; Chua, Caroline L L; Tan, Chek Ying

    2015-01-01

    Out of the minor myelin proteins, most significant one is myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proven immunoregulatory capacity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of syngeneic MSCs on mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) through observation of locomotion by footprint analysis, histological analysis of spinal cord and estimation IL-17. C57BL/6 mice (10 weeks, n = 16) were immunized with 300 µg of MOG35-55 and 200 µL of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to produce EAE model. Sham-treated control (n = 8) were injected with CFA. Half of immunized mice were given 100 µL of PBS (n = 8) and next half (n = 8) received 1 × 10(5) MSCs on day 11 through the tail veins. Clinical scoring showed development of EAE (loss of tonicity of tail and weakness of hind limb) on day 10. Following MSC treatment, clinical scores and hindlimb stride length showed significant improvement on day 15 onwards, compared to day 10 (P < 0.05). Under LFB staining, while PBS-treated group of EAE mice showed pale and degenerated axons in anterolateral white column of lumbar spinal cord, MSC-treated group showed numerous normal-looking axons. H&E staining showed normal axons in anterolateral white column and reduction of macrophages in MSC-treated EAE mice group. A lower level of IL-17 was observed in MSC treated EAE mice, compared to PBS-treated EAE mice. Our results suggest that Intravenous MSC has the potential to improve the locomotion and regeneration of axons in spinal cord in MOG-induced EAE model. PMID:26722389

  7. Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y but Not 177Lu Is Effective Treatment in a Syngeneic Murine Leukemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Gooley, Ted A.; Kenoyer, Aimee; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Shadman, Mazyar; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for treatment of hematologic malignancies has primarily employed monoclonal antibodies (Ab) labeled with 131I or 90Y which have limitations, and alternative radionuclides are needed to facilitate wider adoption of RIT. We therefore compared the relative therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT employing 90Y and 177Lu in a syngeneic, disseminated murine myeloid leukemia (B6SJLF1/J) model. Biodistribution studies showed that both 90Y- and 177Lu-anti-murine CD45 Ab conjugates (DOTA-30F11) targeted hematologic tissues, as at 24 hours 48.8±21.2 and 156±14.6% injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) of 90Y-DOTA-30F11 and 54.2±9.5 and 199±11.7% ID/g of 177Lu-DOTA-30F11 accumulated in bone marrow (BM) and spleen, respectively. However, 90Y-DOTA-30F11 RIT demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit: 60% of mice treated with 300 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 lived over 180 days after therapy, and mice treated with 100 µCi 90Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median survival 66 days. 90Y-anti-CD45 RIT was associated with transient, mild myelotoxicity without hepatic or renal toxicity. Conversely, 177Lu- anti-CD45 RIT yielded no long-term survivors. Thus, 90Y was more effective than 177Lu for anti-CD45 RIT of AML in this murine leukemia model. PMID:25460570

  8. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors. PMID:27467954

  9. Intradermal DNA Electroporation Induces Cellular and Humoral Immune Response and Confers Protection against HER2/neu Tumor.

    PubMed

    Lamolinara, Alessia; Stramucci, Lorenzo; Hysi, Albana; Iezzi, Manuela; Marchini, Cristina; Mariotti, Marianna; Amici, Augusto; Curcio, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Skin represents an attractive target for DNA vaccine delivery because of its natural richness in APCs, whose targeting may potentiate the effect of vaccination. Nevertheless, intramuscular electroporation is the most common delivery method for ECTM vaccination. In this study we assessed whether intradermal administration could deliver the vaccine into different cell types and we analyzed the evolution of tissue infiltrate elicited by the vaccination protocol. Intradermal electroporation (EP) vaccination resulted in transfection of different skin layers, as well as mononuclear cells. Additionally, we observed a marked recruitment of reactive infiltrates mainly 6-24 hours after treatment and inflammatory cells included CD11c(+). Moreover, we tested the efficacy of intradermal vaccination against Her2/neu antigen in cellular and humoral response induction and consequent protection from a Her2/neu tumor challenge in Her2/neu nontolerant and tolerant mice. A significant delay in transplantable tumor onset was observed in both BALB/c (p ≤ 0,0003) and BALB-neuT mice (p = 0,003). Moreover, BALB-neuT mice displayed slow tumor growth as compared to control group (p < 0,0016). In addition, while in vivo cytotoxic response was observed only in BALB/c mice, a significant antibody response was achieved in both mouse models. Our results identify intradermal EP vaccination as a promising method for delivering Her2/neu DNA vaccine. PMID:26247038

  10. Gua Sha, a press-stroke treatment of the skin, boosts the immune response to intradermal vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxuan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Huang, Zhen; Zang, Yuhui; Chen, Jiangning; Dong, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The skin is an important immunological barrier of the body as well as an optimal route for vaccine administration. Gua Sha, which involves press-stroke treatment of the skin, is an effective folk therapy, widely accepted in East Asia, for various symptoms; however, the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects have not been clarified. We investigated the influence of Gua Sha on the immunological features of the skin. Methods Gua Sha was performed on BALB/c mice and the effects were evaluated using anatomical, histological, and cytometric methods as well as cytokine determination locally and systemically. The effect on intradermal vaccination was assessed with antigen-specific subtype antibody responses. Results Blood vessel expansion, erythrocyte extravasation, and increased ratios of immune active cells were observed in the skin tissue following the treatment. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated, and immunosuppressive cytokines, down-regulated, in the treated and untreated skin and systemic circulation; no obvious variations were detected in case of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, intradermal delivery of a model vaccine following Gua Sha induced about three-fold higher IgG titers with a more Th1-biased antibody subtype profile. Conclusion Gua Sha treatment can up-regulate the innate and adaptive immune functions of the skin and boost the response against intradermal antigens. Thus, Gua Sha may serve as a safe, inexpensive, and independent physical adjuvant for intradermal vaccination. PMID:27672506

  11. Experimental sensitization of guinea pigs by drugs. Comparison of the maximization test with the wholly intradermal test.

    PubMed

    Rantuccio, F; Coviello, C; Sinisi, D; Scardigno, A; Conte, A

    1983-11-01

    The capacity of tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin, tolcyclate and chlorquinaldol to induce delayed-type contact sensitization was studied in guinea pigs in 2 series of tests using the method of Magnusson & Kligman and the authors' modification of the wholly intradermal Draize technique. Histological examination of skin biopsies obtained from the test area demonstrated that tegobetain, pyrrolnitrin and tolcyclate are potential sensitizers. PMID:6653105

  12. Gua Sha, a press-stroke treatment of the skin, boosts the immune response to intradermal vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxuan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Huang, Zhen; Zang, Yuhui; Chen, Jiangning; Dong, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The skin is an important immunological barrier of the body as well as an optimal route for vaccine administration. Gua Sha, which involves press-stroke treatment of the skin, is an effective folk therapy, widely accepted in East Asia, for various symptoms; however, the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects have not been clarified. We investigated the influence of Gua Sha on the immunological features of the skin. Methods Gua Sha was performed on BALB/c mice and the effects were evaluated using anatomical, histological, and cytometric methods as well as cytokine determination locally and systemically. The effect on intradermal vaccination was assessed with antigen-specific subtype antibody responses. Results Blood vessel expansion, erythrocyte extravasation, and increased ratios of immune active cells were observed in the skin tissue following the treatment. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated, and immunosuppressive cytokines, down-regulated, in the treated and untreated skin and systemic circulation; no obvious variations were detected in case of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, intradermal delivery of a model vaccine following Gua Sha induced about three-fold higher IgG titers with a more Th1-biased antibody subtype profile. Conclusion Gua Sha treatment can up-regulate the innate and adaptive immune functions of the skin and boost the response against intradermal antigens. Thus, Gua Sha may serve as a safe, inexpensive, and independent physical adjuvant for intradermal vaccination.

  13. Injectable Filler Techniques for Facial Rejuvenation, Volumization, and Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Bass, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    Multiple fillers are available: various hyaluronic acid products, calcium hydroxylapatite, and a few others that are biocompatible with good duration and a variety of mechanical properties allowing intradermal, subdermal, and supraperiosteal injection. Facial features can be reshaped with great control using these fillers. Aging changes, including facial volume loss, can be well-corrected. These treatments have become a mainstay of rejuvenation in the early facial aging patient. Injection technique is critical to obtaining excellent results. Threading, fanning, cross-hatching, bleb, and pillar techniques must be mastered. Technical execution can only measure up to, but not exceed, the quality of the aesthetic analysis.

  14. [Intradermal reactions with coccidioidins in different towns of San Luis Province].

    PubMed

    Bonardello, N M; de Gagliardi, C G

    1979-12-01

    Intradermal tests were used to determine the extent of the endemic zone of coccidioidomycosis in Argentina. We performed our endemiological study among school-aged children and grown-ups in San Luis city and in the following towns: Nogoli, Villa de la Quebrada, Balde, Salinas del Bebedero, Beazley, Fraga and Eleodoro Lobos. We employed three coccidioidins for each person--Negroni's coccidioidin, coloured coccidioidin and uncoloured coccidioidin. Reactions were usually read 48 h after inoculation. After inoculating 1,262 individuals we could read only 1,069 results. Overall, the positive reactors to one, two or three coccidioidins were 14.8%. We found no relation between positive reactors and the sex of subjects, but every group showed a noticeable relation between age and positive reactions, especially in older people. The positive reactors for each of the coccidioidins were as follows: Negroni coccidioidin: 10.1%: coloured coccidioidin: 4.9% and uncoloured coccidioidin: 5.0%.

  15. Induction of Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Like Lymphoproliferative Disease and Its Inhibition by Adoptive Immunotherapy in T-Cell-Deficient Nude Rats Inoculated with Syngeneic Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Immortalized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Takashi; Hanabuchi, Shino; Kato, Hirotomo; Koya, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Fumiyo; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Yoshiki, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro; Kannagi, Mari

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been shown to be the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but the in vivo mechanism by which the virus causes the malignant transformation is largely unknown. In order to investigate the mechanisms of HTLV-1 leukemogenesis, we developed a rat model system in which ATL-like disease was reproducibly observed, following inoculation of various rat HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines. When previously established cell lines, F344-S1 and TARS-1, but not TART-1 or W7TM-1, were inoculated, systemic multiple tumor development was observed in adult nude (nu/nu) rats. FPM1 cells, newly established from a heterozygous (nu/+) rat syngeneic to nu/nu rats, caused transient tumors only at the injection site in adult nu/nu rats, but could progressively grow in newborn nu/nu rats and metastasize in lymph nodes. The derivative cell line (FPM1-V1AX) serially passed through newborn nu/nu rats acquired the potency to grow in adult nu/nu rats. These results indicated that only some with additional changes but not all of the in vitro HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines possessed in vivo tumorigenicity. Using the syngeneic system, we further showed the inhibition of tumor development by transferring splenic T cells from immunized rats, suggesting the involvement of T cells in the regression of tumors. This novel and reproducible nude rat model of human ATL would be useful for investigation of leukemogenesis and antitumor immune responses in HTLV-1 infection. PMID:10364355

  16. The Single Intradermal Cervical Comparative Test Interferes with Johne's Disease ELISA Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Aideen E; Da Silva, Ana T; Byrne, Noel; Govender, Rodney; MacSharry, John; O'Mahony, Jim; Sayers, Riona G

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) of milk and serum samples are a routinely used method of screening herds for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Infection with MAP causes granulomatous enteritis of ruminants known as Johne's disease (JD). The sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of MAP ELISAs leads to difficulties in the identification of both infected and infectious animals. Interference with MAP ELISA Se and Sp has been reported in MAP seronegative cows following administration of purified protein derivative (PPD) as part of intradermal testing for bovine tuberculosis (bTB). The aim of this study is to examine the impact of the single intradermal cervical comparative test (SICCT) for bTB, on both serum and milk MAP ELISA tests, in a herd containing both seropositive and seronegative cows pre-SICCT. A secondary objective is to provide appropriate timing of JD ELISA tests in relation to the SICCT. A herd of 139 cows were serum and milk sampled pre- and post-SICCT administration. Prior to SICCT, 6% of the herd tested seropositive for MAP using milk ELISA, with 8% positive on serum. ID Screen Paratuberculosis Indirect Screening Test (ID Vet) was used to screen the herd. Within 14 days of PPD administration, a significant increase in the prevalence of seropositive cows was recorded. Identical prevalence's were recorded with both test matrices (39%). ELISA values remained significantly higher until day 43 post-SICCT in milk (P = 0.850), and day 71 in serum (P = 0.602). If the "new" positives detected post-bTB testing are deemed false positives due to generation of cross-reacting antibodies by administration of PPD, milk would appear a more suitable sample for JD ELISA testing within 2 months of SICCT. In summary, sampling for JD utilizing milk ELISA should be avoided in the 43-day period following PPD administration, with serum ELISA sampling avoided for an additional 28 days.

  17. Depletion of CD4 T cells enhances immunotherapy for neuroblastoma after syngeneic HSCT but compromises development of antitumor immune memory.

    PubMed

    Jing, Weiqing; Gershan, Jill A; Johnson, Bryon D

    2009-04-30

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains a clinically challenging disease. Here, we report that a multifaceted immunotherapeutic approach including syngeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), adoptive transfer of sensitized T cells (from syngeneic donors vaccinated to tumor antigens), and early posttransplantation tumor vaccination can effectively treat mice with established neuroblastoma. Vaccination was an important component of this immunotherapy, as it resulted in enhanced and prolonged tumor-specific CD8 T-cell activity and improved antitumor efficacy. Surprisingly, CD4 cell depletion of mice given sensitized T cells resulted in better tumor-free survival, which was associated with an early increased expansion of CD8 T cells with an effector phenotype, increased numbers of tumor-reactive CD8 T cells, and increased tumor infiltration by CD8 T cells. However, in the absence of CD4 T cells, development of long-term tumor immunity (memory) was severely compromised as reflected by diminished CD8 T-cell recall responses and an inability to resist tumor rechallenge in vivo. Based on these results, a major challenge with this immunotherapeutic approach is how to obtain the ideal initial antitumor response but still preserve antitumor immune memory. These data suggest that identification and selective depletion of immune inhibitory CD4 T cells may be a strategy to enhance early antitumor immunity and induce a long-lasting tumor response after HSCT.

  18. Compartmentalized coculture of rat brain endothelial cells and astrocytes: a syngenic model to study the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Demeuse, Ph; Kerkhofs, A; Struys-Ponsar, C; Knoops, B; Remacle, C; van den Bosch de Aguilar, Ph

    2002-11-15

    The specific structure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is based on the partnership of brain endothelial cells and astrocytes. In the last decade, cocultures of these two cell types have been developed as in vitro models. However, these studies did not allow close contacts between both cell types. We report here a syngenic coculture model using rat endothelial cells on one side of a polyethylene terephtalate filter and rat astrocytes on the other. Endothelial cells retain their typical morphology and are factor VIII and OX 26 positive. We optimized the diameter of the membrane pores to establish very close contacts between the cells through the membrane pores without mixing the two cell types. Transmission electron microscopy showed evidence of tight junction formation between the endothelial cells and few pinocytic vesicles. The cocultures reached high electrical resistances up to 1000 Omegacm(2) showing their ability to limit the passage of ions. A 15-fold increase in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was measured in the endothelial cells in coculture compared to endothelial cell monoculture. Our syngenic coculture represents a useful in vitro model of the rat BBB that may prove to be valuable for studying the passage of substances across the barrier as well as other aspects of the BBB function. PMID:12393158

  19. The prefabricated scapula flap consists of syngeneic bone, connective tissue, and a self-assembled epithelial coating.

    PubMed

    Kunstfeld, R; Petzelbauer, P; Wickenhauser, G; Schlenz, I; Korak, K; Vinzenz, K; Holle, J

    2001-12-01

    The reconstruction of maxillary defects is a challenge in plastic surgery. The so-called prefabricated scapula flap consists of syngeneic bone covered with syngeneic dermis and is used to reconstruct maxillary defects. After placing these flaps into the oral cavity, they are reepithelialized within a short time period, raising the question of the cellular origin of the "neomucosa." We therefore obtained sequential biopsy samples of the prefabricated flap and of the flap after being placed into the oral cavity and analyzed the keratin expression profile of epithelial cells. We expected that after placing the prefabricated flap into the oral cavity, keratinocytes from adnexal structures of the dermal component of the graft would migrate onto the surface and reepithelialize the flap. Unexpectedly, reepithelialization occurred earlier. The flap had acquired a mucosa-like epithelium at the interface between the Gore-Tex coating and the dermis while still being positioned within the scapular region. The keratin expression profile of this epithelium was very similar to that of mucosal epithelium. Thus, the prefabricated scapula flap not only consisted of bone covered with connective tissue, but was also covered with epithelial cells derived from adnexal structures of the dermal graft. This seems to be the reason for the rapid restoration of an intact mucosa and the excellent outcome achieved with this surgical technique.

  20. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species.

  1. Respiratory allergy to Blomia tropicalis: Immune response in four syngeneic mouse strains and assessment of a low allergen-dose, short-term experimental model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    , immunization with a relatively low BtE dose (10 μg per subcutaneous injection per mouse) was able to sensitize A/J mice, which were the best responders to high-dose BtE immunization, for the development of allergy-associated immune and lung inflammatory responses. Conclusions The described short-term model of BtE-induced allergic lung disease is reproducible in different syngeneic mouse strains, and mice of the A/J strain was the most responsive to it. In addition, it was shown that OVA and BtE induce quantitatively different immune responses in A/J mice and that the experimental model can be set up with low amounts of BtE. PMID:20433763

  2. Targeted therapy with a novel enediyene antibiotic calicheamicin theta(I)1 effectively suppresses growth and dissemination of liver metastases in a syngeneic model of murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Reisfeld, R A; Handgretinger, R; Nicolaou, K C; Gaedicke, G; Wrasidlo, W

    1998-07-15

    The suppression of metastases in malignant diseases is one of the major goals in targeted chemotherapy. This was achieved with an antibody drug conjugate between a novel, rationally designed enediyene antibiotic calicheamicin theta(I)1 of exceptionally high cytotoxic potency and an antiganglioside GD2 monoclonal antibody 14G2a. Effective suppression of hepatic metastases was demonstrated in a novel syngeneic model of murine neuroblastoma that simulates the situation in patients in terms of antigen heterogeneity and presence of the target antigen on normal tissues. Here, we describe the first successful use of calicheamicin theta(I)1 for targeted chemotherapy in a clinically relevant syngeneic metastasis model. PMID:9679947

  3. No-Needle Jet Intradermal Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy for Recurrent Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Nose: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Barolet, Daniel; Boucher, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to treat nodular basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been shown to be beneficial. The success rate of ALA-PDT in the treatment of nodular BCC is dependent on optimal penetration of the photosensitizing agent and subsequent PpIX production. To enhance topical delivery of drugs intradermally, a needleless jet injection (NLJI), which employs a high-speed jet to puncture the skin without the side effects of needles, was used in one patient with recurrent BCC of the nose. Photoactivation was then performed using red light emitting diode [CW @ λ 630 nm, irradiance 50 mW/cm2, total fluence 51 J/cm2] for 17 minutes. Excellent cosmesis was obtained. Aside from mild crusting present for six days, no other adverse signs were noted. Clinically, there was no recurrent lesion up two years postintervention. Additional studies in larger samples of subjects are needed to further evaluate this promising technique. PMID:21188233

  4. Pegfilgrastim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector) to inject subcutaneously (under the skin). If you ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector), the device will usually be applied to your ...

  5. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  6. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  7. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the ... other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Protection of mice against syngeneic C1300 neuroblastoma challenge by immunization with membranes of C1300 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lauro, G; Businaro, R; Butler, R H; Revoltella, R

    1980-05-01

    Male A/J mice 2-3 months old were inoculated sc with membranes from syngeneic C1300 neuroblastoma cells (clone NB6R) in complete Freund's adjuvant. Significant immunoprophylaxis was noted in the sensitized mice upon sc challenge with viable NB6R cells. During the experiment (60 days from viable cell challenge), each control mouse developed a palpable tumor and died within 50 days. Complete protection was obtained with a program of 4 inoculations of NB6R cell membranes. Each mouse given only 1 inoculation of NB6R cell membranes developed a palpable tumor, but afer 60 days only 1 mouse in 7 had died, which indicated a significant degree of protection. With in vitro tests of lymphocyte proliferation, rosette formation, and complement fixation, it was shown that these mice had mounted both cellular and humoral immune response against the tumor cells.

  9. Recombinant IL-21 and anti-CD4 antibodies cooperate in syngeneic neuroblastoma immunotherapy and mediate long-lasting immunity.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Valentina; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Orengo, Anna Maria; Brizzolara, Antonella; Emionite, Laura; Fenoglio, Daniela; Filaci, Gilberto; Croce, Michela; Ferrini, Silvano

    2014-05-01

    IL-21 is an immune-enhancing cytokine, which showed promising results in cancer immunotherapy. We previously observed that the administration of anti-CD4 cell-depleting antibody strongly enhanced the anti-tumor effects of an IL-21-engineered neuroblastoma (NB) cell vaccine. Here, we studied the therapeutic effects of a combination of recombinant (r) IL-21 and anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in a syngeneic model of disseminated NB. Subcutaneous rIL-21 therapy at 0.5 or 1 μg/dose (at days 2, 6, 9, 13 and 15 after NB induction) had a limited effect on NB development. However, coadministration of rIL-21 at the two dose levels and a cell-depleting anti-CD4 mAb cured 28 and 70 % of mice, respectively. Combined immunotherapy was also effective if started 7 days after NB implant, resulting in a 30 % cure rate. Anti-CD4 antibody treatment efficiently depleted CD4(+) CD25(high) Treg cells, but alone had limited impact on NB. Combination immunotherapy by anti-CD4 mAb and rIL-21 induced a CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, which resulted in tumor eradication and long-lasting immunity. CD4(+) T cells, which re-populated mice after combination immunotherapy, were required for immunity to NB antigens as indicated by CD4(+) T cell depletion and re-challenge experiments. In conclusion, these data support a role for regulatory CD4(+) T cells in a syngeneic NB model and suggest that rIL-21 combined with CD4(+) T cell depletion reprograms CD4(+) T cells from immune regulatory to anti-tumor functions. These observations open new perspectives for the use of IL-21-based immunotherapy in conjunction with transient CD4(+) T cell depletion, in human metastatic NB.

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of low-dose intradermal rabies vaccination given during an Expanded Programme on immunization session in Viet Nam: results of a comparative randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lang, J; Hoa, D Q; Gioi, N V; Vien, N C; Nguyen, C V; Rouyrre, N; Forrat, R

    1999-01-01

    The World Health Organization recently recommended a rabies vaccine pre-exposure schedule using 3 intradermal (i.d.) injections of one-fifth the standard intramuscular (i.m.) dose of current cell culture vaccines as a cost-reducing alternative for developing countries. As a strategy to improve further the acceptability of childhood rabies immunization, we assessed, in a controlled, randomized trial performed in 240 Vietnamese infants, the possibility of associating i.d. administration of a one-fifth dose of purified Vero-cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) with routine Expanded Programme on Immunization vaccines given at 2, 3 and 4 months of age (diphtheria, tetanus, whole-cell pertussis and inactivated poliomyelitis combined vaccine, DTP-IPV). Safety and immunogenicity results were compared with a group of infants given 2 i.m. doses of PVRV (2, 4 months) in association with DTP-IPV (2, 3, 4 months). After i.d. injection, more infants experienced local reactions, particularly redness, but these reactions were generally mild and transient. The rate of systemic reactions was the same in both groups. Although the rabies antibody titres (rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test) were higher 1 month after the third vaccine dose in the i.m. group (30.6 IU/mL vs 12.0 IU/mL in the i.d. group), all infants in both groups had achieved WHO-acceptable protective antibody titres (> or = 0.5 IU/mL) at this time. There was no evidence for any interference between DTP-IPV and rabies vaccine, supporting the interest of a low-dose i.d. PVRV pre-exposure regimen in infants living in rabies-endemic developing countries. PMID:10450451

  11. A single intradermal administration of soluble leishmanial antigen and plasmid expressing interleukin-12 protects BALB/c mice from Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, K; Akao, S; Sato, M; Nitta, Y; Miyazaki, J; Tadakuma, T

    2001-07-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, the induction of the T-helper type 1 (Th1) response contributes to infection resistance, whereas the establishment of the Th2 response makes the mice susceptible to infection. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) plays a pivotal role in the diversification of immune responses to the Th1 type. In this study, we tested whether the co-administration of IL-12 expression plasmid which compose p35 and p40 subunits and soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) will skew the susceptible BALB/c mice to Th1 response and protect from leishmaniasis. When the mice were intradermally injected with the combination of IL-12 plasmid and SLA 7 days prior to the challenge with 1x10(6) promastigotes of Leishmania major, the local lesions completely healed and the parasite burden in the local lymph nodes significantly decreased. The cured mice attained long-term immunity, and were resistant to any subsequent rechallenge of the lethal dose of the parasite. The protective effect was associated with the development of a Th1 response, as demonstrated by the enhanced level of antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and dominant production of IgG2a in the serum. In contrast, the administration of empty plasmid plus SLA or IL-12 plasmid alone failed to protect the disease and shape the Th1 response. Furthermore, the protective efficiency induced by the vaccination was clearly prevented by the injection of either neutralizing anti-IL-12 mAb or anti-IFN-gamma mAb. The IL-12 expression plasmid is thus an effective adjuvant for the elicitation of a protective Th1 response against leishmaniasis and is therefore, considered to be appropriate for vaccinations that require the induction of Th1 type immunity.

  12. Gene Gun Her2/neu DNA Vaccination: Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in a Syngeneic Her2/neu Mouse Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Genetic vaccination using naked plasmid DNA is an immunization strategy both against infectious diseases and cancer. In order to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines, particularly in large animals and humans, different strategies have been pursued. These vaccination strategies are based on different application routes, schedules, and coexpression of immunomodulatory molecules as adjuvants. Our mouse tumor model offers the possibility to investigate Her2/neu DNA vaccines in different settings, i.e., intramuscular or intradermal application with or without coexpression of adjuvants. Protection from tumor growth in tumor challenge experiments and both T cell and humoral immune responses against Her2/neu peptides are used as surrogate parameters for vaccine efficacy. PMID:26072399

  13. Hollow agarose microneedle with silver coating for intradermal surface-enhanced Raman measurements: a skin-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2015-06-01

    Human intradermal components contain important clinical information beneficial to the field of immunology and disease diagnosis. Although microneedles have shown great potential to act as probes to break the human skin barrier for the minimally invasive measurement of intradermal components, metal microneedles that include stainless steel could cause the following problems: (1) sharp waste production, and (2) contamination due to reuse of microneedles especially in developing regions. In this study, we fabricate agarose microneedles coated with a layer of silver (Ag) and demonstrate their use as a probe for the realization of intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements in a set of skin-mimicking phantoms. The Ag-coated agarose microneedle quantifies a range of glucose concentrations from 5 to 150 mM inside the skin phantoms with a root-mean-square error of 5.1 mM within 10 s. The needle is found enlarged by 53.9% after another 6 min inside the phantom. The shape-changing capability of this agarose microneedle ensures that the reuse of these microneedles is impossible, thus avoiding sharp waste production and preventing needle contamination, which shows the great potential for safe and effective needle-based measurements.

  14. CCR4 is critically involved in effective antitumor immunity in mice bearing intradermal B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Koyama, Atsushi; Imamura, Reira; Kawai, Shiori; Nishiwaki, Keiji; Oiso, Naoki; Kawada, Akira; Yoshie, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    CCR4 is a major chemokine receptor expressed by Treg cells and Th17 cells. While Treg cells are known to suppress antitumor immunity, Th17 cells have recently been shown to enhance the induction of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here, CCR4-deficient mice displayed enhanced tumor growth upon intradermal inoculation of B16-F10 melanoma cells. In CCR4-deficient mice, while IFN-γ+CD8+ effector T cells were decreased in tumor sites, IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells were decreased in regional lymph nodes. In wild-type mice, CD4+IL-17A+ cells, which were identified as CCR4+CD44+ memory Th17, were found to be clustered around dendritic cells expressing MDC/CCL22, a ligand for CCR4, in regional lymph nodes. Compound 22, a CCR4 antagonist, also enhanced tumor growth and decreased Th17 cells in regional lymph nodes in tumor-bearing mice treated with Dacarbazine. In contrast, CCR6 deficiency did not affect the tumor growth and the numbers of Th17 cells in regional lymph nodes. These findings indicate that CCR4 is critically involved in regional lymph node DC-Th17 cell interactions that are necessary for Th17 cell-mediated induction of antitumor CD8+ effector T cells in mice bearing B16 melanoma. PMID:27132989

  15. Validity of intradermal tuberculin testing for the screening of bovine tuberculosis in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Quirin, R; Rasolofo, V; Andriambololona, R; Ramboasolo, A; Rasolonavalona, T; Raharisolo, C; Rakotoaritahina, H; Chanteau, S; Boisier, P

    2001-09-01

    A sample survey with the objective of determining the prevalence of bovine tuberculosis by means of an intradermal tuberculin test was conducted in Madagascar and it was found that the prevalence rate varied from 0-30% by veterinary district. In order to estimate the true prevalence, the validity of the test was investigated by assessing its sensitivity and specificity in two groups of animals from two different regions, which were destined for slaughter. In the first group where the probability of non-infected animals should have been the highest, sensitivity was estimated at 0.52 (n = 21) and specificity at 0.99 (n = 79). In the second group selected on the basis of apparent ill health of the animals in a high-prevalence bovine tuberculosis area, sensitivity was estimated at 0.8 (n = 10) and specificity at 1 (n = 12). The results obtained from both groups of cattle were not combined for statistical purposes because the sensitivity of the skin test seemed to fluctuate in relation to the chronicity of the disease. These fluctuations are discussed. However, since the first group of zebu cattle was more representative of the cattle population across the country as a whole, its results were retained as operational parameters for further screening.

  16. Characteristics of mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells and therapeutic comparisons between syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cell transplantation in experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Wha; Shin, Il Seob; Park, So Young; Yoon, Eun Ji; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we found that the intravenous administration of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells was a promising therapeutic option for autoimmune thyroiditis even when the cells were transplanted into a xenogeneic model without an immunosuppressant. Therefore, we explored the comparison between the therapeutic effects of syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cells on an experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mouse model. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with porcine thyroglobulin. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells derived from C57BL/6 mice (syngeneic) or BALB/c mice (allogeneic) or saline as a vehicle control were administered intravenously four times weekly. Blood and tissue samples were collected 1 week after the last transplantation. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells from mice were able to differentiate into multiple lineages in vitro; however, mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells did not have immunophenotypes identical to those from humans. Syngeneic and allogeneic administrations of adipose tissue-derived stem cells reduced thyroglobulin autoantibodies and the inflammatory immune response, protected against lymphocyte infiltration into the thyroid, and restored the Th1/Th2 balance without any adverse effects. However, different humoral immune responses were observed for infused cells from different stem cell sources. The strongest humoral immune response was induced by xenogeneic transplantation, followed by allogeneic and syngeneic administration, in that order. The stem cells were mostly found in the spleen, not the thyroid. This migration might be because the stem cells primarily function in systemic immune modulation, due to being given prior to disease induction. In this study, we confirmed that there were equal effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in treating autoimmune thyroiditis between syngeneic and allogeneic transplantations.

  17. Surviving native beta-cells determine outcome of syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S J; Powis, S H; Press, M

    2001-01-01

    In moderately diabetic rats (plasma glucose 20-30 mmol/L), where there is some residual pancreatic islet function, normoglycemia can be restored by transplantation of pancreatic islets into the liver via the portal vein. To examine whether normoglycemia can also be achieved in more severely diabetic animals (which more closely resemble human type I diabetes), we have compared the effect of transplanting 1000 islets intraportally in Lewis rats made moderately diabetic (55 mg/kg streptozotocin injected IP while nonfasting) or severely diabetic (65 mg/kg streptozotocin injected IP while fasting). In the moderately diabetic rats in which residual pancreatic insulin was 128 +/- 40 mU insulin (2.0% of control), plasma glucose stabilized (32 +/- 2.8 mmol/L at 1 week, 34 +/- 2 mmol/L at 3 weeks) as did body weight (falling from 290 +/- 5 to 265 +/- 5 g at 1 week and 253 +/- 6 g at 3 weeks). In contrast, in severely diabetic rats in which residual pancreatic insulin was only 13.5 +/- 4.2 mU insulin (0.21% of control), there was a progressive rise in plasma glucose (30 +/- 1.3 mmol/L at 1 week, 49 +/- 4 mmol/L at 2 weeks, and 67 +/- 7 mmol/L at 3 weeks) and a progressive fall in body weight (from 304 +/- 10 to 260 +/- 5 g by week 1 and to 209 +/- 6 g by week 3). Following islet transplantation, nonfasting plasma glucose normalized in moderately diabetic rats (10.5 +/- 0.6 vs. 9.1 +/- 0.6 mmol/L in nondiabetic controls, NS) after 23 +/- 5 days. In contrast, in the severely diabetic rats plasma glucose stabilized at 32 +/- 5 mmol/L (p < 0.05 compared to moderately diabetic group) but did not normalize. This difference was not attributable to different plasma glucose levels at the time of transplantation (35.1 +/- 1.8 in moderately diabetic vs. 32.5 +/- 2.5 mmol/L in severely diabetic rats). These observations demonstrate that residual native beta-cells (equivalent to only 60-80 islets) contribute to the survival or function of intraportally transplanted islets. PMID:11332628

  18. Intradermal Tests for Diagnosis of Drug Allergy are not Affected by a Topical Anesthetic Patch.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Ferreira, Ana; Cernadas, Josefina R

    2014-09-01

    The use of topical anesthesia to perform intradermal tests (IDTs) for drug allergy diagnosis was never investigated. We aimed to determine the effects of a topical anesthetic patch containing prilocaine-lidocaine on wheal size of IDT with drugs. Patients who had positive IDT as part of their investigation process of suspected drug hypersensitivity were selected. IDT were performed according to guidelines. Anesthetic patch (AP) was placed and the same prior positive IDT, as well as positive histamine skin prick test (SPT) and negative (saline IDT) controls, were performed in the anesthetized area. Patients with negative IDT were also included to check for false positives with AP. Increase in wheals after 20 minutes both with and without AP was recorded and compared. 45 IDT were performed (36 patients), of which 37 have been previously positive (14 antibiotics, 10 general anesthetics, 6 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 3 iodinated contrasts, 3 anti-Hi-histamines and 1 ranitidine). Mean histamine SPT size without the AP was 4.7 mm [95%CI (4.4-5.1]), and 4.6 mm [95%CI(4.2-5.0)] with anesthesia. Mean wheal increase in IDT for drugs without the anesthesia was 4.5 mm [95%CI(3.3-5.7)] and with anesthesia was 4.3 mm [95%CI(2.8-5.8)]. No statistical significant differences were observed between skin tests with or without AP for histamine SPT (P=0.089), IDT with saline (P=0.750), and IDT with drugs (P=0.995). None of the patients with negative IDT showed positivity with the AP, or vice-versa. The use of an AP containing prilocaine-lidocaine does not interfere with IDT to diagnose drug allergy, and no false positive tests were found. PMID:25229004

  19. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Xu, Guang; Goez-Rivillas, Yenny; Drom, Claire; Shelite, Thomas R.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H.; Bouyer, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d.) inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11–12 days post-infection (dpi), followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14–19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF), as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13). Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions. PMID:27479584

  20. Evaluation of Intradermal and Subcutaneous Infusion Set Performance Under 24-Hour Basal and Bolus Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Elaine; Keith, Steven; Herr, Joshua K.; Sutter, Diane; Pettis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to assess the function and delivery reliability of intradermal (ID) infusion sets used with commercial insulin pumps. Method: Healthy subjects (n = 43) were randomized to either ID or subcutaneous (SC) arms, and received basal/bolus placebo delivery for 24 hours. Subjects received 4 of 8 infusion set combinations (ID: microneedle design A or B, with 2 pump brands [Animas or MiniMed]; SC: Teflon Quickset or steel Rapid-D, Animas pump only, with or without overtaping) and were evaluated for pump occlusion alarms, fluid leakage, pain, and tissue tolerability. A novel algorithm was developed to determine flow consistency based on fluid pressure, and the duration and occurrence rate for periods of unalarmed but interrupted flow (“silent occlusions’”) were compared. Results: ID delivery was successfully maintained over the 24-hour infusion period. The number of silent occlusions was lower for ID microneedle cannula design B than A (P < .01) and lower for Rapid-D SC device compared to Quick-set (P = .03). There was no significant difference in the number of occlusion alarms between the ID and SC devices with the Animas pump. However, the pumps tested with ID devices had significantly different alarm rates (MiniMed 29.5%, Animas 0%, P < .001). Leakage and tissue tolerability were comparable across devices. Conclusion: The ID infusion set reliably delivered diluent for an extended 24-hour period in healthy subjects and was well tolerated. Silent occlusion flow interruptions could be detected in both ID and SC infusion sets using a proprietary algorithm. This algorithm is a promising method for quantitatively evaluating infusion set flow performance. PMID:26319228

  1. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development . PMID:25200444

  2. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... not improved when treated with other medications, ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... adalimumab injection to treat Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  3. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denosumab injection (Prolia) is also used to treat bone loss in men with prostate cancer and in women with breast cancer who are receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection ( ...

  4. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance). Diphenhydramine injection should not be ... solution (liquid) to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). Your dosing schedule ...

  5. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... red blood cells) caused by low levels of folic acid in the body. Leucovorin injection is also used ... injection is in a class of medications called folic acid analogs. It treats people who are receiving methotrexate ...

  6. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  7. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

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  9. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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  12. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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  14. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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  19. Levoleucovorin Injection

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    MedlinePlus

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  1. Regulation of immune responses aginst the syngeneic ADJ-PC-5 plasmacytoma in BALB-c mice. III. Induction of specific T suppressor cells to the BALB/c plasmacytoma ADJ-PC-5 during early stages of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haubeck, H D; Kölsch, E

    1982-01-01

    Initial stages of tumour growth are not easily accessible to investigation. Therefore an experimental procedure was developed to mimic tumorigenesis as closely as possible. BALB/c mice received intraperitoneally exponentially increasing numbers of irradiated syngeneic ADJ-PC-5 plasmacytoma cells. The initial injection began with two cells per mouse and according to the generation time of this tumour, subsequent doses were doubled until mice had received up to 10(5) tumour cells. At various stages of treatment, peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) and spleen cells (SC) were tested for either cytotoxicity or specific suppression of induction of a primary in vitro T-cell cytotoxic response (CTL) of BALB/c spleen cells against ADJ-PC-5 plasmacytoma cells. No cytotoxic PEC were found. Instead, PEC from mice in which the final tumour cells number had reached or exceeded 10(3) irradiated ADJ-PC-5 cells, induced complete suppression of this primary in vitro CTL. Specificity was found both in the induction and effector phase of suppression. Specific suppression was mediated by Thy-1.2+ cells and amplified by non-specific suppression through adherent cells. The data arae discussed in context with previous findings on the in vivo immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of the ADJ-PC-5 plasmacytoma. They suggest that induction of T suppressor (Ts) cells might be an early event in tumorigenesis. PMID:6215340

  2. Pharmacokinetic studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies to a rat colon carcinoma: I. Comparison of biodistribution in normal rats, syngeneic tumor-bearing rats, or tumor-bearing nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, J.; Douillard, J.Y.; Burg, C.; Lizzio, E.F.; Ridge, J.; Levenbook, I.; Hoffman, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of two iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled murine anti-rat colon carcinoma monoclonal antibodies (D3 and E4) were compared in normal Sprague Dawley rats, syngeneic BDIX rats, or nude mice bearing that tumor. Results of antibody uptake after i.v. administration were analyzed in terms of accumulation and localization indices for normal tissues and tumor. Statistically significant differences between rat and mouse tissue biodistribution were found. D3, which reacts in vitro with the tumor and several normal rat tissues, cleared quickly from the blood of rats and was specifically targeted to several normal tissues, notably the lung. Virtually no targeting to the tumor was observed. Nude mice, however, showed a slower blood clearance and specific antibody targeting only in the tumor. Similar results were seen after injection of another antibody, E4, which is tumor-specific in vitro. Data suggest that studies on the xenogeneic nude mouse model may not necessarily be relevant to the choice of monoclonal antibodies for clinical diagnostic imaging or therapy.

  3. Biogenicity and Syngeneity of Organic Matter in Ancient Sedimentary Rocks: Recent Advances in the Search for Evidence of Past Life

    SciTech Connect

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Cady, Sherry L.

    2014-12-01

    he past decade has seen an explosion of new technologies for assessment of biogenicity and syngeneity of carbonaceous material within sedimentary rocks. Advances have been made in techniques for analysis of in situ organic matter as well as for extracted bulk samples of soluble and insoluble (kerogen) organic fractions. The in situ techniques allow analysis of micrometer-to-sub-micrometer-scale organic residues within their host rocks and include Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy/imagery, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and forms of secondary ion/laser-based mass spectrometry, analytical transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption microscopy/spectroscopy. Analyses can be made for chemical, molecular, and isotopic composition coupled with assessment of spatial relationships to surrounding minerals, veins, and fractures. The bulk analyses include improved methods for minimizing contamination and recognizing syngenetic constituents of soluble organic fractions as well as enhanced spectroscopic and pyrolytic techniques for unlocking syngenetic molecular signatures in kerogen. Together, these technologies provide vital tools for the study of some of the oldest and problematic carbonaceous residues and for advancing our understanding of the earliest stages of biological evolution on Earth and the search for evidence of life beyond Earth. We discuss each of these new technologies, emphasizing their advantages and disadvantages, applications, and likely future directions.

  4. Enhancement of the pro-apoptotic properties of Newcastle disease virus promotes tumor remission in syngeneic murine cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Ayllon, Juan; Mansour, Mena; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Jordan, Stefan; Tripathi, Shashank; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Villar, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is considered a promising agent for cancer therapy due to its oncolytic properties. These include preferential replication in transformed cells, induction of innate and adaptive immune responses within tumors and cytopathic effects in infected tumor cells due to the activation of apoptosis. In order to enhance the latter and thus possibly enhance the overall oncolytic activity of NDV, we generated a recombinant NDV encoding the human TNF receptor Fas (rNDV-B1/Fas). rNDV-B1/Fas replicates to similar titers as its wild type (rNDV-B1) counterpart, however overexpression of Fas in infected cells leads to higher levels of cytotoxicity correlated with faster and increased apoptosis responses in which both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are activated earlier. Furthermore, in vivo studies in syngeneic murine melanoma model show an enhancement of the oncolytic properties of rNDV-B1/Fas, with major improvements in survival and tumor remission. Altogether, our data suggest that up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic function of NDV is a viable approach to enhance its anti-tumor properties, and adds to the currently known, rationally-based strategies to design optimized therapeutic viral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25761895

  5. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  6. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  7. Differential expression proteomics of human colorectal cancer based on a syngeneic cellular model for the progression of adenoma to carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roth, Udo; Razawi, Hanieh; Hommer, Julia; Engelmann, Katja; Schwientek, Tilo; Müller, Stefan; Baldus, Stephan E; Patsos, Georgios; Corfield, Anthony P; Paraskeva, Christos; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2010-01-01

    This is the first differential expression proteomics study on a human syngeneic cellular in vitro progression model of the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence, the anchorage-dependent non-tumorigenic adenoma derived cell line AA/C1 and the derived anchorage-independent and tumorigenic carcinoma cell line AA/C1/SB10C. The study is based on quantitative 2-DE and is complemented by Western blot validation. Excluding redundancies due to proteolysis and post-translational modified isoforms of over 2000 protein spots, 13 proteins were revealed as regulated with statistical variance being within the 95th confidence level and were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting in MALDI MS. Progression-associated proteins belong to the functional complexes of anaerobic glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, steroid biosynthesis, prostaglandin biosynthesis, the regulation and maintenance of the cytoskeleton, protein biosynthesis and degradation, the regulation of apoptosis or other functions. Partial but significant overlap was revealed with previous proteomics and transcriptomics studies in colorectal carcinoma. Among upregulated proteins we identified 3-HMG-CoA synthase, protein phosphatase 1, prostaglandin E synthase 2, villin 1, annexin A1, triosephosphate isomerase, phosphoserine aminotransferase 1, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1), while glucose-regulated protein 78, cathepsin D, lamin A/C and quinolate phosphoribosyltransferase were downregulated.

  8. Modifications of glycosphingolipid profile and synthesis in normal rat fibroblasts and in syngeneic neoplastic cells at different subculture stages.

    PubMed

    Colombo, I; Sottocornola, E; Moretti, S; Meloni, M A; Pippia, P; Berra, B

    2000-05-31

    Glycosphingolipids are plasma membrane macromolecules involved in diversified recognition functions on the cell surface resulting in modulation of cell adhesion and differentiation. As the in vitro cellular system of the neoplastic cell line SGS/4A and syngeneic normal fibroblasts (FG) represents a useful tool for studies on molecular mechanisms regulating cell adhesion, neoplastic transformation and cellular ageing, we studied the changes of glycosphingolipid and of the enzymes involved in their metabolism in both cultured cells at different subculture stages. The FG subculture progression induces a drastic decrease of total glycosphingolipid content with consistent alterations in the molecular composition. In particular, a significant decrease of GM(3), a slight increase of GD(1a), the disappearance of 'b'-series gangliosides and the drastic reduction of triosylceramides were observed. On the contrary, the increasing number of SGS/4A subcultures, characterized by a specific and different glycosphingolipid composition as compared with FG cells, does not cause modifications. Although glycosyltransferase activity levels quite well parallel the glycosphingolipid patterns and can account for the noted variations, the mRNA expression analysis of two glycosyltransferases suggests that the in vitro cell ageing of normal rat fibroblasts causes drastic changes in the glycosphingolipid profile through the regulation, at either the transcriptional or post-translational level, of some biosynthetic enzymes.

  9. Determination of threshold concentrations of allergens and evaluation of two different histamine concentrations in canine intradermal testing.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Patrick; Austel, Michaela; Medleau, Linda; Zhao, Ying; Vidyashankar, Anand

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal histamine concentration and allergen threshold concentrations for canine intradermal testing. Thirty healthy dogs were tested using two different concentrations of histamine and four different concentrations of each allergen. The optimal histamine concentration was determined to be 1:10 000 w/v. The threshold concentration was at least 1750 PNU/mL for all tested grasses, weeds, trees, moulds and insects, except for fleas which was as least 1:500 w/v. For Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, the optimal threshold concentration was 250 PNU/mL, whereas for Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae, it was 100 PNU/mL. Threshold concentration for all epidermals except human dander was at least 1250 PNU/mL. The optimal threshold concentration for human dander was 300 PNU/mL. Our results suggest that the currently used 1:100 000 w/v concentration of histamine and the 1000 PNU/mL concentration for most grasses, weeds, trees, moulds, epidermals and insects may not be appropriate for canine intradermal testing.

  10. Induction of immunity to neuroblastoma early after syngeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a novel mouse tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jing, Weiqing; Orentas, Rimas J; Johnson, Bryon D

    2007-03-01

    Autologous HSCT has resulted in improved event-free survival in patients with advanced neuroblastoma, but most of these patients still relapse. We previously reported that transient transfection of mouse neuroblastoma cells with plasmid DNA vectors encoding immune costimulatory molecules generates cell-based vaccines capable of inducing potent antitumor T cell immunity. In this study, we explored the effectiveness of tumor vaccine administration soon after HSCT. Soon after transplantation, only vaccinated mice that had received an adoptive transfer of syngeneic T cells survived tumor challenge. Tumor protective immunity in the transplant recipients was dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and tumor-reactive T cells in the spleens of vaccinated mice could be detected in IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assays. Our data indicate that the adoptive transfer of T cells was absolutely required for induction of protective immunity by the tumor vaccine. Adoptive transfer of T cells accelerated T cell reconstitution, but it also resulted in increased percentages of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells soon after HSCT. Treatment of HSC transplant recipients with an anti-CD25 mAb before tumor vaccination inhibited antitumor immunity and significantly decreased the number of IFN-gamma-secreting tumor-specific CD4 T cells. However, physical depletion of CD25(+) cells from the adoptively transferred splenocytes appeared to increase the efficacy of tumor vaccination. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-neuroblastoma immunity can be induced soon after HSCT using a novel cell-based cancer vaccine. However, sufficient numbers of T cells must be added to the graft to achieve protective antitumor immunity, and depletion of CD25(+) T cells from adoptively transferred T cells might provide some additional benefit. These translational studies will aid in our development of post-HSCT vaccines for neuroblastoma.

  11. Variable Metastatic Potentials Correlate with Differential Plectin and Vimentin Expression in Syngeneic Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Tanya C.; Watson, Megan T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, ranging from indolent asymptomatic disease to very aggressive metastatic and life threatening forms of the disease. Distant metastasis represents the major lethal cause of prostate cancer. The most critical clinical challenge in the management of the patients is identifying those individuals at risk of developing metastatic disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis and identify markers with metastatic potential, we have analyzed protein expression in two syngeneic prostate cancer cells lines PC3-N2 and PC3-ML2 using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and multi-dimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography matrix assisted laser desorption ionization tandem mass spectrometry. PC3-N2 is lowly metastatic while PC3-ML2 highly metastatic. A total of 1,756 proteins were identified in the analyses with 130 proteins showing different expression levels (p<0.01) in the two cell lines. Out of these, 68 proteins were found to be significantly up-regulated while 62 are significantly down-regulated in PC3-ML2 cells compared with PC3-N2 cells. The upregulation of plectin and vimentin which were the most significantly differentially expressed were validated by Western blot and their functional relevance with respect to invasion and migration was determined by siRNA gene silencing. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that up-regulation of vimentin and plectin expression positively correlates with the invasion and metastasis of androgen-independent PCA. PMID:23717685

  12. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to triptorelin injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about triptorelin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  13. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to leuprolide injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about leuprolide injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  14. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  15. Transient depletion of CD4(+) T cells augments IL-21-based immunotherapy of disseminated neuroblastoma in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Croce, Michela; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Orengo, Anna Maria; Brizzolara, Antonella; Carlini, Barbara; Borghi, Martina; Rigo, Valentina; Pistoia, Vito; Ferrini, Silvano

    2010-09-01

    IL-21 is a member of the IL-2 cytokine family, produced by CD4+ T cells. We previously showed that immunotherapy (IT) with IL-21-transduced neuroblastoma cells (Neuro2a/IL-21) cured 33% of syngeneic mice bearing systemic NB. Here, we studied whether the removal of Treg cells could potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of Neuro2a/IL-21 vaccine. The administration of anti-CD25 mAb, which targets Treg cells, slightly potentiated the effect of vaccine IT (50% cure rate), but anti-CD4 mAb had a more potent effect leading to 80% cure rate. Anti-CD25 mAb, indeed, only partially depleted CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells, whereas anti-CD4 mAb was more effective in this respect, leading to 90% depletion of Treg cells. In mice receiving vaccine+anti-CD4 mAb, which developed systemic immunity to NB, CD4+ T cells counts completely recovered in 90 days. Depletion of CD8+ T cells abrogated the effect of the combined IT, indicating a predominant role of these cells in driving the immune response. In addition, CD8+ T cells from cured mice coinjected with Neuro2a/parental cells (pc) in NOD-SCID mice completely inhibited tumor growth. Spleen cells from mice receiving Neuro2a/IL-21 vaccination showed increased expression of IFN-alpha2, -beta1 and -gamma mRNA. Moreover, mice receiving vaccine therapy alone or vaccine+anti-CD4 mAb showed increased IFN-gamma serum levels and IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells were found in spleen cells. In conclusion, anti-CD4 mAb potentiated IL-21-based IT by removing Treg cells and/or their precursors and other potentially immune-suppressive CD4+ cell subsets, thus allowing the development of an IL-21-driven CD8+ T cell response, which mediates NB rejection.

  16. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before you plan to inject it to allow the medication to ... supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications ...

  17. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  18. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... including other medications or surgery to remove the spleen. Romiplostim injection should not be used to treat ... tell your doctor if you have had your spleen removed.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, ...

  19. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and swelling and scales on the skin). ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... you are using golimumab injection to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ...

  20. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  1. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as doxycycline injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  2. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a person who was not in the hospital), skin infections, and infections of the abdomen (area between the ... that developed in people who were in a hospital or foot infections in people who have diabetes. Tigecycline injection is ...

  3. Thiotepa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... reproductive organs where eggs are formed), breast, and bladder cancer. It is also used to treat malignant effusions ( ... how you respond to thiotepa.When used for bladder cancer, thiotepa is infused (injected slowly) into your bladder ...

  4. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  5. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  6. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  7. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  8. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  9. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  10. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Dolasetron injection is used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting that may occur after surgery. Dolasetron ... should not be used to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting in people receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. ...

  11. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  12. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to ampicillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, ...

  13. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to nafcillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  14. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxacillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  15. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... drowsiness uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body problems with coordination, balance, or walking weakness itching redness, irritation, pain, or discomfort at the injection spot Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  16. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to treat life-threatening allergic reactions caused by insect bites or stings, foods, medications, ... at the first sign of a serious allergic reaction.Use epinephrine injection exactly as directed; do not ...

  17. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  18. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  19. Bendamustine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Bendamustine injection is also used to treat a ... NHL: cancer that begins in a type of white blood cell that normally fights infection) that is slow spreading, ...

  20. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; ; and , skin, and abdominal (stomach ... antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as moxifloxacin injection ...

  1. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  2. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  3. Meropenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround ... of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection ...

  4. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  5. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  6. Telavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious skin infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Telavancin injection is in a class of medications ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or ...

  7. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  8. Aztreonam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and bronchitis), urinary ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, ...

  9. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  10. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  11. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  12. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ciprofloxacin injection is also sometimes used to treat cat scratch disease (an infection that may develop after a person is bitten or scratched by a cat), Legionnaires' disease (type of lung infection), and infections of the ...

  13. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ganciclovir injection is used to treat cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis (eye infection that can cause blindness) in people whose immune system is not working normally, including those people who have ...

  14. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air and treat and prevent ...

  15. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  16. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg), which can lead to pulmonary embolism (PE; a blood clot in the lung), in people ... with warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) to treat DVT or PE. Fondaparinux injection is in a class of medications ...

  17. Pertuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... docetaxel (Taxotere) to treat a certain type of breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Pertuzumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ...

  18. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to decrease the amount of growth hormone (a natural substance) produced by people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial ...

  19. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release injection are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual thinking, loss of ... medications); medications for anxiety, depression, irritable bowel disease, mental illness, motion sickness, Parkinson's disease, seizures, ulcers, or urinary ...

  20. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  1. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  2. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  3. Oritavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for at least 5 days after receiving oritavancin injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  4. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... hearing loss, if you are being treated for meningitis Cefuroxime injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  5. Alirocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... further decrease the amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ('bad cholesterol') in the blood. Alirocumab injection is ... antibodies. It works by blocking the production of LDL cholesterol in the body to decrease the amount of ...

  6. Secukinumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if you need to receive any vaccinations. It is important to have all vaccines appropriate ... treatment with secukinumab injection. Do not have any vaccinations during your treatment without talking to your doctor. ...

  7. Cerebriform intradermal nevus presenting as cutis verticis gyrata with multiple cellular blue nevus over the body: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Roychoudhury, Soumyajit; Shrimal, Arpit; Das, Kapildeb

    2014-01-01

    Cutis verticis gyrata is a rare skin condition characterized by swelling of scalp resembling the surface of the brain. Various conditions, like cerebriform intradermal nevus (CIN), may give rise to this clinical entity. Moreover, its association with cellular blue nevus is extremely rare and has not been reported so far. Here, we report a 28-year-old male with a huge cerebriform swelling covering the occipital lobe along with multiple nodules all over the body. Histology of the scalp swelling showed solitary or clusters of nevus cells in the dermis and from the body lesions showed features of cellular blue nevus. The diagnosis of CIN with cellular blue nevus was confirmed PMID:24616852

  8. Canine atopic dermatitis in Greece: clinical observations and the prevalence of positive intradermal test reactions in 91 spontaneous cases.

    PubMed

    Saridomichelakis, M N; Koutinas, A F; Gioulekas, D; Leontidis, L

    1999-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in a total of 91 dogs by combining the compatible historical evidence and clinical signs with the presence of one or more positive intradermal test reactions well correlated with the exposure to the aeroallergens and the seasonality of the clinical signs. Compared to the general hospital population Yorkshire terriers, Chinese Shar-Peis and cocker spaniels showed a strong predilection. No such predilection was found regarding the sex of the animals. The age of the dogs at the onset of the clinical signs ranged from 2 months to 8 years (median: 2.5 years). Moderate to severe pruritus, noticed in all the 91 dogs, was either localized (29/91) or generalized (64/91) and non-seasonal (43/91), seasonal (19/91) or of unknown seasonality (29/91). The most common cutaneous lesions included erythema, hyperpigmentation, hypotrichosis and crusts; their body distribution was generalized (64%) or localized (36%) with the feet as the most common site of involvement. Five dogs that had unlesional skin were significantly younger and had been pruritic for a shorter period of time compared to the majority of our study population. Otitis externa (43/91) and bacterial pyoderma (30/91) were the most common conditions associated with atopic dermatitis, while the prevalence of Malassezia dermatitis was very low (2/91). Of the other allergic skin diseases flea allergic dermatitis was the most common (29/91) followed by food hypersensitivity (2 out of the 15 dogs tested). The majority of the dogs demonstrated multiple sensitivities to the 50 aeroallergens tested, while domestic mites (77/91), and particularly Dermatophagoides farinae (64/91), were the most commonly implicated. The total number of the positive intradermal test reactions was increasing parallel to the age of the dogs but it was negatively associated with the presence of skin lesions on the carpal and tarsal joints. PMID:10490235

  9. Laser-assisted intradermal delivery of adjuvant-free vaccines targeting XCR1+ dendritic cells induces potent antitumoral responses.

    PubMed

    Terhorst, Dorothea; Fossum, Even; Baranska, Anna; Tamoutounour, Samira; Malosse, Camille; Garbani, Mattia; Braun, Reinhard; Lechat, Elmira; Crameri, Reto; Bogen, Bjarne; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    The development of vaccines inducing efficient CD8(+) T cell responses is the focus of intense research. Dendritic cells (DCs) expressing the XCR1 chemokine receptor, also known as CD103(+) or CD8α(+) DCs, excel in the presentation of extracellular Ags to CD8(+) T cells. Because of its high numbers of DCs, including XCR1(+) DCs, the skin dermis is an attractive site for vaccine administration. By creating laser-generated micropores through the epidermis, we targeted a model protein Ag fused to XCL1, the ligand of XCR1, to dermal XCR1(+) DCs and induced Ag-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses. Efficient immunization required the emigration of XCR1(+) dermal DCs to draining lymph nodes and occurred irrespective of TLR signaling. Moreover, a single intradermal immunization protected mice against melanoma tumor growth in prophylactic and therapeutic settings, in the absence of exogenous adjuvant. The mild inflammatory milieu created in the dermis by skin laser microporation itself most likely favored the development of potent T cell responses in the absence of exogenous adjuvants. The existence of functionally equivalent XCR1(+) dermal DCs in humans should permit the translation of laser-assisted intradermal delivery of a tumor-specific vaccine targeting XCR1(+) DCs to human cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, considering that the use of adjuvants in vaccines is often associated with safety issues, the possibility of inducing protective responses against melanoma tumor growth independently of the administration of exogenous adjuvants should facilitate the development of safer vaccines. PMID:25941327

  10. Interpretation Criteria for Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Test for Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle in Maroua Area of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Temwa, J.; Mouiche, M. M.; Iyawa, D.; Zoli, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal tuberculin test (TST) is the choice method for diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (Tb) in live animals. This work was done to assess the performance of single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test in randomly selected cattle in Maroua, Cameroon, against detection of Tb lesions and detection of Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli in lesions. While 22.28% of slaughtered cattle presented Tb lesions at meat inspection, detection rates of anti-bovine-Tb antibody, Tb lesions, and Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli were 68.57%, 32.95%, and 22.35%, respectively. SICCT-bovine-Tb positive cattle were 35.29%, 29.41%, 25.88%, 24.7%, and 21.18% at ≥2 mm, ≥2.5 mm, ≥3 mm, ≥3.5 mm, and ≥4 mm cut-offs, respectively. Higher sensitivity and predictive values were obtained at severe interpretations. The best performance was at ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Against detection of Tb lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 67.8% and specificity of 94.7% and 96.5%, respectively. For detection of Tb lesions accompanied with acid fast bacilli in lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 89.4% and specificity of 92.4% and 93.9%, respectively. These findings revealed that interpretations of SICCT-bovine-Tb should be at ≥3 mm and/or ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Severe interpretation of TST is essential for optimal diagnosis of bovine Tb in cattle in Maroua, Cameroon. PMID:27563481

  11. NF-κB activation during intradermal DNA vaccination is essential for eliciting tumor protective antigen-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; Kiessling, Rolf; Lladser, Alvaro

    2013-10-01

    DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit tumor-protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity in preclinical models, but have shown limited efficacy in cancer patients. Plasmids used for DNA vaccines can stimulate several innate immune receptors, triggering the activation of master transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB). These transcription factors drive the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which promote the induction of CTL responses. Understanding the innate immune signaling pathways triggered by DNA vaccines that control the generation of CTL responses will increase our ability to design more effective vaccines. To gain insight into the contribution of these pathways, we vaccinated mice lacking different signaling components with plasmids encoding tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) or ovalbumin (OVA) using intradermal electroporation. Antigen-specific CTL responses were detected by intracellular IFN-γ staining and in vivo cytotoxicity. Mice lacking IRF3, IFN-α receptor, IL-1β/IL-18, TLR9 or MyD88 showed similar CTL responses to wild-type mice, arguing that none of these molecules were required for the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. To elucidate the role of NF-κB activation we co-vaccinated mice with pIκBα-SR, a plasmid encoding a mutant IκBα that blocks NF-κB activity. Mice vaccinated with pIκBα-SR and the TRP2-encoding plasmid (pTRP2) drastically reduced the frequencies of TRP2-specific CTLs and were unable to suppress lung melanoma metastasis in vivo, as compared with mice vaccinated only with pTRP2. Taken together these results indicate that the activation of NF-κB is essential for the immunogenicity of intradermal DNA vaccines. PMID:23884215

  12. Interpretation Criteria for Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Test for Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle in Maroua Area of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Awah-Ndukum, J; Temwa, J; Ngwa, V Ngu; Mouiche, M M; Iyawa, D; Zoli, P A

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal tuberculin test (TST) is the choice method for diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (Tb) in live animals. This work was done to assess the performance of single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test in randomly selected cattle in Maroua, Cameroon, against detection of Tb lesions and detection of Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli in lesions. While 22.28% of slaughtered cattle presented Tb lesions at meat inspection, detection rates of anti-bovine-Tb antibody, Tb lesions, and Tb lesions plus acid fast bacilli were 68.57%, 32.95%, and 22.35%, respectively. SICCT-bovine-Tb positive cattle were 35.29%, 29.41%, 25.88%, 24.7%, and 21.18% at ≥2 mm, ≥2.5 mm, ≥3 mm, ≥3.5 mm, and ≥4 mm cut-offs, respectively. Higher sensitivity and predictive values were obtained at severe interpretations. The best performance was at ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Against detection of Tb lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 67.8% and specificity of 94.7% and 96.5%, respectively. For detection of Tb lesions accompanied with acid fast bacilli in lesions, ≥3 mm and ≥3.5 mm showed sensitivity of 89.4% and specificity of 92.4% and 93.9%, respectively. These findings revealed that interpretations of SICCT-bovine-Tb should be at ≥3 mm and/or ≥3.5 mm cut-offs. Severe interpretation of TST is essential for optimal diagnosis of bovine Tb in cattle in Maroua, Cameroon. PMID:27563481

  13. Development of an Innovative Intradermal siRNA Delivery System Using a Combination of a Functional Stearylated Cytoplasm-Responsive Peptide and a Tight Junction-Opening Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ibaraki, Hisako; Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki; Seta, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    As a new category of therapeutics for skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD), nucleic acids are gaining importance in the clinical setting. Intradermal administration is noninvasive and improves patients' quality of life. However, intradermal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is difficult because of two barriers encountered in the skin: intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum and tight junctions in the stratum granulosum. Tight junctions are the major barrier in AD; therefore, we focused on functional peptides to devise an intradermal siRNA delivery system for topical skin application. In this study, we examined intradermal siRNA permeability in the tape-stripped (20 times) back skin of mice or AD-like skin of auricles treated with 6-carboxyfluorescein-aminohexyl phosphoramidite (FAM)-labeled siRNA, the tight junction modulator AT1002, and the functional cytoplasm-responsive stearylated peptide STR-CH₂R₄H₂C by using confocal laser microscopy. We found that strong fluorescence was observed deep and wide in the epidermis and dermis of back skin and AD-like ears after siRNA with STR-CH₂R₄H₂C and AT1002 treatment. After 10 h from administration, brightness of FAM-siRNA was significantly higher for STR-CH₂R₄H₂C + AT1002, compared to other groups. In addition, we confirmed the nontoxicity of STR-CH₂R₄H₂C as a siRNA carrier using PAM212 cells. Thus, our results demonstrate the applicability of the combination of STR-CH₂R₄H₂C and AT1002 for effective intradermal siRNA delivery. PMID:27669207

  14. Live imaging of transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 activation in Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells implanted into syngeneic mice and treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Saori; Kamioka, Yuji; Takakura, Kanako; Baba, Ai; Shime, Hiroaki; Seya, Tsukasa; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has been shown to play a crucial role in cell death, differentiation, and inflammation. Here, we live-imaged robust TAK1 activation in Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells implanted into the s.c. tissue of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C). First, we developed and characterized a Förster resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for TAK1 activity. The TAK1 biosensor, named Eevee-TAK1, responded to stress-inducing reagents such as anisomycin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin1-β. The anisomycin-induced increase in Förster resonance energy transfer was abolished by the TAK1 inhibitor (5z)-7-oxozeaenol. Activity of TAK1 in 3LL cells was markedly increased by PolyI:C in the presence of macrophages. 3LL cells expressing Eevee-TAK1 were implanted into mice and observed through imaging window by two-photon excitation microscopy. During the growth of tumor, the 3LL cells at the periphery of the tumor showed higher TAK1 activity than the 3LL cells located at the center of the tumor, suggesting that cells at the periphery of the tumor mass were under stronger stress. Injection of PolyI:C, which is known to induce regression of the implanted tumors, induced marked and homogenous TAK1 activation within the tumor tissues. The effect of PolyI:C faded within 4 days. These observations suggest that Eevee-TAK1 is a versatile tool to monitor cellular stress in cancer tissues. PMID:26931406

  15. A novel cell-penetrating peptide derived from WT1 enhances p53 activity, induces cell senescence and displays antimelanoma activity in xeno- and syngeneic systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Massaoka, Mariana H.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Girola, Natalia; Faria, Camyla F.; Azevedo, Ricardo A.; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) transcription factor has been associated in malignant melanoma with cell survival and metastasis, thus emerging as a candidate for targeted therapy. A lysine–arginine rich peptide, WT1-pTj, derived from the ZF domain of WT1 was evaluated as an antitumor agent against A2058 human melanoma cells and B16F10-Nex2 syngeneic murine melanoma. Peptide WT1-pTj quickly penetrated human melanoma cells and induced senescence, recognized by increased SA-β-galactosidase activity, enhanced transcriptional activity of p53, and induction of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. Moreover, the peptide bound to p53 and competed with WT1 protein for binding to p53. WT1-pTj treatment led to sustained cell growth suppression, abrogation of clonogenicity and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Notably, in vivo studies showed that WT1-pTj inhibited both the metastases and subcutaneous growth of murine melanoma in syngeneic mice, and prolonged the survival of nude mice challenged with human melanoma cells. The 27-amino acid cell-penetrating WT1-derived peptide, depends on C3 and H16 for effective antimelanoma activity, inhibits proliferation of WT1-expressing human tumor cell lines, and may have an effective role in the treatment of WT1-expressing malignancies. PMID:24490140

  16. Hydromorphone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, vomiting, diarrhea, or failure to gain weight.tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.if you ... Hydromorphone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... vomiting constipation dry mouth lightheadedness dizziness drowsiness ...

  17. Eculizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... which too many red blood cells are broken down in the body, so there are not enough healthy cells to bring oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS; an inherited condition in which small blood ...

  18. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), abdomen (area between the chest and waist), lungs, blood, and ... to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected ...

  19. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved or that had improved after treatment with other medications, but later returned. Tositumomab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer cells and releasing radiation to damage the cancer ...

  20. Lanreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Lanreotide injection is used to treat people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial features; joint pain; and other symptoms) who have not successfully, or cannot be treated ...

  1. Eribulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests to check your body's response to eribulin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  2. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 7 days after you receive each pegaptanib injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  3. Isolation and detection of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in the reproductive organs and associated lymph nodes of non-pregnant does experimentally inoculated through intradermal route in chronic form

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nur Amirah Abdul; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Othman, Aishatu Mohammed; Rina, Adza; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Saharee, Abdul Aziz; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiological agent of caseous lymphadenitis that affects sheep and goats. This study was designed to determine the presence of the causative organism in the female reproductive organs and associated lymph nodes in non-pregnant does experimentally inoculated through intradermal route in the chronic form. Materials and Methods: 18 non-pregnant healthy Katjang does aged 2-year-old were divided randomly into two groups. The first and second group consists of nine non-pregnant does each and the two groups were subdivided into three subgroups. The first group was experimentally inoculated with 1 ml of 107cfu of live C. pseudotuberculosis through intradermal route, whereas the second group was inoculated with 1 ml phosphate buffer saline (pH 7) solution intradermally. The first group were further subdivided into three subgroups where, the first subgroup (B1) were kept for 30 days post-infection, second subgroup (B2) were kept for 60 days post-infection, and third subgroup (B3) were kept for 90 days. The second group was further subdivided into three subgroups (C1, C2, and C3) where they were kept for 39, 60, and 90 days post-infection, respectively. Results: From this study, there was successful isolation of C. pseudotuberculosis from the reproductive organs of the treatment group after 60 days post-infection. The subgroups (B1, C1, C2, and C3) did not show any presence of the causative organism in the reproductive organs. The second subgroup B2 and third subgroup B3 showed positive isolation of the causative organisms from the ovary, uterine horns, uterus, cervix, vagina, and inguinal lymph node of the experimental non-pregnant does. Conclusion: This study showed that chronic infection of C. pseudotuberculosis via intradermal route may cause effect toward the reproductive organs and may be able to influence the reproductive efficiency of the infected animals. PMID:27047177

  4. Performance of LBSap Vaccine after Intradermal Challenge with L. infantum and Saliva of Lu. longipalpis: Immunogenicity and Parasitological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian de Oliveira; Vitoriano-Souza, Juliana; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Braga, Samuel Leôncio; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; de Lana, Marta; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; Marques, Marcos José; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the search for new vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis has intensified. However, the pattern related to immune protection during long periods after experimental infection in vaccine trials is still not fully understood. Herein, we investigated the immunogenicity and parasitological levels after intradermal challenge with Leishmania infantum plus salivary gland extract in dogs immunized with a vaccine composed of L. braziliensis antigens plus saponin as an adjuvant (LBSap vaccine). The LBSap vaccine elicited higher levels of total anti-Leishmania IgG as well as both IgG1 and IgG2. Furthermore, dogs vaccinated had increased levels of lymphocytes, particularly circulating B cells (CD21+) and both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. LBSap also elicited an intense in vitro cell proliferation associated with higher levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes specific for vaccine soluble antigen and soluble lysate of L. infantum antigen even 885 days after experimental challenge. Furthermore, LBSap vaccinated dogs presented high IFN-γ and low IL-10 and TGF-β1 expression in spleen with significant reduction of parasite load in this tissue. Overall, our results validate the potential of LBSap vaccine to protect against L. infantum experimental infection and strongly support further evaluation of efficiency of LBSap against CVL in natural infection conditions. PMID:23189161

  5. Distribution of polyphenols and a surfactant component in skin during Aerosol OT microemulsion-enhanced intradermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Yutani, Reiko; Morita, Shin-ya; Teraoka, Reiko; Kitagawa, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    As for most other polyphenols, intradermal delivery of curcumin and resveratrol is limited; however, it was significantly improved by a microemulsion using Aerosol OT (Aerosol OT microemulsion) and Tween 80 (Tween 80 microemulsion) as surfactants. Aerosol OT microemulsion was more effective and the incorporation ratio of these polyphenols into skin by Aerosol OT microemulsion was five-fold or ten-fold that by Tween 80 microemulsion. To clarify the mechanism of the enhancement we examined the distribution of these polyphenols and the surfactant component, Aerosol OT, using excised guinea pig skin and Yucatan micropig (YMP) skin. During permeation, polyphenols distributed deep in the skin. In particular, a small molecule, resveratrol, was mainly present in the dermis in YMP skin. Aerosol OT also distributed deep in the skin. These findings suggest the possible involvement of the interaction of surfactant molecules with skin components in the enhanced delivery process of polyphenols. The distribution ratio between the dermis and epidermis of the polyphenols, including quercetin, in the presence of Aerosol OT microemulsion decreased with the increase of molecular weight in YMP skin, suggesting the possibility that distribution to the dermis is regulated by the molecular size.

  6. [Case of 5 year-old boy with anaphylaxis due to erythritol with negative prick test and positive intradermal test].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Unno, Atsushi; Hatano, Michihiro

    2013-11-01

    A 5 year-old boy experienced anaphylaxis after eating a jelly product for diet supplement containing erythritol as a major component. Prick test with the jelly product was negative, but the second oral ingestion of the jelly product at home caused another allergic reaction. Prick test with erythritol was negative even at 300 mg/ml, which was almost the solubility limit. Intradermal test was marginally positive at 0.1 mg/ml, and clearly positive at 1 mg/ml or higher concentration. We found subtle dose-response reaction utilizing basophil activation test, examined with 24 hour incubation at the concentration of 40-4000 μg/ml. At the oral challenge test in the hospital, 3 g of erythritol induced remarkable coughing, urticaria, edema, wheezing and hypoxemia. Erythritol is a natural sugar alcohol, with the molecular weight of 122.12, which is recently being widely used for diet supplements, beverages, or drug medicines due to its properties of calorie-free and good-tasting, with easy-to-use physical characteristics. We now have to recognize erythritol as a candidate for food allergen, and to be careful about negative result of prick test.

  7. Transient engraftment of syngeneic bone marrow after conditioning with high-dose cyclophosphamide and thoracoabdominal irradiation in a patient with aplastic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Matsue, K.; Niki, T.; Shiobara, S.; Ueda, M.; Ohtake, S.; Mori, T.; Matsuda, T.; Harada, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We describe the clinical course of a 16 year old girl with aplastic anemia who was treated by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. Engraftment was not obtained by simple infusion of bone marrow without immunosuppression. The patient received a high-dose cyclophosphamide and thoracoabdominal irradiation, followed by second marrow transplantation from the same donor. Incomplete but significant hematologic recovery was observed; however, marrow failure recurred 5 months after transplantation. Since donor and recipient pairs were genotypically identical, graft failure could not be attributed to immunological reactivity of recipient cells to donor non-HLA antigens. This case report implies that graft failure in some cases of aplastic anemia might be mediated by inhibitory cells resistant to cyclophosphamide and irradiation.

  8. AC-1001 H3 CDR peptide induces apoptosis and signs of autophagy in vitro and exhibits antimetastatic activity in a syngeneic melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Rabaça, Aline N; Arruda, Denise C; Figueiredo, Carlos R; Massaoka, Mariana H; Farias, Camyla F; Tada, Dayane B; Maia, Vera C; Silva Junior, Pedro I; Girola, Natalia; Real, Fernando; Mortara, Renato A; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R

    2016-09-01

    Antibody-derived peptides modulate functions of the immune system and are a source of anti-infective and antitumor substances. Recent studies have shown that they comprise amino acid sequences of immunoglobulin complementarity-determining regions, but also fragments of constant regions. VH CDR3 of murine mAb AC-1001 displays antimetastatic activities using B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma cells in a syngeneic model. The peptide was cytotoxic in vitro in murine and human melanoma cells inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis by the intrinsic pathway. Signs of autophagy were also suggested by the increased expression of LC3/LC3II and Beclin 1 and by ultrastructural evidence. AC-1001 H3 bound to both G- and F-actin and inhibited tumor cell migration. These results are important evidence of the antitumor activity of Ig CDR-derived peptides. PMID:27642552

  9. Developmental changes of cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase functions after transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspension into spleens of adult syngenic rats.

    PubMed

    Lupp, A; Trautmann, A K; Krausse, T; Klinger, W

    1998-06-01

    Fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of adult male syngenic Fisher 344 inbred rats. Animals were sacrificed at 3 days, 1, 2, 4 weeks, and 2, 4 and 6 months after transplantation and cytochrome P450 (P450) dependent monooxygenase functions in spleen and liver 9000 g supernatants were assessed by measuring three model reactions for different P450 subtypes: ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD; mainly 1A), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation (ECOD; predominantly 1A, 2A, 2B) and ethylmorphine N-demethylation (END; mainly 3A). Values of transplant recipients were compared to those of sham operated and age matched control rats. Spleen weights were significantly higher in transplanted rats, compared to controls or sham operated animals, but there was no influence of the transplants within the spleens on liver weights. With fetal livers at the 21st day of gestation, the day of transplantation, a weak EROD and ECOD, but no END activity was seen. Spleens of controls or sham operated animals displayed nearly no P450 mediated monooxygenase functions. In the explant containing spleens a significant and increasing EROD activity was found from 4 weeks after surgery on and an ECOD activity already 2 weeks after transplantation. END was only slightly enhanced at 6 months after surgery. The livers of all three groups of rats displayed normal EROD, ECOD and END activities. Transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspensions into the spleens did not influence the P450 dependent monooxygenase functions within the livers of the animals. From these results it can be concluded that intrasplenically transplanted liver cells originating from syngenic fetal liver tissue suspensions proliferate and differentiate within the host organs. They display P450 dependent monooxygenase functions with some developmental changes during the observed time period of 6 months.

  10. Injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1989-06-01

    The most effective, convenient, reversible method of birth control is considered to be long-acting progestogen injections. Used by over 90 countries, Depot medroxy-progesterone acetate (DMPA, Depo-Provera, Upjohn) has yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The reluctance of the FDA to approve DMPA and much of the controversy surrounding this method revolve around the results of testing done on animals who were given large doses of the progestogen over a long period of time and developed tumors. However, the large body of research and records on this method that have been compiled over the past 30 years is positive. The injectable method works like oral contraceptives, inhibiting ovulation. Changes in menstruation have been the chief complaint of women who use this method; however, the duration and frequency of spotting and bleeding diminish over time. Other side effects of DMPA and Norethindrone enanthate (NET EN, Noristerat, Schering) are discussed. Also discussed is the history of development and testing for the 2 methods and subdermal implants, specifically Norplant.

  11. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  12. Cutaneous vascular and sweating responses to intradermal administration of ATP: a role for nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; McGinn, Ryan; Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Kondo, Narihiko; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    In humans in vivo, the mechanisms behind ATP-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation and whether and how ATP increases sweating remain uncertain. We evaluated whether ATP-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating is mediated via nitric oxide synthase (NOS), cyclooxygenase (COX) and/or adenosine-dependent mechanisms. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweat rate (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at intradermal microdialysis forearm skin sites, each receiving pharmacological agents (two separate protocols). In Protocol 1 (n = 12), sites were perfused with: (1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), (2) 10 mm Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA, a NOS inhibitor), (3) 10 mm ketorolac (Ketorolac, a COX inhibitor) or (4) a combination of 10 mm l-NNA + 10 mm ketorolac (l-NNA + Ketorolac). In Protocol 2 (n = 8), sites were perfused with: (1) lactated Ringer solution (Control) or (2) 4 mm theophylline (Theophylline, an adenosine receptor inhibitor). At all sites, ATP was simultaneously perfused at 0.12, 1.2, 12, 120 and 1200 nm min−1 (each for 20 min). Relative to CVC at the Control site with ATP infused at 120 nm min−1 (71 ± 9% of max CVC), CVC at the Ketorolac site was comparable (64 ± 13% of max CVC, P = 0.407), but lower at l-NNA (51 ± 15% of max CVC, P = 0.040) and l-NNA + Ketorolac (51 ± 13% of max CVC, P = 0.049) sites. Conversely, across the four skin sites at any other ATP infusion rate (all P > 0.174), no differences in CVC were observed. Theophylline did not influence CVC at any ATP infusion rate (all P > 0.234). Furthermore, no ATP infusion rate elicited an increase in sweating from baseline at any skin site (all P > 0.235). We show that NOS, but neither COX nor adenosine receptors, modulates ATP-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation, whereas ATP does not directly increase sweating. Key points In humans in vivo, the mechanisms behind ATP-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation along with whether and how ATP

  13. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This article describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25839221

  14. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Colonization following Intradermal, Sublingual, or Oral Vaccination with EtpA Adhesin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingwei; Vickers, Tim J; Fleckenstein, James M

    2016-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a common cause of diarrhea. Extraordinary antigenic diversity has prompted a search for conserved antigens to complement canonical approaches to ETEC vaccine development. EtpA, an immunogenic extracellular ETEC adhesin relatively conserved in the ETEC pathovar, has previously been shown to be a protective antigen following intranasal immunization. These studies were undertaken to explore alternative routes of EtpA vaccination that would permit use of a double mutant (R192G L211A) heat-labile toxin (dmLT) adjuvant. Here, oral vaccination with EtpA adjuvanted with dmLT afforded significant protection against small intestinal colonization, and the degree of protection correlated with fecal IgG, IgA, or total fecal antibody responses to EtpA. Sublingual vaccination yielded compartmentalized mucosal immune responses with significant increases in anti-EtpA fecal IgG and IgA, and mice vaccinated via this route were also protected against colonization. In contrast, while intradermal (i.d.) vaccination achieved high levels of both serum and fecal antibodies against both EtpA and dmLT, mice vaccinated via the i.d. route were not protected against subsequent colonization and the avidity of serum IgG and IgA EtpA-specific antibodies was significantly lower after i.d. immunization compared to other routes. Finally, we demonstrate that antiserum from vaccinated mice significantly impairs binding of LT to cognate GM1 receptors and shows near complete neutralization of toxin delivery by ETEC in vitro Collectively, these data provide further evidence that EtpA could complement future vaccine strategies but also suggest that additional effort will be required to optimize its use as a protective immunogen. PMID:27226279

  15. Intradermal administration of ATP augments methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilation but not sweating in young males and females.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Meade, Robert D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-10-15

    Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is a key neurotransmitter contributing to heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Given that sympathetic cholinergic nerves also release ATP, ATP may play an important role in modulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. However, the pattern of response may differ between males and females given reports of sex-related differences in the peripheral mechanisms governing these heat loss responses. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweat rate (ventilated capsule) were evaluated in 17 young adults (8 males, 9 females) at four intradermal microdialysis skin sites continuously perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 0.3 mM ATP, 3) 3 mM ATP, or 4) 30 mM ATP. At all skin sites, methacholine was coadministered in a concentration-dependent manner (0.0125, 0.25, 5, 100, 2,000 mM, each for 25 min). In both males and females, CVC was elevated with the lone infusion of 30 mM ATP (both P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 and 3 mM ATP compared with control (all P >0.27). However, 0.3 mM ATP induced a greater increase in CVC compared with control in response to 100 mM methacholine infusion in males (P < 0.05). In females, 0.3 mM ATP infusion resulted in a lower concentration of methacholine required to elicit a half-maximal response (EC50) (P < 0.05). In both males and females, methacholine-induced sweating was unaffected by any concentration of ATP (all P > 0.44). We demonstrate that ATP enhances cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation albeit the pattern of response differs between males and females. Furthermore, we show that ATP does not modulate cholinergic sweating. PMID:26290105

  16. Evidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacteraemia in intradermal skin test positive cattle detected using phage-RPA.

    PubMed

    Swift, Benjamin M C; Convery, Thomas W; Rees, Catherine E D

    2016-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis that affects cattle and can cause tuberculosis in a range of wildlife animals. A bacteriophage-based method combined with PCR (phage-PCR) has been recently used to detect and identify viable pathogenic mycobacteria in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of animals suffering from paratuberculosis. To adapt this method for the detection of M. bovis in blood, a new isothermal DNA amplification protocol using Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) was developed and was found to be able to detect M. bovis BCG within 48 h, with a limit of detection of approximately 10 cells per ml of blood for artificially inoculated blood samples. When blood samples (2 ml) from a Single Comparative Cervical Intradermal Tuberculin (SCCIT)- negative beef herd were tested, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) cells were not detected from any (45) of the blood samples. However when blood samples from SCCIT-positive animals were tested, viable MTC bacteria were detected in 66 % (27/41) of samples. Of these 41 animals sampled, 32 % (13) had visible lesions. In the visible lesion (VL) group, 85 % (11/13) had detectable levels of MTC whereas only 57 % (16/28) of animals which had no visible lesions (NVL) were found to have detectable mycobacteraemia. These results indicated that this simple, rapid method can be applied for the study of M. bovis infections. The frequency with which viable mycobacteria were detected in the peripheral blood of SCCIT-positive animals changes the paradigm of this disease. PMID:27197018

  17. Engraftment of Syngeneic and Allogeneic Endothelial Cells, Hepatocytes and Cholangiocytes into Partially Hepatectomized Rats Previously Treated with Mitomycin C1

    PubMed Central

    Brilliant, Kate E.; Mills, David R.; Callanan, Helen M.; Hixson, Douglas C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pretreatment with retrorsine crosslinks host hepatocyte DNA and prevents proliferation after partial hepatectomy (PH), allowing selective expansion of transplanted progenitors. Shortcomings are length of protocol and carcinogenicity of retrorsine. Methods This report describes a rapid liver repopulation protocol using mitomycin C (MMC) to block proliferation of rat hepatocytes in response to PH. One week post-MMC treatment, dipeptidyl peptidase IV negative (DPPIV−) host rats were given a PH followed by injection of late gestation, newborn or adult total liver isolates from DPPIV+ rats. For allogeneic transplantation, host rats received injections of anti-CD3 antibody before and after PH. Results Host liver staining 2–9 weeks post-transplantation revealed well-defined donor hepatocyte colonies with strong canalicular DPPIV activity. At the same cell dose, fetal and newborn isolates produced more colonies than adult liver isolates. Hepatocyte colonies also co-expressed marker proteins characteristic of adult hepatocytes and showed polarized localization of plasma membrane proteins. Host livers contained large clusters of sinusoids lined by DPPIV+ endothelial cells co-expressing the endothelial cell marker, RECA-1 but lacked the canalicular marker leucine aminopeptidase. Colonies containing donor hepatocytes, endothelial cells and bile ducts, were also observed. Similar levels of engraftment and expansion were achieved with allogeneic liver cell isolates by using anti-CD3 antibody treatment. Conclusions The MMC transplantation model provides a rapid method for engraftment and expansion of hepatocytes, endothelial cells and cholangiocytes and should be applicable to investigations centering on the role of endothelial cells in liver regeneration and the identification and characterization of putative endothelial, hepatocyte and cholangiocyte progenitors. PMID:19696631

  18. Adjuvanted, antigen loaded N-trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles for nasal and intradermal vaccination: adjuvant- and site-dependent immunogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bal, Suzanne M; Slütter, Bram; Verheul, Rolf; Bouwstra, Joke A; Jiskoot, Wim

    2012-03-12

    N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles have been shown to increase the immunogenicity of subunit antigens after nasal and intradermal administration. This work describes a second generation of TMC nanoparticles containing ovalbumin as a model antigen (TMC/OVA nanoparticles) and an immunopotentiator (TMC/OVA/immunopotentiator nanoparticles). The selection of immunopotentiators included Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PAM(3)CSK(4) (PAM), CpG DNA, the NOD-like receptor 2 ligand muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and the GM1 ganglioside receptor ligand, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). The TMC/OVA/immunopotentiator nanoparticles were characterised physico-chemically and their immunogenicity was assessed by determining the serum IgG, IgG1, IgG2a titres and secretory IgA levels in nasal washes after intradermal and nasal vaccination in mice. After nasal vaccination, TMC/OVA nanoparticles containing LPS or MDP elicited higher IgG, IgG1 and sIgA levels than non-adjuvanted TMC/OVA particles, whereas nanoparticles containing CTB, PAM or CpG did not. After intradermal vaccination, the TMC/OVA/CpG and TMC/OVA/LPS nanoparticles provoked higher IgG titres than plain TMC/OVA particles. Altogether, our results show that co-encapsulation of an additional immunopotentiator with the antigen into TMC nanoparticles can further improve the immunogenicity of the vaccine. However, the strength and quality of the response depends on the immunopotentiator as well as the route of administration.

  19. A comparison of intradermal testing and detection of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in horses affected with skin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Miller, William H; Wagner, Bettina

    2007-12-15

    Skin hypersensitivities (allergies) in horses are often diagnosed using clinical signs only. Intradermal testing or serological assays are diagnostic options to confirm the allergic nature of the disease and to identify the allergen(s). Our objective was to develop an allergen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody specific for horse IgE and to examine its potential for allergen detection in serum in comparison to intradermal testing. Intradermal testing with 61 allergen extracts was performed on 10 horses affected with skin hypersensitivity. Their sera were analyzed by ELISA for IgE antibodies to the same allergens. The kappa test of concordance was used for comparison of the results of both tests. Out of 61 allergen extracts, only two (Timothy and Quack) had kappa values greater than 0.60, suggesting a substantial agreement between skin testing and IgE ELISA. The statistical comparison of the remaining 59 allergens showed little or no concordance between the tests beyond chance. To identify parameters that may influence the sensitivity of the ELISA, the assay was modified to detect allergen-specific IgGb and IgG(T) in serum, and the protein content in all allergen extracts was determined by SDS-PAGE. The commercial allergen extracts revealed a high variation in detectable protein. High concentrations of allergen-specific IgG in horse serum were found to compete with IgE for binding to the plates. In conclusion, an ELISA using whole serum and crude allergen preparations provides limited diagnostic information in horses. The reliable diagnosis of allergens in equine skin hypersensitivity is essential to improve allergen-specific treatments, such as hyposensitization, or the development of allergy vaccines.

  20. Induction by interleukin-7 of lymphokine-activated killer activity in lymphocytes from autologous and syngeneic marrow transplant recipients before and after systemic interleukin-2 therapy.

    PubMed

    Pavletic, Z; Benyunes, M C; Thompson, J A; Lindgren, C G; Massumoto, C; Alderson, M R; Buckner, C D; Fefer, A

    1993-09-01

    Therapy with recombinant lymphokines after autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) is being explored as a way to prevent relapse. Lymphokine therapy may exert an antitumor effect through a variety of mechanisms, including the induction of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell cytotoxicity. We tested the ability of interleukin-7 (IL-7) to induce LAK cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy subjects and from patients early after ABMT. LAK activity was defined as lysis of Daudi by PBMC after incubation with IL-7 at 10 to 100 ng/mL or IL-2 at 1000 U/mL. PBMC from four healthy subjects were cultured with either IL-7 or IL-2. IL-7 induced LAK activity in two of the four, whereas IL-2 induced LAK activity in all four. The median percent lysis (effector-to-target ratio [E:T] 40:1) with IL-7 (23%) was lower than with IL-2 (67%). PBMC were obtained from 15 patients 27 to 84 days after autologous (n = 13) or syngeneic (n = 2) bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and tested for IL-7-induced LAK activity. Eleven exhibited significant activity (10% to 77% lysis at E:T 40:1). In contrast to the results in PBMC from normal subjects, in PBMC from ABMT patients IL-7 induced LAK activity of a magnitude similar to that induced by IL-2. Studies were also performed on PBMC from eight patients who had received IL-2 after ABMT (3.0 x 10(6) U/m2/d) for 4 days by continuous intravenous (IV) infusion. In seven of the eight patients, IL-7 induced significant LAK activity, which was higher than that seen in PBMC from ABMT patients who had not received IL-2. Thus, IL-7 reproducibly induced significant LAK activity in cells obtained early after autologous or syngeneic BMT. Indeed, such LAK activity was comparable quantitatively to that induced by IL-2. Finally, IL-7 induced an even greater LAK activity in vitro in PBMC obtained after ABMT and preactivated in vivo by IL-2 therapy. The results suggest that IL-7 may have a potential immunotherapeutic role, alone or

  1. Exploring the mechanisms underpinning sweating: the development of a specialized ventilated capsule for use with intradermal microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Meade, Robert D; Louie, Jeffrey C; Poirier, Martin P; McGinn, Ryan; Fujii, Naoto; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have aimed to identify the controllers of sweating using ventilated capsules with intradermal microdialysis. It is unclear, however, if the surface area covered by the capsule influences the observed response as a result of differences in the number of sweat glands affected by the infused pharmacological agent relative to the total glands captured by the capsule. We evaluated the area of skin perfused with agents delivered via microdialysis. Thereafter, we developed a specialized sweat capsule (1.1 cm(2)) and compared the sweating response with a classic capsule (2.8 cm(2)). InProtocol 1(n = 6), methacholine was delivered to forearm skin in a dose-dependent manner (1-2000 mmol L(-1)). The area of activated sweat glands was assessed via the modified iodine-paper technique. InProtocol 2(n = 6), the area of inhibited sweat glands induced by ouabain and atropine was assessed during moderate-intensity cycling. Marked variability in the affected skin area was observed (0.9 ± 0.4 to 5.2 ± 1.1 cm(2)). InProtocol 3(n = 6), we compared the attenuation in local sweat rate (LSR) induced by atropine between the new and classic capsule during moderate-intensity cycling. Atropine attenuated sweating as assessed using the new (control: 0.87 ± 0.23 mg min(-1) cm(-2)vs. atropine: 0.54 ± 0.22 mg min(-1) cm(-2);P < 0.01) and classic (control: 0.85 ± 0.33 mg min(-1) cm(-2)vs. atropine: 0.60 ± 0.26 mg min(-1) cm(-2);P = 0.05) capsule designs. Importantly, responses did not differ between capsule designs (P = 0.23). These findings provide critical information regarding the skin surface area perfused by microdialysis and suggest that use of a larger capsule does not alter the mechanistic insight into the sweating response gained when using microdialysis. PMID:27033452

  2. Multipoint and multilevel injection technique of botulinum toxin A in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Iozzo, Ivano; Tengattini, Vera; Antonucci, Valentina A

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum toxin represents one of the most frequently requested cosmetic procedures. We treated 223 patients with facial wrinkles using a new technique of injection of botulinum toxin A (BTA) called multipoint and multilevel injection technique (MMIT). The aim of MMIT was to relax the muscle and not paralyze it. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by Facial Line Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (FTSQ). Treatment with botulinum toxin determined a good response in all patients. Facial rhytids were completely resolved in case of young skin and well reduced in case of aged skin, leaving a natural aspect both in static and dynamic wrinkles. Patient mean overall satisfaction evaluated with FTSQ was 6.4 ± 1.1. In our experience, the use of botulin toxin by MMIT consents a better calibration of action with a soft and natural result. This can be achieved by distributing the BTA dose through various injection points for each area ("multipoint injections"). Furthermore, injections can be performed at different levels ("multilevel injections"). The level of injections regulates the potency of effect on the muscle: if the level is deep (intramuscular), the effect will be strong while if it is medium or superficial (subcutaneous and intradermal), the effect will be soft. This consents a fine calibration of action on muscle activity with a personal aesthetic result.

  3. Syngeneic Cardiac and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Display Tissue-Specific microRNA Signatures and microRNA Subsets Restricted to Diverse Differentiation Processes

    PubMed Central

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Azzimato, Valerio; Piacentini, Luca; Chiesa, Mattia; Kesharwani, Rupesh K.; Frati, Caterina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Gaetano, Carlo; Pompilio, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key modulators at molecular level in different biological processes, including determination of cell fate and differentiation. Herein, microRNA expression profiling experiments were performed on syngeneic cardiac (CStC) and bone marrow (BMStC) mesenchymal stromal cells cultured in standard growth medium and then in vitro exposed to adipogenic, osteogenic, cardiomyogenic and endothelial differentiation media. Analysis identified a tissue-specific microRNA signature composed of 16 microRNAs that univocally discriminated cell type of origin and that were completely unaffected by in vitro differentiation media: 4 microRNAs were over-expressed in cardiac stromal cells, and 12 were overexpressed or present only in bone marrow stromal cells. Further, results revealed microRNA subsets specifically modulated by each differentiation medium, irrespective of the cell type of origin, and a subset of 7 microRNAs that were down-regulated by all media with respect to growth medium. Finally, we identified 16 microRNAs that were differentially modulated by the media when comparing the two tissues of origin. The existence of a tissue-specific microRNA signature surviving to any differentiation stimuli, strongly support the role if microRNAs determining cell identity related to tissue origin. Moreover, we identified microRNA subsets modulated by different culture conditions in a tissue-specific manner, pointing out their importance during differentiation processes. PMID:25232725

  4. Preclinical screening of histone deacetylase inhibitors combined with ABT-737, rhTRAIL/MD5-1 or 5-azacytidine using syngeneic Vk*MYC multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Matthews, G M; Lefebure, M; Doyle, M A; Shortt, J; Ellul, J; Chesi, M; Banks, K M; Vidacs, E; Faulkner, D; Atadja, P; Bergsagel, P L; Johnstone, R W

    2013-09-12

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignancy with an unmet need for innovative treatment options. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are a new class of anticancer agent that have demonstrated activity in hematological malignancies. Here, we investigated the efficacy and safety of HDACi (vorinostat, panobinostat, romidepsin) and novel combination therapies using in vitro human MM cell lines and in vivo preclinical screening utilizing syngeneic transplanted Vk*MYC MM. HDACi were combined with ABT-737, which targets the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL/MD5-1), that activates the extrinsic apoptosis pathway or the DNA methyl transferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine. We demonstrate that in vitro cell line-based studies provide some insight into drug activity and combination therapies that synergistically kill MM cells; however, they do not always predict in vivo preclinical efficacy or toxicity. Importantly, utilizing transplanted Vk*MYC MM, we report that panobinostat and 5-azacytidine synergize to prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice. In contrast, combined HDACi/rhTRAIL-based strategies, while efficacious, demonstrated on-target dose-limiting toxicities that precluded prolonged treatment. Taken together, our studies provide evidence that the transplanted Vk*MYC model of MM is a useful screening tool for anti-MM drugs and should aid in the prioritization of novel drug testing in the clinic.

  5. Sonodynamic treatment as an innovative bimodal anticancer approach: shock wave-mediated tumor growth inhibition in a syngeneic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Foglietta, Federica; Canaparo, Roberto; Francovich, Andrea; Arena, Francesca; Civera, Stefania; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Frairia, Roberto; Serpe, Loredana

    2015-10-01

    Despite the great advances in fighting cancer, many therapies still have serious side effects, thus urging the development of highly selective and safe treatments with a wide range of applicability. Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is an innovative bimodal anticancer approach in which two normally non-toxic components -- one chemical, a sonosensitizer, and one physical, ultrasound -- selectively combine to cause oxidative damage and subsequent cancer cell death. In this study, we investigate the anticancer effect of SDT using shock waves (SWs) to activate protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) cytotoxicity on a Mat B-III syngeneic rat breast cancer model. The SDT-treated group saw a significant decrease (p<0.001) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tumor size measurements 72 hours after treatment with PpIX precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and SWs. This occurred together with significant increase (p<0.01) in apparent diffusion coefficients between pre- and post-treatment MR tumor maps and strong increase in necrotic and apoptotic histological features 72 hours post-treatment. Moreover, significant HIF1A mRNA expression up-regulation was observed along with the prominent selective cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and increased autophagy related protein LC3A/B expression in SDT-treated tumors, as compared to untreated tumors 72 hours post-treatment. Thus, the anticancer effect of SDT can be boosted by SWs, making them a valid technology for furthering investigations into this innovative anticancer approach. PMID:26562473

  6. Successful immunotherapy of natural killer-resistant established pulmonary melanoma metastases by the intravenous adoptive transfer of syngeneic lymphocytes activated in vitro by interleukin 2

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    In previous in vitro studies, we have shown that murine splenocytes or cancer patient lymphocytes incubated in IL-2 become lytic for fresh syngeneic or autologous tumors. We have now performed the adoptive transfer of such lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells in a murine B16 metastasis model to test their in vivo efficacy. 1 X 10(8) LAK cells, infused intravenously into C57BL/6 mice with established B16 pulmonary metastases, led to a marked decreased in the number of lung nodules and improved survival. LAK cells administered 3 d after amputation of a tumor-bearing limb also decreased the incidence of spontaneous pulmonary metastases. LAK cells generated from tumor-bearer splenocytes had effects equivalent to those from normal animals, and this antimetastatic effect of the LAK cells did not require the prior administration of cyclophosphamide or other immunosuppressants. Fresh or unstimulated splenocytes had no effect. The antitumor effectors and precursors in vivo and in vitro were Thy-1+. The lymphokine required for the activation appeared to be interleukin 2 (IL-2), since incubation in partially purified supernatants from PMA pulsed EL-4 or Con A-pulsed splenocytes or purified Jurkat IL-2 led to the generation of LAK cells equally active in vivo. The use of IL-2-activated cells may provide a valuable method for the adoptive therapy of human neoplasms as well. PMID:6141211

  7. Mechanisms of drug-induced lupus. II. T cells overexpressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 become autoreactive and cause a lupuslike disease in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Yung, R; Powers, D; Johnson, K; Amento, E; Carr, D; Laing, T; Yang, J; Chang, S; Hemati, N; Richardson, B

    1996-06-15

    Current theories propose that systemic lupus erythematosus develops when genetically predisposed individuals are exposed to certain environmental agents, although how these agents trigger lupus is uncertain. Some of these agents, such as procainamide, hydralazine, and UV-light inhibit T cell DNA methylation, increase lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) (CD11a/CD18) expression, and induce autoreactivity in vitro, and adoptive transfer of T cells that are made autoreactive by this mechanism causes a lupuslike disease. The mechanism by which these cells cause autoimmunity is unknown. In this report, we present evidence that LFA-1 overexpression is sufficient to induce autoimmunity. LFA-1 overexpression was induced on cloned murine Th2 cells by transfection, resulting in autoreactivity. Adoptive transfer of the transfected, autoreactive cells into syngeneic recipients caused a lupuslike disease with anti-DNA antibodies, an immune complex glomerulonephritis and pulmonary alveolitis, similar to that caused by cells treated with procainamide. These results indicate that agents or events which modify T cell DNA methylation may induce autoimmunity by causing T cell LFA-1 overexpression. Since T cells from patients with active lupus have hypomethylated DNA and overexpressed LFA-1, this mechanism could be important in the development of human autoimmunity.

  8. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected so the provider can see where to place the medicine. The steroid medicine is slowly injected into the joint. After the injection, you will remain on the table for another 5 to 10 minutes or so. ...

  9. Safety, Immunogenicity, and Protective Efficacy of Intradermal Immunization with Aseptic, Purified, Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Volunteers under Chloroquine Prophylaxis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaens, Guido J. H.; van Meer, Maurits P. A.; Scholzen, Anja; Obiero, Joshua M.; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; van Grinsven, Tim; Kim Lee Sim, B.; Billingsley, Peter F.; James, Eric R.; Gunasekera, Anusha; Bijker, Else M.; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Graumans, Wouter; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; de Mast, Quirijn; van der Ven, André J. A. M.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Sauerwein, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Immunization of volunteers under chloroquine prophylaxis by bites of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ)–infected mosquitoes induces > 90% protection against controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). We studied intradermal immunization with cryopreserved, infectious PfSPZ in volunteers taking chloroquine (PfSPZ chemoprophylaxis vaccine [CVac]). Vaccine groups 1 and 3 received 3× monthly immunizations with 7.5 × 104 PfSPZ. Control groups 2 and 4 received normal saline. Groups 1 and 2 underwent CHMI (#1) by mosquito bite 60 days after the third immunization. Groups 3 and 4 were boosted 168 days after the third immunization and underwent CHMI (#2) 137 days later. Vaccinees (11/20, 55%) and controls (6/10, 60%) had the same percentage of mild to moderate solicited adverse events. After CHMI #1, 8/10 vaccinees (group 1) and 5/5 controls (group 2) became parasitemic by microscopy; the two negatives were positive by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). After CHMI #2, all vaccinees in group 3 and controls in group 4 were parasitemic by qPCR. Vaccinees showed weak antibody and no detectable cellular immune responses. Intradermal immunization with up to 3 × 105 PfSPZ-CVac was safe, but induced only minimal immune responses and no sterile protection against Pf CHMI. PMID:26711509

  10. Treating activated CD4+ T cells with either of two distinct DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, 5-azacytidine or procainamide, is sufficient to cause a lupus-like disease in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Quddus, J; Johnson, K J; Gavalchin, J; Amento, E P; Chrisp, C E; Yung, R L; Richardson, B C

    1993-01-01

    Human antigen-specific CD4+ T cells become autoreactive after treatment with various DNA methylation inhibitors, including 5-azacytidine, procainamide, and hydralazine. This suggests a mechanism that could contribute to the development of some forms of autoimmunity. In this report we have asked whether T cells treated with DNA methylation inhibitors can induce autoimmunity. Murine CD4+ T cells were treated with 5-azacytidine or procainamide and were shown to respond to syngeneic antigen-presenting cells, similar to CD4+ human T cell clones treated with these drugs. Functional characterization demonstrated that cells treated with either drug spontaneously lysed syngeneic macrophages and secreted IL-4, IL-6, and IFN-gamma. Adoptive transfer of 5-azacytidine- or procainamide-treated cells into unirradiated syngeneic recipients induced an immune complex glomerulonephritis and IgG anti-DNA and antihistone antibodies. These experiments demonstrate that T cells treated with either of two distinct DNA methyltransferase inhibitors are sufficient to induce a lupus-like disease. It is possible that the lysis of macrophages, together with the release of cytokines promoting B cell differentiation, contributes to the autoantibody production and immune complex deposition. These results suggest that environmental agents that inhibit DNA methylation could interact with T cells in vivo to produce a lupus-like illness, a mechanism that could have relevance to drug-induced and idiopathic lupus. Images PMID:7686923

  11. How Long Will I Be Blue? Prolonged Skin Staining Following Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Using Intradermal Patent Blue Dye

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Metehan; Gumus, Hatice; Jones, Sue E; Jones, Peter A; Sever, Ali R; Weeks, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Blue dye used for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in breast cancer patients may cause prolonged skin discoloration at the site of injection. The aim of this study was to assess the duration of such skin discoloration. Patients and Methods 236 consecutive patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery and SLNB for breast cancer were reviewed prospectively from January 2007 to December 2009. Results Of the 236 patients, 2 had undergone bilateral surgery, and 41 had been examined in consecutive yearly reviews. Blue discoloration remained visible at the injection site after 12, 24, and > 36 months in 36.5, 23.6, and 8.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion The use of patent blue for identification of the sentinel lymph node in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery may result in prolonged discoloration of the skin at the injection site. PMID:24415970

  12. Transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspension into the spleens of adult syngenic rats: inducibility of cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase functions by beta-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Lupp, A; Lau, K; Trautmann, A K; Krausse, T; Klinger, W

    1999-01-01

    In the present study the effects of beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), phenobarbital (PB) and dexamethasone (DEX) on cytochrome P450 (P450) dependent monooxygenase functions were investigated in intrasplenic liver cell explants in comparison to adult liver. Fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of 60-90 days old adult male syngenic Fisher 344 inbred rats. 2, 4 or 6 months after surgery, transplant recipients and age matched controls were orally treated with BNF (1x50 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.)), PB (1x50 mg/kg b.wt.), DEX (for 3 days 4 mg/kg b.wt. per day), or the respective solvents (dimethylsulfoxide or 0.9% NaCl). The animals were sacrificed 24 (BNF, DEX) or 48 (PB) hours after the last treatment. P450 mediated monooxygenase functions were measured in spleen and liver 9000 g supernatants by three model reactions for different P450 subtypes: ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD; 1A), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation (ECOD; 1A, 2A, 2B), and ethylmorphine N-demethylation (END; 3A). Spleen weights were significantly higher in transplanted rats, compared to controls, at all three time points after surgery. Induction with PB or DEX, and in some cases also with BNF, lead to a significant increase in liver weights of transplant recipients and control rats independent of the time after transplantation. In contrast, there was no influence on spleen weights due to BNF or PB. At all time points after surgery, with DEX a marked decrease in body weights, weights of adrenal glands and of lymphatic organs like thymus glands and spleens was observed, with the weights of the transplant containing spleens being still higher in comparison to control organs. Spleens of control animals displayed nearly no P450 mediated monooxygenase functions neither without nor with induction. After transplantation, however, significant EROD and ECOD, but hardly any END activities were seen in the host organs at all three time points after surgery. In transplant containing spleens

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) inhibition does not improve engraftment of unfractionated syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow after nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Elisabeth; Klaus, Christoph; Matheeussen, Veerle; Baranyi, Ulrike; Pilat, Nina; Ramsey, Haley; Korom, Stephan; De Meester, Ingrid; Wekerle, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    In order to develop minimally toxic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) protocols suitable for use in a wider range of indications, it is important to identify ways to enhance BM engraftment at a given level of recipient conditioning. CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1α plays a crucial physiological role in homing of hematopoietic stem cells to BM. It is regulated by the ectopeptidase dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV; DPP4) known as CD26, which cleaves dipeptides from the N-terminus of polypeptide chains. Blocking DPPIV enzymatic activity had a beneficial effect on hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in various but very specific experimental settings. Here we investigated whether inhibition of DPPIV enzymatic activity through Diprotin A or sitagliptin (Januvia) improves BM engraftment in nonmyeloablative murine models of syngeneic (i.e., CD45-congenic) and allogeneic (i.e., Balb/c to B6) BMT (1 Gy total body irradiation, 10-15 × 10(6) unseparated BM cells/mouse). Neither Diprotin A administered in vivo at the time of BMT and/or used for in vitro pretreatment of BM nor sitagliptin administered in vivo had a detectable effect on the level of multilineage chimerism (follow-up >20 weeks). Similarly, sitagliptin did not enhance chimerism after allogeneic BMT, even though DPPIV enzymatic activity measured in serum was profoundly inhibited (>98% inhibition at peak exposure). Our results provide evidence that DPPIV inhibition via Diprotin A or sitagliptin does not improve engraftment of unseparated BM in a nonmyeloablative BMT setting.

  14. Gene therapy with a single chain interleukin 12 fusion protein induces T cell-dependent protective immunity in a syngeneic model of murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Dreier, T; Xiang, R; Varki, N M; Kang, A S; Reisfeld, R A

    1998-03-01

    A major goal of tumor immunotherapy is the effective eradication of established metastases associated with the induction of a T cell-mediated protective immunity. We achieved this in a poorly immunogenic murine neuroblastoma model by gene therapy with a single chain interleukin 12 (scIL-12) fusion protein that assures equal expression of its p35 and p40 subunits. Thus, NXS2 hybrid neuroblastoma cells (C1300 x dorsal root ganglion cells), which form experimental bone marrow and liver metastases in syngeneic A/J mice, were transduced with a gene encoding murine interleukin 12, monomerized by introduction of a protein linker between the p35 and p40 protein chains of this heterodimeric cytokine. We demonstrate for the first time that subcutaneous vaccination with these transduced cells induces a protective immunity, as indicated by the complete absence of liver and bone marrow metastasis after challenge with NXS2 wild-type tumor cells. Furthermore, vaccination of animals with established liver and bone marrow metastases completely eradicated liver metastases and suppressed bone marrow metastases. The local and systemic immune response against scIL-12-transduced NXS2 cells is largely dependent on CD8(+) T cells. This was demonstrated in vivo by depletion of immunocompetent A/J mice with monoclonal anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 antibodies and in vitro by specific major histocompatibility complex, class I-restricted CD8(+) T cell-mediated killing of NXS2 and their parental C1300 neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate successful anti-tumor immunotherapy with an scIL-12 fusion protein that could facilitate clinical application of interleukin 12 gene therapy.

  15. pH-Sensitive Biocompatible Nanoparticles of Paclitaxel-Conjugated Poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) for Anticancer Drug Delivery in Solid Tumors of Syngeneic Mice.

    PubMed

    Dalela, Manu; Shrivastav, T G; Kharbanda, Surender; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride), a biocompatible copolymer that was further conjugated with paclitaxel (PTX) via ester linkage and self-assembled to form poly(styrene-co-maleic acid)-paclitaxel (PSMAC-PTX) nanoparticles (NPs). The in vitro release of PTX from PSMAC-PTX NPs showed a higher release at lower pH than at the physiological pH of 7.4, confirming its pH-dependent release. The cell viability of PSMAC-PTX nanoparticles was evaluated using MTT assay. IC50 values of 9.05-18.43 ng/mL of PTX equivalent were observed in various cancer cell lines after 72 h of incubation. Confocal microscopy, Western blotting, and Flow cytometry results further supported that the cellular uptake and apoptosis of cancer cells with PSMAC-PTX NPs. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the conjugation of PTX to the PSMAC co-polymer not only increased the plasma and tumor C(max) of PTX but also prolonged its plasma half-life and retention in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Administration of PSMAC-PTX NPs showed significant tumor growth inhibition with improved apoptosis effects in vivo on Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT)-bearing BALB/c syngeneic mice in comparison with Taxol, without showing any cytotoxicity. On the basis of preliminary results, no subacute toxicity was observed in major organs, tissues and hematological system up to a dosage of 60 mg/kg body weight in mice. Therefore, PSMAC-PTX NPs may be considered as an alternative nanodrug delivery system for the delivery of PTX in solid tumors. PMID:26528585

  16. Targeted tumor therapy by epidermal growth factor appended toxin and purified saponin: an evaluation of toxicity and therapeutic potential in syngeneic tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Mayank; Mergel, Katharina; Weng, Alexander; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Dürkop, Horst; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2013-06-01

    Targeted toxin-based therapeutics are hindered by poor intracellular uptake, limited stability and non-specific immune stimulation. To address these problems, ligand-targeted toxins in combination with low dose saponin mixtures have been adapted and tested in vivo in the past, however, undefined saponin raw mixtures are not suitable for use in clinical development. In the present work we therefore used a targeted toxin (Sap3-EGF, i.e. saporin fused to epidermal growth factor) in combination with a structurally defined isolated saponin m/z 1861 (SO-1861). In vitro evaluation confirmed a 6900-fold enhancement in the cytotoxic efficacy of Sap3-EGF against TSA-EGFR target cells. The required dose of the targeted toxin was appreciably reduced and there was a highly synergistic effect observed. An ex vivo hemolysis assay showed no or very less hemolysis up to 10 μg/mL of SO-1861. In the acute toxicity studies SO-1861 was found to be non-toxic up to a dose of 100 μg/treatment. The enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and glutamate dehydrogenase did not show any statistically significant liver damage, which was further confirmed by histological examination. Additionally, creatinine was also similar to the control group thus ruling out damage to kidney. In vivo studies in a syngeneic BALB/c tumor model characterized by EGFR overexpression were done by applying 30 μg SO-1861 and 0.1 μg Sap3-EGF per treatment. A more than 90% reduction (p < 0.05) in the average tumor volume was observed by this combined therapy.

  17. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  18. Intradermal vaccination of adults with three low doses (2 micrograms) of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. II. Persistence of immunity and induction of immunologic memory.

    PubMed

    Elisbão, Maria do Carmo M; Baldy, José Luís da S; Bonametti, Ana Maria; Reiche, Edna Maria V; Morimoto, Helena K; Pontello, Rubens; Matsuo, Tiemi; Ferelle, Antônio; Neves, Jayme

    2003-12-01

    Of the 110 dentists who had presented seroconversion 50 days after the intradermal application of three 2 micrograms doses of the Belgian recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B (HB), administered eight years before at an interval of one month between the 1st and 2nd doses and of five months between the 2nd and 3rd doses, 51 were included for the assessment of the persistence of immunity. None of the dentists had hepatitis or had received HB vaccine during this period. All subjects were submitted to serological tests for the detection of the following markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection: HBsAg, anti-HBc, HBeAg, anti-HBe, and anti-HBs, with no HBsAg, anti-HBc, HBeAg or anti-HBe being detected. A microparticle enzyme immunoassay (MEIA) revealed the presence of anti-HBs at protective titers (> or = 10 mIU/ml) in 42 dentists (82.4%), with the anti-HBs titer being higher than 100 mIU/ml in 36 of them (70.6%) (good responders), between 10 and 100 mIU/ml in 6 (11.8%) (poor responders), and lower than 10 mIU/ml in 9 (17.6%) (non-responders). According to clinical data and serological tests, none of the dentists had presented disease or latent HBV infection during the eight years following the first vaccination. A 2 micrograms booster dose was administered intradermally to eight dentists with anti-HBs titers lower than 10 mIU/ml (non-responders) and to six dentists with titers ranging from 10 to 100 mIU/ml (poor responders); the determination of anti-HBs one month later demonstrated the occurrence of seroconversion in the eight non-responders and an increase in anti-HBs titer in the six poor responders. In summary, the present results demonstrated the prolonged persistence of protection against HBV infection and the development of immunologic memory provided by vaccination against HB--with intradermal application of three 2 micrograms doses of the Belgian recombinant vaccine at 0, 1, and 6 months--carried out eight years before in 51 dentists.

  19. HIV-DNA Given with or without Intradermal Electroporation Is Safe and Highly Immunogenic in Healthy Swedish HIV-1 DNA/MVA Vaccinees: A Phase I Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Hejdeman, Bo; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Tecleab, Teghesti; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia L.; Stout, Richard R.; Robb, Merlin L.; Shattock, Robin J.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared safety and immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) vaccination with and without electroporation (EP) in a phase I randomized placebo-controlled trial of an HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccine in healthy Swedish volunteers. Methods HIV-DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtypes A, B and C; Rev B; Gag A and B and RTmut B were given ID at weeks 0, 6 and 12 in a dose of 0.6 mg. Twenty-five volunteers received vaccine using a needle-free device (ZetaJet) with (n=16) or without (n=9) ID EP (Dermavax). Five volunteers were placebo recipients. Boosting with recombinant MVA-CMDR expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE (HIV-MVA) or placebo was performed at weeks 24 and 40. Nine of the vaccinees received a subtype C CN54 gp140 protein boost together with HIV-MVA. Results The ID/EP delivery was very well tolerated. After three HIV-DNA immunizations, no statistically significant difference was seen in the IFN-γ ELISpot response rate to Gag between HIV-DNA ID/EP recipients (5/15, 33%) and HIV-DNA ID recipients (1/7, 14%, p=0.6158). The first HIV-MVA or HIV-MVA+gp140 vaccination increased the IFN-γ ELISpot response rate to 18/19 (95%). CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cell responses to Gag or Env were demonstrable in 94% of vaccinees. A balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response was noted, with 78% and 71% responders, respectively. IFN-γ and IL-2 dominated the CD4+ T cell response to Gag and Env. The CD8+ response to Gag was broader with expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1β and/or CD107. No differences were seen between DNA vaccine groups. Binding antibodies were induced after the second HIV-MVA+/-gp140 in 93% of vaccinees to subtype C Env, with the highest titers among EP/gp140 recipients. Conclusion Intradermal electroporation of HIV-DNA was well tolerated. Strong cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses were elicited by the HIV-DNA prime and HIV-MVA boosting regimen, with or without intradermal electroporation use. Trial Registration International Standard

  20. Topical and Intradermal Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy with Methylene Blue and Light-Emitting Diode in the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Sbeghen, Mônica Raquel; Voltarelli, Evandra Maria; Campois, Tácito Graminha; Kimura, Elza; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Caetano, Wilker; Hioka, Noboru; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana; Silveira, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The topical and intradermal photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect of methylene blue (MB) using light-emitting diode (LED) as light source (MB/LED-PDT) in the treatment of lesions of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) caused by Leishmania braziliensis in hamsters were investigated. Methods: Hamsters were infected in the footpad with 4×107 promastigotes of L. braziliensis and divided in 4 groups: Control group was not treated, AmB group was treated with amphotericin B, MB-Id group received intradermal MB at the edge of the lesion and MB-Tp group received MB topic. After treatment with MB, the animals were illuminated using red LEDs at the 655 nm wavelength for 1 hour. The MB/LED-PDT was carried out three times a week for 12 weeks. Results: Animals of MB-Tp group presented lesion healing with significant diminution in extent of the lesion, and reduced parasite burden compared to control group; however, no significant difference was seen compared to the AmB group. MB-Tp group also showed reconstitution of the epithelium, the formation of collagen fibers, organization in the epidermis, a little disorganization and inflammation in the dermis. MB-Id was ineffective in all parameters evaluated, and it was comparable to the control group results. Conclusion: These data show that PDT with the use of MB-Tp and LED may be an alternative for the treatment of ACL. However, additional studies are being conducted to assess the potential of MB/LED-PDT, alone or in combination with conventional therapy, for the treatment of ACL. PMID:26464777

  1. Feasibility of sustainable provision of intradermal post exposure prophylaxis against rabies at primary care level –evidence from rural Haryana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rabies is the most severe and neglected public health problem in India. Management of animal bite with post exposure prophylaxis is the only existent strategy to prevent rabies related deaths. Cost-effective and sustainable programme for provision of post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is needed in India. Methods In this study, we have documented the experience of implementation of intra-dermal anti rabies vaccination in Animal Bite Management (ABM) clinic at Primary Health Centre (PHC). This study facility belonged to Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project, Ballabgarh in Faridabad district of Haryana. Hospital service record of ABM clinic was analyzed and various feasibility issues such as costing of services, vaccine wastage and other operational issues in providing PEP services at PHC level were documented. Results A total of 619 patients were treated in the ABM clinic. Service utilization of ABM clinic was increased by 38% in the second year of implementation. Mean age of the patients was 23.9 years (SD: 18.8) and majority (70.4%) were males. Majority (86%) of the patients received the first dose of anti-rabies vaccine within the recommended 48 hours. A total 446 vaccine vials (1 ml) were consumed of which 20.8% was contributed in vaccine wastage. User-fee (350 Indian Rupees) collected from the patients. User-fee was re-used to purchase vaccines, intradermal (ID) syringes and other consumables required to ensure regular availability of ARV services at the PHC. Conclusions This study demonstrated the cost-effective and sustainable model of provision of PEP against rabies at primary care level. ID PEP provision at primary care level not only address the unmet need of animal bite management in the community also reduces the out of pocket expenditure of the patients. PMID:24965875

  2. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  3. Sensitization or tolerance to Mycobacterium leprae antigen by route of injection

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, C.C.; Walker, L.L.; Van Landingham, R.M.; Ye, S.Z.

    1982-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions of heat-killed Mycobacterium leprae in a dose of 10(7) organisms were highly immunogenic when injected intradermally (i.d.). The same dose of bacteria did not sensitize when given intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intravenously (i.v.), and did so only minimally at best when given subcutaneously. The i.d. route was the most immunogenic for sheep erythrocytes also. M. leprae injected i.p. or i.v. stimulated immune tolerance to M. leprae challenge i.d. In older mice (greater than or equal to 8 weeks), the i.v. injections gave more complete tolerance. Mice that had been rendered tolerant by i.v. injections maintained their tolerance for at least 168 days. Prior UV irradiation of intact mice prevented sensitization by the i.d. route. In normal mice, living M. bovis BCG given i.d. produced good sensitization to M. leprae. Mice that had been made tolerant by i.v. injection of M. leprae could be partially sensitized to M. leprae by i.d. immunization with BCG; mixtures of living BCG and heat-killed M. leprae were no more effective than BCG alone. These findings appear to have relevance to the pathogenesis of lepromatous leprosy and its immunoprophylaxis.

  4. Slit injection device

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Schlitt, Leland G.; Bradley, Laird P.

    1976-06-15

    A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

  5. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  6. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  7. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to ...

  8. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  9. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  10. [INJECTING MATERIAL FOR SKIN REGENERATION LACERTA APPLICATION IN TREATMENT OF TROPHIC ULCERS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC FOOT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, K V; Sydorchuk, R I

    2015-07-01

    Examined 22 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) type II of neuropathic form of diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). In 12 patients (comparison group) local povidone-iodine was used main in 10 (study group), except povidone-iodine, in the phase of exudation used tyrothricin in gel form, the granulation and epithelization phase, after cleaning the wounds, were injected intradermally 1 ml of injecting material for skin regeneration Lacerta. Trophic defects in 9 (90%) patients of the main group during the observation period healed completely, in the comparison group complete healing of the ulcer reached in 2 (16.7%) patients, the rest-wounds, although purified, however, were lethargic granulation, epithelization occurred very slowly. Consequently, the use of the proposed method allows to achieve more rapid healing of trophic ulcers that do not heal continued in patients of neuropathic forms of DFS. PMID:26591219

  11. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  12. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  13. Towards Development of a Dermal Pain Model: In Vitro Activation of Rat and Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Repeat 1 and Safe Dermal Injection of o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile to Rat.

    PubMed

    Annas, Anita; Berg, Anna-Lena; Nyman, Eva; Meijer, Thomas; Lundgren, Viveka; Franzén, Bo; Ståhle, Lars

    2015-12-01

    During clinical development of analgesics, it is important to have access to pharmacologically specific human pain models. o-Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) is a selective and potent agonist of the transient receptor potential ankyrin repeat 1 (TRPA1), which is a transducer molecule in nociceptors sensing reactive chemical species. While CS has been subject to extensive toxicological investigations in animals and human beings, its effects on intradermal or subcutaneous injection have not previously been reported. We have investigated the potential of CS to be used as an agonist on TRPA1 in human experimental pain studies. A calcium influx assay was used to confirm the capacity of CS to activate TRPA1 with >100,000 times the selectivity over the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1. CS dose-dependently (EC50 0.9 μM) released calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat dorsal root ganglion cultures, supporting involvement in pain signalling. In a local tolerance study, injection of a single intradermal dose of 20 mM CS to rats resulted in superficial, circular crusts at the injection sites after approximately 4 days. The histopathology evaluation revealed a mild, acute inflammatory reaction in the epidermis and dermis at the intradermal CS injection site 1 day after administration. After 14 days, the epidermal epithelium was fully restored. The symptoms were not considered to be adverse, and it is suggested that doses up to 20 μL of 20 mM CS can be safely administered to human beings. In conclusion, our data support development of a CS human dermal pain model. PMID:26046936

  14. Autoimmunity and aging: the age-related response of mice of a long-lived strain to trinitrophenylated syngeneic mouse red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Naor, D; Bonavida, B; Walford, R L

    1976-12-01

    Mice of 1.5, 9, 22, and 31 to 32 months of age were injected with the thymus-dependent antigen, TNP-SRC, or the thymus-independent antigen, TNP-SRC, TNP-MRC. The anti-SRC and TNP immune responses to TNP-SRC were markedly reduced in older mice, whereas the anti-TNP response to the TNP-MRC showed no substantial decline. Young mice produced higher anti-TNP plaque-forming cell responses after injection of TNP-SRC than after TNP-MRC, whereas in older mice the reverse obtained. Old mice but not young mice displayed a high anti-SRC cross-reactive response after injection of TNP-MRC. The avidity of anti-TNP antibody of young mice immunized with TNP-SRC was higher than that following immunization with TNP-MRC, whereas the avidities of anti-TNP antibodies from old mice injected with these two reagents were the same. Those individual mice which showed a poorly regulated immune response also displayed an autologous anti-MRC plaque-forming cell response after injection of either TNP-SRC or TNP-MRC. It is suggested that mechanisms mediated by suppressor T cells may be responsible for regulating the autoimmune response to modified self antigens, and that these are severely impaired in age individuals.

  15. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after human marrow transplantation. II. Deficient T and non-T lymphocyte function within 3-4 months of allogeneic, syngeneic, or autologous marrow grafting for hematologic malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, R.P.; Lum, L.G.; Storb, R.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-04-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion was studied in 37 patients between 19 and 106 days after allogeneic HLA-identical (30 patients), allogeneic one HLA-haplotype-identical (three patients), syngeneic (three patients), or autologous (one patient) marrow grafting. E rosette-positive (T) and E rosette-negative (non-T) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cocultured with pokeweed mitogen for 6 days. Polyvalent immunoglobulin secretion was determined by counting plaque forming cells in a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. The number of antibody secreting cells in cocultures of autologous T and non-T lymphocytes was low in 40 of 44 tests conducted on samples from the 37 patients. Mononuclear or non-T cells from 38 of 40 tests failed to produce antibody when cultured with normal helper T cells. T cells from 23 of 37 tests failed to help normal non-T cells secrete antibody. T lymphocytes from 23 of 41 tests suppressed antibody production greater than 80% by normal T and non-T cells. The suppressor cells were radiosensitive in 17 of the 25 tests. The abnormal function of lymphocyte subpopulations in patients during the first 3 mo after syngeneic, allogeneic or autologous marrow grafting was similar regardless of the type of graft or the presence of acute graft versus host disease.

  16. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  17. An unfortunate injection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik Sandip; Yarbrough, Chase; Price, Amy; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injection has been used to administer medications for more than a hundred years. However, despite our profession's long experience with intramuscular administration, preventable complications such as injection nerve palsies are still prevalent in developing countries. Injections account for one-fifth of all traumatic nerve injuries. These injuries largely occur due to indiscriminate use of intramuscular injections for treating common illnesses, frequently by unlicensed or undertrained practitioners administering unnecessary treatment to impoverished patients. The sciatic nerve is the most commonly injured, and frequently the resulting muscle weakness and associated disability are irreversible. This case report includes a video of a patient with foot drop 6 weeks after gluteal intramuscular injection. Such injuries can be prevented by proper awareness and training, the implementation of safer injection techniques, and quality assurance methods. PMID:26931130

  18. Preparing injectable medicines safely.

    PubMed

    Beaney, Alison M; Black, Anne

    Risks to patients are greater when injectable medicines are prepared in clinical areas (wards, theatres, clinics or even patients' homes), rather than provided in ready-to-use form. This article describes the risks involved in preparing injectable medicines in such areas and outlines key principles to ensure they are prepared safely. It also suggests that high-risk injectable medicines be provided in ready-to-use form, either in house, by pharmacy or by pharmaceutical companies. PMID:22359855

  19. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  20. Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Testing of Free-Ranging African Buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) Captured for Ex Situ Conservation in the Kafue Basin Ecosystem in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Matandiko, Wigganson; Nambota, Andrew; Muma, John Bwalya; Mweene, Aaron Simanyengwe; Munyeme, Musso

    2011-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is endemic in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) in some National Parks in Southern Africa, whilst no studies have been conducted on BTB on buffalo populations in Zambia. The increased demand for ecotourism and conservation of the African buffalo on private owned game ranches has prompted the Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) and private sector in Zambia to generate a herd of "BTB-free buffaloes" for ex situ conservation. In the present study, 86 African buffaloes from four different herds comprising a total of 530 animals were investigated for the presence of BTB for the purpose of generating "BTB free" buffalo for ex-situ conservation. Using the comparative intradermal tuberculin test (CIDT) the BTB status at both individual animal and herd level was estimated to be 0.0% by the CIDT technique. Compared to Avian reactors only, a prevalence of 5.8% was determined whilst for Bovine-only reactors a prevalence of 0.0% was determined. These results suggest the likelihood of buffalo herds in the Kafue National Park being free of BTB.

  1. Evaluation of three different histamine concentrations in intradermal testing of normal cats and attempted determination of 'irritant' threshold concentrations for 48 allergens.

    PubMed

    Austel, Michaela; Hensel, Patrick; Jackson, Dawn; Vidyashankar, Anand; Zhao, Ying; Medleau, Linda

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal histamine concentration and 'irritant' allergen threshold concentrations in intradermal testing (IDT) in normal cats. Thirty healthy cats were tested with three different histamine concentrations and four different concentrations of each allergen. The optimal histamine concentration was determined to be 1: 50,000 w/v (0.05 mg mL(-1)). Using this histamine concentration, the 'irritant' threshold concentration for most allergens was above the highest concentrations tested (4,000 PNU mL(-1) for 41 allergens and 700 PNU mL(-1) for human dander). The 'irritant' threshold concentration for flea antigen was determined to be 1:750 w/v. More than 10% of the tested cats showed positive reactions to Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, housefly, mosquito and moth at every allergen concentration, which suggests that the 'irritant' threshold concentration for these allergens is below 1,000 PNU mL(-1), the lowest allergen concentration tested. Our results confirm previous studies in indicating that allergen and histamine concentrations used in feline IDT may need to be revised.

  2. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  3. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  4. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Duracillin A-S ® ... Pfizerpen A-S® ... injection should not be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease) or early in the treatment ... serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by ...

  5. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  6. [Intra-articular injections].

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  7. Injection rate control cam

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.; Liang, E.; Yu, R.C.; Ghuman, A.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a cam for controlling the injection rate of fuel in a fuel injection system of an engine. The fuel injection system including a cyclically operating unit injector having a body, an injector plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in the injector body between an advanced position and a retracted portion to pump into the engine during each cycle a variable quantity of fuel up to a maximum quantity under rated engine conditions, and a drive train for converting rotational movement of the cam into reciprocating movement of the pumping plunger depending on the profile of the cam. The cam profile comprises at least a plunger retraction segment and a plunger advancement segment for controlling the velocity if injector plunger retraction and advancement, respectively, the plunger advancement segment including a pre-injection subsequent shaped to cause an initial quantity of fuel to be injected into the engine during each cycle at rated engine conditions while the pre-injection subsegment is in contact with the drive train, and an injection subsegment following the pre-injection subsegment.

  8. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and gauge…

  9. Intratumoral injection of an adenovirus expressing interleukin 2 induces regression and immunity in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Addison, C L; Braciak, T; Ralston, R; Muller, W J; Gauldie, J; Graham, F L

    1995-01-01

    Rodent tumor cells engineered to secrete cytokines such as interleukin 2 (IL-2) or IL-4 are rejected by syngeneic recipients due to an enhanced antitumor host immune response. An adenovirus vector (AdCAIL-2) containing the human IL-2 gene has been constructed and shown to direct secretion of high levels of human IL-2 in infected tumor cells. AdCAIL-2 induces regression of tumors in a transgenic mouse model of mammary adenocarcinoma following intratumoral injection. Elimination of existing tumors in this way results in immunity against a second challenge with tumor cells. These findings suggest that adenovirus vectors expressing cytokines may form the basis for highly effective immunotherapies of human cancers. PMID:7667323

  10. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  11. [Intravitreal injections of corticoids].

    PubMed

    Demols, P

    2007-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of triamcinolone acetonide are today widely performed as a therapeutic tool for a large variety of ocular diseases. The risk of toxicity of the product and its vehicle is quite real and is still at the center of investigations. Complications related to the substance and the technique of injections are already well-known (intraocular pressure rise, cataract, endophthalmitis, pseudo-endophthalmitis, vitreous haemorrhage and retinal detachment). Carefulness and rigor in the indication, realization and follow-up of these injections are therefore mandatory.

  12. Cutaneous vascular and sweating responses to intradermal administration of prostaglandin E1 and E2 in young and older adults: a role for nitric oxide?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Singh, Maya Sarah; Halili, Lyra; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) contributes to cutaneous vasodilation and sweating responses; however, the mechanisms underpinning these responses remain unknown. We hypothesized that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and E2 (PGE2) (COX-derived vasodilator products) directly mediate cutaneous vasodilation and sweating through nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent mechanisms in young adults. Furthermore, we hypothesized that this response is diminished in older adults, since aging attenuates COX-dependent cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. In 9 young (22 ± 5 yr) and 10 older (61 ± 6 yr) adults, cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate were evaluated at four intradermal forearm skin sites receiving incremental doses (0.05, 0.5, 5, 50, 500 μM each for 25 min) of PGE1 or PGE2 with and without coadministration of 10 mM N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine, a nonspecific NOS inhibitor. N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine attenuated PGE1-mediated increases in CVC at all concentrations in young adults, whereas it reduced PGE2-mediated increases in CVC at lower concentrations (0.05-0.5 μM) in older adults (all P < 0.05). However, the magnitude of the PGE1- and PGE2-mediated increases in CVC did not differ between groups (all P > 0.05). Neither PGE1 nor PGE2 increased sweat rate at any of the administered concentrations for either the young or older adults (all P > 0.05). We show that although cutaneous vascular responsiveness to PGE1 and PGE2 is similar between young and older adults, the cutaneous vasodilator response is partially mediated through NOS albeit via low-to-high concentrations of PGE1 in young adults and low concentrations of PGE2 in older adults, respectively. We also show that in both young and older adults, PGE1 and PGE2 do not increase sweat rate under normothermic conditions.

  13. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... onabotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  14. AbobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abobotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body; blurred vision; or drooping eyelids. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  15. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... incobotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.if ...

  16. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rimabotulinumtoxinB injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  17. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... RR, Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  18. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  19. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. It is usually given once every 2 ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for about 30 minutes afterwards. A doctor ...

  20. Interferon Alfacon-1 Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ordered interferon alfacon-1 to help treat your hepatitis C infection. The drug will be injected under your ... a synthetic interferon that helps to prevent the hepatitis C virus from growing inside your body. This medication ...

  1. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxymaltose injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... medication is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to ...

  2. Penicillin G Benzathine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine injection is in a class of antibiotics called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  3. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... position or distract the child with a noisy toy while you are injecting the medication. You can ... recognizing reality vision problems excessive tiredness increased thirst ... the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  4. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  5. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... often you receive iron sucrose injection and your total number of doses based on your condition and ... hands or feet; swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. ...

  6. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  7. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  8. Injections--how safe.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2005-04-01

    Injection, is a skin-piercing event performed by a syringe and needle with the purpose of introducing a curative substance or vaccine in a patient. According to WHO, safe injection is one which does not harm to the recepient, does not expose the health worker to any risk and does not result in waste that is dangerous for the community. To achieve this injection should be prepared on a clean workspace, provider should clean his hands appropriately, sterility of the syringe and needle to be maintained, skin of the recipient should be cleaned and above all sharps waste should be managed appropriately. Common danger of unsafe injection is infection. Most medication used in primary care can be administered orally. So firstly the behaviour of healthcare providers and patients must be changed so as to decrease overuse of injections, secondly provision of sufficient quantities of appropriate injection equipment and infection control supplies should be made available and thirdly a sharp waste management system should be set up. PMID:16173426

  9. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-07-22

    A fuel injection nozzle is described connected to a fuel injection pump to inject fuel into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a nozzle housing defining therein a fuel sump chamber, an injection hole communicating with the sump chamber and opened at the outer surface of the nozzle housing, a stepped cylinder bore having a smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter bore section and a fuel passage communicating at one end with the sump chamber and at the other end with the smaller diameter bore section of the stepped cylinder bore; a stepped plunger fitted in the stepped cylinder bore and having a smaller diameter plunger section fitted into the smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter plunger section fitted into the larger diameter bore section in which the smaller diameter bore section together with the end face of the smaller diameter plunger section defines a pump chamber communicating with the fuel passage and the larger diameter bore section together with the end face of the larger diameter plunger section defines a main fuel chamber into which a main fuel is supplied from the fuel injection pump; auxiliary fuel supply means for supplying an auxiliary fuel into the sump chamber and pump chamber through the fuel passage; valve means for opening and closing an injection hole; communication means for permitting the main fuel chamber to communicate with the fuel passage when the main fuel is supplied from the injection pump into the main fuel chamber to cause the stepped plunger to be moved a predetermined distance in a direction in which the auxiliary fuel in the pump chamber is pressurized.

  10. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  11. Syringe-injectable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  12. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  13. Immune response in domestic ducks following intradermal delivery of inactivated vaccine against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus adjuvanted with oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; To, Eredene-Ochir; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Gomis, Susantha; Song, Chang-Seon

    2015-08-01

    Ducks are a natural reservoir for H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, which produces a range of clinical outcomes from asymptomatic infections to severe disease with mortality. Vaccination against HPAI is one of the few methods available for controlling avian influenza virus (AIV) infection in domestic ducks; therefore, it is necessary to improve vaccine efficacy against HPAI in domestic ducks. However, few studies have focused on enhancing the immune response by testing alternative administration routes and adjuvants. While attempting to maximize the efficacy of a vaccine, it is important to select an appropriate vaccine delivery route and adjuvant to elicit an enhanced immune response. Although several studies have indicated that the vaccination of ducks against HPAI viruses has offered protection against lethal virus challenge, the immunogenicity of the vaccine still requires improvement. In this study, we characterized the immune response following a novel vaccination strategy against H5N1 HPAI virus in domestic ducks. Our novel intradermal delivery system and the application of the cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) adjuvant allowed us to obtain information regarding the sustained vaccine immunity. Compared with the intramuscular route of vaccination, the intradermal route resulted in higher antibody titer as well as lower antibody deviation following secondary vaccination. In addition, the use of a CpG-ODN adjuvant had a dose-sparing effect on antibody titer. Furthermore, when a high dose of antigen was used, the CpG-ODN-adjuvanted vaccine maintained a high mean antibody titer. This data demonstrates that intradermal immunization combined with administration of CpG-ODN as an adjuvant may be a promising strategy for improving vaccine efficacy in domestic ducks. PMID:26069254

  14. Immune response in domestic ducks following intradermal delivery of inactivated vaccine against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus adjuvanted with oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; To, Eredene-Ochir; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Gomis, Susantha; Song, Chang-Seon

    2015-08-01

    Ducks are a natural reservoir for H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, which produces a range of clinical outcomes from asymptomatic infections to severe disease with mortality. Vaccination against HPAI is one of the few methods available for controlling avian influenza virus (AIV) infection in domestic ducks; therefore, it is necessary to improve vaccine efficacy against HPAI in domestic ducks. However, few studies have focused on enhancing the immune response by testing alternative administration routes and adjuvants. While attempting to maximize the efficacy of a vaccine, it is important to select an appropriate vaccine delivery route and adjuvant to elicit an enhanced immune response. Although several studies have indicated that the vaccination of ducks against HPAI viruses has offered protection against lethal virus challenge, the immunogenicity of the vaccine still requires improvement. In this study, we characterized the immune response following a novel vaccination strategy against H5N1 HPAI virus in domestic ducks. Our novel intradermal delivery system and the application of the cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) adjuvant allowed us to obtain information regarding the sustained vaccine immunity. Compared with the intramuscular route of vaccination, the intradermal route resulted in higher antibody titer as well as lower antibody deviation following secondary vaccination. In addition, the use of a CpG-ODN adjuvant had a dose-sparing effect on antibody titer. Furthermore, when a high dose of antigen was used, the CpG-ODN-adjuvanted vaccine maintained a high mean antibody titer. This data demonstrates that intradermal immunization combined with administration of CpG-ODN as an adjuvant may be a promising strategy for improving vaccine efficacy in domestic ducks.

  15. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hishinuma, O.; Masuda, A.; Ohmori, T.; Miyaki, M.; Takemoto, E.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump for an internal combustion engine comprising: a housing having a cylindrical inner surface; a shaft having a portion disposed in rotatably sliding engagement with the cylindrical inner surface and having a first axial bore and a second radial bore therein; at least one pumping plunger slidably disposed in the second radial bore to cooperate therewith to define a compression chamber; a pumping plunger is adapted to be moved in the second radial bore to vary the volume of the compression chamber; an injection plunger slidably disposed in the first axial, bore to cooperate in defining the first and second pressure chambers separated from each other by the injection plunger.

  16. Water Injected Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Shouse, D. T.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    From antiquity, water has been a source of cooling, lubrication, and power for energy transfer devices. More recent applications in gas turbines demonstrate an added facet, emissions control. Fogging gas turbine inlets or direct injection of water into gas turbine combustors, decreases NOx and increases power. Herein we demonstrate that injection of water into the air upstream of the combustor reduces NOx by factors up to three in a natural gas fueled Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC) and up to two in a liquid JP-8 fueled (TVC) for a range in water/fuel and fuel/air ratios.

  17. High-level cellular and humoral immune responses in Guinea pigs immunized intradermally with a heat-inactivated varicella-zoster virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Julia; Jankovics, Mate; Fodor, Kinga; Kis, Zoltan; Takacs, Maria; Visontai, Ildiko; Jankovics, Istvan; Gonczol, Eva

    2015-05-01

    The threat of varicella and herpes zoster in immunocompromised individuals necessitates the development of a safe and effective varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine. The immune responses of guinea pigs to the intradermal (i.d.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of a heat-inactivated or live VZV vaccine were investigated. Relative to nonimmunized animals, a single 399-PFU dose of vaccine induced nonsignificant increases in gamma interferon (IFN-γ), granzyme B, and perforin mRNA expression in the splenocytes of all groups, while two i.d. administrations of the inactivated vaccine increased IFN-γ mRNA expression significantly (P < 0.005). A single 1,995-PFU dose significantly increased the expression of IFN-γ mRNA in the groups receiving the vaccine either i.d. (P < 0.005) or s.c. (P < 0.05), that of granzyme B mRNA in the groups immunized i.d. with the inactivated (P < 0.005) or live (P < 0.005) vaccine, and that of perforin mRNA in the animals that received the inactivated vaccine i.d. (P < 0.005). Importantly, increases in the expression of IFN-γ (P = 0.025), granzyme B (P = 0.004), and perforin (P > 0.05) mRNAs were observed in the animals immunized i.d. with 1,995 PFU of inactivated vaccine relative to those immunized s.c. with the same dose. The proportion of animals expressing IFN-γ mRNA mirrored the proportion expressing IFN-γ protein (correlation coefficient of 0.88). VZV glycoprotein-specific and virus-neutralizing antibodies were produced with no significant intergroup differences. A booster i.d. administration of the 399-PFU dose of heat-inactivated vaccine enhanced the antibody responses. These results demonstrate that i.d. administration of an inactivated VZV vaccine can be an efficient mode of immunization against VZV.

  18. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells. ... and order certain lab tests to check your body's response to iron dextran injection.Before having any laboratory test, tell ...

  19. More than just someone to inject drugs with: injecting within primary injection partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Meghan D.; Bates, Anna; Andrew, Erin; Hahn, Judith; Page, Kimberly; Maher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have shown intimate injection partners engage in higher rates of syringe and injecting equipment sharing. We examined the drug use context and development of injection drug use behaviors within intimate injection partnerships. Methods In-depth interviews (n=18) were conducted with both members of nine injecting partnerships in Sydney, Australia. Content analysis identified key domains related to the reasons for injecting with a primary injection partner and development of drug injection patterns. Main Findings Most partnerships (n=5) were also sexual; three were blood-relatives and one a friend dyad. The main drug injected was heroin (66%) with high rates of recent sharing behaviors (88%) reported within dyads. Injecting within a primary injection partnership provided perceived protection against overdose events, helped reduce stress, increased control over when, where, and how drugs were used, and promoted the development of an injecting pattern where responsibilities could be shared. Unique to injecting within primary injection partnerships was the social connection and companionship resulted in a feeling of fulfillment while also blinding one from recognizing risky behavior. Conclusions Findings illuminated the tension between protection and risks within primary injection partnerships. Primary injection partnerships provide a potential platform to expand risk reduction strategies. PMID:26460140

  20. The effect of subareolar isosulfan blue injection on pulse oximeter readings.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Baha; Yararbas, Ulkem; Bingolballi, Ozge; Denecli, Ali Galip

    2014-02-01

    Besides several side effects including anaphylaxis, blue dyes are also known to cause false pulse oximeter readings. We aimed to examine the effects of subareolar isosulfan blue injection on pulse oximeter (SpO2) readings. The study group included 27 patients undergoing SLNB using both radiocolloid and isosulfan blue. Another group of 27 patients constituted the control group. Pulse oximeter readings were compared. SpO2 decline ≥4 % was defined as significant. All but one (96.2 %) of the patients in the study group showed SpO2 declines, compared to only one patient in the control group. Median ± Interqartile Range (IR) SpO2 decrease was 3.0 ± 4.0 % in the study and 0.0 ± 1.0 % in the control group (p < 0.001). There were significant (≥4 %) SpO2 decreases in 13 (48.1 %) patients in the study group. Statistically significant differences were noted between the two groups in all recordings between 15 and 180 min (p < 0.001). Initial time for SpO2 fall and the time to the lowest SpO2 recording were 10.0 ± 10.0 and 40.0 ± 30.0 min respectively. Using subareolar injection, the frequency of false readings is comparable with intraparenchymal injections, and is higher than intradermal injections. Time to peak SpO2 fall, and the recovery period, are delayed in the subareolar technique.

  1. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  2. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  3. Injectable nanocarriers for biodetoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2007-11-01

    Hospitals routinely treat patients suffering from overdoses of drugs or other toxic chemicals as a result of illicit drug consumption, suicide attempts or accidental exposures. However, for many life-threatening situations, specific antidotes are not available and treatment is largely based on emptying the stomach, administering activated charcoal or other general measures of intoxication support. A promising strategy for managing such overdoses is to inject nanocarriers that can extract toxic agents from intoxicated tissues. To be effective, the nanocarriers must remain in the blood long enough to sequester the toxic components and/or their metabolites, and the toxin bound complex must also remain stable until it is removed from the bloodstream. Here, we discuss the principles that govern the use of injectable nanocarriers in biodetoxification and review the pharmacological performance of a number of different approaches.

  4. Fuel injection valve connection

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, E.S.; Field, M.J.; Penwright, J.L.

    1987-09-15

    A fuel injection valve connection is described which consists of a fuel injection valve having a cylindrical inlet fitting. The fitting has a threaded internal surface and a cylindrical external surface. A fuel connector has a projection with a threaded external surface that mates with the threaded internal surface of the fitting. The connector also has a sleeve with a cylindrical internal surface surrounding the fitting and an O-ring sealingly engaging the internal surface of the sleeve and the external surface of the fitting, whereby the valve may be rotated relative to the connector without breaking the sealing engagement between the valve and the connector, and wherein the connector also has a tab engageable with the injector to prevent unthreading of the valve from the connector.

  5. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  6. Magnetron injection gun scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, W.

    1988-04-01

    A set of tradeoff equations was simplified to obtain scaling laws for magnetron injection guns (MIGs). The constraints are chosen to examine the maximum-peak-power capabilities of MIGs. The scaling laws are compared with exact solutions of the design equations and are supported by MIG simulations in which each MIG is designed to double the beam power of an existing design by adjusting one of the four fundamental parameters.

  7. Spear 3 Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebek, J.; Arnett, D.; Langton, J.; Pappas, C.

    2002-08-01

    The design of the SPEAR 3 injection kicker system is presented. This system will include three kicker magnets and their associated pulsers. The magnet design is based on the DELTA kicker magnets, which present a low RF impedance to the beam, and are relatively straightforward to construct. The pulsers use cascaded IGBT stages that are based on the modulator pulsers developed by a SLAC/LLNL collaboration for the NLC. Design considerations and the results of prototype tests will be discussed.

  8. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  9. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  10. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  11. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  12. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week. HBV, inject the medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week usually for 16 weeks. hairy cell leukemia, inject ...

  13. Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2006-03-06

    The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

  14. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  15. Experimental erythrocyte autoantibodies. V. Induction and suppression of red blood cell autoantibodies in mice injected with rat bromelain-treated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, K O; McAuliffe, A

    1983-10-01

    Mice injected with rat red blood cells (RBC), or rat bromelain-treated (brom) RBC, produce RBC autoantibodies and suppressor cells that specifically inhibit the autoimmune response without inhibiting the net production of antibodies against rat RBC. It has been investigated whether suppressor cells induced by injections of rat RBC are effective in preventing autoantibody production induced by rat brom RBC and vice versa. Autoantibodies were induced in C3H mice by weekly ip injections, each 0.2 ml, of a 6% suspension of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibody production was assayed using Coombs' test. Suppressor cells were present in the spleens of mice positive in Coombs' tests and were shown by intravenous injections of 40 X 10(6) viable cells per mouse into untreated syngeneic mice 18 hr before the first injection of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibodies eluted from mice positive in Coombs' tests after injections of rat RBC or brom RBC were absorbed by either type of rat RBC but not by RBC from sheep. This suggests that rat RBC and rat brom RBC display antigens that are similar, if not identical, to autoantigens on the mouse RBC. Spleen cells from mice injected with rat RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by both rat RBC and rat brom RBC. In contrast, spleen cells from mice injected with rat brom RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by rat brom RBC but not those induced by unmodified rat RBC. This differential suppression may be due to the removal from rat RBC, by bromelain, of a suppressor site and/or autoantigens of some specificities. Thus rat brom RBC may not induce the total range of specificities of autoantibodies, and of suppressor cells, induced by rat RBC.

  16. Rain underscores need for injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

  17. Epidemiology of Injection Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Nelson; Bruneau, Julie; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2016-01-01

    After more than 30 years of research, numerous studies have shown that injection drug use is associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes such as drug overdoses, drug-related suicidal behaviours, comorbid psychiatric disorders, bloodborne pathogens and other infectious diseases, and traumas. This review explores new trends and prominent issues associated with injection drug use. The dynamic nature of injection drug use is underlined by examining its recent trends and changing patterns in Canada and other “high-income countries.” Three research topics that could further contribute to the development of comprehensive prevention and intervention strategies aimed at people who inject drugs are also discussed: risk behaviours associated with the injection of prescription opioids, binge injection drug use, and mental health problems as determinants of injection risk behaviours. PMID:27254088

  18. The activity of mouse Kupffer cells following intravenous injection of T4 bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Inchley, C. J.

    1969-01-01

    The response of macrophages from the livers and spleens of mice given a single immunizing dose of T4 bacteriophage has been studied. Following their rapid removal from the circulation, phage particles were found to be concentrated in the liver to a level twelve times that for the spleen. Investigation of the fate of ingested phage showed that it was disposed of more rapidly in the liver than in the spleen, as measured by the disappearance of viable T4 particles and by the loss of radioactive label following injection of [131I]T4. It was also found that antigen-containing Kupffer cells could elicit little or no antibody synthesis on transfer into normal syngeneic recipients, or on incubation with lymphoid cells in vitro. It is suggested that these macrophages differ from other components of the reticulo-endothelial system in their treatment of T4 antigen, and may be concerned mainly with its breakdown and disposal rather than with providing a stimulus for the initiation of antibody synthesis. PMID:5370053

  19. In Situ Conversion of Melanoma Lesions into Autologous Vaccine by Intratumoral Injections of α-gal Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Uri; Albertini, Mark R.; Sondel, Paul M.; Wigglesworth, Kim; Sullivan, Mary; Whalen, Giles F.

    2010-01-01

    Autologous melanoma associated antigens (MAA) on murine melanoma cells can elicit a protective anti-tumor immune response following a variety of vaccine strategies. Most require effective uptake by antigen presenting cells (APC). APC transport and process internalized MAA for activation of anti-tumor T cells. One potential problem with clinical melanoma vaccines against autologous tumors may be that often tumor cells do not express surface markers that label them for uptake by APC. Effective uptake of melanoma cells by APC might be achieved by exploiting the natural anti-Gal antibody which constitutes ~1% of immunoglobulins in humans. This approach has been developed in a syngeneic mouse model using mice capable of producing anti-Gal. Anti-Gal binds specifically to α-gal epitopes (Galα1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R). Injection of glycolipids carrying α-gal epitopes (α-gal glycolipids) into melanoma lesions results in glycolipid insertion into melanoma cell membranes, expression of α-gal epitopes on the tumor cells and binding of anti-Gal to these epitopes. Interaction between the Fc portions of bound anti-Gal and Fcγ receptors on APC induces effective uptake of tumor cells by APC. The resulting anti-MAA immune response can be potent enough to destroy distant micrometastases. A clinical trial is now open testing effects of intratumoral α-gal glycolipid injections in melanoma patients. PMID:23087817

  20. Particle beam injection system

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  1. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Van Steirteghem, André; Devroey, P; Liebaers, I

    2002-01-25

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with ejaculated, epididymal or testicular spermatozoa was first successful in 1992 and has since become the widely accepted treatment for couples with severe male-factor infertility. The outcome of several thousands of ICSI cycles in terms of fertilization, embryo cleavage and implantation is similar to that for conventional in-vitro fertilization in couples with tubal or idiopathic infertility. To evaluate the important issue of safety of the new technique of ICSI, a prospective follow-up study of children born after ICSI was carried out. The aim was to compile data on karyotypes, congenital malformations, growth parameters and developmental milestones. Parents' agreement to genetic counseling was obtained, as well as prenatal diagnosis, followed by a physical examination of the children at 2 months, 1 and 2 years. Important outcome data to be examined comprise information on major and minor congenital malformations obtained prenatally or after birth, as well as on the further development of the children.

  2. Premixed direct injection nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2011-02-15

    An injection nozzle having a main body portion with an outer peripheral wall is disclosed. The nozzle includes a plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes disposed within the main body portion and a fuel flow passage fluidly connected to the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes. Fuel and air are partially premixed inside the plurality of the tubes. A second body portion, having an outer peripheral wall extending between a first end and an opposite second end, is connected to the main body portion. The partially premixed fuel and air mixture from the first body portion gets further mixed inside the second body portion. The second body portion converges from the first end toward said second end. The second body portion also includes cooling passages that extend along all the walls around the second body to provide thermal damage resistance for occasional flame flash back into the second body.

  3. Propagating substorm injection fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Feynman, J.; Hardy, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a series of two-satellite observations leads to a clarification of substorm plasma injection, in which boundary motion plays a major role. Emphasis is put on a type of event characterized by abrupt, dispersionless changes in electron intensity and a coincident perturbation that consists of both a field magnitude increase and a small rotation toward more dipolar orientation. Comparing plasma observations at two points, it is found that in active, preinjection conditions the two most important features of the plasma sheet are: (1) the low-energy convection boundary for near-zero energy particles, determined by the magnitude of the large-scale convection electric field; and (2) the precipitation-flow boundary layer between the hot plasma sheet and the atmospherically contaminated inner plasma sheet.

  4. Fuel injection pumping apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, J.A.; Mowbray, D.F.

    1987-10-13

    A liquid fuel injection pumping apparatus is described comprising a rotary and axially movable fuel distributor member housed within a body, a reciprocable pumping plunger housed within a bore formed in the distributor member, cam means mounted in the body for effecting inward movement of the plunger as the distributor member rotates, passage means in the body and distributor member and stop means for limiting the extent of outward movement of the plunger. The extent of outward movement depends on the axial setting of the distributor member in the body, resilient means biasing the distributor member in one axial direction, a chamber defined in the body, means for controlling the fluid pressure in the chamber to control the axial setting of the distributor member.

  5. Steam injection method

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.R.

    1986-02-25

    A method is described for injecting steam into a subterranean reservoir via a well penetrating the reservoir, comprising adding to steam generator feedwater used to generate the steam or adding to the steam, or adding to both the feedwater and the steam. The mixture consists of: (a) a compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium salts of inorganic acids, ammonium salts of carboxylic acids, quaternary ammonium halides, amine or substituted amine hydrochlorides, and mixtures thereof; and (b) a compound selected from the group consisting of ammonia, salts which decompose to form acid neutralizers or buffers having alkaline pH values, amides of carbamic acid or thiocarbamic acid and derivatives of such amides, tertiary carboxylic acid amides and their substituted and alkylated derivatives, and mixtures thereof.

  6. Injectors for Multipoint Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prociw, Lev Alexander (Inventor); Ryon, Jason (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An injector for a multipoint combustor system includes an inner air swirler which defines an interior flow passage and a plurality of swirler inlet ports in an upstream portion thereof. The inlet ports are configured and adapted to impart swirl on flow in the interior flow passage. An outer air cap is mounted outboard of the inner swirler. A fuel passage is defined between the inner air swirler and the outer air cap, and includes a discharge outlet between downstream portions of the inner air swirler and the outer air cap for issuing fuel for combustion. The outer air cap defines an outer air circuit configured for substantially unswirled injection of compressor discharge air outboard of the interior flow passage.

  7. Diesel fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1986-04-22

    A fuel injection pump is described of the multiple plunger spill port type for an automotive type internal combustion engine, the pump including at least four axially spaced engine camshaft driven pump plungers grouped in pairs and sequentially and in succession moved in one direction through a fuel pumping stroke and oppositely through a fuel intake stroke. A fuel pressurization/supply chamber is contiquous to the end of each plunger for pressurization of the fuel therein or supply of fuel thereto from a supply passage upon coordinate movement of the plunger, fill/spill passage means connected to a single fuel return spill port and in parallel flow relationship to each of the plunger bores as a function of the position of the plungers, each plunger having a pair of internal passages connected at all times to its chamber and alternately alignable with the supply or fill/spill passage means as a function of the position of the plunger. A fuel discharge passage is operatively connecting each of the chambers to an individual engine cylinder, a single spill port control valve movable to block or permit the spill of fuel through the spill port to a return line to control the pressurization of fuel in all of the fuel chambers and associated discharge passages, a single solenoid connected to the spill control valve for moving it to block or unblock the spill port, and a single shuttle valve operatively associated with all of the fill/spill passage means and spill port reciprocably movable between positions to sequentially connect the plunger chambers one at a time in succession to the spill port during the pumping pressurization stroke of its plunger for the injection of fuel to an individual cylinder while the other chambers are in various stages of being refilled with fuel and preparing for pressurization upon successive actuation of the plungers by the camshaft.

  8. Genetic immunization by jet injection of targeted pDNA-coated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mumper, Russell J; Cui, Zhengrong

    2003-11-01

    Genetic immunization strategies have largely focused on the use of "naked" plasmid DNA or the gene gun. However, there remains a clear need to further improve the efficiency and/or cost of potential DNA vaccines. The theoretical basis of our research is to rationally design genetic immunization methodologies for nanoparticle-based delivery systems of plasmid DNA, perhaps in combination with already commercially available needle-free devices, such as the Biojector 2000. These methodologies may both reduce the dose of pDNA required and enhance the breadth and depth of protective immune responses (i.e., humoral and cellular). The purpose of this article is to provide detailed experimental methods to (1) engineer and characterize pDNA-coated cationic nanoparticles (<100nm) directly from oil-in-water microemulsion precursors and (2) enhance both the breadth and depth of immune responses after immunization of mice with pDNA-coated nanoparticles by different routes of administration, including intradermal, using a needle-free jet injection device.

  9. The cost of unsafe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M. A.; Pisani, E.

    1999-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly from hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. These inadvertently transmitted bloodborne diseases become manifest some considerable time after infection and hence may not be appropriately accounted for. Annually more than 1.3 million deaths and US$ 535 million are estimated to be due to current unsafe injection practices. With the global increase in the number of injections for vaccination and medical services, safer injecting technologies such as auto-disable syringes must be budgeted for. Investment in health education and safer disposal will also reduce infections associated with unsafe injecting practices. Safer injecting practices are more expensive than current less safe practices, but the additional cost is more than offset by the reduction in disease that would result. PMID:10593028

  10. Worldwide Injection Technique Questionnaire Study: Population Parameters and Injection Practices.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Hirsch, Laurence J; Menchior, Astrid R; Morel, Didier R; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    From February 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients from 423 centers in 42 countries took part in one of the largest surveys ever performed in diabetes. The goal was to assess patient characteristics, as well as historical and practical aspects of their injection technique. Results show that 4- and 8-mm needle lengths are each used by nearly 30% of patients and 5- and 6-mm needles each by approximately 20%. Higher consumption of insulin (as measured by total daily dose) is associated with having lipohypertrophy (LH), injecting into LH, leakage from the injection site, and failing to reconstitute cloudy insulin. Glycated hemoglobin values are, on average, 0.5% higher in patients with LH and are significantly higher with incorrect rotation of sites and with needle reuse. Glycated hemoglobin values are lower in patients who distribute their injections over larger injection areas and whose sites are inspected routinely. The frequencies of unexpected hypoglycemia and glucose variability are significantly higher in those with LH, those injecting into LH, those who incorrectly rotate sites, and those who reuse needles. Needles associated with diabetes treatment are the most commonly used medical sharps in the world. However, correct disposal of sharps after use is critically suboptimal. Many used sharps end up in public trash and constitute a major accidental needlestick risk. Use of these data should stimulate renewed interest in and commitment to optimizing injection practices in patients with diabetes.

  11. Worldwide Injection Technique Questionnaire Study: Population Parameters and Injection Practices.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Hirsch, Laurence J; Menchior, Astrid R; Morel, Didier R; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    From February 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients from 423 centers in 42 countries took part in one of the largest surveys ever performed in diabetes. The goal was to assess patient characteristics, as well as historical and practical aspects of their injection technique. Results show that 4- and 8-mm needle lengths are each used by nearly 30% of patients and 5- and 6-mm needles each by approximately 20%. Higher consumption of insulin (as measured by total daily dose) is associated with having lipohypertrophy (LH), injecting into LH, leakage from the injection site, and failing to reconstitute cloudy insulin. Glycated hemoglobin values are, on average, 0.5% higher in patients with LH and are significantly higher with incorrect rotation of sites and with needle reuse. Glycated hemoglobin values are lower in patients who distribute their injections over larger injection areas and whose sites are inspected routinely. The frequencies of unexpected hypoglycemia and glucose variability are significantly higher in those with LH, those injecting into LH, those who incorrectly rotate sites, and those who reuse needles. Needles associated with diabetes treatment are the most commonly used medical sharps in the world. However, correct disposal of sharps after use is critically suboptimal. Many used sharps end up in public trash and constitute a major accidental needlestick risk. Use of these data should stimulate renewed interest in and commitment to optimizing injection practices in patients with diabetes. PMID:27594185

  12. A comparison of molding procedures - Contact, injection and vacuum injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathiard, G.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic aspects of the contact, injection and vacuum injection molding of reinforced plastic components are compared for the example of a tractor roof with a gel-coated surface. Consideration is given to the possibility of reinforcement, number of smooth faces, condition of the gel-coated surface, reliability, and labor and workplace requirements of the three processes, and advantages of molding between the mold and a countermold in smooth faces, reliability, labor requirements, working surface and industrial hygiene are pointed out. The times and labor requirements of each step in the molding cycles are examined, and material requirements and yields, investment costs, amortization and product cost prices of the processes are compared. It is concluded that, for the specific component examined, the processes of vacuum injection and injection molding appear very interesting, with injection molding processes resulting in lower cost prices than contact molding for any production volume.

  13. Sensor for Injection Rate Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marcic, Milan

    2006-01-01

    A vast majority of the medium and high speed Diesel engines are equipped with multi-hole injection nozzles nowadays. Inaccuracies in workmanship and changing hydraulic conditions in the nozzles result in differences in injection rates between individual injection nozzle holes. The new deformational measuring method described in the paper allows injection rate measurement in each injection nozzle hole. The differences in injection rates lead to uneven thermal loads of Diesel engine combustion chambers. All today known measuring method, such as Bosch and Zeuch give accurate results of the injection rate in diesel single-hole nozzles. With multihole nozzles they tell us nothing about possible differences in injection rates between individual holes of the nozzle. At deformational measuring method, the criterion of the injected fuel is expressed by the deformation of membrane occurring due to the collision of the pressure wave against the membrane. The pressure wave is generated by the injection of the fuel into the measuring space. For each hole of the nozzle the measuring device must have a measuring space of its own into which fuel is injected as well as its measuring membrane and its own fuel outlet. During measurements procedure the measuring space must be filled with fuel to maintain an overpressure of 5 kPa. Fuel escaping from the measuring device is conducted into the graduated cylinders for measuring the volumetric flow through each hole of the nozzle.The membrane deformation is assessed by strain gauges. They are glued to the membrane and forming the full Wheatstone's bridge. We devoted special attention to the membrane shape and temperature compensation of the strain gauges.

  14. The RHIC Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.; Tuozzolo, J. E.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <95 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave solution. The required vertical kick of 0.186 T.m is provided by 4 units, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4× 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a ``C'' cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity ( ~ 100) dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 Ohm characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding >50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Tests indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 Ohm terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the four kicker units for the ``Sextant Test'' and the results from various single-unit tests and operation in beam are reported.

  15. The RHIC injection kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <90 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave structure. The required vertical kick of 0.186 t{center_dot}m is provided by 4 magnets, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4 x 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 {Omega} characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding {approximately} 50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 {Omega} terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the production units and the results from various single-unit tests and operation of four kickers with beam in the {open_quotes}Sextant Test{close_quotes} are reported.

  16. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  17. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyama, A.; Nishimura, T.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump comprising: (a) engageable first and second cam members, the first cam member reciprocating axially as the first cam member moves angularly relative to the second cam member when the first and second cam members are in engagement; (b) means for urging the first cam member toward the second cam member to engage the first and second cam members; (c) a plunger connected to the first cam member for reciprocation with the first cam member, the plunger defining at least a part of a pumping chamber, the pumping chamber contracting and expanding as the plunger reciprocates; (d) means for allowing fuel to move into the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber expands in a fuel intake stroke; (e) means for allowing the fuel to move out of the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber contracts in a fuel compression stroke; and (f) means for resisting movement of the plunger in at least part of the fuel compression stroke and relieving resistance to the movement of the plunger in the fuel intake stroke wherein the resisting means comprises a piston slidably mounted on the plunger, a spring urging the piston to seat the piston on a shoulder on the plunger so that the piston reciprocates as the plunger reciprocates, wherein the piston is seated on the shoulder in the fuel compression stroke and separates from the shoulder against the force of the spring in the fuel intake stroke, a second fluid chamber at least partially defined by the piston.

  18. Effect of in vivo activation of natural killer (NK) cells by a tilorone analogue on the survival of mice injected intravenously with different experimental murine tumours

    PubMed Central

    ALGARRA, I.; GONZÁLEZ, A.; PÉREZ, M.; GAFORIO, J J; GARRIDO, F.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effect of a tilorone analogue (RMI 10,874DA) and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the survival of BALB/c and C57B1/6 mice after i.v. injections of different syngeneic murine tumour cells. Tumour lines used were different clones from chemically (GR9 wild type, GR9.B9, B7.1.B4, B7.1.B5, B7.2.38), and ultraviolet light (GRUV3)-induced sarcomas; B16 melanoma and LSTRA and YC8 lymphomas. Pretreatment of mice with tilorone inhibited metastatic colonization and increased survival significantly in all cases. In some tumour systems, the effect was attenuated when high numbers of cells were injected. Abrogation of NK cells with anti-asialo GM1 serum significantly decreased (in all tumours and at different cell doses) survival in comparison with untreated mice injected with tumours, regardless of cell dose used. These results clearly suggest that NK cell activation in vivo by the tilorone analogue we tested prolongs survival and inhibits metastasis formation in mice, even when pretreatment consists of a single dose of the analogue. PMID:8608652

  19. Blast furnace injection symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    These proceedings contain 14 papers related to blast furnace injection issues. Topics include coal quality, coal grinding, natural gas injection, stable operation of the blast furnace, oxygen enrichment, coal conveying, and performance at several steel companies. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Injectable Foams for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Edna M.; Page, Jonathan M.; Harmata, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of injectable biomaterials has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Many injectable biomaterials, such as hydrogels and calcium phosphate cements, have nanoscale pores that limit the rate of cellular migration and proliferation. While introduction of macroporosity has been suggested to increase cellular infiltration and tissue healing, many conventional methods for generating macropores often require harsh processing conditions that preclude their use in injectable foams. In recent years, processes such as porogen leaching, gas foaming, and emulsion-templating have been adapted to generate macroporosity in injectable calcium phosphate cements, hydrogels, and hydrophobic polymers. While some of the more mature injectable foam technologies have been evaluated in clinical trials, there are challenges remaining to be addressed, such as the biocompatibility and ultimate fate of the sacrificial phase used to generate pores within the foam after it sets in situ. Furthermore, while implantable scaffolds can be washed extensively to remove undesirable impurities, all of the components required to synthesize injectable foams must be injected into the defect. Thus, every compound in the foam must be biocompatible and non-cytotoxic at the concentrations utilized. As future research addresses these critical challenges, injectable macroporous foams are anticipated to have an increasingly significant impact on improving patient outcomes for a number of clinical procedures. PMID:24127230

  1. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did not respond or are ... tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in a class of medications called ...

  2. Main tank injection pressurization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program predicts performance of fluorine-hydrogen main tank injection pressurization system for full range of liquid-hydrogen-fueled space vehicles. Analytical model includes provisions for heat transfer, injectant jet penetration, and ullage gas mixing. Analysis predicts GF2 usage, ullage gas and tank wall temperatures, and LH2 evaporation.

  3. Urine Pretreat Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A new method of introducing the OXONE (Registered Trademark) Monopersulfate Compound for urine pretreat into a two-phase urine/air flow stream has been successfully tested and evaluated. The feasibility of this innovative method has been established for purposes of providing a simple, convenient, and safe method of handling a chemical pretreat required for urine processing in a microgravity space environment. Also, the Oxone portion of the urine pretreat has demonstrated the following advantages during real time collection of 750 pounds of urine in a Space Station design two-phase urine Fan/Separator: Eliminated urine precipitate buildup on internal hardware and plumbing; Minimized odor from collected urine; and Virtually eliminated airborne bacteria. The urine pretreat, as presently defined for the Space Station program for proper downstream processing of urine, is a two-part chemical treatment of 5.0 grams of Oxone and 2.3 ml of H2SO4 per liter of urine. This study program and test demonstrated only the addition of the proper ratio of Oxone into the urine collection system upstream of the Fan/Separator. This program was divided into the following three major tasks: (1) A trade study, to define and recommend the type of Oxone injection method to pursue further; (2) The design and fabrication of the selected method; and (3) A test program using high fidelity hardware and fresh urine to demonstrate the method feasibility. The trade study was conducted which included defining several methods for injecting Oxone in different forms into a urine system. Oxone was considered in a liquid, solid, paste and powered form. The trade study and the resulting recommendation were presented at a trade study review held at Hamilton Standard on 24-25 October 94. An agreement was reached at the meeting to continue the solid tablet in a bag concept which included a series of tablets suspended in the urine/air flow stream. These Oxone tablets would slowly dissolve at a controlled rate

  4. The prognostic advantage of preoperative intratumoral injection of OK-432 for gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gochi, A; Orita, K; Fuchimoto, S; Tanaka, N; Ogawa, N

    2001-01-01

    To investigate, by a multi-institutional randomized trial, the prognostic significance of the augmentation of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by preoperative intratumoral injection of OK-432 (OK-432 it), a bacterial biological response modifier, in patients with gastric cancer. The 10-year survival and disease-free survival were examined and analysis of the factors showing survival benefit was performed. 370 patients who had undergone curative resection of gastric cancer were enrolled in this study and followed up for 10 years postoperatively. Patients were randomized into either an OK-432 it group or a control group. Ten Klinishe Einheit (KE) of OK-432 was endoscopically injected at 1 to 2 weeks before the operation in the OK-432 it group. Both groups received the same adjuvant chemoimmunotherapy consisting of a bolus injection of mitomycin C (0.4 mg kg−1i.v.) and administration of tegafur and OK-432 from postoperative day 14 up to 1 year later. Tegafur (600 mg day−1) was given orally and OK-432 (5 KE/2 weeks) was injected intradermally for a maintenance therapy. The TILs grades in resected tumour specimens and presence of metastasis and metastatic pattern in dissected lymph nodes were examined. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the efficacy of OK-432 it on prognostic factors. All patients were followed up for 10 years. The overall 5- and 10-year survival rates and disease-free survival rates of the OK-432 it group were not significantly higher than those of the control group. However, OK-432 it significantly increased the 5- and 10-year survival rates of patients with stage IIIA + IIIB, moderate lymph node metastasis (pN2), and positive TILs. OK-432 it was most effective at prolonging the survival of patients who had both positive TILs and lymph node metastasis. The OK-432 it group with positive TILs showed a significant decrease in metastatic lymph node frequency and in the number of lymph node micro- metastatic foci when compared to

  5. Palmitoylethanolamide and luteolin ameliorate development of arthritis caused by injection of collagen type II in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recently, several studies demonstrated that PEA is an important analgesic, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective mediator. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin formulation on the modulation of the inflammatory response in mice subjected to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced by an intradermally injection of 100 μl of the emulsion (containing 100 μg of bovine type II collagen (CII)) and complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) at the base of the tail. On day 21, a second injection of CII in CFA was administered. Mice subjected to CIA were administered PEA (10 mg/kg 10% ethanol, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) every 24 hours, starting from day 25 to 35. Results Mice developed erosive hind-paw arthritis when immunized with CII in CFA. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA first appeared as periarticular erythema and edema in the hindpaws. The incidence of CIA was 100% by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with a resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint. Treatment with PEA or PEA + luteolin ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26 to 35 and improved histologic status in the joint and paw. The degree of oxidative and nitrosative damage was significantly reduced in PEA + luteolin-treated mice, as indicated by nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly reduced by PEA + luteolin treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that PEA co-ultramicronized with luteolin exerts an antiinflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and ameliorates CIA. PMID:24246048

  6. Comparison of Bio-Revitalizing Injective Products: A Study on Skin Fibroblast Cultures.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, Anna; Girardi, Ambra; Palmieri, Annalisa; Pascali, Michele; Carinci, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Bio-revitalization is a commonly used technique in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality and appearance by intra-dermal injection of hyaluronic acid (HA)-containing compounds. The present study compares different HA-containing injectables regarding their effects on cultured skin fibroblasts over time (24, 48, and 72 hr) by using RT-PCR and a panel of genes involved in dermal integrity. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on a layer of five different commercial medical devices containing 6.2 mg/mL 10 mg/mL 10%, 13 mg/mL and 20 mg/mL, respectively, of HA. The products differ not only in HA concentration but also in the content and quality of other ingredients; moreover, one of these products contained cross-linked HA. Differences among medical devices were found. In particular, HA concentration seems to be inversely correlated to elastin gene activation. Regarding the neutrophil elastase gene, the two medical devices with the higher concentration of HA displayed the greater effect. Genes encoding for hyaluronan synthase 1, hyaluronidase 1, and desmoplakin were enhanced, but the HA content of the different products did not seem to be directly related to gene activation. Therefore, the explanation for the differences must be studied further with respect to elements that are distinctive for each device. For the physician, it is important to choose which drugs or medical devices can be used and in what protocols. The present study performed a comparison that can be useful in better addressing the skin improvement therapies for aging and in its prevention.

  7. In vitro and in vivo biocompatibility, bioavailability and tolerance of an injectable vehicle for adipose-derived stem/stromal cells for plastic surgery indications.

    PubMed

    Lequeux, Charlotte; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Boucher, Fabien; Rouyer, Ondine; Damour, Odile; Mojallal, Ali; Auxenfans, Céline

    2015-11-01

    Soft tissue reconstruction is a challenge in plastic surgery, when replacing lost materials and correcting contour defects. Many permanent and temporary fillers have been used to restore the volume of these lesions, but often with poor results and even complications. Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) and adipose tissue engineering have been suggested as valuable alternatives. In order to inject these cultured cells, it was essential to find a suitable vehicle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cytocare(®), an injectable medical device, composed of hyaluronic acid plus amino acids, vitamins and mineral salts. First, ASC viability and bioavailability in the 3 different available Cytocare(®) formulations using the MTT test were assessed; then an animal experiment, testing the tolerance after intradermal injections of both Cytocare(®) alone and with ASCs was carried out. Our in vitro results demonstrate a high biocompatibility of Cytocare(®) resulting in a better viability of ASCs when cultured in Cytocare(®) compared to culture medium (p < 0.05, Mann and Whitney). Cytocare(®) also permits their bioavailability and proliferation, making it a potential transfer vehicle that can retain the cells before their integration around the recipient site. Finally, our animal experiment shows that the ASC + Cytocare(®) combination is well tolerated. In conclusion, Cytocare(®) can be used as a biocompatible scaffold for cultured ASCs in therapeutic treatments, ensuring ASC bioavailability, as well as evidence of excellent tolerance in nude mice.

  8. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Mangels, J.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  9. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  10. The Case for Synthetic Injectables.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John H

    2015-11-01

    There are several different classes of synthetic dermal fillers and volume enhancers including semipermanent and permanent products available in the United States. Based on clinical and scientific evidence, this article reviews the chemical and polymeric properties, clinical data, patient selection, indications for use, injection technique, and adverse event profiles of permanent synthetic injectables currently used in clinical practice in the United States: medical-grade liquid injectable silicone and polymethyl methacrylate. Understanding the unique characteristics of these two products reinforces the advantages and disadvantages of each, including under what circumstances they should be used and why they perform the way they do. PMID:26505540

  11. Injection nozzle for a turbomachine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2012-09-11

    A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

  12. Injectable calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres (Radiesse).

    PubMed

    Ridenour, Brock; Kontis, Theda C

    2009-05-01

    Injectable calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse) received FDA approval in 2006 for the correction of facial lipoatrophy and moderate to severe facial wrinkles. This product consists of microspheres of a synthetic bone suspended in a methylcellulose gel matrix. Because the product is thicker than the hyaluronic acids, it is used for the correction of moderate to severe wrinkles, such as deep nasolabial folds. It is also used "off-label" to treat multiple areas of the face, nose, and hands. Radiesse is injected into the subdermal plane, and correction lasts approximately 1 year after injection.

  13. The Case for Synthetic Injectables.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John H

    2015-11-01

    There are several different classes of synthetic dermal fillers and volume enhancers including semipermanent and permanent products available in the United States. Based on clinical and scientific evidence, this article reviews the chemical and polymeric properties, clinical data, patient selection, indications for use, injection technique, and adverse event profiles of permanent synthetic injectables currently used in clinical practice in the United States: medical-grade liquid injectable silicone and polymethyl methacrylate. Understanding the unique characteristics of these two products reinforces the advantages and disadvantages of each, including under what circumstances they should be used and why they perform the way they do.

  14. Non-plugging injection valve

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Jr., Henry S.

    1985-01-01

    A valve for injecting fluid into a conduit carrying a slurry subject to separation to form deposits capable of plugging openings into the conduit. The valve comprises a valve body that is sealed to the conduit about an aperture formed through the wall of the conduit to receive the fluid to be injected and the valve member of the valve includes a punch portion that extends through the injection aperture to the flow passage, when the valve is closed, to provide a clear channel into the conduit, when the valve is opened, through deposits which might have formed on portions of the valve adjacent the conduit.

  15. NSLS-II INJECTION CONCEPT.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN, T.; PINAYEV, I.; ROSE, J.; WANG, X.J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Currently the facility upgrade project is in progress at the NSLS (at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The goal of the NSLS-II is a 3 GeV ultra-low-emittance storage ring that will increase radiation brightness by three orders of magnitude over that of the present NSLS X-ray ring. The low emittance of the high brightness ring's lattice results in a short lifetime, so that a top-off injection mode becomes an operational necessity. Therefore, the NSLS-II injection system must provide, and efficiently inject, an electron beam at a high repetition rate. In this paper, we present our concept of the NSLS-II injection system and discuss the conditions for, and constraints on, its design.

  16. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  17. Midface volumization with injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Marietta; Kontis, Theda C

    2015-05-01

    The aging midface has long been overlooked in cosmetic surgery. Our understanding of facial aging in terms of 3 dimensions has placed increased importance on volume restoration. Although an "off-label" indication for most fillers in this facial region, volumization of the midface with injectable fillers is usually a safe and straightforward procedure technically. Injectors, nevertheless, need to have an excellent understanding of facial anatomy and the characteristics of the injected products should problems arise.

  18. Subcutaneous or intramuscular insulin injections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C P; Sargent, M A; Wilson, B P; Price, D A

    1991-01-01

    To find out whether diabetic children may inject their insulin intramuscularly rather than subcutaneously, a random sample of 32 patients aged 4.3-17.9 (median 11.3) years was studied. Distance from skin to muscle fascia was measured by ultrasonography at standard injection sites on the outer arm, anterior and lateral thigh, abdomen, buttock, and calf. Distances were greater in girls (n = 15) than in boys (n = 17). Whereas in most boys the distances were less than the length of the needle (12.5 mm) at all sites except the buttock, in most girls, the distances were greater than 12.5 mm except over the calf. Over the fascial plane just lateral to the rectus muscle the distance from skin to peritoneum was less than 12.5 mm in 14 of the 17 boys and one of the 15 girls. Twenty five of the 32 children injected at an angle of 90 degrees, and 24 children raised a skinfold before injecting. By raising a skinfold over the anterior thigh, the distance from skin to muscle fascia was increased by 19% (range 0-38%). We conclude that most boys and some girls who use the perpendicular injection technique may often inject insulin into muscle, and perhaps on occasions into the peritoneal cavity. PMID:1863105

  19. Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf D. : Sun, Yong

    2008-12-16

    NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

  20. Caustic burn caused by intradermal self administration of muriatic acid for suicidal attempt: optimal wound healing and functional recovery with a non surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    FINO, P.; SPAGNOLI, A.M.; RUGGIERI, M.; ONESTI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Caustic burns are burns of third and fourth degree caused by strong acids or strong bases. Muriatic acid is often used for suicidal attempt by ingestion. We describe a case of a caustic skin lesion caused by intravenous failed attempt of suicide by injection of Muriatic acid in a woman affected with bipolar-syndrome. Generally, caustic burns are treated by cleansing, escarectomy and coverage with skin grafts. Case report We treated the patient with a non invasive technique with collagenase and hyaluronic acid sodium salt cream (Bionect start®), hyaluronic acid-based matrix (Hyalomatrix®) and Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VAC) Therapy®. Results We obtained complete healing in 6 weeks. Conclusions Combined use of non invasive techniques seems to ensure only advantages for both the patients and the Health System. It reduces health care costs and risks for the patients such as nosocomial infections. Patient’s compliance is high, as its quality of life. Complete healing of the wound is fast and recovery of function is full. PMID:26712258

  1. Effects of hyperthermia and calcium channel blocker co-therapy on mice injected with Meth A solid of Meth A ascites tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effectiveness of treating tumor-injected mice with verapamil, a calcium antagonist, and hyperthermia. The co-treatment reduced the incidence of tumors in animals injected with Meth A solid cells. It was shown that the decrease in tumors corresponded to increases in natural killer (NK) cell activity measured in a /sup 51/Cr release assay, in the amount of anti-Meth A antibody measured in an immunofluorescence assay, and a decrease in the amount of intra-tumor cyclic AMP measured by radioimmunoassay in co-treated compared to untreated sarcoma-injected animals. A role of the immune system for mediating the prevention of sarcoma growth was indicated by Winn assays. Splenocytes sensitized in vivo against Meth A solid cells for 14 days exhibited an enhanced cytotoxic activity against syngeneic target cells compared to untreated tumor-sensitized splenocytes following heat-drug co-treatment. It was established that the stimulation of cytotoxic T cells against a histocompatibility antigen (H-2/sup d/) present on Meth A sarcoma cells resulted in tumor cell lysis. Animals bearing established Meth A solid sarcomas did not manifest tumor regressions following the administration of co-treatment alone or the adoptive transfer of co-treated tumor-sensitized splenocytes. The growth of Meth A ascites and Meth A ascites-derived solid sarcomas, unlike Meth A solid cell tumors, were not prevented in Winn assays. Additionally, the lifespan of animals injected with Meth A ascites cells was reduced by 50% compared to animals injected with Meth A solid sarcoma cells.

  2. Complete regression of a guinea pig hepatocarcinoma by immunotherapy with "tumor-immune" RNA or antibody to fibrin fragment E.

    PubMed

    Schlager, S I; Dray, S

    1976-01-01

    Two novel immunotherapeutic regimens were developed for a uniformly lethal, intradermally growing transplantable ascites variant (line 10) of a diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatoma in strain 2 guinea pigs. In an apparently tumor-specific immunotherapy model, 32 guinea pigs were cured by the injection into the tumor area, five or seven days after tumor challenge, of syngeneic or xenogeneic RNA extracts obtained from lymphoid tissues of line 10-immune strain 2 guinea pigs or rhesus monkeys, as part of a total regimen which included syngeneic nonsensitive peritoneal exudate cells injected prior to, and tumor-specific antigen injected after, the RNA. In another immunotherapy model, not tumor-specific, 18 strain 2 guinea pigs were cured by the injection into the tumor area, 6 and 16 days after tumor challenge, of antibody specific for fibrin fragment E (FFE), an essential component in the formation of a fibrin matrix considered to be important in tumor development. When therapy was delayed to 12 days in the RNA test system, or to 16 days in the anti-FFE test system, complete abrogation of the tumors did not occur. The long-term survival of the 50 successfully treated animals and their immunity to further tumor challenge indicated that both immunotherapeutic procedures had systemic effects. To test this further, line 10 cells were injected intradermally simultaneously at two sites and only one site was treated. When the one tumor location was treated with anti-FFE, complete regression of the treated tumor and a 30% retardation in the development of the untreated tumor were observed. When this tumor location was treated with the RNA regimen, complete regression of the tumors occurred at both the treated and the untreated sites. Optimal conditions for both immunotherapeutic models and their combination have yet to be establshed. Nonetheless, both immunotherapeutic regimens were more effective than any other immunotherapy thus far reported for this tumor, including the use

  3. Vaccinia virus kelch protein A55 is a 64 kDa intracellular factor that affects virus-induced cytopathic effect and the outcome of infection in a murine intradermal model.

    PubMed

    Beard, Philippa M; Froggatt, Graham C; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2006-06-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) protein A55 is a BTB/kelch protein with a broad-complex, tramtrack and bric-a-brac (BTB) domain in the N-terminal region and five kelch repeats in the C-terminal half. The BTB/kelch subgroup of the kelch superfamily of proteins has been associated with a wide variety of functions including regulation of the cytoskeleton. VACV contains three genes predicted to encode BTB/kelch proteins: A55R, F3L and C2L. The A55R gene product has been identified as an intracellular protein of 64 kDa that is expressed late in infection. A VACV strain lacking 93.6% of the A55R open reading frame (vdeltaA55) was constructed and found to have an unaltered growth rate in vivo but a different plaque morphology and cytopathic effect, as well as reduced development of VACV-induced Ca2+-independent cell/extracellular matrix adhesion. In a murine intradermal model of VACV infection, a virus lacking the A55R gene induced larger lesions than wild-type and revertant control viruses.

  4. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  5. Staged direct injection diesel engine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Quentin A.

    1985-01-01

    A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

  6. Rapid response gas injection technique.

    PubMed

    Komar, J J

    1978-10-01

    A unique gas injection technique has been developed which has rapid response and is capable of supplying gas flowrates up to 5 kg/s at pressures of 3.45 x 10(6) N/m(2). Rise times to equilibrium pressure varied from 7 to 15 ms over the operating range. The reliability, excellent repeatibility, and uniform pressure have shown the system to be superior to previously utilized expansion tube gas injection techniques associated with very short duration impulse test facilities. The achievement of precise timing control of the valve opening permitted a complex electronic sequencing of facility events. An additional feature of automatic gas supply shut-off resulted in significant cost savings when rare gases were used as injectants. PMID:18698978

  7. Intravitreal injection of octreotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J E; Westra, I; Woltering, E A; Winthrop, K L; Barrie, R; O'Dorisio, T M; Holmes, D

    1997-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility of injecting the somatostatin analogue, octreotide acetate (OA), into the vitreous cavity. Previous work suggests that octreotide effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vitro, thus its use in vivo may slow the progression of proliferative eye disease. Fifty micrograms of aqueous OA in 50 microliters aqueous solution was injected into the mid-vitreous of kitten eyes (n = 6), and OA levels were monitored over 4 days. A long-acting release form of octreotide (OA-LAR) was also injected into the mid-vitreous of rabbit eyes at doses of 0.36 (n = 16), 1.1 (n = 1), 2.1 (n = 1), 4.05 (n = 1), 8.2 (n = 1), and 36 mg (n = 3) in solution; and octreotide concentrations were measured at various time points over 42 days. OA concentrations were determined by a highly specific radioimmunoassay. Aqueous octreotide was eliminated rapidly (t1/2 = 16 hours) from the vitreous of the kitten eye, with only negligible amounts recoverable 4 days post-injection. In the long-acting form, OA in the rabbit eye reached peak levels at 28 days. By 42 days, OA levels had declined to the 14-day level. Doses of OA-LAR of 1.1 mg or less produced no gross evidence of clinical toxicity and elicited no grossly visible ocular side effects. Doses greater than 1.1 mg produced significant toxicity, including cataracts and rubeosis. The 28-day peak release for long-acting OA implies that monthly intravitreal injections could provide continual high levels of OA. Intravitreal injection of long-acting OA provides sustained, high concentrations of drug, and deserves further study as a potential treatment of proliferative eye diseases.

  8. The role of full-thickness skin grafting and steroid injection in the treatment of auricular keloids.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nefertiti A; Ortega, F Raymond

    2010-05-01

    Keloids are a response to wound healing that occurs due to hyperproliferation of dermal collagen in response to skin injury (Olabanji et al, Surg Pract. 2005;9:2-7). Multiple modalities have been described in the literature to target these lesions, but treatment and prevention remain a challenge because of the high rate of recurrence (Brissett and Sherris, Facial Plast Surg. 2001;17:263-272; Kelly, Dermatol Ther. 2004;17:212-218; Robles and Berg, Clin Dermatol. 2007;25:26-32; Porter, Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2002;35:207-220, viii). We studied the rate of recurrence of auricular keloids through a technique previously described in the literature (Converse and Stallings, Plast Reconstr Surg. 1972;49:461-463), but over a series of patients. Keloids were treated with total excision in combination with coverage of the resulting defect with a full-thickness skin graft and intradermal injection of triamcinolone acetonide solution at the periphery of the donor and recipient sites. From April 2006 to February 2007, 10 patients with auricular keloids were done using this technique, and during an 11-month follow-up no recurrence was observed. These results support that full-thickness skin grafts can be used to address keloid lesions without recurrence.

  9. Systemic injection of neural stem/progenitor cells in mice with chronic EAE.

    PubMed

    Donegà, Matteo; Giusto, Elena; Cossetti, Chiara; Schaeffer, Julia; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-04-15

    Neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are a promising stem cell source for transplantation approaches aiming at brain repair or restoration in regenerative neurology. This directive has arisen from the extensive evidence that brain repair is achieved after focal or systemic NPC transplantation in several preclinical models of neurological diseases. These experimental data have identified the cell delivery route as one of the main hurdles of restorative stem cell therapies for brain diseases that requires urgent assessment. Intraparenchymal stem cell grafting represents a logical approach to those pathologies characterized by isolated and accessible brain lesions such as spinal cord injuries and Parkinson's disease. Unfortunately, this principle is poorly applicable to conditions characterized by a multifocal, inflammatory and disseminated (both in time and space) nature, including multiple sclerosis (MS). As such, brain targeting by systemic NPC delivery has become a low invasive and therapeutically efficacious protocol to deliver cells to the brain and spinal cord of rodents and nonhuman primates affected by experimental chronic inflammatory damage of the central nervous system (CNS). This alternative method of cell delivery relies on the NPC pathotropism, specifically their innate capacity to (i) sense the environment via functional cell adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine receptors; (ii) cross the leaking anatomical barriers after intravenous (i.v.) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection; (iii) accumulate at the level of multiple perivascular site(s) of inflammatory brain and spinal cord damage; and (i.v.) exert remarkable tissue trophic and immune regulatory effects onto different host target cells in vivo. Here we describe the methods that we have developed for the i.v. and i.c.v. delivery of syngeneic NPCs in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), as model of chronic CNS inflammatory demyelination, and envisage

  10. Line10 Charge Injection Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2012-10-01

    Radiation damage on-orbit, in the form of charge traps, gradually reduces the charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of CCDs over time. In WFC3, one option for mitigating CTE losses is charge injection i.e. electronically inserting charge every Nth row. The benefit of this method is the significantly lower noise penalty, much less than the traditional Poissonian noise imparted by a pre- or post-flash of the same charge level. This program acquires the calibration data necessary to support science observations using charge injection.

  11. Sodium storage and injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, A. R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A sodium storage and injection system for delivering atomized liquid sodium to a chemical reactor employed in the production of solar grade silicon is disclosed. The system is adapted to accommodate start-up, shut-down, normal and emergency operations, and is characterized by (1) a jacketed injection nozzle adapted to atomize liquefied sodium and (2) a supply circuit connected to the nozzle for delivering the liquefied sodium. The supply circuit is comprised of a plurality of replaceable sodium containment vessels, a pump interposed between the vessels and the nozzle, and a pressurizing circuit including a source of inert gas connected with the vessels for maintaining the sodium under pressure.

  12. ATF neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Morris, R.N.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is a stellarator torsatron being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate improved plasma confinement schemes. Plasmas heating will be carried out predominantly by means of neutral beam injection. This paper describes the basic parameters of the injection system. Numerical calculations were done to optimize the aiming of the injectors. The results of these calculations and their implications on the neutral power to the machine are elaborated. The effects of improving the beam optics and altering the focal length on the power transmitted to the plasma are discussed.

  13. Sciatica and epidural corticosteroid injections.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    According to trials conducted in hundreds of patients with sciatica, epidural corticosteroid injections have no demonstrated efficacy beyond the placebo effect, either in the short-term or the long-term. However, they expose patients to a risk of sometimes serious neurological adverse effects.

  14. Intradermal delivery of Shigella IpaB and IpaD type III secretion proteins: kinetics of cell recruitment and antigen uptake, mucosal and systemic immunity, and protection across serotypes.

    PubMed

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Andar, Abhay U; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; van de Verg, Lillian; Walker, Richard; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2014-02-15

    Shigella is one of the leading pathogens contributing to the vast pediatric diarrheal disease burden in low-income countries. No licensed vaccine is available, and the existing candidates are only partially effective and serotype specific. Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD, which are conserved across Shigella spp., are candidates for a broadly protective, subunit-based vaccine. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of IpaB and IpaD administered intradermally (i.d.) with a double-mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (dmLT) adjuvant using microneedles. Different dosage levels of IpaB and IpaD, with or without dmLT, were tested in mice. Vaccine delivery into the dermis, recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells, and colocalization of vaccine Ag within skin-activated APC were demonstrated through histology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Ag-loaded neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells remained in the tissue at least 1 wk. IpaB, IpaD, and dmLT-specific serum IgG- and IgG-secreting cells were produced following i.d. immunization. The protective efficacy was 70% against Shigella flexneri and 50% against Shigella sonnei. Similar results were obtained when the vaccine was administered intranasally, with the i.d. route requiring 25-40 times lower doses. Distinctively, IgG was detected in mucosal secretions; secretory IgA, as well as mucosal and systemic IgA Ab-secreting cells, were seemingly absent. Vaccine-induced T cells produced IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. These results demonstrate the potential of i.d. vaccination with IpaB and IpaD to prevent Shigella infection and support further studies in humans.

  15. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Chu, Henry S.; Novascone, Stephen R.

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  16. Diesel engine fuel injection pump capable of injection timing adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Wakasa, S.; Okazaki, T.

    1987-12-15

    A diesel engine fuel injection pump capable of injection timing adjustment is described comprising: (a) housing means; (b) a plunger assembly reciprocably mounted within the housing means and defining a pumping chamber therein; (c) the housing means having defined therein a fuel inlet port to the pumping chamber in a predetermined position in the longitudinal direction of the pumping chamber; (d) drive means for reciprocably moving the plunger assembly within the pumping chamber between a first extreme position; (e) the plunger assembly being formed of at least two transversely split segments movable toward and away from each other within limits and including resilient means biasing the segments of the plunger assembly toward each other; and (f) the housing means further including a timing fluid inlet port for introduction of a timing fluid under variable pressure between the segments of the plunger assembly to move the plunger assembly segments away from each other to an extent that timing fluid pressure is counterbalanced by force of the resilient means for controllably varying the distance therebetween and, in consequence, for varying the prestroke of the plunger assembly solely in response to variation of the timing fluid pressure to effect adjustment of injection timing.

  17. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  18. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  19. Model for pneumatic pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1983-07-01

    A hydrodynamic code has been developed to model the performance of pneumatic pellet injection systems. The code describes one dimensional, unsteady compressible gas dynamics, including gas friction and heat transfer to the walls in a system with variable area. The mass, momentum, and energy equations are solved with an iterated Lax-Wendroff scheme with additional numerical viscosity. The code is described and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  20. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  1. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  2. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  3. Helpful tips for performing musculoskeletal injections.

    PubMed

    Metz, John P

    2010-01-01

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection. PMID:20052957

  4. Musculoskeletal injections: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Beutler, Anthony I; O'Connor, Francis G

    2008-10-15

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection. PMID:18953975

  5. Tumor regression after intralesional injection of mycobacterial components emulsified in 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyl-2,6,10,14,18,22-tetracosahexaene (squalene), 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane (squalane), peanut oil, or mineral oil.

    PubMed

    Yarkoni, E; Rapp, H J

    1979-05-01

    The influence of mineral oil, squalane, squalene, or peanut oil on the antitumor activity of emulsified Bacillus Calmette-Guérin cell walls or emulsified trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate was studied in mice, each with an established transplant of a syngeneic fibrosarcoma. Each animal received an intratumoral injection of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin cell walls (0.6 mg/mouse) or trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate (0.1 mg/mouse) emulsified in 1 to 10% oil. Emulsions of squalene or squalane but not peanut oil were effective substitutes for mineral oil as carriers of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin cell walls in the treatment of the tumor. Trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate was therapeutically active when it was incorporated in any of these four oils. The number of animals in which tumor regressed completely depended on the concentration of oil in the emulsion.

  6. Corticosteroid Injections for Common Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Zoë J; Voss, Tyler T; Hatch, Jacquelynn; Frimodig, Adam

    2015-10-15

    Family physicians considering corticosteroid injections as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for musculoskeletal diagnoses will find few high-quality studies to assist with evidence-based decision making. Most studies of corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis, tendinopathy, bursitis, or neuropathy include only small numbers of patients and have inconsistent long-term follow-up. Corticosteroid injections for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis result in short-term improvements in pain and range of motion. For subacromial impingement syndrome, corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief and improvement in function. In medial and lateral epicondylitis, corticosteroid injections offer only short-term improvement of symptoms and have a high rate of symptom recurrence. Corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome may help patients avoid or delay surgery. Trigger finger and de Quervain tenosynovitis may be treated effectively with corticosteroid injections. Patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis may have short-term symptom relief with corticosteroid injections.

  7. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  8. Side Effects of Injectable Fertility Drugs (Gonadotropins)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually are used during fertility treatments such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF). Injections of gonadotropins ... Gestation. When using injectable gonadotropins alone or with IUI, up to 30% of pregnancies are associated with ...

  9. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  10. Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

  11. Injection dynamics of gelled propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changjin

    Gel propellants have been recognized as attractive candidates for future propulsion systems due to the reduced tendency to spill and the energy advantages over solid propellants. One of strong benefits emphasized in gel propellant applications is a throttling capability, but the accurate flow control is more complicated and difficult than with conventional Newtonian propellants because of the unique rheological behaviors of gels. This study is a computational effort directed to enhance understanding of the injector internal flow characteristics for gel propellants under rocket injection conditions. In simulations, the emphasized rheology is a shear-thinning which represents a viscosity decrease with increasing a shear rate. It is described by a generalized Newtonian fluid constitutive equation and Carreau-Yasuda model. Using this rheological model, two injection schemes are considered in the present study: axially-fed and cross-fed injection for single-element and multi-element impinging injectors, respectively. An axisymmetric model is developed to describe the axially-fed injector flows and fully three-dimensional model is utilized to simulate cross-fed injector flows. Under axially-fed injection conditions investigated, three distinct modes, an unsteady, steady, and hydraulic flip mode, are observed and mapped in terms of Reynolds number and orifice design. In an unsteady mode, quasi-periodic oscillations occur near the inlet lip leading mass pulsations and viscosity fluctuations at the orifice exit. This dynamic behavior is characterized using a time-averaged discharge coefficient, oscillation magnitude and frequency by a parametric study with respect to an orifice design, Reynolds number and rheology. As a result, orifice exit flows for gel propellants appear to be significantly influenced by a viscous damping and flow resistance due to a shear thinning behavior and these are observed in each factors considered. Under conditions driven by a manifold crossflow

  12. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  13. Governor for fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yogome, Y.; Itsuki, S.; Shimizu, T.; Shimizu, T.; Hamada, H.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes double-lever type governor for a fuel injection pump comprising: a governor case; a governor lever and a tension lever rotatably supported in the case and operatively associated with each other; a start spring interposed between the governor lever and the tension lever securing a start fuel increment stroke in the governor lever; a fuel regulating rack connected to the governor lever; a supporting shaft mounted in the case supporting both the governor lever and the tension lever for rotation; and a locking mechanism which connects both levers at the time when the start fuel increment stroke of the governor lever becomes zero or approximately zero to be eliminated.

  14. Semipermanent and permanent injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek H

    2009-10-01

    Today, an impressive array of injectable dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation is available in the United States. These agents, most of which were introduced in the last half decade, represent a variety of semipermanent and permanent fillers across several categories. Physicians can choose between semipermanent fillers, such as hyaluronic acid derivatives (HA), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA), and longer-lasting, so-called "permanent fillers," such as polymethyl methacrylate microspheres (PMMA), highly purified forms of liquid silicone, and hydrogel polymers. PMID:19850193

  15. Injectable collagen implant--update.

    PubMed

    Castrow, F F; Krull, E A

    1983-12-01

    Injectable collagen implant (ICI), a new biomaterial reportedly useful for correction of scars and certain aging skin lines (wrinkles), was recently introduced. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this product. Data for this study were obtained from a survey which was sent to a group of cutaneous surgeons. They were asked about test site and treatment site reactions and about their satisfaction with ICI. The incidence of adverse reactions is low, and the severity of the reactions does not appear to be serious. The long-term benefit of ICI has not been established.

  16. Fuel injection device and method

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1986-02-04

    A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

  17. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  18. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  19. Microneedles for intradermal and transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tuan-Mahmood, Tuan-Mazlelaa; McCrudden, Maeliosa T.C.; Torrisi, Barbara M.; McAlister, Emma; Garland, Martin J; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2014-01-01

    The formidable barrier properties of the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum impose significant limitations for successful systemic delivery of a broad range of therapeutic molecules, particularly macromolecules and genetic material. Microneedle delivery has been proposed as a strategy to breach the SC barrier function in order to facilitate effective transport of molecules across the skin. This strategy involves the use of micron sized needles fabricated from different materials and using different geometries to create transient aqueous conduits across the skin. Microneedles in isolation, or in combination with other enhancing strategies, have been shown to dramatically enhance the skin permeability of numerous therapeutic molecules including biopharmaceuticals either in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo. Progress in the areas of microneedle design, development and manufacture have proven promising in terms of the potential use of this emerging delivery method in clinical applications such as insulin delivery, transcutaneous immunisations and cutaneous gene delivery. This review article focuses on recent and potential future developments in microneedle technologies. This will include the detailing of progress made in microneedle design, an exploration of the challenges faced in this field and potential forward strategies to embrace the exploitation of microneedle methodologies, while considering the inherent safety aspects of such therapeutic tools. PMID:23680534

  20. Dependence of injection locking of a TEA CO2 laser on intensity of injected radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, U. P.; Menzies, R. T.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the minimum required injected power to control the output frequency of a TEA CO2 laser are reported. A CW CO2 waveguide laser was used as the injection oscillator. Both the power and the frequency of the injected radiation were varied, while the TEA resonator cavity length was adjusted to match the frequency of the injected signal. Single-longitudinal mode (SLM) TEA laser radiation was produced for injected power levels which are several orders of magnitude below those previously reported. The ratio of SLM output power to injection power exceeded 10 to the 12th at the lowest levels of injected intensity.

  1. Compressor Stability Enhancement Using Discrete Tip Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Thorp, Scott A.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Bright, Michelle B.

    2001-01-01

    Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing small in tip-critical rotors. This process is examined in a transonic axial compressor rotor through experiments and time-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations. Measurements and simulations for discrete injection are presented for a range of injection rates and distributions of injectors around the annulus. The simulations indicate that tip injection increases stability by unloading the rotor tip and that increasing injection velocity improves the effectiveness of tip injection. For the tested rotor, experimental results demonstrate that at 70 percent speed the stalling flow coefficient can be reduced by 30 percent using an injected mass- flow equivalent to 1 percent of the annulus flow. At design speed, the stalling flow coefficient was reduced by 6 percent using an injected mass-fiow equivalent to 2 percent of the annulus flow. The experiments show that stability enhancement is related to the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip. For a given injected mass-flow, the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip is increased by injecting flow over discrete portions of the circumference as opposed to full-annular injection. The implications of these results on the design of recirculating casing treatments and other methods to enhance stability will be discussed.

  2. Maximum magnitude earthquakes induced by fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of numerous case histories of earthquake sequences induced by fluid injection at depth reveals that the maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the total volume of fluid injected. Similarly, the maximum seismic moment seems to have an upper bound proportional to the total volume of injected fluid. Activities involving fluid injection include (1) hydraulic fracturing of shale formations or coal seams to extract gas and oil, (2) disposal of wastewater from these gas and oil activities by injection into deep aquifers, and (3) the development of enhanced geothermal systems by injecting water into hot, low-permeability rock. Of these three operations, wastewater disposal is observed to be associated with the largest earthquakes, with maximum magnitudes sometimes exceeding 5. To estimate the maximum earthquake that could be induced by a given fluid injection project, the rock mass is assumed to be fully saturated, brittle, to respond to injection with a sequence of earthquakes localized to the region weakened by the pore pressure increase of the injection operation and to have a Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a b value of 1. If these assumptions correctly describe the circumstances of the largest earthquake, then the maximum seismic moment is limited to the volume of injected liquid times the modulus of rigidity. Observations from the available case histories of earthquakes induced by fluid injection are consistent with this bound on seismic moment. In view of the uncertainties in this analysis, however, this should not be regarded as an absolute physical limit.

  3. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Jones, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. Five published trials directly compare acetaminophen injection to drugs available in the United States. For management of pain in adults, acetaminophen injection was at least as effective as morphine injection in renal colic, oral ibuprofen after cesarean delivery, and oral acetaminophen after coronary artery bypass surgery. In children (3 to 16 years old), single-dose acetaminophen injection was similar to meperidine intramuscular (i.m.) for pain after tonsillectomy; readiness for discharge from the recovery room was shorter with acetaminophen injection (median 15 minutes) compared with meperidine i.m. (median 25 minutes), P = .005. In children (2 to 5 years old) postoperative adenotonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, the time to rescue analgesia was superior with high-dose acetaminophen rectal suppository (median 10 hours) compared with acetaminophen injection (median 7 hours), P = .01. One published trial demonstrated acetaminophen injection is noninferior to propacetamol injection for fever related to infection in pediatric patients. Dosing adjustments are not required when switching between oral and injectable acetaminophen formulations in adult and adolescent patients. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:21936636

  4. FDDI network test adaptor error injection circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckenrode, Thomas (Inventor); Stauffer, David R. (Inventor); Stempski, Rebecca (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for injecting errors into a FDDI token ring network is disclosed. The error injection scheme operates by fooling a FORMAC into thinking it sent a real frame of data. This is done by using two RAM buffers. The RAM buffer normally accessed by the RBC/DPC becomes a SHADOW RAM during error injection operation. A dummy frame is loaded into the shadow RAM in order to fool the FORMAC. This data is just like the data that would be used if sending a normal frame, with the restriction that it must be shorter than the error injection data. The other buffer, the error injection RAM, contains the error injection frame. The error injection data is sent out to the media by switching a multiplexor. When the FORMAC is done transmitting the data, the multiplexor is switched back to the normal mode. Thus, the FORMAC is unaware of what happened and the token ring remains operational.

  5. Anthropological perspectives on injections: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Reeler, A. V.

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative studies from developing countries have pointed to the widespread popularity of injections. In addition to their use by formal and informal providers and traditional healers, there is now increasing evidence of the use of injections and injection equipment by lay people. Epidemiological research links the large number of unsafe injections to serious bloodborne infections such as viral hepatitis B and C and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The present article examines the reasons behind the demand for injections by consumers and the administration of unnecessary or unsafe injections by different types of provider. Interventions aimed at reducing the risk of unsafe injections are discussed in relation to cultural and social factors as well as those factors associated with health systems. Suggestions are made for approaches to the design of such interventions. PMID:10686748

  6. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120). PMID:21521663

  7. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120).

  8. Prevalence and correlates of neck injection among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    RAFFUL, CLAUDIA; WAGNER, KARLA D.; WERB, DAN; GONZÁLEZ-ZÚÑIGA, PATRICIA E.; VERDUGO, SILVIA; RANGEL, GUDELIA; STRATHDEE, STEFFANIE A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Injecting drugs in the neck has been related to adverse health conditions such as jugular vein thrombosis, deep neck infections, aneurysm, haematomas, airway obstruction, vocal cord paralysis and wound botulism, among others. We identified prevalence and correlates of neck injection among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico. Design and Methods Beginning in 2011, PWID aged ≥18 years who injected drugs within the last month were recruited into a prospective cohort. At baseline and semi-annually, PWID completed interviewer-administered surveys soliciting data on drug-injecting practices. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of injecting in the neck as the most frequent injection site at a single visit. Results Of 380 PWID, 35.3% injected in the neck at least once in the past 6 months, among whom 71.6% reported it as their most common injection site, the most common injecting site after the arms (47%). Controlling for age, years injecting and injecting frequency, injecting heroin and methamphetamine two or more times per day and having sought injection assistance were associated with injecting in the neck [adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 2.12; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.27–3.53 and AOR: 2.65; 95% CI: 1.52–4.53 respectively]. Discussion and Conclusions Injecting in the neck was very common among PWID in Tijuana and was associated with polydrug use and seeking injection assistance. Tailoring harm reduction education interventions for individuals who provide injection assistance (‘hit doctors’) may allow for the dissemination of safe injecting knowledge to reduce injection-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:25867795

  9. Modeling injection well performance during deep-well injection of liquid wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, K. P.; Sharma, M. M.; Bryant, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Deep-well injection of municipal and industrial wastes, and liquid hazardous wastes is an important waste disposal practice worldwide. Performance of injection wells during the deep-well injection of liquid wastes and waste waters is critically dependent upon the physico-chemical properties of the waste, the operational parameters such as injection rates and pressures, as well as the hydrogeologic and geochemical character of the host formation. Development of theories and models that can predict the injection well performance as a function of these parameters is a vital research need. This paper presents the development and application of a well injectivity decline (WID) simulator, that can be used to model injection well performance during deep-well injection. Injectivity decline due to particulates in the injection fluid is modeled for various types of well completions. Results from the simulator are presented with an emphasis on the resulting well plugging and injectivity decline. The significant role played by injected wastewater quality, host formation properties, injection rate and pressure, well completion type, initial damage to the well/formation and the presence of gravel packs around the wellbore is discussed. The results quantitatively show that under typical injection conditions a high total suspended solids (TSS) concentration in the waste stream, low injection rate, low injection pressures, formation heterogeneity (layering), low porosity and permeability of the formation all contribute to a rapid decline in injection well performance. The simulator provides a tool for predicting well performance during waste injection as a function of the waste, formation and operational characteristics. Such simulations can be valuable during planning and operating injection wells to achieve and sustain satisfactory well performance.

  10. Effect of immunomodulation on the fate of tumor cells in the central nervous system and systemic organs of mice. Distribution of (/sup 125/I)5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled KHT tumor cells after left intracardial injection

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, F.K.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of systemic immunomodulation on tumor cell arrest and retention in the central nervous system was studied by following radioactively labeled tumor cells. KHT mouse sarcoma tumor cells were labeled in vitro with (/sup 125/I)IdUrd, and 1x10/sup 5/ tumor cells were injected into the left side of the hearts of syngeneic C3H mice. Experimental groups consisted of untreated normal mice, mice pretreated iv with Corynebacterium parvum, and mice chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii; in this model both groups of immunomodulated mice are protected from developing systemic metastatic tumor, but only Toxoplasma-infected mice have protection against metastatic brain tumor. At time intervals from 1 to 96 hours, groups of mice from each experimental group were killed, and the brain and other organs were monitored for radioactivity to determine the number of viable tumor cells that had been present at the time of death. Normal mice demonstrated significant retention of tumor cells in the brain and kidneys plus adrenals at 96 hours. By contrast, in both groups of immunomodulated mice tumor cells were rapidly eliminated from systemic organs, but tumor cells were significantly retained in the central nervous system even at 96 hours after tumor cell injections. The results indicated that generalized immunomodulation had more effect in elimination of tumor cells from systemic organs than from the brain and that the elimination of tumor cells from the brain in Toxoplasma-infected mice was a delayed phenomenon.

  11. Safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Gianpiero D; Neri, Queenie V; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Early follow-up studies of IVF children showed that the frequency of birth anomalies resembled those arising with natural conception. More detailed analyses confirmed these findings, reinforcing the concept of the preimplantation period as teratologically "safe." The use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to achieve fertilization introduced another variable.ICSI's safety has often been criticized because the fertilizing spermatozoon neither binds to the zona pellucida nor fuses with oolemma. Bypassing these physiologic steps together with the arbitrary selection of the spermatozoon has been reason for concern. Thus far, ICSI offspring undergoing adolescence and beyond has provided sufficient information to reassure these qualms. In fact, the health of the offspring generated through ICSI, once taken into consideration the gestational order, the age and the genetic makeup of the couples are generally reassuring.

  12. Fault Injection Techniques and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen; Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1997-01-01

    Dependability evaluation involves the study of failures and errors. The destructive nature of a crash and long error latency make it difficult to identify the causes of failures in the operational environment. It is particularly hard to recreate a failure scenario for a large, complex system. To identify and understand potential failures, we use an experiment-based approach for studying the dependability of a system. Such an approach is applied not only during the conception and design phases, but also during the prototype and operational phases. To take an experiment-based approach, we must first understand a system's architecture, structure, and behavior. Specifically, we need to know its tolerance for faults and failures, including its built-in detection and recovery mechanisms, and we need specific instruments and tools to inject faults, create failures or errors, and monitor their effects.

  13. Distinguishing among electron injection types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.

    1987-01-01

    Three types of electron injections taking place in the near-earth region of the magnetotail have been distinguished previously using SCATHA particle and field data. Defining characteristics are given here for each type of event, and the positions of the magnetosphere where they are expected to occur are discussed. These three event types can be difficult to distinguish in data sets that are more limited than the SCATHA set that carried instruments detecting magnetic fields and charged particles over an energy range from eVs to MeVs. It is suggested that determining the magnetospheric regions at which each of these event types occurs will considerably clarify the phenomenological description of substorms available for theoretical analysis.

  14. Injectable fillers: an American perspective.

    PubMed

    Curcio, N M; Parish, L C

    2009-06-01

    Since 1981, there has been a significant repertoire of United States Food and Drug Administrtion (FDA) approved fillers for both cosmetic rejuvenation and facial lipoatrophy. Currently available dermal fillers include bovine, human and porcine collagens, hyaluronic acids of animal and biosynthetic origin, poly-L-lactic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and polymethylmethacrylate. Many of these fillers were first available in Europe and Canada before their arrival in the United States (USA) and many of the complications known about these products have come from studies conducted both in the USA and abroad. Several of the fillers that are currently available abroad or are used in the USA off-label have been associated with significant complications. The authors review three of these fillers: liquid injectable silicone, DermaLive/DermaDeep, and Bio-Alcamid.

  15. Common rail fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Hilsbos, R.L.; Wieland, H.L.; Straub, R.D.; Teerman, R.F.; Timmer, R.C.

    1993-07-27

    A high-pressure pump is described for a fuel injection system having a fuel supply means for supplying fuel at a relatively constant pressure to the pump, the pump comprising: a pump body having a pumping chamber defined therein; a mechanically driven linearly reciprocating plunger disposed in the pumping chamber, the plunger having a head end and a tail end, the plunger being linearly reciprocatable over a stroke range between an extended position and a retracted position, the pumping chamber extending beyond the extended position of the plunger to define a head portion of the pumping chamber; plunger spring means for resiliently biasing the plunger to its retracted position; an inlet valve disposed in the pump body for admitting fuel to the pumping chamber within the stroke range of the head end of the plunger; inlet valve spring means for resiliently biasing the inlet valve to a closed position, the inlet valve being opened by a pressure differential when the head end of the plunger is retracted; an outlet valve disposed in the pump body for discharging fuel from the head portion of the pumping chamber; and outlet valve spring means for resiliently biasing the outlet valve to a closed position; the inlet valve being a ball valve; a piston, the pump body further defining therein a leakage accumulator chamber, the leakage accumulator chamber being slidably divided by the piston into an anterior portion and a posterior portion, the posterior portion being at substantially atmospheric pressure, the collector groove communicating with the anterior portion of the leakage accumulator chamber, recaptured fuel from the fuel injection nozzles also being communicated to the anterior portion of the accumulator chamber; and piston spring means for resiliently biasing the piston away from the posterior portion of the leakage accumulator chamber.

  16. Injectable biomaterials: a perspective on the next wave of injectable therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Spector, Myron; Lim, Teck Chuan

    2016-02-02

    We are experiencing a new wave of injectable therapeutics (namely/injectable biomaterials) to complement injectable drugs and injectable biologics, and to serve as the basis for injectable combinatorial therapeutics. Injectable biomaterials contribute to the treatment of the fluid-filled defects which often result from disease and injury, by providing the missing physical framework (i.e. the stroma). However, while injectable matrices may be necessary for the successful treatment of certain lesions, they will not likely be sufficient. Chemoattractants for select endogenous cells, or cells themselves, may need to be incorporated into the matrix prior to its injection to ensure the necessary cellular repopulation of the cavitary defect. These agents and others (drugs and biologics) delivered by the matrix represent the new category of injectable combinatorial therapeutics.

  17. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    DOE PAGES

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for amore » single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.« less

  18. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for a single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.

  19. Injection molding and debinding of micro gears fabricated by micro powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xin-lei; Yin, Hai-qing; Liu, Lin; Yi, Shan-jie; Qu, Xuan-hui

    2013-01-01

    Micro powder injection molding (μPIM) was investigated for possible mass production of micro-components at relatively low cost. However, scaling down to such a level produces challenges in injection molding and debinding. Micro gears were fabricated by μPIM from in-house feedstock. The effect of injection speed and injection pressure on the replication of the micro gear cavity was investigated. Solvent debinding and thermal debinding processes were discussed. The results show that micro gears can be successfully fabricated under the injection pressure of 70 MPa and the 60% injection speed. Either too low or too high injection speed can cause incomplete filling of micro gears. The same is the case with too low injection pressure. Too high injection pressure can bring cracks. Solvent debinding of micro gears was performed in a mixture of petroleum ether and ethanol. Subsequently, micro gears were successfully debound by a multistep heating schedule.

  20. Forum for Injection Techniques, India: The First Indian Recommendations for Best Practice in Insulin Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P.; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B.; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Kumar, K. M. Prasanna; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Shukla, Rishi; Sahay, Rakesh; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Wangnoo, Subhash K.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of diabetes have led to an increase in the number of injectable therapies, such as human insulin, insulin analogues, and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. The efficacy of injection therapy in diabetes depends on correct injection technique, among many other factors. Good injection technique is vital in achieving glycemic control and thus preventing complications of diabetes. From the patients’ and health-care providers’ perspective, it is essential to have guidelines to understand injections and injection techniques. The abridged version of the First Indian Insulin Injection technique guidelines developed by the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT) India presented here acknowledge good insulin injection techniques and provide evidence-based recommendations to assist diabetes care providers in improving their clinical practice. PMID:23226630

  1. Down-regulation of collagen arthritis after in vivo treatment with a syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody to a cross-reactive idiotope on collagen II auto-antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nordling, C; Holmdahl, R; Klareskog, L

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies previously shown to react with a cross-reactive idiotope of anti-collagen II auto-antibodies were used for in vivo treatment of DBA/1 mice receiving immunization with arthritogenic native rat collagen type II. Injection of 100 micrograms of the anti-idiotypic antibody 3 weeks before the collagen immunization resulted in a significant suppression of collagen arthritis, compared with mice treated with a monoclonal control antibody. The treatment with anti-idiotypic antibody 3 weeks before collagen immunization could also cause a marked down-regulation of the total serum levels of anti-collagen II antibodies. When the anti-idiotypic antibodies were administered near the time for induction of arthritis (2 days after collagen immunization) a significant effect was seen on the collagen arthritis, but not on the levels of anti-collagen antibody. As collagen-induced arthritis is a disease where both T- and B-cell mediated immunity are believed to play critical roles, the present effects of the in vivo anti-idiotype treatment on arthritis development could provide an interesting system for the study of idiotype regulation on both B- and T-cell arthritis-associated autoimmunity. PMID:2037311

  2. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1999-01-01

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  3. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1999-05-25

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube. 8 figs.

  4. Optical injection in semiconductor ring lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Coomans, W.; Beri, S.; Sande, G. Van der; Gelens, L.; Danckaert, J.

    2010-03-15

    We theoretically investigate optical injection in semiconductor ring lasers and disclose several dynamical regimes. Through numerical simulations and bifurcation continuation, two separate parameter regions in which two different injection-locked solutions coexist are revealed, in addition to a region in which a frequency-locked limit cycle coexists with an injection-locked solution. Finally, an antiphase chaotic regime without the involvement of any carrier dynamics is revealed. Parallels are drawn with the onset of chaos in the periodically forced Duffing oscillator.

  5. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  6. Injected Water Augments Cooling In Turboshaft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments in which water injected into compressor-bleed cooling air of aircraft turboshaft engine. Injection of water previously suggested as way to provide additional cooling needed to sustain operation at power levels higher than usual. Involves turbine-inlet temperatures high enough to shorten lives of first-stage high-pressure turbine blades. Latent heat of vaporization of injected water serves as additional heat sink to maintain blades at design operating temperatures during high-power operation.

  7. Fuel injection system for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, A.; Yoshioka, S.; Oda, H.; Tokushima, T.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a fuel injection system for an internal combustion engine having a crankshaft and a combustion chamber, the system comprising (a) an intake passage for introducing an intake gas into the combustion chamber and provided with an intake valve; (b) a fuel injection valve for injecting fuel into the intake passage in the vicinity of the combustion chamber; (c) operating condition detecting means for detecting the operating condition of the engine and outputting a signal corresponding to the thus detected operating condition; (d) fuel injection amount determining means which receives an output signal of the operating conditions detecting means, thereby determining the amount of fuel to be supplied to the combustion chamber, and outputs a signal corresponding to thus determined amount; (e) crankshaft angle detecting means for detecting the rotation angle of the crankshaft; (f) injection timing control means which receives signals from the fuel injection amount determining means and crankshaft angle detecting means, outputs a start signal for actuating the fuel injection valve and a termination signal for terminating the actuation of the fuel injection valve, and actuates the fuel injection valve for the duration between the start and termination signals, thereby supplying an amount of fuel determined by the fuel injection amount determining means; (g) the start and termination signals being set against the crankshaft angle so that the whole fuel injection from the injection valve to the intake passage under light load operation of the engine reaches the combustion chamber substantially in the latter half of the intake stroke before the intake valve is closed.

  8. Corrosion control in water injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, C.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Corrosion control in water injection systems encompasses a wide range of technologies, including chemicals (corrosion inhibitors, biocides, and oxygen scavengers); corrosion-resistant materials (metallic and nonmetallic); internal coatings and linings; mechanical removal of dissolved oxygen; velocity control; and prevention of oxygen entry and galvanic couples. This article reviews the way that these technologies are used in modern water-injection systems (both seawater and produced water) to provide an acceptable service life and high-quality injection water.

  9. Potential Risk Factors for Injecting Among Mexican American Non-Injecting Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Neaigus, Alan; Cepeda, Alice

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY This study examines potential risk factors for resuming and transitioning to injecting among a prospective cohort of 300 Mexican American non-injecting heroin users (NIUs) with distinct injecting histories (i.e., never vs. former injectors). Overall. findings revealed NIUs with an injecting history are more likely to be at greater risk for resuming injecting practices. Of interest, scoring high on acculturation decreased the risk of being a former injector. The present analysis supports previous research, and more importantly further identifies potential risk factors for injecting that are unique to the cultural and social context of the Mexican American community. PMID:18192204

  10. Polyacrylamide hydrogel injection for breast augmentation: Another injectable failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenxiang; Li, Shirong; Wang, Lingli; Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Jinping; Luo, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Increasing complications of polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) augmentation mammoplasty, such as chronic persistent infection, have recently caught the attention of both the medical field and the general public. Material/Methods A total of 96 patients with severe chronic infection following PAAG augmentation mammoplasty were treated in the present study including 63 cases with infection confined to the breast and 33 with systemic infection. Endoscopy and surgery were performed to completely remove the materials and clear the infected tissues followed by drug-irrigation and vacuum-assisted closure for several days. Results In patients with severe infection there were large amounts of PAAG, fibers and infiltration of numerous neutrophils and macrophages. The infection-inducing materials were extensively dispersed in the mammary and subcutaneous tissues, pectoral fascia and intermuscular space. In addition, there was scattered distribution of PAAG materials in the armpit, chest wall and abdominal wall, which were mixed with necrotic tissues and surrounded by lymphocytes, giant cells, macrophages and other inflammatory cells, forming chronic granulomatous and fibrous lesions. Infection was controlled following surgical intervention. No residual infectious foci or recurrent infections were noted among these patients. Although the severe infection did not result in mastectomy, patients had breast atrophy and various degrees of deformation. Conclusions Chronic infection following PAAG augmentation mammaplasty usually causes systemic infection and other devastating adverse reactions. This study confirms PAAG augmentation mammaplasty is another failed attempt. More attention should be paid to the injection of large doses of liquid filler. PMID:22648256

  11. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  12. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  13. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  14. Optical pure spin current injection in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Julien; Burkard, Guido

    2013-03-01

    Pure spin current injection by optical methods is investigated in single-layer and bilayer graphene within the tight-binding model, including bias and interlayer coupling effects. Interlayer coupling in bilayer graphene has a distinct qualitative effect on the polarization dependence of the spin current injection. In combination with interlayer coupling, which induces trigonal warping of the electronic bands, the bias voltage allows to control the warping at the Fermi surface. The resulting implications for the spin current injection are presented. Unlike the previously presented charge current injection [J. Rioux et al., PRB 83, 195406 (2011)], the effect presented here relies on a single monochromatic beam.

  15. Teriparatide (rDNA origin) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... fainting difficulty breathing nausea vomiting constipation lack of energy muscle weakness Teriparatide injection may cause other side ... lightheadedness and fainting on standing constipation lack of energy muscle weakness

  16. Injection molding ceramics to high green densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, J. A.; Williams, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The injection molding behavior of a concentrated suspension of Si powder in wax was studied. It was found that the injection molding behavior was a function of the processing techniques used to generate the powder. Dry ball-milled powders had the best molding behavior, while air classified and impact-milled powders demonstrated poorer injection moldability. The relative viscosity of these molding batches was studied as a function of powder properties: distribution shape, surface area, packing density, and particle morphology. The experimental behavior, in all cases, followed existing theories. The relative viscosity of an injection molding composition composed of dry ball-milled powders could be expressed using Farris' relation.

  17. Addendum 2: Forum for Injection Technique, India

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P.; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B.; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Rishi, Shukla; Sahay, Rakesh; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Wangnoo, Subhash K.

    2014-01-01

    The second addendum to the Forum for Injection Techniques (FIT), India recommendations, first published in 2012 and followed by an addendum in 2013, covers various important issues. It describes how the impact of the so-called non-modifiable factors, which influence the injection technique, can be modulated; provides fresh information on timing of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist injections, methods of minimizing pain during injections, amyloidosis, and factors that impact adherence to insulin therapy. The addendum also lists semantic changes made to keep the FIT recommendations updated.

  18. Fuel injector train with variable injection rate

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a fuel injection train for injecting fuel at a reduced rate during a portion of a fuel injection cycle. It comprises: a fuel injector having a plunger and plunger biasing means having a predetermined spring rate for biasing the plunger to control the injection rate of the injector, a rocker arm for applying force to the plunger in response to force applied thereto, cam assembly means, and a elongate push rod means mounted between the cam assembly means and the rocker means. The cam assembly means operating to apply force to the push rod means to cause the push rod means to apply force to the rocker arm.

  19. Border crossing to inject drugs in Mexico among injection drug users in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Tyson; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Garfein, Richard S; Patterson, Thomas L; Pollini, Robin A; Wagner, Karla D; Artamanova, Irina; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-04-01

    We examined correlates of ever injecting drugs in Mexico among residents of San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2010, injecting drug users (IDUs) in San Diego underwent an interviewer-administered survey. Logistic regression identified correlates of injection drug use in Mexico. Of 302 IDUs, 38% were Hispanic, 72% male and median age was 37; 27% ever injected in Mexico; 43% reported distributive syringe sharing there. Factors independently associated with ever injecting drugs in Mexico included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin, distributive syringe sharing at least half of the time, and transporting drugs over the last 6 months. One-quarter of IDUs reported ever injecting drugs in Mexico, among whom syringe sharing was common, suggesting possible mixing between IDUs in the Mexico-US border region. Prospective studies should monitor trends in cross-border drug use in light of recent Mexican drug policy reforms partially decriminalizing drug possession.

  20. Border crossing to inject drugs in Mexico among injection drug users in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Tyson; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Garfein, Richard S; Patterson, Thomas L; Pollini, Robin A; Wagner, Karla D; Artamanova, Irina; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-04-01

    We examined correlates of ever injecting drugs in Mexico among residents of San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2010, injecting drug users (IDUs) in San Diego underwent an interviewer-administered survey. Logistic regression identified correlates of injection drug use in Mexico. Of 302 IDUs, 38% were Hispanic, 72% male and median age was 37; 27% ever injected in Mexico; 43% reported distributive syringe sharing there. Factors independently associated with ever injecting drugs in Mexico included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin, distributive syringe sharing at least half of the time, and transporting drugs over the last 6 months. One-quarter of IDUs reported ever injecting drugs in Mexico, among whom syringe sharing was common, suggesting possible mixing between IDUs in the Mexico-US border region. Prospective studies should monitor trends in cross-border drug use in light of recent Mexican drug policy reforms partially decriminalizing drug possession. PMID:21442300