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Sample records for intraflagellar transport particle

  1. Electron-tomographic analysis of intraflagellar transport particle trains in situ.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Geimer, Stefan; Lanzavecchia, Salvatore; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Cantele, Francesca; Diener, Dennis R; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Lupetti, Pietro

    2009-10-05

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bidirectional movement of multipolypeptide particles between the ciliary membrane and the axonemal microtubules, and is required for the assembly, maintenance, and sensory function of cilia and flagella. In this paper, we present the first high-resolution ultrastructural analysis of trains of flagellar IFT particles, using transmission electron microscopy and electron-tomographic analysis of sections from flat-embedded Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. Using wild-type and mutant cells with defects in IFT, we identified two different types of IFT trains: long, narrow trains responsible for anterograde transport; and short, compact trains underlying retrograde IFT. Both types of trains have characteristic repeats and patterns that vary as one sections longitudinally through the trains of particles. The individual IFT particles are highly complex, bridged to each other and to the outer doublet microtubules, and are closely apposed to the inner surface of the flagellar membrane.

  2. Isolation of intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Caterina; Mitchell, Aaron; Leoncini, Roberto; Rosenbaum, Joel; Lupetti, Pietro

    2013-08-01

    The intraflagellar transport (IFT) system was first identified in situ by electron microscopy in thin sections of plastic-embedded flagella as linear arrays of electrondense particles, located between the B tubules of the outer doublets and the flagellar membrane. These arrays of particles are referred to as IFT trains. Upon membrane rupture, IFT trains are thought to easily dissociate to yield soluble IFT particles, which are commonly purified through sucrose gradients as ∼16-17S complexes. The latters easily dissociate into two subcomplexes, named A and B. We report here the isolation, visualization, and identification by immunolabeling of flexible strings of IFT particles, which are structurally similar to in situ IFT trains and appear to be formed by both complex A and complex B polypeptides. Moreover, the particles forming isolated IFT trains are structurally similar to the individual particles found in the ∼17S gradient peak. Our results provide the first direct evidence that ∼17S particles do indeed compose the IFT trains. The paper also represents the first isolation of the IFT trains, and opens new possibilities for higher resolution studies on their structure and how particles are attached to each other to form the particle trains.

  3. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport-independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein-tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia.

  4. Regulation of cilium length and intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Broekhuis, Joost R; Leong, Weng Y; Jansen, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are highly conserved sensory organelles that extend from the surface of almost all vertebrate cells. The importance of cilia is evident from their involvement in many diseases, called ciliopathies. Primary cilia contain a microtubular axoneme that is used as a railway for transport of both structural components and signaling proteins. This transport machinery is called intraflagellar transport (IFT). Cilia are dynamic organelles whose presence on the cell surface, morphology, length and function are highly regulated. It is clear that the IFT machinery plays an important role in this regulation. However, it is not clear how, for example environmental cues or cell fate decisions are relayed to modulate IFT and cilium morphology or function. This chapter presents an overview of molecules that have been shown to regulate cilium length and IFT. Several examples where signaling modulates IFT and cilium function are used to discuss the importance of these systems for the cell and for understanding of the etiology of ciliopathies.

  5. The intraflagellar transport protein IFT57 is required for cilia maintenance and regulates IFT-particle-kinesin-II dissociation in vertebrate photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Krock, Bryan L; Perkins, Brian D

    2008-06-01

    Defects in protein transport within vertebrate photoreceptors can result in photoreceptor degeneration. In developing and mature photoreceptors, proteins targeted to the outer segment are transported through the connecting cilium via the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). In studies of vertebrate IFT, mutations in any component of the IFT particle typically abolish ciliogenesis, suggesting that IFT proteins are equally required for IFT. To determine whether photoreceptor outer segment formation depends equally on individual IFT proteins, we compared the retinal phenotypes of IFT57 and IFT88 mutant zebrafish. IFT88 mutants failed to form outer segments, whereas IFT57 mutants formed short outer segments with reduced amounts of opsin. Our phenotypic analysis revealed that IFT57 is not essential for IFT, but is required for efficient IFT. In co-immunoprecipitation experiments from whole-animal extracts, we determined that kinesin II remained associated with the IFT particle in the absence of IFT57, but IFT20 did not. Additionally, kinesin II did not exhibit ATP-dependent dissociation from the IFT particle in IFT57 mutants. We conclude that IFT20 requires IFT57 to associate with the IFT particle and that IFT57 and/or IFT20 mediate kinesin II dissociation.

  6. Intraflagellar transport: a new player at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Paccani, Silvia Rossi; Rosenbaum, Joel; Baldari, Cosima T

    2011-04-01

    The assembly and maintenance of primary cilia, which orchestrate signaling pathways centrally implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration, are ensured by multimeric protein particles in a process known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). It has recently been demonstrated that a number of IFT components are expressed in hematopoietic cells, which have no cilia. Here, we summarize data for an unexpected role of IFT proteins in immune synapse assembly and intracellular membrane trafficking in T lymphocytes, and discuss the hypothesis that the immune synapse could represent the functional homolog of the primary cilium in these cells.

  7. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) during assembly and disassembly of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William

    2005-08-15

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of particles along flagellar microtubules is required for the assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. In Chlamydomonas, anterograde and retrograde particles viewed by light microscopy average 0.12-microm and 0.06-microm diameter, respectively. Examination of IFT particle structure in growing flagella by electron microscopy revealed similar size aggregates composed of small particles linked to each other and to the membrane and microtubules. To determine the relationship between the number of particles and flagellar length, the rate and frequency of IFT particle movement was measured in nongrowing, growing, and shortening flagella. In all flagella, anterograde and retrograde IFT averaged 1.9 microm/s and 2.7 microm/s, respectively, but retrograde IFT was significantly slower in flagella shorter than 4 mum. The number of flagellar IFT particles was not fixed, but depended on flagellar length. Pauses in IFT particle entry into flagella suggest the presence of a periodic "gate" that permits up to 4 particles/s to enter a flagellum.

  8. The Role of Intraflagellar Transport in the Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium.

    PubMed

    Taub, Daniel G; Liu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The photoreceptor is a complex specialized cell in which a major component responsible for visual transduction is the photoreceptor sensory cilium (PSC). Building and maintenance of the PSC requires the transport of large proteins along microtubules that extend from the inner segments to the outer segments. A key process, termed intraflagellar transport (IFT), has been recognized as an essential phenomenon for photoreceptor development and maintenance, and exciting new studies have highlighted its importance in retinal and cilia related diseases. This review focuses on the important roles of IFT players, including motor proteins, IFT proteins, and photoreceptor-specific cargos in photoreceptor sensory cilium. In addition, specific IFT components that are involved in inherited human diseases are discussed.

  9. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) role in ciliary assembly, resorption and signalling.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2008-01-01

    Cilia and flagella have attracted tremendous attention in recent years as research demonstrated crucial roles for these organelles in coordinating a number of physiologically and developmentally important signaling pathways, including the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) alpha, Sonic hedgehog, polycystin, and Wnt pathways. In addition, the realization that defective assembly or function of cilia can cause a plethora of diseases and developmental defects ("ciliopathies") has increased focus on the mechanisms by which these antenna-like, microtubular structures assemble. Ciliogenesis is a complex, multistep process that is tightly coordinated with cell cycle progression and differentiation. The ciliary axoneme is extended from a modified centriole, the basal body, which migrates to and docks onto the apical plasma membrane early in ciliogenesis as cells enter growth arrest. The ciliary axoneme is elongated via intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional transport system that tracks along the polarized microtubules of the axoneme, and which is required for assembly of almost all cilia and flagella. Here, we provide an overview of ciliogenesis with particular emphasis on the molecular mechanisms and functions of IFT. In addition to a general, up-to-date description of IFT, we discuss mechanisms by which proteins are selectively targeted to the ciliary compartment, with special focus on the ciliary transition zone. Finally, we briefly review the role of IFT in cilia-mediated signaling, including how IFT is directly involved in moving signaling moieties into and out of the ciliary compartment.

  10. Unique spatiotemporal requirements for intraflagellar transport genes during forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Cionni, Megan; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary cilia are organelles extended from virtually all cells and are required for the proper regulation of a number of canonical developmental pathways. The role in cortical development of proteins important for ciliary form and function is a relatively understudied area. Here we have taken a genetic approach to define the role in forebrain development of three intraflagellar transport proteins known to be important for primary cilia function. We have genetically ablated Kif3a, Ift88, and Ttc21b in a series of specific spatiotemporal domains. The resulting phenotypes allow us to draw several conclusions. First, we conclude that the Ttc21b cortical phenotype is not due to the activity of Ttc21b within the brain itself. Secondly, some of the most striking phenotypes are from ablations in the neural crest cells and the adjacent surface ectoderm indicating that cilia transduce critical tissue—tissue interactions in the developing embryonic head. Finally, we note striking differences in phenotypes from ablations only one embryonic day apart, indicating very discrete spatiotemporal requirements for these three genes in cortical development. PMID:28291836

  11. The ciliopathy-associated CPLANE proteins direct basal body recruitment of intraflagellar transport machinery

    PubMed Central

    Toriyama, Michinori; Lee, Chanjae; Taylor, S. Paige; Duran, Ivan; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bruel, Ange-Line; Tabler, Jacqueline M.; Drew, Kevin; Kelley, Marcus R.; Kim, Sukyoung; Park, Tae Joo; Braun, Daniella; Pierquin, Ghislaine; Biver, Armand; Wagner, Kerstin; Malfroot, Anne; Panigrahi, Inusha; Franco, Brunella; Al-lami, Hadeel Adel; Yeung, Yvonne; Choi, Yeon Ja; Duffourd, Yannis; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Karen J.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Krakow, Deborah; Jackson, Peter K.; Wallingford, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cilia use microtubule-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) to organize intercellular signaling. The ciliopathies are a spectrum of human disease resulting from defects in cilia structure or function. Mechanisms regulating assembly of ciliary multiprotein complexes and their transport to the base of cilia remain largely unknown. Combine proteomics, in vivo imaging, and genetic analysis of proteins linked to planar cell polarity (Inturned, Fuzzy, WDPCP), we identified and characterized a new genetic module, which we term CPLANE (ciliogenesis and planar polarity effector) and an extensive associated protein network. CPLANE proteins physically and functionally interact with the poorly understood ciliopathy protein Jbts17 at basal bodies, where they act to recruit a specific subset of IFT-A proteins. In the absence of CPLANE, defective IFT-A particles enter the axoneme, and IFT-B trafficking is severely perturbed. Accordingly, mutation of CPLANE genes elicits specific ciliopathy phenotypes in mouse models and is associated with novel ciliopathies in human patients. PMID:27158779

  12. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) cargo: IFT transports flagellar precursors to the tip and turnover products to the cell body.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongmin; Diener, Dennis R; Geimer, Stefan; Cole, Douglas G; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2004-01-19

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bidirectional movement of multisubunit protein particles along axonemal microtubules and is required for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. One posited role of IFT is to transport flagellar precursors to the flagellar tip for assembly. Here, we examine radial spokes, axonemal subunits consisting of 22 polypeptides, as potential cargo for IFT. Radial spokes were found to be partially assembled in the cell body, before being transported to the flagellar tip by anterograde IFT. Fully assembled radial spokes, detached from axonemal microtubules during flagellar breakdown or turnover, are removed from flagella by retrograde IFT. Interactions between IFT particles, motors, radial spokes, and other axonemal proteins were verified by coimmunoprecipitation of these proteins from the soluble fraction of Chlamydomonas flagella. These studies indicate that one of the main roles of IFT in flagellar assembly and maintenance is to transport axonemal proteins in and out of the flagellum.

  13. Functional exploration of the IFT-A complex in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Zhu, Xin; Wang, Limei; Liang, Yinwen; Feng, Qianqian

    2017-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles or trains are composed of IFT-A and IFT-B complexes. To assess the working mechanism of the IFT-A complex in IFT and ciliogenesis, we have analyzed ift43 mutants of Chlamydomnonas in conjunction with mutants of the other IFT-A subunits. An ift43 null mutant or a mutant with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain has no or short flagella. The mutants accumulate not only IFT-B but also IFT-Ain the short flagella, which is in contrast to an ift140 null mutant. The IFT43 conserved domain is necessary and sufficient for the function of IFT43. IFT43 directly interacts with IFT121 and loss of IFT43 results in instability of IFT-A. A construct with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain is sufficient to rescue the instability phenotype of IFT-A, but results in diminishing of IFT-A at the peri-basal body region. We have further provided evidence for the direct interactions within the IFT-A complex and shown that the integrity of IFT-A is important for its stability and cellular localization. Finally, we show that both IFT43 and IFT140 are involved in mobilizing ciliary precursors from the cytoplasmic pool during flagellar regeneration, suggesting a novel role of IFT-A in transporting ciliary components in the cytoplasm to the peri-basal body region. PMID:28207750

  14. Functional exploration of the IFT-A complex in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zhu, Xin; Wang, Limei; Liang, Yinwen; Feng, Qianqian; Pan, Junmin

    2017-02-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles or trains are composed of IFT-A and IFT-B complexes. To assess the working mechanism of the IFT-A complex in IFT and ciliogenesis, we have analyzed ift43 mutants of Chlamydomnonas in conjunction with mutants of the other IFT-A subunits. An ift43 null mutant or a mutant with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain has no or short flagella. The mutants accumulate not only IFT-B but also IFT-Ain the short flagella, which is in contrast to an ift140 null mutant. The IFT43 conserved domain is necessary and sufficient for the function of IFT43. IFT43 directly interacts with IFT121 and loss of IFT43 results in instability of IFT-A. A construct with a partial deletion of the IFT43 conserved domain is sufficient to rescue the instability phenotype of IFT-A, but results in diminishing of IFT-A at the peri-basal body region. We have further provided evidence for the direct interactions within the IFT-A complex and shown that the integrity of IFT-A is important for its stability and cellular localization. Finally, we show that both IFT43 and IFT140 are involved in mobilizing ciliary precursors from the cytoplasmic pool during flagellar regeneration, suggesting a novel role of IFT-A in transporting ciliary components in the cytoplasm to the peri-basal body region.

  15. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; Gilberti, Renée M; Hom, Erik F Y; King, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle-like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly.

  16. IFT57 stabilizes the assembled intraflagellar transport complex and mediates transport of motility-related flagellar cargo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Hernandez, Daniel; Hernandez, Catherine; Ding, Zhaolan; Nan, Beiyan; Aufderheide, Karl; Qin, Hongmin

    2017-03-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential for the assembly and maintenance of flagella and cilia. Recent biochemical studies have shown that IFT complex B (IFT-B) is comprised of two subcomplexes, IFT-B1 and IFT-B2. The IFT-B2 subunit IFT57 lies at the interface between IFT-B1 and IFT-B2. Here, using a Chlamydomonasreinhardtii mutant for IFT57, we tested whether IFT57 is required for IFT-B complex assembly by bridging IFT-B1 and IFT-B2 together. In the ift57-1 mutant, levels of IFT57 and other IFT-B proteins were greatly reduced at the whole-cell level. However, strikingly, in the protease-free flagellar compartment, while the level of IFT57 was reduced, the levels of other IFT particle proteins were not concomitantly reduced but were present at the wild-type level. The IFT movement of the IFT57-deficient IFT particles was also unchanged. Moreover, IFT57 depletion disrupted the flagellar waveform, leading to cell swimming defects. Analysis of the mutant flagellar protein composition showed that certain axonemal proteins were altered. Taken together, these findings suggest that IFT57 does not play an essential structural role in the IFT particle complex but rather functions to prevent it from degradation. Additionally, IFT57 is involved in transporting specific motility-related proteins.

  17. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  18. A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Trevor J.; Snedeker, John; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, cellular projections that function to transduce molecular signals during development. Loss of functional primary cilia has a particularly profound effect on the developing craniofacial complex, causing several anomalies including craniosynostosis, micrognathia, midfacial dysplasia, cleft lip/palate and oral/dental defects. Development of the craniofacial complex is an intricate process that requires interactions between several different tissues including neural crest cells, neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm. To understand the tissue-specific requirements for primary cilia during craniofacial development we conditionally deleted three separate intraflagellar transport genes, Kif3a, Ift88 and Ttc21b with three distinct drivers, Wnt1-Cre, Crect and AP2-Cre which drive recombination in neural crest, surface ectoderm alone, and neural crest, surface ectoderm and neuroectoderm, respectively. We found that tissue-specific conditional loss of ciliary genes with different functions produces profoundly different facial phenotypes. Furthermore, analysis of basic cellular behaviors in these mutants suggests that loss of primary cilia in a distinct tissue has unique effects on development of adjacent tissues. Together, these data suggest specific spatiotemporal roles for intraflagellar transport genes and the primary cilium during craniofacial development. PMID:28346501

  19. TTC26/DYF13 is an intraflagellar transport protein required for transport of motility-related proteins into flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ide, Takahiro; Yagi, Toshiki; Jiang, Xue; Hirono, Masafumi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Wemmer, Kimberly A; Stainier, Didier Yr; Qin, Hongmin; Kamiya, Ritsu; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly conserved mechanism involving more than 20 IFT proteins. However, the functions of individual IFT proteins are mostly unclear. To help address this issue, we focused on a putative IFT protein TTC26/DYF13. Using live imaging and biochemical approaches we show that TTC26/DYF13 is an IFT complex B protein in mammalian cells and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knockdown of TTC26/DYF13 in zebrafish embryos or mutation of TTC26/DYF13 in C. reinhardtii, produced short cilia with abnormal motility. Surprisingly, IFT particle assembly and speed were normal in dyf13 mutant flagella, unlike in other IFT complex B mutants. Proteomic and biochemical analyses indicated a particular set of proteins involved in motility was specifically depleted in the dyf13 mutant. These results support the concept that different IFT proteins are responsible for different cargo subsets, providing a possible explanation for the complexity of the IFT machinery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01566.001.

  20. Microtubule doublets are double-track railways for intraflagellar transport trains.

    PubMed

    Stepanek, Ludek; Pigino, Gaia

    2016-05-06

    The cilium is a large macromolecular machine that is vital for motility, signaling, and sensing in most eukaryotic cells. Its conserved core structure, the axoneme, contains nine microtubule doublets, each comprising a full A-microtubule and an incomplete B-microtubule. However, thus far, the function of this doublet geometry has not been understood. We developed a time-resolved correlative fluorescence and three-dimensional electron microscopy approach to investigate the dynamics of intraflagellar transport (IFT) trains, which carry ciliary building blocks along microtubules during the assembly and disassembly of the cilium. Using this method, we showed that each microtubule doublet is used as a bidirectional double-track railway: Anterograde IFT trains move along B-microtubules, and retrograde trains move along A-microtubules. Thus, the microtubule doublet geometry provides direction-specific rails to coordinate bidirectional transport of ciliary components.

  1. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  2. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes.

  3. The GTPase IFT27 is involved in both anterograde and retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Huet, Diego; Blisnick, Thierry; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-04-24

    The construction of cilia and flagella depends on intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional movement of two protein complexes (IFT-A and IFT-B) driven by specific kinesin and dynein motors. IFT-B and kinesin are associated to anterograde transport whereas IFT-A and dynein participate to retrograde transport. Surprisingly, the small GTPase IFT27, a member of the IFT-B complex, turns out to be essential for retrograde cargo transport in Trypanosoma brucei. We reveal that this is due to failure to import both the IFT-A complex and the IFT dynein into the flagellar compartment. To get further molecular insight about the role of IFT27, GDP- or GTP-locked versions were expressed in presence or absence of endogenous IFT27. The GDP-locked version is unable to enter the flagellum and to interact with other IFT-B proteins and its sole expression prevents flagellum formation. These findings demonstrate that a GTPase-competent IFT27 is required for association to the IFT complex and that IFT27 plays a role in the cargo loading of the retrograde transport machinery.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02419.001.

  4. Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia.

    PubMed

    Mijalkovic, Jona; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2016-01-01

    Inside the cell, vital processes such as cell division and intracellular transport are driven by the concerted action of different molecular motor proteins. In C. elegans chemosensory cilia, 2 kinesin-2 family motor proteins, kinesin-II and OSM-3, team up to drive intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the anterograde direction, from base to tip, whereas IFT dynein hitchhikes toward the tip and subsequently drives IFT in the opposite, retrograde direction, thereby recycling both kinesins. While it is evident that at least a retrograde and an anterograde motor are necessary to drive IFT, it has remained puzzling why 2 same-polarity kinesins are employed. Recently, we addressed this question by combining advanced genome-engineering tools with ultrasensitive, quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study IFT with single-molecule sensitivity.(1,2) Using this combination of approaches, we uncovered a differentiation in kinesin-2 function, in which the slower kinesin-II operates as an 'importer', loading IFT trains into the cilium before gradually handing them over to the faster OSM-3. OSM-3 subsequently acts as a long-range 'transporter', driving the IFT trains toward the tip. The two kinesin-2 motors combine their unique motility properties to achieve something neither motor can achieve on its own; that is to optimize the amount of cargo inside the cilium. In this commentary, we provide detailed insight into the rationale behind our research approach and comment on our recent findings. Moreover, we discuss the role of IFT dynein and provide an outlook on future studies.

  5. IFT-81 and IFT-74 are required for intraflagellar transport in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Katsura, Isao; Mitani, Shohei

    2007-05-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential machinery for biogenesis and maintenance of cilia in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. A large number of polypeptides are known to be involved in IFT, but the physiological role of each component is not fully elucidated. Here, we identified a C. elegans orthologue of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii IFT component, IFT-81, and found that its loss-of-function mutants show an unusual behavioral property and small body size. IFT-81 is expressed in sensory neurons, and localized at the base of cilia. The similar phenotypes with ift-81 mutants were also observed in several IFT mutants, suggesting these defects are caused by inability of IFT. We also demonstrated that IFT-81 interacts and co-localizes with IFT-74, which is another putative component of IFT. The ift-74 loss-of-function mutants showed phenocopies with ift-81 mutants, suggesting IFT-81 and IFT-74 play comparable functions. Moreover, ift-81 and ift-74 mutants similarly exhibited weak anomalies in cilia formation and obvious disruptions of transport in mature cilia. Thus, we conclude that IFT-81 and IFT-74 coordinately act in IFT in C. elegans sensory cilia.

  6. Intraflagellar transport is required for polarized recycling of the TCR/CD3 complex to the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Paccani, Silvia Rossi; Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Giacomello, Emiliana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Pazour, Gregory J; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Baldari, Cosima T

    2009-11-01

    Most eukaryotic cells have a primary cilium which functions as a sensory organelle. Cilia are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process mediated by multimeric IFT particles and molecular motors. Here we show that lymphoid and myeloid cells, which lack primary cilia, express IFT proteins. IFT20, an IFT component essential for ciliary assembly, was found to colocalize with both the microtubule organizing centre (MTOC) and Golgi and post-Golgi compartments in T-lymphocytes. In antigen-specific conjugates, IFT20 translocated to the immune synapse. IFT20 knockdown resulted in impaired T-cell receptor/CD3 (TCR/CD3) clustering and signalling at the immune synapse, due to defective polarized recycling. Moreover, IFT20 was required for the inducible assembly of a complex with other IFT components (IFT57 and IFT88) and the TCR. The results identify IFT20 as a new regulator of immune synapse assembly in T cells and provide the first evidence to implicate IFT in membrane trafficking in cells lacking primary cilia, thereby introducing a new perspective on IFT function beyond its role in ciliogenesis.

  7. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Hom, Erik F. Y.; King, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle–like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly. PMID:23864713

  8. KDM3A coordinates actin dynamics with intraflagellar transport to regulate cilia stability.

    PubMed

    Yeyati, Patricia L; Schiller, Rachel; Mali, Girish; Kasioulis, Ioannis; Kawamura, Akane; Adams, Ian R; Playfoot, Christopher; Gilbert, Nick; van Heyningen, Veronica; Wills, Jimi; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Finch, Andrew; Sakai, Juro; Schofield, Christopher J; Jackson, Ian J; Mill, Pleasantine

    2017-02-28

    Cilia assembly and disassembly are coupled to actin dynamics, ensuring a coherent cellular response during environmental change. How these processes are integrated remains undefined. The histone lysine demethylase KDM3A plays important roles in organismal homeostasis. Loss-of-function mouse models of Kdm3a phenocopy features associated with human ciliopathies, whereas human somatic mutations correlate with poor cancer prognosis. We demonstrate that absence of KDM3A facilitates ciliogenesis, but these resulting cilia have an abnormally wide range of axonemal lengths, delaying disassembly and accumulating intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. KDM3A plays a dual role by regulating actin gene expression and binding to the actin cytoskeleton, creating a responsive "actin gate" that involves ARP2/3 activity and IFT. Promoting actin filament formation rescues KDM3A mutant ciliary defects. Conversely, the simultaneous depolymerization of actin networks and IFT overexpression mimics the abnormal ciliary traits of KDM3A mutants. KDM3A is thus a negative regulator of ciliogenesis required for the controlled recruitment of IFT proteins into cilia through the modulation of actin dynamics.

  9. Specific recycling receptors are targeted to the immune synapse by the intraflagellar transport system.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Masi, Giulia; Onnis, Anna; Galgano, Donatella; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Pazour, Gregory J; Baldari, Cosima T

    2014-05-01

    T cell activation requires sustained signaling at the immune synapse, a specialized interface with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) that assembles following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound peptide. Central to sustained signaling is the continuous recruitment of TCRs to the immune synapse. These TCRs are partly mobilized from an endosomal pool by polarized recycling. We have identified IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, as a central regulator of TCR recycling to the immune synapse. Here, we have investigated the interplay of IFT20 with the Rab GTPase network that controls recycling. We found that IFT20 forms a complex with Rab5 and the TCR on early endosomes. IFT20 knockdown (IFT20KD) resulted in a block in the recycling pathway, leading to a build-up of recycling TCRs in Rab5(+) endosomes. Recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), but not of CXCR4, was disrupted by IFT20 deficiency. The IFT components IFT52 and IFT57 were found to act together with IFT20 to regulate TCR and TfR recycling. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms that control TCR recycling and immune synapse assembly, and underscore the trafficking-related function of the IFT system beyond ciliogenesis.

  10. KDM3A coordinates actin dynamics with intraflagellar transport to regulate cilia stability

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Rachel; Kawamura, Akane; Gilbert, Nick; Wills, Jimi; von Kriegsheim, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Cilia assembly and disassembly are coupled to actin dynamics, ensuring a coherent cellular response during environmental change. How these processes are integrated remains undefined. The histone lysine demethylase KDM3A plays important roles in organismal homeostasis. Loss-of-function mouse models of Kdm3a phenocopy features associated with human ciliopathies, whereas human somatic mutations correlate with poor cancer prognosis. We demonstrate that absence of KDM3A facilitates ciliogenesis, but these resulting cilia have an abnormally wide range of axonemal lengths, delaying disassembly and accumulating intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. KDM3A plays a dual role by regulating actin gene expression and binding to the actin cytoskeleton, creating a responsive “actin gate” that involves ARP2/3 activity and IFT. Promoting actin filament formation rescues KDM3A mutant ciliary defects. Conversely, the simultaneous depolymerization of actin networks and IFT overexpression mimics the abnormal ciliary traits of KDM3A mutants. KDM3A is thus a negative regulator of ciliogenesis required for the controlled recruitment of IFT proteins into cilia through the modulation of actin dynamics. PMID:28246120

  11. Intraflagellar transport protein IFT20 is essential for male fertility and spermiogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Ling; Teves, Maria E.; Liu, Hong; Strauss, Jerome F.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Foster, James A.; Hess, Rex A.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a conserved mechanism believed to be essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. However, little is known about its role in mammalian sperm flagella formation. To fill this gap, we disrupted the Ift20 gene in male germ cells. Homozygous mutant mice were infertile, with significantly reduced sperm counts and motility. In addition, abnormally shaped, elongating spermatid heads and bulbous, round spermatids were found in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules. Electron microscopy revealed increased cytoplasmic vesicles, fiber-like structures, abnormal accumulation of mitochondria, and a decrease in mature lysosomes. The few developed sperm had disrupted axonemes, and some retained cytoplasmic lobe components on the flagella. ODF2 and SPAG16L, two sperm flagella proteins, failed to be incorporated into sperm tails of the mutant mice, and in the germ cells, both were assembled into complexes with lighter density in the absence of IFT20. Disrupting IFT20 did not significantly change expression levels of IFT88, a component of the IFT-B complex, and IFT140, a component of the IFT-A complex. Even though the expression level of an autophagy core protein that associates with IFT20, ATG16, was reduced in the testis of the Ift20 mutant mice, expression levels of other major autophagy markers, including LC3 and ubiquitin, were not changed. Our studies suggest that IFT20 is essential for male fertility and spermiogenesis in mice, and its major function is to transport cargo proteins for sperm flagella formation. It also appears to be involved in removing excess cytoplasmic components. PMID:27682589

  12. Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mijalkovic, Jona; Prevo, Bram; Peterman, Erwin J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inside the cell, vital processes such as cell division and intracellular transport are driven by the concerted action of different molecular motor proteins. In C. elegans chemosensory cilia, 2 kinesin-2 family motor proteins, kinesin-II and OSM-3, team up to drive intraflagellar transport (IFT) in the anterograde direction, from base to tip, whereas IFT dynein hitchhikes toward the tip and subsequently drives IFT in the opposite, retrograde direction, thereby recycling both kinesins. While it is evident that at least a retrograde and an anterograde motor are necessary to drive IFT, it has remained puzzling why 2 same-polarity kinesins are employed. Recently, we addressed this question by combining advanced genome-engineering tools with ultrasensitive, quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study IFT with single-molecule sensitivity.1,2 Using this combination of approaches, we uncovered a differentiation in kinesin-2 function, in which the slower kinesin-II operates as an ‘importer’, loading IFT trains into the cilium before gradually handing them over to the faster OSM-3. OSM-3 subsequently acts as a long-range ‘transporter’, driving the IFT trains toward the tip. The two kinesin-2 motors combine their unique motility properties to achieve something neither motor can achieve on its own; that is to optimize the amount of cargo inside the cilium. In this commentary, we provide detailed insight into the rationale behind our research approach and comment on our recent findings. Moreover, we discuss the role of IFT dynein and provide an outlook on future studies. PMID:27384150

  13. Chibby functions to preserve normal ciliary morphology through the regulation of intraflagellar transport in airway ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Saul S; Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Airway cilia provide the coordinated motive force for mucociliary transport, which prevents the accumulation of mucus, debris, pollutants, and bacteria in our respiratory tracts. As airway cilia are constantly exposed to the environment and, hence, are an integral component of the pathogenesis of several congenital and chronic pulmonary disorders, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that control ciliated cell differentiation and ciliogenesis. We have previously reported that loss of the basal body protein Chibby (Cby) results in chronic upper airway infection in mice due to a significant reduction in the number of airway cilia. In the present work, we demonstrate that Cby is required for normal ciliary structure and proper distribution of proteins involved in the bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which consists of 2 distinct sub-complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, and is essential for ciliary biogenesis and maintenance. In fully differentiated ciliated cells, abnormal paddle-like cilia with dilated ciliary tips are observed in Cby-/- airways and primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). In addition, IFT88, an IFT-B sub-complex protein, robustly accumulates within the dilated tips of both multicilia in Cby-/- MTECs and primary cilia in Cby-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, we show that only IFT-B components, including IFT20 and IFT57, but not IFT-A and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins, amass with IFT88 in these distended tips in Cby-/- ciliated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Cby plays a role in the proper distribution of IFT particles to preserve normal ciliary morphology in airway ciliated cells.

  14. The intraflagellar transport dynein complex of trypanosomes is made of a heterodimer of dynein heavy chains and of light and intermediate chains of distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Blisnick, Thierry; Buisson, Johanna; Absalon, Sabrina; Marie, Alexandra; Cayet, Nadège; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Cilia and flagella are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT) of protein complexes that bring tubulin and other precursors to the incorporation site at their distal tip. Anterograde transport is driven by kinesin, whereas retrograde transport is ensured by a specific dynein. In the protist Trypanosoma brucei, two distinct genes encode fairly different dynein heavy chains (DHCs; ∼40% identity) termed DHC2.1 and DHC2.2, which form a heterodimer and are both essential for retrograde IFT. The stability of each heavy chain relies on the presence of a dynein light intermediate chain (DLI1; also known as XBX-1/D1bLIC). The presence of both heavy chains and of DLI1 at the base of the flagellum depends on the intermediate dynein chain DIC5 (FAP133/WDR34). In the IFT140(RNAi) mutant, an IFT-A protein essential for retrograde transport, the IFT dynein components are found at high concentration at the flagellar base but fail to penetrate the flagellar compartment. We propose a model by which the IFT dynein particle is assembled in the cytoplasm, reaches the base of the flagellum, and associates with the IFT machinery in a manner dependent on the IFT-A complex.

  15. Intraflagellar Transport Protein 172 is essential for primary cilia formation and plays a vital role in patterning the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorivodsky, Marat; Mukhopadhyay, Mahua; Wilsch-Braeuninger, Michaela; Phillips, Matthew; Teufel, Andreas; Kim, Changmee; Malik, Nasir; Huttner, Wieland; Westphal, Heiner

    2008-01-01

    IFT172, also known as Selective Lim-domain Binding protein (SLB), is a component of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex. In order to evaluate the biological role of the Ift172 gene, we generated a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse. The resulting Slb mutant embryos die between E12.5–13.0, and exhibit severe cranio-facial malformations, failure to close the cranial neural tube, holoprosencephaly, heart edema and extensive hemorrhages. Cilia outgrowth in cells of the neuroepithelium is initiated but the axonemes are severely truncated and do not contain visible microtubules. Morphological and molecular analyses revealed a global brain-patterning defect along the dorsal-ventral (DV) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes. We demonstrate that Ift172 gene function is required for early regulation of Fgf8 at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and maintenance of the isthmic organizer. In addition, Ift172 is required for proper function of the embryonic node, the early embryonic organizer and for formation of the head organizing center (the anterior mesendoderm, or AME). We propose a model suggesting that forebrain and mid-hindbrain growth and AP patterning depends on the early function of Ift172 at gastrulation. Our data suggest that the formation and function of the node and AME in the mouse embryo relies on an indispensable role of Ift172 in cilia morphogenesis and cilia-mediated signaling. PMID:18930042

  16. Loss of ift122, a Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) Complex Component, Leads to Slow, Progressive Photoreceptor Degeneration Due to Inefficient Opsin Transport.

    PubMed

    Boubakri, Meriam; Chaya, Taro; Hirata, Hiromi; Kajimura, Naoko; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Ueno, Akiko; Malicki, Jarema; Furukawa, Takahisa; Omori, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-18

    In the retina, aberrant opsin transport from cell bodies to outer segments leads to retinal degenerative diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Opsin transport is facilitated by the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that mediates the bidirectional movement of proteins within cilia. In contrast to functions of the anterograde transport executed by IFT complex B (IFT-B), the precise functions of the retrograde transport mediated by IFT complex A (IFT-A) have not been well studied in photoreceptor cilia. Here, we analyzed developing zebrafish larvae carrying a null mutation in ift122 encoding a component of IFT-A. ift122 mutant larvae show unexpectedly mild phenotypes, compared with those of mutants defective in IFT-B. ift122 mutants exhibit a slow onset of progressive photoreceptor degeneration mainly after 7 days post-fertilization. ift122 mutant larvae also develop cystic kidney but not curly body, both of which are typically observed in various ciliary mutants. ift122 mutants display a loss of cilia in the inner ear hair cells and nasal pit epithelia. Loss of ift122 causes disorganization of outer segment discs. Ectopic accumulation of an IFT-B component, ift88, is observed in the ift122 mutant photoreceptor cilia. In addition, pulse-chase experiments using GFP-opsin fusion proteins revealed that ift122 is required for the efficient transport of opsin and the distal elongation of outer segments. These results show that IFT-A is essential for the efficient transport of outer segment proteins, including opsin, and for the survival of retinal photoreceptor cells, rendering the ift122 mutant a unique model for human retinal degenerative diseases.

  17. Biochemical mapping of interactions within the intraflagellar transport (IFT) B core complex: IFT52 binds directly to four other IFT-B subunits.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Vetter, Melanie; Morawetz, Michaela; Lorentzen, Esben

    2011-07-29

    Cilia and flagella are complex structures emanating from the surface of most eukaroytic cells and serve important functions including motility, signaling, and sensory reception. A process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) is of central importance to ciliary assembly and maintenance. The IFT complex is required for this transport and consists of two distinct multisubunit subcomplexes, IFT-A and IFT-B. Despite the importance of the IFT complex, little is known about its overall architecture. This paper presents a biochemical dissection of the molecular interactions within the IFT-B core complex. Two stable subcomplexes consisting of IFT88/70/52/46 and IFT81/74/27/25 were recombinantly co-expressed and purified. We identify a novel interaction between IFT70/52 and map the interaction domains between IFT52 and the other subunits within the IFT88/70/52/46 complex. Additionally, we show that IFT52 binds directly to the IFT81/74/27/25 complex, indicating that it could mediate the interaction between the two subcomplexes. Our data lead to an improved architectural map for the IFT-B core complex with new interactions as well as domain resolution mapping for several subunits.

  18. Intraflagellar transport proteins 172, 80, 57, 54, 38, and 20 form a stable tubulin-binding IFT-B2 complex.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Weber, Kristina; Mourão, André; Vetter, Melanie; Awasthi, Mayanka; Stiegler, Marc; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-04-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) relies on the IFT complex and is required for ciliogenesis. The IFT-B complex consists of 9-10 stably associated core subunits and six "peripheral" subunits that were shown to dissociate from the core structure at moderate salt concentration. We purified the six "peripheral"IFT-B subunits of Chlamydomonas reinhardtiias recombinant proteins and show that they form a stable complex independently of the IFT-B core. We suggest a nomenclature of IFT-B1 (core) and IFT-B2 (peripheral) for the two IFT-B subcomplexes. We demonstrate that IFT88, together with the N-terminal domain of IFT52, is necessary to bridge the interaction between IFT-B1 and B2. The crystal structure of IFT52N reveals highly conserved residues critical for IFT-B1/IFT-B2 complex formation. Furthermore, we show that of the three IFT-B2 subunits containing a calponin homology (CH) domain (IFT38, 54, and 57), only IFT54 binds αβ-tubulin as a potential IFT cargo, whereas the CH domains of IFT38 and IFT57 mediate the interaction with IFT80 and IFT172, respectively. Crystal structures of IFT54 CH domains reveal that tubulin binding is mediated by basic surface-exposed residues.

  19. Overall Architecture of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT)-B Complex Containing Cluap1/IFT38 as an Essential Component of the IFT-B Peripheral Subcomplex.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yohei; Terada, Masaya; Nishijima, Yuya; Takei, Ryota; Nozaki, Shohei; Hamada, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2016-05-20

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is essential for assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella as well as ciliary motility and signaling. IFT is mediated by multisubunit complexes, including IFT-A, IFT-B, and the BBSome, in concert with kinesin and dynein motors. Under high salt conditions, purified IFT-B complex dissociates into a core subcomplex composed of at least nine subunits and at least five peripherally associated proteins. Using the visible immunoprecipitation assay, which we recently developed as a convenient protein-protein interaction assay, we determined the overall architecture of the IFT-B complex, which can be divided into core and peripheral subcomplexes composed of 10 and 6 subunits, respectively. In particular, we identified TTC26/IFT56 and Cluap1/IFT38, neither of which was included with certainty in previous models of the IFT-B complex, as integral components of the core and peripheral subcomplexes, respectively. Consistent with this, a ciliogenesis defect of Cluap1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts was rescued by exogenous expression of wild-type Cluap1 but not by mutant Cluap1 lacking the binding ability to other IFT-B components. The detailed interaction map as well as comparison of subcellular localization of IFT-B components between wild-type and Cluap1-deficient cells provides insights into the functional relevance of the architecture of the IFT-B complex.

  20. Crystal structures of IFT70/52 and IFT52/46 provide insight into intraflagellar transport B core complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Michael; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Braeuer, Philipp; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that assemble via intraflagellar transport (IFT) and function as signaling hubs on eukaryotic cells. IFT relies on molecular motors and IFT complexes that mediate the contacts with ciliary cargo. To elucidate the architecture of the IFT-B complex, we reconstituted and purified the nonameric IFT-B core from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and determined the crystal structures of C. reinhardtii IFT70/52 and Tetrahymena IFT52/46 subcomplexes. The 2.5-Å resolution IFT70/52 structure shows that IFT52330–370 is buried deeply within the IFT70 tetratricopeptide repeat superhelix. Furthermore, the polycystic kidney disease protein IFT88 binds IFT52281–329 in a complex that interacts directly with IFT70/IFT52330–381 in trans. The structure of IFT52C/IFT46C was solved at 2.3 Å resolution, and we show that it is essential for IFT-B core integrity by mediating interaction between IFT88/70/52/46 and IFT81/74/27/25/22 subcomplexes. Consistent with this, overexpression of mammalian IFT52C in MDCK cells is dominant-negative and causes IFT protein mislocalization and disrupted ciliogenesis. These data further rationalize several ciliogenesis phenotypes of IFT mutant strains. PMID:25349261

  1. Whole-Organism Developmental Expression Profiling Identifies RAB-28 as a Novel Ciliary GTPase Associated with the BBSome and Intraflagellar Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Anna A. W. M.; Li, Chunmei; Kennedy, Julie; Cai, Jerry; Scheidel, Noemie; Kennedy, Breandán N.; Morin, Ryan D.; Leroux, Michel R.; Blacque, Oliver E.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialised sensory and developmental signalling devices extending from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. Defects in these organelles cause inherited human disorders (ciliopathies) such as retinitis pigmentosa and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), frequently affecting many physiological and developmental processes across multiple organs. Cilium formation, maintenance and function depend on intracellular transport systems such as intraflagellar transport (IFT), which is driven by kinesin-2 and IFT-dynein motors and regulated by the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) cargo-adaptor protein complex, or BBSome. To identify new cilium-associated genes, we employed the nematode C. elegans, where ciliogenesis occurs within a short timespan during late embryogenesis when most sensory neurons differentiate. Using whole-organism RNA-Seq libraries, we discovered a signature expression profile highly enriched for transcripts of known ciliary proteins, including FAM-161 (FAM161A orthologue), CCDC-104 (CCDC104), and RPI-1 (RP1/RP1L1), which we confirm are cilium-localised in worms. From a list of 185 candidate ciliary genes, we uncover orthologues of human MAP9, YAP, CCDC149, and RAB28 as conserved cilium-associated components. Further analyses of C. elegans RAB-28, recently associated with autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy, reveal that this small GTPase is exclusively expressed in ciliated neurons where it dynamically associates with IFT trains. Whereas inactive GDP-bound RAB-28 displays no IFT movement and diffuse localisation, GTP-bound (activated) RAB-28 concentrates at the periciliary membrane in a BBSome-dependent manner and undergoes bidirectional IFT. Functional analyses reveal that whilst cilium structure, sensory function and IFT are seemingly normal in a rab-28 null allele, overexpression of predicted GDP or GTP locked variants of RAB-28 perturbs cilium and sensory pore morphogenesis and function. Collectively, our findings present a new approach for

  2. A novel bicistronic expression system composed of the intraflagellar transport protein gene ift25 and FMDV 2A sequence directs robust nuclear gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Hu, He-He; Li, Zhen-Fang; Cheng, Rong-Qiang; Meng, De-Mei; Wang, Junping; Fan, Zhen-Chuan

    2017-02-25

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii offers a great promise for large-scale production of multiple recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical and industrial interest. However, the nuclear-encoding transgenes usually are expressed at a low level, which severely hampers the use of this alga in molecular farming. In this study, the promoter of the endogenous intraflagellar transport 25 (IFT25) gene of C. reinhardtii was tested for its ability to drive the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which functions as a readout for target gene expression. IFT25 promoter (IFT25P) alone was not able to drive GFP expression to a detectable level. IFT25P, however, can drive robust IFT25-GFP fusion protein expression when the intron-containing IFT25 gene was inserted between IFT25P and GFP cDNA. When an extended version of foot-and-mouth virus 2A protease (2A(E)) sequence was further inserted between the intron-containing IFT25 gene and the GFP cDNA, discrete GFP protein was observed to release from the IFT25-2A(E)-GFP polyprotein via 2A self-cleaving with a cleavage efficacy of approximately 99%. The monomer GFP was accumulated to a level of as high as 0.68% of total soluble proteins. To test whether the newly developed bicistronic IFT25P-IFT25-2A(E) expression system can be used to overexpress heterologous proteins of different origins and sizes, we inserted codon-optimized cDNAs encoding a Trichoderma reesei xylanase1 (25 kDa) and a Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 type V CRISPR-Cas protein LbCpf1 (147 kDa) to the vector and found that the production of xylanase1 and LbCpf1 was as high as 0.69 and 0.49% of total soluble protein. Our result showed that IFT25P-IFT25-2A(E) system is more efficient to drive nuclear gene expression in C. reinhardtii than other conventionally used promoters, thus representing a novel efficient recombinant protein expression tool and has the potential to be scaled for commercial production of nuclear-encoded recombinant proteins of different sizes and

  3. RAB-Like 2 Has an Essential Role in Male Fertility, Sperm Intra-Flagellar Transport, and Tail Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Jamsai, Duangporn; O'Connor, Anne E.; Borg, Claire; Clark, Brett J.; Whisstock, James C.; Field, Mark C.; Adams, Vicki; Ishikawa, Tomomoto; Aitken, R. John; Whittle, Belinda; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; O'Bryan, Moira K.

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of young men are infertile and, for the majority, the underlying cause remains unknown. Male infertility is, however, frequently associated with defective sperm motility, wherein the sperm tail is a modified flagella/cilia. Conversely, a greater understanding of essential mechanisms involved in tail formation may offer contraceptive opportunities, or more broadly, therapeutic strategies for global cilia defects. Here we have identified Rab-like 2 (RABL2) as an essential requirement for sperm tail assembly and function. RABL2 is a member of a poorly characterized clade of the RAS GTPase superfamily. RABL2 is highly enriched within developing male germ cells, where it localizes to the mid-piece of the sperm tail. Lesser amounts of Rabl2 mRNA were observed in other tissues containing motile cilia. Using a co-immunoprecipitation approach and RABL2 affinity columns followed by immunochemistry, we demonstrated that within developing haploid germ cells RABL2 interacts with intra-flagella transport (IFT) proteins and delivers a specific set of effector (cargo) proteins, including key members of the glycolytic pathway, to the sperm tail. RABL2 binding to effector proteins is regulated by GTP. Perturbed RABL2 function, as exemplified by the Mot mouse line that contains a mutation in a critical protein–protein interaction domain, results in male sterility characterized by reduced sperm output, and sperm with aberrant motility and short tails. Our data demonstrate a novel function for the RABL protein family, an essential role for RABL2 in male fertility and a previously uncharacterised mechanism for protein delivery to the flagellum. PMID:23055941

  4. Nephrocystins and MKS proteins interact with IFT particle and facilitate transport of selected ciliary cargos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengtian; Malicki, Jarema

    2011-05-20

    Cilia are required for the development and function of many organs. Efficient transport of protein cargo along ciliary axoneme is necessary to sustain these processes. Despite its importance, the mode of interaction between the intraflagellar ciliary transport (IFT) mechanism and its cargo proteins remains poorly understood. Our studies demonstrate that IFT particle components, and a Meckel-Gruber syndrome 1 (MKS1)-related, B9 domain protein, B9d2, bind each other and contribute to the ciliary localization of Inversin (Nephrocystin 2). B9d2, Inversin, and Nephrocystin 5 support, in turn, the transport of a cargo protein, Opsin, but not another photoreceptor ciliary transmembrane protein, Peripherin. Interestingly, the components of this mechanism also contribute to the formation of planar cell polarity in mechanosensory epithelia. These studies reveal a molecular mechanism that mediates the transport of selected ciliary cargos and is of fundamental importance for the differentiation and survival of sensory cells.

  5. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  6. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  7. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  8. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  9. Particle transport in planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, T.J.

    1984-11-01

    Particle energization in Earth's and Jupiter's magnetospheres is discussed. Understanding of the large scale magnetic and electric fields in which charged particles move is reviewed. Orbit theory in the adiabatic approximation is sketched. General conditions for adiabatic breakdown at each of three levels of periodicity are presented. High energy losses and lower energy sources argue for the existence of magnetospheric accelerations. Nonadiabatic acceleration processes are mentioned. Slow diffusive energization by particle interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations is outlined. This mechanism seems adequate at Earth but, operating alone, is unconvincing for Jupiter. Adding spatial diffusion in the radially distended Jovian magnetodisk may resolve the difficulty. (ESA)

  10. Particle transport in asymmetrically modulated pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Müller, Frank; Gösele, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Brownian motion plays an important role in the separation of small particles and molecules, but generally leads to undirected motion or intermixing by diffusion. Matthias and Müller (2003 Nature 424 53-7) reported on the experimental realization of a drift ratchet, a microfluidic particle transport mechanism that utilizes random fluctuations instead, i.e. a Brownian motor. Here, we offer a new interpretation of this previously published work on the drift ratchet. New experiments, which allow us to distinguish between particles of different sizes, as well as a re-examination of the original work, lead to the conclusion that the measured particle transport does not result from a ratchet effect. We demonstrate that the transport is caused by convection instead. While our result challenges one specific type of experiment, we do not assess the feasibility of a drift ratchet in principle. Instead, we identify the experimental conditions that need to be fulfilled for the successful separation of particles.

  11. Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

    1999-08-01

    A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle

  12. Magnetotail particle dynamics and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, Theodore W.

    1995-01-01

    The main thrust of our research is to study the consequences of particle dynamics in the current sheet region of the magnetotail. The importance of understanding particle dynamics, in and near current sheets, cannot be over estimated, especially in light of NASA's recent interest in developing global circulation models to predict space weather. We have embarked on a long-term study to investigate the electrical resistance due to chaotic behavior, compare this resistance to inertial effects, and relate it to that resistance required in MHD modeling for reconnection to proceed. Using a single-particle model and observations, we have also found that a neutral line region can be remotely sensed. We plan to evaluate other cases of satellite observations near times of substorm onset to elucidate the relationship between the temporal development of a near-Earth neutral line and onset.

  13. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S; Butler, James P

    2013-10-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. The particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic. Conversely, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drugs. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this article. A large portion of this article deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: (i) the physical characteristics of particles, (ii) particle behavior in gas flow, and (iii) gas-flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The article concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research.

  14. Particle transport and deposition: basic physics of particle kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Akira; Henry, Frank S.; Butler, James P.

    2015-01-01

    The human body interacts with the environment in many different ways. The lungs interact with the external environment through breathing. The enormously large surface area of the lung with its extremely thin air-blood barrier is exposed to particles suspended in the inhaled air. Whereas the particle-lung interaction may cause deleterious effects on health if the inhaled pollutant aerosols are toxic, this interaction can be beneficial for disease treatment if the inhaled particles are therapeutic aerosolized drug. In either case, an accurate estimation of dose and sites of deposition in the respiratory tract is fundamental to understanding subsequent biological response, and the basic physics of particle motion and engineering knowledge needed to understand these subjects is the topic of this chapter. A large portion of this chapter deals with three fundamental areas necessary to the understanding of particle transport and deposition in the respiratory tract. These are: 1) the physical characteristics of particles, 2) particle behavior in gas flow, and 3) gas flow patterns in the respiratory tract. Other areas, such as particle transport in the developing lung and in the diseased lung are also considered. The chapter concludes with a summary and a brief discussion of areas of future research. PMID:24265235

  15. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  16. Transport of particles across continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Nittrouer, C.A. ); Wright, L.D. College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA )

    1994-02-01

    Transport of particulate material across continental shelves is well demonstrated by the distributions on the seabed and in the water column of geological, chemical, or biological components, whose sources are found farther landward or farther seaward. This paper addresses passive (incapable of swimming) particles and their transport across (not necessarily off) continental shelves during high stands of sea level. Among the general factors that influence across-shelf transport are shelf geometry, latitudinal constraints, and the timescale of interest. Research studies have investigated the physical mechanisms of transport and have made quantitative estimates of mass flux across continental shelves. Important mechanisms include wind-driven flows, internal wave, wave-orbital flows, infragravity phenomena, buoyant plumes, and surf zone processes. Most particulate transport occurs in the portion of the water column closest to the seabed. Therefore physical processes are effective where and when they influence the bottom boundary layer, causing shear stresses sufficient to erode and transport particulate material. Biological and geological processes at the seabed play important roles within the boundary layer. The coupling of hydrodynamic forces from currents and surface gravity waves has a particularly strong influence on across-shelf transport; during storm events, the combined effect can transport particles tens of kilometers seaward. Several important mechanisms can cause bidirectional (seaward and landward) transport, and estimates of the net flux are difficult to obtain. Also, measurements of across-shelf transport are made difficult by the dominance of along-shelf transport. Geological parameters are often the best indicators of net across-shelf transport integrated over time scales longer than a month. For example, fluvially discharged particles with distinct composition commonly accumulate in the midshelf region. 47 refs., 16 figs.

  17. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets.

  18. Dephasing-controlled particle transport devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanović, Edin; Rodríguez-Rosario, César A.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We study the role of dephasing in transport through different structures. We show that interference effects invalidate Kirchhoff's circuit laws in quantum devices and illustrate the emergence of Ohmic conduction under strong dephasing. We present circuits where the particle transport and the direction of rectification can be controlled through the dephasing strength. This suggests the possibility of constructing molecular devices with new functionalities which use dephasing as a control parameter.

  19. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation. The main algorithms we consider are: • Domain decomposition of constructive solid geometry: enables extremely large calculations in which the background geometry is too large to fit in the memory of a single computational node. • Load Balancing: keeps the workload per processor as even as possible so the calculation runs efficiently. • Global Particle Find: if particles are on the wrong processor, globally resolve their locations to the correct processor based on particle coordinate and background domain. • Visualizing constructive solid geometry, sourcing particles, deciding that particle streaming communication is completed and spatial redecomposition. These algorithms are some of the most important parallel algorithms required for domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport. We demonstrate that our previous algorithms were not scalable, prove that our new algorithms are scalable, and run some of the algorithms up to 2 million MPI processes on the Sequoia supercomputer.

  20. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Matthew Joseph

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  1. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; Fasso, A.; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  2. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  3. Particle Swarm Transport in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Mackin, T.; Boomsma, E.

    2012-12-01

    Colloidal particles of many types occur in fractures in the subsurface as a result of both natural and industrial processes (e.g., environmental influences, synthetic nano- & micro-particles from consumer products, chemical and mechanical erosion of geologic material, proppants used in gas and oil extraction, etc.). The degree of localization and speed of transport of such particles depends on the transport mechanisms, the chemical and physical properties of the particles and the surrounding rock, and the flow path geometry through the fracture. In this study, we investigated the transport of particle swarms through artificial fracture networks. A synthetic fracture network was created using an Objet Eden 350V 3D printer to build a network of fractures. Each fracture in the network had a rectangular cross-sectional area with a constant depth of 7 mm but with widths that ranged from 2 mm to 11 mm. The overall dimensions of the network were 132 mm by 166 mm. The fracture network had 7 ports that were used either as the inlet or outlet for fluid flow through the sample or for introducing a particle swarm. Water flow rates through the fracture were controlled with a syringe pump, and ranged from zero flow to 6 ml/min. Swarms were composed of a dilute suspension (2% by mass) of 3 μm fluorescent polystyrene beads in water. Swarms with volumes of 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 μl were used and delivered into the network using a second syringe pump. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system illuminated by green (525 nm) LED arrays and captured by a CCD camera. For fracture networks with quiescent fluids, particle swarms fell under gravity and remained localized within the network. Large swarms (30-60 μl) were observed to bifurcate at shallower depths resulting in a broader dispersal of the particles than for smaller swarm volumes. For all swarm volumes studied, particle swarms tended to bifurcate at the intersection between fractures. These

  4. Turbulent particle transport in magnetized fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for particle transport is of the utmost importance for magnetized fusion plasmas. A peaked density profile is attractive to improve the fusion rate, which is proportional to the square of the density, and to self-generate a large fraction of non-inductive current required for continuous operation. Experiments in various tokamak devices (ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET, TCV, TEXT, TFTR) indicate the existence of a turbulent particle pinch. Recently, such a turbulent pinch has been unambiguously identified in Tore Supra very long discharges, in the absence of both collisional particle pinch and central particle source, for more than 4 min (Hoang et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 155002). This turbulent pinch is predicted by a quasilinear theory of particle transport (Weiland J et al 1989 Nucl. Fusion 29 1810), and confirmed by non-linear turbulence simulations (Garbet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 035001) and general considerations based on the conservation of motion invariants (Baker et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11 992). Experimentally, the particle pinch is found to be sensitive to the magnetic field gradient in many cases (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Zabolotsky et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 735, Weisen et al 2004 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 751, Baker et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 1003), to the temperature profile (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Angioni et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 827) and also to the collisionality that changes the nature of the microturbulence (Angioni et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 205003, Garzotti et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 1829, Weisen et al 2004 31st EPS Conf. on Plasma Phys. (London) vol 28G (ECA) P-1.146, Lopes Cardozo N J 1995 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37 799). The consistency of some of the observed dependences with the theoretical predictions gives us a clearer understanding of the particle pinch in tokamaks, allowing us to predict more accurately the density

  5. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  6. Mechanism of transport of IFT particles in C. elegans cilia by the concerted action of kinesin-II and OSM-3 motors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyu; Ou, Guangshuo; Civelekoglu-Scholey, Gul; Blacque, Oliver E; Endres, Nicholas F; Tao, Li; Mogilner, Alex; Leroux, Michel R; Vale, Ronald D; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2006-09-25

    The assembly and function of cilia on Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the action of two kinesin-2 motors, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3-kinesin, which cooperate to move the same intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles along microtubule (MT) doublets. Using competitive in vitro MT gliding assays, we show that purified kinesin-II and OSM-3 cooperate to generate movement similar to that seen along the cilium in the absence of any additional regulatory factors. Quantitative modeling suggests that this could reflect an alternating action mechanism, in which the motors take turns to move along MTs, or a mechanical competition, in which the motors function in a concerted fashion to move along MTs with the slow motor exerting drag on the fast motor and vice versa. In vivo transport assays performed in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) protein and IFT motor mutants favor a mechanical competition model for motor coordination in which the IFT motors exert a BBS protein-dependent tension on IFT particles, which controls the IFT pathway that builds the cilium foundation.

  7. Mechanism of travelling-wave transport of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Hiroyuki; Seki, Kyogo; Kuromiya, Naoyuki

    2006-03-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations have been carried out on transport of particles in an electrostatic travelling field. A three-dimensional hard-sphere model of the distinct element method was developed to simulate the dynamics of particles. Forces applied to particles in the model were the Coulomb force, the dielectrophoresis force on polarized dipole particles in a non-uniform field, the image force, gravity and the air drag. Friction and repulsion between particle-particle and particle-conveyer were included in the model to replace initial conditions after mechanical contacts. Two kinds of experiments were performed to confirm the model. One was the measurement of charge of particles that is indispensable to determine the Coulomb force. Charge distribution was measured from the locus of free-fallen particles in a parallel electrostatic field. The averaged charge of the bulk particle was confirmed by measurement with a Faraday cage. The other experiment was measurements of the differential dynamics of particles on a conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes to which a four-phase travelling electrostatic wave was applied. Calculated results agreed with measurements, and the following characteristics were clarified. (1) The Coulomb force is the predominant force to drive particles compared with the other kinds of forces, (2) the direction of particle transport did not always coincide with that of the travelling wave but changed partially. It depended on the frequency of the travelling wave, the particle diameter and the electric field, (3) although some particles overtook the travelling wave at a very low frequency, the motion of particles was almost synchronized with the wave at the low frequency and (4) the transport of some particles was delayed to the wave at medium frequency; the majority of particles were transported backwards at high frequency and particles were not transported but only vibrated at very high frequency.

  8. Peristaltic particle transport using the Lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Connington, Kevin William; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S; Abdel-fattah, Amr; Chen, Shiyi

    2009-01-01

    Peristaltic transport refers to a class of internal fluid flows where the periodic deformation of flexible containing walls elicits a non-negligible fluid motion. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles in a tube or channel when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two-dimensional channel using the lattice Boltzmann method. We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant dimensionless parameters of the system on the particle transport. We find, among other results, a case where an increase in Reynolds number can actually lead to a slight increase in particle transport, and a case where, as the wall deformation increases, the motion of the particle becomes non-negative only. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid trapping. Under these circumstances, the particle may itself become trapped where it is subsequently transported at the wave speed, which is the maximum possible transport in the absence of a favorable pressure gradient. Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles. We find that the levels of shear stress are most hazardous near the throat of the channel. We advise that shear-sensitive particles should be transported under conditions where trapping occurs as the particle is typically situated in a region of innocuous shear stress levels.

  9. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan Wu, Jian-Chun

    2014-03-07

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities)

  10. Kinesin-2 motors transport IFT-particles, dyneins and tubulin subunits to the tips of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia: relevance to vision research?

    PubMed

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2012-12-15

    The sensory outer segments (OS) of vertebrate retinal photoreceptors, which detect photons of light, resemble the distal segments of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia, which detect chemical ligands that influence the chemotactic movements of the animal. Based on fluorescence microscopy assays performed in sensory cilia of living, transgenic "wild type" and mutant C. elegans, combined with in vitro motility assays using purified motors, we have proposed that two types of kinesin-2 motor, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3, cooperate to build amphid and phasmid sensory cilia on chemosensory neurons. Specifically, we propose that these motors function together in a redundant manner to build the axoneme core (aka middle segments (MS)), whereas OSM-3 alone serves to build the distal segments (DS). Furthermore, our data suggest that these motors accomplish this by driving two sequential steps of anterograde transport of cargoes consisting of IFT-particles, retrograde dynein motors, and ciliary tubulin subunits, from the transition zone to the tips of the axonemal microtubules (MTs). Homologs of kinesin-II (KIF3) and OSM-3 (KIF17) are also proposed to contribute to the assembly of vertebrate photoreceptors, although how they do so is currently unclear. Here I review our work on kinesin-2 motors, intraflagellar transport (IFT) and cilium biogenesis in C. elegans sensory cilia, and comment on its possible relevance to current research on vertebrate photoreceptor cilia assembly and function.

  11. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  12. Energetic Particle Transport in Strong Compressive Wave Turbulence Near Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, J.A.; Zank, G.P.; Li, G.; Webb, G.M.

    2005-08-01

    Strong interplanetary coronal mass ejection driven shocks are often accompanied by high levels of low frequency compressive wave turbulence. This might require a non-linear kinetic theory approach to properly describe energetic particle transport in their vicinity. We present a non-linear diffusive kinetic theory for suprathermal particle transport and stochastic acceleration along the background magnetic field in strong compressive dynamic wave turbulence to which small-scale Alfven waves are coupled. Our theory shows that the standard cosmic-ray transport equation must be revised for low suprathermal particle energies to accommodate fundamental changes in spatial diffusion (standard diffusion becomes turbulent diffusion) as well as modifications to particle convection, and adiabatic energy changes. In addition, a momentum diffusion term, which generates accelerated suprathermal particle spectra with a hard power law, must be added. Such effective first stage acceleration possibly leads to efficient injection of particles into second stage diffusive shock acceleration as described by standard theory.

  13. Inferring transient particle transport dynamics in live cells.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Nilah; Barry, Zachary; Park, Hye Yoon; Su, Kuan-Chung; Katz, Zachary; English, Brian P; Dey, Arkajit; Pan, Keyao; Cheeseman, Iain M; Singer, Robert H; Bathe, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Live-cell imaging and particle tracking provide rich information on mechanisms of intracellular transport. However, trajectory analysis procedures to infer complex transport dynamics involving stochastic switching between active transport and diffusive motion are lacking. We applied Bayesian model selection to hidden Markov modeling to infer transient transport states from trajectories of mRNA-protein complexes in live mouse hippocampal neurons and metaphase kinetochores in dividing human cells. The software is available at http://hmm-bayes.org/.

  14. NONLINEAR EFFECTS IN PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Croitoru, A.

    2015-12-10

    Collisional particle transport in stochastic magnetic fields is studied using a semi-analytical method. The aim is to determine the influence of the nonlinear effects that occur in the magnetic field line random walk on particle transport. We show that particle transport coefficients can be strongly influenced by the magnetic line trapping. The conditions that correspond to these nonlinear regimes are determined. We also analyze the effects produced by the space variation of the large-scale magnetic field. We show that an average drift is generated by the gradient of the magnetic field, which strongly increases and reverses its orientation in the nonlinear regime.

  15. Microstripes for transport and separation of magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple technique for creating an on-chip magnetic particle conveyor based on exchange-biased permalloy microstripes. The particle transportation relies on an array of stripes with a spacing smaller than their width in conjunction with a periodic sequence of four different externally applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate the controlled transportation of a large population of particles over several millimeters of distance as well as the spatial separation of two populations of magnetic particles with different magnetophoretic mobilities. The technique can be used for the controlled selective manipulation and separation of magnetically labelled species. PMID:22655020

  16. Transport of inertial anisotropic particles under surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibenedetto, Michelle; Koseff, Jeffrey; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    The motion of neutrally and almost-neutrally buoyant particles under surface gravity waves is relevant to the transport of microplastic debris and other small particulates in the ocean. Consequently, a number of studies have looked at the transport of spherical particles or mobile plankton in these conditions. However, the effects of particle-shape anisotropy on the trajectories and behavior of irregularly shaped particles in this type of oscillatory flow are still relatively unknown. To better understand these issues, we created an idealized numerical model which simulates the three-dimensional behavior of anisotropic spheroids in flow described by Airy wave theory. The particle's response is calculated using a simplified Maxey-Riley equation coupled with Jeffery's equation for particle rotation. We show that the particle dynamics are strongly dependent on their initial conditions and shape, with some some additional dependence on Stokes number.

  17. Electrokinetic transport of heterogeneous particles in suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velegol, D.; Garoff, Stephen; Anderson, John L.

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation for electrophoresis predicts that the electrophoretic velocity of a particle is proportional to its zeta potential but not its size, shape, or orientation. Furthermore, the equation predicts that the rotation rate is identically zero. The Smoluchowski equation fails for heterogeneous particles (i.e., those with nonuniform zeta potentials). Recent theories and experiments show that particles with a dipole moment of zeta potential rotate into alignment with an externally applied electric field. For doublets (particles composed of two spheres) the rotation rate depends on (1) whether the spheres are rigidly rocked or freely rotating, and (2) the gap distance between the spheres. The relative configuration of two coagulated spheres is determined by the colloidal forces of the system. The goal of our research is to use measurements of electrophoretic rotation to determine the gap between two spheres of a colloidal doublet and also to determine whether or not the doublet is rigid.

  18. Electrokinetic transport of heterogeneous particles in suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of research over the past nine months had been on a theory for the electrophoresis of slender particles and on trajectory analysis of colloidal doublets rotating in electric fields. Brief summaries of the research are given.

  19. Moisture Transport in Silica Gel Particle Beds: I. Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A. A.; Mills, A. F.

    1986-08-01

    Diffusion mechanisms of moisture within silica gel particles are investigated. It is found that for microporous silica gel surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism of moisture transport, while for macroporous silica gel both Knudsen and surface diffusion are important.

  20. Modeling particle transport in downward and upward flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basha, H. A.; Culligan, P. J.

    2010-07-01

    Experimental data obtained for particle transport in downward and upward flows in smooth and rough porous media are analyzed at various flow rates. The data analysis and interpretation are aided through an analytical model with linear kinetics that assumes two sites for particle deposition within a medium, namely, reversible and irreversible, together with a dual mode of irreversible deposition. The bimodal particle transport model is obtained using the Green's function method and is capable of fitting, with reasonable accuracy, the observed transport and deposition behavior of particles. Approximations for advection-dominated flows are also obtained that could represent a simplified modeling tool. Expressions of the temporal moments are developed and algebraic equations are derived that express the model parameters in terms of the moments of the measured particle concentration distributions. The transport models helped define the relationship of the modeled parameters to flow velocity and media roughness. The fitting results show that the parameters for rough and smooth media vary in a systematic way with the pore fluid velocity. The results also reveal that flow direction has a significant influence on the mode and magnitude of irreversible particle deposition for the conditions investigated. For the same seepage velocity, the rate of particle deposition is greater for upward flows than for downward flows. Moreover, roughness effects increase the irreversible particle deposition in downward flows but have little effect in upward flows.

  1. Parameterization of Submesoscale Particle Transport in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haza, A. C.; Ozgokmen, T. M.; Griffa, A.; Poje, A. C.; Hogan, P. J.; Jacobs, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Submesoscale flows have a significant impact on the transport at their own scales, yet require extensive data sets and numerical computations, making them challenging to approach deterministically. A recent Lagrangian parametrization to correct particle transport at the submesoscales is implemented to an eddy permitting ocean model at 1/25 degree grid for the surface circulation of the Gulf of Mexico. It combines mesoscale transport from the deterministic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) and statistical Lagrangian subgridscale (LSGS) models over the submesoscale range. Comparison to a 1km submesoscale-permitting ocean model shows a significant improvement of the scale-dependent relative dispersion and particle distribution.

  2. Transport of finite size particles in confined narrow channels: Diffusion, coherence, and particle separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wu, Jian-Chun

    2013-07-01

    Transport of the finite size spherical Brownian particles is investigated in confined narrow channels with varying cross-section width. Applying the Fick-Jacobs approximation, we obtain the expressions of the particle current, the effective diffusion coefficient, and the coherence level of Brownian transport (the Péclet number). For the case of the biased constant force, the dependencies of the nonlinear mobility, the effective diffusion coefficient, and the Péclet number on the particle size exhibit striking behaviors. The Péclet number decreases with increasing the radius of the particle which shows that the big sizes of the particles reduce the coherence level of Brownian transport. There exists an optimized value of the radius at which the effective diffusion coefficient is maximal. For the case of the asymmetric unbiased force, due to the competition between the spatial asymmetry and the temporal asymmetry, the transport directions of the particles depend very sensitively on the size of the particle. Particles larger than a given threshold radius move to the left, whereas particles smaller than that move to the right. Therefore, one can separate particles of different radii and make them move towards opposite directions.

  3. Models of motor-assisted transport of intracellular particles.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Simmons, R M

    2001-01-01

    One-dimensional models are presented for the macroscopic intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles by molecular motors on a network of aligned intracellular filaments. A motor-coated vesicle or organelle is described as a diffusing particle binding intermittently to filaments, when it is transported at the motor velocity. Two models are treated in detail: 1) a unidirectional model, where only one kind of motor is operative and all filaments have the same polarity; and 2) a bidirectional model, in which filaments of both polarities exist (for example, a randomly polarized actin network for myosin motors) and/or particles have plus-end and minus-end motors operating on unipolar filaments (kinesin and dynein on microtubules). The unidirectional model provides net particle transport in the absence of a concentration gradient. A symmetric bidirectional model, with equal mixtures of filament polarities or plus-end and minus-end motors of the same characteristics, provides rapid transport down a concentration gradient and enhanced dispersion of particles from a point source by motor-assisted diffusion. Both models are studied in detail as a function of the diffusion constant and motor velocity of bound particles, and their rates of binding to and detachment from filaments. These models can form the basis of more realistic models for particle transport in axons, melanophores, and the dendritic arms of melanocytes, in which networks of actin filaments and microtubules coexist and motors for both types of filament are implicated. PMID:11159382

  4. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  5. Isotope effects on particle transport in the Compact Helical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Ida, K.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Osakabe, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Isobe, M.; Morita, S.; Matsuoka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogen isotope effects of particle transport were studied in the hydrogen and deuterium dominant plasmas of the Compact Helical System (CHS). Longer decay time of electron density after the turning-off of the gas puffing was observed in the deuterium dominant plasma suggesting that the recycling was higher and/or the particle confinement was better in the deuterium dominant plasma. Density modulation experiments showed the quantitative difference of the particle transport coefficients. Density was scanned from 0.8  ×  1019 m-3 to 4  ×  1019 m-3 under the same magnetic field and almost the same heating power. In the low density regime (line averaged density  <  2.5  ×  1019 m-3), the lower particle diffusivity and the larger inwardly directed core convection velocity was observed in the deuterium dominant plasma, while in the high density regime (line averaged density  >2.5  ×  1019 m-3) no clear difference was observed. This result indicates that the isotope effects of particle transport exist only in the low density regime. Comparison with neoclassical transport coefficients showed that the difference of particle transport is likely to be due to the difference of turbulence driven anomalous transport. Linear character of the ion scale turbulence was studied. The smaller linear growth rate qualitatively agreed with the reduced particle transport in the deuterium dominant plasma of the low density regime.

  6. Computational Investigation of the Transport of Burning Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, O. V.; Fil'kov, A. I.; Grishin, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Computational modeling of the dynamics of the convective column formed by a low forest fire and of the transport of particles burning in it has been carried out. At the initial stage of formation of a thermal column, medium- and large-size particles move with the ascending air flow to its upper boundary; then they are entrained by the torroidal vortex and carried out of the combustion zone to the outer boundary of the circulation flow where they settle to the underlying surface. With increasing size of particles the maximum rise height of particles and the distance for which they are transported by the vortex flow decrease. The temperature of large particles at the moment of their landing is above the critical one, which can initiate ignition of the underlying surface and the formation of a secondary site of fire.

  7. Stochastic Simulation of Lagrangian Particle Transport in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guangyuan

    This dissertation presents the development and validation of the One Dimensional Turbulence (ODT) multiphase model in the Lagrangian reference frame. ODT is a stochastic model that captures the full range of length and time scales and provides statistical information on fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport at low computational cost. The flow evolution is governed by a deterministic solution of the viscous processes and a stochastic representation of advection through stochastic domain mapping processes. The three algorithms for Lagrangian particle transport are presented within the context of the ODT approach. The Type-I and -C models consider the particle-eddy interaction as instantaneous and continuous change of the particle position and velocity, respectively. The Type-IC model combines the features of the Type-I and -C models. The models are applied to the multi-phase flows in the homogeneous decaying turbulence and turbulent round jet. Particle dispersion, dispersion coefficients, and velocity statistics are predicted and compared with experimental data. The models accurately reproduces the experimental data sets and capture particle inertial effects and trajectory crossing effect. A new adjustable particle parameter is introduced into the ODT model, and sensitivity analysis is performed to facilitate parameter estimation and selection. A novel algorithm of the two-way momentum coupling between the particle and carrier phases is developed in the ODT multiphase model. Momentum exchange between the phases is accounted for through particle source terms in the viscous diffusion. The source term is implemented in eddy events through a new kernel transformation and an iterative procedure is required for eddy selection. This model is applied to a particle-laden turbulent jet flow, and simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. The effect of particle addition on the velocities of the gas phase is investigated. The development of

  8. Transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms. [in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Various processes can erode the surfaces of planetary ring particles. Recent estimates for Saturn's rings suggest that a centimeter-thick surface layer could be eroded from an isolated ring particle in less than 1000 yr by meteoroid impacts alone. The atoms, molecules, and chips ejected from ring particles by erosion will arc across the rings along elliptical orbits. For moderate ring optical depths, ejecta will be absorbed or inelastically scattered upon reintersecting the ring plane. Continuous exchange of ejecta between different ring regions can lead to net radial transport of mass and angular momentum, to changes in particle sizes, and to the buildup of chip regoliths several centimeters deep on the surfaces of ring particles. Because most of the erosional ejecta are not lost but merely exchanged over short distances, the net erosion rate of the surfaces of these ring particles will be much less than that estimated for an isolated particle. Numerical solutions for time-dependent ballistic transport under various assumptions suggest pile-up and spillover effects especially near regions of preexisting high optical depth contrast, such as the inner edges of A and B rings. Global redistribution could be significant over billions of years. Other features in planetary ring systems may be influenced by ballistic transport.

  9. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, A.; Palade, D. I.; Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} diffusion of fusion born α particles in tokamak plasmas. We determine the transport regimes for a realistic model that has the characteristics of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or of the trapped electron mode (TEM) driven turbulence. It includes a spectrum of potential fluctuations that is modeled using the results of the numerical simulations, the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity and the parallel motion. Our semi-analytical statistical approach is based on the decorrelation trajectory method (DTM), which is adapted to the gyrokinetic approximation. We obtain the transport coefficients as a function of the parameters of the turbulence and of the energy of the α particles. According to our results, significant turbulent transport of the α particles can appear only at energies of the order of 100 KeV. We determine the corresponding conditions.

  10. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-15

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  11. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-06-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated.

  12. Particle transport in unsaturated fractured chalk under arid conditions.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Noam; Dahan, Ofer; Adar, Eilon M

    2002-05-01

    A series of field and laboratory experiments were conducted to study the mechanisms of particle detachment and transport from fractures in vadose chalk. Experiments of intermittent flow events along fracture surfaces were carried out in the laboratory. In the field, water was percolated from land surface via a discrete fracture into a compartmental sampler installed inside a horizontal corehole located I m below the surface. The mass, size distribution, and composition of the particles drained from the fracture voids were examined along with flow rates and salt dissolution. Two boreholes penetrating the underlying saturated zone were sampled and analyzed for colloidal concentration and composition. Most of the particle and solute release at the drained effluents occurred during the first several hours of flow, but erratic pulses of particles were still observed after long periods of time. Most of the detached particles had a mean diameter of >2 microm, while the mobile colloidal phase in the groundwater had a mean diameter of approximately 1 microm. Mineralogical composition of the groundwater colloids and the particles detached from the upper vadose fracture were similar. Laboratory observations demonstrated the importance of the existence of a coating layer, made of weathered particles and salts, on particle detachment. The results of this study suggest that: (1) particle detachment causes flow-rate variability in the unsaturated fracture; (2) the mechanisms of particle detachment and salt dissolution within the fracture are linked: and (3) although most of the detached particles are large and likely to accumulate inside fractures, some colloidal particles also eroded from the fracture void and are likely to be transported to the groundwater.

  13. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  14. Interactive design environment transportation channel of relativistic charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchuk, I. O.; Averyanov, G. P.; Budkin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Considered a modern implementation of a computer environment for the design of channels of transportation of high-energy charged particle beams. The environment includes a software package for the simulation of the dynamics of charged particles in the channel, operating means for changing parameters of the channel, the elements channel optimization and processing of the output characteristics of the beam with the graphical output the main output parameters.

  15. Transport coefficients of soft repulsive particle fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Brańka, A. C.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulation has been used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient, D, and shear viscosity, ηs, of soft-sphere fluids, in which the particles interact through the soft-sphere pair potential, phi(r) = epsilon(σ/r)n, where n measures the steepness or stiffness of the potential, epsilon and σ are a characteristic energy and distance, respectively. The simulations were carried out on monodisperse systems for a range of n values from the hard-sphere (n\\to \\infty ) limit down to n = 4 over a range of densities. An ideal glass transition value was estimated from the limit where D and \\eta_{\\mathrm {s}}^{-1}\\to 0 for each value of n. Nucleation of the crystalline phase was found to intervene prior to the formation of the glass itself, as has been found previously for hard spheres (i.e. n\\to \\infty ). With increasing softness the glass transition moves further within the solid part of the phase diagram, as predicted by Cardenas and Tosi (2005 Phys. Lett. A 336 423), although the volume fractions at the glass transition estimated by the current procedure here are systematically lower than the predictions of that study.

  16. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'.

  17. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  18. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  19. Modeling transport and aggregation of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    A complete description of ash aggregation processes in volcanic clouds is an very arduous task and the full coupling of ash transport and ash aggregation models is still computationally prohibitive. A large fraction of fine ash injected in the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate because of complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in settling velocities. The formation of aggregates of size and density different from those of the primary particles dramatically changes the sedimentation dynamics and results in lower atmospheric residence times of ash particles and in the formation of secondary maxima of tephra deposit. Volcanic ash transport models should include a full aggregation model accounting for all particle class interaction. However this approach would require prohibitive computational times. Here we present a simplified model for wet aggregation that accounts for both atmospheric and volcanic water transport. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average efficiencies factors, and collision frequency functions accounting for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, such as the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. Moreover, understanding aggregation processes in volcanic clouds will contribute to mitigate the risks related with volcanic ash transport and sedimentation.

  20. Probing cytoskeleton dynamics by intracellular particle transport analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, M.; Hodeck, K. F.; Witzel, P.; Nandi, A.; Lindner, B.; Heinrich, D.

    2015-07-01

    All cellular functions arise from the transport of molecules through a heterogeneous, highly dynamic cell interior for intracellular signaling. Here, the impact of intracellular architecture and cytoskeleton dynamics on transport processes is revealed by high-resolution single particle tracking within living cells, in combination with time-resolved local mean squared displacement (I-MSD) analysis. We apply the I-MSD analysis to trajectories of 200 nm silica particles within living cells of Dictyostelium discoideum obtained by high resolution spinning disc confocal microscopy with a frame rate of 100 fps and imaging in one fixed focal plane. We investigate phases of motor-driven active transport and subdiffusion, normal diffusion, as well as superdiffusion with high spatial and temporal resolution. Active directed intracellular motion is attributed to microtubule associated molecular motor driven transport with average absolute velocities of 2.8 μm s-1 for 200 nm diameter particles. Diffusion processes of these particles within wild-type cells are found to exhibit diffusion constants ranging across two orders of magnitude from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior. This type of analysis might prove of ample importance for medical applications, like targeted drug treatment of cells by nano-sized carriers or innovative diagnostic assays.

  1. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS. Jung-il Choi*, Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; C. S. Kim, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab. RTP, NC 27711

    Partic...

  2. The Effect of Particle Density on Aeolian Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. H.; Greeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    A set of experiments using a wide range of particle densities was performed in an open-circuit, terrestrial-atmospheric-pressure wind tunnel at Arizona State University. The results show that saltation flux equations derived for typical geologic material overpredict the flux of low-density particles. Walnut shells (approximately 1.1 g/cc) were used in the experiment and correspond to volcanic ash or ice. Less mass is transported by the wind in the case of low particle density because the style of transport is different. There is a direct, counter-intuitive relationship between particle density and transport height. Measurements of the vertical distribution of material show that the low-density walnut shells travel in a zone within 10 cm of the surface while high-density (approximately 4.5 g/cc) chromite particles travel as 50 cm. Furthermore, the overall saltation rate of the chromite is approximately four times greater than the walnut shells at the same freestream wind speed, even though the wind is much further above threshold for the walnut shells.

  3. Origin and transport of high energy particles in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The origin, confinement, and transport of cosmic ray nuclei in the galaxy was studied. The work involves interpretations of the existing cosmic ray physics database derived from both balloon and satellite measurements, combined with an effort directed towards defining the next generation of instruments for the study of cosmic radiation. The shape and the energy dependence of the cosmic ray pathlength distribution in the galaxy was studied, demonstrating that the leaky box model is not a good representation of the detailed particle transport over the energy range covered by the database. Alternative confinement methods were investigated, analyzing the confinement lifetime in these models based upon the available data for radioactive secondary isotopes. The source abundances of several isotopes were studied using compiled nuclear physics data and the detailed transport calculations. The effects of distributed particle acceleration on the secondary to primary ratios were investigated.

  4. Applying Dispersive Changes to Lagrangian Particles in Groundwater Transport Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative. ?? US Government 2010.

  5. Applying dispersive changes to Lagrangian particles in groundwater transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.

    2010-01-01

    Method-of-characteristics groundwater transport models require that changes in concentrations computed within an Eulerian framework to account for dispersion be transferred to moving particles used to simulate advective transport. A new algorithm was developed to accomplish this transfer between nodal values and advecting particles more precisely and realistically compared to currently used methods. The new method scales the changes and adjustments of particle concentrations relative to limiting bounds of concentration values determined from the population of adjacent nodal values. The method precludes unrealistic undershoot or overshoot for concentrations of individual particles. In the new method, if dispersion causes cell concentrations to decrease during a time step, those particles in the cell having the highest concentration will decrease the most, and those with the lowest concentration will decrease the least. The converse is true if dispersion is causing concentrations to increase. Furthermore, if the initial concentration on a particle is outside the range of the adjacent nodal values, it will automatically be adjusted in the direction of the acceptable range of values. The new method is inherently mass conservative.

  6. Particle acceleration and transport in a chaotic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, G.; Dasgupta, B.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent chaotic magnetic field can arise from a simple asymmetric current wire-loop system (CWLS). Such simple CWLSs exist, for example, in solar flares. Indeed one can use an ensemble of such systems to model solar active region magnetic field [1,2]. Here we use test particle simulation to investigate particle transport and energization in such a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field, and through induction, a chaotic electric field. We first construct an ensemble of simple systems based on the estimated size and field strength of solar active region. By following the trajectories of single charged particles, we will examine how particle energy is changed. Diffusion coefficients in both real space and momentum space can be calculated as well as the average trapped time of the particles within chaotic field region. Particle energy spectrum as a function of time will be examined. [1] Dasgupta, B. and Abhay K. Ram, (2007) Chaotic magnetic fields due to asymmetric current configurations -application to cross field diffusion of particles in cosmic rays, (Presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the DPP, APS, Abstract # BP8.00102) [2] G. Li, B. Dasgupta, G. Webb, and A. K. Ram, (2009) Particle Motion and Energization in a Chaotic Magnetic Field, AIP Conf. Proc. 1183, pp. 201-211; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3266777

  7. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  8. Stochastic transport of interacting particles in periodically driven ratchets.

    PubMed

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Marchesoni, Fabio; Nori, Franco

    2004-12-01

    An open system of overdamped, interacting Brownian particles diffusing on a periodic substrate potential U(x+l)=U(x) is studied in terms of an infinite set of coupled partial differential equations describing the time evolution of the relevant many-particle distribution functions. In the mean-field approximation, this hierarchy of equations can be replaced by a nonlinear integro-differential Fokker-Planck equation. This is applicable when the distance a between particles is much less than the interaction length lambda , i.e., a particle interacts with many others, resulting in averaging out fluctuations. The equation obtained in the mean-field approximation is applied to an ensemble of locally (aparticles placed in an asymmetric one-dimensional substrate potential, either with an oscillating temperature (temperature rachet) or driven by an ac force (rocked ratchet). In both cases we focus on the high-frequency limit. For the temperature ratchet, we find that the net current is typically suppressed (or can even be inverted) with increasing density of the repelling particles. In contrast, the net current through a rocked ratchet can be enhanced by increasing the density of the repelling particles. In the case of attracting particles, our perturbation technique is valid up to a critical value of the particle density, above which a finite fraction of the particles starts condensing in a liquidlike state near the substrate minima. The dependence of the net transport current on the particle density and the interparticle potential is analyzed in detail for different values of the ratchet parameters.

  9. Analysis of cargo transport by IFT and GFP imaging of IFT in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Diener, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the organism in which intraflagellar transport (IFT) was first visualized and in which the composition of IFT particles was originally elucidated. As the universality of IFT among ciliated/flagellated cells was uncovered, the diversity of organisms used to study IFT has grown. Still, because of the ease of isolation of flagella from Chlamydomonas and the battery of temperature-sensitive mutants affecting IFT proteins and motors, this unicellular alga remains the principal model for biochemical studies of IFT motors and cargo; furthermore, the long, exposed flagella of this cell are ideally suited for observing IFT in real time with GFP-tagged components of IFT.

  10. Transport of sputtered particles in capacitive sputter sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The transport of sputtered aluminum inside a multi frequency capacitively coupled plasma chamber is simulated by means of a kinetic test multi-particle approach. A novel consistent set of scattering parameters obtained for a modified variable hard sphere collision model is presented for both argon and aluminum. An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution is fitted to results from Monte Carlo simulations and used for the kinetic simulation of the transport of sputtered aluminum. For the proposed configuration, the transport of sputtered particles is characterized under typical process conditions at a gas pressure of p = 0.5 Pa. It is found that—due to the peculiar geometric conditions—the transport can be understood in a one dimensional picture, governed by the interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. It is shown that the precise geometric features play an important role only in proximity to the electrode edges, where the effect of backscattering from the outside chamber volume becomes the governing mechanism.

  11. Full f gyrokinetic method for particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Ogando, F.

    2008-05-10

    A gyrokinetic particle-in-cell approach with direct implicit construction of the coefficient matrix of the Poisson equation from ion polarization and electron parallel nonlinearity is described and applied in global electrostatic toroidal plasma transport simulations. The method is applicable for calculation of the evolution of particle distribution function f including as special cases strong plasma pressure profile evolution by transport and formation of neoclassical flows. This is made feasible by full f formulation and by recording the charge density changes due to the ion polarization drift and electron acceleration along the local magnetic field while particles are advanced. The code has been validated against the linear predictions of the unstable ion temperature gradient mode growth rates and frequencies. Convergence and saturation in both turbulent and neoclassical limit of the ion heat conductivity is obtained with numerical noise well suppressed by a sufficiently large number of simulation particles. A first global full f validation of the neoclassical radial electric field in the presence of turbulence for a heated collisional tokamak plasma is obtained. At high Mach number (M{sub p}{approx}1) of the poloidal flow, the radial electric field is significantly enhanced over the standard neoclassical prediction. The neoclassical radial electric field together with the related GAM oscillations is found to regulate the turbulent heat and particle diffusion levels particularly strongly in a large aspect ratio tokamak at low plasma current.

  12. How entropy and hydrodynamics cooperate in rectifying particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, S.; Schmid, G.; Straube, A. V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Hänggi, P.

    2013-10-01

    Using the analytical Fick-Jacobs approximation formalism and extensive Brownian dynamics simulations we study particle transport through two-dimensional periodic channels with triangularly shaped walls. Directed motion is caused by the interplay of constant bias acting along the channel axis and a pressure-driven flow. In particular, we analyze the particle mobility and the effective diffusion coefficient. The mechanisms of entropic rectification is revealed in channels with a broken spatial reflection symmetry in presence of hydrodynamically enforced entropic trapping. Due to the combined action of the forcing and the pressure-driven flow field, efficient rectification with a drastically reduced diffusivity is achieved.

  13. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  14. Momentum and particle transport in a nonhomogenous canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew W.

    Turbulent particle transport through the air plays an important role in the life cycle of many plant pathogens. In this study, data from a field experiment was analyzed to explore momentum and particle transport within a grape vineyard. The overall goal of these experiments was to understand how the architecture of a sparse agricultural canopy interacts with turbulent flow and ultimately determines the dispersion of airborne fungal plant pathogens. Turbulence in the vineyard canopy was measured using an array of four sonic anemometers deployed at heights z/H 0.4, 0.9, 1.45, and 1.95 where z is the height of the each sonic and H is the canopy height. In addition to turbulence measurements from the sonic anemometers, particle dispersion was measured using inert particles with the approximate size and density of powdery mildew spores and a roto-rod impaction trap array. Measurements from the sonic anemometers demonstrate that first and second order statistics of the wind field are dependent on wind direction orientation with respect to vineyard row direction. This dependence is a result of wind channeling which transfers energy between the velocity components when the wind direction is not aligned with the rows. Although the winds have a strong directional dependence, spectra analysis indicates that the structure of the turbulent flow is not fundamentally altered by the interaction between wind direction and row direction. Examination of a limited number of particle release events indicates that the wind turning and channeling observed in the momentum field impacts particle dispersion. For row-aligned flow, particle dispersion in the direction normal to the flow is decreased relative to the plume spread predicted by a standard Gaussian plume model. For flow that is not aligned with the row direction, the plume is found to rotate in the same manner as the momentum field.

  15. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  16. Particle transport in pellet fueled JET (Jet European Torus) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Pellet fueling experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak with a multi-pellet injector. The pellets are injected at speeds approaching 1400 m/s and penetrate deep into the JET plasma. Highly peaked electron density profiles are achieved when penetration of the pellets approaches or goes beyond the magnetic axis, and these peaked profiles persist for more than two seconds in ohmic discharges and over one second in ICRF heated discharges. In this dissertation, analysis of electron particle transport in multi-pellet fueled JET limiter plasmas under a variety of heating conditions is described. The analysis is carried out with a one and one-half dimensional radial particle transport code to model the experimental density evolution with various particle transport coefficients. These analyses are carried out in plasmas with ohmic heating, ICRF heating, and neural beam heating, in limiter configurations. Peaked density profile cases are generally characterized by diffusion coefficients with a central (r/a < 0.5) diffusivity {approximately}0.1 m{sup 2}/s that increases rapidly to {approximately}0.3 m{sup 2}/s at r/a = 0.6 and then increases out to the plasma edge as (r/a){sup 2}. These discharges can be satisfactorily modeled without any anomalous convective (pinch) flux. 79 refs., 60 figs.

  17. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  18. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  19. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  20. Transport of Particle Swarms Through Variable Aperture Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Particle transport through fractured rock is a key concern with the increased use of micro- and nano-size particles in consumer products as well as from other activities in the sub- and near surface (e.g. mining, industrial waste, hydraulic fracturing, etc.). While particle transport is often studied as the transport of emulsions or dispersions, particles may also enter the subsurface from leaks or seepage that lead to particle swarms. Swarms are drop-like collections of millions of colloidal-sized particles that exhibit a number of unique characteristics when compared to dispersions and emulsions. Any contaminant or engineered particle that forms a swarm can be transported farther, faster, and more cohesively in fractures than would be expected from a traditional dispersion model. In this study, the effects of several variable aperture fractures on colloidal swarm cohesiveness and evolution were studied as a swarm fell under gravity and interacted with the fracture walls. Transparent acrylic was used to fabricate synthetic fracture samples with (1) a uniform aperture, (2) a converging region followed by a uniform region (funnel shaped), (3) a uniform region followed by a diverging region (inverted funnel), and (4) a cast of a an induced fracture from a carbonate rock. All of the samples consisted of two blocks that measured 100 x 100 x 50 mm. The minimum separation between these blocks determined the nominal aperture (0.5 mm to 20 mm). During experiments a fracture was fully submerged in water and swarms were released into it. The swarms consisted of a dilute suspension of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (1% by mass) with an initial volume of 5μL. The swarms were illuminated with a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged optically with a CCD camera. The variation in fracture aperture controlled swarm behavior. Diverging apertures caused a sudden loss of confinement that resulted in a rapid change in the swarm's shape as well as a sharp increase in its velocity

  1. Particle Simulations of DARHT-II Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B; Chen, Y J

    2001-06-11

    The DARHT-II beam line utilizes a fast stripline kicker to temporally chop a high current electron beam from a single induction LINAC and deliver multiple temporal electron beam pulses to an x-ray converter target. High beam quality needs to be maintained throughout the transport line from the end of the accelerator through the final focus lens to the x-ray converter target to produce a high quality radiographic image. Issues that will affect beam quality such as spot size and emittance at the converter target include dynamic effects associated with the stripline kicker as well as emittance growth due to the nonlinear forces associated with the kicker and various focusing elements in the transport line. In addition, dynamic effects associated with transverse resistive wall instability as well as gas focusing will affect the beam transport. A particle-in-cell code is utilized to evaluate beam transport in the downstream transport line in DARHT-II. External focusing forces are included utilizing either analytic expressions or field maps. Models for wakefields from the beam kicker, transverse resistive wall instability, and gas focusing are included in the simulation to provide a more complete picture of beam transport in DARHT-II. From these simulations, for various initial beam loads based on expected accelerator performance the temporally integrated target spot size and emittance can be estimated.

  2. PAHs loadings of particles as tracer for origin and transport dynamics of particles in river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, Marc; Hermann, Rügner; Bennett, Jeremy-Paul; Grathwohl, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Transport of many urban pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles, potentially dominated by storm water overflows and mobilization of legacy contamination of sediments. Concentration of these pollutants depends on the mixture of "polluted" urban and "clean" background particles. In the current study, the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) were meaured in the course of pronounced flood events in 3 catchments with contrast¬ing land use in Southwest Germany. Average PAHs loadings were calculated based on linear regressions of total PAHs concentrations versus TSS. For single samples PAHs loadings were estimated based on PAHs/TSS quotients. Average loadings are characteristic for each catchment and represent the number of inhabitants within the catchment per load of suspended sediment. The absence of significant long-term trends or pronounced changes of the catchment-specific loadings indicate that either input and output of PAHs into the stream networks are largely at steady state or that storage of PAHs in the sediments within the stream network are sufficient to smooth out larger fluctuations. Sampling at high temporal resolution during flood events revealed that loadings do show some short-term fluctuations and, additionally, that loadings show generally slightly decreasing trends during flood events. This is attributed to temporally and spatially varying contributions of particle inputs from sewer overflows and subcatchments which causes a changing proportion of urban and background particles. The decreasing trend is interpreted as the existence of a PAHs storage within the stream network and a slowly depletion therof in PAHs by the inputs of fresh particles in the course of the events. To better understand origin, transport and storage of contaminated particles, also metals, total organic carbon and carbonate content were measured for suspended particles

  3. Measurement of particle transport coefficients on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, T.C.T.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the behavior of the plasma transport during the divertor detachment in order to explain the central electron density rise. The measurement of particle transport coefficients requires sophisticated diagnostic tools. A two color interferometer system was developed and installed on Alcator C-Mod to measure the electron density with high spatial ({approx} 2 cm) and high temporal ({le} 1.0 ms) resolution. The system consists of 10 CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) and 4 HeNe (.6328 {mu}m) chords that are used to measure the line integrated density to within 0.08 CO{sub 2} degrees or 2.3 {times} 10{sup 16}m{sup {minus}2} theoretically. Using the two color interferometer, a series of gas puffing experiments were conducted. The density was varied above and below the threshold density for detachment at a constant magnetic field and plasma current. Using a gas modulation technique, the particle diffusion, D, and the convective velocity, V, were determined. Profiles were inverted using a SVD inversion and the transport coefficients were extracted with a time regression analysis and a transport simulation analysis. Results from each analysis were in good agreement. Measured profiles of the coefficients increased with the radius and the values were consistent with measurements from other experiments. The values exceeded neoclassical predictions by a factor of 10. The profiles also exhibited an inverse dependence with plasma density. The scaling of both attached and detached plasmas agreed well with this inverse scaling. This result and the lack of change in the energy and impurity transport indicate that there was no change in the underlying transport processes after detachment.

  4. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingjiang

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energization of particles (both electrons and ions) to tens and hundreds of keV and the associated transport process in the magnetotail during substorms. Particles energized in the magnetotail are further accelerated to even higher energies (hundreds of keV to MeV) in the radiation belts, causing space weather hazards to human activities in space and on ground. We develop an analytical model to quantitatively estimate flux changes caused by betatron and Fermi acceleration when particles are transported along narrow high-speed flow channels from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere. The model shows that energetic particle flux can be significantly enhanced by a modest compression of the magnetic field and/or shrinking of the distance between the magnetic mirror points. We use coordinated spacecraft measurements, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by measured upstream solar wind conditions, and large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulations to quantify electron local acceleration in the near-Earth reconnection region and nonlocal acceleration during plasma earthward transport. Compared to the analytical model, application of the LSK simulations is much less restrictive because trajectories of millions of test particles are calculated in the realistically determined global MHD fields and the results are statistical. The simulation results validated by the observations show that electrons following a power law distribution at high energies are generated earthward of the reconnection site, and that the majority of the energetic electrons observed in the inner magnetosphere are caused by adiabatic acceleration in association with magnetic dipolarizations and fast flows during earthward transport. We extend the global MHD+LSK simulations to examine ion energization and compare it with electron energization. The simulations demonstrate that ions in the magnetotail are first nonadiabatically accelerated in the weak

  5. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  6. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  7. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  8. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  9. Production and global transport of Titan's sand particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Hayes, Alexander G.; Arnold, Karl; Chandler, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Previous authors have suggested that Titan's individual sand particles form by either sintering or by lithification and erosion. We suggest two new mechanisms for the production of Titan's organic sand particles that would occur within bodies of liquid: flocculation and evaporitic precipitation. Such production mechanisms would suggest discrete sand sources in dry lakebeds. We search for such sources, but find no convincing candidates with the present Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer coverage. As a result we propose that Titan's equatorial dunes may represent a single, global sand sea with west-to-east transport providing sources and sinks for sand in each interconnected basin. The sand might then be transported around Xanadu by fast-moving Barchan dune chains and/or fluvial transport in transient riverbeds. A river at the Xanadu/Shangri-La border could explain the sharp edge of the sand sea there, much like the Kuiseb River stops the Namib Sand Sea in southwest Africa on Earth. Future missions could use the composition of Titan's sands to constrain the global hydrocarbon cycle.

  10. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  11. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  12. Field-aligned Transport and Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Sokolov, I.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) phenomena represent one of the major components of space weather. Often, but not exclusively associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), they pose a significant scientific as well as practical interest. As these particles originate at such explosive events, they have energies up to several GeV. SEP may cause disruptions in operations of space instruments and spacecrafts and are dangerous to astronauts. For this reason, studies of SEP events and predictions of their impact are of great importance. The motion and acceleration of SEP, though kinetic in nature, is governed by Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and its disturbances. Therefore, a consistent and accurate simulation and predictive tool must include a realistic MHD model of IMF. At the same time, transport of SEP is essentially one-dimensional as at high energies particles are tied to magnetic field lines. This allows building a model that can effectively map active regions on the solar surface onto various regions of the Solar System thus predicting the affected regions of the at any distance from the Sun. We present the first attempt to construct a model that employs coupling of MHD and kinetic models. The former describes the evolution of IMF disturbed by CME, while the latter simulates particles moving along the field lines extracted from MHD model. The first results are provided.

  13. Modeling Single Particle Transport in Stochastic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Ben; Fiksel, Gennady; Prager, Stewart

    2001-10-01

    Single particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field is simulated via code ION and RIO. Developed in collaboration with a group in Novosibirsk, Russia, they simulate both single ion and multiple ion trajectories in a stochastic magnetic field. A sharp decrease in the relative diffusion of ions to magnetic field lines is seen in two gyro-radii regimes. One is explainable from the unbroken flux surfaces near the edge of the plasma. The other is thought to be due to a "gyro-averaging" effect that occurs when the gyro-radius exceeds the radial correlation length of the field lines. The simulations indicate a decrease in expected transport, most strongly as a function of gyro-radius, which will be tested experimentally with the MST neutral beam injector.

  14. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  15. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-06-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  16. Simulating the transport of heavy charged particles through trabecular spongiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh, Jacob A.

    As planning continues for manned missions far beyond Low Earth Orbit, a paramount concern remains the flight crew's exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. When humans exit the protective magnetic field of Earth, they become subject to bombardment by highly-reactive heavy charged (HZE) particles. A possible consequence of this two- to three-year-long mission is the onset of radiation-induced leukemia, a disorder with a latency period as short as two to three years. Because data on risk to humans from exposure to HZE particles is non-existent, studies of leukemia in animals are now underway to investigate the relative effectiveness of HZE exposures. Leukemogenesis can result from energy depositions occurring within marrow contained in the trabecular spongiosa. Trabecular spongiosa is found in flat bones and within the ends of long bones, and is characterized by an intricate matrix of interconnected bone tissue forming cavities that house marrow. The microscopic internal dimensions of spongiosa vary between species. As radiation traverses this region, interface-induced dose perturbations that occur at the interfaces between bone and marrow affect the patterns of energy deposition within the region. An aim of this project is to determine the extent by which tissue heterogeneity and microscopic dimensions have on patterns of energy deposition within the trabecular spongiosa. This leads to the development of PATHFIT, a computer code capable of generating simple quadric-based geometric models of trabecular spongiosa for both humans and mice based on actual experimentally-determined internal dimensions of trabecular spongiosa. Following the creation of spongiosa models, focus is placed on the development of HITSPAP, a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport code system that combines capabilities of the MC code PENELOPE and MC code PARTRAC. This code is capable of simulating the transport of HZE particles through accurate models of trabecular spongiosa. The final and

  17. Investigations of Particle Transport in the Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, E. I.; Rowan, W. L.; Gentle, K. W.; Huang, H.; Williams, C. B.

    2016-10-01

    The correlation between electrostatic turbulence and particle flux is investigated in a simple magnetic torus, the Helimak. The Helimak is an experimental realization of a sheared cylindrical slab that generates and heats a plasma with microwaves at 2.45 GHz and confines it in a helical magnetic field. Although it is MHD stable, the plasma is always in a nonlinearly saturated state of microturbulence. The causes of this turbulence are diverse and it is thought that it is either due to drift wave instabilities or interchange instabilites. The local particle flux is estimated over most of the plasma cross section by measuring the particle source using filtered cameras. Plasma flow along the field lines is physically similar to SOL flows in tokamaks. It is significant and can be measured directly as well as inferred from asymmetries in the electron density. The cross field transport due to electrostatic turbulence is measured as the cross correlation of radial electric field fluctuations with electron density fluctuations with the data acquired using Langmuir probes. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54766.

  18. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  19. Transport of large particles in flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imdakm, A. O.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    1987-12-01

    There is considerable evidence indicating that significant reduction in the efficiency of many processes in porous media, such as enhancing oil recovery, heterogeneous chemical reactions, deep-bed filtration, gel permeation, and liquid chromatography, is due to the reduction in the permeability of the pore space. This reduction is due to the transport of particles, whose sizes are comparable with those of the pores, and the subsequent blocking of the pores by various mechanisms. In this paper we develop a novel Monte Carlo method for theoretical modeling of this phenomenon. Particles of various sizes are injected into the medium, and their migration in the flow field is modeled by a random walk whose transition porbability is proportional to the local pore fluxes. Pores are blocked and their flow capacity is reduced (or vanished) when large particles pass through them (and reduce their flow) or totally block them. The permeability of the medium can ultimately vanish and, therefore, this phenomenon is a percolation process. Various quantities of interest such as the variations of the permeability with process time and the distribution of pore-plugging times are computed. The critical exponent characterizing the vanishing of the permeability near the percolation threshold appears to be different from that of percolation conductivity. The agreement between our results and the available experimental data is excellent.

  20. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in Reservoirs throughout the Heliosphere: 1. Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2015-09-01

    “Reservoirs” of energetic charged particles are regions where the particle population is quasi-trapped in large-scale (relative to the gyroradii) magnetic field structures. Reservoirs are found throughout the heliosphere: the huge heliosheath (90particles within these reservoirs is produced by the interaction when the particle magnetic drifts have a component along the large-scale electric fields produced by plasma convection. The appropriate description of this transport is “weak scattering”, in which the particle's first adiabatic invariant (magnetic moment) is approximately conserved while the particle itself moves rather freely along magnetic field lines. Considerable insight into the observed properties of energization processes can be gained from a remarkably simple equation that describes the particle's fractional time-rate-of-change of momentum (dlnp/dt) which depends only upon its pitch angle, the divergence of the plasma velocity (V⊥) transverse to the magnetic field), and the inner product of (V⊥) with the curvature vector of the field lines. The possibilities encompassed in this simple (but general) equation are quite rich, so we restrict our application of it in this paper to the compressive acceleration of SEPs within CMEs.

  1. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  2. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in transportation microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongwoo; Jaimes, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    This study is one of the first case studies to characterize the exposure of urban residents to traffic-related air pollution across locations and transportation microenvironments during everyday activities. Twenty-four adult residents of Boyle Heights, a neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles, carried a portable air pollution monitor and a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tracking device for a total of 96 days. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pPAH) concentrations in transportation microenvironments. Average pPAH concentrations were higher while walking outdoors (190 ng m-3) compared to traveling in private passenger vehicles (138-155 ng m-3) or traveling in public transportation (61-124 ng m-3). Although travel comprised 5% of participant days, it was associated with 27% of overall daily pPAH exposure. Regression models explained 40-55% of the variation in daily average pPAH concentrations, and 40-44% of the variation in 1-min interval concentrations. Important factors included time spent traveling, travel speed, meteorological and nearby land use factors, time of day, and proximity to roadways. Although future research is needed to develop stronger predictive models, our study demonstrates portable tracking devices can provide a more complete, diurnal characterization of air pollution exposures for urban populations.

  3. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  4. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions on rectified transport of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-quan; He, Ya-feng; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2017-01-01

    Directed transport of self-propelled particles is numerically investigated in a three-dimensional asymmetric potential. Beside the steric repulsive forces, hydrodynamic interactions between particles have been taken into account in an approximate way. From numerical simulations, we find that hydrodynamic interactions can strongly affect the rectified transport of self-propelled particles. Hydrodynamic interactions enhance the performance of the rectified transport when particles can easily pass across the barrier of the potential, and reduce the rectified transport when particles are mainly trapped in the potential well.

  5. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Andreas; Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst; Effenberger, Frederic; Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd; Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S.

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  6. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  7. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions.

  8. A moment-preserving nonanalog method for charged particle transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K.; Franke, Brian Claude; Fichtl, Erin; Harding, Lee T.

    2004-09-01

    Extremely short collision mean free paths and near-singular elastic and inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) make analog Monte Carlo simulation an impractical tool for charged particle transport. The widely used alternative, the condensed history method, while efficient, also suffers from several limitations arising from the use of precomputed smooth distributions for sampling. There is much interest in developing computationally efficient algorithms that implement the correct transport mechanics. Here we present a nonanalog transport-based method that incorporates the correct transport mechanics and is computationally efficient for implementation in single event Monte Carlo codes. Our method systematically preserves important physics and is mathematically rigorous. It builds on higher order Fokker-Planck and Boltzmann Fokker-Planck representations of the scattering and energy-loss process, and we accordingly refer to it as a Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck (GBFP) approach. We postulate the existence of nonanalog single collision scattering and energy-loss distributions (differential cross sections) and impose the constraint that the first few momentum transfer and energy loss moments be identical to corresponding analog values. This is effected through a decomposition or hybridizing scheme wherein the singular forward peaked, small energy-transfer collisions are isolated and de-singularized using different moment-preserving strategies, while the large angle, large energy-transfer collisions are described by the exact (analog) DCS or approximated to a high degree of accuracy. The inclusion of the latter component allows the higher angle and energy-loss moments to be accurately captured. This procedure yields a regularized transport model characterized by longer mean free paths and smoother scattering and energy transfer kernels than analog. In practice, acceptable accuracy is achieved with two rigorously preserved moments, but accuracy can be

  9. Discrete particle model for sheet flow sediment transport in the nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Thomas G.; Calantoni, Joseph

    2001-09-01

    Fully three-dimensional discrete particle computer simulations of high-concentration sheet flow transport in oscillatory flows quantify the effect of fluid acceleration on bed load transport in highly unsteady flows typical of nearshore marine environments. A simple impulse-momentum approach explains simulation results and forms the basis for adding an acceleration-related term to widely used energetics sediment transport formulae. Transport predicted by the acceleration term becomes increasingly significant as wave shape approaches the sawtooth profile characteristic of surf zone bores. Simulations integrate F = ma and a corresponding set of equations for the torques for each sphere. Normal and tangential forces between contacting particles are linear functions of the distance between sphere centers and the relative tangential displacement at the contact point, respectively; particle interactions are both inelastic and frictional. Pressure gradient forces generated by the passage of surface gravity waves drive fluid and particle motion in a stack of thin horizontal fluid layers that exchange momentum and exert fluid drag, added mass, and buoyancy forces on particles. Transport properties of the simulated granular-fluid assemblage are robust to large variations in material properties of the particles. Simulated transport rates agree with available experimental data for unsteady transport of coarse sands; the mode of bed load motion, dispersion of bed load particles, and particle segregation by size and density are qualitatively consistent with available particle-scale observations of bed load transport of natural particles.

  10. Altered transport of lindane caused by the retention of natural particles in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K.; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2014-07-01

    Attachment and straining of colloidal particles in porous media result in their reversible and irreversible retention. The retained particles may either increase the retention of hydrophobic pollutants by sorption onto the particles, or enhance pollutant transport when particles, loaded with the pollutants, are remobilized. The present study examines the effects of retained particles on the transport of the hydrophobic pesticide lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) in saturated porous media. The lignite particles used have median diameters of about 3 μm, 1 μm, 0.8 μm, and 0.2 μm, respectively. Laboratory column experiments were analyzed by numerical modeling in order to identify and understand the processes involved in the transport of the particles and of lindane. Four scenarios were considered in which the solution containing lindane is injected either during or after the elution of the particles. The results show that lignite particles retained in a sandy porous medium alter the transport of the invading lindane. Particle retention was high in all scenarios and increased with increasing particle size. Remobilization of particles occurred due to a change in solution chemistry, and continuous particle detachment was observed over time. Numerical modeling of particle transport suggests that both reversible attachment and irreversible straining affected the transport of the particles. Lindane was retarded in all scenarios due to the strong particle retention in conjunction with the sorption of lindane onto the sand and onto retained particles, and the limited number of mobile particles carrying lindane. Moreover, it was found that intra-particle diffusion limited adsorption/desorption of lindane onto/from both limestone fragments of the sand and lignite particles. We assume that retention of lindane is reversible even though lindane recovery was incomplete over the duration of the experiments. The analysis of the effluent concentration suggests that retained

  11. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  12. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  13. Electron tomography of IFT particles.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Cantele, Francesca; Vannuccini, Elisa; Lanzavecchia, Salvatore; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lupetti, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Cilia and flagella play very important roles in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell motility to chemo- and mechanosensation with active involvement in embryonic development and control of cell division. Cilia and flagella are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant turnover at their tip, where multiprotein precursors synthesized in the cell cytoplasm are assembled, turnover products are released and carried back for recycling. Such bidirectional trafficking is maintained by an ATP-dependent active transport that is carried out by intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles. Despite our knowledge of the cell biology, the genomic, and the biochemistry of IFT, high-resolution 3D models for IFT are still missing. To date, the only information on the 3D structure of IFT come from our analysis of full-length flagella from the biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the model organism where IFT was discovered and first characterized. In this chapter, we describe and discuss the strategy we implemented to produce the first 3D models of in situ IFT trains in flat-embedded flagella. We provide detailed information about the acquisition of tomographic images, the simultaneous alignment of the double-tilt tomographic series, and the analysis of the tomograms by subtomogram averaging for the generation of detailed 3D models of IFT particles.

  14. Kinetic simulation of neutral particle transport in sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Ries, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    For many physical vapor deposition applications using sputtering processes, knowledge about the detailed spatial and temporal evolution of the involved gas species is of great importance. Modeling of the involved gas dynamic and plasma processes is however challenging, because the operating pressure is typically below 1 Pa. In consequence, only kinetic descriptions are appropriate. In order to approach this problem, the dynamics of sputtered particle transport through a neutral gas background is simulated. For this study, a modified version of the three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is utilized. The impact of a transient sputtering wind is investigated in a generic reactor geometry, which may be used for dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS), High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS), as well as sputtering in capacitively coupled discharges. In the present work a rarefaction of the background gas is observed. Moreover in pulsed mode the temporal dynamics of the rarefaction and subsequent recovery of the background gas is investigated. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of TRR 87.

  15. Coherent pulses in the diffusive transport of charged particles`

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kota, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present exact solutions to the diffusive transport of charged particles following impulsive injection for a simple model of scattering. A modified, two-parameter relaxation-time model is considered that simulates the low rate of scattering through perpendicular pitch-angle. Scattering is taken to be isotropic within each of the foward- and backward-pointing hemispheres, respectively, but, at the same time, a reduced rate of sccattering is assumed from one hemisphere to the other one. By applying a technique of Fourier- and Laplace-transform, the inverse transformation can be performed and exact solutions can be reached. By contrast with the first, and so far only exact solutions of Federov and Shakov, this wider class of solutions gives rise to coherent pulses to appear. The present work addresses omnidirectional densities for isotropic injection from an instantaneous and localized source. The dispersion relations are briefly discussed. We find, for this particular model, two diffusive models to exist up to a certain limiting wavenumber. The corresponding eigenvalues are real at the lowest wavenumbers. Complex eigenvalues, which are responsible for coherent pulses, appear at higher wavenumbers.

  16. An SN Application of Homotopy Continuation in Neutral Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Nicholas T.

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate the usefulness of homotopy continuation applied in the context of neutral particle transport where traditional methods of acceleration degrade. This occurs in higher dimensional heterogeneous problems. We focus on utilizing homotopy continuation as a means of providing a better initial guess for difficult problems. We investigate various homotopy formulations for two primary difficult problems: a thick-diffusive fixed internal source, and a k-eigenvalue problem with high dominance ratio. We also investigate the usefulness of homotopy continuation for computationally intensive problems with 30-energy groups. We find that homotopy continuation exhibits usefulness in specific problem formulations. In the thick-diffusive problem it shows benefit when there is a strong internal source in thin materials. In the k-eigenvalue problem, homotopy continuation provides an improvement in convergence speed for fixed point iteration methods in high dominance ratio problems. We also show that one of our imbeddings successfully stabilizes the nonlinear formulation of the k-eigenvalue problem with a high dominance ratio.

  17. Chlamydomonas shortens its flagella by activating axonemal disassembly, stimulating IFT particle trafficking, and blocking anterograde cargo loading.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junmin; Snell, William J

    2005-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic cells form cilia/flagella, maintain them at their genetically specified lengths, and shorten them. Here, we define the cellular mechanisms that bring about shortening of flagella prior to meiotic cell division and in response to environmental cues in the biflagellated green alga Chlamydomonas. We show that the flagellar shortening pathway is distinct from the one that enforces transient shortening essential for length control. During flagellar shortening, disassembly of the axoneme is stimulated over the basal rate, and the rate of entry into flagella of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles is increased. Moreover, the particles entering the disassembling flagella lack cargo. Thus, flagellar shortening depends on the interplay between dynamic properties of the axoneme and the IFT machinery; a cell triggered to shorten its flagellum activates disassembly of the axoneme and stimulates entry into the flagellum of IFT particles possessing empty cargo binding sites available to retrieve the disassembled components.

  18. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-12-31

    Particle and energy transport in tokamak plasmas have long been subjects of vigorous investigation. Present-day measurement techniques permit radially resolved studies of the transport of electron perturbations, low- and high-Z impurities, and energy. In addition, developments in transport theory provide tools that can be brought to bear on transport issues. Here, we examine local particle transport measurements of electrons, fully-stripped thermal helium, and helium-like iron in balanced-injection L-mode and enhanced confinement deuterium plasmas on TFTR of the same plasma current, toroidal field, and auxiliary heating power. He{sup 2{plus}} and Fe{sup 24{plus}} transport has been studied with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, while electron transport has been studied by analyzing the perturbed electron flux following the same helium puff used for the He{sup 2{plus}} studies. By examining the electron and He{sup 2{plus}} responses following the same gas puff in the same plasmas, an unambiguous comparison of the transport of the two species has been made. The local energy transport has been examined with power balance analysis, allowing for comparisons to the local thermal fluxes. Some particle and energy transport results from the Supershot have been compared to a transport model based on a quasilinear picture of electrostatic toroidal drift-type microinstabilities. Finally, implications for future fusion reactors of the observed correlation between thermal transport and helium particle transport is discussed.

  19. Flow and particle dispersion in a pulmonary alveolus--part II: effect of gravity on particle transport.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sudhaker; Prasad, Ajay K

    2010-05-01

    The acinar region of the human lung comprises about 300x10(6) alveoli, which are responsible for gas exchange between the lung and the blood. As discussed in Part I (Chhabra and Prasad, "Flow and Particle Dispersion in a Pulmonary Alveolus-Part I: Velocity Measurements and Convective Particle Transport," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 051009), the deposition of aerosols in the acinar region can either be detrimental to gas exchange (as in the case of harmful particulate matter) or beneficial (as in the case of inhalable pharmaceuticals). We measured the flow field inside an in-vitro model of a single alveolus mounted on a bronchiole and calculated the transport and deposition of massless particles in Part I. This paper focuses on the transport and deposition of finite-sized particles ranging from 0.25 microm to 4 microm under the combined influence of flow-induced advection (computed from velocity maps obtained by particle image velocimetry) and gravitational settling. Particles were introduced during the first inhalation cycle and their trajectories and deposition statistics were calculated for subsequent cycles for three different particle sizes (0.25 microm, 1 microm, and 4 microm) and three alveolar orientations. The key outcome of the study is that particles particles (d(p)=1 microm) deviate to some extent from streamlines and exhibit complex trajectories. The motion of large particles >or=4 microm is dominated by gravitational settling and shows little effect of fluid advection. Additionally, small and midsize particles deposit at about two-thirds height in the alveolus irrespective of the gravitational orientation whereas the deposition of large particles is governed primarily by the orientation of the gravity vector.

  20. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Particle and energy transport in tokamak plasmas have long been subjects of vigorous investigation. Present-day measurement techniques permit radially resolved studies of the transport of electron perturbations, low- and high-Z impurities, and energy. In addition, developments in transport theory provide tools that can be brought to bear on transport issues. Here, we examine local particle transport measurements of electrons, fully-stripped thermal helium, and helium-like iron in balanced-injection L-mode and enhanced confinement deuterium plasmas on TFTR of the same plasma current, toroidal field, and auxiliary heating power. He[sup 2[plus

  1. Continuous Nano-Particle Transport in a Standing Wave Optical Line Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demergis, Vassili; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of the single beam optical trap (SBT) by Ashkin et. al. in 1986, trapping and manipulation of micron-sized particles by optical forces has become instrumental in many areas of research. However, controlled transport of large numbers of particles is difficult using a SBT. Here we introduce a technique for controlled transport that we call an Optical Capillary (OC), named for its ability to strongly confine and continuously transport nanometer-sized particles. The OC, generated by an optical standing wave pattern, is especially strong along the optical axis due to the compensation of the axial scattering force. We utilize the lateral scattering forces to control the transport of particles along a line perpendicular to the optical axis. The measured velocity profiles of single particles in the OC agree with our model predictions.

  2. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  3. Entrainment, motion, and deposition of coarse particles transported by water over a sloping mobile bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, J.; Bohorquez, P.; Ancey, C.

    2016-10-01

    In gravel bed rivers, bed load transport exhibits considerable variability in time and space. Recently, stochastic bed load transport theories have been developed to address the mechanisms and effects of bed load transport fluctuations. Stochastic models involve parameters such as particle diffusivity, entrainment, and deposition rates. The lack of hard information on how these parameters vary with flow conditions is a clear impediment to their application to real-world scenarios. In this paper, we determined the closure equations for the above parameters from laboratory experiments. We focused on shallow supercritical flow on a sloping mobile bed in straight channels, a setting that was representative of flow conditions in mountain rivers. Experiments were run at low sediment transport rates under steady nonuniform flow conditions (i.e., the water discharge was kept constant, but bed forms developed and migrated upstream, making flow nonuniform). Using image processing, we reconstructed particle paths to deduce the particle velocity and its probability distribution, particle diffusivity, and rates of deposition and entrainment. We found that on average, particle acceleration, velocity, and deposition rate were responsive to local flow conditions, whereas entrainment rate depended strongly on local bed activity. Particle diffusivity varied linearly with the depth-averaged flow velocity. The empirical probability distribution of particle velocity was well approximated by a Gaussian distribution when all particle positions were considered together. In contrast, the particles located in close vicinity to the bed had exponentially distributed velocities. Our experimental results provide closure equations for stochastic or deterministic bed load transport models.

  4. Microbial and Organic Fine Particle Transport Dynamics in Streams - a Combined Experimental and Stochastic Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jen; Davies-Colley, Rob; Stott, Rebecca; Sukias, James; Nagels, John; Sharp, Alice; Packman, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    Transport dynamics of microbial cells and organic fine particles are important to stream ecology and biogeochemistry. Cells and particles continuously deposit and resuspend during downstream transport owing to a variety of processes including gravitational settling, interactions with in-stream structures or biofilms at the sediment-water interface, and hyporheic exchange and filtration within underlying sediments. Deposited cells and particles are also resuspended following increases in streamflow. Fine particle retention influences biogeochemical processing of substrates and nutrients (C, N, P), while remobilization of pathogenic microbes during flood events presents a hazard to downstream uses such as water supplies and recreation. We are conducting studies to gain insights into the dynamics of fine particles and microbes in streams, with a campaign of experiments and modeling. The results improve understanding of fine sediment transport, carbon cycling, nutrient spiraling, and microbial hazards in streams. We developed a stochastic model to describe the transport and retention of fine particles and microbes in rivers that accounts for hyporheic exchange and transport through porewaters, reversible filtration within the streambed, and microbial inactivation in the water column and subsurface. This model framework is an advance over previous work in that it incorporates detailed transport and retention processes that are amenable to measurement. Solute, particle, and microbial transport were observed both locally within sediment and at the whole-stream scale. A multi-tracer whole-stream injection experiment compared the transport and retention of a conservative solute, fluorescent fine particles, and the fecal indicator bacterium Escherichia coli. Retention occurred within both the underlying sediment bed and stands of submerged macrophytes. The results demonstrate that the combination of local measurements, whole-stream tracer experiments, and advanced modeling

  5. Flow and particle dispersion in a pulmonary alveolus--part I: velocity measurements and convective particle transport.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sudhaker; Prasad, Ajay K

    2010-05-01

    The alveoli are the smallest units of the lung that participate in gas exchange. Although gas transport is governed primarily by diffusion due to the small length scales associated with the acinar region (approximately 500 microm), the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosol particles are influenced by convective airflow patterns. Therefore, understanding alveolar fluid flow and mixing is a necessary first step toward predicting aerosol transport and deposition in the human acinar region. In this study, flow patterns and particle transport have been measured using a simplified in-vitro alveolar model consisting of a single alveolus located on a bronchiole. The model comprises a transparent elastic 5/6 spherical cap (representing the alveolus) mounted over a circular hole on the side of a rigid circular tube (representing the bronchiole). The alveolus is capable of expanding and contracting in phase with the oscillatory flow through the tube. Realistic breathing conditions were achieved by exercising the model at physiologically relevant Reynolds and Womersley numbers. Particle image velocimetry was used to measure the resulting flow patterns in the alveolus. Data were acquired for five cases obtained as combinations of the alveolar-wall motion (nondeforming/oscillating) and the bronchiole flow (none/steady/oscillating). Detailed vector maps at discrete points within a given cycle revealed flow patterns, and transport and mixing of bronchiole fluid into the alveolar cavity. The time-dependent velocity vector fields were integrated over multiple cycles to estimate particle transport into the alveolar cavity and deposition on the alveolar wall. The key outcome of the study is that alveolar-wall motion enhances mixing between the bronchiole and the alveolar fluid. Particle transport and deposition into the alveolar cavity are maximized when the alveolar wall oscillates in tandem with the bronchiole fluid, which is the operating case in the human lung.

  6. Aspect ratio effect on particle transport in turbulent duct flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorani, A.; Vinuesa, R.; Brandt, L.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of dilute micron-sized spherical inertial particles in turbulent duct flows is studied by means of direct numerical simulations of the carrier phase turbulence with one-way coupled Lagrangian particles. The geometries are a square and a rectangular duct with width-to-height aspect ratio AR of 3 operating at Reτ,c = 360 (based on the centerplane friction velocity and duct half-height). The present study is designed to determine the effect of turbulence-driven secondary motion on the particle dynamics. Our results show that a weak cross-flow secondary motion significantly changes the cross-sectional map of the particle concentration, mean velocity, and fluctuations. As the geometry of the duct is widened from AR = 1 to 3, the secondary vortex on the horizontal wall significantly expands in the spanwise direction, and although the kinetic energy of the secondary flow increases close to the corner, it decays towards the duct centreplane in the AR = 3 case so as the turbulent carrier phase approaches the behavior in spanwise-periodic channel flows, a fact that significantly affects the particle statistics. In the square duct the particle concentration in the viscous sublayer is maximum at the duct centreplane, whereas the maximum is found closer to the corner, at a distance of |z/h| ≈ 1.25 from the centreplane, in the AR = 3 case. Interestingly the centreplane concentration in the rectangular duct is around 3 times lower than that in the square duct. Moreover, a second peak in the accumulation distribution is found right at the corners for both ducts. At this location the concentration increases with particle inertia. The secondary motion changes also the cross-stream map of the particle velocities significantly in comparison to the fluid flow statistics. These directly affect the particle velocity fluctuations such that multiple peaks appear near the duct walls for the particle streamwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations.

  7. The effect of inelastic collisions on the transport of alpha particles in ITER-like plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Farengo, R.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of charge changes on the transport of alpha particles in ITER-like plasmas is studied with a numerical code that follows the exact particle trajectories and includes the effect of elastic and inelastic collisions. It is shown that charge changing processes can produce significant changes in the transport of alpha particles in the edge-SOL region. The addition of inelastic collisions actually reduces the alpha particle loss rate below the level obtained when only elastic (Coulomb) collisions are included. This is due to the inward flux produced by the neutral density gradient. Power losses, on the other hand, remain at approximately the same level because the average energy of the lost particles is higher when inelastic collisions are included. Finally, the spatial distribution of the lost particles changes significantly when inelastic collisions are added, with a larger fraction of the lost particles reaching the wall.

  8. Effect of weightlessness on colloidal particle transport and segregation in self-organising microtubule preparations.

    PubMed

    Tabony, James; Rigotti, Nathalie; Glade, Nicolas; Cortès, Sandra

    2007-05-01

    Weightlessness is known to effect cellular functions by as yet undetermined processes. Many experiments indicate a role of the cytoskeleton and microtubules. Under appropriate conditions in vitro microtubule preparations behave as a complex system that self-organises by a combination of reaction and diffusion. This process also results in the collective transport and organisation of any colloidal particles present. In large centimetre-sized samples, self-organisation does not occur when samples are exposed to a brief early period of weightlessness. Here, we report both space-flight and ground-based (clinorotation) experiments on the effect of weightlessness on the transport and segregation of colloidal particles and chromosomes. In centimetre-sized containers, both methods show that a brief initial period of weightlessness strongly inhibits particle transport. In miniature cell-sized containers under normal gravity conditions, the particle transport that self-organisation causes results in their accumulation into segregated regions of high and low particle density. The gravity dependence of this behaviour is strongly shape dependent. In square wells, neither self-organisation nor particle transport and segregation occur under conditions of weightlessness. On the contrary, in rectangular canals, both phenomena are largely unaffected by weightlessness. These observations suggest, depending on factors such as cell and embryo shape, that major biological functions associated with microtubule driven particle transport and organisation might be strongly perturbed by weightlessness.

  9. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-02

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants.

  10. The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, E.; Louge, M.; Jenkins, J. T.

    1989-09-01

    A model of dilute gas-solid flow in vertical risers is developed in which the particle phase is treated as a granular material, the balance equations for rapid granular flow are modified to incorporate the drag force from the gas, and boundary conditions, based on collisional exchanges of momentum and energy at the wall, are employed. In this model, it is assumed that the particle fluctuations are determined by inter-particle collisions only and that the turbulence of the gas is unaffected by the presence of the particles. The model is developed in the context of, but not limited to, steady, fully developed flow. A numerical solution of the resulting governing equations provides concentration profiles generally observed in dilute pneumatic flow, velocity profiles in good agreement with the measurements of Tsuji, et al. (1984), and an explanation for the enhancement of turbulence that they observed.

  11. The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastorakos, E.; Louge, M.; Jenkins, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    A model of dilute gas-solid flow in vertical risers is developed in which the particle phase is treated as a granular material, the balance equations for rapid granular flow are modified to incorporate the drag force from the gas, and boundary conditions, based on collisional exchanges of momentum and energy at the wall, are employed. In this model, it is assumed that the particle fluctuations are determined by inter-particle collisions only and that the turbulence of the gas is unaffected by the presence of the particles. The model is developed in the context of, but not limited to, steady, fully developed flow. A numerical solution of the resulting governing equations provides concentration profiles generally observed in dilute pneumatic flow, velocity profiles in good agreement with the measurements of Tsuji, et al. (1984), and an explanation for the enhancement of turbulence that they observed.

  12. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  13. Review of the facile (F/sub N/) method in particle transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1985-10-01

    The facile (F/sub N/) method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail.

  14. Changes in particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gentle, K. W.; Reimerdes, H.; Schmitz, O.; Solomon, W. M.; Staebler, G. M.

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we introduce the first direct perturbed particle transport measurements in resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) H-mode plasmas. The perturbed particle transport increases as a result of application of RMP deep into the core. In the core, a large reduction in E Multiplication-Sign B shear to a value below the linear growth rate, in conjunction with increasing density fluctuations, is consistent with an increase in turbulent particle transport. In the edge, the changes in turbulent particle transport are less obvious. There is a clear correlation between the linear growth rates and the density fluctuations measured at different scales, but it is uncertain which is the cause and which is the consequence.

  15. Changes in particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Doyle, E. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R.A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gentle, T. K.; Reimerdes, H.; Schmitz, O.; Solomon, W. M.; Staebler, G. M.; Wang, G. Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the first direct perturbed particle transport measurements in resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) H-mode plasmas. The perturbed particle transport increases as a result of application of RMP deep into the core. In the core, a large reduction in E x B shear to a value below the linear growth rate, in conjunction with increasing density fluctuations, is consistent with an increase in turbulent particle transport. In the edge, the changes in turbulent particle transport are less obvious. There is a clear correlation between the linear growth rates and the density fluctuations measured at different scales, but it is uncertain which is the cause and which is the consequence.

  16. Simulation of charged particle transport on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Computations of cosmic ray transport based upon finite difference methods are afflicted by instabilities, inaccuracies, and artifacts. To avoid these problems, a Monte Carlo formulation was developed which is closely related not only to the finite difference formulation, but also to the underlying physics of transport phenomena. Implementations of this approach are currently running on the Massively Parallel Processor at Goddard, whose enormous computing power overwhelms the poor statistical accuracy that usually limits the use of stochastic methods. In a Monte Carlo simulation of rectilinear transport, the coherent and diffusive effects that appeared are in good quantitative agreement with both finite difference and analytical calculations.

  17. Monte Carlo Particle Transport: Algorithm and Performance Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N; Procassini, R; Scott, H

    2005-06-02

    Monte Carlo methods are frequently used for neutron and radiation transport. These methods have several advantages, such as relative ease of programming and dealing with complex meshes. Disadvantages include long run times and statistical noise. Monte Carlo photon transport calculations also often suffer from inaccuracies in matter temperature due to the lack of implicitness. In this paper we discuss the Monte Carlo algorithm as it is applied to neutron and photon transport, detail the differences between neutron and photon Monte Carlo, and give an overview of the ways the numerical method has been modified to deal with issues that arise in photon Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Steady State Chaotic Magnetic Fields and Particle Dynamics Cross-field Transport of Particles in Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, B.; Ram, A.

    2009-12-01

    The observed propagation of cosmic rays in the interplanetary space cannot be explained unless there is diffusion of the energetic particles across the interplanetary magnetic field. The cross-field diffusion of cosmic rays is assumed to be due to the chaotic nature of the interplanetary/intergalactic magnetic fields. Among the classic works on this subject have been those of Parker [1] and Jokipii [2]. Parker considered the passage of cosmic ray particles and energetic solar particles in a large scale magnetic field containing small scale irregularities. In the context of cosmic ray propagation, Jokipii considered a small fluctuating component, added on to a uniform magnetic field, to study the spatial transport of particles. We consider asymmetric, steady-state magnetic fields, in three spatial dimensions, generated by currents flowing in circular loops and straight lines [3]. We find that under very special circumstances can one generate large scale coherent magnetic fields. In general, even simple asymmetric current configurations generate spatially chaotic magnetic fields in three-dimensions. The motion of charged particles in these chaotic magnetic fields is quite coherent. This is a surprising result as one generally assumes that spatially chaotic magnetic fields will give rise to chaotic particle motion. So chaotic magnetic fields by themselves do not lead to cross-field transport. However, if we consider a current system, e.g., a current loop, embedded in a uniform magnetic field then a particle can undergo cross-field transport. For cross-field diffusion of charged particles it is necessary that the magnetic field lines be three dimensional. [1] E.N. Parker, Planet. Space Sci. 13, 9, (1965) [2] J.R. Jokipii, Astrophys. J. 146, 480, (1966). [3] A.K. Ram and B. Dasgupta, in 35th EPS Conference on Plasma Phys. Hersonissos, ECA Vol.32D, O-4.059 (2008); and Eos Trans. AGU 88 (52), Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstract NG21B-0522 (2007).

  19. Ciliary intraflagellar transport protein 80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signaling for osteoblast differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutation of different IFT proteins cause numerous different clinical bone disorders accompanied with or without the disruption of cilia formation. Currently, there is no any effective treatment for these disorders due to lack of understanding in the function and mechanism of these proteins. IFT80 is...

  20. Directed Magnetic Particle Transport above Artificial Magnetic Domains Due to Dynamic Magnetic Potential Energy Landscape Transformation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dennis; Koch, Iris; Burgard, Stefan; Ehresmann, Arno

    2015-07-28

    An approach for a remotely controllable transport of magnetic micro- and/or nanoparticles above a topographically flat exchange-bias (EB) thin film system, magnetically patterned into parallel stripe domains, is presented where the particle manipulation is achieved by sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. Superparamagnetic core-shell particles are moved stepwise by the dynamic transformation of the particles' magnetic potential energy landscape due to the external magnetic field pulses without affecting the magnetic state of the thin film system. The magnetic particle velocity is adjustable in the range of 1-100 μm/s by the design of the substrate's magnetic field landscape (MFL), the particle-substrate distance, and the magnitude of the applied external magnetic field pulses. The agglomeration of magnetic particles is avoided by the intrinsic magnetostatic repulsion of particles due to the parallel alignment of the particles' magnetic moments perpendicular to the transport direction and parallel to the surface normal of the substrate during the particle motion. The transport mechanism is modeled by a quantitative theory based on the precise knowledge of the sample's MFL and the particle-substrate distance.

  1. DANTSYS: A diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.; Brinkley, F.W.; Marr, D.R.; O`Dell, R.D.; Walters, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The DANTSYS code package includes the following transport codes: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, TWOHEX, and THREEDANT. The DANTSYS code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent, multigroup discrete ordinates form of the boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, one or more Solver Modules, and the Edit Module, respectively. The Input and Edit Modules are very general in nature and are common to all the Solver Modules. The ONEDANT Solver Module contains a one-dimensional (slab, cylinder, and sphere), time-independent transport equation solver using the standard diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. Also included in the package are solver Modules named TWODANT, TWODANT/GQ, THREEDANT, and TWOHEX. The TWODANT Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation using the diamond-differencing method for space/angle discretization. The authors have also introduced an adaptive weighted diamond differencing (AWDD) method for the spatial and angular discretization into TWODANT as an option. The TWOHEX Solver Module solves the time-independent two-dimensional transport equation on an equilateral triangle spatial mesh. The THREEDANT Solver Module solves the time independent, three-dimensional transport equation for XYZ and RZ{Theta} symmetries using both diamond differencing with set-to-zero fixup and the AWDD method. The TWODANT/GQ Solver Module solves the 2-D transport equation in XY and RZ symmetries using a spatial mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals. The spatial differencing method is based upon the diamond differencing method with set-to-zero fixup with changes to accommodate the generalized spatial meshing.

  2. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  3. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; ...

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  4. Simulation of Neutral Particle Transport During HiPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In this work the importance of the knowledge of the spatial distribution, its temporal evolution as well as their energy distribution of heavy particles within sputtering processes is discussed. To describe these discharges - typically operated at very low pressures below 1 Pa - specific modeling approaches are required. Our approach comprises a three-dimensional kinetic Lagrangian description of neutral particles. A modified version of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is used, with the aim to describe the evolution of background and sputtered particles of a High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) process in a research reactor. Emphasize is put on the influence of the initial angular distribution of sputtered particles, as well as their energy distribution and its angular dependence. Based on the work of Stepanova and Dew a modified Thompson energy distribution is used. Differently distributed sputtered particles provide densities and fluxes concerning the corresponding film formation. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  5. Radiation Transport Through a Particle Laden Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Hilario; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a turbulent duct flow laden with small particles was performed at several Reynolds and Stokes numbers. After the flow reached a statistically stationary state the instantaneous particle positions were saved at several time steps. Separate radiative heat transfer calculations were performed to study the amount of absorbed radiation and the local heat flux. The radiative source was considered outside of the duct, and one wall contained a window from which thermal radiation streamed through. The fluid was treated as transparent and the instantaneous particle positions obtained from the DNS where used to build Eulerian absorption and scattering fields. A Monte Carlo ray tracing code has been developed and used to solve for the radiative intensity, incident radiation, and heat flux inside of the domain. The qualitative behavior of the radiation fields as the particle positions change due to the turbulence are discussed. The effects of changes in the resolution of the Eulerian mesh used to convert the Lagrangian particles into absorption and scattering fields are also presented. The sensitivity of the amount of total absorbed radiation in the domain is also discussed in both of the previously mentioned cases.

  6. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  7. Interacting particles in a periodically moving potential: traveling wave and transport.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Sakuntala; Pradhan, Punyabrata; Manna, S S

    2014-02-01

    We study a system of interacting particles in a periodically moving external potential, within the simplest possible description of paradigmatic symmetric exclusion process on a ring. The model describes diffusion of hardcore particles where the diffusion dynamics is locally modified at a uniformly moving defect site, mimicking the effect of the periodically moving external potential. The model, though simple, exhibits remarkably rich features in particle transport, such as polarity reversal and double peaks in particle current upon variation of defect velocity and particle density. By tuning these variables, the most efficient transport can be achieved in either direction along the ring. These features can be understood in terms of a traveling density wave propagating in the system. Our results could be experimentally tested, e.g., in a system of colloidal particles driven by a moving optical tweezer.

  8. NANO-PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN BIFURCATING TUBES WITH DIFFERENT INLET CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transport and deposition of ultrafine particles in straight, bend and bifurcating tubes are considered for different inlet Reynolds numbers, velocity profiles, and particle sizes i.e., 1 nm= =150 nm. A commercial finite-volume code with user-supplied programs was validated with a...

  9. FACTORS IN GEOTROPOSPHERIC PARTICLE-GAS TRANSPORT OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can exist in solid, liquid, or gas phases under ambient environmental conditions. The geotropospheric transport of SVOCs varies according to the particle type. Two classes of SVOCs and two types of particles were analyzed to determine possib...

  10. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions.

  11. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  12. The absorption of trapped particles by the inner satellites of Jupiter and the radial diffusion coefficient of particle transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogro-Campero, A.; Fillius, W.

    1976-01-01

    The process of trapped particle absorption by the inner Jovian satellites is considered in detail taking into account both the particle and satellite motions in a magnetic dipole field which is displaced from the center of the planet and tilted with respect to the planetary rotation axis. An expression is derived for computing the sweeping time at a given satellite, defined as the time required for the satellite to sweep up a given fraction of the trapped particles within its sweeping region. By making use of the sweeping time and the radial diffusion equation of particle transport approximate expressions for the diffusion coefficient are derived. Measurements obtained by Pioneer 10 are then used to obtain estimates of the diffusion coefficient at the orbits of Io and Europa. We find that the diffusion coefficient is a function of energy and magnetic latitude for electrons in the energy range 0.7-14 MeV.

  13. Particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    During periods of sporadic flare activity, the Sun releases energy stored in the magnetic field into the plasma of the solar atmosphere. This is an extremely efficient process, with a large fraction of the magnetic energy going into plasma particles. The solar flares are accompanied by prompt electromagnetic emission virtually over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma-rays down to radio frequencies. The Sun, through its activity, also plays a driving role in the Sun-Earth system that substantially influences geophysical space. Solar flare energetic particles from the Sun are detected in interplanetary space by in-situ measurements making them a vital component of the single Sun-Earth system. Although a qualitative picture is generally agreed upon, many processes solar flare processes are poorly understood. Specifically, the processes of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles interacting on various physical scales remain major challenges in solar physics and basic plasma physics. In the talk, I will review the current understanding of solar flare energetic particles focusing on recent observational progress, which became possible due to the numerous spacecraft and ground-based observations.

  14. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2011-12-21

    In this project, we have developed techniques for visualizing large-scale time-varying multivariate particle and field data produced by the GPS_TTBP team. Our basic approach to particle data visualization is to provide the user with an intuitive interactive interface for exploring the data. We have designed a multivariate filtering interface for scientists to effortlessly isolate those particles of interest for revealing structures in densely packed particles as well as the temporal behaviors of selected particles. With such a visualization system, scientists on the GPS-TTBP project can validate known relationships and temporal trends, and possibly gain new insights in their simulations. We have tested the system using over several millions of particles on a single PC. We will also need to address the scalability of the system to handle billions of particles using a cluster of PCs. To visualize the field data, we choose to use direct volume rendering. Because the data provided by PPPL is on a curvilinear mesh, several processing steps have to be taken. The mesh is curvilinear in nature, following the shape of a deformed torus. Additionally, in order to properly interpolate between the given slices we cannot use simple linear interpolation in Cartesian space but instead have to interpolate along the magnetic field lines given to us by the scientists. With these limitations, building a system that can provide an accurate visualization of the dataset is quite a challenge to overcome. In the end we use a combination of deformation methods such as deformation textures in order to fit a normal torus into their deformed torus, allowing us to store the data in toroidal coordinates in order to take advantage of modern GPUs to perform the interpolation along the field lines for us. The resulting new rendering capability produces visualizations at a quality and detail level previously not available to the scientists at the PPPL. In summary, in this project we have

  15. Mechanism for Particle Transport and Size Sorting via Low-Frequency Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Scott, James S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for effective sample handling tools to deliver and sort particles for analytical instruments that are planned for use in future NASA missions. Specifically, a need exists for a compact mechanism that allows transporting and sieving particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains that may be acquired by sampling tools such as a robotic scoop or drill. The required tool needs to be low mass and compact to operate from such platforms as a lander or rover. This technology also would be applicable to sample handling when transporting samples to analyzers and sorting particles by size.

  16. Vertical Transport of Aerosol Particles across Mountain Topography near the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. J.; Schill, S.; Freeman, S.; Bertram, T. H.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of aerosol particles is known to affect air quality and is largely dependent on the characteristic topography of the surrounding region. To characterize this transport, aerosol number distributions were collected with an Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS, DMT) during the 2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) in and around the Los Angeles Basin in Southern California. Increases in particle number concentration and size were observed over mountainous terrain north of Los Angeles County. Chemical analysis and meteorological lagrangian trajectories suggest orographic lifting processes, known as the "chimney effect". Implications for spatial transport and distribution will be discussed.

  17. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pähtz, Thomas; Durán, Orencio; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F.

    2015-01-15

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  18. PTV measurements of Lagrangian particle transport by surface gravity wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Whittaker, Colin; Raby, Alison; Taylor, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present detailed PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) measurements of the Lagrangian transport and trajectories of neutrally buoyant particles underneath two-dimensional surface gravity wave groups in a laboratory flume. By focussing our attention on wave groups of moderate steepness, we confirm the predictions of standard second-order multi-chromatic wave theory, in which the body of fluid satisfies the potential flow equations. Particles near the surface are transported forwards and their motion is dominated by Stokes drift. Particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for surface wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. Finally, we provide experimental validation of a simple scaling relationship, derived based under the assumption of separation of scales, for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current. We present results for a range of effective water depths.

  19. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  20. Effects of oil dispersants on settling of marine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Jie; Liu, Wen; Fu, Kunming; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2017-01-15

    This work investigated effects of three model oil dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and SPC1000) on settling of fine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components in sediment-seawater systems. All three dispersants enhanced settling of sediment particles. The nonionic surfactants (Tween 80 and Tween 85) play key roles in promoting particle aggregation. Yet, the effects varied with environmental factors (pH, salinity, DOM, and temperature). Strongest dispersant effect was observed at neutral or alkaline pH and in salinity range of 0-3.5wt%. The presence of water accommodated oil and dispersed oil accelerated settling of the particles. Total petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediment phase were increased from 6.9% to 90.1% in the presence of Corexit EC9527A, and from 11.4% to 86.7% for PAHs. The information is useful for understanding roles of oil dispersants in formation of oil-sediment aggregates and in sediment-facilitated transport of oil and PAHs in marine eco-systems.

  1. Analysis of Particle Transport Using a Particulate Tracer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Linker, L. C.; Lung, W.; Batiuk, R. A.

    2002-05-01

    Understanding the transport of dissolved and particulate materials in the Chesapeake Bay estuary is critical to allocating nutrient and sediment load reduction goals to the seven watershed states. A computer simulation of a particulate conservative tracer was conducted to help determine the transport mechanism. Tracers were loaded daily at the fall-line of Potomac River (a middle Bay's tributary). The settling rate is set at 0.1 m/day, with the assumption of neither scour nor re-suspension of tracer from the bed to allow continuous accumulation of tracers on bed. The low settling rate was used to allow tracer to transport widely in the estuary to provide information on the transport of fine particulates such as dead algae. After the tracers reach the mouth of Potomac River, most of them are further transported into the lower main-stem Bay. Flood tide is the main force for tracers transported north to the upper main-stem Bay and to the upstream of non-source rivers. In the main stem of the Bay, there exist concentration gradients from the Potomac River mouth to the opposite shore (the Maryland and Virginia eastern shore), to the lower Bay, and to the upper Bay. Concentration gradients also exist from the fall-line to the mouth in the source river, and from the mouth to the upstream in non-source rivers. These gradients are usually disturbed across trenches, due to a so-called "trench effect". A trench either deposits more or less tracers than its shallower sides, depending on the trench to be hydrologically landward from the source (i.e., the Potomac fall line) or the sub-source (e.g., the Rappahannock River mouth for the trench in the upstream of Rappahannock River), or hydrologically seaward from the source or the sub-source. Depending on the layer (saline water-rich or fresh water-rich) in which tracers reside and the direction (landward or seaward) along which tracers transport, the transport/deposit of tracer may be favored along trench over its shallower sides

  2. Impact of particle nanotopology on water transport through hydrophobic soils.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vi Khanh; Owuor, Elizabeth A; Murugaraj, Pandiyan; Crawford, Russell J; Mainwaring, David E

    2015-12-15

    The impact of non- and poorly wetting soils has become increasingly important, due to its direct influence on the water-limited potential yield of rain-fed grain crops at a time of enhanced global competition for fresh water. This study investigates the physical and compositional mechanisms underlying the influence of soil organic matter (SOM) on the wetting processes of model systems. These model systems are directly related to two sandy wheat-producing soils that have contrasting hydrophobicities. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and Raman micro-spectroscopy measurements on model planar and particulate SOM-containing surfaces demonstrated the role of the hierarchical surface structure on the wetting dynamics of packed particulate beds. It was found that a nanoscale surface topology is superimposed over the microscale roughness of the packed particles, and this controls the extent of water ingress into particulate packed beds of these particles. Using two of the dominant component organic species found in the SOM of the two soils used in this study, it was found that the specific interactions taking place between the SOM components, rather than their absolute quantities, dictated the formation of highly hydrophobic surface nanotopologies. This hydrophobicity was demonstrated, using micro-Raman imaging, to arise from the surface being in a composite Cassie-Baxter wetting state. Raman imaging demonstrated that the particle surface nanotopography influenced the degree of air entrapment in the interstices within the particle bed. The influence of a conventional surfactant on the wetting kinetics of both the model planar surfaces and packed particulate beds was quantified in terms of their respective advancing contact angles and the capillary wetting force vector. The information obtained for all of the planar and particulate surfaces, together with that obtained for the two soils, allowed linear relationships to be obtained in plots of the contact angle

  3. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  4. Transport and fate of microplastic particles in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Carr, Steve A; Liu, Jin; Tesoro, Arnold G

    2016-03-15

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are frequently suspected as significant point sources or conduits of microplastics to the environment. To directly investigate these suspicions, effluent discharges from seven tertiary plants and one secondary plant in Southern California were studied. The study also looked at influent loads, particle size/type, conveyance, and removal at these wastewater treatment facilities. Over 0.189 million liters of effluent at each of the seven tertiary plants were filtered using an assembled stack of sieves with mesh sizes between 400 and 45 μm. Additionally, the surface of 28.4 million liters of final effluent at three tertiary plants was skimmed using a 125 μm filtering assembly. The results suggest that tertiary effluent is not a significant source of microplastics and that these plastic pollutants are effectively removed during the skimming and settling treatment processes. However, at a downstream secondary plant, an average of one micro-particle in every 1.14 thousand liters of final effluent was counted. The majority of microplastics identified in this study had a profile (color, shape, and size) similar to the blue polyethylene particles present in toothpaste formulations. Existing treatment processes were determined to be very effective for removal of microplastic contaminants entering typical municipal WWTPs.

  5. Random walk particle tracking simulations of non-Fickian transport in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G. Tartakovsky, D.M. Dentz, M. Viswanathan, H.; Berkowitz, B.; Robinson, B.A.

    2010-06-01

    Derivations of continuum nonlocal models of non-Fickian (anomalous) transport require assumptions that might limit their applicability. We present a particle-based algorithm, which obviates the need for many of these assumptions by allowing stochastic processes that represent spatial and temporal random increments to be correlated in space and time, be stationary or non-stationary, and to have arbitrary distributions. The approach treats a particle trajectory as a subordinated stochastic process that is described by a set of Langevin equations, which represent a continuous time random walk (CTRW). Convolution-based particle tracking (CBPT) is used to increase the computational efficiency and accuracy of these particle-based simulations. The combined CTRW-CBPT approach enables one to convert any particle tracking legacy code into a simulator capable of handling non-Fickian transport.

  6. Proper orthogonal decomposition methods for noise reduction in particle-based transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Spong, D. A.; Hirshman, S. P.

    2008-09-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition techniques to reduce noise in the reconstruction of the distribution function in particle-based transport calculations are explored. For two-dimensional steady-state problems, the method is based on low rank truncations of the singular value decomposition of a coarse-grained representation of the particle distribution function. For time-dependent two-dimensional problems or three-dimensional time-independent problems, the use of a generalized low-rank approximation of matrices technique is proposed. The methods are illustrated and tested with Monte Carlo particle simulation data of plasma collisional relaxation and guiding-center transport with collisions in a magnetically confined plasma in toroidal geometry. It is observed that the proposed noise reduction methods achieve high levels of smoothness in the particle distribution function by using significantly fewer particles in the computations.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  8. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  9. Transport equations for subdiffusion with nonlinear particle interaction.

    PubMed

    Straka, P; Fedotov, S

    2015-02-07

    We show how the nonlinear interaction effects 'volume filling' and 'adhesion' can be incorporated into the fractional subdiffusive transport of cells and individual organisms. To this end, we use microscopic random walk models with anomalous trapping and systematically derive generic non-Markovian and nonlinear governing equations for the mean concentrations of the subdiffusive cells or organisms. We uncover an interesting interaction between the nonlinearities and the non-Markovian nature of the transport. In the subdiffusive case, this interaction manifests itself in a nontrivial combination of nonlinear terms with fractional derivatives. In the long time limit, however, these equations simplify to a form without fractional operators. This provides an easy method for the study of aggregation phenomena. In particular, this enables us to show that volume filling can prevent "anomalous aggregation," which occurs in subdiffusive systems with a spatially varying anomalous exponent.

  10. Charged Particle Transport in High-Energy-Density Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Transport coefficients for dense plasmas have been numerically computed using an effective Boltzmann approach. We have developed a simplified effective potential approach that yields accurate fits for all of the relevant cross sections and collision integrals. Our results have been validated with molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusion, interdiffusion, viscosity, thermal conductivity and stopping power. Molecular dynamics has also been used to examine the underlying assumptions of the Boltzmann approach through a categorization of behaviors of the velocity autocorrelation function in the Yukawa phase diagram. Using a velocity-dependent screening model, we examine the role of dynamical screening in transport as well. Implications of these results for Coulomb logarithm approaches are discussed. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Saturated Particle Transport in Porous Media: An Investigation into the Influence of Flow Direction and Particle Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-28

    Media, Colloid Transport, Flow Direction REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8...also as a sorbed phase on moving particulate matter such as humic substances, clay particles, colloidal silica and metal oxides [Šimůnek et al., 2006a...Washington, D.C. Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, and S.A. Bradford (2006a), Colloid -Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media

  12. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, “Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  13. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  14. Development of a particle injection system for impurity transport study in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. Y.; Hong, Joohwan; Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Siwon; Jang, Juhyeok; Jeon, Taemin; Park, Jae Sun; Choe, Wonho; Hong, Suk-Ho

    2014-11-15

    A solid particle injection system is developed for KSTAR. The system has a compact size, compatibility with a strong magnetic field and high vacuum environment, and the capability to inject a small amount of solid particles with a narrow injection angle. The target flight-distance of 10 cm has been achieved with a particle loss rate of less than 10%. Solid impurity particles such as tungsten and carbon will be injected by this system at the midplane in KSTAR. The impurity transport feature will be studied with a soft X-ray array, a vacuum ultra-violet diagnostic, and Stand Alone Non-Corona code.

  15. Characteristics of turbulence transport for momentum and heat in particle-laden turbulent vertical channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Caixi; Tang, Shuai; Shen, Lian; Dong, Yuhong

    2017-03-01

    The dynamic and thermal performance of particle-laden turbulent flow is investigated via direction numerical simulation combined with the Lagrangian point-particle tracking under the condition of two-way coupling, with a focus on the contributions of particle feedback effect to momentum and heat transfer of turbulence. We take into account the effects of particles on flow drag and Nusselt number and explore the possibility of drag reduction in conjunction with heat transfer enhancement in particle-laden turbulent flows. The effects of particles on momentum and heat transfer are analyzed, and the possibility of drag reduction in conjunction with heat transfer enhancement for the prototypical case of particle-laden turbulent channel flows is addressed. We present results of turbulence modification and heat transfer in turbulent particle-laden channel flow, which shows the heat transfer reduction when large inertial particles with low specific heat capacity are added to the flow. However, we also found an enhancement of the heat transfer and a small reduction of the flow drag when particles with high specific heat capacity are involved. The present results show that particles, which are active agents, interact not only with the velocity field, but also the temperature field and can cause a dissimilarity in momentum and heat transport. This demonstrates that the possibility to increase heat transfer and suppress friction drag can be achieved with addition of particles with different thermal properties.

  16. Fermion particle production in semiclassical Boltzmann-Vlasov transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, John F.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Cooper, Fred

    2009-07-01

    We present numerical solutions of the semiclassical Boltzmann-Vlasov equation for fermion particle-antiparticle production by strong electric fields in boost-invariant coordinates in (1+1) and (3+1) dimensional QED. We compare the Boltzmann-Vlasov results with those of recent quantum field theory calculations and find good agreement. We conclude that extending the Boltzmann-Vlasov approach to the case of QCD should allow us to do a thorough investigation of how backreaction affects recent results on the dependence of the transverse momentum distribution of quarks and antiquarks on a second Casimir invariant of color SU(3)

  17. Transport coefficients for relativistic gas mixtures of hard-sphere particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Moratto, Valdemar

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we calculate the transport coefficients for a relativistic binary mixture of diluted gases of hard-sphere particles. The gas mixture under consideration is studied within the relativistic Boltzmann equation in the presence of a gravitational field described by the isotropic Schwarzschild metric. We obtain the linear constitutive equations for the thermodynamic fluxes. The driving forces for the fluxes of particles and heat will appear with terms proportional to the gradient of gravitational potential. We discuss the consequences of the gravitational dependence on the driving forces. We obtain general integral expressions for the transport coefficients and evaluate them by assuming a hard-sphere interaction amongst the particles when they collide and not very disparate masses and diameters of the particles of each species. The obtained results are expressed in terms of their temperature dependence through the relativistic parameter which gives the ratio of the rest energy of the particles and the thermal energy of the gas mixture. Plots are given to analyze the behavior of the transport coefficients with respect to the temperature when small variations in masses and diameters of the particles of the species are present. We also analyze for each coefficient the corresponding limits to a single gas so the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limiting cases are recovered as well. Furthermore, we show that the transport coefficients have a dependence on the gravitational field.

  18. A Pipeline Transport Correlation for Slurries with Small but Dense Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P; Etchells, Arthur W; Chun, Jaehun; Adkins, Harold E; Casella, Andrew M; Minette, Michael J; Yokuda, Satoru T

    2010-04-01

    Most correlations/models for minimum transport or critical velocity of slurry were developed for slurries composed of particles greater than ~100-200 µm diameter with narrow particle-size distributions which is typical of the minerals industry. Many other process industries handle smaller particles. In particular waste slurries at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site have broad size distributions and significant fractions of smaller particles. Despite the size of these wastes, recent PNNL studies indicate that the small particles might be of sufficient density to pose a significant risk for pipeline deposition and plugging. To allow predictive assessment of deposition of fine dense particles for waste slurry transport at the U.S. DOE Hanford site, a pipeline-transport correlation for critical velocity was developed using a simple power-law between two dimensionless numbers important for slurry transport, the deposition Froude and Archimedes numbers. The correlation accords well with experimental data for slurries with Archimedes numbers <80 and is an adequate pipeline design guide for processing Hanford waste slurry.

  19. Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during magnetorotational instability in a kinetic accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2015-02-13

    Angular momentum transport and particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk are investigated using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. We show that the kinetic MRI can provide not only high-energy particle acceleration but also enhancement of angular momentum transport. We find that the plasma pressure anisotropy inside the channel flow with p(∥)>p(⊥) induced by active magnetic reconnection suppresses the onset of subsequent reconnection, which, in turn, leads to high-magnetic-field saturation and enhancement of the Maxwell stress tensor of angular momentum transport. Meanwhile, during the quiescent stage of reconnection, the plasma isotropization progresses in the channel flow and the anisotropic plasma with p(⊥)>p(∥) due to the dynamo action of MRI outside the channel flow contribute to rapid reconnection and strong particle acceleration. This efficient particle acceleration and enhanced angular momentum transport in a collisionless accretion disk may explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  20. The role of unsteady forces for sediment particles in bedload transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Detian; Liu, Xiaofeng; Fu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    In engineering, bedload transport is usually predicted by a variety of formulas, and huge uncertainty is found from case to case. One of the fundamental reasons is the lack of fully understanding the dynamic behavior of bedload particles. We explore the dynamic characteristics of sediment particles transported in turbulent open-channel flows. A numerical model of sediment transport is built by combining the large eddy simulation (LES) with discrete element model (DEM) using a fully four-way coupling method. Particular attention is paid to the hydrodynamic forces acting on bedload particles. The result shows that, in addition to drag force, the unsteady forces (i.e. Basset history force and added mass force) are important (40%~60% in the summation of all the time-averaged magnitude of forces) for fine sediment particles (with a diameter of 0.5 mm), which are usually ignored for computational complexity. While the lift force has been found to be significant for gravel particles (with a diameter of 31 mm)[1], it is not relatively dominant for such fine particles (less than 3% in the summation). This helps explaining why the prediction of the same formula change greatly from case to case. The comparison with experimental data also shows great potential of the current LES-DEM model for fundamental research in bedload transport. Reference: [1] Nino, Y., & Garcia, M. (1994). Gravel saltation 2. Modeling. Water Resources Research, 30(6), 1915-1924.

  1. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  2. Analysis of non-spherical particle transport in complex internal shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kleinstreuer, C.

    2013-09-01

    Focusing on ellipsoidal particles of different aspect ratios, the motion characteristics, including critical angle and stable vs. unstable rotational periods, are computationally analyzed in developing and fully developed tubular flows. As an application of particle transport and deposition, the one-way coupled Euler-Lagrange method enhanced by Euler's rotation equations is then employed to simulate laminar-turbulent flow in a subject-specific lung-airway model. First, to gain some basic insight into the dynamics of non-spherical particles, tubular flow is considered where the trajectories of ellipsoidal fibers with randomly initialized incidence angles were released at different inlet-plane positions, computed and visualized. Local and overall particle deposition results are compared between spheres, ellipsoidal fibers, and sphere-equivalent particles for which a revised Stokes diameter was developed. Concerning non-spherical particle transport and deposition in a subject-specific respiratory system, the validated computer simulation model provides realistic and accurate particle-deposition results. Specifically, slender non-spherical particles (i.e., those with higher aspect ratios) are potentially more harmful than thicker ones due to their ability to penetrate into deeper lung regions when somewhat aligned with the major flow field. Furthermore, non-spherical particle deposition is enhanced as the breathing rate increases.

  3. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, RANDAL S.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and the Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D (slab, two

  4. Solar Energetic Particle Transport Near a Heliospheric Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarbee, Markus; Dalla, Silvia; Marsh, Mike S.

    2017-02-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs), a major component of space weather, propagate through the interplanetary medium strongly guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In this work, we analyze the implications that a flat Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) has on proton propagation from SEP release sites to the Earth. We simulate proton propagation by integrating fully 3D trajectories near an analytically defined flat current sheet, collecting comprehensive statistics into histograms, fluence maps, and virtual observer time profiles within an energy range of 1–800 MeV. We show that protons experience significant current sheet drift to distant longitudes, causing time profiles to exhibit multiple components, which are a potential source of confusing interpretations of observations. We find that variation of the current sheet thickness within a realistic parameter range has little effect on particle propagation. We show that the IMF configuration strongly affects the deceleration of protons. We show that in our model, the presence of a flat equatorial HCS in the inner heliosphere limits the crossing of protons into the opposite hemisphere.

  5. Hydrodynamic controls on particle transport through heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silliman, S.E.

    1992-09-30

    The initial stages of this project have been focused on equipment development and preliminary experimental efforts. Among the accomplishments to date are the development of a successful flow cell design, proof of the utility of the UV resin, adjustment of the Laser Particle Counter to produce reliable readings, installation of a low particle content water supply, installation of a microscope for viewing discharge samples, development of a fiber/rod optic system for freezing the UV resin in situ and performance of initial experiments on layered and complex heterogeneities. The work is currently following very closely the original schedule for research efforts. Continuing efforts in year one will include continued efforts in simple and complex heterogeneity in two-dimensions, extension into three-dimensions, consideration of the most appropriate methods for creating geologically realistic structures in the laboratory, interaction with other SSP research programs and organization of the spring meeting on intermediate-scale experimentation to be held at Notre Dame. Efforts in year two will be focused on three-dimensional experiments in saturated media, extension of results into unsaturated media, development of techniques for unsaturated media characterization, and development of research ties with outside research interests.

  6. Hydrodynamic controls on particle transport through heterogeneous porous media. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Silliman, S.E.; Babic, M.

    1993-09-28

    Sophisticated models of the movement of particles, particularly bacteria and viruses, through porous media have been developed, but have met with limited success when compared to field observations some argue that the poor predictive capabilities of the models are due in part to the fact that most of the sophisticated models are tied to an assumptions of homogeneity within the flow field. In previous work, the structure of random percolation fields has been investigated and suggests application of percolation theory to heterogeneous porous media. One conclusion from this study as applied to particle transport is that as the distribution of pore throat sizes takes on variation in the third dimension, the probability of finding a continuous flow path with large throat size increases. One interpretation of this work, within the current context, leads to an argument that a saturated medium will become more open to transport of particles as the medium takes on three dimensional structure. The central hypothesis of the current project is therefore be stated: Particles which are suspended within the pore fluids of media demonstrating three-dimensional heterogeneities will be transported at higher average velocities and with less trapping than particles which are suspended in the pore fluids of media demonstrating one- or two-dimensional heterogeneities. This dependence on dimension is a function of the dimensional character of the heterogeneity, the length scales of the heterogeneity, the size of the particles, the hydrodynamics of the flow field, the degree of saturation of the medium, and the medium/particle interaction.

  7. Modeling and Simulation of Cardiogenic Embolic Particle Transport to the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Jani, Neel; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    Emboli are aggregates of cells, proteins, or fatty material, which travel along arteries distal to the point of their origin, and can potentially block blood flow to the brain, causing stroke. This is a prominent mechanism of stroke, accounting for about a third of all cases, with the heart being a prominent source of these emboli. This work presents our investigations towards developing numerical simulation frameworks for modeling the transport of embolic particles originating from the heart along the major arteries supplying the brain. The simulations are based on combining discrete particle method with image based computational fluid dynamics. Simulations of unsteady, pulsatile hemodynamics, and embolic particle transport within patient-specific geometries, with physiological boundary conditions, are presented. The analysis is focused on elucidating the distribution of particles, transport of particles in the head across the major cerebral arteries connected at the Circle of Willis, the role of hemodynamic variables on the particle trajectories, and the effect of considering one-way vs. two-way coupling methods for the particle-fluid momentum exchange. These investigations are aimed at advancing our understanding of embolic stroke using computational fluid dynamics techniques. This research was supported by the American Heart Association grant titled ``Embolic Stroke: Anatomic and Physiologic Insights from Image-Based CFD.''

  8. Commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod; Gupta, N C

    2016-01-15

    A public health concern is to understand the linkages between specific pollution sources and adverse health impacts. Commuting can be viewed as one of the significant-exposure activity in high-vehicle density areas. This paper investigates the commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi, India. Air pollution levels are significantly contributed by automobile exhaust and also in-vehicle exposure can be higher sometime than ambient levels. Motorcycle, auto rickshaw, car and bus were selected to study particles concentration along two routes in Delhi between Kashmere Gate and Dwarka. The bus and auto rickshaw were running on compressed natural gas (CNG) while the car and motorcycle were operated on gasoline fuel. Aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles during morning and evening rush hours for five weekdays. From the study, we observed that the concentration levels of these particles were greatly influenced by transportation modes. Concentrations of inhalable particles were found higher during morning in auto rickshaw (332.81 ± 90.97 μg/m(3)) while the commuter of bus exhibited higher exposure of thoracic particles (292.23 ± 110.45 μg/m(3)) and car commuters were exposed to maximum concentrations of alveolic particles (222.37 ± 26.56 μg/m(3)). We observed that in evening car commuters experienced maximum concentrations of all sizes of particles among the four commuting modes. Interestingly, motorcycle commuters were exposed to lower levels of inhalable and thoracic particles during morning and evening hours as compared to other modes of transport. The mean values were found greater than the median values for all the modes of transport suggesting that positive skewed distributions are characteristics of naturally occurring phenomenon.

  9. Applications to particle transport in the Earth`s aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jasperse, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The visual display of light called the aurora borealis occurs when energetic (1 to 100-keV) electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms from the Earth`s magnetosphere enter the Earth`s upper atmosphere and collide with the ambient neutral particles. Two kinds of auroras occur in nature: those excited by incident electrons and those excited by incident protons and hydrogen atoms. In this paper, we consider only the latter. The proton-hydrogen aurora may be divided into two altitude regions: high altitudes ({approximately}250 to {approximately}600 km) where charge-changing collisions dominate and energy-loss collisions may be neglected and low altitudes ({approximately}100 to {approximately}250 km) where energy-loss collisions also become important and cause rapid energy degradation. The focus of this review is on the high-altitude region where the one-group approximation is valid.

  10. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  11. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  12. CHARGED-PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN MAGNETIC TURBULENCE. I. A GLOBALLY ANISOTROPIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-10

    Collisionless magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence is common in large scale astrophysical environments. The determination of the transport of charged particles both parallel and perpendicular in such a system is of considerable interest. Quasi-linear analysis or direct numerical simulation can be used to find the effects of the turbulent magnetic field on the transport of charged particles. A number of different magnetic turbulence models have been proposed in the last several decades. We present here the results of studying particle transport in synthesized, anisotropic turbulence and compare the results with those obtained using the standard isotropic turbulence model in a series of papers. In this paper we consider the magnetic field turbulence model with global anisotropy.

  13. Resolving Rapid Variation in Energy for Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Haut, Terry Scot; Ahrens, Cory Douglas; Jonko, Alexandra; Till, Andrew Thomas; Lowrie, Robert Byron

    2016-08-23

    Resolving the rapid variation in energy in neutron and thermal radiation transport is needed for the predictive simulation capability in high-energy density physics applications. Energy variation is difficult to resolve due to rapid variations in cross sections and opacities caused by quantized energy levels in the nuclei and electron clouds. In recent work, we have developed a new technique to simultaneously capture slow and rapid variations in the opacities and the solution using homogenization theory, which is similar to multiband (MB) and to the finite-element with discontiguous support (FEDS) method, but does not require closure information. We demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of the method for a variety of problems. We are researching how to extend the method to problems with multiple materials and the same material but with different temperatures and densities. In this highlight, we briefly describe homogenization theory and some results.

  14. Physical considerations relevant to HZE-particle transport in matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1988-01-01

    High-energy, highly charged (HZE) heavy nuclei may seem at first sight to be an exotic type of radiation, only remotely connected with nuclear power generation. On closer examination it becomes evident that heavy-ion accelerators are being seriously considered for driving inertial confinement fusion reactors, and high-energy heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation are likely to place significant constraints on satellite power system deployment and space-based power generation. The use of beams of heavy nuclei in an increasing number of current applications, as well as their importance for the development of the state of the art of the future, makes it necessary to develop at the same time a good understanding of their transport through matter.

  15. Physical considerations relevant to HZE-particle transport in matter.

    PubMed

    Schimmerling, W

    1988-06-01

    High-energy, highly charged (HZE) heavy nuclei may seem at first sight to be an exotic type of radiation, only remotely connected with nuclear power generation. On closer examination it becomes evident that heavy-ion accelerators are being seriously considered for driving inertial confinement fusion reactors, and high-energy heavy nuclei in the cosmic radiation are likely to place significant constraints on satellite power system deployment and space-based power generation. The use of beams of heavy nuclei in an increasing number of current applications, as well as their importance for the development of the state of the art of the future, makes it necessary to develop at the same time a good understanding of their transport through matter.

  16. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-15

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  17. Alpha particle transport in the presence of ballooning type electrostatic driftwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Huang, B.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Employing Hamiltonian mechanics, the transport of fusion born alpha particles in the presence of driftwave turbulence is investigated. An analytical turbulence model based on the toroidal drift eigenmode is employed for guiding center orbit-following calculations. It is shown that high energy particles are less susceptible to driftwave turbulence. The passing particle transport is due to overlapping of guiding center electric islands whose widths are inversely proportional to the square root of the parallel velocity. For trapped particles, through a coordinate transformation from the poloidal angle and the parallel velocity to the action-angle variables, the resonance between the bounce motion and the toroidal precession motion, which can cause secondary island formation in the phase space, is demonstrated.

  18. The RABL5 homolog IFT22 regulates the cellular pool size and the amount of IFT particles partitioned to the flagellar compartment in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Silva, David A; Huang, Xiaomeng; Behal, Robert H; Cole, Douglas G; Qin, Hongmin

    2012-01-01

    Cilia and flagella, sensory and motile structures protruding from the cell body, rely on the continuous bidirectional traffic of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles to ferry flagellar precursors into flagella for assembly. Cells synthesize a large pool of IFT particle proteins in the cell body, but only a small portion engages in active transport within the flagella at any given time. The atypical small G protein Rab-like 5 (RABL5) has been shown to move in an IFT-like manner in the flagella, but its function in ciliogenesis is controversial. In this report, we demonstrate that IFT22, the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii homolog of RABL5, is a bona fide IFT particle complex B subunit. Although the amount of IFT22 remains unaffected by depletion of either complex A or B, depletion of IFT22 leads to a smaller pool of both complex A and B. Strikingly, the smaller cellular pool of IFT particles does not lead to a reduced distribution of IFT particles to flagella. Instead, the amount of IFT particle proteins, including IFT22 itself, increase in the flagella. Moreover, cells over-expressing IFT22 also accumulate IFT particles in their flagella. Taken together, these data indicate that, in C. reinhardtii, IFT22 controls the cellular levels of both complex A and B, thus plays a critical role in determining the cellular availability of IFT particles. In addition, although IFT22 may not directly carry any precursors for flagellar assembly, it controls how many IFT particles participate in ferrying precursors into flagella.

  19. Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a Stochastic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Particle transport and density relaxation associated with electromagnetic fluctuations is an unresolved problem of long standing in plasma physics and magnetic fusion research. In toroidal fusion plasmas, magnetic field fluctuations can arise spontaneously from global MHD instabilities, e.g., tearing fluctuations associated with sawtooth oscillations. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have also been externally imposed to mitigate the effect of edge localized modes (ELMs) by locally enhancing edge transport in Tokamaks. Understanding stochastic-field-driven transport processes is thus not only of basic science interest but possibly critical to ELM control in ITER. We report on the first direct measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport in the core of a high-temperature plasma, the MST reversed field pinch. Measurements focus on the sawtooth crash, when the stochastic field resulting from tearing reconnection is strongest, and are accomplished using newly developed, laser-based, differential interferometry and Faraday rotation techniques. The measured electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density (δn) and radial magnetic fluctuations (δbr), accounts for density profile relaxation during these magnetic reconnection events. Surprisingly, the electron diffusion is 30 times larger than estimates of ambipolarity-constrained transport in a stochastic magnetic field. A significant ion flux associated with parallel ion flow velocity fluctuations (δvi,//) correlated with δbr appears responsible for transport larger than predictions from the quasi-linear test particle model. These results indicate the need for improved understanding of particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. Work performed in collaboration with W.X. Ding, W.F. Bergerson, T.F. Yates, UCLA; D.J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, S.C. Prager, J.S. Sarff and the MST Group, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  20. Two-dimensional transport model of coupled Brownian particles driven by biharmonic forces and constant forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weixia; Meng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    A directed transport model of coupled Brownian particles in a two-dimensional potential is established. In this model, the system of Brownian particles is driven by biharmonic forces and constant forces. By numerical simulation, the cooperative transport behaviours of the system are investigated. The results show that the average velocity of the system is significantly independent of the frequencies and intensities of the harmonic forces, the barrier height of the ratchet potential, coupling strength and noise intensity. The average velocity increases monotonically with increasing the intensities of the harmonic forces, and can reach some maximum values when the two frequencies are equal. In addition, the average velocity presents stochastic resonance and generalized resonance for noise intensity, coupling strength and the barrier height of the ratchet potential. Moreover, when a constant force is exerted on the ratchet potential direction, it will promote the directed transport of the system. But, when on the non-ratchet potential direction, the transport will not be affected.

  1. Transport equations for low-energy solar particles in evolving interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Two new forms of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation are derived for the transport of low-energy solar energetic particles in an evolving interplanetary magnetic field, carried by a variable radial solar wind. An idealized solution suggests that the 'invariant' anisotropy direction reported by Allum et al. (1974) may be explained within the conventional theoretical framework. The equations may be used to relate studies of solar particle propagation to solar wind transients, and vice versa.

  2. Self-propelled particles that transport cargo through flowing blood and halt hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, James R.; Yeon, Ju Hun; Thomson, Max H.; Kazerooni, Amir; Wang, Xu; St. John, Alex E.; Lim, Esther B.; Chien, Diana; Lee, Anna; Zhang, Jesse Q.; Piret, James M.; Machan, Lindsay S.; Burke, Thomas F.; White, Nathan J.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Delivering therapeutics deep into damaged tissue during bleeding is challenging because of the outward flow of blood. When coagulants cannot reach and clot blood at its source, uncontrolled bleeding can occur and increase surgical complications and fatalities. Self-propelling particles have been proposed as a strategy for transporting agents upstream through blood. Many nanoparticle and microparticle systems exhibiting autonomous or collective movement have been developed, but propulsion has not been used successfully in blood or used in vivo to transport therapeutics. We show that simple gas-generating microparticles consisting of carbonate and tranexamic acid traveled through aqueous solutions at velocities of up to 1.5 cm/s and delivered therapeutics millimeters into the vasculature of wounds. The particles transported themselves through a combination of lateral propulsion, buoyant rise, and convection. When loaded with active thrombin, these particles worked effectively as a hemostatic agent and halted severe hemorrhage in multiple animal models of intraoperative and traumatic bleeding. Many medical applications have been suggested for self-propelling particles, and the findings of this study show that the active self-fueled transport of particles can function in vivo to enhance drug delivery. PMID:26601282

  3. Radial transport processes as a precursor to particle deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    van Thienen, P; Vreeburg, J H G; Blokker, E J M

    2011-02-01

    Various particle transport mechanisms play a role in the build-up of discoloration potential in drinking water distribution networks. In order to enhance our understanding of and ability to predict this build-up, it is essential to recognize and understand their role. Gravitational settling with drag has primarily been considered in this context. However, since flow in water distribution pipes is nearly always in the turbulent regime, turbulent processes should be considered also. In addition to these, single particle effects and forces may affect radial particle transport. In this work, we present an application of a previously published turbulent particle deposition theory to conditions relevant for drinking water distribution systems. We predict quantitatively under which conditions turbophoresis, including the virtual mass effect, the Saffman lift force, and the Magnus force may contribute significantly to sediment transport in radial direction and compare these results to experimental observations. The contribution of turbophoresis is mostly limited to large particles (>50 μm) in transport mains, and not expected to play a major role in distribution mains. The Saffman lift force may enhance this process to some degree. The Magnus force is not expected to play any significant role in drinking water distribution systems.

  4. Transport and Removal experiment of Dust (TReD) for the Dust Particle Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Soon-Gook; Chung, Kyu-Sun; Park, Eun-Kyung; Park, Sang-Joon; Hong, Suk-Ho

    2011-10-01

    The tokamak dust might be hazardous based on the radioactive from tritium or activated metals (e.g. tritium retention), toxic and/or explosive (or chemically reactive) in steam and air conditions. Therefore, controls of dust particle inventory can be treated a critical issue for safe operation of ITER and next step fusion devices. Although the dust removal experiments for fusion reactor had been tried in 1990s, it cannot directly applied to ITER and next step fusion reactors since scale issues does not solved. In this work, one developed the dedicated plasma device for the dust particle transport and removal tests to the level required in ITER or next step fusion reactors (~1 m dust particle transportation), which is called TReD (Transport and Removal experiments of Dust). The TReD also plan to test the dust particle detectors, such as electrostatic dust detector and capacitance diaphragm microbalance (CDM) used (or will be used) in fusion plasmas. The first experimental results of dust particle transport and removal will be explained along with the design concepts, assembly structure, also collaboration plans, etc.

  5. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto-Perez, Martin

    2008-04-07

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles.

  6. Energetic particle transport in the presence of magnetic turbulence: influence of spectral extension and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, F.; Malara, F.; Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Valentini, F.

    2016-07-01

    The transport of energetic particles in the presence of magnetic turbulence is an important but unsolved problem of space physics and astrophysics. Here, we aim at advancing the understanding of energetic particle transport by means of a new numerical model of synthetic magnetic turbulence. The model builds up a turbulent magnetic field as a superposition of space-localized fluctuations at different spatial scales. The resulting spectrum is isotropic with an adjustable spectral index. The model allows us to reproduce a spectrum broader than four decades, and to regulate the level of intermittency through a technique based on the p-model. Adjusting the simulation parameters close to solar wind conditions at 1 au, we inject ˜1 MeV protons in the turbulence realization and compute the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients as a function of spectral extension, turbulence level, and intermittency. While a number of previous results are recovered in the appropriate limits, including anomalous transport regimes for low turbulence levels, we find that long spectral extensions tend to reduce the diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, we find for the first time that intermittency has an influence on parallel transport but not on perpendicular transport, with the parallel diffusion coefficient increasing with the level of intermittency. We also obtain the distribution of particle inversion times for parallel velocity, a power law for more than one decade, and compare it with the pitch angle scattering times observed in the solar wind. This parametric study can be useful to interpret particle propagation properties in astrophysical systems.

  7. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Jones, A. Daniel; Day, James A.; Tur-Rojas, Vincent R.; Jorgensen, Trond; Herchert, Edwin; Yoder, Richard; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Farquar, George R.

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The use of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.

  8. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    DOE PAGES

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; ...

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The usemore » of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.« less

  9. Nonlinear alfvénic fast particle transport and losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneller, M.; Lauber, Ph; García-Muñoz, M.; Brüdgam, M.; Günter, S.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities like Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes or core-localized modes such as Beta Induced Alfvén Eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfvén Eigenmodes driven by fast particles can lead to significant redistribution and losses in fusion devices. This is observed in many ASDEX Upgrade discharges. The present work aims to understand the underlying resonance mechanisms, especially in the presence of multiple modes with different frequencies. Resonant mode coupling mechanisms are investigated using the drift kinetic HAGIS code [Pinches 1998]. Simulations were performed for different plasma equilibria, in particular for different q profiles, employing the availability of improved experimental data. A study was carried out, investigating double-resonant mode coupling with respect to various overlapping scenarios. It was found that, depending on the radial mode distance, double-resonance is able to enhance growth rates as well as mode amplitudes significantly. Small radial mode distances, however can also lead to strong nonlinear mode stabilization of a linear dominant mode. With the extended version of HAGIS, losses were simulated and directly compared with experimental loss measurements. The losses' phase space distribution as well as their ejection signal is consistent with experimental data. Furthermore, it allowed to characterize them as prompt, resonant or stochastic. It was found that especially in multiple mode scenarios (with different mode frequencies), abundant incoherent losses occur in the lower energy range, due to a broad phase-space stochastization. The incoherent higher energetic losses are "prompt", i.e. their initial energy is too large for confined orbits.

  10. Surfing along Filopodia: A Particle Transport Revealed by Molecular-Scale Fluctuation Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Filopodia perform cellular functions such as environmental sensing or cell motility, but they also grab for particles and withdraw them leading to an increased efficiency of phagocytic uptake. Remarkably, withdrawal of micron-sized particles is also possible without noticeable movements of the filopodia. Here, we demonstrate that polystyrene beads connected by optical tweezers to the ends of adherent filopodia of J774 macrophages, are transported discontinuously toward the cell body. After a typical resting time of 1–2 min, the cargo is moved with alternating velocities, force constants, and friction constants along the surface of the filopodia. This surfing-like behavior along the filopodium is recorded by feedback-controlled interferometric three-dimensional tracking of the bead motions at 10–100 kHz. We measured transport velocities of up to 120 nm/s and transport forces of ∼70 pN. Small changes in position, fluctuation width, and temporal correlation, which are invisible in conventional microscopy, indicate molecular reorganization of transport-relevant proteins in different phases of the entire transport process. A detailed analysis implicates a controlled particle transport with fingerprints of a nanoscale unbinding/binding behavior. The manipulation and analysis methods presented in our study may also be helpful in other fields of cellular biophysics. PMID:25954870

  11. Surfing along Filopodia: A Particle Transport Revealed by Molecular-Scale Fluctuation Analyses.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-05-05

    Filopodia perform cellular functions such as environmental sensing or cell motility, but they also grab for particles and withdraw them leading to an increased efficiency of phagocytic uptake. Remarkably, withdrawal of micron-sized particles is also possible without noticeable movements of the filopodia. Here, we demonstrate that polystyrene beads connected by optical tweezers to the ends of adherent filopodia of J774 macrophages, are transported discontinuously toward the cell body. After a typical resting time of 1-2 min, the cargo is moved with alternating velocities, force constants, and friction constants along the surface of the filopodia. This surfing-like behavior along the filopodium is recorded by feedback-controlled interferometric three-dimensional tracking of the bead motions at 10-100 kHz. We measured transport velocities of up to 120 nm/s and transport forces of ∼ 70 pN. Small changes in position, fluctuation width, and temporal correlation, which are invisible in conventional microscopy, indicate molecular reorganization of transport-relevant proteins in different phases of the entire transport process. A detailed analysis implicates a controlled particle transport with fingerprints of a nanoscale unbinding/binding behavior. The manipulation and analysis methods presented in our study may also be helpful in other fields of cellular biophysics.

  12. Nonequilibrium charge transport in an interacting open system: Two-particle resonance and current asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dibyendu; Soori, Abhiram; Sen, Diptiman; Dhar, Abhishek

    2009-08-01

    We use the Lippman-Schwinger scattering theory to study nonequilibrium electron transport through an interacting open quantum dot. The two-particle current is evaluated exactly while we use perturbation theory to calculate the current when the leads are Fermi liquids at different chemical potentials. We find an interesting two-particle resonance induced by the interaction and obtain criteria to observe it when a small bias is applied across the dot. Finally, for a system without spatial inversion symmetry, we find that the two-particle current is quite different depending on whether the electrons are incident from the left or the right lead.

  13. Numerical modeling of pollutant transport using a Lagrangian marker particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, M.

    1976-01-01

    A derivation and code were developed for the three-dimensional mass transport equation, using a particle-in-cell solution technique, to solve coastal zone waste discharge problems where particles are a major component of the waste. Improvements in the particle movement techniques are suggested and typical examples illustrated. Preliminary model comparisons with analytic solutions for an instantaneous point release in a uniform flow show good results in resolving the waste motion. The findings to date indicate that this computational model will provide a useful technique to study the motion of sediment, dredged spoils, and other particulate waste commonly deposited in coastal waters.

  14. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  15. Nanoparticle transport in heterogeneous porous media with particle tracking numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, transport and retention of nanoparticles that flow in suspension through packed beds with unconsolidated spheres and through consolidated Berea sandstone are numerically explored. The surfaces exhibit electrical charge heterogeneity where particles can deposit blocking the surrounding surface deposition sites. The lattice Boltzmann method with Lagrangian particle tracking are the techniques employed. Four ideal patterns of surface charge heterogeneity are adopted for the packed sphere beds, while a real distribution of charge heterogeneity is determined for the Berea core through micro-CT image segmentation. It is found that particle breakthrough curves do not reach a plateau, unless the pore surfaces are completely saturated. Surface saturation also enhances particle propagation because of the surface blocking mechanism, reducing the effective particle deposition rate. In addition, surface saturation mitigates the effect of the pattern of heterogeneity on particle retention, which might be pronounced when blocking is not taken into account. It is also observed from the case of Berea core that the heterogeneity of the mineralogical surfaces disturbs particle transport depending on the physicochemical properties of the surfaces. Likewise, similarity of the mineralogical surface properties is a prerequisite for the commonly used patch-wise model with Langmuirian blocking to reproduce nanoparticle breakthrough in such porous media.

  16. Transport and selective chaining of bidisperse particles in a travelling wave potential.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Straube, Arthur V

    2016-05-01

    We combine experiments, theory and numerical simulation to investigate the dynamics of a binary suspension of paramagnetic colloidal particles dispersed in water and transported above a stripe-patterned magnetic garnet film. The substrate generates a one-dimensional periodic energy landscape above its surface. The application of an elliptically polarized rotating magnetic field causes the landscape to translate, inducing direct transport of paramagnetic particles placed above the film. The ellipticity of the applied field can be used to control and tune the interparticle interactions, from net repulsive to net attractive. When considering particles of two distinct sizes, we find that, depending on their elevation above the surface of the magnetic substrate, the particles feel effectively different potentials, resulting in different mobilities. We exploit this feature to induce selective chaining for certain values of the applied field parameters. In particular, when driving two types of particles, we force only one type to condense into travelling parallel chains. These chains confine the movement of the other non-chaining particles within narrow colloidal channels. This phenomenon is explained by considering the balance of pairwise magnetic forces between the particles and their individual coupling with the travelling landscape.

  17. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    DOE PAGES

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; ...

    2017-02-27

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition betweenmore » samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. Finally, this study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.« less

  18. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND ACCELERATION AT SHOCK WAVES IN A FOCUSED TRANSPORT MODEL: IMPLICATIONS FOR MIXED SOLAR PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Dröge, W.; Gedalin, M.

    2016-03-20

    We use numerical solutions of the focused transport equation obtained by an implicit stochastic differential equation scheme to study the evolution of the pitch-angle dependent distribution function of protons in the vicinity of shock waves. For a planar stationary parallel shock, the effects of anisotropic distribution functions, pitch-angle dependent spatial diffusion, and first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock are examined, including the timescales on which the energy spectrum approaches the predictions of diffusive shock acceleration theory. We then consider the case that a flare-accelerated population of ions is released close to the Sun simultaneously with a traveling interplanetary shock for which we assume a simplified geometry. We investigate the consequences of adiabatic focusing in the diverging magnetic field on the particle transport at the shock, and of the competing effects of acceleration at the shock and adiabatic energy losses in the expanding solar wind. We analyze the resulting intensities, anisotropies, and energy spectra as a function of time and find that our simulations can naturally reproduce the morphologies of so-called mixed particle events in which sometimes the prompt and sometimes the shock component is more prominent, by assuming parameter values which are typically observed for scattering mean free paths of ions in the inner heliosphere and energy spectra of the flare particles which are injected simultaneously with the release of the shock.

  19. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  20. Using Cytochome c to Monitor Electron Transport and Inhibition in Beef Heart Submitochondrial Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Amanda D.; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-part undergraduate laboratory exercise. In the first part, electron transport in bovine heart submitochondrial particles causing reduction of cytochrome c is monitored at 550 nm. Redox-active dyes have historically been used in most previous undergraduate laboratory exercises of this sort but do not demonstrate respiratory…

  1. TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS. Zhe Zhang*, Huawei Shi, Clement Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910; Chong S. Kim, National Health and En...

  2. Enhanced transport of Si-coated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles in porous media.

    PubMed

    HonetschlÄgerová, Lenka; Janouškovcová, Petra; Kubal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of previously described silica coating method on the transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media. The silica coating method showed the potential to prevent the agglomeration of nZVI. Transport experiments were conducted using laboratory-scale sand-packed columns at conditions that were very similar of natural groundwater. Transport properties of non-coated and silica-coated nZVI are investigated in columns of 40 cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was injected in three different Fe particle concentrations (100, 500, and 1000 mg/L) at flow 5  mL/min. Experimental results were compared using nanoparticle attachment efficiency and travel distances which were calculated by classical particle filtration theory. It was found that non-coated particles were essentially immobile in porous media. In contrast, silica-coated particles showed significant transport distances at the tested conditions. Results of this study suggest that silica can increase nZVI mobility in the subsurface.

  3. From Mechanical Motion to Brownian Motion, Thermodynamics and Particle Transport Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2008-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a medium is dealt with either as a problem of mechanics or as a transport process in non-equilibrium statistical physics. The two kinds of approach are often unrelated as they are taught in different textbooks. The aim of this paper is to highlight the link between the mechanical and statistical treatments of particle…

  4. Analysis of a model for transport of charged particles in a random magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, F. B.; Ramanathan, G. V.; Klimas, A.; Sandri, G.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the transport of charged particles in a random magnetic field is a Volterra integrodifferential equation with a long-range kernel. The integrodifferential equation is solved numerically with the method of Bellman, Kalaba, and Lockett (1966). The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical asymptotic results.-

  5. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  6. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  7. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  8. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas (GPS - TTBP) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2011-05-27

    The goal of this project is the development of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) Framework and its applications to problems related to the physics of turbulence and turbulent transport in tokamaks,. The project involves physics studies, code development, noise effect mitigation, supporting computer science efforts, diagnostics and advanced visualizations, verification and validation. Its main scientific themes are mesoscale dynamics and non-locality effects on transport, the physics of secondary structures such as zonal flows, and strongly coherent wave-particle interaction phenomena at magnetic precession resonances. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of these themes for rho-star and current scalings and for the turbulent transport of momentum. GTC-TTBP also explores applications to electron thermal transport, particle transport; ITB formation and cross-cuts such as edge-core coupling, interaction of energetic particles with turbulence and neoclassical tearing mode trigger dynamics. Code development focuses on major initiatives in the development of full-f formulations and the capacity to simulate flux-driven transport. In addition to the full-f -formulation, the project includes the development of numerical collision models and methods for coarse graining in phase space. Verification is pursued by linear stability study comparisons with the FULL and HD7 codes and by benchmarking with the GKV, GYSELA and other gyrokinetic simulation codes. Validation of gyrokinetic models of ion and electron thermal transport is pursed by systematic stressing comparisons with fluctuation and transport data from the DIII-D and NSTX tokamaks. The physics and code development research programs are supported by complementary efforts in computer sciences, high performance computing, and data management.

  9. Transport of Lactate-modified Nanoscale Iron Particles in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Nanoscale iron particles (NIP) have recently shown to be effective for dehalogenation of recalcitrant organic contaminants such as pentachlorphenol (PCP) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) in the environment. However, effective transport of NIP into the contaminated subsurface zones is crucial for the success of in-situ remediation. Previous studies showed that the transport of NIP in soils is very limited and surface-modification of NIP is required to achieve adequate transport. This paper investigates the transport of NIP and lactate-modified NIP (LMNIP) through four different porous media (sands with different particle size and distribution). A series of laboratory column experiments was conducted to quantify the transport of NIP and LMNIP at two different slurry concentrations of 1 g/L and 4 g/L under two different flow velcoities. NIP used in this study possessed magentic properties, thus a magnetic susceptibility sensor system was used to monitor the changes in magnetic susceptibility (MS) along the length of the column at different times during the experiments. At the end of testing, the distribution of total Fe in the sand column was measured. Results showed a linear correlation between the Fe concentration and MS and it was used to assess the transient transport of NIP and LMNIP in the sand columns. Results showed that LMNIP transported better than bare NIP and higher concentration of 4 g/L LMNIP exhibited unform and greater transport compared to other tested conditions. Transport of NIP increased in the order from fine Ottawa sand > medium field sand > coarse field sand > coarse Ottawa sand. Filtration theory and advective-dispersion equation with reaction were applied to capture the transport response of NIP and LMNIP in the sand columns.

  10. Particle velocity and sediment transport at the limit of deposition in sewers.

    PubMed

    Ota, J J; Perrusquía, G S

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the sediment particle while it is transported at the limit of deposition in storm sewers, i.e. as bed load at the limit of concentration that leads to sediment deposition. Although many empirical sediment transport equations are known in the literature, there is only limited knowledge concerning particle velocity. Sediment particle and sphere velocity measurements were carried out in two pipe channels and these results led to the development of a semi-theoretical equation for sediment transport at the limit of deposition in sewers. Even in the transport process without deposition, sediment movement is slower than water velocity and depends on the angle of repose of sediment with a diameter d on the roughness k of the pipe channel. Instead of classical dimensionless bed shear stress ψ, a modified dimensionless bed shear stress ψ (d/k)(2/3) was suggested, based on the angle of repose and this parameter was proved to be significant for quantifying the transport capacity. The main purpose of this article is to emphasize the importance of careful observation of experiments. Not only number of tests, but physical understanding are essential for better empirical equations.

  11. PARTICLE TRANSPORTATION AND DEPOSITION IN HOT GAS FILTER VESSELS - A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2002-07-01

    In this project, a computational modeling approach for analyzing flow and ash transport and deposition in filter vessels was developed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for studying hot-gas filtration process was established. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas flows in the filter vessel, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the particle transport and deposition. Particular attention was given to the Siemens-Westinghouse filter vessel at Power System Development Facility in Wilsonville in Alabama. Details of hot-gas flow in this tangential flow filter vessel are evaluated. The simulation results show that the rapidly rotation flow in the spacing between the shroud and the vessel refractory acts as cyclone that leads to the removal of a large fraction of the larger particles from the gas stream. Several alternate designs for the filter vessel are considered. These include a vessel with a short shroud, a filter vessel with no shroud and a vessel with a deflector plate. The hot-gas flow and particle transport and deposition in various vessels are evaluated. The deposition patterns in various vessels are compared. It is shown that certain filter vessel designs allow for the large particles to remain suspended in the gas stream and to deposit on the filters. The presence of the larger particles in the filter cake leads to lower mechanical strength thus allowing for the back-pulse process to more easily remove the filter cake. A laboratory-scale filter vessel for testing the cold flow condition was designed and fabricated. A laser-based flow visualization technique is used and the gas flow condition in the laboratory-scale vessel was experimental studied. A computer model for the experimental vessel was also developed and the gas flow and particle transport patterns are evaluated.

  12. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  13. Proper orthogonal decomposition and wavelet methods for noise reduction in particle-based transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen van Ye, Romain; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Spong, D.; Hirshman, S.; Farge, M.

    2008-11-01

    A limitation of particle-based transport calculations is the noise due to limited statistical sampling. Thus, a key element for the success of these calculations is the development of efficient denoising methods. Here we discuss denoising techniques based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Wavelet Decomposition (WD). The goal is the reconstruction of smooth (denoised) particle distribution functions from discrete particle data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. In 2-D, the POD method is based on low rank truncations of the singular value decomposition of the data. For 3-D we propose the use of a generalized low rank approximation of matrices technique. The WD denoising is based on the thresholding of empirical wavelet coefficients [Donoho et al., 1996]. The methods are illustrated and tested with Monte-Carlo particle simulation data of plasma collisional relaxation including pitch angle and energy scattering. As an application we consider guiding-center transport with collisions in a magnetically confined plasma in toroidal geometry. The proposed noise reduction methods allow to achieve high levels of smoothness in the particle distribution function using significantly less particles in the computations.

  14. Particle release transport in Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean: a modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Kimura, Nobuaki; Hsu, Ming-Hsi

    2010-09-01

    A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was created to study the Danshuei River estuarine system and adjacent coastal ocean in Taiwan. The model was verified using measurements of the time-series water surface elevation, tidal current, and salinity from 1999. We conclude that our model is consistent with these observations. Our particle-tracking model was also used to explore the transport of particles released from the Hsin-Hai Bridge, an area that is heavily polluted. The results suggest that it takes a much longer time for the estuary to be flushed out under low freshwater discharge conditions than with high freshwater discharge. We conclude that the northeast and southwest winds minimally impact particle dispersion in the estuary. The particles fail to settle to the bottom in the absence of density-induced circulation. Our model was also used to simulate the ocean outfall at the Bali. Our experimental results suggest that the tidal current dominates the particle trajectories and influences the transport properties in the absence of a wind stress condition. The particles tend to move northeast or southwest along the coast when northeast or southwest winds prevail. Our data suggest that wind-driven currents and tidal currents play important roles in water movement as linked with ocean outfall in the context of the Danshuei River.

  15. Influence of oxide particle network morphology on ion solvation and transport in "soggy sand" electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal K; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2010-05-27

    The role of oxide surface chemical composition and solvent on ion solvation and ion transport of "soggy sand" electrolytes are discussed here. A "soggy sand" electrolyte system comprising dispersions of hydrophilic/hydrophobic functionalized aerosil silica in lithium perchlorate-methoxy polyethylene glycol solution was employed for the study. Static and dynamic rheology measurements show formation of an attractive particle network in the case of the composite with unmodified aerosil silica (i.e., with surface silanol groups) as well as composites with hydrophobic alkane groups. While particle network in the composite with hydrophilic aerosil silica (unmodified) were due to hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic aerosil silica particles were held together via van der Waals forces. The network strength in the latter case (i.e., for hydrophobic composites) were weaker compared with the composite with unmodified aerosil silica. Both unmodified silica as well as hydrophobic silica composites displayed solid-like mechanical strength. No enhancement in ionic conductivity compared to the liquid electrolyte was observed in the case of the unmodified silica. This was attributed to the existence of a very strong particle network, which led to the "expulsion" of all conducting entities from the interfacial region between adjacent particles. The ionic conductivity for composites with hydrophobic aerosil particles displayed ionic conductivity dependent on the size of the hydrophobic chemical moiety. No spanning attractive particle network was observed for aerosil particles with surfaces modified with stronger hydrophilic groups (than silanol). The composite resembled a sol, and no percolation in ionic conductivity was observed.

  16. Transport and dispersion of fluorescent tracer particles for the dune-bed condition, Atrisco Feeder Canal near Bernalillo, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Kennedy, Vance C.

    1978-01-01

    A fluorescent tracer technique was used to study the rates of transport and dispersion of sediment particles of various diameters and specific gravities for a dune-bed condition in an alluvial channel, Atrisco Feeder Canal near Bernalillo, N. Mex. The total transport rates of bed material measured by the steady-dilution and spatial-integration procedures were within the range of transport rates computed by the modified Einstein procedure. Lateral dispersion of the tracer particles increased with increase in the size of the tracer particles, whereas longitudinal dispersion decreased. The velocities of the tracer particles decreased with increase in the size of the tracer particles; dependence on particle diameter was large for the small particles, small for the large particles. Tracers were found at larger depths in the bed than would be expected on the basis of the sizes of the dunes in the channel. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Influence of Bentonite Particles on the Transport and Deposition Behavior of Bacteria in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haiyan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2013-04-01

    The influence of clay particles on the transport and deposition behavior of bacteria in irregular quartz sand was examined by direct comparison of both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with clay particles in bacteria suspension versus those without clay particles. Two representative cell types, Gram-negative strain E.coli DH5α and Gram-positive strain Bacillus subtilis were utilized to systematically determine the influence of clay particles (bentonite) on cell transport behavior. Packed column experiments for both cell types were conducted in both NaCl (5 and 25 mM ionic strengths) and CaCl2 (5 mM ionic strength) solutions at pH 6.0. The breakthrough plateaus with bentonite in solutions (30 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1) were lower than those without bentonite for both cell types under all examined conditions, indicating that bentonite in solutions decreased cell transport in porous media regardless of cell types (Gram-negative or Gram-positive) and solution chemistry (ionic strength and ion valence). The enhanced cell deposition with bentonite particles was mainly observed at segments near to column inlet, retained profiles for both cell types with bentonite particles therefore were steeper relative to those without bentonite. The increased cell deposition with bentonite observed in NaCl solutions was mainly attributed to the co-deposition of bacteria with bentonite particles whereas, in addition to co-deposition of bacteria with bentonite, the bacteria-bentonite-bacteria cluster formed in suspensions also contributed to the increased deposition of bacteria with bentonite in CaCl2 solution.

  18. Effect of natural particles on the transport of lindane in saturated porous media: Laboratory experiments and model-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu, Stéphane K.; Grathwohl, Peter; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal particles can act as carriers for adsorbing pollutants, such as hydrophobic organic pollutants, and enhance their mobility in the subsurface. In this study, we investigate the influence of colloidal particles on the transport of pesticides through saturated porous media by column experiments. We also investigate the effect of particle size on this transport. The model pesticide is lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane), a representative hydrophobic insecticide which has been banned in 2009 but is still used in many developing countries. The breakthrough curves are analyzed with the help of numerical modeling, in which we examine the minimum model complexity needed to simulate such transport. The transport of lindane without particles can be described by advective-dispersive transport coupled to linear three-site sorption, one site being in local equilibrium and the others undergoing first-order kinetic sorption. In the presence of mobile particles, the total concentration of mobile lindane is increased, that is, lindane is transported not only in aqueous solution but also sorbed onto the smallest, mobile particles. The models developed to simulate separate and associated transport of lindane and the particles reproduced the measurements very well and showed that the adsorption/desorption of lindane to the particles could be expressed by a common first-order rate law, regardless whether the particles are mobile, attached, or strained.

  19. Transport and crystallization of colloidal particles in a thin nematic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabot, M. Å.; Tkalec, U.; Muševič, I.

    2007-09-01

    In a thin planar nematic cell, the application of an AC electric field induces a macroscopic transport of micrometer-sized colloidal particles along the nematic director. We have analyzed the dependence of particle velocities on the electric-field amplitude and frequency and found that it decreases exponentially with increasing frequency. Using specially designed electrodes we have observed that colloidal particles could be pumped and accelerated across the field-no-field interface, and measured the structural force and the corresponding potential, which is of the order of 10000 kBT for 4μm particles. We demonstrate that spatially periodic close-packed crystalline colloidal structures can be obtained, which are thermodinamically metastable for many days after turning off the electric field and slowly decay into linear chains. Above the nematic-isotropic phase transition, such crystalline structures are non-stable and decay in few minutes.

  20. Purification of IFT particle proteins and preparation of recombinant proteins for structural and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Behal, Robert H; Betleja, Ewelina; Cole, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is characterized by a robust bidirectional movement of large proteinaceous particles along the length of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Essential for the assembly and function of the organelle, IFT is believed to transport a large array of ciliary components in and out of the organelle. Biochemical analysis of the proteins involved with this transport has been largely dependent on the ability to isolate suitable quantities of intact cilia or flagella. One model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, has proven to be especially well-suited for such endeavors. Indeed, many of the IFT particle proteins were initially identified through biochemical analysis of green algae. This chapter describes some of the most effective methods for the purification of IFT particle proteins from Chlamydomonas flagella. This chapter also describes complementary approaches where recombinant IFT proteins are generated with affinity tags that allow rapid and specific purification. The recombinant proteins can be used to analyze protein-protein interactions and can be directly delivered to mutant cells to analyze functional domains. Although the techniques described here are focused entirely on Chlamydomonas IFT proteins, the approaches, especially regarding recombinant proteins, should be applicable to the study of IFT machinery in other model organisms.

  1. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  2. Turbulent particle transport in streams: can exponential settling be reconciled with fluid mechanics?

    PubMed

    McNair, James N; Newbold, J Denis

    2012-05-07

    Most ecological studies of particle transport in streams that focus on fine particulate organic matter or benthic invertebrates use the Exponential Settling Model (ESM) to characterize the longitudinal pattern of particle settling on the bed. The ESM predicts that if particles are released into a stream, the proportion that have not yet settled will decline exponentially with transport time or distance and will be independent of the release elevation above the bed. To date, no credible basis in fluid mechanics has been established for this model, nor has it been rigorously tested against more-mechanistic alternative models. One alternative is the Local Exchange Model (LEM), which is a stochastic advection-diffusion model that includes both longitudinal and vertical spatial dimensions and is based on classical fluid mechanics. The LEM predicts that particle settling will be non-exponential in the near field but will become exponential in the far field, providing a new theoretical justification for far-field exponential settling that is based on plausible fluid mechanics. We review properties of the ESM and LEM and compare these with available empirical evidence. Most evidence supports the prediction of both models that settling will be exponential in the far field but contradicts the ESM's prediction that a single exponential distribution will hold for all transport times and distances.

  3. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  4. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO coated particles: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    I J van Rooyen; J H Neethling; J A A Engelbrecht; P M van Rooyen; G Strydom

    2012-10-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  5. Collection and analysis of colloidal particles transported in the Mississippi River, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, T.F.; Ranville, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Sediment transport has long been recognized as an important mechanism for the transport of contaminants in surface waters. Suspended sediment has traditionally been divided into three size classes: sand-sized (>63 ??m), silt-sized ( 63 ??m), silt-sized (< 63 ??m but settleable) and clay-sized (non-settleable). The first two classes are easily collected and characterized using screens (sand) and settling (silt). The clay-sized particles, more properly called colloids, are more difficult to collect and characterize, and until recently received little attention. From the hydrologic perspective, a colloid is a particle, droplet, or gas bubble with at least one dimension between 0.001 and 1 ??m. Because of their small size, colloids have large specific surface areas and high surface free energies which may facilitate sorption of hydrophobic materials. Understanding what types of colloids are present in a system, how contaminants of interest interact with these colloids, and what parameters control the transport of colloids in natural systems is critical if the relative importance of colloid-mediated transport is to be understood. This paper describes the collection, concentration and characterization of colloidal materials in the Mississippi River. Colloid concentrations, particle-size distributions, mineral composition and electrophoretic mobilities were determined. Techniques used are illustrated with samples collected at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.

  6. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO Coated Particles: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    IJ van Rooyen; ML Dunzik-Gougar; PM van Rooyen

    2014-05-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  7. Bacterial Composition and Survival on Sahara Dust Particles Transported to the European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Marco; Lazzaro, Anna; Zeyer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of Sahara dust (SD) particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.). After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria. Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport. PMID:26733988

  8. Studies of HZE particle interactions and transport for space radiation protection purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Wong, Mervyn

    1987-01-01

    The main emphasis is on developing general methods for accurately predicting high-energy heavy ion (HZE) particle interactions and transport for use by researchers in mission planning studies, in evaluating astronaut self-shielding factors, and in spacecraft shield design and optimization studies. The two research tasks are: (1) to develop computationally fast and accurate solutions to the Boltzmann (transport) equation; and (2) to develop accurate HZE interaction models, from fundamental physical considerations, for use as inputs into these transport codes. Accurate solutions to the HZE transport problem have been formulated through a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. In addition, theoretical models for the input interaction parameters are under development: stopping powers, nuclear absorption cross sections, and fragmentation parameters.

  9. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Version 03 PHITS can deal with the transport of almost all particles (nucleons, nuclei, mesons, photons, and electrons) over wide energy ranges, using several nuclear reaction models and nuclear data libraries. Geometrical configuration of the simulation can be set with GG (General Geometry) or CG (Combinatorial Geometry). Various quantities such as heat deposition, track length and production yields can be deduced from the simulation, using implemented estimator functions called "tally". The code also has a function to draw 2D and 3D figures of the calculated results as well as the setup geometries, using a code ANGEL. The physical processes included in PHITS can be divided into two categories, transport process and collision process. In the transport process, PHITS can simulate motion of particles under external fields such as magnetic and gravity. Without the external fields, neutral particles move along a straight trajectory with constant energy up to the next collision point. However, charge particles interact many times with electrons in the material losing energy and changing direction. PHITS treats ionization processes not as collision but as a transport process, using the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The average stopping power is given by the charge density of the material and the momentum of the particle taking into account the fluctuations of the energy loss and the angular deviation. In the collision process, PHITS can simulate the elastic and inelastic interactions as well as decay of particles. The total reaction cross section, or the life time of the particle is an essential quantity in the determination of the mean free path of the transport particle. According to the mean free path, PHITS chooses the next collision point using the Monte Carlo method. To generate the secondary particles of the collision, we need the information of the final states of the collision. For neutron induced reactions in low energy region, PHITS employs the cross

  10. Transport and deposition of pharmaceutical particles in three commercial spacer-MDI combinations.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, A; Normandie, M; Yousefi, M; Saidi, M S; Ahmadi, G

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory drug delivery has been under the research spotlight for the past few decades, mainly due to the high incidence of pulmonary diseases and the fact that this type of delivery offers the highest efficiency for treatment. Despite its invaluable benefits, there are some major drawbacks to respiratory drug delivery, the most important of which being poor delivery efficiency and relatively high drug deposition in undesirable regions, such as the mouth cavity. One way to improve the efficiency of respiratory drug delivery with metered-dose inhalers is placing a respiratory spacer between the inhaler exit and the mouth. It is argued that high drug deposition in the immediate airways of the respiratory system is strongly affected by relatively high initial momentum of pharmaceutical particles leaving the inhaler. A respiratory spacer, however, can provide an expansion region in which the initial momentum of particles can subside. As a result, particles enter the patient׳s oral cavity more gradually and are more likely to reach the desired regions. In this study, the effectiveness of using three commercial spacers paired with a commercial inhaler is examined through numerical investigation of fluid flow and particle transport phenomena. Particles ranging from 1 to 50 µm in diameter are tracked using a Lagrangian point of view and fluid flow fields are resolved using the LRN k-ω turbulence model. A novel particle injection method is introduced and is demonstrated to be able to adequately capture the effects of particle initial momentum. Lastly, a few design suggestions are made.

  11. Fast transport in phase space due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Vasiliev, Alexii; Mourenas, Didier; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boscher, Daniel; Rolland, Guy

    2014-05-01

    We present an analytical, simplified formulation accounting for the fast transport of particles in phase space, in the presence of nonlinear wave-particle resonant interactions in an inhomogeneous magnetic field representative of the radiation belts. We show that the general approach for the description of the evolution of the particle velocity distribution based on the Fokker-Plank equation can be modified to consider the process of nonlinear wave-particle interaction, including particle trapping. Such a modification consists in one additional operator describing fast particle jumps in phase space. The proposed approach is illustrated by considering the acceleration of relativistic electrons by strongly oblique whistler waves. We determine the typical variation of electron phase-density due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction and compare this variation with pitch-angle/energy diffusion due to quasi-linear electron scattering. We show that relation between nonlinear and quasi-linear effects is controlled by the distribution of wave-amplitudes. When this distribution has a heavy tail, nonlinear effects can become dominant in the formation of the electron energy distribution.

  12. Percolation and particle transport in the unsaturated zone of a karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Michiel; Goldscheider, Nico; Zopfi, Jakob; Zwahlen, Francxois

    2009-01-01

    Recharge and contamination of karst aquifers often occur via the unsaturated zone, but the functioning of this zone has not yet been fully understood. Therefore, irrigation and tracer experiments, along with monitoring of rainfall events, were used to examine water percolation and the transport of solutes, particles, and fecal bacteria between the land surface and a water outlet into a shallow cave. Monitored parameters included discharge, electrical conductivity, temperature, organic carbon, turbidity, particle-size distribution (PSD), fecal indicator bacteria, chloride, bromide, and uranine. Percolation following rainfall or irrigation can be subdivided into a lag phase (no response at the outlet), a piston-flow phase (release of epikarst storage water by pressure transfer), and a mixed-flow phase (increasing contribution of freshly infiltrated water), starting between 20 min and a few hours after the start of recharge event. Concerning particle and bacteria transport, results demonstrate that (1) a first turbidity signal occurs during increasing discharge due to remobilization of particles from fractures (pulse-through turbidity); (2) a second turbidity signal is caused by direct particle transfer from the soil (flow-through turbidity), often accompanied by high levels of fecal indicator bacteria, up to 17,000 Escherichia coli/100 mL; and (3) PSD allows differentiation between the two types of turbidity. A relative increase of fine particles (0.9 to 1.5 microm) coincides with microbial contamination. These findings help quantify water storage and percolation in the epikarst and better understand contaminant transport and attenuation. The use of PSD as "early-warning parameter" for microbial contamination in karst water is confirmed.

  13. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Local thermal particle and energy transport studies of balanced-injection L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power have been performed on TFTR. The particle transport of He[sup 2+] and electrons following a small helium gas puff and Fe[sup 24+] induced by laser ablation has been examined and compared to the local energy transport characteristics inferred from power balance analysis. All particle perturbation diffusivities are radially hollow and are similar in magnitude and shape to the effective thermal conductivities found by power balance analysis. All particle diffusivities are 1--2 orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical values, except near the magnetic axis. A reduction in the helium diffusivity D[sub He] in the Supershot as compared to the L-mode is accompanied by a similar reduction in the effective single fluid thermal conductivity [chi]fluid. Also, the helium core convective velocity V[sub He] is found to increase in the Supershot over the L-Mode for r/a < 0.5. A quasilinear model of electrostatic drift waves has been used to calculate ratios between particle and energy fluxes in the Supershot. The measured ratios of the helium and iron particle diffusivities are in good accord with predictions, as are predicted ratios of V[sub He]/D[sub He]. Modelling indicates that the similarity in magnitude and profile shape of D[sub He] and [chi]fluid has generally favorable implications for helium ash content in a future fusion reactor. The core convection found in the Supershot increases the helium concentration on axis but does not reduce the plasma reactivity significantly.

  14. Particle and energy transport studies on TFTR and implications for helium ash in future fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Bell, R.E.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Hill, K.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Local thermal particle and energy transport studies of balanced-injection L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power have been performed on TFTR. The particle transport of He{sup 2+} and electrons following a small helium gas puff and Fe{sup 24+} induced by laser ablation has been examined and compared to the local energy transport characteristics inferred from power balance analysis. All particle perturbation diffusivities are radially hollow and are similar in magnitude and shape to the effective thermal conductivities found by power balance analysis. All particle diffusivities are 1--2 orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical values, except near the magnetic axis. A reduction in the helium diffusivity D{sub He} in the Supershot as compared to the L-mode is accompanied by a similar reduction in the effective single fluid thermal conductivity {chi}fluid. Also, the helium core convective velocity V{sub He} is found to increase in the Supershot over the L-Mode for r/a < 0.5. A quasilinear model of electrostatic drift waves has been used to calculate ratios between particle and energy fluxes in the Supershot. The measured ratios of the helium and iron particle diffusivities are in good accord with predictions, as are predicted ratios of V{sub He}/D{sub He}. Modelling indicates that the similarity in magnitude and profile shape of D{sub He} and {chi}fluid has generally favorable implications for helium ash content in a future fusion reactor. The core convection found in the Supershot increases the helium concentration on axis but does not reduce the plasma reactivity significantly.

  15. Modeling of Particle Acceleration and Transport in Gradual SEP Events Using the PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, O.; Li, G.; Zank, G.; Hu, Q.

    2007-12-01

    We discuss Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere (PATH) numerical model developed at University of California at Riverside and present current progress on modeling of energetic particle acceleration at a traveling quasi-parallel CME-driven shock. We initiate the code by modeling a quiet-time solar wind background and then follow the propagation and evolution of an MHD shock from a distance of ~0.1 AU to the Earth's orbit. The model utilizes the solar wind parameters measured in situ by ACE. A semi-analytical approach is applied to simulate particle acceleration at the shock by injecting solar wind suprathermal ions locally. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism due to the ion scattering by Alfvenic turbulence in the vicinity of the shock is adopted in the code. Monte-Carlo approach is used to follow transport of the energetic particles after they escape from the shock. The output of the PATH model includes time-dependent energetic particle fluxes, spectra and compositional ratios (Fe/O) for proton and heavy ions. We model specific SEP events and compare our modeling results with ACE measurements.

  16. Measurements and modeling of deposited particle transport by foot traffic indoors.

    PubMed

    Sippola, Mark R; Sextro, Richard G; Thatcher, Tracy L

    2014-04-01

    Deposited particles are transported into and within buildings by adhering to and releasing from people's shoes. To better understand transport of deposited particulate contaminants and exposures to these materials, experimental data on tracking by foot traffic are needed. Laboratory experiments measured uptake and downlay mass transfer efficiencies of particles between shoes and floors in a step-simulation chamber. Equilibrium uptake transfer fractions, the net mass fraction transferred from floors to shoes after several steps, were also measured. Single-step uptake and downlay transfer efficiencies ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 and equilibrium uptake transfer fractions were 0.10-0.40. Particle size, particle loading, shoe type, floor type, step pressure, and step sequence were all investigated. Experiments demonstrated that single-step downlay transfer efficiencies decrease with each successive step onto clean floors. A simple empirical model is proposed to estimate these transfers as a function of step number. Simulations using the transfer efficiency values measured here illustrate the spread of deposited particles by people walking in a hypothetical hallway. These simulations show that in locations where a few people walk over the same area each minute, tracking can spread deposited material over length scales comparable to building dimensions in just a few hours.

  17. Particle size distributions and the sequential fragmentation/transport theory applied to volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohletz, K. H.; Sheridan, M. F.; Brown, W. K.

    1989-11-01

    The assumption that distributions of mass versus size interval for fragmented materials fit the log normal distribution is empirically based and has historical roots in the late 19th century. Other often used distributions (e.g., Rosin-Rammler, Weibull) are also empirical and have the general form for mass per size interval: n(l) = klα exp (-lβ), where n(l) represents the number of particles of diameter l, l is the normalized particle diameter, and k, α, and β are constants. We describe and extend the sequential fragmentation distribution to include transport effects upon observed volcanic ash size distributions. The sequential fragmentation/transport (SFT) distribution is also of the above mathematical form, but it has a physical basis rather than empirical. The SFT model applies to a particle-mass distribution formed by a sequence of fragmentation (comminution) and transport (size sorting) events acting upon an initial mass m': n(x, m) = C ∫∫ n(x', m')p(ξ)dx' dm', where x' denotes spatial location along a linear axis, C is a constant, and integration is performed over distance from an origin to the sample location and mass limits from 0 to m. We show that the probability function that models the production of particles of different size from an initial mass and sorts that distribution, p(ξ), is related to mg, where g (noted as γ for fragmentation processes) is a free parameter that determines the location, breadth, and skewness of the distribution; g(γ) must be greater than -1, and it increases from that value as the distribution matures with greater number of sequential steps in the fragmentation or transport process; γ is expected to be near -1 for "sudden" fragmentation mechanisms such as single-event explosions and transport mechanisms that are functionally dependent upon particle mass. This free parameter will be more positive for evolved fragmentation mechanisms such as ball milling and complex transport processes such as saltation. The SFT

  18. Particle and Energy Transport in the SOL of DIII-D and NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J; Maqueda, R; Rudakov, D; McKee, G; Kugel, H; Maingi, R; Crocker, N; Moyer, R; Soukhanovskii, V; Menard, J; Watkins, J; Zweben, S; D'Ippolito, D; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Hollmann, E; Lasnier, C; Myra, J; Roquemore, L; West, W; Zeng, L

    2006-10-09

    The far scrape-off layer (SOL) radial transport and plasma-wall contact is mediated by intermittent and ELM-driven transport. Experiments to characterize the intermittent transport and ELMs have been performed in both DIII-D and NSTX under similar conditions. Both intermittent transport and ELMs are comprised of filaments of hot, dense plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e} {approx} 400 eV) originating at the edge, transport both particles and heat into the SOL by convection, increasing wall interaction and causing sputtering and impurity release. Both intermittent filaments and ELMs leave the pedestal region at speeds of {approx}0.5-3 km/s, losing heat and particles by parallel transport as they travel through the SOL. The intermittency shows many similarities in NSTX and DIII-D, featuring similar size (2-5 cm), large convective radial velocity, ''holes'' inside and peaks outside the LCFS which quickly decay and slow down with radius. Whereas in DIII-D the intermittency decays in both intensity and frequency in H-mode, it chiefly decays in frequency in NSTX. In the low collisionality (v* = {pi}R{sub q{sub 95}}/{lambda}C) (v* {approx} 0.1, N{sub G} {approx} 0.3) case, the ELMs impact the walls quite directly and account for {approx}90% of the wall particle flux, decreasing to {approx}30% at (v* {approx} 1.0, N{sub G} > 0.6).

  19. Asymmetric transport of light in linearly arrayed metallic nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horchani, R.

    2016-02-01

    A strong asymmetric light transport in a linear chain of spherical and equidistantly spaced silver metal nano-particles (MNPs) located near a substrate is reported. The contrast ratio of the proposed structure is above 0.95. We have studied the propagation of light in the array with respect to the metal and the size of the last nano-particle of the chain and the nature of the substrate. It is shown also that the presence of a copper or gold substrate enhance the guiding properties of the array. This structure opens the possibility to design various optical devices such as broadband antennae and optical diodes.

  20. Asymmetric transport of light in linearly arrayed metallic nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroua, W.; Horchani, R.; AbdelMalek, F.; Haxha, S.; Kamli, Ali A.

    2016-09-01

    A strong asymmetric light transport in a linear chain of spherical and equidistantly spaced silver metal nano-particles (MNPs) located near a substrate is reported. The contrast ratio of the proposed structure is above 0.95. We have studied the propagation of light in the array with respect to the metal and the size of the last nano-particle of the chain and the nature of the substrate. It is shown also that the presence of a copper or gold substrate enhance the guiding properties of the array. This structure opens the possibility to design various optical devices such as broadband antennae and optical diodes.

  1. New Capabilities in Mercury: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Cullen, D E; Greenman, G M; Hagmann, C A; Kramer, K J; McKinley, M S; O'Brien, M J; Taylor, J M

    2007-03-08

    The new physics, algorithmic and computer science capabilities of the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code are discussed. The new physics and algorithmic features include in-line energy deposition and isotopic depletion, significant enhancements to the tally and source capabilities, diagnostic ray-traced particles, support for multi-region hybrid (mesh and combinatorial geometry) systems, and a probability of initiation method. Computer science enhancements include a second method of dynamically load-balancing parallel calculations, improved methods for visualizing 3-D combinatorial geometries and initial implementation of an in-line visualization capabilities.

  2. Transport of particle-associated elements in two agriculture-dominated boreal river systems.

    PubMed

    Marttila, Hannu; Saarinen, Tuomas; Celebi, Ahmet; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-09-01

    Transport of particulate pollutants in fluvial systems can contribute greatly to total loads. Understanding transport mechanics under different hydrological conditions is key in successful load estimation. This study analysed trace elements and physico-chemical parameters in time-integrated suspended sediment samples, together with dissolved and total concentrations of pollutants, along two agriculture- and peatland-dominated boreal river systems. The samples were taken in a spatially and temporally comprehensive sampling programme during the ice-free seasons of 2010 and 2011. The hydrochemistry and transport of particle-bound elements in the rivers were strongly linked to intense land use and acid sulphate soils in the catchment area, with arable, pasture and peat areas in particular being main diffuse sources. There were significant seasonal and temporal variations in dissolved and particulate fluxes, but spatial variations were small. Continuous measurements of EC, turbidity and discharge proved to be an accurate indicator of dissolved and particulate fluxes. Overall, the results show that transport of particle-bound elements makes a major contribution to total transport fluxes in agriculture-dominated boreal rivers.

  3. Elipsa is an early determinant of ciliogenesis that links the IFT particle to membrane-associated small GTPase Rab8.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Zhao, Chengtian; Saras, Arunesh; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Kim, Woong; Furukawa, Takahisa; Sengupta, Piali; Veraksa, Alexey; Malicki, Jarema

    2008-04-01

    The formation and function of cilia involves the movement of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles underneath the ciliary membrane, along axonemal microtubules. Although this process has been studied extensively, its molecular basis remains incompletely understood. For example, it is unknown how the IFT particle interacts with transmembrane proteins. To study the IFT particle further, we examined elipsa, a locus characterized by mutations that cause particularly early ciliogenesis defects in zebrafish. We show here that elipsa encodes a coiled-coil polypeptide that localizes to cilia. Elipsa protein binds to Ift20, a component of IFT particles, and Elipsa homologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-11, translocates in sensory cilia, similarly to the IFT particle. This indicates that Elipsa is an IFT particle polypeptide. In the context of zebrafish embryogenesis, Elipsa interacts genetically with Rabaptin5, a well-studied regulator of endocytosis, which in turn interacts with Rab8, a small GTPase, known to localize to cilia. We show that Rabaptin5 binds to both Elipsa and Rab8, suggesting that these proteins provide a bridging mechanism between the IFT particle and protein complexes that assemble at the ciliary membrane.

  4. Stochastic simulation of charged particle transport on the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Computations of cosmic-ray transport based upon finite-difference methods are afflicted by instabilities, inaccuracies, and artifacts. To avoid these problems, researchers developed a Monte Carlo formulation which is closely related not only to the finite-difference formulation, but also to the underlying physics of transport phenomena. Implementations of this approach are currently running on the Massively Parallel Processor at Goddard Space Flight Center, whose enormous computing power overcomes the poor statistical accuracy that usually limits the use of stochastic methods. These simulations have progressed to a stage where they provide a useful and realistic picture of solar energetic particle propagation in interplanetary space.

  5. Transport and particle-hole asymmetry in graphene on boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaSilva, Ashley M.; Jung, Jeil; Adam, Shaffique; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2015-06-01

    All local electronic properties of graphene on a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate exhibit spatial moiré patterns related to lattice constant and orientation differences between shared triangular Bravais lattices. We apply a previously derived effective Hamiltonian for the π bands of graphene on hBN to address the carrier dependence of transport properties, concentrating on the conductivity features at four electrons and four holes per unit cell. These transport features measure the strength of Bragg scattering of π electrons off the moiré pattern, and they exhibit a striking particle-hole asymmetry that we trace to specific features of the effective Hamiltonian that we interpret physically.

  6. Computational modeling of monoenergetic neutral particle inverse transport problems in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Rodrigo R.; Barros, Ricardo C.

    2012-09-01

    Presented here is an analytical numerical method applied to three different types of monoenergetic neutral particle inverse transport problems in the discrete ordinates (SN) formulation: (a) boundary condition estimation; (b) interior source estimation; and (c) effective slab length estimation. These three types of inverse problems governed by the linear integrodifferential transport equation in SN formulation are related respectively to medical physics (a); nuclear waste storage (b); and non-destructive testing in industry (c). Numerical results and a brief discussion are given to conclude this paper.

  7. Cytoplasmic transport in keratocytes: direct visualization of particle translocation along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Hayden, J H; Allen, R D; Goldman, R D

    1983-01-01

    We report the first direct demonstration that the cytoplasmic transport of organelles and vesicles (collectively called particles) takes place along microtubules. Living keratocytes from the corneal stroma of the frog, Rana pipiens were observed with Allen video-enhanced contrast, differential interference contrast (AVEC-DIC) microscopy [Allen et al, 1981]. In sufficiently thin regions of these cells a network of linear elements was visible. When particles were observed in motion, they always moved along these linear elements. The linear elements remained intact and in focus on the microscope when lysed in a cell lysis solution that stabilized microtubules. Preparations were then fixed in formaldehyde, washed with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), incubated with rabbit antitubulin, washed with PBS, stained with rhodamine-conjugated goat antirabbit, and washed with PBS. The extracted cells continued to remain in place and in focus on the microscope throughout these procedures. The same cells were then observed using epifluorescence optics and a silicon-intensified target (SIT) video camera. A network of fluorescent linear elements was seen to correspond in number, form, and position to the linear elements seen in the live AVEC-DIC image. Taken together, the AVEC-DIC and fluorescence microscopy observations prove that the linear elements along which particles move are microtubules (MTLEs). The observed particle speeds, pause times, and distances moved varied widely, even for the same particle on the same microtubule. Particles were also observed to switch from one microtubule to another as they were transported. The polarity of the microtubules did not seem to affect the particle direction, since particles were observed to move in both directions on the same MTLE. When not in motion these particles behaved as if anchored to the microtubules since they showed negligible Brownian motion. Finally, it was observed that an elongate particle could move onto two intersecting

  8. Exposure to ultrafine particles and PM 2.5 in four Sydney transport modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knibbs, Luke D.; de Dear, Richard J.

    2010-08-01

    Concentrations of ultrafine (<0.1 μm) particles (UFPs) and PM 2.5 (<2.5 μm) were measured whilst commuting along a similar route by train, bus, ferry and automobile in Sydney, Australia. One trip on each transport mode was undertaken during both morning and evening peak hours throughout a working week, for a total of 40 trips. Analyses comprised one-way ANOVA to compare overall (i.e. all trips combined) geometric mean concentrations of both particle fractions measured across transport modes, and assessment of both the correlation between wind speed and individual trip means of UFPs and PM 2.5, and the correlation between the two particle fractions. Overall geometric mean concentrations of UFPs and PM 2.5 ranged from 2.8 (train) to 8.4 (bus) × 10 4 particles cm -3 and 22.6 (automobile) to 29.6 (bus) μg m -3, respectively, and a statistically significant difference ( p < 0.001) between modes was found for both particle fractions. Individual trip geometric mean concentrations were between 9.7 × 10 3 (train) and 2.2 × 10 5 (bus) particles cm -3 and 9.5 (train) to 78.7 (train) μg m -3. Estimated commuter exposures were variable, and the highest return trip mean PM 2.5 exposure occurred in the ferry mode, whilst the highest UFP exposure occurred during bus trips. The correlation between fractions was generally poor, and in keeping with the duality of particle mass and number emissions in vehicle-dominated urban areas. Wind speed was negatively correlated with, and a generally poor determinant of, UFP and PM 2.5 concentrations, suggesting a more significant role for other factors in determining commuter exposure.

  9. Sources, transport, and mixing of particle-bound PAHs fluxes in the upper Neckar River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, Marc; Rügner, Hermann; Qin, Xintong; Scherer, Ulrike; Grathwohl, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transport of many urban pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles. The degree of contamination of these suspended particles depends on the mixture of "polluted" urban and "clean" background particles. Recent results have shown that, in several meso-scale catchments studied in southwestern and eastern Germany, the loading of particles with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was stable over time and characteristic for each catchment. The absence of significant long-term trends or pronounced changes of the catchment-specific loadings indicate that either input and output of PAHs into the stream networks are largely at steady state or that storage of PAHs in the sediments within the stream network are sufficient to smooth out larger fluctuations. Moreover, it was shown that the contamination of sediments and suspended particles with PAHs is proportional to the number of inhabitants per suspended sediment flux in a catchment. These processes are being further studied at larger scale in the upper Neckar River basin (2300 km²) in southwestern Germany. This basin, located between the mountain ranges of the Black Forest and the Swabian Alb, comprises sub-catchments that are diverse in terms of urban impact, geology (ranging from gypsum and limetstones to siliceous sandstones) and hydrology (dynamics driven either by summerly convective events or by winterly frontal systems and snow melt). Accordingly, quality and quantity of particles being released in the sub-catchments as potential vectors for hydrophobic pollutants differ; and so do the events that mobilize the particles. These settings enable the investigation of how particle-bound pollutant fluxes generated at the meso-scale are mixed and transported at larger scales when introduced into a higher order river. A prominent research question is whether varying contributions from contrasting sub-catchments lead to changing contamination patterns in the main stem or if the sediment storage in

  10. Transport coefficients of multi-particle collision algorithms with velocity-dependent collision rules.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Thomas

    2008-06-11

    Detailed calculations of the transport coefficients of a recently introduced particle-based model for fluid dynamics with a non-ideal equation of state are presented. Excluded volume interactions are modeled by means of biased stochastic multi-particle collisions which depend on the local velocities and densities. Momentum and energy are exactly conserved locally. A general scheme to derive transport coefficients for such biased, velocity-dependent collision rules is developed. Analytic expressions for the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity are obtained, and very good agreement is found with numerical results at small and large mean free paths. The viscosity turns out to be proportional to the square root of temperature, as in a real gas. In addition, the theoretical framework is applied to a two-component version of the model, and expressions for the viscosity and the difference in diffusion of the two species are given.

  11. Transport of membrane-bound mineral particles in blood vessels during chicken embryonic bone development.

    PubMed

    Kerschnitzki, Michael; Akiva, Anat; Ben Shoham, Adi; Koifman, Naama; Shimoni, Eyal; Rechav, Katya; Arraf, Alaa A; Schultheiss, Thomas M; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Zelzer, Elazar; Weiner, Stephen; Addadi, Lia

    2016-02-01

    During bone formation in embryos, large amounts of calcium and phosphate are taken up and transported to the site where solid mineral is first deposited. The initial mineral forms in vesicles inside osteoblasts and is deposited as a highly disordered calcium phosphate phase. The mineral is then translocated to the extracellular space where it penetrates the collagen matrix and crystallizes. To date little is known about the transport mechanisms of calcium and phosphate in the vascular system, especially when high transport rates are needed and the concentrations of these ions in the blood serum may exceed the solubility product of the mineral phase. Here we used a rapidly growing biological model, the chick embryo, to study the bone mineralization pathway taking advantage of the fact that large amounts of bone mineral constituents are transported. Cryo scanning electron microscopy together with cryo energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and focused-ion beam imaging in the serial surface view mode surprisingly reveal the presence of abundant vesicles containing small mineral particles in the lumen of the blood vessels. Morphologically similar vesicles are also found in the cells associated with bone formation. This observation directly implicates the vascular system in solid mineral distribution, as opposed to the transport of ions in solution. Mineral particle transport inside vesicles implies that far larger amounts of the bone mineral constituents can be transported through the vasculature, without the danger of ectopic precipitation. This introduces a new stage into the bone mineral formation pathway, with the first mineral being formed far from the bone itself.

  12. A model for particle-selective transport of tracers in sediments with conveyor belt deposit feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, John A.

    1986-07-01

    Conveyor belt deposit-feeding organisms prevalent in both marine and freshwater systems have a profound effect on sediment properties and transport processes. These organisms ingest sediments over a range of depths while depositing gut contents from tails protruding above the sediment surface. This action results in particle-selective transfer of buried materials to the sediment surface and imposes an accelerated rate of sediment and pore water burial within the feeding zone. Most previous efforts to combine sediment diagenesis with the effects of biogenic reworking characterize mixing as exclusively diffusive and ignore such major advective effects. Here a model is developed, based on fundamental diagenetic equations for transport and reaction, for the distribution of tracers in accumulating sediments subject to compaction and diffusive as well as advective redistribution by benthic organisms. Conveyor belt (CB) feeding is characterized as a first-order process with a depth-dependent rate constant which is either localized (Gaussian) or distributed (integrated Gaussian). Biogenic diffusivity of bulk sediments is allowed these alternative depth dependences as well. The model assumes simple linear adsorption of the tracer between solid and solution phases and uses a time-dependent flux at (x = 0) which is a combination of that originating externally and the depth-integrated contributions from feeding. Particle selectivity is introduced by applying mass conservation separately to transport of the tracer and bulk sediments. Properties of the model are illustrated for tracers in nondispersive systems strongly bound to sediment solids. CB recycling gives rise to transient reflections on passage of a tracer pulse through the zone of bioturbation. Reflections readily disappear in the presence of various integrative processes. The system time resolution is defined in terms of the downward propagation of dual tracer pulses and shown to be systematically degraded by

  13. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and its applications for multiphase flow and reactive transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Trask, Nathaniel; Pan, K.; Jones, Bruce D.; Pan, Wenxiao; Williams, John R.

    2016-03-11

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a Lagrangian method based on a meshless discretization of partial differential equations. In this review, we present SPH discretization of the Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion-Reaction equations, implementation of various boundary conditions, and time integration of the SPH equations, and we discuss applications of the SPH method for modeling pore-scale multiphase flows and reactive transport in porous and fractured media.

  14. Measurement of energetic-particle-driven core magnetic fluctuations and induced fast-ion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Koliner, J. J.; Eilerman, S.; Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Liu, D.

    2013-03-01

    Internal fluctuations arising from energetic-particle-driven instabilities, including both density and radial magnetic field, are measured in a reversed-field-pinch plasma. The fluctuations peak near the core where fast ions reside and shift outward along the major radius as the instability transits from the n = 5 to n = 4 mode. During this transition, strong nonlinear three-wave interaction among multiple modes accompanied by enhanced fast-ion transport is observed.

  15. The three-dimensional, discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code TORT: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The centerpiece of the Discrete Ordinates Oak Ridge System (DOORS), the three-dimensional neutral particle transport code TORT is reviewed. Its most prominent features pertaining to large applications, such as adjustable problem parameters, memory management, and coarse mesh methods, are described. Advanced, state-of-the-art capabilities including acceleration and multiprocessing are summarized here. Future enhancement of existing graphics and visualization tools is briefly presented.

  16. High Altitude Neutral Particle Transport Using the Monte Carlo Simulation Code MCNP with Variable Density Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Monti Captain# USAF AFIT.’GNE/F•P/91M-6 (LO IA Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT/IGNE/ENP/91M-6 HIGH ALTITUDE NEUTRAL... distribution unlimited Preface The purpose of this study was to perform Monte Carlo simulations of neutral particle transport with primary and secondary...21 4. Spatial Cell Geometry for Co-Altitude Detectors .................... .................. 44 5. MCNP vs. SMAUG Neutron Fluence at Source Co

  17. Viscous dissipation effects on thermophoretically augmented aerosol particle transport across laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of viscous dissipation on mass transport across nonisothermal low-mass-loading laminar boundary layers of dusty gas is investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The derivation of the model is outlined, and numerical results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. The dissipation effects are found to be significant, increasing total particle-deposition rates; the intensity of the effects depends on the ratio of wall temperature to mainstream static temperature.

  18. Performing three-dimensional neutral particle transport calculations on tera scale computers

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Brown, P N; Chang, B; Dorr, M R; Hanebutte, U R

    1999-01-12

    A scalable, parallel code system to perform neutral particle transport calculations in three dimensions is presented. To utilize the hyper-cluster architecture of emerging tera scale computers, the parallel code successfully combines the MPI message passing and paradigms. The code's capabilities are demonstrated by a shielding calculation containing over 14 billion unknowns. This calculation was accomplished on the IBM SP ''ASCI-Blue-Pacific computer located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  19. Effect of Hydrodynamics on Particle Transport in Saturated Fractures: Experimental and Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianflone, S.; Lakhian, V.; Dickson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately one third of Canadians and Americans use groundwater as their source of drinking water. Porous media aquifers typically provide significant filtration of particulate contaminants (e.g., viruses, bacteria, protozoa). Fractured media, however, does not provide the same degree of filtration, and in fact often acts as a pathway for particulates to migrate, typically at much greater velocities than in porous media. Fractured aquifers, therefore, are significantly more vulnerable to particulate contamination than unconsolidated porous media. Thus, understanding in the mechanisms of particle migration and retention in fractures is important for the protection and management of these drinking water sources. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of hydrodynamics on particle transport in saturated, variable aperture fractures. A 2D fracture was randomly generated with an average aperture of approximately 2mm. The fracture was inscribed into pieces of poly(methyl methacrylate), thus creating a pseudo-2D fracture (the xy fracture domain is invariant in z). Transport experiments using fluorescent microspheres (0.05 um, 0.5 um, and 0.75 um) were performed at 2.6 m/day, 26 m/day and 113 m/day and the resulting breakthrough curves were measured. These breakthrough curves included various shoulders and artifacts that were repeatable and could be used to evaluate the quality of a model. COMSOL Multiphysics, was used to generate an average flow field through the 2D fracture by numerically solving the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation. In order to have a 3D realization of the flow field, a parabolic flow regime was assumed in the z-axis and used to scale the average flow field. Random walk particle tracking was utilized to generate breakthrough curves; however, the Brownian motion and local fluid shear mechanisms needed to be considered in addition to the standard movement of particles via the local flow field in order to appropriately model the

  20. Influence of permeability on nanoscale zero-valent iron particle transport in saturated homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Strutz, Tessa J; Hornbruch, Götz; Dahmke, Andreas; Köber, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles can be used for in situ groundwater remediation. The spatial particle distribution plays a very important role in successful and efficient remediation, especially in heterogeneous systems. Initial sand permeability (k 0) influences on spatial particle distributions were investigated and quantified in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems within the presented study. Four homogeneously filled column experiments and a heterogeneously filled tank experiment, using different median sand grain diameters (d 50), were performed to determine if NZVI particles were transported into finer sand where contaminants could be trapped. More NZVI particle retention, less particle transport, and faster decrease in k were observed in the column studies using finer sands than in those using coarser sands, reflecting a function of k 0. In heterogeneous media, NZVI particles were initially transported and deposited in coarse sand areas. Increasing the retained NZVI mass (decreasing k in particle deposition areas) caused NZVI particles to also be transported into finer sand areas, forming an area with a relatively homogeneous particle distribution and converged k values despite the different grain sizes present. The deposited-particle surface area contribution to the increasing of the matrix surface area (θ) was one to two orders of magnitude higher for finer than coarser sand. The dependency of θ on d 50 presumably affects simulated k changes and NZVI distributions in numerical simulations of NZVI injections into heterogeneous aquifers. The results implied that NZVI can in principle also penetrate finer layers.

  1. Enhanced magnetic particle transport by integration of a magnetic flux guide: Experimental verification of simulated behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirix-Speetjens, Roel; Fyen, Wim; Boeck, Jo De; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2006-04-01

    In the past, magnetic biosensors have shown to be promising alternatives for classical fluorescence-based microarrays, replacing the fluorescent label by a superparamagnetic particle. While on-chip detection of magnetic particles is firmly established, research groups continue to explore the unique ability of manipulating these particles by applying controlled magnetic forces. One of the challenging tasks in designing magnetic force generating structures remains the generation of large forces for a minimal current consumption. Previously, a simple transporting device for single magnetic particles has been demonstrated using a magnetic field that is generated by two tapered current carrying conductors [R. Wirix-Speetjens, W. Fyen, K. Xu, J. De Boeck, and G. Borghs, IEEE Trans. Magn. 41(10), 4128 (2005)]. We also developed a model to accurately predict the motion of a magnetic particle moving in the vicinity of a solid wall. Using this model, we now present a technique that enhances the magnetic force up to a factor of 3 using a magnetic flux guide. The larger magnetic force results in an average speed of the particle which increases with a factor of 3. These simulations show good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Micro-particle transporting system using galvanotactically stimulated apo-symbiotic cells of Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shunsuke; Karaki, Chiaki; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that Paramecium species including green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria) migrate towards the anode when exposed to an electric field in a medium. This type of a cellular movement is known as galvanotaxis. Our previous study revealed that an electric stimulus given to P bursaria is converted to a galvanotactic cellular movement by involvement of T-type calcium channel on the plasma membrane [Aonuma et al. (2007), Z. Naturforsch. 62c, 93-102]. This phenomenon has attracted the attention of bioengineers in the fields of biorobotics or micro-robotics in order to develop electrically controllable micromachineries. Here, we demonstrate the galvanotactic controls of the cellular migration of P bursaria in capillary tubes (diameter, 1-2 mm; length, 30-240 mm). Since the Paramecium cells take up particles of various sizes, we attempted to use the electrically stimulated cells of P bursaria as the vehicle for transportation of micro-particles in the capillary system. By using apo-symbiotic cells of P bursaria obtained after forced removal of symbiotic algae, the uptake of the particles could be maximized and visualized. Then, electrically controlled transportations of particle-filled apo-symbiotic P bursaria cells were manifested. The particles transported by electrically controlled cells (varying in size from nm to /m levels) included re-introduced green algae, fluorescence-labeled polystyrene beads, magnetic microspheres, emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-labeled cells of E. coli, Indian ink, and crystals of zeolite (hydrated aluminosilicate minerals with a micro-porous structure) and some metal oxides. Since the above demonstrations were successful, we concluded that P bursaria has a potential to be employed as one of the micro-biorobotic devices used in BioMEMS (biological micro-electro-mechanical systems).

  3. Progress in Solving the Elusive Ag Transport Mechanism in TRISO Coated Particles: What is new?

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella Van Rooyen

    2014-10-01

    The TRISO particle for HTRs has been developed to an advanced state where the coating withstands internal gas pressures and retains fission products during irradiation and under postulated accidents. However, one exception is Ag that has been found to be released from high quality TRISO coated particles when irradiated and can also during high temperature accident heating tests. Although out- of- pile laboratory tests have never hither to been able to demonstrate a diffusion process of Ag in SiC, effective diffusion coefficients have been derived to successfully reproduce measured Ag-110m releases from irradiated HTR fuel elements, compacts and TRISO particles It was found that silver transport through SiC does not proceed via bulk volume diffusion. Presently grain boundary diffusion that may be irradiation enhanced either by neutron bombardment or by the presence of fission products such as Pd, are being investigated. Recent studies of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission kukuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to further the understanding of Ag transport through TRISO particles. No silver was observed in SiC grains, but Ag was identified at triple-points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in some of the very same triple junctions, but this could be related to silver behavior as Ag-110m decays to Cd-110. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries and in most SiC grain boundaries and the potential role of Pd in the transport of Ag will be discussed.

  4. Specific spacecraft evaluation: Special report. [charged particle transport from a mercury ion thruster to spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Charged and neutral particle transport from an 8 cm mercury ion thruster to the surfaces of the P 80-1 spacecraft and to the Teal Ruby sensor and the ECOM-501 sensor of that spacecraft were investigated. Laboratory measurements and analyses were used to examine line-of-sight and nonline-of sight particle transport modes. The recirculation of Hg(+) ions in the magnetic field of the earth was analyzed for spacecraft velocity and Earth magnetic field vector configurations which are expected to occur in near Earth, circular, high inclination orbits. For these magnetic field and orbit conditions and for expected ion release distribution functions, in both angles and energies, the recirculation/re-interception of ions on spacecraft surfaces was evaluated. The refraction of weakly energetic ions in the electric fields of the thruster plasma plume and in the electric fields between this plasma plume and the material boundaries of the thruster, the thruster sputter shield, and the various spacecraft surfaces were examined. The neutral particle transport modes of interest were identified as sputtered metal atoms from the thruster beam shield. Results, conclusions, and future considerations are presented.

  5. Transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles in response to thunderstorm runoff.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, G; Ketterer, M E; Wilson, C G; Layman, R; Whiting, P J

    2001-08-15

    The downslope transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles remobilized during a spring thunderstorm was studied on both a natural prairie and an agricultural field in southwestern Iowa (U.S.A.). A technique was developed for tagging natural soils with the rare earth elements Eu, Tb, and Ho to approximately 1,000 ppm via coprecipitation with MnO2. Tagged material was replaced in target locations; surficial soil samples were collected following precipitation and runoff; and rare earth element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Diffusion and exponential models were applied to the concentration-distance data to determine particle transport distances. The results indicate that the concentration-distance data are well described by the diffusion model, butthe exponential model does not simulate the rapid drop-off in concentrations near the tagged source. Using the diffusion model, calculated particle transport distances at all hillside locations and at both the cultivated and natural prairie sites were short, ranging from 3 to 73 cm during this single runoff event. This study successfully demonstrates a new tool for studying soil erosion.

  6. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Iandola, F N; O'Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  7. Radial transport of approximately 1 MeV/nucleon ions during the 22 November 1977 solar particle event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Gloeckler, G.; Klecker, B.

    1985-01-01

    Time intensity profiles of solar flare energetic particle events carry information on the particle injection processes at the Sun, as well as the transport of particles in interplanetary space. However, in order to help identify the individual processes of injection versus transport it is necessary to use observations taken at more than one radial location. Results of such a study concerning the 22 November 1977 solar particle event, observed with instruments at 1.0 and 1.55 AU are presented. The observations are for particles of energies near 1 MeV/nucleon, considerably less than the approx. 10 to 20 MeV/nucleon energies typical of previous radial transport studies. Thus, in the present work it is possible to examine the validity of transport models to considerably lower energies than in previous work.

  8. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  9. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particles Turbulence and Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Xiao, Yong; Bierwage, Andreas; Spong, Donald; Chu, Ming

    2009-05-01

    The confinement of the energetic particles (EP) is a critical issue in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), since that ignition relies on the self-heating by the fusion products. Shear Alfven wave excitations by EP in toroidal systems, for example Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) and Energetic Particle Mode (EPM) have been investigated as primary candidate for fluctuation-induced transport of EP in fusion plasma. In this work, TAE excitations by energetic particles are investigated in large scale first-principle simulations of fusion plasmas using the global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin, Science 1998]. Comprehensive linear benchmarking results are reported between GTC, GYRO, fluid code TAEFL, and Magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic hybrid code HMGC.

  10. Fluctuation-induced transport of two coupled particles: Effect of the interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I.; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-06-01

    We consider a system of two coupled particles fluctuating between two states, with different interparticle interaction potentials and particle friction coefficients. An external action drives the interstate transitions that induces reciprocating motion along the internal coordinate x (the interparticle distance). The system moves unidirectionally due to rectification of the internal motion by asymmetric friction fluctuations and thus operates as a dimeric motor that converts input energy into net movement. We focus on how the law of interaction between the particles affects the dimer transport and, in particular, the role of thermal noise in the motion inducing mechanism. It is argued that if the interaction potential behaves at large distances as xα, depending on the value of the exponent α, the thermal noise plays a constructive (α > 2), neutral (α = 2), or destructive (α < 2) role. In the case of α = 1, corresponding piecewise linear potential profiles, an exact solution is obtained and discussed in detail.

  11. Quantum Phase Coherence in Mesoscopic Transport Devices with Two-Particle Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhimei; Guo, Xiaofang; Xue, Haibin; Xue, Naitao; Liang, J.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new type of quantum phase coherence (QPC), which is generated by the two-body interaction. This conclusion is based on quantum master equation analysis for the full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum-dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes in order to eliminate the Aharonov-Bohm interference of either single-particle or non-interacting two-particle wave functions. The interacting two-particle QPC is realized by the flux-dependent oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness with a characteristic period. The accurately quantized peaks of cumulant spectrum may have technical applications to probe the two-body Coulomb interaction. PMID:26255858

  12. Drift-Alfven wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-06-15

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfven waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28x0.24 ion sound-gyroradii {rho}{sub s}=c{sub s}/{omega}{sub ci}. The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub s}{approx}0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  13. Practical Implementation of New Particle Tracking Method to the Real Field of Groundwater Flow and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Heejun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In articles published in 2009 and 2010, Suk and Yeh reported the development of an accurate and efficient particle tracking algorithm for simulating a path line under complicated unsteady flow conditions, using a range of elements within finite elements in multidimensions. Here two examples, an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) example and a landfill leachate migration example, are examined to enhance the practical implementation of the proposed particle tracking method, known as Suk's method, to a real field of groundwater flow and transport. Results obtained by Suk's method are compared with those obtained by Pollock's method. Suk's method produces superior tracking accuracy, which suggests that Suk's method can describe more accurately various advection-dominated transport problems in a real field than existing popular particle tracking methods, such as Pollock's method. To illustrate the wide and practical applicability of Suk's method to random-walk particle tracking (RWPT), the original RWPT has been modified to incorporate Suk's method. Performance of the modified RWPT using Suk's method is compared with the original RWPT scheme by examining the concentration distributions obtained by the modified RWPT and the original RWPT under complicated transient flow systems. PMID:22476629

  14. Practical Implementation of New Particle Tracking Method to the Real Field of Groundwater Flow and Transport.

    PubMed

    Suk, Heejun

    2012-01-01

    In articles published in 2009 and 2010, Suk and Yeh reported the development of an accurate and efficient particle tracking algorithm for simulating a path line under complicated unsteady flow conditions, using a range of elements within finite elements in multidimensions. Here two examples, an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) example and a landfill leachate migration example, are examined to enhance the practical implementation of the proposed particle tracking method, known as Suk's method, to a real field of groundwater flow and transport. Results obtained by Suk's method are compared with those obtained by Pollock's method. Suk's method produces superior tracking accuracy, which suggests that Suk's method can describe more accurately various advection-dominated transport problems in a real field than existing popular particle tracking methods, such as Pollock's method. To illustrate the wide and practical applicability of Suk's method to random-walk particle tracking (RWPT), the original RWPT has been modified to incorporate Suk's method. Performance of the modified RWPT using Suk's method is compared with the original RWPT scheme by examining the concentration distributions obtained by the modified RWPT and the original RWPT under complicated transient flow systems.

  15. Active transport of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in a reconstituted cell-free system.

    PubMed

    French, B T; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1987-08-01

    The ability of a reconstituted cell-free system to transport mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein particle has been examined. Poly(A) messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), UV cross-linked after release from isolated liver nuclei in a cell-free system, exhibited a buoyant density of 1.33 g/cm3 in cesium sulfate and 1.47 g/cm3 in cesium chloride, values identical to those of poly(A) mRNP isolated directly from liver polysomes. Furthermore, the in vivo and in vitro transported mRNP showed a similar degree of resistance to RNase digestion and had sedimentation coefficients approximately 2.5 times that of the isolated mRNA. Release of both total mRNA and alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was proportional to the concentration of a specific cytoplasmic protein. Removal of the transport proteins from the cytosol with streptomycin sulfate provided a basal system incapable of supporting the active transport of alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA. Hybridization of released RNA with a recombinant probe specific for intron 6 of alpha 2 mu-globulin showed that intron sequences were retained within the nucleus under optimal alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA transport conditions and that the transported alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was of mature size.

  16. Transport of colloidal silica in unsaturated sand: Effect of charging properties of sand and silica particles.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Motoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the transport of colloidal silica in various degrees of a water-saturated Toyoura sand column, because silica particles are widely used as catalyst carriers and abrasive agents, and their toxicity is reported recently. Since water-silica, water-sand, and air-water interfaces have pH-dependent negative charges, the magnitude of surface charge was controlled by changing the solution pH. The results show that, at high pH conditions (pH 7.4), the deposition of colloidal silica to the sand surface is interrupted and the silica concentration at the column outlet immediately reaches the input concentration in saturated conditions. In addition, the relative concentration of silica at the column outlet only slightly decreases to 0.9 with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 38%, because silica particles are trapped in straining regions in the soil pore and air-water interface. On the other hand, at pH 5 conditions (low pH), where sand and colloid have less charge, reduced repulsive forces result in colloidal silica attaching onto the sand in saturated conditions. The deposition amount of silica particles remarkably increases with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 37%, which is explained by more particles being retained in the sand column associated with the air-water interface. In conclusion, at higher pH, the mobility of silica particles is high, and the air-water interface is inactive for the deposition of silica. On the other hand, at low pH, the deposition amount increases with decreasing water saturation, and the particle transport is inhibited.

  17. Transport of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Designed to Deliver Reactive Iron Particles in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, J. J.; Berge, N. D.; Ramsburg, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    Treatment of subsurface regions contaminated with DNAPL is a significant challenge to environmental restoration. The focus of remediation has recently shifted from technologies that recover the contamination to technologies that destroy the contamination in situ. One method of in situ contaminant destruction employs nano- or submicron-size particles of reactive iron metal. Application of iron-based destruction technologies is currently limited by poor delivery of the reactive particles (i.e., lack of contact between the iron particles and the DNAPL). Encapsulation of the reactive particles within an oil-in-water emulsion is a novel approach that may facilitate delivery. The goal of this project was to investigate the transport behavior of emulsions (Tallow oil, Tween 80, and Span 80) within porous media. One-dimensional column experiments were conducted to evaluate pore-clogging when emulsions containing encapsulated reactive particles were passed through two homogeneous sands with an order of magnitude difference in intrinsic permeability. In these experiments, passing an emulsion through the sand column (4.8 cm i.d.) at a constant flow rate (0.86 mL/min) increased the hydraulic gradient by a factor of approximately three. The hydraulic gradient in each experiment was observed to stabilize after one pore volume of emulsion. Subsequent flushing with water recovered the initial hydraulic gradient. Together, these observations indicate that conductivity reductions during emulsion flushing were the result of viscosity and not the result of extensive pore-clogging. Analysis of effluent samples confirmed that there was minimal retention of the emulsion within the sand column. Results from these experiments suggest that emulsion encapsulation may be an effective means for transporting reactive iron particles within the subsurface environment.

  18. Regulation of Human Hepatic Drug Transporter Activity and Expression by Diesel Exhaust Particle Extract

    PubMed Central

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  19. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Sanders, Aric W.; Wiggins, Gavin M.; Robichaud, David; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Foust, Thomas D.

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, including cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.

  20. Biomass particle models with realistic morphology and resolved microstructure for simulations of intraparticle transport phenomena

    DOE PAGES

    Ciesielski, Peter N.; Crowley, Michael F.; Nimlos, Mark R.; ...

    2014-12-09

    Biomass exhibits a complex microstructure of directional pores that impact how heat and mass are transferred within biomass particles during conversion processes. However, models of biomass particles used in simulations of conversion processes typically employ oversimplified geometries such as spheres and cylinders and neglect intraparticle microstructure. In this study, we develop 3D models of biomass particles with size, morphology, and microstructure based on parameters obtained from quantitative image analysis. We obtain measurements of particle size and morphology by analyzing large ensembles of particles that result from typical size reduction methods, and we delineate several representative size classes. Microstructural parameters, includingmore » cell wall thickness and cell lumen dimensions, are measured directly from micrographs of sectioned biomass. A general constructive solid geometry algorithm is presented that produces models of biomass particles based on these measurements. Next, we employ the parameters obtained from image analysis to construct models of three different particle size classes from two different feedstocks representing a hardwood poplar species (Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen) and a softwood pine (Pinus taeda, loblolly pine). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the models and the effects explicit microstructure by performing finite-element simulations of intraparticle heat and mass transfer, and the results are compared to similar simulations using traditional simplified geometries. In conclusion, we show how the behavior of particle models with more realistic morphology and explicit microstructure departs from that of spherical models in simulations of transport phenomena and that species-dependent differences in microstructure impact simulation results in some cases.« less

  1. Effects of Flow Velocity and Particle Size on Transport of Ultrafine Bubbles in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Nihei, N.; Ueda, Y.; Nishimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Potential applications of ultrafine bubbles (UFBs) have drawn more attention, especially in environmental engineering fields such as soil/groundwater remediation. Understanding a transport mechanism of UFBs in soils is essential to optimize remediation techniques using UFBs. In this study, column transport experiments using glass beads with different size fraction were conducted, where UFBs created by either air or oxygen were injected to the column with different flow conditions. Effects of particle size and flow velocities on transport characteristics of UFBs were investigated based on the column experiments. The results showed that attachments of UFBs were enhanced under lower water velocity condition, exhibiting more than 50% of UFBs injected were attached inside the column. The mobility of O2-UFBs which have lower zeta potential was higher than that of Air-UFBs. A convection-dispersion model including bubble attachment and detachment terms was applied to the obtained breakthrough curves for each experiment, showing good fitness against the measured data.

  2. Nonlinear physics and energetic particle transport features of the beam-plasma instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Falessi, Matteo V.; Montani, Giovanni; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-10-01

    > In this paper we study transport features of a one-dimensional beam-plasma system in the presence of multiple resonances. As a model description of the general problem of a warm energetic particle beam, we assume cold supra-thermal beams and investigate the self-consistent evolution in the presence of the complete spectrum of nearly degenerate Langmuir modes. A qualitative transport estimation is obtained by computing the Lagrangian Coherent Structures of the system on given temporal scales. This leads to the splitting of the phase space into regions where the local transport processes are relatively faster. The general theoretical framework is applied to the case of the nonlinear dynamics of two cold beams, for which numerical simulation results are illustrated and analysed.

  3. Particle Scale Studies Experimental and Computational Studies on the Effects of Turbulence Statistics and Bed Variability on Particle Entrainment and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Templin, K.; Tewoldebrhan, B. Y.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2010-12-01

    Most models used to predict transport of particles in bedload transport are semi-empirically based on averaged fluid velocity or stress. While these models work reasonably well for relatively simple fluid flow (through experimental channels), under unsteady conditions (e.g., due to roughness transitions such as that associated with gravel patches or gravel-sand transitions) these models are significantly less successful. Recent experiments suggest that discrepancies between models and physical measurements are due largely to the neglected effects of fluctuating fluid velocities on particle movement. We measure the average and instantaneous velocities in 3-D to determine how they are correlated with particle transport over fixed and mobile gravel beds and near roughness transitions. In this way, we determine which turbulence structures are responsible for the majority of bedload transport under these conditions. We also perform complimentary discrete element simulations using simple models for fluid-particle interactions to isolate effects of different particle sizes from turbulence fluctuations on bedload transport. In this presentation, we describe the results from these experiments and simulations and, based on these results, the development of a physically representative model for bedload transport that takes into account this phenomonology.

  4. Sensory ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans: assignment of IFT components into distinct modules based on transport and phenotypic profiles.

    PubMed

    Ou, Guangshuo; Koga, Makato; Blacque, Oliver E; Murayama, Takashi; Ohshima, Yasumi; Schafer, Jenny C; Li, Chunmei; Yoder, Bradley K; Leroux, Michel R; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2007-05-01

    Sensory cilium biogenesis within Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the kinesin-2-dependent intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors associated with IFT particles to the axoneme tip. Here we analyzed the molecular organization of the IFT machinery by comparing the in vivo transport and phenotypic profiles of multiple proteins involved in IFT and ciliogenesis. Based on their motility in wild-type and bbs (Bardet-Biedl syndrome) mutants, IFT proteins were classified into groups with similar transport profiles that we refer to as "modules." We also analyzed the distribution and transport of fluorescent IFT particles in multiple known ciliary mutants and 49 new ciliary mutants. Most of the latter mutants were snip-SNP mapped and one, namely dyf-14(ks69), was cloned and found to encode a conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis. The products of these ciliogenesis genes could also be assigned to the aforementioned set of modules or to specific aspects of ciliogenesis, based on IFT particle dynamics and ciliary mutant phenotypes. Although binding assays would be required to confirm direct physical interactions, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the C. elegans IFT machinery has a modular design, consisting of modules IFT-subcomplex A, IFT-subcomplex B, and a BBS protein complex, in addition to motor and cargo modules, with each module contributing to distinct functional aspects of IFT or ciliogenesis.

  5. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-06-04

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81

  6. Changes In The Characteristics of Basaltic Particles During Different Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, R. A.; Rose, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of the grains in sedimentary deposits can provide valuable clues about transport processes, distance traveled, and provenance. A fundamental physical characteristic is particle shape, which is diagnostic of transport process as well as the distance traveled. For example, it is possible to distinguish the emplacement process of sediments based entirely on the shape of the quartz grains in the deposit [e.g., Folk, 1980]. Such basic sedimentological concepts have been applied to our interpretation of surface materials on the terrestrial planets [e.g. Cabrol et al., 2014]. However, what we know about the nature of sedimentary materials is based primarily on sediments that have weathered from felsic rocks—granite. This is true because felsic materials compose most of the landmass on the Earth. Yet, the surface of Mars is composed predominately of mafic materials—basalt—and sedimentary particles derived from basalt are much different than those derived from granite. Instead of quartz, feldspar, and heavy minerals commonly found in most terrestrial sedimentary deposits, basaltic sediments are typically composed of varying amounts of olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, and vitric and lithic fragments. Both the persistence of basaltic particles and their specific gravities are different than particles derived from granite. These differences are important because they will affect the characteristics of basaltic sediment as it is transported by wind, water, and ice, and currently we have little to no understanding as to how basaltic sediment will weather as a function of the transport mechanism and distance. We will present preliminary analyses of typical basaltic sediments that have been transported by a variety of geologic processes in Hawaii, including details about surface texture, componentry, and the influence different sedimentary processes may have on remote sensing data. The figure below shows examples of A) sediment

  7. Understanding how hydrodynamics affects particle transport in saturated fractures using modelling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianflone, S.; Lakhian, V.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 35% of Canadians and Americans utilize groundwater for drinking water and as such, it is essential to understand the mechanisms which may jeopardize this resource. Porous media aquifers typically provide significant removal of particulate contaminants (eg. viruses, bacteria); however, fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards often provide pathways for particles to move in greater numbers and speed than in porous media. Thus, understanding flow and transport in fractures is important for the preservation and use of groundwater sources. Models based on coupling flow and transport equations can be used in understanding transport in fractures. Both experiments and simulations have shown that there are inconsistencies in current transport, attachment and detachment theory, particularly when particle size is varied. The assumption that hydrodynamic effects do not significantly affect transport of particles is likely untrue. As well, it has been shown that preferential flow paths occur in fractures, but the effects of path specific properties such as fracture geometry have yet to be thoroughly explored. It has been observed that eddies caused by local changes in geometry exist in fractures in the environment and models have demonstrated that such eddies will retard the flow of particles. In this work, two 2D fractures were randomly generated with a mean aperture of approximately 2mm. Finite element software, COMSOL Multiphysics, generated flow fields through the fractures by numerically solving the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation for varied flow rates. Eddies were observed in one of the fractures at both low (~1 m/day) and high (>100 m/day) velocities. A program was written using random walk particle tracking to simulate transport. Theories of attachment, detachment and matrix flow are not included in this model in order to isolate hydrodynamic forces. In combination with the modelling procedure, the two fractures were inscribed into pieces of

  8. Controlling the structure and dynamics of magnetoresponsive particle suspensions for enhanced transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Kyle J.

    The work contained herein describes the use of various magnetic fields to control the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle suspensions, with the practical aim of enhancing momentum, heat, and mass transport. The magnetic fields are often multiaxial and can consist of up to three orthogonal components that may be either static (dc), time-dependent (ac), or some combination thereof. The magnetic particles are composed of a ferromagnetic material---such as iron, nickel, cobalt, or Permalloy---and can exist in a variety of shapes, including spheres, platelets, and rods. The shape of the particles is particularly important, as this can determine the type of behavior the suspension exhibits and can strongly affect the efficacy of various transport properties. The continuous phase can be almost any fluid so long as it possesses a viscosity that allows the particles to orient and aggregate in response to the applied field. Additionally, if the liquid is polymerizable (e.g., an epoxy system), then composite materials with particular, field-directed particle assemblies can be created. Given the many combinations of various particles, suspending fluids, and magnetic fields, a vast array of behavior is possible: the formation of anisotropic particle structures for directed heat transport for use as advanced thermal interface materials; the stimulation of emergent dynamics in platelet suspensions, which give rise to field-controllable flow lattices; and the creation of vortex fluids that possess a uniform torque density, enabling such strange behaviors as active wetting, a negative viscosity and striking biomimetic dynamics. Because the applied fields used to produce many of these phenomena are uniform and modest in strength, such adaptive fluids open up the possibility of tuning the degree of mixing or heat/mass transfer for specific operating conditions in a number of processes, ranging from the microscale to the industrial scale. Moreover, the very nature of magnetism

  9. Influencing factors on particle-bound contaminant transport in the Elbe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleisinger, Carmen; Haase, Holger; Schubert, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter, i.e. suspended particulate matter and sediments in rivers and estuaries, often are contaminated with trace metals and selected organic contaminants and are mainly associated with fine-grained fractions. Transport processes and fate of particles in estuaries are influenced by several factors, e.g. freshwater discharge, tide, flow velocity and dredging activities (Kappenberg et al., 2007). Understanding the transport processes in estuaries may help to achieve the objectives of the Water Framework Directive and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. The German Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) operates for more than 20 years five monitoring sites in the Elbe estuary in order to monitor the development of particle-bound contaminant concentrations over time and to understand their transport mechanisms. Results of the monitoring revealed freshwater discharge as an important influencing factor on the transport of contaminated particulate matter (Ackermann et al., 2007). The bidirectional transport of marine and fluvial water and particulate matter in estuaries results in a turbidity zone where large amounts of particulate matter are temporarily retained and thus in a delayed transport of particulate matter towards the sea. The extent and the location of the turbidity zone as well as the ratio of highly contaminated fluvial and less contaminated marine sediments at a given location are mainly influenced by the freshwater discharge (Kowalewska et al., 2011). Furthermore, at high freshwater discharge conditions the highly contaminated particulate matter from fluvial origin are transported downstream the estuary, whereas at low freshwater discharges, upstream transport of less contaminated marine sediments prevails. Hence, residence times of particulate matter in the estuary are difficult to estimate. Furthermore, sedimentation areas with flow reduced conditions, e.g. wadden areas or branches of the Elbe estuary, may act as sinks for particle bound

  10. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  11. Influence of diameter on particle transport in a fractured shale saprolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cumbie, D.H.; McKay, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments in an undisturbed, saturated column of weathered and fractured shale saprolite using fluorescent carboxylate-coated latex microspheres as tracers indicate that particle diameter plays a major role in controlling transport. In this study the optimum microsphere diameter for transport was approximately 0.5 ??m. Microspheres larger than the optimum size were present in the effluent at lower relative concentrations, apparently because of greater retention due to gravitational settling and/or physical straining. The smaller than optimum microspheres also experienced greater retention, apparently related to their higher rates of diffusion. Faster diffusion can lead to more frequent collisions with, and attachment to, fracture walls and may also lead to movement of particles into zones of relatively immobile pore water in the fractures or in the fine pore structure of the clay-rich matrix between fractures. Dismantling of the soil column and mapping of the distribution of retained microspheres indicated that there was substantial size-segregation of the microspheres between different fractures or in 'channels' within a fracture. Examination of small core samples showed that the smallest microspheres (0.05-0.1 ??m) were present in the fine pores of the matrix at distances of up to 3-4 mm from the nearest fracture, which supports the hypothesis that small particles can be retained by diffusion into the matrix. Calculations of settling velocity and diffusion rate using simple 1D approaches suggest that these processes could both cause significant retention of the larger and smaller particles, respectively, even for the fast advective transport rates (up to 32 m/day) observed during the experiments. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Simulations of Lateral Transport and Dropout Structure of Energetic Particles from Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooprakai, P.; Seripienlert, A.; Ruffolo, D.; Chuychai, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2016-11-01

    We simulate trajectories of energetic particles from impulsive solar flares for 2D+slab models of magnetic turbulence in spherical geometry to study dropout features, i.e., sharp, repeated changes in the particle density. Among random-phase realizations of two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, a spherical harmonic expansion can generate homogeneous turbulence over a sphere, but a 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) locally mapped onto the lateral coordinates in the region of interest is much faster computationally, and we show that the results are qualitatively similar. We then use the 2D FFT field as input to a 2D MHD simulation, which dynamically generates realistic features of turbulence such as coherent structures. The magnetic field lines and particles spread non-diffusively (ballistically) to a patchy distribution reaching up to 25° from the injection longitude and latitude at r ∼ 1 au. This dropout pattern in field line trajectories has sharper features in the case of the more realistic 2D MHD model, in better qualitative agreement with observations. The initial dropout pattern in particle trajectories is relatively insensitive to particle energy, though the energy affects the pattern’s evolution with time. We make predictions for future observations of solar particles near the Sun (e.g., at 0.25 au), for which we expect a sharp pulse of outgoing particles along the dropout pattern, followed by backscattering that first remains close to the dropout pattern and later exhibits cross-field transport to a distribution that is more diffusive, yet mostly contained within the dropout pattern found at greater distances.

  13. Rapid calculation of hydrodynamic and transport properties in concentrated solutions of colloidal particles and macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James W.; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A new method for calculating the resistance tensors of arbitrarily shaped particles and the translational and rotational self-diffusivity in suspensions of such particles is developed. This approach can be harnessed to efficiently and accurately predict the hydrodynamic and transport properties of large macromolecules such as antibodies in solution. Particles are modeled as a rigid composite of spherical beads, and the continuum equations for low Reynolds number fluid mechanics are used to calculate the drag on the composite or its diffusivity in a solution of other composites. The hydrodynamic calculations are driven by a graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation of the particle-mesh-Ewald technique which offers log-linear scaling with respect to the complexity of the composite-bead particles modeled as well as high speed execution leveraging the hyper-parallelization of the GPU. Matrix-free expressions for the hydrodynamic resistance and translational and rotational diffusivity of composite bead particles are developed, which exhibit substantial improvements in computational complexity over existing approaches. The effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated through a series of calculations for composite-bead particles having a spherical geometry, and the results are compared to exact solutions for spheres. Included in the supplementary material is an implementation of the proposed algorithm which functions as a plug-in for the GPU molecular dynamics suite HOOMD-blue (http://codeblue.umich.edu/hoomd-blue) [J. A. Anderson, C. D. Lorenz, and A. Travesset, "General purpose molecular dynamics simulations fully implemented on graphics processing units," J. Comput. Phys. 227(10), 5342-5359 (2008) and Glaser et al., "Strong scaling of general-purpose molecular dynamics simulations on GPUs," Comput. Phys. Commun. 192, 97-107 (2015)].

  14. Inactivation of particle-associated microorganisms in wastewater disinfection: modeling of ozone and chlorine reactive diffusive transport in polydispersed suspensions.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Joseph P; Loge, Frank J; Ginn, Timothy R; Başağaoğlu, Hakan

    2007-05-01

    Occlusion of microorganisms in wastewater particles often governs the overall performance of a disinfection system, and the associated health risks of post-disinfected effluents. Little is currently known on the penetration of chemical oxidants into particles developed in wastewater treatment. In this work, a reactive transport model that incorporates intra- and extra-particle chemical decay, radial intra-particle diffusion, mass transfer resistance at particle surfaces, and non-linear reaction kinetics within a competitive multi-particle size aqueous environment, was used to analyze the penetration of ozone and chlorine into wastewater particles. Individual characteristics from two secondary wastewater treatment facilities were used in model calibration. Simulations revealed that significant ozone transport within particles greater than 6 microm required large initial concentrations to exhaust the preferential reaction with aqueous soluble matter. Chlorinated samples exhibited apparently slower reactions and thus deeper penetration (22-40 microm). Chlorine penetration was less sensitive to variations in the extra-particle reaction and disinfectant concentration than ozone. Model simulations that considered elevated initial concentrations of chemical disinfectants revealed that complete inactivation of all particle size domains was not possible with current disinfection practices (e.g., contact times). Reduction in the health risks associated with wastewater particles requires treatment that efficiently balances particle removal (filtration) and particle inactivation (disinfection).

  15. Children exposure assessment to ultrafine particles and black carbon: The role of transport and cooking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Stabile, L.; Morawska, L.; Russi, A.

    2013-11-01

    An accurate evaluation of the airborne particle dose-response relationship requires detailed measurements of the actual particle concentration levels that people are exposed to, in every microenvironment in which they reside. The aim of this work was to perform an exposure assessment of children in relation to two different aerosol species: ultrafine particles (UFPs) and black carbon (BC). To this purpose, personal exposure measurements, in terms of UFP and BC concentrations, were performed on 103 children aged 8-11 years (10.1 ± 1.1 years) using hand-held particle counters and aethalometers. Simultaneously, a time-activity diary and a portable GPS were used to determine the children's daily time-activity pattern and estimate their inhaled dose of UFPs and BC. The median concentration to which the study population was exposed was found to be comparable to the high levels typically detected in urban traffic microenvironments, in terms of both particle number (2.2 × 104 part. cm-3) and BC (3.8 μg m-3) concentrations. Daily inhaled doses were also found to be relatively high and were equal to 3.35 × 1011 part. day-1 and 3.92 × 101 μg day-1 for UFPs and BC, respectively. Cooking and using transportation were recognized as the main activities contributing to overall daily exposure, when normalized according to their corresponding time contribution for UFPs and BC, respectively. Therefore, UFPs and BC could represent tracers of children exposure to particulate pollution from indoor cooking activities and transportation microenvironments, respectively.

  16. Modeling fundamental plasma transport and particle-induced emission in a simplified Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Paul Nicholas

    This work involves the modeling of fundamental plasma physics processes occurring within environments that are similar to that of the discharge and plume regions of electric propulsion devices such as Hall effect thrusters. The research is conducted as a collaborative effort with the Plasma & Space Propulsion Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), as part of the University of Michigan/AFRL Center for Excellence in Electric Propulsion (MACEEP). Transport physics, such as particle-particle collisions and particle-induced electron emission, are simulated within the UCLA experimental facility and its representative electric propulsion environment. Simulation methods employed include the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques for the kinetic simulation of charged, rarefied species on high-performance computing architectures. Momentum- (MEX) and charge-exchange (CEX) collision cross-section models for Xe and Xe+, both total and differential, are successfully validated at collision energies of ˜1.5 keV within the novel facility. Heavy-species collisional transport models are validated and the importance of scattering anisotropy in this collision-dominated environment is shown. The theory of particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is then investigated in the context of the relevant energies and environments of the UCLA facility and electric propulsion devices and diagnostics. Reduced, semi-empirical models for total yield and emitted electron energy distribution functions that are easily implemented in a DSMC-PIC code are developed for the simulation of secondary-electron emission due to low-energy ions and high-energy atoms, even in the case of incomplete target-material information. These models are important for the characterization of electric propulsion devices due to the problematic nature of low-temperature plasma diagnostic techniques in which the emission of electrons is physically indistinguishable

  17. Accuracy of momentum and gyrodensity transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, B. F.; Villard, L.

    2014-05-15

    Gyrokinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations based on conservative Lagrangian formalisms admit transport equations for conserved quantities such as gyrodensity and toroidal momentum, and these can be derived for arbitrary wavelength, even though previous applications have used the long-wavelength approximation. In control-variate PIC simulations, a consequence of the different treatment of the background (f{sub 0}) and perturbed parts (δf), when a splitting f = f{sub 0} + δf is performed, is that analytical transport relations for the relevant fluxes and moments are only reproduced in the large marker number limit. The transport equations for f can be used to write the inconsistency in the perturbed quantities explicitly in terms of the sampling of the background distribution f{sub 0}. This immediately allows estimates of the error in consistency of momentum transport in control-variate PIC simulations. This inconsistency tends to accumulate secularly and is not directly affected by the sources and noise control in the system. Although physical tokamaks often rotate quite strongly, the standard gyrokinetic formalism assumes weak perpendicular flows, comparable to the drift speed. For systems with such weak flows, maintaining acceptably small relative errors requires that a number of markers scale with the fourth power of the linear system size to consistently resolve long-wavelength evolution. To avoid this unfavourable scaling, an algorithm for exact gyrodensity transport has been developed, and this is shown to allow accurate simulations with an order of magnitude fewer markers.

  18. Results and perspectives of particle transport measurements in gases in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Balapanov, Daniyar; Beresnev, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Solid or liquid particles floating in a gas belong to dispersed systems, most often referred to as aerosols or dust clouds. They are widely spread in nature, involving both environmental and technological issues. They attract growing attention in microgravity, particularly in complex plasma, simulation of protoplanetary dust clouds, atmospheric aerosol, etc. Brownian random walk, motion of particles in gravity, electrostatic and magnetic fields, are well defined. We present the survey showing that the quantitative description of a vast variety of other types of motion is much less accurate, often known only in a limited region of parameters, sometimes described by the contradictory models, poorly verified experimentally. It is true even for the most extensively investigated transport phenomena - thermophoresis and photophoresis, not to say about diffusiophoresis, gravito-photophoresis, various other types of particle motion driven by physicochemical transformation and accommodation peculiarities on the particle-gas interface, combination of different processes. The number of publications grow very quickly, only those dealing with thermophoresis exceeded 300 in 2015. Hence, there is a strong need in high quality experimental data on particle transport properties with growing interest to expand the scope for non-isometric particles, agglomerates, dense clouds, interrelation with the two-phase flow dynamics. In most cases, the accuracy and sometimes the entire possibility of the measurement is limited by the presence of gravity. Floating particles have the density considerably different from that of the gas. They sediment, often with gliding and tumbling, that perturbs the motion trajectory, local hydrodynamic environment around particles, all together complicating definition of the response. Measurements at very high or very low Knudsen numbers (rarefied gas or too big particles) are of particular difficulty. Experiments assume creating a well-defined force, i

  19. Acceleration and Transport of Solar Energetic Particles in 'Semi-transparent' Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    intermittence of coronal and solar wind plasmas can affect energetic particle acceleration in coronal and interplanetary shocks. The new modeling incorporates particle acceleration in the shock front and the particle transport both in parallel to the magnetic field and in perpendicular to the magnetic field directions. The modeling suggests that the perpendicular diffusion is always essential for the energetic particle production, because particles can be accelerated in tubes with a high turbulence level and then escape to far upstream of the shock via neighboring, less turbulent tubes. Considered are both the penetration of the high-energy (>50 MeV) solar protons through the interplanetary shock and the interplanetary shock acceleration to lower energies (~1-10 MeV). The modeling results are compared with data of spaceborne particle instruments (SOHO. STEREO) and data of neutron monitors.

  20. Vesicular transport of progeny parvovirus particles through ER and Golgi regulates maturation and cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P F

    2013-09-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway.

  1. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Stochastic Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Meakin, Paul

    2008-11-03

    A meso-scale stochastic Lagrangian particle model was developed and used to simulate conservative and reactive transport in porous media. In the stochastic model, the fluid flow in a porous continuum is governed by a combination of a Langevin equation and continuity equation. Pore-scale velocity fluctuations, the source of hydrodynamic dispersion, are represented by the white noise. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method was used to solve the governing equations. Changes in the properties of the fluid particles (e.g., the solute concentration) are governed by the advection-diffusion equation. The separate treatment of advective and diffusive mixing in the stochastic transport model is more realistic than the classical advection-dispersion theory, which uses a single effective diffusion coefficient (the dispersion coefficient) to describe both types of mixing leading to over-prediction of mixing induced effective reaction rates. The stochastic model predicts much lower reaction product concentrations in mixing induced reactions. In addition, the dispersion theory predicts more stable fronts (with a higher effective fractal dimension) than the stochastic model during the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

  3. A coarse-grained transport model for neutral particles in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Reiter, D.; Boerner, P.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-15

    The transport of neutral particles in turbulent plasmas is addressed from the prospect of developing coarse-grained transport models which can be implemented in code suites like B2-EIRENE, currently used for designing the ITER divertor. The statistical properties of turbulent fluctuations are described by a multivariate Gamma distribution able to retain space and time correlations through a proper choice of covariance function. We show that in the scattering free case, relevant for molecules and impurity atoms, the average neutral particle density obeys a Boltzmann equation with an ionization rate renormalized by fluctuations. This result lends itself to a straightforward implementation in the EIRENE Monte Carlo solver for neutral particles. Special emphasis is put on the inclusion of time correlations, and in particular on the ballistic motion of coherent turbulent structures. The role of these time dependent effects is discussed for D{sub 2} molecules and beryllium atoms. The sensitivity of our results to the assumptions on the statistical properties of fluctuations is investigated.

  4. Effects of Natural Organic Matter on Stability, Transport and Deposition of Engineered Nano-particles in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of nano-particles and organic substances, like natural organic matter, could have significant influence on the fate, transport and bioavailability of toxic substances. Natural organic matter (NOM) is a mixture of chemically complex polyelectrolytes with varying m...

  5. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  6. Fluid and gyrokinetic modelling of particle transport in plasmas with hollow density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Nordman, H.; Strand, P.

    2016-11-01

    Hollow density profiles occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by ITG/TE mode turbulence in regions of hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description, and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT , and magnetic shear are investigated. It is found that β in particular has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region, both nonlinear GENE and EDWM show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change of direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln . This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas.

  7. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides.

  8. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Mourant, Judith R.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides. PMID:27231642

  9. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, F.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Leerink, S.

    2006-11-30

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data.

  10. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K.; Siegel, Andrew R.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  11. Development of a relativistic Particle In Cell code PARTDYN for linear accelerator beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadte, D.; Patidar, C. B.; Pal, M. K.

    2017-04-01

    A relativistic Particle In Cell (PIC) code PARTDYN is developed for the beam dynamics simulation of z-continuous and bunched beams. The code is implemented in MATLAB using its MEX functionality which allows both ease of development as well higher performance similar to a compiled language like C. The beam dynamics calculations carried out by the code are compared with analytical results and with other well developed codes like PARMELA and BEAMPATH. The effect of finite number of simulation particles on the emittance growth of intense beams has been studied. Corrections to the RF cavity field expressions were incorporated in the code so that the fields could be calculated correctly. The deviations of the beam dynamics results between PARTDYN and BEAMPATH for a cavity driven in zero-mode have been discussed. The beam dynamics studies of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) using PARTDYN have been presented.

  12. Particle production and equilibrium properties within a new hadron transport approach for heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, J.; Steinberg, V.; Staudenmaier, J.; Pang, L. G.; Oliinychenko, D.; Mohs, J.; Kretz, M.; Kehrenberg, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Bäuchle, B.; Auvinen, J.; Attems, M.; Petersen, H.

    2016-11-01

    The microscopic description of heavy-ion reactions at low beam energies is achieved within hadronic transport approaches. In this article a new approach called "Simulating Many Accelerated Strongly interacting Hadrons" (SMASH) is introduced and applied to study the production of nonstrange particles in heavy-ion reactions at Ekin=0.4 A -2 A GeV. First, the model is described including details about the collision criterion, the initial conditions and the resonance formation and decays. To validate the approach, equilibrium properties such as detailed balance are presented and the results are compared to experimental data for elementary cross sections. Finally results for pion and proton production in C+C and Au+Au collisions is confronted with data from the high-acceptance dielectron spectrometer (HADES) and FOPI. Predictions for particle production in π +A collisions are made.

  13. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  14. Airborne bacteria transported with Sahara dust particles from Northern Africa to the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, A.; Meola, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Sahara Desert is the most important source of aerosols transported across the Mediterranean towards Europe. Airborne microorganisms associated with aerosols may be transported over long distances and act as colonizers of distant habitats. However, little is known on the composition and viability of such microorganisms, due to difficulties related to their detection, collection and isolation. Here we describe an in-depth assessment of the bacterial communities associated with Sahara dust (SD) particles deposited on snow. Two distinct SD events reaching the European Alps in February and May 2014 were preserved as distinct ochre-coloured layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples from a snow profile at 3621 m a.s.l. close to the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps). SD particles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). Backward trajectories were calculated using the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Bacterial communities were charac-terized by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial physiological profiles were assessed by incubation of samples on BIOLOG plates. The SD-layers were generally enriched in illite and kaolinite particles as compared to the adjacent snow layers. The source of SD could be traced back to Algeria. We observed distinct bacterial community structures in the SD-layers as compared to the clean snow layers. While sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers, low abundant (<1%) phyla such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bioindicators for SD. Both phyla are adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation and thus are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-distance airborne transport. Our results show that bacteria are viable and metabolically active after the trek to the European Alps.

  15. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Capecchi, W.; Ding, W. X.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Liu, D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-05-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n =5 to n =6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m =1. The transition occurs when the m =1, n =5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (qfi) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  16. Flow and Transport in Smooth and Rough Unsaturated Wide Aperture Fractures with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Geyer, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present pore- and fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions. Several empirical and semi-analytical solutions are used to verify the model. We show that our results satisfy the empirical scaling laws for droplet velocity and critical contact angle. Due to the efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces as well as the velocity enhancement of droplets on saturated surfaces can readily be obtained. Furthermore, we study the effect of surface roughness on droplet velocities. Lastly, we present flow and transport simulations in the presence of an adjacent porous matrix in order to investigate its influence on the fracture surface flow dynamics and transport across the matrix-fracture interface.

  17. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-05-01

    The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory). Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  18. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on how wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory). Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  19. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of fission product silver transport through TRISO fuel particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bellefon, G. M.; Wirth, B. D.

    2011-06-01

    A mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model developed to investigate the diffusion of silver through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide containment layers of a TRISO fuel particle is described. The release of radioactive silver from TRISO particles has been studied for nearly three decades, yet the mechanisms governing silver transport are not fully understood. This model atomically resolves Ag, but provides a mesoscale medium of carbon and silicon carbide, which can include a variety of defects including grain boundaries, reflective interfaces, cracks, and radiation-induced cavities that can either accelerate silver diffusion or slow diffusion by acting as traps for silver. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, trap binding energies, interface characteristics) are determined from available experimental data, or parametrically varied, until more precise values become available from lower length scale modeling or experiment. The predicted results, in terms of the time/temperature dependence of silver release during post-irradiation annealing and the variability of silver release from particle to particle have been compared to available experimental data from the German HTR Fuel Program ( Gontard and Nabielek [1]) and Minato and co-workers ( Minato et al. [2]).

  20. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  1. Human Cough as a Two-Stage Jet and Its Role in Particle Transport

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuguo

    2017-01-01

    The human cough is a significant vector in the transmission of respiratory diseases in indoor environments. The cough flow is characterized as a two-stage jet; specifically, the starting jet (when the cough starts and flow is released) and interrupted jet (after the source supply is terminated). During the starting-jet stage, the flow rate is a function of time; three temporal profiles of the exit velocity (pulsation, sinusoidal and real-cough) were investigated in this study, and our results showed that the cough flow’s maximum penetration distance was in the range of a 50.6–85.5 opening diameter (D) under our experimental conditions. The real-cough and sinusoidal cases exhibited greater penetration ability than the pulsation cases under the same characteristic Reynolds number (Rec) and normalized cough expired volume (Q/AD, with Q as the cough expired volume and A as the opening area). However, the effects of Rec and Q/AD on the maximum penetration distances proved to be more significant; larger values of Rec and Q/AD reflected cough flows with greater penetration distances. A protocol was developed to scale the particle experiments between the prototype in air, and the model in water. The water tank experiments revealed that although medium and large particles deposit readily, their maximum spread distance is similar to that of small particles. Moreover, the leading vortex plays an important role in enhancing particle transport. PMID:28046084

  2. A Generalized Boltzmann Fokker-Planck Method for Coupled Charged Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, Anil K

    2012-01-09

    The goal of this project was to develop and investigate the performance of reduced-physics formulations of high energy charged particle (electrons, protons and heavier ions) transport that are computationally more efficient than not only analog Monte Carlo methods but also the established condensed history Monte Carlo technique. Charged particles interact with matter by Coulomb collisions with target nuclei and electrons, by bremsstrahlung radiation loss and by nuclear reactions such as spallation and fission. Of these, inelastic electronic collisions and elastic nuclear collisions are the dominant cause of energy-loss straggling and angular deflection or range straggling of a primary particle. These collisions are characterized by extremely short mean free paths (sub-microns) and highly peaked, near-singular differential cross sections about forward directions and zero energy loss, with the situation for protons and heavier ions more extreme than for electrons. For this reason, analog or truephysics single-event Monte Carlo simulation, while possible in principle, is computationally prohibitive for routine calculation of charged particle interaction phenomena.

  3. OoTran, an object-oriented program for charged-particle beam transport design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninane, A.; Ferté, J. M.; Mareschal, P.; Sibomana, M.; Somers, F.

    1990-08-01

    The OoTran program is a new object-oriented program for charge-particle beam transport computation. Using a simple menu interface, the user builds his beam line with magnetic and electric elements taken from a standard library. The program computes the beam transport using a well-known first-order matrix formalism and displays "in real time" the computed beam envelope. The menu editor provides functions to interactively modify the beam line. Ootran is written in C ++ and uses two object libraries: OOPS, the Object-Oriented Program Support Class Library, which is a collection of classes similar to those of Smalltalk-80; and InterViews, a C++ graphical-interface toolkit based on the X-Window system. OoTran is running on DECstation 3100, VAXstation 2000 and SUN 3, with the ULTRIX and SUN OS operating systems.

  4. Determination of macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Bian, Xin; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to determine macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) solvent. Shear viscosity, isothermal speed of sound, and bulk viscosity result from DPD-model input parameters and can be determined only a posteriori. For this reason approximate predictions of these quantities are desirable in order to set appropriate DPD input parameters. For the purpose of deriving an improved approximate prediction we analyze the autocorrelation of shear and longitudinal modes in Fourier space of a DPD solvent for Kolmogorov flow. We propose a fitting function with nonexponential properties which gives a good approximation to these autocorrelation functions. Given this fitting function we improve significantly the capability of a priori determination of macroscopic solvent transport coefficients in comparison to previously used exponential fitting functions.

  5. Study of particle transport during application of resonant magnetic perturbations in the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiming; Zhuang, Ge; Chen, Wei; Yu, Qinquan; Wang, Nengchao; Chen, Jie; Gao, Li; Ding, Yonghua; Rao, Bo; Hu, Xiwei; J-TEXT Team

    2013-10-01

    In the J-TEXT tokamak, electron density pump-out is frequently observed during the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). It is found that the applied RMPs cause obvious density pump-out in plasma core, while the edge plasma density changes little. In order to study the density pump-out caused by RMPs, the direct perturbed particle transport measurements are carried out during the application of RMPs in J-TEXT ohmic plasmas. It is found that, compared to the case without application of RMPs, the applied RMPs substantially decrease the pinch velocity V and increase the diffusion coefficient D. Stronger amplitude of applied RMPs results in more obvious change in both the transport coefficients. Ministry of Science and Technology of China under Grant No: 2011GB109001, 2010GB107004.

  6. Are marine plastic particles transport vectors for organic pollutants to the Arctic?

    PubMed

    Zarfl, Christiane; Matthies, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Plastic litter accounts for 50-80% of waste items stranded on beaches, floating on the ocean surface and lodged in the seabed. Organic pollutants can be absorbed onto plastic particles from sea water, attached to their surfaces or included in the plastic matrix as additives. Such chemicals may be transported to remote regions by buoyant plastics and ocean currents. We have estimated mass fluxes of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) to the Arctic via the main ocean currents and compared them to those in the dissolved state and in air. Substance fluxes with atmospheric or sea water currents account for several tons per year, whereas those mediated by plastics are four to six orders of magnitude smaller. However, the significance of various pollutant transport routes does not depend only on absolute mass fluxes but also on bioaccumulation in marine food chains.

  7. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-07-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  8. Particle size traces modern Saharan dust transport and deposition across the equatorial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Does, Michèlle; Korte, Laura F.; Munday, Chris I.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2016-11-01

    Mineral dust has a large impact on regional and global climate, depending on its particle size. Especially in the Atlantic Ocean downwind of the Sahara, the largest dust source on earth, the effects can be substantial but are poorly understood. This study focuses on seasonal and spatial variations in particle size of Saharan dust deposition across the Atlantic Ocean, using an array of submarine sediment traps moored along a transect at 12° N. We show that the particle size decreases downwind with increased distance from the Saharan source, due to higher gravitational settling velocities of coarse particles in the atmosphere. Modal grain sizes vary between 4 and 32 µm throughout the different seasons and at five locations along the transect. This is much coarser than previously suggested and incorporated into climate models. In addition, seasonal changes are prominent, with coarser dust in summer and finer dust in winter and spring. Such seasonal changes are caused by transport at higher altitudes and at greater wind velocities during summer than in winter. Also, the latitudinal migration of the dust cloud, associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, causes seasonal differences in deposition as the summer dust cloud is located more to the north and more directly above the sampled transect. Furthermore, increased precipitation and more frequent dust storms in summer coincide with coarser dust deposition. Our findings contribute to understanding Saharan dust transport and deposition relevant for the interpretation of sedimentary records for climate reconstructions, as well as for global and regional models for improved prediction of future climate.

  9. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection-diffusion-reaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-01-01

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between tDPD particles, and the advection is implicitly considered by the movements of these Lagrangian particles. An analytical formula is proposed to relate the tDPD parameters to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the conventional DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers. PMID:26156459

  10. Electronic excitation transport in core antennae of enriched photosystem I particles from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Causgrove, T.P.; Yang, S.; Struve, W.S.

    1988-10-20

    The polarized photobleaching recovery of PSI-60 particles enriched in iron-sulfur protein and P700 was monitored with approx. 2-ps resolution at 665, 670, 675, and 681 nm. Considerable residual anisotropy appears at long times, proving that local ordering exists in the Chl a-protein core antenna of PSI-60. At these four wavelengths, the polarization decays with mean lifetimes between 2.9 and 6.6 ps. This slow time scale suggests that the depolarization accompanies electronic excitation transport between clusters of Chl a chromophores rather than between individual nearest-neighbor chromophores.

  11. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration.

  12. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration.

  13. Study of electron transport in a Hall thruster by axial–radial fully kinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Shinatora Kubota, Kenichi; Funaki, Ikkoh; Watanabe, Hiroki; Iihara, Shigeyasu; Fuchigami, Kenji; Uematsu, Kazuo

    2015-10-15

    Electron transport across a magnetic field in a magnetic-layer-type Hall thruster was numerically investigated for the future predictive modeling of Hall thrusters. The discharge of a 1-kW-class magnetic-layer-type Hall thruster designed for high-specific-impulse operation was modeled using an r-z two-dimensional fully kinetic particle code with and without artificial electron-diffusion models. The thruster performance results showed that both electron transport models captured the experimental result within discrepancies less than 20% in thrust and discharge current for all the simulated operation conditions. The electron cross-field transport mechanism of the so-called anomalous diffusion was self-consistently observed in the simulation without artificial diffusion models; the effective electron mobility was two orders of magnitude higher than the value obtained using the classical diffusion theory. To account for the self-consistently observed anomalous transport, the oscillation of plasma properties was speculated. It was suggested that the enhanced random-walk diffusion due to the velocity oscillation of low-frequency electron flow could explain the observed anomalous diffusion within an order of magnitude. The dominant oscillation mode of the electron flow velocity was found to be 20 kHz, which was coupled to electrostatic oscillation excited by global ionization instability.

  14. Study of Density Fluctuations and Particle Transport at the Edge of I-Mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Arturo

    The wide range of plasma parameters available on Alcator C-Mod has led to the accessibility of many regimes of operation. Since its commissioning, C-Mod has accessed the Linear ohmic confinement, Saturated ohmic confinement, L-Mode and ELM-free, ELMy and Enhanced Dalpha H-Mode regimes. Recently, another novel regime, the I-Mode, has been identified. I-modes feature the presence of steep H-Mode-like electron and ion temperature gradients at the edge of the plasma with L-Mode-like density profiles. The I-Mode, in contrast to the H-mode, shows very weak degradation of energy confinement with increased input power, and routinely reaches H 98 > 1 while operating at low edge collisionalities ( n*ped ˜0.1), making it a good candidate for reactor relevant tokamaks. Also relevant for reactors, this regime can be sustained in steady state for more than ˜15 energy confinement times without the need for ELMs to regulate particle and impurity confinement. Changes in edge density, temperature and magnetic field fluctuations accompany the L-mode to I-mode transition, with reduction of fluctuations in the 50--150kHz range as well as the appearance of a Weakly Coherent Mode (WCM) in the 200-300kHz range, analogous to the Quasi-Coherent Mode (QCM) characteristic of the Enhanced D alpha H-mode. Previous work has established a connection between the midrange fluctuation suppression and reduction in the effective thermal diffusivity, chi eff, in the pedestal region. The mechanism in I-mode for maintaining sufficient particle transport to avoid impurity accumulation and instabilities has been unclear. The O-mode reflectometry system has been extensively used for the characterization and detection of the I-mode and the WCM, in part, enhanced by upgrades to the system which enabled the broadband detection of density fluctuations at an array of cutoff locations at the edge of the plasma. Using a novel model, the autopower signals of reflectometry channels detecting the density

  15. Transport dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic advection- diffusion-reaction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Li; Yazdani, Alireza; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Karniadakis, George E.

    2015-07-07

    We present a transport dissipative particle dynamics (tDPD) model for simulating mesoscopic problems involving advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) processes, along with a methodology for implementation of the correct Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in tDPD simulations. tDPD is an extension of the classic DPD framework with extra variables for describing the evolution of concentration fields. The transport of concentration is modeled by a Fickian flux and a random flux between particles, and an analytical formula is proposed to relate the mesoscopic concentration friction to the effective diffusion coefficient. To validate the present tDPD model and the boundary conditions, we perform three tDPD simulations of one-dimensional diffusion with different boundary conditions, and the results show excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We also performed two-dimensional simulations of ADR systems and the tDPD simulations agree well with the results obtained by the spectral element method. Finally, we present an application of the tDPD model to the dynamic process of blood coagulation involving 25 reacting species in order to demonstrate the potential of tDPD in simulating biological dynamics at the mesoscale. We find that the tDPD solution of this comprehensive 25-species coagulation model is only twice as computationally expensive as the DPD simulation of the hydrodynamics only, which is a significant advantage over available continuum solvers.

  16. Update on the Development and Validation of MERCURY: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Taylor, J M; McKinley, M S; Greenman, G M; Cullen, D E; O'Brien, M J; Beck, B R; Hagmann, C A

    2005-06-06

    An update on the development and validation of the MERCURY Monte Carlo particle transport code is presented. MERCURY is a modern, parallel, general-purpose Monte Carlo code being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the past year, several major algorithm enhancements have been completed. These include the addition of particle trackers for 3-D combinatorial geometry (CG), 1-D radial meshes, 2-D quadrilateral unstructured meshes, as well as a feature known as templates for defining recursive, repeated structures in CG. New physics capabilities include an elastic-scattering neutron thermalization model, support for continuous energy cross sections and S ({alpha}, {beta}) molecular bound scattering. Each of these new physics features has been validated through code-to-code comparisons with another Monte Carlo transport code. Several important computer science features have been developed, including an extensible input-parameter parser based upon the XML data description language, and a dynamic load-balance methodology for efficient parallel calculations. This paper discusses the recent work in each of these areas, and describes a plan for future extensions that are required to meet the needs of our ever expanding user base.

  17. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  18. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition methods for particle-based transport calculations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Spong, D.; Hirshman, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is a powerful technique to analyze large data sets by projecting the data into an optimal set of low-order modes that capture the main features of the data. POD methods have been widely used in image and signal processing and also in the study of coherent structures in neutral fluids. However, the use of these techniques in plasma physics is a relatively new area of research. Here we discuss recent novel applications of POD methods to particle-based transport calculations in plasmas. We show that POD techniques provide an efficient method to filter noise in the reconstruction of the particle distribution function. As a specific application we consider Monte Carlo simulations of plasma collisional relaxation and guiding-center transport in magnetically confined plasma in toroidal geometry [1]. We also discuss recent results on the application of POD methods to PIC-codes in the context of the Vlasov-Poisson system, and the use of POD methods in projective integration. In particular, we show how POD modes can be used as effective macroscopic variables to accelerate Monte-Carlo calculations. [1] D. del-Castillo-Negrete, et al. Phys. of Plasmas 15, 092308 (2008).

  19. Edge resonant fluctuations and particle transport in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, A.

    1998-12-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch [J. R. Drake et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1997), Vol. 2, pp. 193-199] using a Langmuir probe array. The electrostatic fluctuation, driven particle transport ΓnΦ is derived and found to constitute a large fraction of the total particle transport. The spectral density of all measured quantities exhibits a peak in the frequency range 100-250 kHz, which originates from fluctuations that are resonant close to the edge [n=-(40-80)]. This peak contains only about 10-20% of the total fluctuation power, but is shown to dominate ΓnΦ. The main reason for this is the high toroidal mode number as compared with internally resonant magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations. The edge resonant fluctuations also features a higher coherence (γ=0.5) and close to 90° phase shift between density and potential fluctuations.

  20. Particle transport in low-collisionality H-mode plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, Saskia; Wang, Xin; Doyle, Edward J.; Rhodes, Terry L.; Schmitz, Lothar; Zeng, Lei; Staebler, Gary M.; Petty, Clinton C.; Groebner, Richard J.; Ko, W. -H.; Grierson, Brian A.; Solomon, Wayne M.; Tala, Tuomas; Salmi, Antti; Chrystal, Colin; Diamond, P. H.; McKee, George R.

    2015-10-05

    In this article we show that changing from an ion temperature gradient (ITG) to trapped electron mode (TEM) dominant turbulence regime (based on linear gyrokinetic simulations) results experimentally in a strong density pump-out (defined as a reduction in line-averaged density) in low collisionality, low power H-mode plasmas. We vary the turbulence drive by changing the heating from pre-dominantly ion heatedusing neutral beam injection to electron heated using electron cyclotron heating, which changes the Te/Ti ratio and the temperature gradients. Perturbed gas puff experiments show an increase in transport outside ρ = 0.6, through a strong increase in the perturbed diffusion coefficient and a decrease in the inward pinch. Linear gyrokinetic simulations with TGLF show an increase in the particle flux outside the mid-radius. In conjunction an increase in intermediate-scale length density fluctuations is observed, which indicates an increase in turbulence intensity at typical TEM wavelengths. However, although the experimental changes in particle transport agree with a change from ITG to TEM turbulence regimes, we do not observe a reduction in the core rotation at mid-radius, nor a rotation reversal.

  1. Particle transport in low-collisionality H-mode plasmas on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Mordijck, Saskia; Wang, Xin; Doyle, Edward J.; ...

    2015-10-05

    In this article we show that changing from an ion temperature gradient (ITG) to trapped electron mode (TEM) dominant turbulence regime (based on linear gyrokinetic simulations) results experimentally in a strong density pump-out (defined as a reduction in line-averaged density) in low collisionality, low power H-mode plasmas. We vary the turbulence drive by changing the heating from pre-dominantly ion heatedusing neutral beam injection to electron heated using electron cyclotron heating, which changes the Te/Ti ratio and the temperature gradients. Perturbed gas puff experiments show an increase in transport outside ρ = 0.6, through a strong increase in the perturbed diffusionmore » coefficient and a decrease in the inward pinch. Linear gyrokinetic simulations with TGLF show an increase in the particle flux outside the mid-radius. In conjunction an increase in intermediate-scale length density fluctuations is observed, which indicates an increase in turbulence intensity at typical TEM wavelengths. However, although the experimental changes in particle transport agree with a change from ITG to TEM turbulence regimes, we do not observe a reduction in the core rotation at mid-radius, nor a rotation reversal.« less

  2. Optimizations of the energy grid search algorithm in continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Romano, Paul K.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we propose, implement, and test various optimizations of the typical energy grid-cross section pair lookup algorithm in Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The key feature common to all of the optimizations is a reduction in the length of the vector of energies that must be searched when locating the index of a particle's current energy. Other factors held constant, a reduction in energy vector length yields a reduction in CPU time. The computational methods we present here are physics-informed. That is, they are designed to utilize the physical information embedded in a simulation in order to reduce the length of the vector to be searched. More specifically, the optimizations take advantage of information about scattering kinematics, neutron cross section structure and data representation, and also the expected characteristics of a system's spatial flux distribution and energy spectrum. The methods that we present are implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code as part of this work. The gains in computational efficiency, as measured by overall code speedup, associated with each of the optimizations are demonstrated in both serial and multithreaded simulations of realistic systems. Depending on the system, simulation parameters, and optimization method employed, overall code speedup factors of 1.2-1.5, relative to the typical single-nuclide binary search algorithm, are routinely observed.

  3. PAH transport by sinking particles in the open Mediterranean Sea: a 1 year sediment trap study.

    PubMed

    Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Méjanelle, Laurence; Pete, Romain; Fillaux, Joëlle; Lorre, Anne; Point, Vanessa

    2006-05-01

    One year time series of sinking particles were collected at two depths in the open Mediterranean Sea and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Average total PAH concentrations were 593+/-284 ng g(-1) at 250 m and 551 +/- 198 ng g(-1) at 2850 m. Total PAH fluxes averaged 73 +/- 58 ng m(-2) d(-1) at 250 m and 53 +/- 39 ng m(-2) d(-1) at 2850 m. Contamination levels and, thus, exposure of marine organisms to PAH are comparable in surface and deep waters. Deep waters appear as a significant, yet overlooked, PAH sink. PAH temporal patterns show noticeable seasonality. This is partly due to varying levels of specific components such as the winter increase of pyrolytic PAH. Downward transport processes and the nature of sinking particles also impact on PAH fluxes, as inferred during periods of increasing productivity. Different phase-associations and interactions with particulate organic carbon for low-MW fossil PAH and high-MW pyrolytic PAH influence their downward transport efficiency.

  4. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  5. Long-range transport episodes of fine particles in southern Finland during 1999-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Jarkko V.; Saarikoski, Sanna; Aurela, Minna; Tervahattu, Heikki; Hillamo, Risto; Westphal, Douglas L.; Aarnio, Päivi; Koskentalo, Tarja; Makkonen, Ulla; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kulmala, Markku

    The frequency, strength and sources of long-range transport (LRT) episodes of fine particles (PM 2.5) were studied in southern Finland using air quality monitoring results, backward air mass trajectories, remote sensing of fire hot spots, transport and dispersion modelling of smoke and chemical analysis of particle samples (black carbon, monosaccharide anhydrides, oxalate, succinate, malonate, SO 42-, NO 3-, K + and NH 4+). At an urban background site in Helsinki, the daily WHO guideline value (24-h PM 2.5 mean 25 μg m -3) was exceeded during 1-7 LRT episodes per year in 1999-2007. The 24-h mean maximum concentrations varied between 25 and 49 μg m -3 during the episodes, which was 3-6 times higher than the local mean concentration (8.7 μg m -3) in 1999-2007. The highest particle concentrations (max. 1-h mean 163 μg m -3) and the longest episodes (max. 9 days) were mainly caused by the emissions from open biomass burning, especially during springs and late-summers in 2002 and 2006. During the period 2001-2007, the satellite remote sensing of active fire hot spots and transport and dispersion modelling of smoke indicated that approximately half of the episodes were caused partly by the emissions from wildfires and/or agricultural waste burning in fields in Eastern Europe, especially in Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. Other episodes were mainly caused by the LRT of ordinary anthropogenic pollutants, e.g. from energy production, traffic, industry and wood combustion. During those 'other episodes', air masses also arrived from Eastern Europe, including Poland. The highest concentrations of biomass-burning tracers, such as monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan + mannosan + galactosan) and K +, were observed during open biomass-burning episodes, but quite high values were also measured during some winter episodes due to wood combustion emissions. Our results indicate that open biomass burning in Eastern Europe causes high fine particle concentration peaks in large

  6. Generation of discrete scattering cross sections and demonstration of Monte Carlo charged particle transport in the Milagro IMC code package

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. A.; Palmer, T. S.; Urbatsch, T. J.

    2013-07-01

    A new method for generating discrete scattering cross sections to be used in charged particle transport calculations is investigated. The method of data generation is presented and compared to current methods for obtaining discrete cross sections. The new, more generalized approach allows greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data generated with the new method is verified through a comparison with discrete data obtained with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code package, Milagro. The implementation of this capability is verified using test problems with analytic solutions as well as a comparison of electron dose-depth profiles calculated with Milagro and an already-established electron transport code. An initial investigation of a preliminary integration of the discrete cross section generation method with the new charged particle transport capability in Milagro is also presented. (authors)

  7. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) modes with fishbone-like structures are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection into MST reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to large fast ion beta and stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of these instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport and interaction with global tearing modes. Internal magnetic field fluctuations associated with the EP modes are directly observed for the first time by Faraday-effect polarimetry (frequency ~ 90 kHz and amplitude ~ 2 G). Simultaneously measured density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving and asymmetric spatial structure that peaks near the core where fast ions reside and shifts outward as the instability evolves. Furthermore, the EP mode frequencies appear at ~k∥VA , consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growing phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop (~ 15 %) when the EP modes peak, indicating the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced (× 2) with the onset of multiple nonlinearly-interacting EP modes. The fast ions also impact global tearing modes, reducing their amplitudes by up to 65%. This mode reduction is lessened following the EP-bursts, further evidence for fast ion redistribution that weakens the suppression mechanism. Possible tearing mode suppression mechanisms will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE.

  8. Applications of Lagrangian Particle Transport Modeling in the Top-Down Regional CO2 Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uliasz, M.; Denning, S.; Lu, L.; Corbin, K.; Zupanski, D.; Miles, N.; Richardson, S.; Davis, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric transport plays a critical role in top-down studies where observations from towers and/or aircraft are inverted to estimate net sources and sinks of CO2 for the study area over short periods of time. Lagrangian particle dispersion models are well suited for this modeling task since they 1) can be easily linked to any regional scale meteorological model, 2) can be run both forward or backward in time (in an adjoint mode), 3) can accurately resolve any CO2 observational system without limits of gridded transport models, and 4) can be applied to different spatial scales even across grids or domains of meteorological models. In the modeling framework developed at CSU, the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model is linked to SiB-RAMS: Regional Atmospheric Modeling System combined with Simple Biosphere model. For our North America studies the SiB-RAMS domain extends over the entire continental US with nested grids centered in the mesoscale area of interest. The CO2 lateral boundary conditions are provided by a global transport model - PCTM (Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model). Influence functions derived from the LPDM output allow us to quantify each CO2 data point (e.g., concentration at a specific sampling time and tower) in terms of contributions from different sources: 1) surface fluxes, 2) inflow fluxes across domain boundaries and 2) initial CO2 concentration in the domain at the beginning of the analysis period. The surface contributions can be furher quantified by a physical process (respiration, assimilation or fossil fuel emission) and/or land cover type. Therefore, the influence function approach is very useful for interpretation of CO2 observations and source apportionment, designing tower network and, finally, deriving source-receptor information for the inverse studies. We are going to review our modeling efforts based on the SiB-RAMS/ LPDM and the influence function approach to the meso- regional scales from a few tens to several

  9. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  10. Single Particle Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires: Effect of Defects and Polyhedral Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Govidan, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to manipulate carbon nanotubes with increasing precision has enabled a large number of successful electron transport experiments. These studies have primarily focussed on characterizing transport through both metallic and semiconducting wires. Tans et al. demonstrated ballistic transport in single-wall nanotubes for the first time, although the experimental configuration incurred large contact resistance. Subsequently, methods of producing low contact resistances have been developed and two terminal conductances smaller than 50 k-ohms have been repeatably demonstrated in single-wall and multi-wall nanotubes. In multi-wall nanotubes, Frank et al. demonstrated a resistance of approximately h/2e(exp 2) in a configuration where the outermost layer made contact to a liquid metal. This was followed by the work of de Pablo et al. where a resistance of h(bar)/27e(exp 2) (approximately 478 ohms) was measured in a configuration where electrical contact was made to many layers of a multi-wall nanotube. Frank et al. and Pablo et al. note that each conducting layer contributes a conductance of only 2e(exp 2)/h, instead of the 4e(exp 2)/h that a single particle mode counting picture yields. These small resistances have been obtained in microns long nanotubes, making them the best conducting molecular wires to date. The large conductance of nanotube wires stems from the fact that the crossing bands of nanotubes are robust to defect scattering.

  11. Dual radiotracer measurement of zoobenthos-mediated solute and particle transport in freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Krezoski, J.R.; Robbins, J.A.; White, D.S.

    1984-09-01

    ..gamma.. spectroscopy methods have been applied to determine the effects of two freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates, on reworking of sediments and the transfer of solutes across the sediment-water interface. Natural lake sediments and overlying water were contained in temperature-regulated rectangular plastic cells. After addition of Stylodrilus (oligochaete worms) and Pontoporeia (crustacean amphipods) to these microcosms, the vertical distribution of Cs-137 (a tracer of particle transport) and Na-22 (a tracer of solute transport) were determined. In cells with Stylodrilus, the Cs-137 layer moved downward at a rate that decreased exponentially with time. In cells with Pontoporeia, Cs-137 activity was smeared downward in time owing to eddy diffusive mixing of sediments over a small range (1-2 cm). In cells without worms, the veneer of Cs active material remained at the interface while the penetration of Na-22 into sediments was consistent with diffusion in free solution with small corrections for sediment porosity and sorption. In cells with live Stylodrilus, penetration of Na-22 within the feeding zone was considerably more rapid. Advective transport arises from the incorporation of Na-22 into pore fluids moved downward as a result of conveyor-belt feeding. In cells with Pontoporeia, De is approximately twice that in control cells. In these cells, Na-22 profiles may be treated theoretically without advection. 47 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulations of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Parker

    2011-05-02

    This is the Final Technical Report for University of Colorado's portion of the SciDAC project 'Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport.' This is funded as a multi-institutional SciDAC Center and W.W. Lee at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is the lead Principal Investigator. Scott Parker is the local Principal Investigator for University of Colorado and Yang Chen is a Co-Principal Investigator. This is Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-05ER54816. Research personnel include Yang Chen (Senior Research Associate), Jianying Lang (Graduate Research Associate, Ph.D. Physics Student) and Scott Parker (Associate Professor). Research includes core microturbulence studies of NSTX, simulation of trapped electron modes, development of efficient particle-continuum hybrid methods and particle convergence studies of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence simulations. Recently, the particle-continuum method has been extended to five-dimensions in GEM. We find that actually a simple method works quite well for the Cyclone base case with either fully kinetic or adiabatic electrons. Particles are deposited on a 5D phase-space grid using nearest-grid-point interpolation. Then, the value of delta-f is reset, but not the particle's trajectory. This has the effect of occasionally averaging delta-f of nearby (in the phase space) particles. We are currently trying to estimate the dissipation (or effective collision operator). We have been using GEM to study turbulence and transport in NSTX with realistic equilibrium density and temperature profiles, including impurities, magnetic geometry and ExB shear flow. Greg Rewoldt, PPPL, has developed a TRANSP interface for GEM that specifies the equilibrium profiles and parameters needed to run realistic NSTX cases. Results were reported at the American Physical Society - Division of Plasma Physics, and we are currently running convergence studies to ensure physical results. We are also studying the effect of

  13. Glider monitoring of shelf suspended particle dynamics and transport during storm and flooding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrin, François; Many, Gaël; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Martín, Jacobo; Puig, Pere; Houpert, Loic; Testor, Pierre; Kunesch, Stéphane; Mahiouz, Karim; Béguery, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Transfers of particulate matter on continental margins primarily occur during energetic events. As part of the CASCADE (CAscading, Storm, Convection, Advection and Downwelling Events) experiment, a glider equipped with optical sensors was deployed in the coastal area of the Gulf of Lions, NW Mediterranean in March 2011 to assess the spatio-temporal variability of hydrology, suspended particles properties and fluxes during energetic conditions. This deployment complemented a larger observational effort, a part of the MOOSE (Mediterranean Ocean Observing System of the Environment) network, composed of a coastal benthic station, a surface buoy and moorings on the continental slope. This set of observations permitted to measure the impact of three consecutive storms and a flood event across the entire continental shelf. Glider data showed that the sediment resuspension and transport observed at the coastal station during the largest storm (Hs>4 m) was effective down to a water depth of 80 m. The mid-shelf mud belt, located between 40 and 90 m depth, appears as the zone where the along-shelf flux of suspended sediment is maximum. Besides, the across-shelf flux of suspended sediment converges towards the outer limit of the mid-shelf mud belt, where deposition of suspended particles probably occurs and contributes to the nourishment of this area. Hydrological structures, suspended particles transport and properties changed drastically during stormy periods and the following flood event. Prior to the storms, the shelf waters were weakly stratified due in particular to the presence of cold dense water on the inner- and mid-shelf. The storms rapidly swept away this dense water, as well as the resuspended sediments, along the shelf and towards a downstream submarine canyon. The buoyant river plumes that spread along the shelf after the flooding period provoked a restratification of the water column on the inner- and mid-shelf. The analysis of glider's optical data at

  14. Behavior of the particle transport coefficients near the density limit in MTX

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M.M.

    1993-04-01

    The perturbed particle transport coefficients were determined for a range of plasma conditions in the Alcator C tokamak, a component of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX), from analysis of density perturbations created in gas modulation experiments. Density measurements from a 15 chord far-infrared interferometer were sufficiently detailed to allow radial profiles of the transport coefficients to be resolved. Gas modulation experiments were carried out on plasmas over a range of relatively low currents and a wide variety of line-averaged densities, including values near the Greenwald density limit. With this technique the perturbed diffusion coefficient D and the perturbed convection velocity V can be determined simultaneously. Measured profiles of D rise toward the outside of the plasma column in a manner generally similar to those determined previously for {chi}{sub e,HP} from sawtooth heat pulse propagation. Values of D are typically smaller than those of {chi}{sub e,HP} given for the same line-averaged densities by a factor of 2-5. Diffusion coefficients from a series of discharges at constant current showed little variation with density through most of the saturated ohmic confinement regime. At the Greenwald density limit threshold a dramatic increase occurred in both the perturbed convective and diffusive transport coefficients in the outer region of the plasma. The increases were most pronounced at the outermost range of the radii where coefficients were determined (r/a = 0.8), but were apparent over a region which extended well into the plasma interior. Density profiles maintained a similar shape near the density limit, congruous with the similar behavior of the transport coefficients. No dramatic deterioration was evident in the global energy confinement.

  15. Mobilization and transport of metal-rich colloidal particles from mine tailings into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Raza, Muhammad Ali; Fu, Yilin

    2016-04-01

    Exposed mine tailing wastes with considerable heavy metals can release hazardous colloidal particles into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions. Two-layered packed columns with tailings above and soils below were established to investigate mobilization and transport of colloidal particles from metal-rich mine tailings into soil under transient infiltration ionic strength (IS: 100, 20, 2 mM) and flow rate (FR: 20.7, 41, and 62.3 mm h(-1)), with Cu and Pb as representatives of the heavy metals. Results show that the tailing particles within the colloidal size (below 2 μm) were released from the columns. A step-decrease in infiltration IS and FR enhanced, whereas a step-increase in the IS and FR restrained the release of tailing particles from the column. The effects of step-changing FR were unexpected due to the small size of the released tailing particles (220-342 nm, being not sensitive to hydrodynamic shear force), the diffusion-controlled particle release process and the relatively compact pore structure. The tailing particles present in the solution with tested IS were found negatively charged and more stable than soil particles, which provides favorable conditions for tailing particles to be transported over a long distance in the soil. The mobilization and transport of Cu and Pb from the tailings into soil were mediated by the tailing particles. Therefore, the inherent toxic tailing particles could be considerably introduced into soil under certain conditions (IS reduction or FR decrease), which may result in serious environmental pollution.

  16. A Kinetic Transport Theory for Particle Acceleration and Transport in Regions of Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  17. A KINETIC TRANSPORT THEORY FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND TRANSPORT IN REGIONS OF MULTIPLE CONTRACTING AND RECONNECTING INERTIAL-SCALE FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-03-10

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  18. The diffusive idealization of charged particle transport in random magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The transport of charged particles diffusing in a random magnetic field parallel to a relatively large guiding field is presented. The same coefficient of diffusion is obtained by three methods. Two corrections must be added to the expression in which the diffusive flux is proportional to the gradient of the density. Explicit expressions are given for a characteristic time and a characteristic length which describe the corrections. The well known divergence of the coefficient of diffusion, which is implied by the quasilinear analysis of pitch angle scattering, does not occur if the scattering rate is finite at 90 deg pitch angle. This effect is illustrated by formulas which give the coefficient of diffusion when the quasilinear expression is perturbed by a variable amount of isotropic scattering.

  19. H{alpha} measurements and neutral particle transport in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Yabutani, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Higashizono, Y.; Nagasaki, K.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Sano, F.; Cappa, A.; Kondo, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-10-15

    A multichannel system of the H{alpha}-line emission detector is developed in order to investigate the neutral particle transport in the Heliotron J plasma. The application of a multianode photomultiplier tube to the filter measurement system enables us to observe the H{alpha} emission profile with 32 chords. The absolute calibration with a standard lamp is performed and the cross-talk between each of the adjoining channels is evaluated to be less than 6%, while the photomultiplier tube has a typical cross-talk of 3% in nominal value. The temporal and spatial profiles of the H{alpha} emission are measured in detail in the plasma breakdown by electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The H{alpha} emission profile in the ECH plasma is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using a three-dimensional mesh model. The fueling rates of the wall recycling and the gas puffing are estimated by means of the simulation and the measurement.

  20. Functional analysis of an individual IFT protein: IFT46 is required for transport of outer dynein arms into flagella.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuqing; Qin, Hongmin; Follit, John A; Pazour, Gregory J; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Witman, George B

    2007-02-26

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT), which is the bidirectional movement of particles within flagella, is required for flagellar assembly. IFT particles are composed of approximately 16 proteins, which are organized into complexes A and B. We have cloned Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and mouse IFT46, and show that IFT46 is a highly conserved complex B protein in both organisms. A C. reinhardtii insertional mutant null for IFT46 has short, paralyzed flagella lacking dynein arms and with central pair defects. The mutant has greatly reduced levels of most complex B proteins, indicating that IFT46 is necessary for complex B stability. A partial suppressor mutation restores flagellar length to the ift46 mutant. IFT46 is still absent, but levels of the other IFT particle proteins are largely restored, indicating that complex B is stabilized in the suppressed strain. Axonemal ultrastructure is restored, except that the outer arms are still missing, although outer arm subunits are present in the cytoplasm. Thus, IFT46 is specifically required for transporting outer arms into the flagellum.

  1. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Boedo, J. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; Canik, J. M.; deGrassie, J. S.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Maingi, Rajesh; Smith, S. P.

    2014-09-01

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  2. The effects of roadside structures on the transport and dispersion of ultrafine particles from highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, George E.; Baldauf, Richard; Isakov, Vlad; Khlystov, Andrey; Petersen, William

    Understanding local-scale transport and dispersion of pollutants emitted from traffic sources is important for urban planning and air quality assessments. Predicting pollutant concentration patterns in complex environments depends on accurate representations of local features (e.g., noise barriers, trees, buildings) affecting near-field air flows. This study examined the effects of roadside barriers on the flow patterns and dispersion of pollutants from a high-traffic highway in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. The effects of the structures were analyzed using the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) model, an empirically based diagnostic tool which simulates fine-scale wind field and dispersion patterns around obstacles. Model simulations were compared with the spatial distributions of ultrafine particles (UFP) from vehicular emissions measured using a passenger van equipped with a Differential Mobility Analyzer/Condensation Particle Counter. The field site allowed for an evaluation of pollutant concentrations in open terrain, with a noise barrier present near the road, and with a noise barrier and vegetation present near the road. Results indicated that air pollutant concentrations near the road were generally higher in open terrain situations with no barriers present; however, concentrations for this case decreased faster with distance than when roadside barriers were present. The presence of a noise barrier and vegetation resulted in the lowest downwind pollutant concentrations, indicating that the plume under this condition was relatively uniform and vertically well-mixed. Comparison of the QUIC model with the mobile UFP measurements indicated that QUIC reasonably represented pollutant transport and dispersion for each of the study configurations.

  3. Transport of and radiation production by transrelativistic and nonrelativistic particles moving through sub-Larmor-scale electromagnetic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett D.; Ford, Alexander L.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmas with electromagnetic fields turbulent at sub-Larmor scales are a feature of a wide variety of high-energy-density environments and are essential to the description of many astrophysical and laboratory plasma phenomena. Radiation from particles, whether they are relativistic or nonrelativistic, moving through small-scale magnetic turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying information on the statistical properties of the magnetic turbulence, is also intimately related to the particle diffusive transport. We have investigated, both theoretically and numerically, the transport of nonrelativistic and trans-relativistic particles in plasmas with high-amplitude isotropic sub-Larmor-scale magnetic turbulence, and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. Consequently, the diffusive and radiative properties of plasmas turbulent on sub-Larmor scales may serve as a powerful tool to diagnosis laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Source energy spectra from demodulation of solar particle data by interplanetary and coronal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.; Rivero, F.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The data on source energy spectra of solar cosmic rays (SCR), i.e. the data on the spectrum form and on the absolute SCR are of interest for three reasons: (1) the SCR contain the energy comparable to the total energy of electromagnetic flare radiation (less than or equal to 10 to the 32nd power ergs); (2) the source spectrum form indicates a possible acceleration mechanism (or mechanism); and (3) the accelerated particles are efficiently involved in nuclear electromagnetic and plasma processes in the solar atmosphere. Therefore, the data on SCR source spectra are necessary for a theoretical description of the processes mentioned and for the formulation of the consistent flare model. Below it is attempted to sound solar particle sources by means of SCR energy spectrum obtained near the Sun, at the level of the roots of the interplanetary field lines in the upper solar corona. Data from approx. 60 solar proton events (SPE) between 1956-1981. These data were obtained mainly by the interplanetary demodulation of observed fluxes near the Earth. Further, a model of coronal azimuthal transport is used to demodulate those spectra, and to obtain the source energy spectra.

  5. Impact of Sahara dust transport on Cape Verde atmospheric element particles.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, M; Almeida, S M; Freitas, M C; Pio, C A; Nunes, T; Cardoso, J

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) conduct an elemental characterization of airborne particles sampled in Cape Verde and (2) assess the influence of Sahara desert on local suspended particles. Particulate matter (PM(10)) was collected in Praia city (14°94'N; 23°49'W) with a low-volume sampler in order to characterize its chemical composition by k0-INAA. The filter samples were first weighed and subsequently irradiated at the Portuguese Research Reactor. Results showed that PM(10) concentrations in Cape Verde markedly exceeded the health-based air quality standards defined by the European Union (EU), World Health Organization (WHO), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in part due to the influence of Sahara dust transport. The PM(10) composition was characterized essentially by high concentrations of elements originating from the soil (K, Sm, Co, Fe, Sc, Rb, Cr, Ce, and Ba) and sea (Na), and low concentrations of anthropogenic elements (As, Zn, and Sb). In addition, the high concentrations of PM measured in Cape Verde suggest that health of the population may be less affected compared with other sites where PM(10) concentrations are lower but more enriched with toxic elements.

  6. Mesoscale Model for Blood Cell Adhesion and Transport using Ellipsoidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer; Marshall, Jeffrey

    2008-11-01

    A novel discrete-element computational model for efficient transport, collision, and adhesion of ellipsoidal particles is applied to blood cells adhering through receptor-ligand binding in three-dimensional flow. The model has been used for simulation of over 13,000 adhesive cells through approximation of blood cells as elastic particles and other physically-justifiable approximations. The computational model is validated against experimental data of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear and channel flows. The structure of aggregates formed by RBCs is analyzed by various measures that relate RBCs which are in contact with each other and that characterize an aggregate by fitting an ellipse to the projection of cells contained in the aggregate. Factors such as shear rate and adhesive surface energy density between cells are examined for their effects on the size and structure of RBC aggregates in both two- and three-dimensional computations. The effect of RBC aggregation on migration of blood elements (RBCs, leukocytes, platelets) in channel flow is also investigated.

  7. Mass transport of deposited particles by surface-to-surface contact.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, A; Sextro, R G; Byrne, M A

    2012-08-15

    The spread of particle-borne contamination by surface-to-surface contact and its implications for exposures within the indoor environment have been observed - largely qualitatively. The present study was conducted with the aim of quantifying the mass transfer efficiency (TE) of deposited aerosol particles when selected soft and hard surfaces come in contact. The surfaces used were 100% cotton, synthetic fleece, plastic laminate and brass. Contact transfer efficiencies ranging from 2 to 45% were observed; these are very significant numbers in terms of hazardous aerosol transport in the environment. Other observations include an increase in the mass transferred with increased surface roughness. An increase in the applied pressure between the two surfaces in contact leads to a step change in transfer efficiency, so that two pressure regimes can be identified, with a transition pressure between them that depends on surface type. Time of contact appears to have little to no effect on the mass transfer efficiency for the surfaces studied, while contaminant loading has some effect that is not systematic.

  8. Messenger RNA sequence and the translation process --a particle transport perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajia; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, Royce K. P.

    2008-03-01

    The translation process in bacteria has been under intensive study. A key question concerns the quantitative effect of different elongation rates, associated with different codons, on the overall translation efficiency. Starting with a simple particle transport model, the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we incorporate the essential components of the translation process: Ribosomes, cognate tRNA concentrations, and messenger RNA (mRNA) templates correspond to particles, hopping rates, and the underlying lattice, respectively. Using simulations and mean-field approximations to obtain the stationary currents (the protein production rates) associated with different mRNA sequences, we are especially interested in the effect of slow codons, i.e., codons which are associated with rare tRNAs and are therefore translated very slowly. As the first step, we look at a ``designed sequence'' with one and two slow codons and quantify the marked impact of their spatial distribution to the currents. Extending the results to several mRNA sequences taken from real genes, we argue that an effective translation rate including the information from the vicinity of each codon needs to be taken into consideration when seeking an efficient strategy to optimize the protein production.

  9. Study on the creation and destruction of transport barriers via the effective safety factors for energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Leoncini, Xavier; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Charged particles with low kinetic energy move along the magnetic field lines, but so do not the energetic particles. We investigate the topological structure changes in the phase space of energetic particles with respect to the magnetic one. For this study, cylindrical magnetic fields with non-monotonic safety factors that induce the magnetic internal transport barrier are considered. We show that the topological structure of the magnetic field line and of the particle trajectories can be quite different. We explain this difference using the concept of an effective particle q-profile. Using this notion, we can investigate the location and existence of resonances for particle orbits that are different from the magnetic ones. These are examined both numerically by integrating an equation of motion and theoretically by the use of Alfvén's guiding center theory and by the use of an effective reduced Hamiltonian for the integrable unperturbed system. It is clarified that, for the energetic particles, the grad B drift effect shifts the resonances and the drift induced by curvature of the magnetic field line leads to the vanishing of the resonances. As a result, we give two different mechanisms that lead to the creation of transport barriers for energetic particles in the region where the magnetic field line is chaotic.

  10. Particle simulations of ion generation and transport in microelectromechanical systems and microthrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyaswamy, Venkattraman

    Field emission and evaporation are processes of electron and ion generation due to intense electric fields. This work presents a particle-based computational approach using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) and the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to study ion generation and transport in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) microthrusters. Electrostatically actuated MEMS operate in intense electric fields > 107 V/m thereby resulting in electron emission from the cathode that has important implications on reliability and performance of these devices. The PIC/MCC method is used to develop compact models to provide closure to a mathematical model for the modified Paschen law which bridges breakdown in macroscale gaps with field emission driven breakdown at nano/microscales. The models have the capability to account for the influence of operating parameters including pressure, composition and cathode properties making it suitable for the analysis and design of electrostatic MEMS. This work also deals with the modeling of field emission ion thrusters used for in-space propulsion. Particle simulations are used to study performance parameters such as thrust and plume characteristics by comparison with experiments. While PIC simulations predict thrust values in excellent agreement with measurements, comparisons with measurements of current distribution in the plume indicate that ion-neutral collisions become increasingly important as the current increases. Good agreement for current distribution is obtained if the elastic scattering of ions by background neutrals in the vacuum chamber is included thereby providing a numerical framework for the design and optimization of these thrusters.

  11. ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; LEONARD,AW; SNYDER,PB; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GROEBNER,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROTH,M; HOLLMANN,E; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2003-04-01

    A271 ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. Results from a series of dedicated experiments measuring the effect of particle and energy pulses from Type-I Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor are compared with a simple model of ELM propagation in the boundary plasma. The simple model asserts that the propagation of ELM particle and energy perturbations is dominated by ion parallel convection along SOL fields lines and the recovery from the ELM perturbation is determined by recycling physics. Time scales associated with the initial changes of boundary plasma parameters are expected to be on the order of the ion transit time from the outer midplane, where the ELM instability is initiated, to the divertor targets. To test the model, the ion convection velocity is changed in the experiment by varying the plasma density. At moderate to high density, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} = 0.5-0.8, the delays in the response of the boundary plasma to the midplane ELM pulses, the density dependence of those delays and other observations are consistent with the model. However, at the lowest densities, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} {approx} 0.35, small delays between the response sin the two divertors, and changes in the response of the pedestal thermal energy to ELM events, indicate that additional factors including electron conduction in the SOL, the pre-ELM condition of the divertor plasma, and the ratio of ELM instability duration to SOL transit time, may be playing a role. The results show that understanding the response of the SOL and divertor plasmas to ELMs, for various pre-ELM conditions, is just as important to predicting the effect of ELM pulses on the target surfaces of future devices as is predicting the characteristics of the ELM perturbation of the core plasma.

  12. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  13. Galactomannan and Zymosan Block the Epinephrine-Induced Particle Transport in Tracheal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Weiterer, Sebastian; Kohlen, Thomas; Veit, Florian; Sachs, Lydia; Uhle, Florian; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Weigand, Markus A.; Henrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Ciliary beating by respiratory epithelial cells continuously purges pathogens from the lower airways. Here we investigated the effect of the fungal cell wall polysaccharides Galactomannan (GM) and Zymosan (Zym) on the adrenergic activated particle transport velocity (PTV) of tracheal epithelium. Methods Experiments were performed using tracheae isolated from male C57BL/6J mice. Transport velocity of the cilia bearing epithelial cells was measured by analysing recorded image sequences. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using Amplex Red reagents. PCR experiments were performed on isolated tracheal epithelium to identify adrenergic receptor mRNA. Results The adrenergic receptors α1D, α2A, β1 and β2 have been identified in isolated tracheal epithelium. We found epinephrine responsible for an increase in PTV, which could only be reduced by selective β-receptor-inhibition. In addition, either GM or Zym prevented the epinephrine induced PTV increase. Furthermore, we observed a strong ROS generation evoked by GM or Zym. However, epinephrine induced increase in PTV recovered in the presence of GM and Zym after application of ROS scavengers. Conclusion Both GM or Zym trigger reversible ROS generation in tracheal tissue leading to inhibition of the β-adrenergic increase in PTV. PMID:26571499

  14. The effect of particle density on ultrasound-mediated transport of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lea-Banks, Harriet; Teo, Boon; Stride, Eleanor; Coussios, Constantin C

    2016-11-21

    A significant barrier to successful drug delivery is the limited penetration of nanoscale therapeutics beyond the vasculature. Building on recent in vivo findings in the context of cancer drug delivery, the current study investigates whether modification of nanoparticle drug-carriers to increase their density can be used to enhance their penetration into viscoelastic materials under ultrasound exposure. A computational model is first presented to predict the transport of identically sized nanoparticles of different densities in an ultrasonic field in the presence of an oscillating microbubble, by a combination of primary and secondary acoustic radiation forces, acoustic streaming and microstreaming. Experiments are then described in which near monodisperse (polydispersity index  <0.2) nanoparticles of approximate mean diameter 200 nm and densities ranging from 1.01 g cm(-3) to 5.58 g cm(-3) were fabricated and delivered to a tissue-mimicking material in the presence or absence of a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent, at ultrasound frequencies of 0.5 MHz and 1.6 MHz and a peak negative pressure of 1 MPa. Both the theoretical and experimental results confirm that denser particles exhibit significantly greater ultrasound-mediated transport than their lower density counterparts, indicating that density is a key consideration in the design of nanoscale therapeutics.

  15. The effect of particle density on ultrasound-mediated transport of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea-Banks, Harriet; Teo, Boon; Stride, Eleanor; Coussios, Constantin C.

    2016-11-01

    A significant barrier to successful drug delivery is the limited penetration of nanoscale therapeutics beyond the vasculature. Building on recent in vivo findings in the context of cancer drug delivery, the current study investigates whether modification of nanoparticle drug-carriers to increase their density can be used to enhance their penetration into viscoelastic materials under ultrasound exposure. A computational model is first presented to predict the transport of identically sized nanoparticles of different densities in an ultrasonic field in the presence of an oscillating microbubble, by a combination of primary and secondary acoustic radiation forces, acoustic streaming and microstreaming. Experiments are then described in which near monodisperse (polydispersity index  <0.2) nanoparticles of approximate mean diameter 200 nm and densities ranging from 1.01 g cm-3 to 5.58 g cm-3 were fabricated and delivered to a tissue-mimicking material in the presence or absence of a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent, at ultrasound frequencies of 0.5 MHz and 1.6 MHz and a peak negative pressure of 1 MPa. Both the theoretical and experimental results confirm that denser particles exhibit significantly greater ultrasound-mediated transport than their lower density counterparts, indicating that density is a key consideration in the design of nanoscale therapeutics.

  16. Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas model with on-site potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei

    2015-05-15

    Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas of elastically colliding particles are studied. In the nonequal mass case, due to the presence of on-site potential, the heat conduction of the model obeys the Fourier law and all the transport coefficients asymptotically approach constants in the thermodynamic limit. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT increases slowly with the system length L and is proportional to the height of the potential barriers H in high H regime. These findings may serve as a guide for future theoretical and experimental studies.

  17. TopoDrive and ParticleFlow--Two Computer Models for Simulation and Visualization of Ground-Water Flow and Transport of Fluid Particles in Two Dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    This report serves as a user?s guide for two computer models: TopoDrive and ParticleFlow. These two-dimensional models are designed to simulate two ground-water processes: topography-driven flow and advective transport of fluid particles. To simulate topography-driven flow, the user may specify the shape of the water table, which bounds the top of the vertical flow section. To simulate transport of fluid particles, the model domain is a rectangle with overall flow from left to right. In both cases, the flow is under steady state, and the distribution of hydraulic conductivity may be specified by the user. The models compute hydraulic head, ground-water flow paths, and the movement of fluid particles. An interactive visual interface enables the user to easily and quickly explore model behavior, and thereby better understand ground-water flow processes. In this regard, TopoDrive and ParticleFlow are not intended to be comprehensive modeling tools, but are designed for modeling at the exploratory or conceptual level, for visual demonstration, and for educational purposes.

  18. Bedload transport in a formerly glaciated mountain catchment constrained by particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agnese, A.; Brardinoni, F.; Toro, M.; Mao, L.; Engel, M.; Comiti, F.

    2015-11-01

    In formerly glaciated mountain settings, Pleistocene glaciations are responsible for profound spatial reorganization of the landscape structure. By imposing local channel slope and the degree of hillslope-channel connectivity, glacial macro-forms can exert first-order controls on the downstream strength and continuity of the coarse sediment cascade. To estimate quantitatively these controls we trace bedload transport for 3 years along Strimm Creek, Eastern Italian Alps. Specifically, we monitor the travel distance of 490 PIT-tagged particles (b axis: 23-229 mm; weight: 83-6525 g) at two contrasting sites: Upper Strimm Creek (US; 4 km2), which flows through a fluvially dominated hanging valley, and Lower Strimm Creek (LS; 7.5 km2), located downstream, in a relict glacial trough where it experiences periodic colluvial sediment inputs from lateral tributaries. Tracer positioning within the streambed is periodically tracked in the field with a portable antenna in order to assess progressive travel distances, as well as the extent of the channel active layer, in relation to snowmelt and rainfall-driven peak flows. Interestingly, we show that tracer virtual velocities for selected inter-survey periods are independent of tracer weight at both study sites. Cumulatively, tracers in US have travelled across distances (i.e. inner quartiles) shorter than 2 m, which correspond to over 2 orders of magnitude less than what was observed in LS. These figures translate, after calculations of tracer inter-survey virtual velocities, into estimated bedload volumes equal to about 3 m3 in US and 600 m3 in LS, with most of the transport (75 % in US, and 93 % in LS) occurring during snowmelt. A similar contrast in bedload transport rates, even without considering the additional volumes of material mobilized by mass-wasting processes in LS, testifies the extent to which the glacial imprinting can still affect contemporary sediment transfer, and thus postglacial landscape evolution, in

  19. The Effects of Interplanetary Transport in the Event-intergrated Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lulu; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2017-02-01

    Previous investigations on the energy spectra of solar energetic particle (SEP) events revealed that the energy spectra observed at 1 au often show double power laws with break energies from one to tens of MeV/nuc. In order to determine whether the double power-law features result from the SEP source or the interplanetary transport process from the Sun to 1 au, we separately analyze the SEP spectra in the decay phase, during which the transport effect is minimum. In this paper, we reported three events observed by the Interplanetary Monitory Platform 8 spacecraft, which occurred on 1977 September 19, November 22, and 1979 March 1. For the first two events, the event-integrated spectra of protons possess double power-law profiles with break energies in a range of several MeV to tens of MeV, while the spectra integrated in the decay (reservoir) phase yield single power laws. Moreover, a general trend from a double power law at the rising phase to a single power law at the decay phase is observed. For the third event, both the event-integrated and the reservoir spectra show double power-law features. However, the difference between the low- and high-energy power-law indices is smaller for the reservoir spectrum than the event-integrated spectrum. These features were reproduced by solving the 1D diffusion equation analytically and we suggest that the transport process, especially the diffusion process, plays an important role in breaking the energy spectra.

  20. SHIELD-HIT12A - a Monte Carlo particle transport program for ion therapy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassler, N.; Hansen, D. C.; Lühr, A.; Thomsen, B.; Petersen, J. B.; Sobolevsky, N.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT simulates the transport of ions through matter. Since SHIELD-HIT08 we added numerous features that improves speed, usability and underlying physics and thereby the user experience. The "-A" fork of SHIELD-HIT also aims to attach SHIELD-HIT to a heavy ion dose optimization algorithm to provide MC-optimized treatment plans that include radiobiology. Methods: SHIELD-HIT12A is written in FORTRAN and carefully retains platform independence. A powerful scoring engine is implemented scoring relevant quantities such as dose and track-average LET. It supports native formats compatible with the heavy ion treatment planning system TRiP. Stopping power files follow ICRU standard and are generated using the libdEdx library, which allows the user to choose from a multitude of stopping power tables. Results: SHIELD-HIT12A runs on Linux and Windows platforms. We experienced that new users quickly learn to use SHIELD-HIT12A and setup new geometries. Contrary to previous versions of SHIELD-HIT, the 12A distribution comes along with easy-to-use example files and an English manual. A new implementation of Vavilov straggling resulted in a massive reduction of computation time. Scheduled for later release are CT import and photon-electron transport. Conclusions: SHIELD-HIT12A is an interesting alternative ion transport engine. Apart from being a flexible particle therapy research tool, it can also serve as a back end for a MC ion treatment planning system. More information about SHIELD-HIT12A and a demo version can be found on http://www.shieldhit.org.

  1. Connection between the Weakly Coherent Mode and particle transport across the LCFS in the I-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, A.; Marmar, E. S.; Terry, J. L.; Labombard, B.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Kramer, G. J.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The I-mode regime is characterized by the formation of ion and electron temperature pedestals, while maintaining L-mode-like radial density profiles [1]. Changes in edge density, temperature and magnetic field fluctuations accompany the L-mode to I-mode transition with reduction of fluctuations in the 50-150kHz range as well as the appearance of a Weakly Coherent Mode (WCM) in the 150-300kHz range. Previous work[2] has established a connection between the midrange fluctuation reduction and a decrease in the effective thermal diffusivity in the pedestal region. The mechanism for maintaining sufficient particle transport to avoid impurity accumulation has been unclear. In this work, quantitative comparisons are made between particle transport measurements across the LCFS and the intensity of the WCM in the I-mode. The particle transport has been estimated using Dα profiles measured near the outboard midplane and the intensity of the WCM is obtained by spectral analysis of density fluctuations from reflectometry. The measurements show correlations between the particle transport and the WCM intensity, supporting evidence that the WCM causes enhanced transport.[4pt] [1] D.G. Whyte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010)105005.[0pt] [2] A.E. Hubbard, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(2011)056115

  2. Amino acid transport system - A substrate predicts the therapeutic effects of particle radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mariko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Arano, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    L-[methyl-11C]Methionine (11C-Met) is useful for estimating the therapeutic efficacy of particle radiotherapy at early stages of the treatment. Given the short half-life of 11C, the development of longer-lived 18F- and 123I-labeled probes that afford diagnostic information similar to 11C-Met, are being sought. Tumor uptake of 11C-Met is involved in many cellular functions such as amino acid transport System-L, protein synthesis, and transmethylation. Among these processes, since the energy-dependent intracellular functions involved with 11C-Met are more reflective of the radiotherapeutic effects, we evaluated the activity of the amino acid transport System-A as an another energy-dependent cellular function in order to estimate radiotherapeutic effects. In this study, using a carbon-ion beam as the radiation source, the activity of System-A was evaluated by a specific System-A substrate, alpha-[1-14C]-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid (14C-MeAIB). Cellular growth and the accumulation of 14C-MeAIB or 14C-Met were evaluated over time in vitro in cultured human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells (3-Gy) or in vivo in murine xenografts of HSG tumors (6- or 25-Gy) before and after irradiation with the carbon-ion beam. Post 3-Gy irradiation, in vitro accumulation of 14C-Met and 14C-MeAIB decreased over a 5-day period. In xenografts of HSG tumors in mice, tumor re-growth was observed in vivo on day-10 after a 6-Gy irradiation dose, but no re-growth was detected after the 25-Gy irradiation dose. Consistent with the growth results, the in vivo tumor accumulation of 14C-MeAIB did not decrease after the 6-Gy irradiation dose, whereas a significant decrease was observed after the 25-Gy irradiation dose. These results indicate that the activity of energy dependent System-A transporter may reflect the therapeutic efficacy of carbon-ion radiotherapy and suggests that longer half-life radionuclide-labeled probes for System-A may also provide widely available probes to evaluate the effects

  3. A transmission/escape probabilities model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    A new computational model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak plasma chamber is presented. The model is based on the calculation of transmission and escape probabilities using first-flight integral transport theory and the balancing of fluxes across the surfaces bounding the various regions. The geometrical complexity of the problem is included in precomputed probabilities which depend only on the mean free path of the region.

  4. Installation and Operation of Particle Transport Simulation Programs to Model the Detection and Measurement of Space Radiation of Space-Borne Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    realistic flight sensor computer models; (3) performance of particle transport calculations ; (4) analysis of transport simulation results, including...programs (LAHET, ACCEPT, CYLTRAN, MCNPX ) for particle transport simulation were applied to the modeling of the CEASE and HEP sensors. In addition, a...preliminary version of a post-processor program for analysis of single particle histories from MCNPX was written. Shown in this report are several listings

  5. Tracking suspended particle transport via radium isotopes ((226)Ra and (228)Ra) through the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C; Opsahl, Stephen P; Santos, Isaac R; Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    Suspended particles in rivers can carry metals, nutrients, and pollutants downstream which can become bioactive in estuaries and coastal marine waters. In river systems with multiple sources of both suspended particles and contamination sources, it is important to assess the hydrologic conditions under which contaminated particles can be delivered to downstream ecosystems. The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River system in the southeastern United States represents an ideal system to study these hydrologic impacts on particle transport through a heavily-impacted river (the Chattahoochee River) and one much less impacted by anthropogenic activities (the Flint River). We demonstrate here the utility of natural radioisotopes as tracers of suspended particles through the ACF system, where particles contaminated with arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) have been shown to be contributed from coal-fired power plants along the Chattahoochee River, and have elevated concentrations in the surficial sediments of the Apalachicola Bay Delta. Radium isotopes ((228)Ra and (226)Ra) on suspended particles should vary throughout the different geologic provinces of this river system, allowing differentiation of the relative contributions of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers to the suspended load delivered to Lake Seminole, the Apalachicola River, and ultimately to Apalachicola Bay. We also use various geochemical proxies ((40)K, organic carbon, and calcium) to assess the relative composition of suspended particles (lithogenic, organic, and carbonate fractions, respectively) under a range of hydrologic conditions. During low (base) flow conditions, the Flint River contributed 70% of the suspended particle load to both the Apalachicola River and the bay, whereas the Chattahoochee River became the dominant source during higher discharge, contributing 80% of the suspended load to the Apalachicola River and 62% of the particles entering the estuary. Neither of these hydrologic

  6. Determinants of personal exposure to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts, and CO in a transport microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kaur, S; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J

    2009-07-01

    Short-term human exposure concentrations to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts (particle range: 0.02-1 microm), and carbon monoxide (CO) were investigated at and around a street canyon intersection in Central London, UK. During a four week field campaign, groups of four volunteers collected samples at three timings (morning, lunch, and afternoon), along two different routes (a heavily trafficked route and a backstreet route) via five modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car, and taxi). This was followed by an investigation into the determinants of exposure using a regression technique which incorporated the site-specific traffic counts, meteorological variables (wind speed and temperature) and the mode of transport used. The analyses explained 9, 62, and 43% of the variability observed in the exposure concentrations to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts, and CO in this study, respectively. The mode of transport was a statistically significant determinant of personal exposure to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts, and CO, and for PM2.5 and ultrafine particle counts it was the most important determinant. Traffic count explained little of the variability in the PM2.5 concentrations, but it had a greater influence on ultrafine particle count and CO concentrations. The analyses showed that temperature had a statistically significant impact on ultrafine particle count and CO concentrations. Wind speed also had a statistically significant effect but smaller. The small proportion in variability explained in PM2.5 by the model compared to the largest proportion in ultrafine particle counts and CO may be due to the effect of long-range transboundary sources, whereas for ultrafine particle counts and CO, local traffic is the main source.

  7. From particle counts to flux: Wind tunnel testing and calibration of the 'Wenglor' aeolian sediment transport sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Li, Bailiang; Neuman, Cheryl McKenna; Steven Sanderson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Despite almost a century of study, aeolian sediment transport remains difficult to measure. Low temporal resolution sediment traps filter sub-second scale variability hypothesized to be important, and high resolution electronic sensors are poorly tested, inconsistent, and often produce incomparable particle count outputs. No sediment transport prediction model can be validated or applied without quality empirical transport measurements. Here, we test a popular electronic laser gate sensor (Wenglor YH03PCT8, 'the Wenglor') in a wind tunnel. We have 3 goals: (i) assess the reproducibility of Wenglor measurements, (ii) examine saturation potential, and (iii) relate trap-measured sediment flux to particle counts. To assess reproducibility we measured particle counts with two co-located Wenglors. Temporally-autocorrelated sections of the time series occurred where one Wenglor deviated; this is likely the result of lens contamination. To examine saturation potential, we measured saltator velocity to calculate particle concentration within the airstream. Particle concentrations suggest the mean number of particles within the laser sampling volume is consistently less than one. To relate trap-measured sediment flux to particle counts, we used particle size samples to calculate an average mass per counted particle. We relate count predicted mass fluxes to trap-measured mass fluxes with linear regression and obtain the relation: trap flux = 2.1 * Wenglor predicted flux (r2 = 0.99). The constant represents aspects of the Wenglor operation that cannot be directly evaluated. Together, these investigations suggest the Wenglor provides a consistent and low-cost method to measure aeolian saltation flux at a high resolution in non-dusty settings.

  8. Parameterizing Urban Canopy Layer transport in an Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckl, Stefan; Rotach, Mathias W.

    2016-04-01

    The percentage of people living in urban areas is rising worldwide, crossed 50% in 2007 and is even higher in developed countries. High population density and numerous sources of air pollution in close proximity can lead to health issues. Therefore it is important to understand the nature of urban pollutant dispersion. In the last decades this field has experienced considerable progress, however the influence of large roughness elements is complex and has as of yet not been completely described. Hence, this work studied urban particle dispersion close to source and ground. It used an existing, steady state, three-dimensional Lagrangian particle dispersion model, which includes Roughness Sublayer parameterizations of turbulence and flow. The model is valid for convective and neutral to stable conditions and uses the kernel method for concentration calculation. As most Lagrangian models, its lower boundary is the zero-plane displacement, which means that roughly the lower two-thirds of the mean building height are not included in the model. This missing layer roughly coincides with the Urban Canopy Layer. An earlier work "traps" particles hitting the lower model boundary for a recirculation period, which is calculated under the assumption of a vortex in skimming flow, before "releasing" them again. The authors hypothesize that improving the lower boundary condition by including Urban Canopy Layer transport could improve model predictions. This was tested herein by not only trapping the particles, but also advecting them with a mean, parameterized flow in the Urban Canopy Layer. Now the model calculates the trapping period based on either recirculation due to vortex motion in skimming flow regimes or vertical velocity if no vortex forms, depending on incidence angle of the wind on a randomly chosen street canyon. The influence of this modification, as well as the model's sensitivity to parameterization constants, was investigated. To reach this goal, the model was

  9. Transport of interacting particles in a chain of cavities: Description through a modified Fick-Jacobs equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, G. P.; Hoyuelos, M.; Mártin, H. O.

    2015-01-01

    We study the transport process of interacting Brownian particles in a tube of varying cross section. To describe this process we introduce a modified Fick-Jacobs equation, considering particles that interact through a hard-core potential. We were able to solve the equation with numerical methods for the case of symmetric and asymmetric cavities. We focused in the concentration of particles along the direction of the tube. We also preformed Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the accuracy of the results, obtaining good agreement between theory and simulations.

  10. Particle transport in a He-microchip plasma atomic emission system with an ultrasonic nebulizer for aqueous sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joosuck; Lim, H. B.

    2008-11-01

    The transport efficiency of dried particles generated from an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was studied to improve the analytical performance of a lab-made, He-microchip plasma system, in which a quartz tube (~ 1 mm i.d.) was positioned inside the central channel of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) polymer chip. The polymer microchip plasma has the advantages of low cost, small size, easy handling and design, and self-ignition with long stabilization (> 24 h). However, direct introduction of aqueous solution into the microplasma for the detection of metals remains problematic due to plasma instability. In addition, the much smaller size of the system can cause signal suppression due to low transport efficiency. Therefore, knowledge of particle transport efficiency in this microplasma system is required to enhance the sensitivity and stability. The weight of transported particles in the range of 0.02 to 10 mg m - 3 was measured using a piezobalance with a precision of 0.4-17.8%, depending on the operating conditions. The significant effects of the USN operating conditions and the physical properties of the tubing, namely, length, inner diameter and surface characteristics, on the number of particles transported from the nebulizer to the microplasma were studied. When selected metals, such as Na, Mg and Pb, at a concentration of 5 mg L - 1 were nebulized, transported particles were obtained with a mass range of 0.5-5 mg m - 3 , depending on atomic weights. For application of the He-rf-microplasma, the atomic emission system was optimized by changing both the radio frequency (rf) power (60-200 W) and cooling temperature of the USN (- 12-9 °C). The limits of detection obtained for K, Na and Cu were 0.26, 0.22, and 0.28 mg L - 1 , respectively. These results confirmed the suitable stability and sensitivity of the He-rf-PDMS microchip plasma for application as an atomization source.

  11. Coarse particulate organic matter transport and particle-size distribution in two mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Turowski, J. M.; Federspiel, N.; Swingle, K.; Rickli, C.; Abt, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    The computation of coarse particulate organic material (CPOM) export from mountain streams with basin areas larger than a few ha in size is typically conducted using a rating curve approach in which a relationship is established between short-term measured CPOM transport rates or concentrations and stream flow Q (CPOM = f(Q) that is applied to the hydrograph of a storm event or the highflow season to compute an event or seasonal CPOM load. In analogy to temporal variability that is commonly observed in bedload or suspended sediment transport, CPOM transport is likewise affected by an interplay between flow hydraulics as well as temporal and spatial variations in off-stream and in-stream supply. Consequently, rating relationships of CPOM = f(Q) may be expected to be variable between events and within a highflow season as well. With respect to particle sizes of organic material, fine particulate organics < 1 mm (FPOM) have typically been found to contribute more to total export than CPOM, but it is unknown whether this trend extends to pieces of wood as well. This study is based on CPOM pieces > 4 mm and > larger 10 mm contained in large bedload samples collected in two mountain streams, one at a high elevation with a snowmelt regime in the United States Rocky Mountains, one at a moderate elevation and mainly rainfall regime in the Swiss Pre-Alps. The study shows that transport rates of CPOM are subject to hysteresis over a snowmelt highflow season. Hence, seasonal CPOM load computed from a summation approach differed from the CPOM load computed using rating curve approaches by factors ranging from 0.5 to 4.5, depending on whether CPOM samples were collected during a rising or a falling limb of the dual peak seasonal hydrograph. Our study results indicate that collection of time-series CPOM samples and application of a summation approach are desirable to compute seasonal CPOM loads. Frequency distributions of CPOM piece sizes collected over different storm events in

  12. Studies of Particle Acceleration, Transport and Radiation in Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2005-01-01

    the reconnection region above a flare loop. This turbulence accelerates particles stochastically which radiate some of their energy in this region but carry most of their energy to the footpoints of the loop, where they lose all their energy and radiate bulk of the observed radiation as in the traditional thick target model. In the past we have worked on various aspects of this model. We have evaluated the interaction rates of the plasma waves with electrons and ions, developed theoretical frameworks for the acceleration, transport and radiative processes, and produced numerical codes for the investigation of these processes. The goal of this grant has been further development and testing of this new paradigm, with emphases on the relative acceleration of electrons and ions and on a comprehensive investigation of the turbulence generation, cascade, and damping processes. We review several pieces of important evidence that we have uncovered indicating the crucial roles of turbulence, in and we describe accomplishments during the past two years of this grant.

  13. Modeling Transport in Fractured Porous Media with the Random-Walk Particle Method: The Transient Activity Range and the Particle-Transfer Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Lehua Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-22

    Multiscale features of transport processes in fractured porous media make numerical modeling a difficult task, both in conceptualization and computation. Modeling the mass transfer through the fracture-matrix interface is one of the critical issues in the simulation of transport in a fractured porous medium. Because conventional dual-continuum-based numerical methods are unable to capture the transient features of the diffusion depth into the matrix (unless they assume a passive matrix medium), such methods will overestimate the transport of tracers through the fractures, especially for the cases with large fracture spacing, resulting in artificial early breakthroughs. We have developed a new method for calculating the particle-transfer probability that can capture the transient features of diffusion depth into the matrix within the framework of the dual-continuum random-walk particle method (RWPM) by introducing a new concept of activity range of a particle within the matrix. Unlike the multiple-continuum approach, the new dual-continuum RWPM does not require using additional grid blocks to represent the matrix. It does not assume a passive matrix medium and can be applied to the cases where global water flow exists in both continua. The new method has been verified against analytical solutions for transport in the fracture-matrix systems with various fracture spacing. The calculations of the breakthrough curves of radionuclides from a potential repository to the water table in Yucca Mountain demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method for simulating 3-D, mountain-scale transport in a heterogeneous, fractured porous medium under variably saturated conditions.

  14. New capabilities of the Liège intranuclear-cascade model for particle-transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancusi, D.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; David, J.-C.; Hagiwara, M.; Leprince, A.; Leray, S.

    2014-06-01

    We review and discuss the latest developments of the Liège Intranuclear Cascade model. The new capabilities are illustrated by comparisons with selected experimental data. We also present examples of thick-target calculations performed using particle-transport codes.

  15. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  16. Losses and nonlinear steady-state particle distribution functions for fully ionized tokamak-plasmas in the collisional transport regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnino, G.

    2011-03-01

    Fully ionized L-mode tokamak plasmas in the fully collisional (Pfirsch-Schlüter) and in the low-collisional (banana) nonlinear transport regimes are analyzed. We derive the expressions for particles and heat losses together with the steady-state particle distribution functions in the several collisional transport regimes. The validity of the nonlinear closure equations, previously derived, has been indirectly tested by checking that the obtained particle distribution functions are indeed solutions of the nonlinear, steady-state, Vlasov-Landau gyro-kinetic equations. A quite encouraging result is the fact that, for L-mode tokamak plasmas a dissymmetry appears between the ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter submits to a nonlinear correction, which makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. In particular we show that when the L-mode JET plasma is out of the linear region, the Pfirsch-Schlüter electron transport coefficients are corrected by an amplification factor, which may reach values of order 102. Such a correction is absent for ions. On the contrary, in the banana regime, the ion transport coefficients are increased by a factor 2 and the nonlinear corrections for electrons are negligible. These results are in line with experiments.

  17. A Hitch-hiker's Guide to Stochastic Differential Equations - Solution Methods for Energetic Particle Transport in Space Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R. Du Toit; Effenberger, Frederic

    2017-03-01

    In this review, an overview of the recent history of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in application to particle transport problems in space physics and astrophysics is given. The aim is to present a helpful working guide to the literature and at the same time introduce key principles of the SDE approach via "toy models". Using these examples, we hope to provide an easy way for newcomers to the field to use such methods in their own research. Aspects covered are the solar modulation of cosmic rays, diffusive shock acceleration, galactic cosmic ray propagation and solar energetic particle transport. We believe that the SDE method, due to its simplicity and computational efficiency on modern computer architectures, will be of significant relevance in energetic particle studies in the years to come.

  18. A particle-based model of size or anion exclusion with application to microbial transport in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Wood, Brian D.

    2003-04-02

    This paper presents a novel approach to the quantification of pore-scale exclusion processes, based on the truncation of the distribution of local dispersive displacements in a random-walk particle model. This approach increases the mean velocity of colloidal-sized particles relative to inert solute tracers, and decreases the apparent dispersion. An equivalent continuum (concentration-based) model, with modified velocity and dispersion parameters, is derived. The model was applied to the results of laboratory experiments on bacterial transport in intact cores from a research site near Oyster, Virginia. The significant observed decrease in bacterial arrival times relative to a bromide tracer was closely reproduced by the particle-based model with modest degrees of truncation (8% maximum). The approach provides a conceptually consistent means of incorporating the exclusion process into groundwater transport models.

  19. Impacts on particles and ozone by transport processes recorded at urban and high-altitude monitoring stations.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, J F; Crespo, J; Yubero, E; Soler, R; Carratalá, A; Mantilla, E

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of particle transport episodes on particle number concentration temporal trends at both urban and high-altitude (Aitana peak-1558 m a.s.l.) stations, a simultaneous sampling campaign from October 2011 to September 2012 was performed. The monitoring stations are located in southeastern Spain, close to the Mediterranean coast. The annual average value of particle concentration obtained in the larger accumulation mode (size range 0.25-1 μm) at the mountain site, 55.0 ± 3.0 cm(-3), was practically half that of the value obtained at the urban station (112.0 ± 4.0 cm(-3)). The largest difference between both stations was recorded during December 2011 and January 2012, when particles at the mountain station registered the lowest values. It was observed that during urban stagnant episodes, particle transport from urban sites to the mountain station could take place under specific atmospheric conditions. During these transports, the major particle transfer is produced in the 0.5-2 μm size range. The minimum difference between stations was recorded in summer, particularly in July 2012, which is most likely due to several particle transport events that affected only the mountain station. The particle concentration in the coarse mode was very similar at both monitoring sites, with the biggest difference being recorded during the summer months, 0.4 ± 0.1cm(-3) at the urban site and 0.9 ± 0.1cm(-3) at the Aitana peak in August 2012. Saharan dust outbreaks were the main factor responsible for these values during summer time. The regional station was affected more by these outbreaks, recording values of >4.0 cm(-3), than the urban site. This long-range particle transport from the Sahara desert also had an effect upon O3 levels measured at the mountain station. During periods affected by Saharan dust outbreaks, ozone levels underwent a significant decrease (3-17%) with respect to its mean value.