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Sample records for intramembrane particle aggregation

  1. Aggregation of intramembrane particles in erythrocyte membranes treated with diamide.

    PubMed

    Kurantsin-Mills, J; Lessin, L S

    1981-02-20

    Treatment of erythrocytes with diamide (diazene dicarboxylic acid bis-(N,N-dimethylamide)) results in oxidation of sulfhydryl groups of the membrane, and cross-linking of membrane proteins into high molecular weight complexes. Concomitant freeze-etching studies show aggregation of intramembrane particles on the protoplasmic fracture face of erythrocyte ghost membranes treated with the oxidant. Furthermore, after a 3 h incubation of erythrocytes with 10 mM diamide at 37 degrees C, cellular energy levels declined to about 70% of control values. The data suggest that disulfide cross-linking of the major membrane proteins releases the apparent physical occlusion of the band 3 proteins within the interstices of the cytoskeletal shell. This results in the translational mobility of band 3 proteins which is reflected ultra-structurally in the freeze-etch images.

  2. Intramembrane particles and the organization of lymphocyte membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuby, JM; Wofsy, L

    1981-01-01

    An experimental system was developed in which the majority of all lymphocyte cell-surface proteins, regardless of antigenic specificity, could be cross-linked and redistributed in the membrane to determine whether this would induce a corresponding redistribution of intramembrane particles (IMP). Mouse spleen cells were treated with P-diazoniumphenyl- β-D-lactoside (lac) to modify all exposed cell-surface proteins. Extensive azo- coupling was achieved without significantly reducing cell viability or compromising cellular function in mitogen- or antigen-stimulated cultures. When the lac-modified cell- surface proteins were capped with a sandwich of rabbit antilactoside antibody and fluorescein-goat anti-rabbit Ig, freeze-fracture preparations obtained from these cells revealed no obvious redistribution of IMP on the majority of fracture faces. However, detailed analysis showed a statistically significant 35 percent decrease (P less than 0.01) in average IMP density in the E face of the lac-capped spleen cells compared with control cells, whereas a few E-face micrographs showed intense IMP aggregation. In contrast, there was no significant alteration of P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP do not present accessible antigenic sites on the lymphocyte surface and do not associate in a stable manner with surface protein antigens. This finding suggests that IMP, as observed in freeze-fracture analysis, may not comprise a representative reflection of lymphocyte transmembrane protein molecules and complexes because other evidence establishes: (a) that at least some common lymphocyte surface antigens are indeed exposed portions of transmembrane proteins and (b) that the aggregation of molecules of any surface antigen results in altered organization of contractile proteins at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane

  3. Intramembrane particles and the organization of lymphocyte membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuby, J M; Wofsy, L

    1981-03-01

    An experimental system was developed in which the majority of all lymphocyte cell-surface proteins, regardless of antigenic specificity, could be cross-linked and redistributed in the membrane to determine whether this would induce a corresponding redistribution of intramembrane particles (IMP). Mouse spleen cells were treated with P-diazoniumphenyl- beta-D-lactoside (lac) to modify all exposed cell-surface proteins. Extensive azo- coupling was achieved without significantly reducing cell viability or compromising cellular function in mitogen- or antigen-stimulated cultures. When the lac-modified cell- surface proteins were capped with a sandwich of rabbit antilactoside antibody and fluorescein-goat anti-rabbit Ig, freeze-fracture preparations obtained from these cells revealed no obvious redistribution of IMP on the majority of fracture faces. However, detailed analysis showed a statistically significant 35 percent decrease (P less than 0.01) in average IMP density in the E face of the lac-capped spleen cells compared with control cells, whereas a few E-face micrographs showed intense IMP aggregation. In contrast, there was no significant alteration of P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP densities or distribution. Apparently, the majority of E-face IMP and virtually all P-face IMP do not present accessible antigenic sites on the lymphocyte surface and do not associate in a stable manner with surface protein antigens. This finding suggests that IMP, as observed in freeze-fracture analysis, may not comprise a representative reflection of lymphocyte transmembrane protein molecules and complexes because other evidence establishes: (a) that at least some common lymphocyte surface antigens are indeed exposed portions of transmembrane proteins and (b) that the aggregation of molecules of any surface antigen results in altered organization of contractile proteins at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane.

  4. Thermotropic lateral translational motion of intramembrane particles in the inner mitochondrial membrane and its inhibition by artificial peripheral proteins

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Freeze fracturing and deep etching have been used to study thermotropic lateral translational motion of intramembrane particles and membrane surface anionic groups in the inner mitochondrial membrane. When the inner membrane is equilibrated at low temperature, the fracture faces of both halves of the membrane reveal a lateral separation between intramembrane particles and particle free, large smooth patches. Such separation is completely reversed through free lateral translational diffusion by reversing the temperature. The low temperature induced, particle-free, smooth membrane patches appear to represent regions of protein-excluding, ordered bilayer lipid which form during thermotropic liquid crystalline to gel state phase transitions. When polycationic ferritin is electrostatically bound to anionic groups exposed at the membrane surface at concentrations which inhibit the activities of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate permease, the bound ferritin migrates with intramembrane particles during the thermotropic lateral separation between the membrane particles and smooth patches. When bound polycationic ferritin is cross-bridged with native ferritin, an artificial peripheral protein lattice forms in association with the surface anionic groups and diminishes the thermotropic lateral translational motion of intramembrane particles in the membrane. These results reveal that the anionic groups of metabolically active integral proteins which are known to be exposed at the surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane migrate with intramembrane particles in the plane of the membrane under conditions which induce lipid-protein lateral separations. In addition, cross-bridging of the anionic groups through an artificial peripheral protein lattice appears to diminish such induced lipid protein lateral separations. PMID:833199

  5. Quantitative analysis of modulations in numerical and lateral distribution of intramembrane particles during the cell cycle of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Modulations in the internal structure of the plasma membrane during the cell cycle of mouse C1300 neuroblastoma cells (clone Neuro-2A) have been studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Both the numerical and lateral distributions of the intramembrane particles (IMP) of the P face of the medium-exposed plasma membrane were determined as a function of the IMP diameter. The lateral IMP-distribution was quantified by a differential density distribution analysis, that could distinguish between random, aggregated, and dispersed distributions of IMP-subpopulations at various levels of spatial organization. Nonrandom lateral IMP-distribution was considered to indicate significant directional constraints on the lateral mobility of the represented molecules. The analysis demonstrated that the density, the size distribution, and the lateral distribution of the IMP are modulated during the cell cycle, such that characteristic structural and dynamic membrane properties can be attributed to the various cell cycle phases (M, G1, S, and G2). The results are interpreted in terms of asynchronous assembly of different membrane components and dynamic reorganizations within the plasma membrane during the cell cycle. Furthermore, they provide a structural manifestation of earlier observed changes in the dynamic properties of membrane proteins and lipids, and functional membrane transport properties in these neuroblastoma cells. PMID:6833390

  6. Intramembraneous Particle Cluster and Cytoplasmic Vesicles in Mice with Nephrogenic Defects of Urinary Concentration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    solution; computed by multiplying the molar con- centration by the number of particles per mol obtained by ionization Pd(w) diffusional watir...cultured human fibroblasts exist in two configurations: clustered in coated pits and diffusely distributed over the membrane surface (1,2). * , ~k.M %* N1...Sp.P .,uq -20- Experiments by Anderson et al suggested that these LDL receptors can move in the membrane from the diffuse configuration to the

  7. Marine particle aggregate breakup in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Matthew; Ackleson, Steven; Smith, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of marine particle aggregate formation and breakup due to turbulence is studied experimentally. Aggregates of clay particles, initially in a quiescent aggregation tank, are subjected to fully developed turbulent pipe flow at Reynolds numbers of up to 25,000. This flow arrangement simulates the exposure of marine aggregates in coastal waters to a sudden turbulent event. Particle size distributions are measured by in-situ sampling of the small-angle forward volume scattering function and the volume concentration of the suspended particulate matter is quantified through light attenuation measurements. Results are compared to measurements conducted under laminar and turbulent flow conditions. At low shear rates, larger sized particles indicate that aggregation initially governs the particle dynamics. Breakup is observed when large aggregates are exposed to the highest levels of shear in the experiment. Models describing the aggregation and breakup rates of marine particles due to turbulence are evaluated with the population balance equation and results from the simulation and experiment are compared. Additional model development will more accurately describe aggregation dynamics for remote sensing applications in turbulent marine environments.

  8. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment is expected to grow in the coming years due to their increasing pervasiveness in consumer and industrial applications. Once released into the environment, nanoparticles encounter conditions of pH, salinity, UV light, and other solution conditions that may alter their surface characteristics and lead to aggregation. The unique properties that make nanoparticles desirable are a direct consequence of their size and increased surface area. Therefore, it is critical to recognize how aggregation alters the reactive properties of nanomaterials, if we wish to understand how these properties are going to behave once released into the environment. The size and structure of nanoparticle aggregates depend on surrounding conditions, including hydrodynamic ones. Depending on these conditions, aggregates can be large or small, tightly packed or loosely bound. Characterizing and measuring these changes to aggregate morphology is important to understanding the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactive properties. Examples of decreased reactivity due to aggregation include the case where tightly packed aggregates have fewer available surface sites compared to loosely packed ones; also, photocatalytic particles embedded in the center of large aggregates will experience less light when compared to particles embedded in small aggregates. However, aggregation also results in an increase in solid-solid interfaces between nanoparticles. This can result in increased energy transfer between neighboring particles, surface passivation, and altered surface tension. These phenomena can lead to an increase in reactivity. The goal of this thesis is to examine the impacts of aggregation on the reactivity of a select group of nanomaterials. Additionally, we examined how aggregation impacts the removal efficiency of fullerene nanoparticles using membrane filtration. The materials we selected to study include ZnS---a metal chalcogenide

  9. Particle aggregation with simultaneous surface growth

    SciTech Connect

    pablo.mitchell@cal.Berkeley.EDU

    2003-04-29

    Particle aggregation with simultaneous surface growth was modeled using a dynamic Monte Carlo method. The Monte Carlo algorithm begins in the particle inception zone and constructs aggregates via ensemble-averaged collisions between spheres and deposition of gaseous species on the sphere surfaces. Simulations were conducted using four scenarios. The first, referred to as scenario 0, is used as a benchmark and simulates aggregation in the absence of surface growth. Scenario 1 forces all balls to grow at a uniform rate while scenario 2 only permits them to grow once they have collided and stuck to each other. The last one is a test scenario constructed to confirm conclusions drawn from scenarios 0-2. The transition between the coalescent and the fully-developed fractal aggregation regimes is investigated using shape descriptors to quantify particle geometry. They are used to define the transition between the coalescent and fractal growth regimes. The simulations demonstrate that the morphology of aggregating particles is intimately related to both the surface deposition and particle nucleation rates.

  10. Single soil particle or an aggregate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Kovács, József; Szabó, Boglárka; Szalai, Zoltán; Jakab, Gergely

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of particle size distribution (PSD) of the soil is essential in many soil-related studies, as well as in erosional studies. Not only single particles are translocated during erosion process, but also aggregates of various size. Both of these types are responsible for either the redistribution of the nutrients and organic matter or for their in situ accumulation. The mentioned selectivity, the detachment and the early stage of the transport phase of the erosion were studied. Are the factors as slope or moisture content have an effect on the aggregate/particle size distribution of the runoff in case of the same soil sample? Which fraction dominates in the soil and the runoff? Laboratory rainfall simulation experiments were applied for six different treatments: detailed studies were made on the aggregate size distribution of the runoff and the particle size distribution of the aggregate size classes. The results showed the followings: 1) the >1mm macroaggregate fraction, which dominated the control sample (40%) was missing in the soil loss; 2) the ratio of microaggregates was increased (from 30% to 70%). The ratio of >50µm fraction was smaller in steeper slope and the fraction of 50-250µm decreased to its half under extremely dry or saturated condition. The PSD histograms were similar per fraction in each treatment, but the shape of the PSD histograms suggested that there were unbroken aggregates in the sample. As we concluded, the real question could be, if it is really needed to measure particles. It could it also be possible that if a small (60-110 µm) aggregate (which is still stable after drop erosion and transportation) could be chemically broken down or it has to be counted with as a particle during modelling? The used particle size analyser was purchased with the support of KMOP project no. 4.2.1/ B-10-2011-0002. The authors gratefully acknowledge this support.

  11. Coarsening modes of clusters of aggregating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototsky, Andrey; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2014-03-01

    There are two modes by which clusters of aggregating particles can coalesce: The clusters can merge either (i) by the Ostwald ripening process, in which particles diffuse from one cluster to the other while the cluster centers remain stationary, or (ii) by means of a cluster translation mode, in which the clusters move toward each other and join. To understand in detail the interplay between these different modes, we study a model system of hard particles with an additional attraction between them. The particles diffuse along narrow channels with smooth or periodically corrugated walls, so that the system may be treated as one-dimensional. When the attraction between the particles is strong enough, they aggregate to form clusters. The channel potential influences whether clusters can move easily or not through the system and can prevent cluster motion. We use dynamical density functional theory to study the dynamics of the aggregation process, focusing in particular on the coalescence of two equal-sized clusters. As long as the particle hard-core diameter is nonzero, we find that the coalescence process can be halted by a sufficiently strong corrugation potential. The period of the potential determines the size of the final stable clusters. For the case of smooth channel walls, we demonstrate that there is a crossover in the dominance of the two different coarsening modes, which depends on the strength of the attraction between particles, the cluster sizes, and the separation distance between clusters.

  12. A unified kinetic model for particle aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, K.H.; Theis, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    Aggregation of submicrometer particles is a process with significant implications for the fate and transport of contaminants and major nutrients in many coastal, estuarine, and freshwater bodies as well as groundwater systems. A unified model has been developed that describes the kinetics of particle aggregation. The model is unique in the incorporation of surface chemical phenomena along with solution chemistry in the determination of the stability of a colloidal dispersion. The aggregation process is treated in a truly kinetic fashion, the main output from the model being the evolution of complete particle size distributions over time. The model was developed to interpret laboratory data and, as such, has the capacity to estimate a (variable) set of system parameters by fitting the size distribution over time data to that measured. It was found that the attachment distance, a parameter frequently approximated in practice, has a profound influence on the predicted aggregation kinetics as does the choice of a solid/solution interfacial model. Furthermore, simulation of relatively long-term aggregation, which was the principal focus of this work, indicates that values of the collision efficiency factor should be much smaller than those reported elsewhere in the literature.

  13. Plastid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zach

    2015-09-01

    Progress in the field of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in recent years has not surpassed plant biology. Nevertheless, reports on RIP in plants, and especially in chloroplasts, are still scarce. Of the four different families of intramembrane proteases, only two have been linked to chloroplasts so far, rhomboids and site-2 proteases (S2Ps). The lack of chloroplast-located rhomboid proteases was associated with reduced fertility and aberrations in flower morphology, probably due to perturbations in jasmonic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in chloroplasts. Mutations in homologues of S2P resulted in chlorophyll deficiency and impaired chloroplast development, through a yet unknown mechanism. To date, the only known substrate of RIP in chloroplasts is a PHD transcription factor, located in the envelope. Upon proteolytic cleavage by an unknown protease, the soluble N-terminal domain of this protein is released from the membrane and relocates to the nucleus, where it activates the transcription of the ABA response gene ABI4. Continuing studies on these proteases and substrates, as well as identification of the genes responsible for different chloroplast mutant phenotypes, are expected to shed more light on the roles of intramembrane proteases in chloroplast biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Aggregation and Gelation of Anisometric Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohraz, Ali; Solomon, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The quiescent and flow-induced structure and dynamics of colloidal aggregates and gels of anisometric particles are studied by means of static and dynamic light scattering. Ground-based studies of weak gels are possible due to the submicron size of the boehmite rod suspensions investigated; however, microgravity conditions would be required for more general studies. The properties of colloidal rod suspensions are compared to typical properties of spherical particle gels to understand the role of anisotropic excluded volume on gel structure and dynamics. The structure and dynamics of colloidal aggregates and gels have long been of scientific and technological interest; however, most research has focused on suspensions of spherical particles. Yet, aggregates and gels of anisometric particles - colloidal rods and platelets - may exhibit structure and dynamics that are quite different from spherical colloids. For example, suspensions of colloidal rods gel at extremely low volume fractions and form birefringent sediments. The rheology of solutions and gels of colloidal rods and platelets differs dramatically from that of colloidal spheres. Scientifically, studies with anisometric particles offer the opportunity to assess the role of anisotropic excluded volume and particle orientation in aggregates and gels. Technologically, anisometric colloids find use in a wide range of materials such as ceramics, polymer nanocomposites, well-bore drilling fluids and magnetic storage media. Model colloidal boehmite rods of approximately monodisperse dimension and aspect ratio have been synthesized according to the method of Philipse and coworkers. In aqueous solution, these materials undergo gelation upon the addition of divalent salt. By means of a novel grafting reaction and procedure for solvent refractive index matching, the rods have also been dispersed in mixed organic solvents. In this case, gelation is induced by means of depletion interaction. We report the effect of

  15. Particle Aggregation Dynamics in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.

    2009-09-01

    We continue our study of the dynamics of rigid aggregates, in the context of a local N-body simulation of planetary rings. Our modified version of pkdgrav now includes the unique capability to simulate the creation and destruction of rigid bonds of arbitrary strength between colliding particles in a non-inertial rotating frame. We have applied this model to dense planetary rings, such as Saturn's A and B rings, as interparticle sticking is hypothesized to occur between its icy particles. Laboratory experiments, such as Hatzes (1991), suggest that such bonding is common if the particles are coated in a layer of frost. And Tremaine (2003) suggests that radial structures in Saturn's B ring can be explained by invoking the presence of large bonded aggregates. The strength of these icy bonds is highly uncertain, however, so the potential parameter space to investigate is large. We present results from simulations exploring some of these parameters, particularly sticking and fragmentation thresholds, and shear and tensile bond strength, with the goal to determine the equilibrium state of the particles (wake formation and structure, aggregate size and shape, etc.) as a function of these parameters. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Sciences Fellowship (NESSF).

  16. Aggregate particles in the plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Kopparla, Pushkar; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of mostly spheres. The high particulate mass plumes have total particulate masses of (166 ± 42) × 103 kg, consistent with the results of Ingersoll and Ewald (Ingersoll, A.P., Ewald, S.P. [2011]. Icarus 216(2), 492-506). The low particulate mass plumes have masses of (25 ± 4) × 103 kg, leading to a solid to vapor mass ratio of 0.07 ± 0.01 for the plume. If indeed the plumes are made of such aggregates, then a vapor-based origin for the plume particles cannot be ruled out. Finally, we show that the residence time of the monomers inside the plume vents is sufficiently long for Brownian coagulation to form the aggregates before they are ejected to space.

  17. Fractal dimension and mechanism of aggregation of apple juice particles.

    PubMed

    Benítez, E I; Lozano, J E; Genovese, D B

    2010-04-01

    Turbidity of freshly squeezed apple juice is produced by a polydisperse suspension of particles coming from the cellular tissue. After precipitation of coarse particles by gravity, only fine-colloidal particles remain in suspension. Aggregation of colloidal particles leads to the formation of fractal structures. The fractal dimension is a measure of the internal density of these aggregates and depends on their mechanism of aggregation. Digitized images of primary particles and aggregates of depectinized, diafiltered cloudy apple juice were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Average radius of the primary particles was found to be a = 40 ± 11 nm. Maximum radius of the aggregates, R(L), ranged between 250 and 7750 nm. Fractal dimension of the aggregates was determined by analyzing SEM images with the variogram method, obtaining an average value of D(f) = 2.3 ± 0.1. This value is typical of aggregates formed by rapid flocculation or diffusion limited aggregation. Diafiltration process was found to reduce the average size and polydispersity of the aggregates, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. Average gyration radius of the aggregates before juice diafiltration was found to be R(g) = 629 ± 87 nm. Average number of primary particles per aggregate was calculated to be N = 1174.

  18. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G.; Dunstan, Dave E.

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes.

  19. Modeling transport and aggregation of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    A complete description of ash aggregation processes in volcanic clouds is an very arduous task and the full coupling of ash transport and ash aggregation models is still computationally prohibitive. A large fraction of fine ash injected in the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate because of complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in settling velocities. The formation of aggregates of size and density different from those of the primary particles dramatically changes the sedimentation dynamics and results in lower atmospheric residence times of ash particles and in the formation of secondary maxima of tephra deposit. Volcanic ash transport models should include a full aggregation model accounting for all particle class interaction. However this approach would require prohibitive computational times. Here we present a simplified model for wet aggregation that accounts for both atmospheric and volcanic water transport. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average efficiencies factors, and collision frequency functions accounting for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, such as the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. Moreover, understanding aggregation processes in volcanic clouds will contribute to mitigate the risks related with volcanic ash transport and sedimentation.

  20. Revisiting Coiled Flocculator Performance for Particle Aggregation.

    PubMed

    2017-09-08

    This work summarizes recent studies evaluating the torsion and curvature parameters in the flocculation efficiency using a hydraulic plug-flow flocculator named as Flocs Generator Reactor (FGR). Colloidal Fe(OH)3 and coal particles were used as suspension models and a cationic polyacrylamide was used for the flocculation. The effectiveness of the aggregation process (in the distinct curvature and torsion parameters and hydrodynamic conditions) was evaluated by the settling rate of the Fe(OH)3 flocs and flocs size by photographic analysis. Due to curvature, a secondary flow is induced and the profiles of the flow quantities differ from those for a straight pipe. Results showed that the difference in the flocculator design influences the Fe(OH)3 flocs size and settling rates, reaching values about 13 and 4 mh-1, for the coiled and straight pipes respectively. Coal flocs generation also showed to be dependent on the flocculator design and shear rate. Results showed that turbulent kinetic energy increases due to curvature when the torsion parameter is kept constant (pitch close to zero) enhancing the flocs formation.

  1. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (i) to perform experiments for observing and quantifying electrophoretic aggregation, (ii) to develop a theoretical description to appropriately analyze and compare with the experimental results, (iii) to study the combined effects of electrophoretic and gravitational aggregation of large particles, and the combined effects of electrophoretic and Brownian aggregation of small particles, and (iv) to perform a preliminary design of a potential future flight experiment involving electrophoretic aggregation. Electrophoresis refers to the motion of charged particles, droplets or molecules in response to an applied electric field. Electrophoresis is commonly used for analysis and separation of biological particles or molecules. When particles have different surface charge densities or potentials, they will migrate at different velocities in an electric field. This differential migration leads to the possibility that they will collide and aggregate, thereby preventing separation.

  2. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hua; Zeng, Shulin; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul; Davis, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles under the collective effects of buoyancy-driven motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin double-layers and different zeta potentials. The particle aggregation rates may be enhanced or reduced, respectively, by parallel and antiparallel alignments of the buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignments, with the buoyancy-driven relative velocity exceeding the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely-separated particles, there is a 'collision-forbidden region' in parameter space due to hydrodynamic interactions; thus, the suspension becomes stable against aggregation.

  3. Modelling aggregate formation and sedimentation of organic and mineral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkmann, Wolfgang; Schäfer-Neth, Christian; Balzer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    A one-dimensional model "ADAM" is presented that allows the prognostic computation of the interactions between mineral particles (dust) and biologically formed aggregates. The model couples a 7-compartment biogeochemical component (NO 3, NH 4, phytoplankton aggregates, zooplankton, detritus, carbon, and chlorophyll) and a 4-compartment component for the tracing of mineral particles: single free particles in the water, particles aggregated with phytoplankton, incorporated in zooplankton, and attached to detritus. It resolves both annual and daily cycles of plankton and the fate of dust from eolian import into the ocean via biological activity, aggregation and disaggregation to sedimentation at the sea floor. The model results suggest that particle scavenging is essentially occurring in the mixed layer, where biological activity and shear aggregation regulate the formation of the aggregates. The aggregates interact intensively with the suspended pool of dust particles, and sink through the upper main thermocline with increasing speed. Particle break up and organic matter degradation are important mechanisms for particle cycling in the intermediate and deeper layers. The model predicts an 80% decrease of the annual carbon flux between 100 m and 3000 m depth. The vertical profile of Al-contents in suspended particulates and the annual average vertical flux of particulate organic matter are fairly well reproduced by the model, as well as the seasonal cycles of carbon and dust fluxes in the ocean interior.

  4. Electrophoretic interactions and aggregation of colloidal biological particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Nichols, Scott C.; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The separation of cells or particles from solution has traditionally been accomplished with centrifuges or by sedimentation; however, many particles have specific densities close to unity, making buoyancy-driven motion slow or negligible, but most cells and particles carry surface charges, making them ideal for electrophoretic separation. Both buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic separation may be influenced by hydrodynamic interactions and aggregation of neighboring particles. Aggregation by electrophoresis was analyzed for two non-Brownian particles with different zeta potentials and thin double layers migrating through a viscous fluid. The results indicate that the initial rate of electrophoretically-driven aggregation may exceed that of buoyancy-driven aggregation, even under conditions in which buoyancy-driven relative motion of noninteracting particles is dominant.

  5. Aggregate Morphology Evolution by Sintering: Number & Diameter of Primary Particles.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, Max L; Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-04-01

    The structure of fractal-like agglomerates (physically-bonded) and aggregates (chemically- or sinter-bonded) is important in aerosol synthesis of nanoparticles, and in monitoring combustion emissions and atmospheric particles. It influences also particle mobility, scattering, and eventually performance of nanocomposites, suspensions and devices made with such particles. Here, aggregate sintering by viscous flow of amorphous materials (silica, polymers) and grain boundary diffusion of crystalline ceramics (titania, alumina) or metals (Ni, Fe, Ag etc.) is investigated. A scaling law is found between average aggregate projected area and equivalent number of constituent primary particles during sintering: from fractal-like agglomerates to aggregates and eventually compact particles (e.g. spheres). This is essentially a relation independent of time, material properties and sintering mechanisms. It is used to estimate the equivalent primary particle diameter and number in aggregates. The evolution of aggregate morphology or structure is quantified by the effective fractal dimension (Df ) and mass-mobility exponent (Dfm ) and the corresponding prefactors. The Dfm increases monotonically during sintering converging to 3 for a compact particle. Therefore Dfm and its prefactor could be used to gauge the degree or extent of sintering of agglomerates made by a known collision mechanism. This analysis is exemplified by comparison to experiments of silver nanoparticle aggregates sintered at different temperatures in an electric tube furnace.

  6. Aggregate Morphology Evolution by Sintering: Number & Diameter of Primary Particles

    PubMed Central

    Eggersdorfer, Max L.; Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of fractal-like agglomerates (physically-bonded) and aggregates (chemically- or sinter-bonded) is important in aerosol synthesis of nanoparticles, and in monitoring combustion emissions and atmospheric particles. It influences also particle mobility, scattering, and eventually performance of nanocomposites, suspensions and devices made with such particles. Here, aggregate sintering by viscous flow of amorphous materials (silica, polymers) and grain boundary diffusion of crystalline ceramics (titania, alumina) or metals (Ni, Fe, Ag etc.) is investigated. A scaling law is found between average aggregate projected area and equivalent number of constituent primary particles during sintering: from fractal-like agglomerates to aggregates and eventually compact particles (e.g. spheres). This is essentially a relation independent of time, material properties and sintering mechanisms. It is used to estimate the equivalent primary particle diameter and number in aggregates. The evolution of aggregate morphology or structure is quantified by the effective fractal dimension (Df) and mass-mobility exponent (Dfm) and the corresponding prefactors. The Dfm increases monotonically during sintering converging to 3 for a compact particle. Therefore Dfm and its prefactor could be used to gauge the degree or extent of sintering of agglomerates made by a known collision mechanism. This analysis is exemplified by comparison to experiments of silver nanoparticle aggregates sintered at different temperatures in an electric tube furnace. PMID:23658467

  7. An aggregation model for ash particles in volcanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Macedonio, G.; Durant, A.

    2009-12-01

    A large fraction of fine ash particles injected into the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate through complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in particle settling velocities. The aggregates formed have a different size and density compared to primary particles formed during eruption which dramatically changes the dynamics of sedimentation from the volcanic cloud. Consequently, the lifetime of ash particles in the atmosphere is reduced and a distal mass deposition maximum is often generated in resulting tephra deposits. A complete and rigorous description of volcanic ash fallout requires the full coupling of models of volcanic cloud dynamics and dispersion, and ash particle transport, aggregation and sedimentation. Furthermore, volcanic ash transport models should include an aggregation model that accounts for the interaction of all particle size classes. The problem with this approach is that simulations would require excessively long computational times thereby prohibiting its application in an operational setting during an explosive volcanic eruption. Here we present a simplified model for ash particle transport and aggregation that includes the effects of water in the volcanic cloud and surrounding atmosphere. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average sticking efficiency factors, and collision frequency functions that account for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. A parametric study on the key parameters of the model was performed. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, including the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. In these cases, mass deposited as a function of deposit area and the particle

  8. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Mark S; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  9. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  10. Investigation and visualization of internal flow through particle aggregates and microbial flocs using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Lam, Kit Ming; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-05-01

    An advanced particle-tracking and flow-visualization technology, particle image velocimetry (PIV), was utilized to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of large aggregates in water. The laser-based PIV system was used together with a settling column to capture the streamlines around two types of aggregates: latex particle aggregates and activated sludge (AS) flocs. Both types of the aggregates were highly porous and fractal with fractal dimensions of 2.13±0.31 for the latex particle aggregates (1210-2144 μm) and 1.78±0.24 for the AS flocs (1265-3737 μm). The results show that PIV is a powerful flow visualization technique capable of determining flow field details at the micrometer scale around and through settling aggregates and flocs. The PIV streamlines provided direct experimental proof of internal flow through the aggregate interiors. According to the PIV images, fluid collection efficiency ranged from 0.052 to 0.174 for the latex particle aggregates and from 0.008 to 0.126 for AS flocs. AS flocs are apparently less permeable than the particle aggregates, probably due to the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) produced by bacteria clogging the pores within the flocs. The internal permeation of fractal aggregates and bio-flocs would enhance flocculation between particles and material transport into the aggregates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Particle Aggregation due to Combined Gravitational and Electrophoretic Motion

    PubMed

    Wang; Zeng; Loewenberg; Davis

    1997-03-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles in a heterogeneous suspension under the collective effects of gravitational motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin, unpolarized double layers and different zeta potentials. The gravity vector and the electric field are assumed to be oriented in either the same direction or opposite directions. The particle aggregation rates are always enhanced by the presence of an electric field for parallel alignment of the gravitational and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignment with the magnitude of the gravitational relative velocity exceeding the magnitude of the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely separated particles, the particle aggregation rates are reduced by the presence of the electric field, and there is a "collision-forbidden" region in parameter space due to stronger hydrodynamic interactions of the particles for gravitational motion than for electrophoretic motion. For antiparallel alignment with the magnitude of the electrophoretic relative velocity exceeding the magnitude of the gravitational relative velocity between two widely separated particles, the particle aggregation rates are enhanced by the presence of the electric field.

  12. Control of binder viscosity and hygroscopicity on particle aggregation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Delmelle, Pierre; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    In the course of explosive volcanic eruptions, large amounts of ash are released into the atmosphere and may subsequently pose a threat to infrastructure, such as aviation industry. Ash plume forecasting is therefore a crucial tool for volcanic hazard mitigation but may be significantly affected by aggregation, altering the aerodynamic properties of particles. Models struggle with the implementation of aggregation since external conditions promoting aggregation have not been completely understood; in a previous study we have shown the rapid generation of ash aggregates through liquid bonding via the use of fluidization bed technology and further defined humidity and temperature ranges necessary to trigger aggregation. Salt (NaCl) was required for the recovery of stable aggregates, acting as a cementation agent and granting aggregate cohesion. A numerical model was used to explain the physics behind particle aggregation mechanisms and further predicted a dependency of aggregation efficiency on liquid binder viscosity. In this study we proof the effect of viscosity on particle aggregation. HCl and H2SO4 solutions were diluted to various concentrations resulting in viscosities between 1 and 2 mPas. Phonolitic and rhyolitic ash samples as well as soda-lime glass beads (serving as analogue material) were fluidized in the ProCell Lab® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH and treated with the acids via a bottom-spray technique. Chemically driven interaction between acid liquids and surfaces of the three used materials led to crystal precipitation. Salt crystals (e.g. NaCl) have been confirmed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leachate analysis. Both volcanic ash samples as well as the glass beads showed a clear dependency of aggregation efficiency on viscosity of the sprayed HCl solution. Spraying H2SO4 provoked a collapse of the fluidized bed and no aggregation has been observed. This is accounted by the high hygroscopicity of H2SO4. Dissolving CaCl2 (known to be

  13. A particle dynamic model of red blood cell aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Marianne; Garcia, Damien; Meiselman, Herbert J; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-11-01

    To elucidate the relationship between microscopic red blood cell (RBC) interactions and macroscopic rheological behavior, we propose a two-dimensional particle model capable of mimicking the main characteristics of RBC aggregation kinetics. The mechanical model of RBCs sheared in Couette flow is based on Newton law. We assumed a hydrodynamic force to move particles, a force to describe aggregation and an elasticity force. The role of molecular mass and concentration of neutral polymers on aggregation [Neu, B., and H. J. Meiselman. Biophys. J. 83:2482-2490, 2002] could be mimicked. Specifically, it was shown that for any shear rate (SR), the mean aggregate size (MAS) grew with time until it reached a constant value, which is consistent with in vitro experiments. It was also demonstrated that we could mimic the modal relationship between MAS and SR and the occurrence of maximum aggregation at about 0.1 s(-1). As anticipated, simulations indicated that an increase in aggregation force augmented MAS. Further, augmentation of the depletion layer thickness influenced MAS only for SR close to zero, which is a new finding. To conclude, our contribution reveals that the aggregation force intensity and SR influence the steady state MAS, and that the depletion and layer thickness affect the aggregation speed.

  14. From static micrographs to particle aggregation dynamics in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Häbel, H; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M; Hamngren Blomqvist, C; Olsson, E; Abrahamsson, C; Nordin, M

    2016-04-01

    Studies on colloidal aggregation have brought forth theories on stability of colloidal gels and models for aggregation dynamics. Still, a complete link between developed frameworks and obtained laboratory observations has to be found. In this work, aggregates of silica nanoparticles (20 nm) are studied using diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) and reaction limited cluster aggregation (RLCA) models. These processes are driven by the probability of particles to aggregate upon collision. This probability of aggregation is one in the DLCA and close to zero in the RLCA process. We show how to study the probability of aggregation from static micrographs on the example of a silica nanoparticle gel at 9 wt%. The analysis includes common summary functions from spatial statistics, namely the empty space function and Ripley's K-function, as well as two newly developed summary functions for cluster analysis based on graph theory. One of the new cluster analysis functions is related to the clustering coefficient in communication networks and the other to the size of a cluster. All four topological summary statistics are used to quantitatively compare in plots and in a least-square approach experimental data to cluster aggregation simulations with decreasing probabilities of aggregation. We study scanning transmission electron micrographs and utilize the intensity-mass thickness relation present in such images to create comparable micrographs from three-dimensional simulations. Finally, a characterization of colloidal silica aggregates and simulated structures is obtained, which allows for an evaluation of the cluster aggregation process for different aggregation scenarios. As a result, we find that the RLCA process fits the experimental data better than the DLCA process.

  15. Aggregation of colloidal particles with a finite interparticle attraction energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wan Y.; Liu, Jun; Shih, Wei-Heng; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    1991-03-01

    Aggregation of colloidal particles with a finite attraction energy was investigated with computer simulations and with gold particles coated with a surfactant. Computer simulations were carried out with the Shih-Aksay-Kikuchi (SAK) model, which incorporates a finite nearest-neighbor attraction energy- E into the diffusion-limited-cluster-aggregation (DLCA) model. Both the computer simulations and the experiments showed that (i) with a finite interparticle attraction energy, aggregates can still remain fractal, and (ii) the fractal dimension remains unchanged at large interparticle attraction energies and increases when the interparticle attraction energy is smaller than 4 k B T where T is the temperature and K B is the Boltzmann constant. The agreement between the simulations and the experimental results suggests that the reversible aggregation process in a colloidal system can be represented by the SAK model.

  16. Unequilibrated, equilibrated, and reduced aggregates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    Track-rich anhydrous IDP's are probably the most primitive IDP's because they have escaped significant post-accretional alteration; they exhibit evidence of (nebular) gas phase reactions; their mineralogy is similar to comet Halley's dust; and some of them exhibit comet-like IR spectral characteristics. However, basic questions about the mineralogy and petrography of anhydrous IDP's remain unanswered, because they contain aggregated components that can be heterogeneous on a scale of nanometers. In some IDP's, aggregates account for greater than 75 percent of the volume of the particle. The aggregates have been systematically examined using an analytical electron microscope (AEM), which provides probe-forming optics and (x-ray and electron) spectrometers necessary to analyze individual nanometer-sized grains. The AEM results reveal at least three mineralogically distinct classes of aggregates in an hydrous IDP's, with mineralogies reflecting significantly different formation/aggregation environments.

  17. Protein aggregation and particle formation in prefilled glass syringes.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Alana; Mcgraw, Nicole R; Schwartz, Daniel K; Bee, Jared S; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2014-06-01

    The stability of therapeutic proteins formulated in prefilled syringes (PFS) may be negatively impacted by the exposure of protein molecules to silicone oil-water interfaces and air-water interfaces. In addition, agitation, such as that experienced during transportation, may increase the detrimental effects (i.e., protein aggregation and particle formation) of protein interactions with interfaces. In this study, surfactant-free formulations containing either a monoclonal antibody or lysozyme were incubated in PFS, where they were exposed to silicone oil-water interfaces (siliconized syringe walls), air-water interfaces (air bubbles), and agitation stress (occurring during end-over-end rotation). Using flow microscopy, particles (≥2 μm diameter) were detected under all conditions. The highest particle concentrations were found in agitated, siliconized syringes containing an air bubble. The particles formed in this condition consisted of silicone oil droplets and aggregated protein, as well as agglomerates of protein aggregates and silicone oil. We propose an interfacial mechanism of particle generation in PFS in which capillary forces at the three-phase (silicone oil-water-air) contact line remove silicone oil and gelled protein aggregates from the interface and transport them into the bulk. This mechanism explains the synergistic effects of silicone oil-water interfaces, air-water interfaces, and agitation in the generation of particles in protein formulations.

  18. Aggregation of Thermal Particles in Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Iat Neng

    2011-03-01

    Based on the Schrodinger Equation, energy levels are evaluated for charged particle or atom surrounded by few atoms imitated to atomic cavity situations under multipole or Lennard-Jones interactions. To examine the states of corresponding eigenvalues, the associated wave functions from simulation are plotted in three-dimension to elucidate the space distribution of particles. In cases for testing on effect of different adjacent atomic structures, concentration region of distribution is revealed from a series of results. The range of localization shown also is affected by the type and strength of interactions between particles and atoms, besides the number and position of surrounding atoms. The thermal effect considered in the computation is modeled by average over results from random fluctuation of atom positions for a given heating grade. Moreover, analysis with fuzzy conditions is applied to reduce the complicated and time-consumption approach, also for the training in science education. Even the investigation is limited and tentative, qualitative studies on different parameters and structures can provide the influence of factors and approximate information to compare with the experience evidences. Supported by UM grant No. RG062/09-10S/CIN/FST.

  19. Reduced projection angles for binary tomography with particle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Al-Rifaie, Mohammad Majid; Blackwell, Tim

    This paper extends particle aggregate reconstruction technique (PART), a reconstruction algorithm for binary tomography based on the movement of particles. PART supposes that pixel values are particles, and that particles diffuse through the image, staying together in regions of uniform pixel value known as aggregates. In this work, a variation of this algorithm is proposed and a focus is placed on reducing the number of projections and whether this impacts the reconstruction of images. The algorithm is tested on three phantoms of varying sizes and numbers of forward projections and compared to filtered back projection, a random search algorithm and to SART, a standard algebraic reconstruction method. It is shown that the proposed algorithm outperforms the aforementioned algorithms on small numbers of projections. This potentially makes the algorithm attractive in scenarios where collecting less projection data are inevitable.

  20. Modelling of strongly coupled particle growth and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruy, F.; Touboul, E.

    2013-02-01

    The mathematical modelling of the dynamics of particle suspension is based on the population balance equation (PBE). PBE is an integro-differential equation for the population density that is a function of time t, space coordinates and internal parameters. Usually, the particle is characterized by a unique parameter, e.g. the matter volume v. PBE consists of several terms: for instance, the growth rate and the aggregation rate. So, the growth rate is a function of v and t. In classical modelling, the growth and the aggregation are independently considered, i.e. they are not coupled. However, current applications occur where the growth and the aggregation are coupled, i.e. the change of the particle volume with time is depending on its initial value v0, that in turn is related to an aggregation event. As a consequence, the dynamics of the suspension does not obey the classical Von Smoluchowski equation. This paper revisits this problem by proposing a new modelling by using a bivariate PBE (with two internal variables: v and v0) and by solving the PBE by means of a numerical method and Monte Carlo simulations. This is applied to a physicochemical system with a simple growth law and a constant aggregation kernel.

  1. Complex Kepler Orbits and Particle Aggregation in Charged Microscopic Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Waitukaitis, Scott; Miskin, Marc; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    Kepler orbits are usually associated with the motion of astronomical objects such as planets or comets. Here we observe such orbits at the microscale in a system of charged, insulating grains. By letting the grains fall freely under vacuum, we eliminate the effects of air drag and gravity, and by imaging them with a co-falling high-speed camera we track the relative positions of individual particles with high spatial and temporal precision. This makes it possible to investigate the behaviors caused by the combination of long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range, dissipative, contact interactions in unprecedented detail. We make the first direct observations of microscopic elliptical and hyperbolic Kepler orbits, collide-and-capture events between pairs of charged grains, and particle-by-particle aggregation into larger clusters. Our findings provide experimental evidence for electrostatic mechanisms that have been suspected, but not previously observed at the single-event level, as driving the early stages of particle aggregation in systems ranging from fluidized particle bed reactors to interstellar protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, since particles of different net charge and size are seen to aggregate into characteristic spatial configurations, our results suggest new possibilities for the formation of charge-stabilized ``granular molecules''. We can reproduce the observed molecule configurations by taking many-body, dielectric polarization effects into account.

  2. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  3. First flush and natural aggregation of particles in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Lau, S L; Kayhanian, M; Stenstrom, M K

    2006-01-01

    Particle Size Distribution (PSD) in highway runoff was monitored in the 2004-2005 rainy season at three highway sites in west Los Angeles, California. PSD was measured for 200 grab samples for 18 storm events. Particles and especially larger particles showed a strong first flush. On average, the initial 20% runoff volume transported approximately 28% total number of particles between 0.5 and 2 microm in diameter, more than 30% of particles between 2 and 30 microm and more than 40% of particles larger than 30 microm. A naturally occurring aggregation was observed with smaller particles and mixing experiments were performed to determine the possible benefits for sedimentation and filtration. Samples composited from grab samples manually collected over the first hour of runoff were gently mixed (G = 38) and small particle concentration decreased by more than 50%. After 24 hours the number of particles with diameter between 0.5 and 7 microm decreased by 51% with gentle mixing and the same size particles decreased by only 14% without mixing. Number of particles with diameter larger than 20 microm increased by 6 and 4.5 times with and without mixing, respectively. Slow mixing can improve sedimentation efficiency by more than 40% for particles less than 20 microm in diameter.

  4. Disorientation angle distribution of primary particles in potash alum aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačević, Tijana; Wiedmeyer, Viktoria; Schock, Jonathan; Voigt, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Sundmacher, Kai; Briesen, Heiko

    2017-06-01

    In order to fully characterize crystal aggregates, the orientation of primary particles has to be analyzed. A procedure for extracting this information from three-dimensional microcomputed tomography (μ CT) images was recently published by our group. We here extend this method for asymmetrical crystals and apply it for studying the disorientation angle distribution of four potash alum crystal samples that were obtained under various experimental conditions. The results show that for all considered supersaturation profiles, primary particle pairs tend to have the same orientation significantly more often than in theoretical considerations, in which the orientations of primary particles are assumed to be distributed randomly.

  5. Characterization of multiphoton emission from aggregated gold nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Akira; Lu, Phat; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2016-09-01

    Although gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are promising probes for biological imaging because of their attracting optical properties and bio-friendly nature, properties of the multi-photon (MP) emission from GNP aggregates produced by a short-wave infrared (SWIR) laser have not been examined. In this paper, characterization of MP emission from aggregated 50 nm GNPs excited by a femtosecond (fs) laser at 1560 nm is discussed with respect to aggregate structures. The key technique in this work is single particle spectroscopy. A pattern matching technique is applied to correlate MP emission and SEM images, which includes an optimization processes to maximize cross correlation coefficients between a binary microscope image and a binary SEM image with respect to xy displacement, image rotation angle, and image magnification. Once optimization is completed, emission spots are matched to the SEM image, which clarifies GNP ordering and emission properties of each aggregate. Correlation results showed that GNP aggregates have stronger MP emission than single GNPs. By combining the pattern matching technique with spectroscopy, MP emission spectrum is characterized for each GNP aggregate. A broad spectrum in the visible region and near infrared (NIR) region is obtained from GNP dimers, unlike previously reported surface plasmon enhanced emission spectrum.

  6. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2016-01-19

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters' fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  7. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  8. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  9. Circular-polarization ratios for aggregates of spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkki, A.; Muinonen, K.; Penttilä, A.

    2012-04-01

    A basic strategy for observing a small solar-system object using radar is to measure the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency for a circularly polarized transmitted wave, in the same and opposite senses of circular polarization. The measurement can be repeated for differing orientations and plane-of-sky directions of the object. The circular-polarization ratio μ is the ratio of the echo power in the same circular-polarization state (SC) to that in the opposite circular-polarization state (OC). The ratio μ is often the most important physical observable with the radar technique, as it provides the best indications for wavelength-scale complexity of the surface. At the typical transmitter frequencies of 2380 MHz or 8495 MHz, the wavelengths are 12.6 cm or 3.5 cm, respectively. We model electromagnetic scattering from closely-packed random aggregates of spheres imitating the structure of an asteroid's regolith. Both scattering and absorption of the electromagnetic wave are treated. The Multiple-Sphere T -Matrix Method computer software (MSTM; D. W. Mackowski and M. I. Mishchenko, JQSRT 112, 1282, 2011) is utilized to study how different parameters affect the circular-polarization ratio, e.g., the size distribution and electric permittivities of the spherical particles forming the different aggregates. Our primary goal is to see if the computed circular-polarization ratios can be linked to the observational data of asteroids detected with radar. The results of the simulations show striking structure for the circular-polarization ratio as a function of the size parameter and the electric permittivity of the medium. Also differences between aggregates of monodisperse and polydisperse spheres clearly exist: the aggregates consisting of polydisperse spherical particles, and hence, showing more complex structure and surface, result in circular-polarization ratios higher than the aggregates of monodisperse spherical particles, probably due to the

  10. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  11. Intramembrane organization of specialized contacts in the outer plexiform layer of the retina. A freeze-fracture study in monkeys and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Freeze-fracture analysis of the neural connections in the outer plexiform layer of the retina of primates (Macaca mulatta and Macaca arctoides) demonstrates a remarkable diversity in the internal structure of the synaptic membranes. In the invaginating synapses of cone pedicles, the plasma membrane of the photoreceptor ending contains an aggregate of A-face particles, a hexagonal array of synaptic vesicle sites, and rows of coated vesicle sites, which are deployed in sequence from apex to base of the synaptic ridge. The horizontal cell dendrites lack vesicle sites and have two aggregates of intramembrane A-face particles, one at the interface with the apex of the synaptic ridge, the other opposite the tip of the invaginating midget bipolar dendrite. Furthermore, the horizontal cell dendrites are interconnected by a novel type of specialized junction, characterized by: (a) enlarged intercellular cleft, bisected by a dense plate and traversed by uniformly spaced crossbars; (b) symmetrical arrays of B-face particles arranged in parallel rows within the junctional membranes; and (c) a layer of dense material on the cytoplasmic surface of the membranes. The plasmalemma of the invaginating midget bipolar dendrite is unspecialized. At the contact region between the basal surface of cone pedicles and the dendrites of the flat midget and diffuse cone bipolar cells, the pedicle membrane has moderately clustered A-face particles, but no vesicle sites, whereas the adjoining membrane of the bipolar dendrites contains an aggregate of B-face particles. The invaginating synapse of rod spherules differs from that of cone pedicles, because the membrane of the axonal endings of the horizontal cells only has an A-face particle aggregate opposite the apex of the synaptic ridge. Specialized junctions between horizontal cell processes, characterized by symmetrical arrays of intramembrane B-face particles, are also present in the neuropil underlying the photoreceptor endings. Small gap

  12. Particle interactions in kaolinite suspensions and corresponding aggregate structures.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Hampton, Marc A; Stokes, Jason R; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2011-07-01

    The surface charge densities of the silica face surface and the alumina face surface of kaolinite particles, recently determined from surface force measurements using atomic force microscopy, show a distinct dependence on the pH of the system. The silica face was found to be negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina face surface was found to be positively charged at pH<6, and negatively charged at pH>8. The surface charge densities of the silica face and the alumina face were utilized in this study to determine the interaction energies between different surfaces of kaolinite particles. Results indicate that the silica face-alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low pH. This face-face association increases the stacking of kaolinite layers, and thereby promotes the edge-face (edge-silica face and edge-alumina face) and face-face (silica face-alumina face) associations with increasing pH, and hence the maximum shear-yield stress at pH 5-5.5. With further increase in pH, the face-face and edge-face association decreases due to increasing surface charge density on the silica face and the edge surfaces, and decreasing surface charge density on the alumina face. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negatively charged, kaolinite particles are dispersed, and the suspension is stabilized. The face-face association at low pH has been confirmed from cryo-SEM images of kaolinite aggregates taken from suspension which show that the particles are mostly organized in a face-face and edge-face manner. At higher pH conditions, the cryo-SEM images of the kaolinite aggregates reveal a lower degree of consolidation and the edge-edge association is evident.

  13. Modeling fibrin aggregation in blood flow with discrete-particles.

    PubMed

    Boryczko, Krzysztof; Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A

    2004-09-01

    Excessive clotting can cause bleeding over a vast capillary area. We study the mesoscopic dynamics of clotting by using the fluid particle model. We assume that the plasma consists of fluid particles containing fibrin monomers, while the red blood cells and capillary walls are modeled with elastic mesh of "solid" particles. The fluid particles interact with each other with a short-ranged, repulsive dissipative force. The particles containing fibrin monomers have a dual character. The polymerization of fibrin monomers into hydrated fibrins is modeled by the change of the interactions between fluid particles from repulsive to attractive forces. This process occurs with a probability being an increasing function of the local density. We study the blood flow in microscopic capillary vessels about 100 microm long and with diameters in order of 10 microm. We show that the model of polymerization reflects clearly the role played by fibrins in clotting. Due to the density fluctuations caused the by the high acceleration, the fibrin chains are produced within a very short time (0.5 ms). Fibrin aggregation modifies the rheological properties of blood, slows down the incipient flow, and entraps the red blood cells, thus forming dangerous clots.

  14. Particle size changes in unsealed mineral trioxide aggregate powder.

    PubMed

    Ha, William N; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2014-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is commonly supplied in 1-g packages of powder that are used by some clinicians across several treatments against the manufacturer's instructions. ProRoot MTA cannot be resealed after opening, whereas MTA Angelus has a resealable lid. This study assessed changes in particle size distribution once the packaging had been opened. Fresh ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus powder were analyzed by using laser diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and compared with powder from packages that had been opened once and kept in storage for 2 years. The ProRoot packet was folded over, whereas the MTA Angelus jar had the lid twisted back to its original position. After 2 years, ProRoot MTA powder showed a 6-fold increase in particle size (lower 10% from 1.13 to 4.37 μm, median particle size from 1.99 to 12.87 μm, and upper 10% from 4.30 to 34.67 μm), with an accompanying 50-fold change in particle surface area. MTA Angelus showed only a 2-fold increase in particle size (4.15 to 8.32 μm, 12.72 to 23.79 μm, and 42.66 to 47.91 μm, respectively) and a 2-fold change in particle size surface area. MTA reacts with atmospheric moisture, causing an increase in particle size that may adversely affect the properties and shelf life of the material. Smaller particles have a greater predisposition to absorb moisture. Single-use systems are advised. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aggregation and Disaggregation of Flocculated Particles with Different Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. H.; Smith, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The fate, transport and depositional rate of fine grained sediments are known to depend on floc size, hydrodynamic stress, cohesive sediment types and organic matter. In recent laboratory studies, it was determined that flocculated sediments will readily disaggregate at moderate Reynolds numbers and degrade further as the hydrodynamic stresses increase. This was the case for pure clays of montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite with biopolymers that had varied net charges of net neutral, anionic and cationic. In these initial studies, flocculated sediments were found to rapidly disaggregate under high shear stresses from large aggregates of 500 to 2000 microns to approximately three to four times the median grain size of the primary particles or 30 to 40 microns. More recently, laboratory and natural flocs were analyzed to determine if particle disaggregation was reversible and if particles would increase in size as the stress state was reduced. The montmorillonite rich samples were found to begin to reaggregate within 20 minutes of a reduction in shear stress and these flocs approached that of the original floc sizes. On the other hand, kaolinite rich samples displayed a slower rate of reaggregation and a significant delay in reaggregation after the reduction of shear stress. results indicate that clay mineralogy plays a large role in flocculation, and specifically dissaggregation and reaggregation rates at varied hydrodynamic conditions that regularly occur within estuarine and nearshore environments.

  16. Particle aggregation in microgravity: Informal experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Pettit, Donald R.; Messenger, Scott R.

    2014-05-01

    We conducted experiments in space to investigate the aggregation of millimeter- and submillimeter-sized particles in microgravity, an important early step in planet formation. Particulate materials included salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), coffee, mica, ice, Bjurböle chondrules, ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite meteorite fragments, and acrylic and glass beads, all triply confined in clear plastic containers. Angular submillimeter particles rapidly and spontaneously formed clusters strong enough to survive turbulence in a protoplanetary nebula. Smaller particles generally aggregated more strongly and quickly than larger ones. We observed only a weak dependence of aggregation time on particle number density. We observed no strong dependence on composition. Round, smooth particles aggregated weakly or not at all. In a mixture of particle types, some phases aggregated more readily than others, creating selection effects that controlled the composition of the growing clumps. The physical process of aggregation appears to be electrostatic in nature.

  17. Irreversible aggregation of interacting particles in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Sidi Ammi, Hachem; Chame, Anna; Touzani, M'hammed; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Pierre-Louis, Olivier; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2005-04-01

    We present a study of the aggregation of interacting particles in one dimension. This situation, for example, applies to atoms trapped along linear defects at the surface of a crystal. Simulations are performed with two lattice models. In the first model, the borders of atoms and islands interact in a vectorial manner via force monopoles. In the second model, each atom carries a dipole. These two models lead to qualitatively similar but quantitatively different behaviors. In both cases, the final average island size S(f) does not depend on the interactions in the limits of very low and very high coverages. For intermediate coverages, S(f) exhibits an asymmetric behavior as a function of the interaction strength: while it saturates for attractive interactions, it decreases for repulsive interactions. A class of mean-field models is designed, which allows one to retrieve the interaction dependence on the coverage dependence of the average island size with a good accuracy.

  18. Conditions for self-consistent aggregation by chemotactic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masayo; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-04-01

    We have numerically studied chemotactic aggregation of microorganisms by introducing a model consisting of elements with intracellular dynamics, random walks with a state-dependent turnover rate, and secretion of attractant. Three phases with and without aggregation, as well as partial aggregation, were obtained as to the diffusion and degradation rates of the attractant, and conditions for cellular aggregation were analyzed. The size of aggregated clusters was shown to be independent of cell density, as is consistent with experiment.

  19. Particle and nanoparticle interactions with fibrinogen: the importance of aggregation in nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Ding, Ping; Kendall, Kevin

    2011-03-01

    Ingested, inhaled or injected particles come into contact with biological fluids containing polymers, such as the protein fibrinogen. We studied interactions between well-characterized submicron particles or nanoparticles (NPs) and human fibrinogen. In vitro aggregation and zeta potential measurements of different sized and functionalized polystyrene, carbon black and silica NPs suspended in fibrinogen solutions were made. Particle size, surface charge and aggregation behaviour significantly changed in the presence of fibrinogen. Polymer (protein) bridging and bridge flocculation was observed. We concluded: (1) NP aggregation rate in a fibrinogen solution depended on particle surface type; (2) amine-functionalized particles aggregated more slowly in fibrinogen; and (3) particle morphology strongly influenced biologically available surface for protein attachment, but this did not correlate well with particle surface area for complex particles (calculated or measured). Interaction of particles and NPs with pro-coagulant polymers may therefore dictate the NP surface dose presentation to cells/organs and subsequent cellular effects, in and ex vivo.

  20. Aggregation of colloidal particles modeled as a dynamical process.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J; Nir, S

    1981-01-01

    Aggregation kinetics of sonicated phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) vesicles in NaCl indicate that the process is fully reversible and dynamical, involving the rapid formation and dispersal of aggregates. Accordingly, the general mass action kinetic equations are analyzed with respect to the equilibrium state and the formation of higher order aggregates. For a general class of systems, the values for the mass average aggregate size at equilibrium are obtained from simple closed-form expressions. It is shown that an analysis of the aggregation equilibrium will yield estimates for the potential energy well that holds the aggregates together. A fit to the experimental data for kinetics of Na+-induced aggregation of the vesicles has been achieved by employing mass action kinetic equations that include the dissociation reactions. The threshold of NaCl concentration required for aggregation involves the clear distinction between the rate and extent of aggregation. PMID:6940176

  1. Single particle detection and characterization of synuclein co-aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, Armin . E-mail: Armin.Giese@med.uni-muenchen.de; Bader, Benedikt; Bieschke, Jan; Schaffar, Gregor; Odoy, Sabine; Kahle, Philipp J.; Haass, Christian; Kretzschmar, Hans

    2005-08-12

    Protein aggregation is the key event in a number of human diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We present a general method to quantify and characterize protein aggregates by dual-colour scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). In addition to high sensitivity, this approach offers a unique opportunity to study co-aggregation processes. As the ratio of two fluorescently labelled components can be analysed for each aggregate separately in a homogeneous assay, the molecular composition of aggregates can be studied even in samples containing a mixture of different types of aggregates. Using this method, we could show that wild-type {alpha}-synuclein forms co-aggregates with a mutant variant found in familial Parkinson's disease. Moreover, we found a striking increase in aggregate formation at non-equimolar mixing ratios, which may have important therapeutic implications, as lowering the relative amount of aberrant protein may cause an increase of protein aggregation leading to adverse effects.

  2. SnapShot: Cartography of Intramembrane Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Urban, Siniša

    2016-12-15

    Intramembrane proteases hydrolyze peptide bonds within the cell membrane as the decision-making step of various signaling pathways or during general proteostasis. Although initially thought to be rare, fourteen proteases from four superfamilies are now known to be distributed among nearly every membrane compartment of a human cell. Each protease is endowed with specific enzymatic properties that determine both substrate choice and outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of turbulence on aggregation of small particles in agitated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusters, Karel Antonius

    The influence of the hydrodynamics in baffled turbine agitated vessels on the turbulent coagulation of small solid particles is studied, with focus on the dependence of the aggregate size on stirrer speed, concentration of solids, destabilizer concentration, and vessel size. The following studies are presented: aggregation theory; hydrodynamics in stirred tanks; numerical particle tracking in a turbine agitated vessel; aggregation kinetics in stirred tanks; and maximum aggregate size in stirred tanks. The application of the model to describe the aggregation process in strirred tanks to experimental conditions other than those tested and to particulate systems with different physical properties is discussed.

  4. The infrared spectral transmittance of Aspergillus niger spore aggregated particle swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinying; Hu, Yihua; Gu, Youlin; Li, Le

    2015-10-01

    Microorganism aggregated particle swarm, which is quite an important composition of complex media environment, can be developed as a new kind of infrared functional materials. Current researches mainly focus on the optical properties of single microorganism particle. As for the swarm, especially the microorganism aggregated particle swarm, a more accurate simulation model should be proposed to calculate its extinction effect. At the same time, certain parameters deserve to be discussed, which helps to better develop the microorganism aggregated particle swarm as a new kind of infrared functional materials. In this paper, take Aspergillus Niger spore as an example. On the one hand, a new calculation model is established. Firstly, the cluster-cluster aggregation (CCA) model is used to simulate the structure of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle. Secondly, the single scattering extinction parameters for Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle are calculated by using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method. Thirdly, the transmittance of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle swarm is simulated by using Monte Carlo method. On the other hand, based on the model proposed above, what influences can wavelength causes has been studied, including the spectral distribution of scattering intensity of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle and the infrared spectral transmittance of the aggregated particle swarm within the range of 8~14μm incident infrared wavelengths. Numerical results indicate that the scattering intensity of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle reduces with the increase of incident wavelengths at each scattering angle. Scattering energy mainly concentrates on the scattering angle between 0~40°, forward scattering has an obvious effect. In addition, the infrared transmittance of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle swarm goes up with the increase of incident wavelengths. However, some turning points of the trend

  5. Simulation on the aggregation process of spherical particle confined in a spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xu, J. J.; Zhang, L.

    2016-04-01

    The aggregation process of spherical particles confined in a spherical shell was studied by using a diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA) model. The influence of geometrical confinement and wetting-like properties of the spherical shell walls on the particle concentration profile, aggregate structure and aggregation kinetics had been explored. The results show that there will be either depletion or absorption particles near the shell walls depending on the wall properties. It is observed that there are four different types of density distribution which can be realized by modifying the property of the inner or outer spherical shell wall. In addition, the aggregate structure will become more compact in the confined spherical shell comparing to bulk system with the same particle volume fraction. The analysis on the aggregation kinetics indicates that geometrical confinement will promote the aggregation process by reducing the invalid movement of the small aggregates and by constraining the movement of those large aggregates. Due to the concave geometrical characteristic of the outer wall of the spherical shell, its effects on the aggregating kinetics and the structure of the formed aggregates are more evident than those of the inner wall. This study will provide some instructive information of controlling the density distribution of low-density porous polymer hollow spherical shells and helps to predict gel structures developed in confined geometries.

  6. Particle Formation and Aggregation of a Therapeutic Protein in Nanobubble Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Snell, Jared R; Zhou, Chen; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2016-10-01

    The generation of nanobubbles following reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations has recently been reported. Here, we characterize particle formation and aggregation of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) in reconstituted formulations of lyophilized trehalose. Particle characterization methods including resonant mass measurement and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to count and size particles generated upon reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations. In addition, accelerated degradation studies were conducted to monitor rhIL-1ra aggregation in solutions containing various concentrations of suspended nanobubbles. Reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations with solutions containing rhIL-1ra reduced nanobubble concentrations and generated negatively buoyant particles attributed to aggregated rhIL-1ra. Furthermore, levels of rhIL-1ra aggregation following incubation in aqueous solution correlated with concentrations of suspended nanobubbles. The results of this study suggest that nanobubbles may be a contributor to protein aggregation and particle formation in reconstituted, lyophilized therapeutic protein formulations.

  7. Aggregation process of paramagnetic particles in fluid in the magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ning; Cheng, Xiaoye; Huang, Zheyong; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Kai; Wang, Ye; Gong, Yongyong

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic targeting is a promising therapeutic strategy for localizing systemically delivered magnetic responsive drugs or cells to target tissue, but excessive aggregation of magnetic particles could result in vascular embolization. To analyze the reason for embolization, the attractive process of magnetic particles in magnetic field (MF) was studied in this paper by analyzing the form of the aggregated paramagnetic particles while the particle suspension flowed through a tube, which served as a model of blood vessels. The effects of magnetic flux density and fluid velocity on the formation of aggregated paramagnetic particles were investigated. The number of large aggregated clusters dramatically increased with increment in the magnetic flux density and decreased with increment in the fluid velocity. The analysis of accumulative process demonstrates the MF around initially attracted particles was focused, which induced the formation of clusters and increased the possibility of embolism. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:323-330, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Particle-bubble aggregate stability on static bubble generated by single nozzle on flotation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warjito, Harinaldi, Setyantono, Manus; Siregar, Sahala D.

    2016-06-01

    There are three sub-processes on flotation. These processes are intervening liquid film into critical thickness, rupture of liquid film forming three phase contact line, and expansion three phase contact line forming aggregate stability. Aggregate stability factor contribute to determine flotation efficiency. Aggregate stability has some important factors such as reagent and particle geometry. This research focussed on to understand effect of particle geometry to aggregate stability. Experimental setup consists of 9 x 9 x26 cm flotation column made of glass, bubble generator, particle feeding system, and high speed video camera. Bubble generator made from single nozzle with 0.3 mm diameter attached to programmable syringe pump. Particle feeding system made of pipette. Particle used in this research is taken from open pit Grasberg in Timika, Papua. Particle has sub-angular geometry and its size varies from 38 to 300 µm. Bubble-particle interaction are recorded using high speed video camera. Recordings from high speed video camera analyzed using image processing software. Experiment result shows that aggregate particle-bubble and induction time depends on particle size. Small particle (38-106 µm) has long induction time and able to rupture liquid film and also forming three phase contact line. Big particle (150-300 µm) has short induction time, so it unable to attach with bubble easily. This phenomenon is caused by apparent gravity work on particle-bubble interaction. Apparent gravity worked during particle sliding on bubble surface experience increase and reached its maximum magnitude at bubble equator. After particle passed bubble equator, apparent gravity force experience decrease. In conclusion particle size from 38-300 µm can form stable aggregate if particle attached with bubble in certain condition.

  9. Polarization-resolved near-backscattering of airborne aggregates composed of different primary particles.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Pan, Yong-Le; Wang, Chuji; Cao, Hui

    2014-07-15

    We measured the polarization-resolved angular elastic scattering intensity distribution of aggregates composed of primary particles with different shapes and packing densities in the near-backward directions (155°-180°). Specifically, we compare aggregates composed of spherical polystyrene latex spheres, cylinder-like Bacillus subtilis particles, and Arizona road dust, as well as tryptophan particles. We observe clearly differentiable polarization aspect ratios and find that the negative polarization dip is more pronounced in more densely packed aggregates or particles. This work indicates that the polarization aspect ratio in the near-backward direction may be used as a fingerprint to discriminate between aggregates with the same size and overall shape by differences in their constituent particles.

  10. Model simulations of particle aggregation effect on colloid exchange between streams and streambeds.

    PubMed

    Areepitak, Trachu; Ren, Jianhong

    2011-07-01

    Colloids found in natural streams have large reactive surface areas, which makes them significant absorbents and carriers for pollutants. Stream-subsurface exchange plays a critical role in regulating the transport of colloids and contaminants in natural streams. Previous process-based multiphase exchange models were developed without consideration of colloid-colloid interaction. However, many studies have indicated that aggregation is a significant process and needs to be considered in stream process analysis. Herein, a new colloid exchange model was developed by including particle aggregation in addition to colloid settling and filtration. Self-preserving size distribution concepts and classical aggregation theory were employed to model the aggregation process. Model simulations indicate that under conditions of low filtration and high degree of particle-particle interaction, aggregation could either decrease or increase the amount of colloids retained in streambeds, depending on the initial particle size. Thus, two possible cases may occur including enhanced colloid deposition and facilitated colloid transport. Also, when the aggregation rate is high and filtration increases, more particles are retained by bed sediments due to filtration, and fewer are aggregated, which reduces the extent of aggregation effect on colloid deposition. The work presented here will contribute to a better understanding and prediction of colloid transport phenomena in natural streams.

  11. Structural Change of Aerosol Particle Aggregates with Exposure to Elevated Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James F; Rogak, Steven N; Green, Sheldon I; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K

    2015-10-20

    Structural changes of aggregates composed of inorganic salts exposed to relative humidity (RH) between 0 and 80% after formation at selected RH between 0 and 60% were investigated using a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) and fluorescence microscopy. The TDMA was used to measure a shift in peak mobility diameter for 100-700 nm aggregates of hygroscopic aerosol particles composed of NaCl, Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4, and nonhygroscopic Al2O3 as the RH was increased. Aggregates of hygroscopic particles were found to shrink when exposed to RH greater than that during the aggregation process. The degree of aggregate restructuring is greater for larger aggregates and greater increases in RH. Growth factors (GF) calculated from mobility diameter measurements as low as 0.77 were seen for NaCl before deliquescence. The GF subsequently increased to 1.23 at 80% RH, indicating growth after deliquescence. Exposure to RH lower than that experienced during aggregation did not result in structural changes. Fluorescent microscopy confirmed that aggregates formed on wire surfaces undergo an irreversible change in structure when exposed to elevated RH. Analysis of 2D movement of aggregates shows a displacement of 5-13% compared to projected length of initial aggregate from a wire surface. Surface tension due to water adsorption within the aggregate structure is a potential cause of the structural changes.

  12. An alternative method for determining particle-size distribution of forest road aggregate and soil with large-sized particles

    Treesearch

    Hakjun Rhee; Randy B. Foltz; James L. Fridley; Finn Krogstad; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of particle-size distribution (PSD) of soil with large-sized particles (e.g., 25.4 mm diameter) requires a large sample and numerous particle-size analyses (PSAs). A new method is needed that would reduce time, effort, and cost for PSAs of the soil and aggregate material with large-sized particles. We evaluated a nested method for sampling and PSA by...

  13. Multiscale modeling of the thixotropic behavior of aggregating soft colloidal particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwasame, Paul; Wagner, Norman; Beris, Antony

    A multiscale model is presented that incorporates microscopic information at the soft, aggregating, colloidal particle level to a macroscopic description of a thixotropic suspension with a yield stress. This is accomplished by incorporating the relevant physics describing aggregation and breakage at the particle level into a population balance microscopic framework. A moment approach is followed to allow for model coarsening and its incorporation into a macroscopic description. Furthermore, to describe the aggregate dynamics under flow, it is necessary to include an additional description of the aggregate deformation. The yielding behavior of gel networks observed in thixotropic suspensions is modeled by adapting micromechanical models of emulsions and pastes to describe aggregate deformation under flow. A key outcome of this work is the recognition of the important role of competition between orthokinetic and perikinetic aggregation on polydispersity and dynamical behavior. Comparison to rheological experiments on a model thixotropic suspension will also be presented to validate the model developed. NSF CBET 312146.

  14. Bi-modal hetero-aggregation rate response to particle dosage.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Aaron; Franks, George; Biggs, Simon; Jameson, Graeme J

    2005-11-22

    The rate of flocculation of cationic polystyrene latex (PSL) particles by smaller, anionic PSL particles has been measured using a low-angle static light scattering technique. The rate of aggregate growth has been investigated as a function of particle size ratio and relative concentration of each particle species (for a constant dose of cationic particles). Contrary to many previous reports, two peaks in the flocculation rate were observed as a function of dose. It is speculated that the peak observed at the lower particle concentration coincides with the dose yielding maximum constant collision efficiency in the steady-state regime, a condition which is attained only after complete adsorption of the smaller particles onto the larger particle species. The peak at the higher particle concentration is believed to be related to the maximum collision rate constant upon reaching the steady-state regime, the value of which corresponds to maximum degree of aggregation and therefore the maximum mean collision efficiency prior to reaching this condition. From classical collision kinetics, the rate of aggregate growth may be represented as being proportional to the product of the collision rate constant and collision efficiency at any given time. Given then that the maximum value of these two variables coincides with different particle concentrations, the product of the response of each to particle dosage can in some cases yield a net bi-modal aggregation rate response to particle dosage.

  15. Aggregates of ultrafine particles impair phagocytosis of microorganisms by human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Margot; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Johard, Urban; Gerde, Per; Jarstrand, Connie; Camner, Per; Låstbom, Lena

    2006-02-01

    We investigated whether exposure of alveolar macrophages to aggregates of ultrafine carbon particles affected subsequent phagocytosis of microorganisms. Human alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and exposed to aggregates of ultrafine carbon particles or diesel exhaust particles (DEP) for 20 h before measurements of phagocytosis. The particle loads were estimated to be comparable to those of air pollution exposure with established health effects in humans. Phagocytotic activity was measured as attachment and ingestion of four different test particles (amorphous silica particles, yeast cells from Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus neoformans opsonized with specific IgG or fresh serum) that bind to scavenger, mannose, Fc, and complement receptors, respectively. Carbon preloading significantly impaired the attachment and ingestion process (P<0.01) for all particles, except for yeast cells from C. neoformans opsonized with specific IgG. On the average, the accumulated attachment decreased by 30% and the ingested fraction decreased by 10%. Loading of alveolar macrophages with either aggregates of ultrafine DEP or carbon particles impaired the phagocytosis of silica test particles in a similar way. Exposure of human alveolar macrophages to aggregates of carbon or DEP, in concentrations relevant to human environmental exposures, caused significant impairment of phagocytosis of silica particles and microorganisms. The inhibitory effect on particle phagocytosis mediated by four different receptors suggests that air pollution particles cause a general inhibition of macrophage phagocytosis. Such an effect may contribute to increased susceptibility to infections and, for example, result in more exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  16. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-09-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases.

  17. Shaped beam scattering by an aggregate of particles using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Paul; Wang, Jia jie; Han, Yi Ping

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the light scattering by an aggregate of particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam is analyzed within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). The theoretical derivations of aggregated particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam are revisited, with special attention paid to the computation of beam shape coefficients of a shaped beam for aggregated particles. The theoretical treatments as well as a home-made code are then verified by making comparisons between our numerical results and those calculated using a public available T-Matrix code MSTM. Good agreements are achieved which partially indicate the correctness of both codes. Additionally, more numerical results are presented to study the scattered fields of aggregated particles illuminated by a focused Gaussian beam. Several large enhancements in the scattered intensity distributions are found which are believed to be due to the Bragg's scattering by a linear chain of spheres.

  18. Experimental investigation of the aggregation-disaggregation of colliding volcanic ash particles in turbulent, low-humidity suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Giacalone, Emanuele; Cesaroni, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of laboratory experiments on the aggregation and disaggregation of colliding volcanic ash particles. Ash particles of different composition and size <90 µm were held in turbulent suspension and filmed in high speed while colliding, aggregating, and disaggregating, forming a growing layer of electrostatically bound particles along a vertical plate. At room conditions and regardless of composition, 60-80% of the colliding particles smaller than 32 µm remained aggregated. In contrast, aggregation of particles larger than 63 µm was negligible, and, when a layer formed, periods when disaggregation (mainly by collisions or drag) exceeded aggregation occurred twice as frequently than for smaller particles. An empirical relationship linking the aggregation index, i.e., the effective fraction of aggregated particles surviving disaggregation, to the mean particle collision kinetic energy is provided. Our results have potential implications on the dynamics of volcanic plumes and ash mobility in the environment.

  19. Beads on a string: structure of bound aggregates of globular particles and long polymer chains.

    PubMed

    Souslov, Anton; Curtis, Jennifer E; Goldbart, Paul M

    2015-11-07

    Macroscopic properties of suspensions, such as those composed of globular particles (e.g., colloidal or macromolecular), can be tuned by controlling the equilibrium aggregation of the particles. We examine how aggregation - and, hence, macroscopic properties - can be controlled in a system composed of both globular particles and long, flexible polymer chains that reversibly bind to one another. We base this on a minimal statistical mechanical model of a single aggregate in which the polymer chain is treated either as ideal or self-avoiding, and, in addition, the globular particles are taken to interact with one another via excluded volume repulsion. Furthermore, each of the globular particles is taken to have one single site to which at most one polymer segment may bind. Within the context of this model, we examine the statistics of the equilibrium size of an aggregate and, thence, the structure of dilute and semidilute suspensions of these aggregates. We apply the model to biologically relevant aggregates, specifically those composed of macromolecular proteoglycan globules and long hyaluronan polymer chains. These aggregates are especially relevant to the materials properties of cartilage and the structure-function properties of perineuronal nets in brain tissue, as well as the pericellular coats of mammalian cells.

  20. Interaction and Aggregation of Colloidal Biological Particles and Droplets in Electrically-Driven Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Loewenberg, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to develop a fundamental understanding of aggregation and coalescence processes during electrically-driven migration of cells, particles and droplets. The process by which charged cells, particles, molecules, or drops migrate in a weak electric field is known as electrophoresis. If the migrating species have different charges or surface potentials, they will migrate at different speeds and thus may collide and aggregate or coalesce. Aggregation and coalescence are undesirable, if the goal is to separate the different species on the basis of their different electrophoretic mobilities.

  1. Sedimentation of particles and aggregates in colloids considering both streaming and seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongxing; Jin, Hui; Jin, Jingyu; Jing, Dengwei

    2016-10-01

    Sedimentation of colloids is a common phenomenon in various industrial processes. Aggregation of nanoparticles is expected to occur during the processes. However, previous studies often ignore the important features of aggregates, e.g. porosity and possible seepage, leading to a mathematical description of the sedimentation processes of low reliability. In this study, we successfully elaborated the partial differential equation of the dynamic concentration distribution of regimented colloids based on the Stokes approximation and diffusion along the negative gradient of concentration. The permeability of aggregates was obtained by the finite volume method and the ratios of the velocities of flowing around (u f) to seepage through (u s) aggregates over various primary particle sizes and aggregation structures were obtained based on the Darcy equations. After validation of the model, the effects of size and density of the particles and aggregates on the concentration profiles were investigated. Our results indicate that both an increase in size and density of particles and aggregates can accelerate the sedimentation process, and lead to more ‘thorough’ sedimentation. We mathematically explain why suspensions with high particle concentration are more unstable. What is more, replacing gravity with other volume forces, e.g. centrifugal force and magnetic forces, our model is expected to be applicable to centrifugation or magnetic sedimentation processes.

  2. A model for wet aggregation of ash particles in volcanic plumes and clouds: 2. Model application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Durant, A.; Macedonio, G.

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of particle aggregation has a dramatic effect on the transport and sedimentation of volcanic ash. The aggregation process is complex and can occur under different conditions and in multiple regions of the plume and in the ash cloud. In the companion paper, Costa et al. develop an aggregation model based on a fractal relationship to describe the rate particles are incorporated into ash aggregates. The model includes the effects of both magmatic and atmospheric water present in the volcanic cloud and demonstrates that the rate of aggregation depends on the characteristics of the initial particle size distribution. The aggregation model includes two parameters, the fractal exponent Df, which describes the efficiency of the aggregation process, and the aggregate settling velocity correction factor ψe, which influences the distance at which distal mass deposition maxima form. Both parameters are adjusted using features of the observed deposits. Here this aggregation model is implemented in the FALL3D volcanic ash transport model and applied to the 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens and the 17-18 September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions. For both eruptions, the optimized values for Df (2.96-3.00) and ψe (0.27-0.33) indicate that the ash aggregates had a bulk density of 700-800 kg m-3. The model provides a higher degree of agreement than previous fully empirical aggregation models and successfully reproduces the depositional characteristics of the deposits investigated over a large range of scales, including the position and thickness of the secondary maxima.

  3. Concurrent changes in aggregation and swelling of coal particles in solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new method of coal swelling has been developed tinder the condition of low coal concentrations with continuous mixing of coal and solvent. The change in particle size distributions by a laser scattering procedure was used for the evaluation of coal swelling. Particle size distributions in good and poor solvents were nearly equal, but reversibly changed in good solvents from time to time. The effects of solubles and coal concentrations on the distributions were small. It was concluded that aggregate d coal particles disaggregate in good solvents, and that an increase in the particle size distribution due to swelling in good solvents are compensated by a decrease in the particle size due to disaggregation. Therefore, the behavior of coal particles in solvents is controlled by aggregation in addition to coal swelling. This implies that an increase in the particle size due to coal swelling in actual processes is not so large as expected by the results obtained from the conventional coal swelling methods.

  4. Experimental investigation of the aggregation-disaggregation of colliding volcanic ash particles in turbulent, low-humidity suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of laboratory experiments on the aggregation and disaggregation of colliding volcanic ash particles. Ash particles of different composition and size <90 µm were held in turbulent suspension and filmed in high-speed while colliding, aggregating, and disaggregating, forming a growing layer of electrostatically-bound particles along a vertical plate. At room conditions and regardless of composition, 60-80% of the colliding particles smaller than 32 µm remained aggregated. In contrast, aggregation of particles larger than 63 µm was less efficient and, when a layer formed, got disaggregated by collisions or drag twice more frequently than that of smaller particles. An empirical relationship linking the aggregation index, i.e, the effective fraction of aggregated particles surviving disaggregation, to the mean particle collision kinetic energy is provided. Our results have potential implications on the dynamics of volcanic plumes and ash mobility in the environment.

  5. Aggregation Of Volcanic Particles: Physical Constraints Provided By Field And Numerical Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, E.; Bagheri, G.; Bonadonna, C.

    2014-12-01

    The characterization and parameterization of both sedimentation and aggregation of volcanic particles is necessary for an accurate description of the sink term in numerical models of tephra dispersal used for the evaluation of tephra hazards. Nonetheless, our understanding of particle fallout in various eruptive and atmospheric conditions is still limited mostly due to the lack of direct observations. A comparative investigation of sedimentation and aggregation of volcanic particles is here presented based on field experiments and numerical simulations. Field experiments are based on detailed observations of particle fallout during Vulcanian explosions and ash emissions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan) on August 3, 2013. Column height was up to about 3 km above sea level and the cloud spread with average velocity of about 7 ms-1 toward southeast direction. Aggregates that fell at a distance of about 4 km from the vent were filmed with a high-speed and high-resolution camera before depositing on collection glasses. In order to preserve and analyze particle aggregates with the Scanning Electron Microscope, collecting glasses were covered with a special adhesive tape. Dedicated trays were also used to collect the depositing tephra at five-minute intervals to investigate both accumulation rate and particle size. CILAS grain size analysis showed that mode of particles deposited on the ground decreased with time from 550 μm to 250 μm at the reference location. Aggregate size ranged between 400 and 900 μm (based on video analysis) and they mostly consist of a single or multiple particles acting as nuclei with diameter between 200 and 800 μm coated with ash particles (<90 μm). Also aggregate size decreased with time during fallout and aggregate typology changed from mostly coated particles to ash clusters. Aggregation significantly affected particle residence time in the spreading cloud by changing the associated settling velocity. Based on numerical constraints

  6. Soft electrostatic repulsion in particle monolayers at liquid interfaces: surface pressure and effect of aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Danov, Krassimir D.; Petkov, Plamen V.

    2016-01-01

    Non-densely packed interfacial monolayers from charged micrometre-sized colloid particles find applications for producing micropatterned surfaces. The soft electrostatic repulsion between the particles in a monolayer on an air/water (or oil/water) interface is mediated by the non-polar fluid, where Debye screening is absent and the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters. Surface pressure versus area isotherms were measured at the air/water interface. The experiments show that asymptotically the surface pressure is inversely proportional to the third power of the interparticle distance. A theoretical model is developed that predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole surface pressure versus area dependence. An increase in the surface pressure upon aggregation of charged particles in the interfacial monolayers is experimentally established. This effect is explained by the developed theoretical model, which predicts that the surface pressure should linearly increase with the square root of the particle mean aggregation number. The effect of added electrolyte on the aggregation is also investigated. The data lead to the conclusion that ‘limited aggregation’ exists in the monolayers of charged particles. In brief, the stronger electrostatic repulsion between the bigger aggregates leads to a higher barrier to their coalescence that, in turn, prevents any further aggregation, i.e. negative feedback is present. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298437

  7. Cluster-cluster aggregations of superparamagnetic particles in a rotational magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Tomofumi; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the cluster-cluster aggregations of superparamagnetic particles in a rotational magnetic field numerically by the Brownian dynamics method, focusing on the cases of ϕ = 0.01 and 0.03 and Ma = 0, 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1, where ϕ is the area fraction of superparamagnetic particles and Ma is the Mason number, i.e., the ratio of viscous drag to magnetic force acting on a magnetic particle. We clarify the effect of ϕ and Ma on the cluster-cluster aggregation process from the point of view of dynamic scaling law.

  8. Scattering of aggregated particles illuminated by a zeroth-order Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Paul; Han, Yi Ping; Chen, Zhuyang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Wang, Jiajie

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the scattering of aggregated particles illuminated by a zeroth-order Bessel beam is investigated using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). The beam shape coefficients (BSCs) of the zeroth-order Bessel beam are computed rigorously using analytical expressions. Numerical results concerning the scattering properties of aggregated particles located on the propagation axis of the incident zeroth-order Bessel beam are presented. The influences of the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, the radius and the refractive index of the particles on the scattering pattern are discussed.

  9. Computer-aided generation and lung deposition modeling of nano-scale particle aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The study sets its main focus on the introduction of a random-walk-based model for the generation of variably shaped particle aggregates consisting of a predefined number of spherical components. With the help of a well-defined algorithm, the user is enabled to select between isodimensional, chain-like and platelet-like aggregates, for which related aerodynamic parameters (dynamic shape factors, volume-equivalent diameters, aerodynamic diameters) are determined automatically. The theoretical approach for random aggregate construction is directly connected with the previously developed stochastic particle transport and deposition model. Thereby, individually shaped aggregates may be provided for each random-walk scenario taking place in the almost realistic lung structure. Preliminary application of the aggregate generation model was carried out by assuming single components with a constant diameter of 1 nm and unit-density (1 g cm(-3)) and variably shaped aggregates consisting of 10, 100 and 1000 components. Inhalation of the aggregate-loaded aerosol into lungs of average size (FRC = 3300 mL) was supposed to take place under sitting, light-exercise and heavy-exercise conditions. Results obtained from deposition modeling clearly show that, independent of aggregate geometry, total deposition declines with increasing number of components included in the particulate construct, but experiences a continuous enhancement with rising inhalation flow rate. Among the predefined geometric categories, platelet-like aggregates are distinguished by lowest deposition and isodimensional clusters by highest. While isodimensional aggregates preferentially deposit in the extrathoracic and bronchial airways, chain-like and platelet-like aggregates exhibit a significantly increased tendency to hit the alveolar walls.

  10. Aggregation and colloidal stability of fine-particle coal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, P.R.; Rubin, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The aggregation and colloidal stability of colloidal coal suspensions in the presence of varying concentrations of hydrogen ions, neutral salts, and aluminum sulfate were investigated. Critical concentration and critical pH values for coagulation and stabilization were determined from turbidity changes during settling following aggregation. Two colloidal suspensions of a bituminous coal representing stability extremes due to oxidation were compared. In the absence of other coagulants, vigorous oxidation lowered the isoelectric point of the coal sol from pH 5.1 to pH 1.1 and the pH for stabilization from 7.5 to 2.6. The coagulation of the suspensions followed the Schulze-Hardy rule as hydrophobic sols although the oxidized coal sol was slightly less sensitive to neutral salts. The entire log aluminum sulfate concentration-pH stability limit diagram for the oxidized coal sol was established. The boundaries of settling of the coal in the presence of aluminum sulfate were similar to other hydrophobic sols except for small differences in alkaline solution. Regions of ionic coagulation, rapid coagulation due to enmeshment in aluminum hydroxide precipitate, and restabilization were also observed and delineated.

  11. Inhibitor of intramembranous absorption in ovine amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F

    2014-02-01

    Intramembranous absorption increases during intra-amniotic infusion of physiological saline solutions. The increase may be due partly to the concomitant elevation in fetal urine production as fetal urine contains a stimulator of intramembranous absorption. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in intramembranous absorption during intra-amniotic infusion is due, in part, to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is present in amniotic fluid. In late-gestation fetal sheep, amniotic fluid volume and the four primary amniotic inflows and outflows were determined over 2-day intervals under three conditions: 1) control conditions when fetal urine entered the amniotic sac, 2) during intra-amniotic infusion of 2 l/day of lactated Ringer solution when urine entered the amniotic sac, and 3) during the same intra-amniotic infusion when fetal urine was continuously replaced with lactated Ringer solution. Amniotic fluid volume, fetal urine production, swallowed volume, and intramembranous absorption rate increased during the infusions independent of fetal urine entry into the amniotic sac or its replacement. Lung liquid secretion rate was unchanged during infusion. Because fetal membrane stretch has been shown not to be involved and because urine replacement did not alter the response, we conclude that the increase in intramembranous absorption that occurs during intra-amniotic infusions is due primarily to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is normally present in amniotic fluid. This result combined with our previous study suggests that a nonrenal inhibitor(s) together with a renal stimulator(s) interact to regulate intramembranous absorption rate and, hence, amniotic fluid volume.

  12. Modeling the competition between aggregation and self-assembly during virus-like particle processing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yong; Chuan, Yap Pang; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2010-10-15

    Understanding and controlling aggregation is an essential aspect in the development of pharmaceutical proteins to improve product yield, potency and quality consistency. Even a minute quantity of aggregates may be reactogenic and can render the final product unusable. Self-assembly processing of virus-like particles (VLPs) is an efficient method to quicken the delivery of safe and efficacious vaccines to the market at low cost. VLP production, as with the manufacture of many biotherapeutics, is susceptible to aggregation, which may be minimized through the use of accurate and practical mathematical models. However, existing models for virus assembly are idealized, and do not predict the non-native aggregation behavior of self-assembling viral subunits in a tractable nor useful way. Here we present a mechanistic mathematical model describing VLP self-assembly that accounts for partitioning of reactive subunits between the correct and aggregation pathways. Our results show that unproductive aggregation causes up to 38% product loss by competing favorably with the productive nucleation of self-assembling subunits, therefore limiting the availability of nuclei for subsequent capsid growth. The protein subunit aggregation reaction exhibits an apparent second-order concentration dependence, suggesting a dimerization-controlled agglomeration pathway. Despite the plethora of possible assembly intermediates and aggregation pathways, protein aggregation behavior may be predicted by a relatively simple yet realistic model. More importantly, we have shown that our bioengineering model is amenable to different reactor formats, thus opening the way to rational scale-up strategies for products that comprise biomolecular assemblies.

  13. Impact of ozonation on particle aggregation in mature fine tailings.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiaming; Tumpa, Fahmida; Pérez Estrada, Leonidas; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2014-12-15

    The extraction of bitumen from the oil sands in Canada generates tonnes of mature fine tailings (MFT), consisting of a mineral matrix of sand, clay, and water, which without treatment requires thousands of years to fully consolidate. We assessed the performance of a novel ozonation method designed to enhance the settling of MFT and explored the mechanisms involved. The solid content of MFT obtained from oil sands tailings was adjusted to 1, 3, 5 wt % with water before applying 15, 30, and 60 min of ozonation. MFT settled after a short (15 min) ozonation treatment, resulting in a sample with clear released water on the top and condensed sludge at the bottom. The water chemistry characteristics, particles' surface charge and chemical bonding were measured. Ozonation led to the increased organic acids concentrations in MFT suspension through converting of organic matter from high to low molecular weight, and detaching organic coating on MFT particles. The pH and the concentrations of ions in the MFT suspension were changed significantly, an association of metal ions with MFT particles was promoted, and the surface charges of MFT particles were neutralized. Consequently, the MFT suspension was destabilized and MFT particle precipitation was observed.

  14. Mineral Particles Modulate Osteo-chondrogenic Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cell Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Yu, Xiaohua; Baker, Christopher; Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell aggregates offer an attractive approach to emulate embryonic morphogenesis and skeletal development. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based biomaterials have been shown to promote bone healing due to their osteoconductive and potential osteoinductive properties. In this study, we hypothesized that incorporation of CaP-coated hydroxyapatite mineral particles (MPs) within murine embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates could promote osteo-chondrogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrated that MP alone dose-dependently promoted the gene expression of chondrogenic and early osteogenic markers. In combination with soluble osteoinductive cues, MPs enhanced the hypertrophic and osteogenic phenotype, and mineralization of ESC aggregates. Additionally, MPs dose-dependently reduced ESC pluripotency and thereby decreased the size of teratomas derived from MP-incorporated ESC aggregates in vivo. Our data suggested a novel yet simple means of using mineral particles to control stem cell fate and create an osteochondral niche for skeletal tissue engineering applications. PMID:26597546

  15. Influence of Electrolyte Concentration on the Aggregation Of Colloidal Particles Near Electrodes in Oscillatory Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukosky, Scott; Saini, Sukhleen; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Micron-scale particles suspended in various aqueous electrolytes have been widely observed to aggregate near electrodes in response to oscillatory electric fields, a phenomenon believed to result from electrically induced flows around the particles. Most work has focused on a narrow range of ionic strengths. Here we demonstrate that an applied field causes micron-scale particles in aqueous NaCl to rapidly aggregate over a wide range of ionic strengths, but with significant differences in aggregation morphology. Optical microscopy observations reveal that at higher ionic strengths ( 1 mM) particles arrange as hexagonally closed-packed (HCP) crystals, but at lower ionic strengths ( 0.05 mM) the particles arrange in randomly closed-packed (RCP) structures. We interpret this behavior in terms of two complementary effects: an increased particle diffusivity at lower ionic strengths due to increased particle height over the electrode and the existence of a deep secondary minimum in the particle pair interaction potential at higher ionic strength that traps particles in close proximity to one another. The results suggest that electrically induced crystallization will readily occur only over a narrow range of ionic strengths.

  16. Lung lining liquid modifies PM(2.5) in favor of particle aggregation: a protective mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Tetley, Teresa D; Wigzell, Edward; Hutton, Bernie; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Luckham, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The health effects of particle inhalation including urban air pollution and tobacco smoke comprise a significant public health concern worldwide, although the mechanisms by which inhaled particles cause premature deaths remain undetermined. In this study, we assessed the physicochemical interactions of fine airborne particles (PM(2.5)) and lung lining liquid using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photon spectroscopy. We provide experimental evidence to show that lung lining liquid modifies the chemistry and attractive forces at the surface of PM(2.5), which leads to enhanced particle aggregation. We propose that this is an important protective mechanism that aids particle clearance in the lung.

  17. Polyions act as an electrostatic glue for mesoscopic particle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.; Sennato, S.

    2005-06-01

    Although complexation of charged particles induced by polyions of opposite charge is a well-known phenomenon, the possibility of obtaining equilibrium clusters stuck together by flexible polyions, which act as an electrostatic glue, is not completely recognized. In this Letter, we call attention towards the behavior of polyions in attaching together charged particles, by means of controlled electrostatic interactions. As an example, we present some features of equilibrium clusters composed of cationic liposomes built up by DOTAP and glued up by an anionic polyion, polyacrylate sodium salt. We discuss briefly some applications in nanostructure science and biotechnology.

  18. Frozen Fractals All Around: Aggregate Particles in the Plumes of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Kopparla, P.; Zhang, X.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll & Ewald (2011), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of large aggregates and spheres. The high mass plumes can be divided into a population of large aggregates with total particulate mass of 116 ± 12 × 103 kg, and a mixed population of spheres and aggregates consisting of a few large monomers that has a total plume particulate mass of 166 ± 42 × 103 kg, consistent with the results of Ingersoll & Ewald (2011). Meanwhile, the low particulate mass aggregate plumes have masses of 25 ± 4 × 103 kg, leading to a solid to vapor mass ratio of 0.07 ± 0.01 for the plume. If indeed the plumes are made of such aggregates, then a vapor-based origin for the plume particles is possible. The process of aggregate formation by the coagulation of monomers, which depends on the bulk monomer number density inside the plume vents, requires a total plume vent cross sectional area of at most 1800 m2 to allow for the aggregates to form before the monomers are ejected into space. Differentiation between the high mass and low mass solutions may be possible if forward scattering observations are taken at scattering angles <2°, or else an independent plume particulate mass measurement becomes available.

  19. The effect of particle aggregate shape on ultrasonic anisotropy in concentrated magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.; Kołodziejczyk, B.; Timko, M.; Skumiel, A.; Rajnak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of aggregate shape on the ultrasonic anisotropy in magnetic fluid was studied. Experimental results were compared with the theory of Ahuja and Hendee. Analysis of experimental results in terms of the theoretical model show the formation of ellipsoidal aggregates composed of several particles. The chain-like aggregates (h = b/a >> 1 a and b being minor and major axis lengths, respectively) are most conspicuous in diluted ferrofluids while dense ferrofluids are characterized by a more homogeneous drop-like (h = b/a > 1) structure. This finding is supported by some theoretical simulations.

  20. Fractal analysis of the effect of particle aggregation distribution on thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Cai, Jianchao; Hu, Xiangyun; Han, Qi; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Yingfang

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical effective thermal conductivity model for nanofluids is derived based on fractal distribution characteristics of nanoparticle aggregation. Considering two different mechanisms of heat conduction including particle aggregation and convention, the model is expressed as a function of the fractal dimension and concentration. In the model, the change of fractal dimension is related to the variation of aggregation shape. The theoretical computations of the developed model provide a good agreement with the experimental results, which may serve as an effective approach for quantitatively estimating the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids.

  1. Mineral particles modulate osteo-chondrogenic differentiation of embryonic stem cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Yu, Xiaohua; Baker, Christopher; Murphy, William L; McDevitt, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell aggregates offer an attractive approach to emulate embryonic morphogenesis and skeletal development. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based biomaterials have been shown to promote bone healing due to their osteoconductive and potential osteoinductive properties. In this study, we hypothesized that incorporation of CaP-coated hydroxyapatite mineral particles (MPs) within murine embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates could promote osteo-chondrogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrated that MP alone dose-dependently promoted the gene expression of chondrogenic and early osteogenic markers. In combination with soluble osteoinductive cues, MPs enhanced the hypertrophic and osteogenic phenotype, and mineralization of ESC aggregates. Additionally, MPs dose-dependently reduced ESC pluripotency and thereby decreased the size of teratomas derived from MP-incorporated ESC aggregates in vivo. Our data suggested a novel yet simple means of using mineral particles to control stem cell fate and create an osteochondral niche for skeletal tissue engineering applications. Directing stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis via biomaterials represents a novel strategy to promote cell fates and tissue formation. Our study demonstrates the ability of calcium phosphate-based mineral particles to promote osteochondrogenic differentiation of embryonic stem cell aggregates as well as modulate teratoma formation in vivo. This hybrid biomaterial-ESC aggregate approach serves as an enabling platform to evaluate the ability of biomaterials to regulate stem cell fate and regenerate functional skeletal tissues for clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices.

  3. Electromagnetic scattering of an aggregate of particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Paul; Wang, Jiajie; Han, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an analysis of scattering properties of aggregated particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam is implemented using GLMT. A theoretical treatment for an aggregate of particles illuminated by an arbitrarily incident beam is briefly presented, with special attention paid to the calculation of beam shape coefficients of a shaped beam. The theoretical treatment and the home-made codes are verified by making a comparison between our numerical results and those obtained using a public available T-Matrix code MSTM. Good agreements are achieved which partially indicate the correctness of both codes. Furthermore, some new numerical results concerning the scattered fields of aggregated particles illuminated by a focused Gaussian beam are presented.

  4. Aggregates in the strength and gravity regime: Particles sizes in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Ana H. F.; Albers, Nicole; Spahn, Frank; Seiß, Martin; Vieira-Neto, Ernesto; Brilliantov, Nikolai V.

    2012-08-01

    Particles in Saturn's main rings range in size from dust to kilometer-sized objects. Their size distribution is thought to be a result of competing accretion and fragmentation processes. While growth is naturally limited in tidal environments, frequent collisions among these objects may contribute to both accretion and fragmentation. As ring particles are primarily made of water ice attractive surface forces like adhesion could significantly influence these processes, finally determining the resulting size distribution. Here, we derive analytic expressions for the specific self-energy Q and related specific break-up energy Q★ of aggregates. These expressions can be used for any aggregate type composed of monomeric constituents. We compare these expressions to numerical experiments where we create aggregates of various types including: regular packings like the face-centered cubic (fcc), Ballistic Particle Cluster Aggregates (BPCA), and modified BPCAs including e.g. different constituent size distributions. We show that accounting for attractive surface forces such as adhesion a simple approach is able to: (a) generally account for the size dependence of the specific break-up energy for fragmentation to occur reported in the literature, namely the division into "strength" and "gravity" regimes and (b) estimate the maximum aggregate size in a collisional ensemble to be on the order of a few tens of meters, consistent with the maximum particle size observed in Saturn's rings of about 10 m.

  5. Specificity of Intramembrane Protein–Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Ernst, Andreas Max; Wieland, Felix; Brügger, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Our concept of biological membranes has markedly changed, from the fluid mosaic model to the current model that lipids and proteins have the ability to separate into microdomains, differing in their protein and lipid compositions. Since the breakthrough in crystallizing membrane proteins, the most powerful method to define lipid-binding sites on proteins has been X-ray and electron crystallography. More recently, chemical biology approaches have been developed to analyze protein–lipid interactions. Such methods have the advantage of providing highly specific cellular probes. With the advent of novel tools to study functions of individual lipid species in membranes together with structural analysis and simulations at the atomistic resolution, a growing number of specific protein–lipid complexes are defined and their functions explored. In the present article, we discuss the various modes of intramembrane protein–lipid interactions in cellular membranes, including examples for both annular and nonannular bound lipids. Furthermore, we will discuss possible functional roles of such specific protein–lipid interactions as well as roles of lipids as chaperones in protein folding and transport. PMID:21536707

  6. Impact of Sterilization Method on Protein Aggregation and Particle Formation in Polymer-Based Syringes.

    PubMed

    Kiminami, Hideaki; Krueger, Aaron B; Abe, Yoshihiko; Yoshino, Keisuke; Carpenter, John F

    2017-04-01

    The effects of sterilization methods on the storage stability of erythropoietin (EPO) in polymer-based syringes were assessed by quantifying protein oxidation, aggregation, and particle formation. Micro-particle counting and size exclusion chromatography coupled with a multi-angle light scattering detector demonstrated much lower levels of protein particles and aggregates for EPO stored for 12 weeks in steam-sterilized than in radiation (Rad)-sterilized syringes. Intermediate levels of damage were observed for EPO stored in ethylene oxide-sterilized syringes. HPLC analysis documented that the Rad-sterilized syringes caused increased oxidation of the protein during storage. In contrast, in the steam- and ethylene oxide-sterilized syringes EPO oxidation did not change. Analysis with electron spin resonance revealed that only Rad-sterilized syringes formed radicals in the syringe body, which persisted over the 12-week storage period. These results demonstrated that Rad-sterilization generated radicals in the syringes which in turn caused increased EPO oxidation, particle formation, and protein aggregation. Therefore, steam sterilization was shown to be a preferable sterilization method for the polymer-based syringe system when using biopharmaceutical drugs highly sensitive to oxidation, and particle formation and aggregation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Particles shed from syringe filters and their effects on agitation-induced protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2012-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that foreign particles shed from filters can accelerate the rate of protein aggregation and particle formation during agitation stress. Various types and brands of syringe filters were tested. Particle counts and size distribution (≥1 µm) in buffer alone or in solutions of keratinocyte growth factor 2 (KGF-2) were determined with a micro-flow imaging. Submicron particle populations were characterized by dynamic light scattering. Loss of soluble protein during filtration or postfiltration incubation was determined by ultraviolet spectroscopy and bicinchoninic acid protein assay. There was a wide range (from essentially none to >100,000/mL) in the counts for at least 1 µm particles shed into buffer or KGF-2 solution from the different syringe filters (with or without borosilicate glass microfibers). Filtration of KGF-2 with units containing glass microfibers above the membrane resulted in 20%-80% loss of protein due to adsorption to filter components. Filtration with systems containing a membrane alone resulted in 0%-20% loss of KGF-2. Effects of 24-h postfiltration incubation were tested on KGF-2 solution filtered with polyether sulfone membrane filters. Loss of soluble protein and formation of particles during agitation were much greater than that in control, unfiltered KGF-2 solutions. Similar acceleration of protein aggregation and particle formation was observed when unfiltered KGF-2 solution was mixed with filtered buffer and agitated. Particle shedding from syringe filters--and the resulting acceleration of protein aggregation during agitation--varied greatly among the different syringe filters and individual units of a given filter type. Our results demonstrate that nanoparticles and microparticles shed from the filters can accelerate protein aggregation and particle formation, especially during agitation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2016-01-01

    Oil–particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual–numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil–particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil–particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil–particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil–particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil–particle aggregation.

  9. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith

    2016-05-15

    Oil-particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual-numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil-particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil-particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil-particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil-particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil-particle aggregation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of particle collisions and aggregation on red blood cell passage through a bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2009-12-01

    Blood flow through bifurcating vessels in the microvasculature leads to uneven distribution of red blood cells (RBC) in the downstream channels when the channels have different sizes or the flow rates through the channels are different. This phenomenon, known as plasma skimming, is responsible for the large variation in hematocrit throughout the circulatory system. Furthermore, the strong streamline curvature present within bifurcations leads to frequent collisions between the blood elements (red and white blood cells and platelets) and the vessel walls, as well as a rearrangement of the distribution of the blood elements in the channels downstream of the bifurcation. Computational models of bifurcation flows typically neglect collision and adhesion of RBCs with each other. In this paper, we use a new type of discrete-element model to investigate the effect of particle-particle collisions and RBC aggregation on modeling of plasma skimming in bifurcations. Cases are examined with and without RBC adhesion and for different hematocrit values, including validation against previous computational results. Results show significant plasma skimming in the low-flow daughter branch and an increase in fractional particle flux with increased hematocrit, as in experimental studies. Accounting for particle-particle collisions leads to a considerable increase in collision rate of particles with the vessel wall. Particles are found to approximately follow fluid velocity streamlines, and consequently particle-particle collisions and aggregation do not significantly affect plasma skimming.

  11. Restructuring of plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates with arbitrary particle size distribution in pulsed laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, A. E.; Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.; Polyutov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied processes of interaction of pulsed laser radiation with resonant groups of plasmonic nanoparticles (resonant domains) in large colloidal nanoparticle aggregates having different interparticle gaps and particle size distributions. These processes are responsible for the origin of nonlinear optical effects and photochromic reactions in multiparticle aggregates. To describe photo-induced transformations in resonant domains and alterations in their absorption spectra remaining after the pulse action, we introduce the factor of spectral photomodification. Based on calculation of changes in thermodynamic, mechanical, and optical characteristics of the domains, the histograms of the spectrum photomodification factor have been obtained for various interparticle gaps, an average particle size, and the degree of polydispersity. Variations in spectra have been analyzed depending on the intensity of laser radiation and various combinations of size characteristics of domains. The obtained results can be used to predict manifestation of photochromic effects in composite materials containing different plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates in pulsed laser fields.

  12. Estimation of the Oblongness of Aggregates of Magnetic Particles Formed in Static Magnetic Field Using ESR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, Olga N.; Kovarski, Alexander L.; Dzheparov, Fridrikh S.

    2010-12-01

    Aggregation process in magnetic fluid has been investigated by electron spin resonance method. A low molecular paramagnet (paramagnetic sensor) has been added to magnetite hydrosol and its ESR spectra have been analyzed. Fraction of aggregated particles and aggregate oblongness have been calculated using new theoretical model for the ESR spectra of paramagnetic sensor in diluted magnetic media containing elongated structures.

  13. Primary particle size distribution of eroded material affected by degree of aggregate slaking and seal development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Primary particle size distribution (PSD) of eroded sediments can be used to estimate potential nutrient losses from soil and pollution hazards to the environment. We studied eroded sediment PSDs from three saturated soils, packed in trays (20 x 40 x 4 cm), that had undergone either minimal aggregate...

  14. Reversible Unfolding of Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro; Lemieux, M. Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Denaturant-induced unfolding of helical membrane proteins provides insights into their mechanism of folding and domain organization, which take place in the chemically heterogeneous, anisotropic environment of a lipid membrane. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane proteases that play key roles in various diseases. Crystal structures have revealed a compact helical bundle with a buried active site, which requires conformational changes for the cleavage of transmembrane substrates. A dimeric form of the rhomboid protease has been shown to be important for activity. In this study, we examine the mechanism of refolding for two distinct rhomboids to gain insight into their secondary structure-activity relationships. Although helicity is largely abolished in the unfolded states of both proteins, unfolding is completely reversible for HiGlpG but only partially reversible for PsAarA. Refolding of both proteins results in reassociation of the dimer, with a 90% regain of catalytic activity for HiGlpG but only a 70% regain for PsAarA. For both proteins, a broad, gradual transition from the native, folded state to the denatured, partly unfolded state was revealed with the aid of circular dichroism spectroscopy as a function of denaturant concentration, thus arguing against a classical two-state model as found for many globular soluble proteins. Thermal denaturation has irreversible destabilizing effects on both proteins, yet reveals important functional details regarding substrate accessibility to the buried active site. This concerted biophysical and functional analysis demonstrates that HiGlpG, with a simple six-transmembrane-segment organization, is more robust than PsAarA, which has seven predicted transmembrane segments, thus rendering HiGlpG amenable to in vitro studies of membrane-protein folding. PMID:27028647

  15. On the kinetics of chitosan/tripolyphosphate micro- and nanogel aggregation and their effects on particle polydispersity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Lapitsky, Yakov

    2017-01-15

    Submicron chitosan/tripolyphosphate (TPP) particles are widely investigated as nanocarriers for drugs, genes and vaccines. One of the key particle properties that requires control is their size distribution, which depends on the extent of chitosan/TPP primary nanoparticle aggregation into higher-order submicron colloids. To provide a better understanding of this higher-order aggregation process, this study analyzes the factors that control chitosan/TPP particle aggregation kinetics in the presence of free TPP (such as present during particle formation). The aggregation rates exhibit a sharp power-law decrease with the monovalent salt concentration and a power-law increase with the free TPP concentration. Moreover, the aggregation rates increase with the pH and with the chitosan degree of deacetylation (DD). These variations in aggregation rates reflect the effects of monovalent salt, TPP concentration, pH and chitosan DD on particle bridging by the surface-bound TPP. Furthermore, these aggregation rates are much faster than those predicted based on Derjaguin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) interaction potentials, which might reflect nonuniformities in particle shape and charge, and/or complications caused by particle softness. Finally, implications of the above aggregation kinetics on the uniformity of chitosan/TPP micro- and nanogel size are analyzed, where we: (1) show how particle polydispersity can be diminished by lowering the chitosan DD; and (2) explain the opposing results on how chitosan/TPP particle polydispersity is affected by monovalent salt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of the particle shape on the optical properties of black carbon aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorupski, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Small particles tend to connect to each other and create large geometries, namely aggregates. To simplify the light scattering simulation process, they are usually modelled as assemblies of spheres positioned in point contact. This is a rough approximation because connections between them always exist. In this work we present answers to the three following questions: which optical properties of fractal-like aggregates are strongly dependent on the particle shape, what is the magnitude of the relative extinction error σCext when non-spherical particles are modelled as spheres and whether the relative extinction error σCext is dependent on the aggregate size Np. The paper was aimed at tropospheric black carbon particles and their complex refractive index m was based on the work by Chang and Charalampopoulos. The incident wavelength λ varied from λ = 300nm to λ = 900nm. For the light scattering simulations the ADDA algorithm was used. The polarizability expression was IGT_SO (approximate Integration of Greens Tensor over the dipole) and each particle, regardless of its shape, was composed of ca. Nd ≍ 1000 volume elements (dipoles). In the study, fractal-like aggregates consisted of up to Np = 300 primary particles with the volume equivalent to the volume of a sphere with the radius rp = 15nm. The fractal dimension was Df = 1:8 and the fractal prefactor was kf = 1:3. Geometries were generated with the tunable CC (Cluster-Cluster) algorithm proposed by Filippov et al. The results show that when the extinction cross section σCext is considered, the changes caused by the particle shape, which are especially visible for longer wavelengths λ cannot be neglected. The most significant difference can be observed for the regular tetrahedron. The relative extinction error σCext diminishes slightly along with the number of primary particles Np. However, even when large fractal-like aggregates are studied, it should not be considered as non-existent. On the contrary

  17. Levitation, aggregation and separation of micro-sized particles in a Hydrodynamic Acoustic Sorter, HAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angelica; Bazou, Despina; Separation Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    Levitation, aggregation and separation of micron-sized particulate materials can be generated in a fluidic resonator by an ultrasonic standing wave field force. A piezoelectric transducer generates standing waves between the two walls of a parallel plate channel composing the resonator. The number of pressure nodes n is given by the relationship: w = nλ / 2 with λ the wavelength. The primary radiation force generated by the standing wave generates levitation of micron-sized particles driving them toward the nodal planes. An equilibrium position is reached in the channel thickness where the acoustic force balances the gravity force. The equilibrium position is independent on particle size but it depends on the acoustic properties. Once particles reach the equilibrium position, transversal secondary forces generate aggregation. We shall present the levitation and aggregation process of latex particles and cancer cells in a 2MHz resonator. We demonstrate the possibility of separating particles under flow in a Hydrodynamic Acoustic Sorter HAS, in function of their acoustic impedance and in function of their size using a programming field force.

  18. Volcanic Particle Aggregation: A Fast Algorithm for the Smoluchowski Coagulation Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, E.; Bagheri, G.; Bonadonna, C.

    2014-12-01

    Particle aggregation is a key process that significantly affects dispersal and sedimentation of volcanic ash, with obvious implications for the associated hazards. Most theoretical studies of particle aggregation have been based on the Smoluchowski Coagulation Equation (SCE), which describes the expected time evolution of the total grain-size distribution under the hypothesis that particles can collide and stick together following specific mathematical relations (kernels). Nonetheless, the practical application of the SCE to real erupting scenarios is made extremely difficult - if not even impossible - by the large number of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE) which have to be solved to study the typical sizes of volcanic ash (1 micron to 1 mm). We propose an algorithm to approximate the discrete solutions of the SCE, which can describe the time evolution of the total grain-size distribution of the erupted material with an increased computational efficiency. This algorithm has been applied to observed volcanic eruptions (i.e., Eyjafjallajokull 2010, Sakurajima 2013 and Mt. Saint Helens 1980) to see if the commonly used kernels can explain field data and to study how aggregation processes can modify the tephra dispersal on the ground. Different scenarios of sticking efficiencies and aggregate porosity have been used to test the sensitiveness of the SCE to these parameters. Constraints on these parameters come from field observations and laboratory experiments.

  19. Aggregate breakdown and surface seal development influenced by rain intensity, slope gradient and soil particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand Sajjadi, S.; Mahmoodabadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aggregate breakdown is an important process which controls infiltration rate (IR) and the availability of fine materials necessary for structural sealing under rainfall. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different slope gradients, rain intensities and particle size distributions on aggregate breakdown and IR to describe the formation of surface sealing. To address this issue, 60 experiments were carried out in a 35 cm x 30 cm x 10 cm detachment tray using a rainfall simulator. By sieving a sandy loam soil, two sub-samples with different maximum aggregate sizes of 2 mm (Dmax 2 mm) and 4.75 mm (Dmax 4.75 mm) were prepared. The soils were exposed to two different rain intensities (57 and 80 mm h-1) on several slopes (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20%) each at three replications. The result showed that the most fraction percentages in soils Dmax 2 mm and Dmax 4.75 mm were in the finest size classes of 0.02 and 0.043 mm, respectively for all slope gradients and rain intensities. The soil containing finer aggregates exhibited higher transportability of pre-detached material than the soil containing larger aggregates. Also, IR increased with increasing slope gradient, rain intensity and aggregate size under unsteady state conditions because of less development of surface seal. But under steady state conditions, no significant relationship was found between slope and IR. The finding of this study revealed the importance of rain intensity, slope steepness and soil aggregate size on aggregate breakdown and seal formation, which can control infiltration rate and the consequent runoff and erosion rates.

  20. Aggregate breakdown and surface seal development influenced by rain intensity, slope gradient and soil particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand Sajjadi, S.; Mahmoodabadi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Aggregate breakdown is an important process which controls infiltration rate (IR) and the availability of fine materials necessary for structural sealing under rainfall. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different slope gradients, rain intensities and particle size distributions on aggregate breakdown and IR to describe the formation of surface seal. To address this issue, 60 experiments were carried out in a 35 × 30 × 10 cm detachment tray using a rainfall simulator. By sieving a sandy loam soil, two sub-samples with different maximum aggregate sizes of 2 mm (Dmax2 mm) and 4.75 mm (Dmax4.75 mm) were prepared. The soils were exposed to two different rain intensities (57 and 80 mm h-1) on several slopes (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20%) each at three replicates. The result showed that for all slope gradients and rain intensities, the most fraction percentages in soils Dmax2 and Dmax4.75 mm were in the finest size classes of 0.02 and 0.043 mm, respectively. The soil containing finer aggregates exhibited higher transportability of pre-detached material than the soil containing larger aggregates. Also, IR increased with increasing slope gradient, rain intensity and aggregate size under unsteady state conditions because of less development of surface seal. However, under steady state conditions, no significant relationship was found between slope and IR. The findings of this study revealed the importance of rain intensity, slope steepness and soil aggregate size on aggregate breakdown and seal formation, which can control infiltration rate and the consequent runoff and erosion rates.

  1. Accretion of Fine Particles: Sticking Probability Estimated by Optical Sizing of Fractal Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, N.; Higuchi, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Sticking probability of fine particles is an important parameter that determines (1) the settling of fine particles to the equatorial plane of the solar nebula and hence the formation of planetesimals, and (2) the thermal structure of the nebula, which is dependent on the particle size through opacity. It is generally agreed that the sticking probability is 1 for submicrometer particles, but at sizes larger than 1 micrometer, there exist almost no data on the sticking probability. A recent study [1] showed that aggregates (with radius from 0.2 to 2 mm) did not stick when collided at a speed of 0.15 to 4 m/s. Therefore, somewhere between 1 micrometer and 200 micrometers, sticking probabilities of fine particles change from nearly 1 to nearly 0. We have been studying [2,3] sticking probabilities of dust aggregates in this size range using an optical sizing method. The optical sizing method has been well established for spherical particles. This method utilizes the fact that the smaller the size, the larger the angle of the scattered light. For spheres with various sizes, the size distribution is determined by solving Y(i) = M(i,j)X(j), where Y(i) is the scattered light intensity at angle i, X(j) is the number density of spheres with size j, and M(i,j) is the scattering matrix, which is determined by Mie theory. Dust aggregates, which we expect to be present in the early solar nebula, are not solid spheres, but probably have a porous fractal structure. For such aggregates the scattering matrix M(i,j) must be determined by taking account of all the interaction among constituent particles (discrete dipole approximation). Such calculation is possible only for very small aggregates, and for larger aggregates we estimate the scattering matrix by extrapolation, assuming that the fractal nature of the aggregates allows such extrapolation. In the experiments using magnesium oxide fine particles floating in a chamber at ambient pressure, the size distribution (determined by

  2. A Two-Level, Discrete Particle Approach for Large-Scale Simulation of Colloidal Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A.

    Most numerical techniques employed for aggregation simulation are based on equilibrium growth assumption and Smoluchowski theory. We present a new two-level discrete particle model, which can be employed in simulating large colloidal clusters in highly nonequilibrium physical conditions. We consider the system of colloidal particles (CP) interacting via conservative CP-CP repulsive-attractive two-body forces, which is initially mixed in a dissipative solvent. In order to obtain a high-resolution picture of colloidal dynamics, we employ around 20 million particles consisting of two kinds of particles. For bridging the spatio-temporal scales between nanoscale colloidal and the solvent particles (SP), the solvent is modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) fluid. We focus on the systems size for which the CP-SP interactions can also be described by the DPD forces. Unlike previous numerical techniques, the two-level particle model can display much more realistic physics, thus allowing for the simulation of aggregation for various types of colloids and solvent liquids in a broad range of conditions. We show that not only large and static clusters but also the initial stages of aggregation evolution can be better scrutinized. The large-scale simulation results obtained in two-dimensions show that the mean cluster size grows with time t according to the power law tκ. Because of the time-dependence of growth mechanism, the value of κ necessarily must change. We have first κ=1 with a value of 1 achieved asymptotically with time. We can also discern intermediate-scale structures. We emphasize that the method developed here can be easily extended to algorithms dealing with multi-level hierarchy and multiphase fluid dynamics.

  3. Enhanced fuzzy-connective-based hierarchical aggregation network using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Su, Chao-Ton

    2014-11-01

    The fuzzy-connective-based aggregation network is similar to the human decision-making process. It is capable of aggregating and propagating degrees of satisfaction of a set of criteria in a hierarchical manner. Its interpreting ability and transparency make it especially desirable. To enhance its effectiveness and further applicability, a learning approach is successfully developed based on particle swarm optimization to determine the weights and parameters of the connectives in the network. By experimenting on eight datasets with different characteristics and conducting further statistical tests, it has been found to outperform the gradient- and genetic algorithm-based learning approaches proposed in the literature; furthermore, it is capable of generating more accurate estimates. The present approach retains the original benefits of fuzzy-connective-based aggregation networks and is widely applicable. The characteristics of the learning approaches are also discussed and summarized, providing better understanding of the similarities and differences among these three approaches.

  4. The settling velocity of mineral, biomineral, and biological particles and aggregates in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Federico

    2013-04-01

    A new equation was developed to relate the size and settling velocity of particulate matter commonly recurring in aqueous ecosystems. This equation explicitly balanced the gravitational, buoyancy, viscous, and inertial forces as in Rubey () but was amended to describe in one instance both individual particles and granular aggregates with an internal fractal architecture. This approach allowed for an algebraic solution of the settling velocity, thus overcoming earlier approaches that required iterative numerical solutions. The equation was tested with mineral, biomineral, and biological suspended particles and granular aggregates from 52 existing experimental data sets, and resulted in average correlation coefficients R between 71% and 93.9%, and normilized residuals between 14.3% and 24.8% over Reynolds numbers ranging within 10-7 and 102. Accuracy of these results was generally better than for the Stokes' law, the Stokes' law modified with the Schiller-Naumann drag coefficient, and Rubey's equation. Estimated parameters ranged within observed ones, thus suggesting that the equation was robust. An analysis of the drag showed that inertial force was negligible only for biological cells (isolated cysts), whereas it contributed by not less than 5% to the drag on large mineral particles and up to 20% for biomineral and biological aggregates. Finally, a correlation was found between the organic matter content and fractal properties of granular aggregates, which were described by empirical equations proposed here for the first time. The hypothesis that the settling velocity is a function of linear and nonlinear drag, and is ultimately determined by physical characteristics as much as biological composition and internal aggregate geometry, is supported here by quantitative analyses.

  5. Multi-objective particle swarm optimization using Pareto-based set and aggregation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Song; Wang, Yan; Ji, Zhicheng

    2017-07-01

    Multi-objective optimization problems (MOPs) need to be solved in real world recently. In this paper, a multi-objective particle swarm optimization based on Pareto set and aggregation approach was proposed to deal with MOPs. Firstly, velocities and positions were updated similar to PSO. Then, global-best set was defined in particle swarm optimizer to preserve Pareto-based set obtained by the population. Specifically, a hybrid updating strategy based on Pareto set and aggregation approach was introduced to update the global-best set and local search was carried on global-best set. Thirdly, personal-best positions were updated in decomposition way, and global-best position was selected from global-best set. Finally, ZDT instances and DTLZ instances were selected to evaluate the performance of MULPSO and the results show validity of the proposed algorithm for MOPs.

  6. Electric conductivity and aggregation of anthracite and graphite particles in concretes

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Fanina; A.N. Lopanov

    2009-02-15

    A statistical model of the electric conductivity of a heterogeneous system based on coal and a binding agent is presented. In this system, a conductive phase appears because of particle aggregation. The model was tested in the systems of anthracite and graphite in cement stone. The consistency between the experimental and calculated electric conductivities with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 was found on a linear interpolation of model parameters. It was found that the presence of a surfactant (cetylpyridinium chloride) and a high-molecular-weight compound (polyvinyl acetate) changed the number of particles in anthracite and graphite aggregates to affect the specific conductivity of the heterogeneous system. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Self-organized anomalous aggregation of particles performing nonlinear and non-Markovian random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Sergei; Korabel, Nickolay

    2015-12-01

    We present a nonlinear and non-Markovian random walks model for stochastic movement and the spatial aggregation of living organisms that have the ability to sense population density. We take into account social crowding effects for which the dispersal rate is a decreasing function of the population density and residence time. We perform stochastic simulations of random walks and discover the phenomenon of self-organized anomaly (SOA), which leads to a collapse of stationary aggregation pattern. This anomalous regime is self-organized and arises without the need for a heavy tailed waiting time distribution from the inception. Conditions have been found under which the nonlinear random walk evolves into anomalous state when all particles aggregate inside a tiny domain (anomalous aggregation). We obtain power-law stationary density-dependent survival function and define the critical condition for SOA as the divergence of mean residence time. The role of the initial conditions in different SOA scenarios is discussed. We observe phenomenon of transient anomalous bimodal aggregation.

  8. Feeding on dispersed vs. aggregated particles: The effect of zooplankton feeding behavior on vertical flux.

    PubMed

    Koski, Marja; Boutorh, Julia; de la Rocha, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Zooplankton feeding activity is hypothesized to attenuate the downward flux of elements in the ocean. We investigated whether the zooplankton community composition could influence the flux attenuation, due to the differences of feeding modes (feeding on dispersed vs. aggregated particles) and of metabolic rates. We fed 5 copepod species-three calanoid, one harpacticoid and one poecilamastoid-microplankton food, in either dispersed or aggregated form and measured rates of respiration, fecal pellet production and egg production. Calanoid copepods were able to feed only on dispersed food; when their food was introduced as aggregates, their pellet production and respiration rates decreased to rates observed for starved individuals. In contrast, harpacticoids and the poecilamastoid copepod Oncaea spp. were able to feed only when the food was in the form of aggregates. The sum of copepod respiration, pellet production and egg production rates was equivalent to a daily minimum carbon demand of ca. 10% body weight-1 for all non-feeding copepods; the carbon demand of calanoids feeding on dispersed food was 2-3 times greater, and the carbon demand of harpacticoids and Oncaea spp. feeding on aggregates was >7 times greater, than the resting rates. The zooplankton species composition combined with the type of available food strongly influences the calculated carbon demand of a copepod community, and thus also the attenuation of vertical carbon flux.

  9. A model for wet aggregation of ash particles in volcanic plumes and clouds: 1. Theoretical formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    We develop a model to describe ash aggregates in a volcanic plume. The model is based on a solution of the classical Smoluchowski equation, obtained by introducing a similarity variable and a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in an aggregate. The considered collision frequency function accounts for different mechanisms of aggregation, such as Brownian motion, ambient fluid shear, and differential sedimentation. Although model formulation is general, here only sticking efficiency related to the presence of water is considered. However, the different binding effect of liquid water and ice is discerned. The proposed approach represents a first compromise between the full description of the aggregation process and the need to decrease the computational time necessary for solving the full Smoluchowski equation. We also perform a parametric study on the main model parameters and estimate coagulation kernels and timescales of the aggregation process under simplified conditions of interest in volcanology. Further analyses and applications to real eruptions are presented in the companion paper by Folch et al.

  10. Self-organized anomalous aggregation of particles performing nonlinear and non-Markovian random walks.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergei; Korabel, Nickolay

    2015-12-01

    We present a nonlinear and non-Markovian random walks model for stochastic movement and the spatial aggregation of living organisms that have the ability to sense population density. We take into account social crowding effects for which the dispersal rate is a decreasing function of the population density and residence time. We perform stochastic simulations of random walks and discover the phenomenon of self-organized anomaly (SOA), which leads to a collapse of stationary aggregation pattern. This anomalous regime is self-organized and arises without the need for a heavy tailed waiting time distribution from the inception. Conditions have been found under which the nonlinear random walk evolves into anomalous state when all particles aggregate inside a tiny domain (anomalous aggregation). We obtain power-law stationary density-dependent survival function and define the critical condition for SOA as the divergence of mean residence time. The role of the initial conditions in different SOA scenarios is discussed. We observe phenomenon of transient anomalous bimodal aggregation.

  11. An optical investigation of the geometric characteristics of aggregates formed by particles of magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokof'ev, A. V.; Pleshakov, I. V.; Bibik, E. E.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the dimensions of elements of a structure formed by particles of a colloidal solution of magnetite under the action of a magnetic field. The pattern observed in a thin layer of this fluid illuminated by a focused laser beam was characteristic of diffraction on the infinitely long dielectric cylinder that was used for determining the dimensions of separate aggregates. The obtained results proved to be well consistent with the values determined by means of optical microscopy.

  12. Particle-based simulation of ellipse-shaped particle aggregation as a model for vascular network formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palachanis, Dimitrios; Szabó, András; Merks, Roeland M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Computational modeling is helpful for elucidating the cellular mechanisms driving biological morphogenesis. Previous simulation studies of blood vessel growth based on the cellular Potts model proposed that elongated, adhesive or mutually attractive endothelial cells suffice for the formation of blood vessel sprouts and vascular networks. Because each mathematical representation of a model introduces potential artifacts, it is important that model results are reproduced using alternative modeling paradigms. Here, we present a lattice-free, particle-based simulation of the cell elongation model of vasculogenesis. The new, particle-based simulations confirm the results obtained from the previous cellular Potts simulations. Furthermore, our current findings suggest that the emergence of order is possible with the application of a high enough attractive force or, alternatively, a longer attraction radius. The methodology will be applicable to a range of problems in morphogenesis and noisy particle aggregation in which cell shape is a key determining factor.

  13. Bletilla striata Micron Particles Function as a Hemostatic Agent by Promoting Rapid Blood Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Zeng, Rui; Liao, Zhencheng; Fu, Chaomei; Luo, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The human body cannot control blood loss without treatment. Available hemostatic agents are ineffective at treating cases of severe bleeding and are expensive or raise safety concerns. Bletilla striata serve as an inexpensive, natural, and promising alternative. However, no detailed studies on its hemostatic approach have been performed. The aim of this study was to examine the hemostatic effects of B. striata Micron Particles (BSMPs) and their hemostatic mechanisms. We prepared and characterized BSMPs of different size ranges and investigated their use as hemostatic agent. BSMPs of different size ranges were characterized by scanning electron microscope. In vitro coagulation studies revealed BSMP-blood aggregate formation via stereoscope and texture analyzers. In vivo studies based on rat injury model illustrated the BSMP capabilities under conditions of hemostasis. Compared to other BSMPs of different size ranges, BSMPs of 350–250 μm are most efficient in hemostasis. As powder sizes decrease, the degree of aggregation between particles and hemostatic BSMP effects declines. The BSMP in contact with a bleeding surface locally forms a visible particle/blood aggregate as a physical barrier that facilitates hemostasis. Considering the facile preparation, low cost, and long shelf life of B. striata, BSMPs offer great potential as mechanisms of trauma treatment. PMID:28386291

  14. Modeling Aggregation Processes of Lennard-Jones particles Via Stochastic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Yakir; Cameron, Maria

    2017-07-01

    We model an isothermal aggregation process of particles/atoms interacting according to the Lennard-Jones pair potential by mapping the energy landscapes of each cluster size N onto stochastic networks, computing transition probabilities from the network for an N-particle cluster to the one for N+1, and connecting these networks into a single joint network. The attachment rate is a control parameter. The resulting network representing the aggregation of up to 14 particles contains 6427 vertices. It is not only time-irreversible but also reducible. To analyze its transient dynamics, we introduce the sequence of the expected initial and pre-attachment distributions and compute them for a wide range of attachment rates and three values of temperature. As a result, we find the configurations most likely to be observed in the process of aggregation for each cluster size. We examine the attachment process and conduct a structural analysis of the sets of local energy minima for every cluster size. We show that both processes taking place in the network, attachment and relaxation, lead to the dominance of icosahedral packing in small (up to 14 atom) clusters.

  15. The physical dimensions of amyloid aggregates control their infective potential as prion particles

    PubMed Central

    Marchante, Ricardo; Beal, David M; Koloteva-Levine, Nadejda; Purton, Tracey J; Tuite, Mick F

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible amyloid particles called prions are associated with infectious prion diseases in mammals and inherited phenotypes in yeast. All amyloid aggregates can give rise to potentially infectious seeds that accelerate their growth. Why some amyloid seeds are highly infectious prion particles while others are less infectious or even inert, is currently not understood. To address this question, we analyzed the suprastructure and dimensions of synthetic amyloid fibrils assembled from the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) prion protein Sup35NM. We then quantified the ability of these particles to induce the [PSI+] prion phenotype in cells. Our results show a striking relationship between the length distribution of the amyloid fibrils and their ability to induce the heritable [PSI+] prion phenotype. Using a simple particle size threshold model to describe transfection activity, we explain how dimensions of amyloid fibrils are able to modulate their infectious potential as prions. PMID:28880146

  16. Size distribution of particles in Saturn’s rings from aggregation and fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Brilliantov, Nikolai; Krapivsky, P. L.; Bodrova, Anna; Spahn, Frank; Hayakawa, Hisao; Stadnichuk, Vladimir; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Saturn’s rings consist of a huge number of water ice particles, with a tiny addition of rocky material. They form a flat disk, as the result of an interplay of angular momentum conservation and the steady loss of energy in dissipative interparticle collisions. For particles in the size range from a few centimeters to a few meters, a power-law distribution of radii, ∼r−q with q≈3, has been inferred; for larger sizes, the distribution has a steep cutoff. It has been suggested that this size distribution may arise from a balance between aggregation and fragmentation of ring particles, yet neither the power-law dependence nor the upper size cutoff have been established on theoretical grounds. Here we propose a model for the particle size distribution that quantitatively explains the observations. In accordance with data, our model predicts the exponent q to be constrained to the interval 2.75≤q≤3.5. Also an exponential cutoff for larger particle sizes establishes naturally with the cutoff radius being set by the relative frequency of aggregating and disruptive collisions. This cutoff is much smaller than the typical scale of microstructures seen in Saturn’s rings. PMID:26183228

  17. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanotin, Caroline; Puig, Jean; Neyret, Muriel; Marchal, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO2 particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity.

  18. Sintering of highly porous silica-particle samples: analogues of early Solar-System aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, T.

    2003-07-01

    I describe a new method to make particle layers which consist of SiO 2 spheres with 0.78 μm radius. The layers were produced by sedimentation of aggregates which had grown in ballistic particle collisions, and the layers had a porosity of 0.95. They were used for experiments on sintering, i.e., the samples were heated in an oven at varying temperatures and heating durations, and the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Based on the change of particle diameter, surface diffusion sintering and viscous flow are identified as important transformation mechanisms. The first effect dominated at the start of restructuring and the latter at higher temperatures. The neck growth of adjacent particles was fitted to a surface diffusion sintering model and predicts neck radii as a heating temperature and duration function. Between the temperature range of neck formation and of melting, further restructuring occurred which lead to dissolution of particulate structure and to densification and which resulted in a porous object consisting of straight elongated substructures which connected kinks of higher material density. The thermal transformation is important for the change of strength, collisional behavior, light-scattering properties, and thermal conductivity with relevance to dust aggregates, planetesimals, comets, interplanetary dust particles, and regolith-covered celestial bodies.

  19. Characterizing Scattering of PSD-Integrated Aggregate Ensembles using a Comprehensive Particle Scattering Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Olson, William; Tanelli, Simone; Haddad, Ziad; van Aartsen, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    We have constructed ~10,000 realistic snow particles, including both pristine and aggregate types, with maximum diameter spanning ~100 micron to 15 mm. The scattering property for each of these particles has subsequently been obtained using the open source discrete-dipole-approximation (DDA) code, DDSCAT, at thirteen (13) microwave frequencies ranging from 10 to 190 GHz. A scattering property database has thus been constructed to support precipitation remote sensing involving ice particles in the GPM era. Preliminary trial retrievals, utilizing radar and radiometer measurements from a field campaign and the GPM radar-radiometer combined algorithm currently under development, demonstrates that much better consistency between radar and radiometer is achieved when using scattering properties from this database rather than the ones derived with simplified assumptions. Although this scattering database, using more realistic particles and being more comprehensive in scope, represents a considerable stride forward in the advancement of solid-precipitation remote sensing, there are still important tasks to be accomplished in order to effectively use this database for practical retrievals. One of such tasks is to find parameters, preferably a very small number of them, that can adequately characterize the single-scattering properties for realistic ensembles of these particles, i.e. with realistic particle size distributions, of these particles. This study reports an approach that holds great promise in reducing the seemingly insurmountable complexity in the plethora of particle shapes into a few parameters.

  20. The single scattering properties of the aerosol particles as aggregated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Gu, X.; Cheng, T.; Xie, D.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Guo, J.

    2012-08-01

    The light scattering and absorption properties of anthropogenic aerosol particles such as soot aggregates are complicated in the temporal and spatial distribution, which introduce uncertainty of radiative forcing on global climate change. In order to study the single scattering properties of anthorpogenic aerosol particles, the structures of these aerosols such as soot paticles and soot-containing mixtures with the sulfate or organic matter, are simulated using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA) based on the transmission electron microscope images (TEM). Then, the single scattering properties of randomly oriented aerosols, such as scattering matrix, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), are computed using the superposition T-matrix method. The comparisons of the single scattering properties of these specific types of clusters with different morphological and chemical factors such as fractal parameters, aspect ratio, monomer radius, mixture mode and refractive index, indicate that these different impact factors can respectively generate the significant influences on the single scattering properties of these aerosols. The results show that aspect ratio of circumscribed shape has relatively small effect on single scattering properties, for both differences of SSA and AP are less than 0.1. However, mixture modes of soot clusters with larger sulfate particles have remarkably important effects on the scattering and absorption properties of aggregated spheres, and SSA of those soot-containing mixtures are increased in proportion to the ratio of larger weakly absorbing attachments. Therefore, these complex aerosols come from man made pollution cannot be neglected in the aerosol retrievals. The study of the single scattering properties on these kinds of aggregated spheres is important and helpful in remote sensing observations and atmospheric radiation balance computations.

  1. Electric-field-induced dielectrophoresis and heterogeneous aggregation in dilute suspensions of positively polarizable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acrivos, Andreas; Qiu, Zhiyong; Markarian, Nikolai; Khusid, Boris

    2002-11-01

    We specified the conditions under which a dilute suspension of positively polarizable particles would undergo a heterogeneous aggregation in high-gradient strong AC fields and then examined experimentally and theoretically its kinetics [1]. Experiments were conducted on flowing dilute suspensions of heavy aluminum oxide spheres subjected to a high-gradient AC field (several kV/mm) such that the dielectrophoretic force acting on the particles was arranged in the plane perpendicular to the streamlines of the main flow. To reduce the gravitational settling of the particles, the electric chamber was kept slowly rotating around a horizontal axis. Following the application of a field, the particles were found to move towards both the high-voltage and grounded electrodes and to form arrays of "bristles" along their edges. The process was modeled by computing the motion of a single particle under the action of dielectrophoretic, viscous, and gravitational forces for negligibly small particle Reynolds numbers. The particle polarization required for the calculation of the dielectrophoretic force was measured in low-strength fields (several V/mm). The theoretical predictions for the kinetics of the particle accumulation on the electrodes were found to be in a reasonable agreement with experiment, although the interparticle interactions governed the formation of arrays of bristles. These bristles were formed in a two-step mechanism, which arose from the interplay of the dielectrophoretic force that confined the particles near the electrode edge and the dipolar interactions of nearby particles. The results of our studies provide the basic characteristics needed for the design and optimization of electro-hydrodynamic apparatuses. The work was supported by a NASA grant. The suspension characterization was conducted at the NJIT W.M. Keck Laboratory. 1. Z. Qiu, N. Markarian, B. Khusid, A. Acrivos, J. Apple. Phys., 92(5), 2002.

  2. Shear-induced reaction-limited aggregation kinetics of brownian particles at arbitrary concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Gentili, Daniele; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-04-07

    The aggregation of interacting brownian particles in sheared concentrated suspensions is an important issue in colloid and soft matter science per se. Also, it serves as a model to understand biochemical reactions occurring in vivo where both crowding and shear play an important role. We present an effective medium approach within the Smoluchowski equation with shear which allows one to calculate the encounter kinetics through a potential barrier under shear at arbitrary colloid concentrations. Experiments on a model colloidal system in simple shear flow support the validity of the model in the concentration range considered. By generalizing Kramers' rate theory to the presence of shear and collective hydrodynamics, our model explains the significant increase in the shear-induced reaction-limited aggregation kinetics upon increasing the colloid concentration.

  3. A numerical model for aggregations formation and magnetic driving of spherical particles based on OpenFOAM®.

    PubMed

    Karvelas, E G; Lampropoulos, N K; Sarris, I E

    2017-04-01

    This work presents a numerical model for the formation of particle aggregations under the influence of a permanent constant magnetic field and their driving process under a gradient magnetic field, suitably created by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device. The model is developed in the OpenFOAM platform and it is successfully compared to the existing experimental and numerical results in terms of aggregates size and their motion in water solutions. Furthermore, several series of simulations are performed for two common types of particles of different diameter in order to verify their aggregation and flow behaviour, under various constant and gradient magnetic fields in the usual MRI working range. Moreover, the numerical model is used to measure the mean length of aggregations, the total time needed to form and their mean velocity under different permanent and gradient magnetic fields. The present model is found to predict successfully the size, velocity and distribution of aggregates. In addition, our simulations showed that the mean length of aggregations is proportional to the permanent magnetic field magnitude and particle diameter according to the relation : l¯a=7.5B0di(3/2). The mean velocity of the aggregations is proportional to the magnetic gradient, according to : u¯a=6.63G˜B0 and seems to reach a steady condition after a certain period of time. The mean time needed for particles to aggregate is proportional to permanent magnetic field magnitude, scaled by the relationship : t¯a∝7B0. A numerical model to predict the motion of magnetic particles for medical application is developed. This model is found suitable to predict the formation of aggregations and their motion under the influence of permanent and gradient magnetic fields, respectively, that are produced by an MRI device. The magnitude of the external constant magnetic field is the most important parameter for the aggregations formation and their driving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  4. Morphology, mechanical characterization and in vivo neo-vascularization of chitosan particle aggregated scaffolds architectures.

    PubMed

    Malafaya, Patrícia B; Santos, Tírcia C; van Griensven, Martijn; Reis, Rui L

    2008-10-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the performance of chitosan-based scaffolds produced by a particle aggregation method aimed to be used in tissue engineering applications addressing key issues such as morphological characteristics, mechanical performance and in vivo behaviour. It is claimed that the particle aggregation methodology may present several advantages, such as combine simultaneously a high interconnectivity with high mechanical properties that are both critical for an in vivo successful application. In order to evaluate these properties, micro-Computed Tomography (micro-CT) and Dynamical Mechanical Analysis (DMA) were applied. The herein proposed scaffolds present an interesting morphology as assessed by micro-CT that generally seems to be adequate for the proposed applications. At a mechanical level, DMA has shown that chitosan scaffolds have an elastic behaviour under dynamic compression solicitation, being simultaneously mechanically stable in the wet state and exhibiting a storage modulus of 4.21+/-1.04MPa at 1Hz frequency. Furthermore, chitosan scaffolds were evaluated in vivo using a rat muscle-pockets model for different implantation periods (1, 2 and 12 weeks). The histological and immunohistochemistry results have demonstrated that chitosan scaffolds can provide the required in vivo functionality. In addition, the scaffolds interconnectivity has been shown to be favourable to the connective tissues ingrowth into the scaffolds and to promote the neo-vascularization even in early stages of implantation. It is concluded that the proposed chitosan scaffolds produced by particle aggregation method are suitable alternatives, being simultaneously mechanical stable and in vivo biofunctional that might be used in load-bearing tissue engineering applications, including bone and cartilage regeneration.

  5. Aggregated Particle-size distributions for tephra-deposit model forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Durant, A. J.; Van Eaton, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The accuracy of models that forecast atmospheric transport and deposition of tephra to anticipate hazards during volcanic eruptions is limited by the fact that fine ash tends to aggregate and fall out more rapidly than the individual constituent particles. Aggregation is generally accounted for by representing fine ash as aggregates with density ρagg and a log-normal size range with median μagg and standard deviation σagg. Values of these parameters likely vary with eruption type, grain size, and atmospheric conditions. To date, no studies have examined how the values vary from one eruption or deposit to another. In this study, we used the Ash3d tephra model to simulate four deposits: 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens, 16-17 September 1992 Crater Peak (Mount Spurr), Alaska, 17 June 1996 Ruapehu, and 23 March 2009 Mount Redoubt volcano. In 158 simulations, we systematically varied μagg (1-2.3Φ) and σagg (0.1-0.3Φ), using ellipsoidal aggregates with =600 kg m-3 and a shape factor F≡((b+c)/2a)=0.44 . We evaluated the goodness of fit using three statistical comparisons: modeled versus measured (1) mass load at individual sample locations; (2) mass load versus distance along the dispersal axis; and (3) isomass area. For all deposits, the best-fit μagg ranged narrowly between ~1.6-2.0Φ (0.33-0.25mm), despite large variations in erupted mass (0.25-50 Tg), plume height (8.5-25 km), mass fraction of fine (<0.063mm) ash (3-59%), atmospheric temperature, aggregation mechanism, and water content between these eruptions. This close agreement suggests that the aggregation process may be modeled as a discrete process that is agnostic to the eruptive style or magnitude of eruption. This result paves the way to a simple, computationally-efficient parameterization of aggregation that is suitable for use in operational deposit forecasts. Further research may indicate whether this narrow range also reflects physical constraints on processes in the evolving cloud.

  6. The roles of intramembrane proteases in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Sibley, L David

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is widely conserved throughout different forms of life, with three major types of proteases being known for their ability to cleave peptide bonds directly within the transmembrane domains of their substrates. Although intramembrane proteases have been extensively studied in humans and model organisms, they have only more recently been investigated in protozoan parasites, where they turn out to play important and sometimes unexpected roles. Signal peptide peptidases are involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and signal peptide degradation from exported proteins. Recent studies suggest that repurposing inhibitors developed for blocking presenilins may be useful for inhibiting the growth of Plasmodium, and possibly other protozoan parasites, by blocking signal peptide peptidases. Rhomboid proteases, originally described in the fly, are also widespread in parasites, and are especially expanded in apicomplexans. Their study in parasites has revealed novel roles that expand our understanding of how these proteases function. Within this diverse group of parasites, rhomboid proteases contribute to processing of adhesins involved in attachment, invasion, intracellular replication, phagocytosis, and immune evasion, placing them at the vertex of host-parasite interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging roles for diverse intramembrane proteases in plant biology.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zach

    2013-12-01

    Progress in the field of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in recent years has made its impact on plant biology as well. Although this field within plant research is still in its infancy, some interesting observations have started to emerge. Gene encoding orthologs of rhomboid proteases, site-2 proteases (S2P), presenilin/γ-secretases, and signal peptide peptidases are found in plant genomes and some of these gene products were identified in different plant cell membranes. The lack of chloroplast-located rhomboid proteases was associated with reduced fertility and aberrations in flower morphology. Mutations in homologues of S2P resulted in chlorophyll deficiency and impaired chloroplast development. An S2P was also implicated in the response to ER stress through cleavage of ER-membrane bZIP transcription factors, allowing their migration to the nucleus and activation of the transcription of BiP chaperones. Other membrane-bound transcription factors of the NAC and PHD families were also demonstrated to undergo RIP and relocalization to the nucleus. These and other new data are expected to shed more light on the roles of intramembrane proteases in plant biology in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A review of the effects of particle types on oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Andrew; Yim, Un Hyuk

    2016-12-01

    Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate (OSA) can form naturally when oil and particles interact. The interaction between oil and suspended particulate matter makes oil less sticky, and facilitates its dispersion in the water column. The high oil-water surface contact enhances the biodegradation of oil and thus increases the efficiency of remediation processes. There are many factors that affect OSA formation, but, particle type is one of the most important. Because different particle types have different physical, chemical, and biological properties, their interactions with oil differ greatly. Particle properties such as interlayer spaces, hydrophobicity, surface charges, polarity, organic content, and size affect the interactions between materials and oil. These different interactions determine the type, buoyancy, size, and stability of OSA that forms, thus determining its fate in the environment. This review provides a current understanding of (1) OSA formation mechanisms, (2) sources and classes of marine materials, (3) oil-particle interactions, (4) material properties and their effects on oil interaction, and (5) future research needs.

  9. Formation of clumps and patches in self-aggregation of finite-size particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Darryl D.; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2006-08-01

    New model equations are derived for the dynamics of self-aggregation of finite-size particles. Differences from standard Debye-Hückel [P. Debye, E. Hückel, Zur Theorie der Elektrolyte: (2): Das Grenzgesetz für die Elektrische Leiftfahrigkeit (On the theory of electrolytes 2: limiting law of electrical conductivity), Phys. Z. 24 (1923) 305-325] and Keller-Segel [E.F. Keller, L.A. Segel, J. Theoret. Biol. 26 (1970) 399-415; E.F. Keller, L.A. Segel, J. Theoret. Biol. 30 (1971) 225-234] models are: (a) the mobility μ of particles depends on the locally averaged particle density and (b) linear diffusion acts on that locally averaged particle density. The cases both with and without diffusion are considered here. Surprisingly, these simple modifications of standard models allow progress in the analytical description of evolution as well as the complete analysis of stationary states. When μ remains positive, the evolution of collapsed states in our model reduces exactly to finite-dimensional dynamics of interacting particle clumps. Simulations show these collapsed (clumped) states emerging from smooth initial conditions, even in one spatial dimension. If μ vanishes for some averaged density, the evolution leads to the spontaneous formation of jammed patches (a weak solution with the density having compact support). Simulations confirm that a combination of these patches forms the final state for the system.

  10. The Effect of Surface Induced Flows on Bubble and Particle Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelcher, Scott A.; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Anderson, John L.; Boehmer, Marcel; Sides, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Almost 20 years have elapsed since a phenomenon called "radial specific coalescence" was identified. During studies of electrolytic oxygen evolution from the back side of a vertically oriented, transparent tin oxide electrode in alkaline electrolyte, one of the authors (Sides) observed that large "collector" bubbles appeared to attract smaller bubbles. The bubbles moved parallel to the surface of the electrode, while the electric field was normal to the electrode surface. The phenomenon was reported but not explained. More recently self ordering of latex particles was observed during electrophoretic deposition at low DC voltages likewise on a transparent tin oxide electrode. As in the bubble work, the field was normal to the electrode while the particles moved parallel to it. Fluid convection caused by surface induced flows (SIF) can explain these two apparently different experimental observations: the aggregation of particles on an electrode during electrophoretic deposition, and a radial bubble coalescence pattern on an electrode during electrolytic gas evolution. An externally imposed driving force (the gradient of electrical potential or temperature), interacting with the surface of particles or bubbles very near a planar conducting surface, drives the convection of fluid that causes particles and bubbles to approach each other on the electrode.

  11. Mineralogy of Stardust Track 112 Particle: Relation to Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, M.; Fagan, T.; Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Zolensky, M.; Ohsumi, K.

    2012-01-01

    The successful analysis of comet 81P/Wild 2 particles returned by the Stardust mission has revealed that the Wild 2 dust contains abundant silicate grains that are much larger than interstellar grains and appear to have formed in the inner regions of the solar nebula [1]. Wild 2 particles include minerals which are isotopically and mineralogically similar to CAIs [e.g., 2, 3] and chondrules [e.g., 4] in chondrites. In addition, particles similar to amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) also have been discovered [5, 6,7]. C2067,2,112,1 is a terminal particle recovered from track #112 (T112). Nakamura-Messenger et al. [7] showed that the forsterite grain in T112 has O-16 enrichment of approximately 40 0/00 (vs. SMOW) and possibly formed together with AOAs. In this study, we have examined the mineralogy of the T112 particle and compared the possible relationships between T112 and AOAs in primitive meteorites.

  12. The suborbital particle aggregation and collision experiment (SPACE): Studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  13. The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE): studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  14. An optical light microscopy study of aggregation of membrane tethered particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rädler, Joachim O.; Koltover, Ilya; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied the behavior of polystyrene latex beads tethered to giant phospholipid vesicle membranes via the covalent biotin-streptavidin bond. The vesicles were composed of mixtures of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with small amounts of biotinylated diheptanoyl phosphatidylethanolamin (DHPE-X-biotin). Giant vesicles with attached beads were observed by video-enhanced optical microscopy as a function of local vesicle curvature, membrane tension and temperature. We have found that the beads tend to aggregate at high curvature regions of the membrane above the phospholipid chain-melting temperature (i.e. on a fluid membrane). With increasing number of beads, large bead aggregates form even on spherical vesicles. In the latter case, larger bead aggregates are favored over a number of smaller ones. We compare our findings to recent theories of interactions between particles locally deforming the membranes. footnote Goulian et. al., Europhysics Letters, 1993, v.22, (no.2), 145-50. footnote Dan et. al., J. Phys II, 1994, v.4, (no.10), 1713-25.

  15. Imaging Chemical Aggregation of Ni/NiO Particles from Reduced NiO-YSZ

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2011-07-20

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping of nickel oxide yttria-stabilized zirconia (NiO-YSZ) was carried out after various hydrogen reducing and methane steam reforming conditions. Nickel aggregation was visualized after methane steam reforming by correlating Ni K{sub {alpha}} map with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. From the reduced O K{sub {alpha}} intensities in the Ni K{sub {alpha}} dominated regions after methane steam reforming, NiO reduction in to Ni can be interpreted. From correlation between Zr K{sub {alpha}} and O K{sub {alpha}} maps, high stability of YSZ was also realized. Examples of NiO-YSZ overlapped particles are considered to discuss chemical imaging of a single particle.

  16. A fluid-particle interaction method for blood flow with special emphasis on red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fluid-particle interaction algorithm using the distributed Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain method. The application of this method to the numerical investigation of motion and aggregation of red blood cells in two-dimensional microvessels is discussed. The cells are modelled as rigid biconcave-shaped neutrally buoyant particles. The aggregating force between two cells is derived from a Morse type potential function. The cell-cell interaction is coupled with the fluid-cell interaction through a time splitting scheme. Simulation results of multiple red blood cells in Poiseuille flow are presented. Because of its modular nature, this algorithm is applicable to a large class of problems involving the processes of particle aggregation and fluid-particle interaction.

  17. The Effects of Aggregation and Disaggregation on Particle Size Distributions and Water Clarity in the Coastal Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    The effects of aggregation and disaggregation on particle size distributions and water clarity in the coastal ocean Paul S. Hill Department of...of fine siliciclastics on water clarity in the coastal ocean. Scattering of light by suspended particles depends on sediment concentration...composition, and size distribution. Particle size distribu- tions in coastal waters are dynamic because high concentrations of suspended sediment in coastal

  18. Characterizing Single-Scattering Properties of Snow Aggregate Particles Integrated over Size Distributions in the Microwave Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K.; Van Aartsen, B.; Haddad, Z. S.; Tanelli, S.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 7000 snow aggregate particles have been synthesized, using a heuristic aggregation algorithm, from 9 realistic snowflake habits simulated using the now famous Snowfake ice crystal growth model. These particles exhibit mass-dimension relations consistent with those derived from observations. In addition, ranging from 0.1 to 3.5 mm in liquid-equivalent diameter, the sizes of these particle cover ranges wide enough for assemblies of realistic particle size distributions. The single-scattering properties, such as scattering/absorption/extinction/backscatter cross sections, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, as well as the scattering matrix, are obtained for each aggregate particle using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT at 13 microwave frequencies, ranging from 10 to 190 GHz. Preliminary radiative transfer calculations show that the single-scattering properties so obtained yield much more reasonable brightness temperatures than those derived from "fluffy sphere" Mie approximations. However, in order to achieve better retrievals involving these complex particles, we need to be able to characterize their single-scattering with only a few parameters. In this study, we present such an attempt using a pair of generalized effective radii, expressed as ratios of particle volume to particle surface area and to orientation-averaged particle cross section, in addition to mass content. It is shown that these effective radii are indeed effective in characterizing the PSD-integrated single-scattering properties of these complex particles. Pristine ice crystals simulated using the "Snowfake" ice crystal growth mode (3rd row from top) and example aggregates generated using the corresponding pristine particles (bottom 3 rows, i.e. 4th to 6th rows from top).

  19. Dissolution of hematite nanoparticle aggregates: influence of primary particle size, dissolution mechanism, and solution pH.

    PubMed

    Lanzl, Caylyn A; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Cwiertny, David M

    2012-11-13

    The size-dependent dissolution of nanoscale hematite (8 and 40 nm α-Fe(2)O(3)) was examined across a broad range of pH (pH 1-7) and mechanisms including proton- and ligand- (oxalate-) promoted dissolution and dark (ascorbic acid) and photochemical (oxalate) reductive dissolution. Empirical relationships between dissolution rate and pH revealed that suspensions of 8 nm hematite exhibit between 3.3- and 10-fold greater reactivity per unit mass than suspensions of 40 nm particles across all dissolution modes and pH, including circumneutral. Complementary suspension characterization (i.e., sedimentation studies and dynamic light scattering) indicated extensive aggregation, with steady-state aggregate sizes increasing with pH but being roughly equivalent for both primary particles. Thus, while the reactivity difference between 8 and 40 nm suspensions is generally greater than expected from specific surface areas measured via N(2)-BET or estimated from primary particle geometry, loss of reactive surface area during aggregation limits the certainty of such comparisons. We propose that the relative reactivity of 8 and 40 nm hematite suspensions is best explained by differences in the fraction of aggregate surface area that is reactive. This scenario is consistent with TEM images revealing uniform dissolution of aggregated 8 nm particles, whereas 40 nm particles within aggregates undergo preferential etching at edges and structural defects. Ultimately, we show that comparably sized hematite aggregates can exhibit vastly different dissolution activity depending on the nature of the primary nanoparticles from which they are constructed, a result with wide-ranging implications for iron redox cycling.

  20. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  1. Coupling adsorption and particle aggregation: Laboratory studies of colloidal pumping' using sup 59 Fe-labeled hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, B.D. ); Santschi, P.H. )

    1991-10-01

    {sup 59}Fe-labeled, spherical hematite particles not retained by filters because of their size coagulated to form aggregates, which were filter-retained. Batch systems containing hematite particles and a suite of radionuclides showed that, as the hematite coagulated, colloid-adsorbed radionuclide species were transferred from the colloid pool to the filter-retained particle pool. Sorptive equilibrium was rapidly achieved; thus, the rate-limiting step for the appearance of the radionuclides in the filter-retained particle pool was coagulation. The results indicate that, in many instances, slow sorption' kinetics may be due to a combination of particle aggregation and artifacts of incomplete phase separation. It is evident that what is an artifact in experimental systems can be an important process in natural aquatic systems. The results of this study therefore provide a framework for a better understanding of the role of coagulation coupled to sorption in regulating the fate of trace metals in natural systems.

  2. Structural and Functional Determinants of γ-Secretase, an Intramembrane Protease Implicated in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraering, Patrick C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of neurodegenerative diseases in humans, characterized by the progressive accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in brain regions subserving memory and cognition. These 39-43 amino acids long peptides are generated by the sequential proteolytic cleavages of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases, with the latter being the founding member of a new class of intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CliPs) characterized by their intramembranous catalytic residues hydrolyzing the peptide bonds within the transmembrane regions of their respective substrates. These proteases include the S2P family of metalloproteases, the Rhomboid family of serine proteases, and two aspartyl proteases: the signal peptide peptidase (SPP) and γ-secretase. In sharp contrast to Rhomboid and SPP that function as a single component, γ-secretase is a multi-component protease with complex assembly, maturation and activation processes. Recently, two low-resolution three-dimensional structures of γ-secretase and three high-resolution structures of the GlpG rhomboid protease have been obtained almost simultaneously by different laboratories. Although these proteases are unrelated by sequence or evolution, they seem to share common functional and structural mechanisms explaining how they catalyze intramembrane proteolysis. Indeed, a water-containing chamber in the catalytic cores of both γ-secretase and GlpG rhomboid provides the hydrophilic environment required for proteolysis and a lateral gating mechanism controls substrate access to the active site. The studies that have identified and characterized the structural determinants critical for the assembly and activity of the γ-secretase complex are reviewed here. PMID:19415127

  3. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Textor, C.; Graf, H. F.; Herzog, M.; Oberhuber, J. M.; Rose, William I.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2006-02-01

    The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption column of explosive eruptions has been observed at many volcanoes. It influences the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information on the processes leading to aggregate formation are still either lacking or very incomplete. We examine the fate of ash particles through numerical experiments with the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High resolution Atmospheric Model) in order to determine the conditions that promote ash particle aggregation. In this paper we describe the microphysics and parameterization of ash and hydrometeors. In a companion paper (this issue) we use this information in a series of numerical experiments. The parameterization includes the condensation of water vapor in the rising eruption column. The formation of liquid and solid hydrometeors and the effect of latent heat release on the eruption column dynamics are considered. The interactions of hydrometeors and volcanic ash within the eruption column that lead to aggregate formation are simulated for the first time within a rising eruption column. The microphysical parameterization follows a modal approach. The hydrometeors are described by two size classes, each of which is divided into a liquid and a frozen category. By analogy with the hydrometeor classification, we specify four categories of volcanic ash particles. We imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can be contained in all categories of hydrometeors, thus forming mixed particles of any composition reaching from mud rain to accretionary lapilli. Collisions are caused by gravitational capture of particles with different fall velocity. Coalescence of hydrometeor-ash aggregates is assumed to be a function of the hydrometeor mass fraction within the mixed particles. The parameterization also includes simplified descriptions of electrostatics and salinity

  4. The aggregation and diffusion of asphaltenes studied by GPU-accelerated dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sibo; Xu, Junbo; Wen, Hao

    2014-12-01

    The heavy crude oil consists of thousands of compounds and much of them have large molecular weights and complex structures. Studying the aggregation and diffusion behavior of asphaltenes can facilitate the understanding of the heavy crude oil. In previous studies, the fused aromatic rings were treated as rigid bodies so that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) integrated with the quaternion method can be used to study asphaltene systems. In this work, DPD integrated with the quaternion method is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs). Compared with the serial program, tens of times speedup can be achieved when simulations performed on a single GPU. Using multiple GPUs can provide faster computation speed and more storage space for simulations of significant large systems. By using large systems, simulations of the asphaltene-toluene system at extremely dilute concentrations can be performed. The determined diffusion coefficients of asphaltenes are similar to that in experimental studies. At last, the aggregation behavior of asphaltenes in heptane was investigated, and the simulation results agreed with the modified Yen model. Monomers, nanoaggregates and clusters were observed from the simulations at different concentrations.

  5. Random walks on finite lattices with multiple traps: Application to particle-cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.; Nord, R. S.

    1985-11-01

    For random walks on finite lattices with multiple (completely adsorbing) traps, one is interested in the mean walk length until trapping and in the probability of capture for the various traps (either for a walk with a specific starting site, or for an average over all nontrap sites). We develop the formulation of Montroll to enable determination of the large-lattice-size asymptotic behavior of these quantities. (Only the case of a single trap has been analyzed in detail previously.) Explicit results are given for the case of symmetric nearest-neighbor random walks on two-dimensional (2D) square and triangular lattices. Procedures for exact calculation of walk lengths on a finite lattice with a single trap are extended to the multiple-trap case to determine all the above quantities. We examine convergence to asymptotic behavior as the lattice size increases. Connection with Witten-Sander irreversible particle-cluster aggregation is made by noting that this process corresponds to designating all sites adjacent to the cluster as traps. Thus capture probabilities for different traps determine the proportions of the various shaped clusters formed. (Reciprocals of) associated average walk lengths relate to rates for various irreversible aggregation processes involving a gas of walkers and clusters. Results are also presented for some of these quantities.

  6. Setting limits for acceptable change in sediment particle size composition following marine aggregate dredging.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    In the UK, Government policy requires marine aggregate extraction companies to leave the seabed in a similar physical condition after the cessation of dredging. This measure is intended to promote recovery, and the return of a similar faunal community to that which existed before dredging. Whilst the policy is sensible, and in line with the principles of sustainable development, the use of the word 'similar' is open to interpretation. There is, therefore, a need to set quantifiable limits for acceptable change in sediment composition. Using a case study site, it is shown how such limits could be defined by the range of sediment particle size composition naturally found in association with the faunal assemblages in the wider region. Whilst the approach offers a number of advantages over the present system, further testing would be required before it could be recommended for use in the regulatory context. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural Characterization of IgG1 mAb Aggregates and Particles Generated under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Telikepalli, Srivalli N.; Kumru, Ozan S.; Kalonia, Cavan; Esfandiary, Reza; Joshi, Sangeeta B.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.

    2014-01-01

    IgG1 mAb solutions were prepared with and without sodium chloride and subjected to different environmental stresses. Formation of aggregates and particles of varying size was monitored by a combination of size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Nanosight Tracking Analysis (NTA), Micro-flow Imaging (MFI), turbidity, and visual assessments. Stirring and heating induced the highest concentration of particles. In general, the presence of NaCl enhanced this effect. The morphology of the particles formed from mAb samples exposed to different stresses was analyzed from TEM and MFI images. Shaking samples without NaCl generated the most fibrillar particles, while stirring created largely spherical particles. The composition of the particles was evaluated for covalent cross-linking by SDS-PAGE, overall secondary structure by FTIR microscopy, and surface apolarity by extrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. Freeze-thaw and shaking led to particles containing protein with native-like secondary structure. Heating and stirring produced IgG1 containing aggregates and particles with some non-native disulfide crosslinks, varying levels of intermolecular beta sheet content, and increased surface hydrophobicity. These results highlight the importance of evaluating protein particle morphology and composition, in addition to particle number and size distributions, to better understand the effect of solution conditions and environmental stresses on the formation of protein particles in mAb solutions. PMID:24452866

  8. Effect of PEG and mPEG-anthracene on tRNA aggregation and particle formation.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Arnold, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-09

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its derivatives are synthetic polymers with major applications in gene and drug delivery systems. Synthetic polymers are also used to transport miRNA and siRNA in vitro. We studied the interaction of tRNA with several PEGs of different compositions, such as PEG 3350, PEG 6000, and mPEG-anthracene under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the PEG binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on tRNA stability, aggregation, and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that PEG-tRNA interaction occurs via RNA bases and the backbone phosphate group with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. The overall binding constants of K(PEG 3350-tRNA)= 1.9 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), K(PEG 6000-tRNA) = 8.9 (±1) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(mPEG-anthracene)= 1.2 (±0.40) × 10(3) M(-1) show stronger polymer-RNA complexation by PEG 6000 and by PEG 3350 than the mPEG-anthracene. AFM imaging showed that PEG complexes contain on average one tRNA with PEG 3350, five tRNA with PEG 6000, and ten tRNA molecules with mPEG-anthracene. tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polymer concentrations, whereas it remains in A-family structure.

  9. Rapid detection of Aβ aggregation and inhibition by dual functions of gold nanoplasmic particles: catalytic activator and optical reporter.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee; Lee, Luke P

    2013-07-23

    One of the primary pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and its extracellular accumulation. However, current in vitro Aβ aggregation assays require time-consuming and labor-intensive steps, which delay the process of drug discovery and understanding the mechanism of Aβ induced neurotoxicity. Here, we propose a rapid detection method for studying Aβ aggregation and inhibition under an optimized acidic perturbation condition by dual functions of gold nanoplasmonic particles (GNPs): (1) catalytic activator and (2) optical reporter. Because of roles of GNPs as effective nucleation sites for fast-catalyzing Aβ aggregation and colorimetric optical reporters for tracking Aβ aggregation, we accomplished the fast aggregation assay in less than 1 min by the naked eyes. Our detection method is based on spontaneous clustering of unconjugated (unmodified) GNPs along with the aggregated Aβ network under an aggregation-promoting condition. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we employed the acidic perturbation permitting rapid cooperative assemblies of GNPs and Aβ peptides via their surface charge modulation. Under the optimized acidic perturbation condition around pH 2 to 3, we characterized the concentration-dependent colorimetric responses for aggregation at physiologically relevant Aβ concentration levels (from 100 μM to 10 nM). We also demonstrated the GNP/acidic condition-based rapid inhibition assay of Aβ aggregation by using well-known binding reagents such as antibody and serum albumin. The proposed methodology can be a powerful alternative method for screening drugs for AD as well as studying molecular biophysics of protein aggregations, and further extended to explore other protein conformational diseases such as neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Modelling the polarization properties of Comet 1P/Halley using a mixture of compact and aggregate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. S.; Paul, D.; Suklabaidya, A.; Sen, A. K.

    2011-09-01

    Both the in situ measurement of Comet 1P/Halley and the Stardust-returned samples of Comet Wild 2 showed the presence of a mixture of compact and aggregate particles, with both silicates and organic refractory being in the composition of the cometary dust. Results obtained recently from the Stardust mission suggest that the overall ratio of compact to aggregate particles is 65:35 (or 13:7) for Comet 81P/Wild 2. In the present work, we propose a model that considers cometary dust as a mixture of compact and aggregate particles, with a composition of silicate and organic. We consider compact particles as spheroidal particles and aggregates as both ballistic cluster-cluster aggregate (BCCA) and ballistic agglomeration with two migrations (BAM2) aggregate with a certain size distribution. The mixing ratio of compact to aggregate particles is taken to be 13:7. For modelling Comet 1P/Halley, the power-law size distribution n(a) ˜a-2.6, obtained from a re-analysis of the Giotto spacecraft data, for both compact and aggregate particles, is used. We consider a mixture of BAM2 and BCCA aggregates with a lower cut-off size of about 0.20 μ m and an upper cut-off of about 1 μ m. We also consider a mixture of prolate, spherical and oblate compact particles with an axial ratio (E) of 0.8-1.2 where a lower cut-off size of about 0.1 μ m and an upper cut-off of about 10 μ m are considered. Using a T-matrix code for polydisperse spheroids (0.1 μ m ≤a≤ 10 μ m) and superposition T-matrix code for aggregates (0.2 μ m ≤av≤ 1 μ m), the average simulated polarization curves are generated, which can best fit the observed polarization data at the four wavelengths: λ= 0.365, 0.485, 0.670 and 0.684 μ m. The suitable mixing percentages of aggregates obtained from the present modelling are 50 per cent BAM2 and 50 per cent BCCA particles, and the silicate-to-organic mixing percentages are 78 per cent silicate and 22 per cent organic, in terms of volume. The present model

  11. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2014-11-15

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Optical properties of the semi-external mixture composed of sulfate particle and different quantities of soot aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The effects of soot aggregate quantities on the optical properties of their semi-external mixture with sulfate host particle were investigated. In this study, the individual soot-containing mixtures were simulated as sulfate host point-contact attached to a specified amount of soot aggregates with the same monomer numbers and fractal parameters. The total numbers and volumes of soot monomers were also constant. Optical properties of this type of aerosol mixture were calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method (STM). The random-orientation averaging results indicated that the optical properties of the soot-containing mixtures may be influenced by the soot aggregate quantities. In these simulations, the absorption Ångström exponent (AÅE) values ranged from 0.9 to 1.1, which agree with the observations. The relative deviations of scattering Ångström exponent (SÅE) values between different numbers of soot aggregates attached to the surface of a sulfate host were upwards of ~11%. The results showed that the greater number of attached soot aggregates may lead to smaller SÅE values in the soot-containing mixtures. For most cases of simulated mixtures, a more compact morphology of soot aggregates, larger soot monomer radii and smaller soot volume fractions (Fsoot) may also generate smaller SÅE values. Moreover, in the visible range, the simulated scattering cross sections of soot-containing mixtures with two, three, four, and six soot aggregates (Df=1.8) were ~5%, ~10%, ~15%, and ~30% larger than those with only one soot aggregate, respectively, on the condition that volumes of soot and sulfate are comparable. However, these relative deviations between different numbers of attached soot aggregates on the scattering cross sections of mixtures may be weakened for larger volume of non-absorbing sulfate particle (<5% for the cases of Fsoot=1/10, sulfate volume is 9 times of soot).

  13. Presenilin-dependent intramembrane cleavage of ephrin-B1

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Taisuke; Tanaka, Sayaka; Morohashi, Yuichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Background Presenilin-dependent γ-secretase cleavage of several transmembrane proteins, including amyloid-β precursor protein and Notch, mediates the intramembrane proteolysis to liberate their intracellular domains that are involved in cellular signaling. Considering γ-secretase inhibitors as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease, understanding the physiologically and biologically important substrate for γ-secretase activity in brains is emerging issue. To elucidate the molecular mechanism and physiological role of γ-secretase, we screened candidate molecules for γ-secretase substrates. Results We show that ephrin-B1, that participates in cell-cell repulsive and attractive signaling together with its Eph receptor, constitutively undergoes ectodomain shedding and that the residual membrane-tethered fragment is sequentially cleaved by γ-secretase to release the intracellular domain. Furthermore, overexpression of membrane-tethered ephrin-B1 caused protrusion of numerous cellular processes consisted of F-actin, that required the preservation of the most C-terminal region of ephrin-B1. In contrast, soluble intracellular domain translocated into the nucleus and had no effect on cell morphology. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ephrin-B is a genuine substrate for γ-secretase and regulates the cytoskeletal dynamics through intramembrane proteolysis. PMID:16930449

  14. Bioinformatics perspective on rhomboid intramembrane protease evolution and function.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2013-12-01

    Endopeptidase classification based on catalytic mechanism and evolutionary history has proven to be invaluable to the study of proteolytic enzymes. Such general mechanistic- and evolutionary- based groupings have launched experimental investigations, because knowledge gained for one family member tends to apply to the other closely related enzymes. The serine endopeptidases represent one of the most abundant and diverse groups, with their apparently successful proteolytic mechanism having arisen independently many times throughout evolution, giving rise to the well-studied soluble chemotrypsins and subtilisins, among many others. A large and diverse family of polytopic transmembrane proteins known as rhomboids has also evolved the serine protease mechanism. While the spatial structure, mechanism, and biochemical function of this family as intramembrane proteases has been established, the cellular roles of these enzymes as well as their natural substrates remain largely undetermined. While the evolutionary history of rhomboid proteases has been debated, sorting out the relationships among current day representatives should provide a solid basis for narrowing the knowledge gap between their biochemical and cellular functions. Indeed, some functional characteristics of rhomboid proteases can be gleaned from their evolutionary relationships. Finally, a specific case where phylogenetic profile analysis has identified proteins that contain a C-terminal processing motif (GlyGly-Cterm) as co-occurring with a set of bacterial rhomboid proteases provides an example of potential target identification through bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. © 2013.

  15. The thermal aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles decreases its allergenicity for egg allergic patients and in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Claude, M; Lupi, R; Bouchaud, G; Bodinier, M; Brossard, C; Denery-Papini, S

    2016-07-15

    Most egg-allergic children can tolerate extensively cooked eggs. Ovalbumin, a major allergen in egg whites, is prone to aggregate upon heating. This study compares ovalbumin's allergenicity when it is aggregated as large particles to ovalbumin in its native form. Immunoglobulins (Ig)-binding and the degranulation capacities of native and aggregated ovalbumin were measured with sera from egg-allergic children and from mice sensitized to native or aggregated ovalbumin. The influence of ovalbumin structure on Ig production upon sensitization and elicitation potency by challenge was also studied. We showed that heat aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles enhances IgG production and promotes IgG2a production (a shift toward the T helper 1 profile). Aggregated ovalbumin displayed lower Ig-binding and basophil-activation capacities for sera from both allergic patients and mice. This work illustrates the links between ovalbumin structure after heating and allergenicity potential using parameters from both the sensitization and elicitation phases of the allergic reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of silver nanoparticle aggregates using single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-A; Lee, Byung-Tae; Na, So-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Ranville, James F; Kim, Soon-Oh; Jo, Eunhye; Eom, Ig-Chun

    2017-03-01

    The single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was applied to characterize the aggregates of AgNPs. was applied to characterize the aggregates of AgNPs. Two sizes of citrate-AgNPs and PVP-AgNPs were used at relatively high and predicted environmental concentrations under various ionic strengths. Citrate-AgNP aggregated with increases in the ionic strength, whereas PVP-AgNPs were sterically stable. The critical coagulation concentrations were 85 mM and 100 mM NaNO3 for 60 nm and 100 nm citrate-AgNPs at 2 mg L(-1) as total Ag obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS). At 2 mg L(-1) as total Ag, the mass of an aggregate gradually increased with increasing ionic strength for both citrate-AgNP during spICP-MS analyses. The average number of single particles derived from the mass in an aggregate was calculated to be 8.68 and 5.95 for 60 nm and 100 nm citrate-AgNPs at 85 mM and 100 mM NaNO3, respectively after 2 h. The mass fractal dimensions were determined to be 2.97 and 2.83, further implying that the aggregate structures were very rigid and compact. Only marginal increases in the average mass and number of single particles in the aggregate units were found during 24 h under environmentally relevant AgNP concentrations. The average number of single particles constituting an aggregate unit for 60 nm and 100 nm citrate-AgNPs was 1.24 and 1.37 after 24 h at a high ionic strength. These results indicate that under environmentally relevant conditions, the collision frequency is predominant in the aggregation and that NPs are likely to encounter natural colloids such as clay and organic matter to form hetero-aggregates.

  17. Aggregation Kinetics of Hematite Particles in the Presence of Outer Membrane Cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Anxu; Liu, Feng; Shi, Liang; Liu, Juan

    2016-10-06

    The aggregation behavior of 9, 36, and 112 nm hematite particles was studied in the presence of OmcA, a bacterial extracellular protein, in aqueous dispersions at pH 5.7 through time-resolved dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and circular dichroism spectra, respectively. At low salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of hematite particles in all sizes first increased, then decreased, and finally remained stable with the increase of OmcA concentration, indicating the dominant interparticle interaction changed along with the increase in the protein-to-particle ratio. Nevertheless, at high salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of all hematite samples gradually decreased with increasing OmcA concentration, which can be attributed to increasing steric force. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of OmcA-hematite conjugates was more correlated to total particle-surface area than primary particle size. It was further established that OmcA could stabilize hematite nanoparticles more efficiently than bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model plasma protein, due to the higher affinity of OmcA to hematite surface. This study highlighted the effects of particle properties, solution conditions, and protein properties on the complicated aggregation behavior of protein-nanoparticle conjugates in aqueous environments.

  18. Cluster-cluster aggregation with particle replication and chemotaxy: a simple model for the growth of animal cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, S. G.; Martins, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Aggregation of animal cells in culture comprises a series of motility, collision and adhesion processes of basic relevance for tissue engineering, bioseparations, oncology research and in vitro drug testing. In the present paper, a cluster-cluster aggregation model with stochastic particle replication and chemotactically driven motility is investigated as a model for the growth of animal cells in culture. The focus is on the scaling laws governing the aggregation kinetics. Our simulations reveal that in the absence of chemotaxy the mean cluster size and the total number of clusters scale in time as stretched exponentials dependent on the particle replication rate. Also, the dynamical cluster size distribution functions are represented by a scaling relation in which the scaling function involves a stretched exponential of the time. The introduction of chemoattraction among the particles leads to distribution functions decaying as power laws with exponents that decrease in time. The fractal dimensions and size distributions of the simulated clusters are qualitatively discussed in terms of those determined experimentally for several normal and tumoral cell lines growing in culture. It is shown that particle replication and chemotaxy account for the simplest cluster size distributions of cellular aggregates observed in culture.

  19. Assessment of optimum threshold and particle shape parameter for the image analysis of aggregate size distribution of concrete sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Murat; Guler, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Aggregate gradation is one of the key design parameters affecting the workability and strength properties of concrete mixtures. Estimating aggregate gradation from hardened concrete samples can offer valuable insights into the quality of mixtures in terms of the degree of segregation and the amount of deviation from the specified gradation limits. In this study, a methodology is introduced to determine the particle size distribution of aggregates from 2D cross sectional images of concrete samples. The samples used in the study were fabricated from six mix designs by varying the aggregate gradation, aggregate source and maximum aggregate size with five replicates of each design combination. Each sample was cut into three pieces using a diamond saw and then scanned to obtain the cross sectional images using a desktop flatbed scanner. An algorithm is proposed to determine the optimum threshold for the image analysis of the cross sections. A procedure was also suggested to determine a suitable particle shape parameter to be used in the analysis of aggregate size distribution within each cross section. Results of analyses indicated that the optimum threshold hence the pixel distribution functions may be different even for the cross sections of an identical concrete sample. Besides, the maximum ferret diameter is the most suitable shape parameter to estimate the size distribution of aggregates when computed based on the diagonal sieve opening. The outcome of this study can be of practical value for the practitioners to evaluate concrete in terms of the degree of segregation and the bounds of mixture's gradation achieved during manufacturing.

  20. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for morphology of nanoparticles and particle size distributions: comparison of the cluster-cluster aggregation model with the sectional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Kiminori; Matsukawa, Yoshiya; Saito, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Yohsuke; Aoki, Hideyuki; Era, Koki; Aoki, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Togo

    2015-06-01

    This study presents the validity and ability of an aggregate mean free path cluster-cluster aggregation (AMP-CCA) model, which is a direct Monte Carlo simulation, to predict the aggregate morphology with diameters form about 15-200 nm by comparing the particle size distributions (PSDs) with the results of the previous stochastic approach. The PSDs calculated by the AMP-CCA model with the calculated aggregate as a coalesced spherical particle are in reasonable agreement with the results of the previous stochastic model regardless of the initial number concentration of particles. The shape analysis using two methods, perimeter fractal dimension and the shape categories, has demonstrated that the aggregate structures become complex with increasing the initial number concentration of particles. The AMP-CCA model provides a useful tool to calculate the aggregate morphology and PSD with reasonable accuracy.

  2. Character, mass, distribution, and origin of tephra-fall deposits from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: highlighting the significance of particle aggregation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Kristi; Coombs, Michelle L; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Particle size data showing a preponderance of fine ash, even in the most proximal locations, along with the abundance of aggregate lapilli documented in most samples, confirms that particle aggregation played a significant role in the 2009 eruption and induced premature fallout of fine ash.

  3. Dispersion/Aggregation of polymer grafted nanorods in a polymer matrix studied by Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joao; Khani, Shaghayegh

    2015-03-01

    Nanorods are incorporated into polymer matrices for fabricating composite materials with enhanced physical and mechanical properties.The final macroscopic properties of the composites are directly related to the dispersion and organization of the nanoparticles in the matrix. For instance, a significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the nanorod-polymer composites is observed upon formation of a percolating network. One way of controlling the assembly of nanorods in the polymer medium is adjusting the chemical interactions which is done through grafting polymer chains on the surface of the rods. The recent developments in the computational techniques have paved the road for further understanding of the controlled dispersion and aggregation of nanorods in polymer matrices. In this study, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is employed in order to investigate the effect of enthalpic and entopic variables on the phase behavior of the abovementioned nanocomposites. In DPD, the interaction parameter between the components of the systems can be mapped onto the Flory-Huggins χ-parameter via well-known Groot-Warren expression. This works studies the effect of the enthalpic and entropic variables on phase transitions. The main goal is to provide a phase diagram than can be used to guide the experiments in designing new materials.

  4. Intramembrane protease RasP boosts protein production in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Neef, Jolanda; Bongiorni, Cristina; Goosens, Vivianne J; Schmidt, Brian; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2017-04-04

    The microbial cell factory Bacillus subtilis is a popular industrial platform for high-level production of secreted technical enzymes. Nonetheless, the effective secretion of particular heterologous enzymes remains challenging. Over the past decades various studies have tackled this problem, and major improvements were achieved by optimizing signal peptides or removing proteases involved in product degradation. On the other hand, serious bottlenecks in the protein export process per se remained enigmatic, especially for protein secretion at commercially significant levels by cells grown to high density. The aim of our present study was to assess the relevance of the intramembrane protease RasP for high-level protein production in B. subtilis. Deletion of the rasP gene resulted in reduced precursor processing and extracellular levels of the overproduced α-amylases AmyE from B. subtilis and AmyL from Bacillus licheniformis. Further, secretion of the overproduced serine protease BPN' from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was severely impaired in the absence of RasP. Importantly, overexpression of rasP resulted in threefold increased production of a serine protease from Bacillus clausii, and 2.5- to 10-fold increased production of an AmyAc α-amylase from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, depending on the culture conditions. Of note, growth defects due to overproduction of the two latter enzymes were suppressed by rasP-overexpression. Here we show that an intramembrane protease, RasP, sets a limit to high-level production of two secreted heterologous enzymes that are difficult to produce in the B. subtilis cell factory. This finding was unexpected and suggests that proteolytic membrane sanitation is key to effective enzyme production in Bacillus.

  5. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  6. A simplified model to predict the effects of aggregation on the absorption properties of soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2006-07-01

    An exact electrostatics formulation for sphere clusters is used to predict the Rayleigh-limit radiative absorption properties of soot aggregates. In the near to mid IR wavelengths, it is shown that aggregation can result in absorption cross sections that are significantly larger than that predicted by an independent-sphere (Rayleigh Gans) model. The relative increase in absorption increases with the number of spheres in the aggregate, and reaches an asymptote for aggregates containing 100 200 spheres. A simplified correlation is developed to predict the aggregate absorption cross section as a function of number of spheres and refractive index. Implications of the effects of aggregation on absorption and emission of thermal radiation by soot in flame and atmospheric environments are discussed.

  7. Particle coating-dependent interaction of molecular weight fractionated natural organic matter: impacts on the aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Shen, Mohai; Tan, Zhiqiang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-06-02

    Ubiquitous natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in the aggregation state of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aquatic environment, which determines the transport, transformation, and toxicity of AgNPs. As various capping agents are used as coatings for nanoparticles and NOM are natural polymer mixture with wide molecular weight (MW) distribution, probing the particle coating-dependent interaction of MW fractionated natural organic matter (Mf-NOM) with various coatings is helpful for understanding the differential aggregation and transport behavior of engineered AgNPs as well as other metal nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the role of pristine and Mf-NOM on the aggregation of AgNPs with Bare, citrate, and PVP coating (Bare-, Cit-, and PVP-AgNP) in mono- and divalent electrolyte solutions. We observed that the enhanced aggregation or dispersion of AgNPs in NOM solution highly depends on the coating of AgNPs. Pristine NOM inhibited the aggregation of Bare-AgNPs but enhanced the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs. In addition, Mf-NOM fractions have distinguishing roles on the aggregation and dispersion of AgNPs, which also highly depend on the AgNPs coating as well as the MW of Mf-NOM. Higher MW Mf-NOM (>100 kDa and 30-100 kDa) enhanced the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs in mono- and divalent electrolyte solutions, whereas lower MW Mf-NOM (10-30 kDa, 3-10 kDa and <3 kDa) inhibited the aggregation of PVP-AgNPs. However, all the Mf-NOM fractions inhibited the aggregation of Bare-AgNPs. For PVP- and Bare-AgNPs, the stability of AgNPs in electrolyte solution was significantly correlated to the MW of Mf-NOM. But for Cit-AgNPs, pristine NOM and Mf-NOM has minor influence on the stability of AgNPs. These findings about significantly different roles of Mf-NOM on aggregation of engineered AgNPs with various coating are important for better understanding of the transport and subsequent transformation of AgNPs in aquatic environment.

  8. A study of sedimentation and aggregation of volcanic particles based on experiments carried out with a vertical wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, G.; Bonadonna, C.; Manzella, I.; Pontelandolfo, P.; Haas, P.

    2012-12-01

    A complete understanding and parameterization of both particle sedimentation and particle aggregation require systematic and detailed laboratory investigations performed in controlled conditions. For this purpose, a dedicated 4-meter-high vertical wind tunnel has been designed and constructed at the University of Geneva in collaboration with the Groupe de compétence en mécanique des fluides et procédés énergétiques (CMEFE). Final design is a result of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations combined with laboratory tests. With its diverging test section, the tunnel is designed to suspend particles of different shapes and sizes in order to study the aero-dynamical behavior of volcanic particles and their collision and aggregation. In current set-up, velocities between 5.0 to 27 ms-1 can be obtained, which correspond to typical volcanic particles with diameters between 10 to 40 mm. A combination of Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) and statistical methods is used to derive particle terminal velocity. The method is validated using smooth spherical particles with known drag coefficient. More than 120 particles of different shapes (i.e. spherical, regular and volcanic) and compositions are 3D-scanned and almost 1 million images of their suspension in the test section of wind tunnel are recorded by a high speed camera and analyzed by a PTV code specially developed for the wind tunnel. Measured values of terminal velocity for tested particles are between 3.6 and 24.9 ms-1 which corresponds to Reynolds numbers between 8×103 and 1×105. In addition to the vertical wind tunnel, an apparatus with height varying between 0.5 and 3.5 m has been built to measure terminal velocity of micrometric particles in Reynolds number between 4 and 100. In these experiments, particles are released individually in the air at top of the apparatus and their terminal velocities are measured at the bottom of apparatus by a combination of high-speed camera imaging and PTV post

  9. High-Resolution Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging of Zeolite Aggregates within Real-Life Fluid Catalytic Cracking Particles**

    PubMed Central

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50–150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. PMID:25504139

  10. Evaluation of Incremental Siliconization Levels on Soluble Aggregates, Submicron and Subvisible Particles in a Prefilled Syringe Product.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shujun; Landsman, Pavel; Spencer, Andrea; DeCollibus, Daniel; Vega, Fabian; Temel, Deniz B; Houde, Damian; Henderson, Olivia; Brader, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of stability with respect to particles in prefilled syringes is complicated by the presence of silicone oil. The mobility, colloidal characteristics, and kinetic instability of silicone oil in contact with a protein formulation may be influenced in unpredictable ways by pharmaceutical variables, storage, and handling conditions. To provide insight into the impact of these variables on silicone oil originating specifically from the siliconized prefillable syringe (PFS), a series of studies were conducted at incremental syringe barrel siliconization levels. Size-exclusion chromatography and particle counting methods were used to quantitate soluble aggregates and submicron and subvisible particles in peginterferon beta-1a in a PFS siliconized with a fixed nozzle spray-on siliconization process. The effect of silicone oil on the peginterferon beta-1a molecule was examined under pharmaceutically relevant conditions, accelerated degradation, and under denaturing conditions. Resonant mass measurement was used to discriminate silicone oil from protein particles establishing that silicone oil does not mask adverse trends in non-silicone oil particles. The peginterferon beta-1a molecule was shown to be stable in the presence of silicone oil and robust with respect to the formation of soluble aggregates and submicron and subvisible particles in its PFS siliconized over the range of 0-1.2 mg silicone oil per syringe barrel.

  11. A review of the terms agglomerate and aggregate with a recommendation for nomenclature used in powder and particle characterization.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gary; Byard, Stephen; Bloxham, Mark J; Botterill, Joanne; Dawson, Neil J; Dennis, Andrew; Diart, Valerie; North, Nigel C; Sherwood, John D

    2002-10-01

    The terms "agglomerate" and "aggregate" are widely used by powder technologists to describe assemblages of particles that are found in dry powders and powders in liquid suspensions. Each term has a specific meaning but, unfortunately, they are frequently interchanged at will and this has resulted in universal confusion. This confusion is perpetuated by conflicting definitions in national and international standards and this presents problems when describing powder properties or communicating results in reports and research papers. This paper reviews the current status of the definitions, with particular emphasis on their use in the pharmaceutical industry. It is proposed that just one term, agglomerate, should be used to describe an assemblage of particles in a powder and that the term aggregate should be confined to pre-nucleation structures. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association

  12. Elastic and quasielastic light-scattering studies of the aggregation phenomena in water solutions of polystyrene particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majolino, D.; Mallamace, F.; Migliardo, P.; Micali, N.; Vasi, C.

    1989-10-01

    We report measurements on the aggregation processes in a colloidal solution of polystyrene particles performed by elastic (intensity) and quasielastic light scattering. In order to observe the different kinetics of aggregation of the system, reversible flocculation, and the slow and the fast irreversible coagulation, the experiment was made varying the concentration of a simple electrolyte (NaCl) in the 0.01-3 mol/liter range. Intensity data give direct information that aggregated clusters are built with fractal structure and different kinetics; in the slow regime the aggregation process is reaction limited, whereas in the raft regime we have a diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. Dynamical data, showing well-defined scaling behavior in the measured mean linewidth, confirm such a picture and give a rough estimate of the cluster dimension. Experimental results are consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory on colloidal stability [Derjaguin and Landau, Acta Phys. Chim. Debricina 14, 633 (1941); Verwey and Overbeek, Theory of the Stability of Lyophobic Colloids (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1948)].

  13. Platelet-adenovirus vs. inert particles interaction: effect on aggregation and the role of platelet membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Gupalo, Elena; Kuk, Cynthia; Qadura, Mohammad; Buriachkovskaia, Liudmila; Othman, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are involved in host defense via clearance of bacteria from the circulation, interaction with virus particles, and uptake of various size particulates. There is a growing interest in micro- and nanoparticles for drug delivery and there is evidence that the properties of these particles critically influence their interaction and uptake by various tissues and cells including platelets. Virus mediated gene therapy applications are still challenged by the resultant thrombocytopenia and the mechanism(s) of platelet-foreign particles interaction remains unclear. We studied the specifics of platelet interaction with an active biological agent (adenovirus) and inert latex microspheres (MS) and investigated the role of platelet proteins in this interaction. We show that activated and not resting platelets internalize MS, without influencing platelet aggregation. In contrast, adenovirus induces and potentiates ADP-induced platelet aggregation and results in rapid expression of P-selectin. Platelets then internalize adenovirus and viral particles appear inside the open canalicular system. Inhibition of platelet αIIbβ3, GPIbα, and P-selectin decreases both platelet aggregation and internalization of MS. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 and αVβ3 does not abolish adenovirus platelet internalization and adenovirus-induced platelet activation is maintained. Our study demonstrates that platelets react differentially with foreign particles and that αIIbβ3 is a key player in platelet engulfing of foreign particles but not in mediating adenovirus internalization. Other platelet candidate molecules remain to be investigated as potential targets for management of adenovirus-induced thrombocytopenia.

  14. Simultaneous interfacial rheology and microstructure measurement of densely aggregated particle laden interfaces using a modified double wall ring interfacial rheometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2014-08-19

    The study of particle laden interfaces has increased significantly due to the increasing industrial use of particle stabilized foams and Pickering emulsions, whose bulk rheology and stability are highly dependent on particle laden interface's interfacial rheology, which is a function of interfacial microstructure. To understand the physical mechanisms that dictate interfacial rheology of particle laden interfaces requires correlating rheology to microstructure. To achieve this goal, a double wall ring interfacial rheometer has been modified to allow real time, simultaneous interfacial visualization and shear rheology measurements. The development of this tool is outlined, and its ability to provide novel and unique measurements is demonstrated on a sample system. This tool has been used to examine the role of microstructure on the steady shear rheology of densely packed, aggregated particle laden interfaces at three surface concentrations. Through examination of the rheology and analysis of interfacial microstructure response to shear, a transition from shear thinning due to aggregated cluster breakup to yielding at a slip plane within the interface has been identified. Interestingly, it is found that aggregated interfaces transition to yielding well before they reached a jammed state. Furthermore, these systems undergo significant shear induced order when densely packed. These results indicate that the mechanics of these interfaces are not simply jammed or unjammed and that the interfacial rheology relationship with microstructure can give us significant insight into understanding how to engineer particle laden interfaces in the future. By examining both rheology and microstructure, the mechanisms that dictate observed rheology are now understood and can be used to predict and control the rheology of the interface.

  15. Fractal Analysis of Aggregates of Non-Uniformly Sized Particles: AN Application to Macaque Monkey Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. I.; Hof, P. R.; Rothnie, P.; Wearne, S. L.

    A variant of the cumulative mass method is developed for measuring the multi-fractal dimension spectrum of three-dimensional aggregates composed of particles of different sizes. The method is applied to measuring the mass fractal dimensions of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex of macaque monkeys, digitized with standard 3-dimensional tracing software. Fractal dimension estimates obtained from our approach are found to be useful for distinguishing two functionally different neuronal types which are visually similar.

  16. Effect of aggregation, morphology and mixing state on optical properties of bare and internally mixed Black Carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarnato, Barbara; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a small, dark particle that warms Earth's climate. BC is a distinct type of carbonaceous aerosol particle, product of combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Upon emission into the atmosphere, BC internally mixes with other aerosol compounds. According to recent studies, internal mixing of BC with other aerosol materials in the atmosphere alters its aggregate shape, absorption of solar radiation, and radiative forcing. These mixing state effects are not yet fully understood. Laboratory and field studies have identified a strong variability in the observed absorption efficiencies of internally mixed BC. Additionally, there is a discrepancy between modeled and measured values using traditional modeling approaches. This talk will investigate the central role of parameterization of light interaction by BC particles in the assessment of its radiative forcing and present a sensitivity study of the effect of aggregation, morphology and mixing state on optical properties of bare and internally mixed BC with mineral dust, ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and others. Optical properties of the different mixtures, sampled both in field campaigns and laboratory environment, are computed using Discrete Dipole Approximation model in accordance with BC aggregation, morphology and mixing observed at microscopes. The results of this work are relevant for several applications in atmospheric science, including but not limited to radiative transfer calculations, regional and global climate modeling and, the interpretation of remote sensing measurements.

  17. Importance of aggregation and small ice crystals in cirrus clouds, based on observations and an ice particle growth model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David L.; Chai, Steven K.; Dong, Yayi; Arnott, W. Patrick; Hallett, John

    1993-01-01

    The 1 November 1986 FIRE I case study was used to test an ice particle growth model which predicts bimodal size spectra in cirrus clouds. The model was developed from an analytically based model which predicts the height evolution of monomodal ice particle size spectra from the measured ice water content (IWC). Size spectra from the monomodal model are represented by a gamma distribution, N(D) = N(sub o)D(exp nu)exp(-lambda D), where D = ice particle maximum dimension. The slope parameter, lambda, and the parameter N(sub o) are predicted from the IWC through the growth processes of vapor diffusion and aggregation. The model formulation is analytical, computationally efficient, and well suited for incorporation into larger models. The monomodal model has been validated against two other cirrus cloud case studies. From the monomodal size spectra, the size distributions which determine concentrations of ice particles less than about 150 mu m are predicted.

  18. Regulation of intramembranous absorption and amniotic fluid volume by constituents in fetal sheep urine

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Sonnet S.; Louey, Samantha; Cheung, Cecilia Y.; Brace, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to test the hypothesis that fetal urine contains a substance(s) that regulates amniotic fluid volume by altering the rate of intramembranous absorption of amniotic fluid. In late gestation ovine fetuses, amniotic fluid volumes, urine, and lung liquid production rates, swallowed volumes and intramembranous volume and solute absorption rates were measured over 2-day periods under control conditions and when urine was removed and continuously replaced at an equal rate with exogenous fluid. Intramembranous volume absorption rate decreased by 40% when urine was replaced with lactated Ringer solution or lactated Ringer solution diluted 50% with water. Amniotic fluid volume doubled under both conditions. Analysis of the intramembranous sodium and chloride fluxes suggests that the active but not passive component of intramembranous volume absorption was altered by urine replacement, whereas both active and passive components of solute fluxes were altered. We conclude that fetal urine contains an unidentified substance(s) that stimulates active intramembranous transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion into the underlying fetal vasculature and thereby functions as a regulator of amniotic fluid volume. PMID:23824958

  19. Mass-Mobility Characterization of Flame-made ZrO2 Aerosols: Primary Particle Diameter & Extent of Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Eggersdorfer, M.L.; Gröhn, A.J.; Sorensen, C.M.; McMurry, P.H.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-borne nanoparticles undergoing coagulation and sintering form irregular or fractal-like structures affecting their transport, light scattering, effective surface area and density. Here, zirconia (ZrO2) nanoparticles are generated by scalable spray combustion, and their mobility diameter and mass are obtained nearly in-situ by differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and aerosol particle mass (APM) measurements. Using these data, the density of ZrO2 and a power law between mobility and primary particle diameters, the structure of fractal-like particles is determined (mass-mobility exponent, prefactor and average number and surface area mean diameter of primary particles, dva). The dva determined by DMA-APM measurements and this power law is in good agreement with the dva obtained by ex-situ nitrogen adsorption and microscopic analysis. Using this combination of measurements and above power law, the effect of flame spray process parameters (e.g. precursor solution and oxygen flow rate as well as zirconium concentration) on fractal-like particle structure characteristics is investigated in detail. This reveals that predominantly agglomerates (physically-bonded particles) and aggregates (chemically- or sinter-bonded particles) of nanoparticles are formed at low and high particle concentrations, respectively. PMID:22959835

  20. Mass-mobility characterization of flame-made ZrO2 aerosols: primary particle diameter and extent of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, M L; Gröhn, A J; Sorensen, C M; McMurry, P H; Pratsinis, S E

    2012-12-01

    Gas-borne nanoparticles undergoing coagulation and sintering form irregular or fractal-like structures affecting their transport, light scattering, effective surface area, and density. Here, zirconia (ZrO(2)) nanoparticles are generated by scalable spray combustion, and their mobility diameter and mass are obtained nearly in situ by differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and aerosol particle mass (APM) measurements. Using these data, the density of ZrO(2) and a power law between mobility and primary particle diameters, the structure of fractal-like particles is determined (mass-mobility exponent, prefactor and average number, and surface area mean diameter of primary particles, d(va)). The d(va) determined by DMA-APM measurements and this power law is in good agreement with the d(va) obtained by ex situ nitrogen adsorption and microscopic analysis. Using this combination of measurements and above power law, the effect of flame spray process parameters (e.g., precursor solution and oxygen flow rate as well as zirconium concentration) on fractal-like particle structure characteristics is investigated in detail. This reveals that predominantly agglomerates (physically-bonded particles) and aggregates (chemically- or sinter-bonded particles) of nanoparticles are formed at low and high particle concentrations, respectively.

  1. A role for a Hevea latex lectin-like protein in mediating rubber particle aggregation and latex coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun; Pasitkul, Piyaporn; Kanokwiroon, Kamonwan; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos

    2008-01-01

    An in vitro aggregation of washed lutoid membrane and rubber particles, respectively, prepared from the bottom (lutoid) fraction and rubber layer of centrifuged fresh latex, leading to the formation of rubber coagulum necessary for a latex coagulation was demonstrated. A Triton X-100 extract of washed lutoid membrane proteins, isolated and prepared from the bottom fraction of centrifuged fresh latex was examined for its role in the latex coagulation process. It induced agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes, indicating the presence of a lectin-like protein. Hevea latex lectin-like protein (HLL) was purified to homogeneity by active chitin binding separation, followed by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. Its M(r) analyzed by SDS-PAGE was 17 kDa, whereas that determined by gel filtration was 267 kDa. The HLL had a pI value of 7.2. Several glycoproteins were shown to inhibit the HLL-induced hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin activity of HLL was enhanced by Ca(2+). Of most interest was the finding that HLL strongly induced aggregation of the Hevea latex rubber particles (RP). This strong RP aggregation leads to latex coagulation, indicating the possibility that it is involved in the formation of the coagulum that plugs the latex vessel ends and stops the flow of latex upon tapping. In addition, the purified HLL also induced aggregation of RP taken from several other non-Hevea latex producing plants. This might indicate either a common or universal role of this lectin-like protein in RP aggregation and hence latex coagulation. This paper, for the first time, provides clear and unequivocal evidence for either a key biological role or physiological function of an endogenous latex lectin-like protein in the sequential process of latex coagulation.

  2. Design of reduced-fat food emulsions: Manipulating microstructure and rheology through controlled aggregation of colloidal particles and biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bi-Cheng; McClements, David Julian

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop model reduced-calorie food emulsions with desirable textural and optical properties based on controlled aggregation of food-grade colloidal particles and biopolymers. The model food emulsion consisted of fat droplets (5wt.%), starch granules (4wt.%), and xanthan gum (0 to 0.02wt.%) under acidic conditions (pH3). The fat droplets were stabilized by a protein-based emulsifier (whey protein isolate). Fat droplet aggregation was induced by adding anionic xanthan gum to promote bridging flocculation of the cationic protein-coated fat droplets. Thermal processing (95°C) did not have a major impact on fat droplet aggregation, but it did promote starch granule swelling. The structural organization of the fat droplets could be regulated by altering xanthan levels. Relatively small droplet aggregates were formed at low xanthan concentrations that coated the starch granule surfaces. Conversely, large irregular shaped droplet aggregates were formed throughout the system at higher xanthan levels. The rheological and optical properties of the model emulsions could therefore be controlled by altering fat droplet organization. Addition of low levels of xanthan significantly increased the viscosity, yield stress, and complex modulus of the model food emulsions. However, high levels of xanthan led to the formation of large visible aggregates that would negatively impact on sensory quality. This study has important implications for the development of cost-effective and clean-label reduced-fat products with desirable quality attributes, such as dressings and sauces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-07-16

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals.

  4. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals. PMID:26177695

  5. Influence of aggregated particles on biodegradation activities for dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in Lake Kahokugata.

    PubMed

    Maki, Teruya; Hirota, Wakana; Motojima, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur

    2011-06-01

    Aquatic arsenic cycles mainly depend on microbial activities that change the arsenic chemical forms and influence human health and organism activities. The microbial aggregates degrading organic matter are significantly related to the turnover between inorganic arsenic and organoarsenic compounds. We investigated the effects of microbial aggregates on organoarsenic mineralization in Lake Kahokugata using lake water samples spiked with dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). The lake water samples converted 1 μmol L(-1) of DMA to inorganic arsenic for 28d only under anaerobic and dark conditions in the presence of microbial activities. During the DMA mineralization process, organic aggregates >5.0 μm with bacterial colonization increased the densities. When the organic aggregates >5.0 μm were eliminated from the lake water samples using filters, the degradation activities were reduced. DMA in the lake water would be mineralized by the microbial aggregates under anaerobic and dark conditions. Moreover, DMA amendment enhanced the degradation activities in the lake water samples, which mineralized 50 μmol L(-1) of DMA. The DMA-amended aggregates >5.0 μm completely degraded 1 μmol L(-1) of DMA with a shorter incubation time of 7d. The supplement of KNO(3) and NaHCO(3) to lake water samples also shortened the DMA-degradation period. Presumably, the bacterial aggregates involved in the chemical heterotrophic process would contribute to the DMA-biodegradation process in Lake Kahokugata, which is induced by the DMA amendment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. X-ray mapping technique: a preliminary study in discriminating gunshot residue particles from aggregates of environmental occupational origin.

    PubMed

    Cardinetti, Bruno; Ciampini, Claudio; D'Onofrio, Carlo; Orlando, Giovanni; Gravina, Luciano; Ferrari, Francesco; Di Tullio, Donatello; Torresi, Luca

    2004-06-30

    The possibility of detection of lead-antimony-barium aggregates from non-firearm sources is confirmed according to the tests performed on brake pads, and firework and automobile workers. Moreover, information on particles taken from cartridge cases shows the relative feeble importance of the morphology in distinguishing gunshot residues (GSRs). Furthermore, also the presence in the spectrum of other elements (e.g., iron) is not so conclusive. In this panorama, the possibility of discriminating gunshot residue particles from other non-firearm lead-antimony-barium aggregates is investigated: the proposed method is based on X-ray mapping technique--currently applied used in Reparto Carabinieri Investigazioni Scientifiche in Rome, the forensic service of Italian Carabinieri--according to which the spatial distribution of the emission energy of each element of the sample is pictured. Gunshot residues present the same lead-antimony-barium distribution (or at least the same antimony-barium distribution with lead nodules), as some other environmental occupational aggregates do not (different plaques of lead, antimony, and barium). So, X-ray mapping technique can offer a new fundamental evaluation parameter in analysis of gunshot residues with scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive (SEM/EDS) spectrometry, and new standards could be considered.

  7. Mathematical modeling of electro-rotation spectra of small particles in liquid solutions: application to human erythrocyte aggregates.

    PubMed

    Zehe, A; Ramírez, A; Starostenko, O

    2004-02-01

    Electro-rotation can be used to determine the dielectric properties of cells, as well as to observe dynamic changes in both dielectric and morphological properties. Suspended biological cells and particles respond to alternating-field polarization by moving, deforming or rotating. While in linearly polarized alternating fields the particles are oriented along their axis of highest polarizability, in circularly polarized fields the axis of lowest polarizability aligns perpendicular to the plane of field rotation. Ellipsoidal models for cells are frequently applied, which include, beside sphere-shaped cells, also the limiting cases of rods and disks. Human erythrocyte cells, due to their particular shape, hardly resemble an ellipsoid. The additional effect of rouleaux formation with different numbers of aggregations suggests a model of circular cylinders of variable length. In the present study, the induced dipole moment of short cylinders was calculated and applied to rouleaux of human erythrocytes, which move freely in a suspending conductive medium under the effect of a rotating external field. Electro-rotation torque spectra are calculated for such aggregations of different length. Both the maximum rotation speeds and the peak frequencies of the torque are found to depend clearly on the size of the rouleaux. While the rotation speed grows with rouleaux length, the field frequency nu(p) is lowest for the largest cell aggregations where the torque shows a maximum.

  8. Cluster-cluster aggregation kinetics and primary particle growth of soot nanoparticles in flame by light scattering and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    di Stasio, Stefano; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G; Kostoglou, Margaritis

    2002-03-01

    The agglomeration kinetics of growing soot generated in a diffusion atmospheric flame are here studied in situ by light scattering technique to infer cluster morphology and size (fractal dimension D(f) and radius of gyration R(g)). SEM analysis is used as a standard reference to obtain primary particle size D(P) at different residence times. The number N(P) of primary particles per aggregate and the number concentration n(A) of clusters are evaluated on the basis of the measured angular patterns of the scattered light intensity. The major finding is that the kinetics of the coagulation process that yields to the formation of chain-like aggregates by soot primary particles (size 10 to 40 nm) can be described with a constant coagulation kernel beta(c,exp)=2.37x10(-9) cm3/s (coagulation constant tau(c) approximately = 0.28 ms). This result is in nice accord with the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in the free molecular regime, and, vice versa, it is in contrast with previous studies conducted by invasive (ex situ) techniques, which claimed the evidence in flames of coagulation rates much larger than the kinetic theory predictions. Thereafter, a number of numerical simulations is implemented to compare with the experimental results on primary particle growth rate and on the process of aggregate reshaping that is observed by light scattering at later residence times. The restructuring process is conjectured to occur, for not well understood reasons, as a direct consequence of the atomic rearrangement in the solid phase carbon due to the prolonged residence time within the flame. Thus, on one side, it is shown that the numerical simulations of primary size history compare well with the values of primary size from SEM experiment with a growth rate constant of primary diameter about 1 nm/s. On the other side, the evolution of aggregate morphology is found to be predictable by the numerical simulations when the onset of a first-order "thermal" restructuring mechanism is

  9. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  10. Measurement of particle size distribution of soil and selected aggregate sizes using the hydrometer method and laser diffractometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, G.; Gómez, J. A.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2010-05-01

    Soil particle size distribution has been traditionally determined by the hydrometer or the sieve-pipette methods, both of them time consuming and requiring a relatively large soil sample. This might be a limitation in situations, such as for instance analysis of suspended sediment, when the sample is small. A possible alternative to these methods are the optical techniques such as laser diffractometry. However the literature indicates that the use of this technique as an alternative to traditional methods is still limited, because the difficulty in replicating the results obtained with the standard methods. In this study we present the percentages of soil grain size determined using laser diffractometry within ranges set between 0.04 - 2000 μm. A Beckman-Coulter ® LS-230 with a 750 nm laser beam and software version 3.2 in five soils, representative of southern Spain: Alameda, Benacazón, Conchuela, Lanjarón and Pedrera. In three of the studied soils (Alameda, Benacazón and Conchuela) the particle size distribution of each aggregate size class was also determined. Aggregate size classes were obtained by dry sieve analysis using a Retsch AS 200 basic ®. Two hundred grams of air dried soil were sieved during 150 s, at amplitude 2 mm, getting nine different sizes between 2000 μm and 10 μm. Analyses were performed by triplicate. The soil sample preparation was also adapted to our conditions. A small amount each soil sample (less than 1 g) was transferred to the fluid module full of running water and disaggregated by ultrasonication at energy level 4 and 80 ml of sodium hexametaphosphate solution during 580 seconds. Two replicates of each sample were performed. Each measurement was made for a 90 second reading at a pump speed of 62. After the laser diffractometry analysis, each soil and its aggregate classes were processed calibrating its own optical model fitting the optical parameters that mainly depends on the color and the shape of the analyzed particle. As a

  11. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  12. Ballistic aggregation in systems of inelastic particles: Cluster growth, structure, and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Subhajit; Das, Subir K.

    2017-07-01

    We study far-from-equilibrium dynamics in models of freely cooling granular gas and ballistically aggregating compact clusters. For both the cases, from event-driven molecular dynamics simulations, we have presented detailed results on structure and dynamics in space dimensions d =1 and 2. Via appropriate analyses it has been confirmed that the ballistic aggregation mechanism applies in d =1 granular gases as well. Aging phenomena for this mechanism, in both the dimensions, have been studied via the two-time density autocorrelation function. This quantity is demonstrated to exhibit scaling property similar to that in the standard phase transition kinetics. The corresponding functional forms have been quantified and the outcomes have been discussed in connection with the structural properties. Our results on aging establish a more complete equivalence between the granular gas and the ballistic aggregation models in d =1 .

  13. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  14. Theory of dielectrophoresis and aggregation in suspensions of highly polarized particles subjected to high-gradient AC electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqmin, David; Khusid, Boris; Acrivos, Andreas

    2001-11-01

    The proposed mathematical model of electro-hydrodynamic phenomena consists of strongly coupled field and flow equations supplemented by constitutive equations for the dielectric polarization and the field-induced contribution to the energy and stresses in a suspension in the presence of a time-varying electric field. The suspension is viewed as an effective Newtonian fluid with a concentration-dependent viscosity. The long-range hydrodynamic interactions of the particles subjected to shear are incorporated through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, the hindrance function in the expression for the particle settling velocity, and the shear-induced diffusion of the particles. For the electric energy and stress, we employed the constitutive equations of our microscopic theory for the case of strong electric energy dissipation. The equation for the total particle flux includes the flux induced by the electric force exerted on a particle due to the gradient of its chemical potential in a spatially non-uniform electric field, the flux generated by the buoyancy force, and the particle shear-diffusion. We consider the specific case of low particle Reynolds numbers which is relevant to our current experiments. We investigated the situation of "heterogeneous aggregation" when the field-induced phase transitions occur in a thin layer adjacent to the electrodes. By comparing our theoretical predictions with the results of experiments on a rotating channel, we demonstrated that the model is capable of predicting a wide range of physical processes in a suspension of highly polarizable particles, in particular, the formation of highly concentrated particle layers on both the high-voltage and the grounded electrodes.

  15. Zeta Potential and Aggregation of Virus-Like Particle of Human Norovirus and Feline Calicivirus Under Different Physicochemical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Fliss, Ismaïl; Jean, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Although the spread of human norovirus reportedly depends on its ability to bind to food materials, the mechanism of the phenomenon remains unknown. Since protein size and electrical charge are reportedly important parameters in their adsorption, the current work is focused on determining human noroviruses isoelectric point (IEP), electrical charge and aggregate size at different pH, ionic strength (IS), and temperature. Using the baculovirus expression vector system, we produced and purified virus-like particles (VLPs) of GI.1 and GII.4 noroviruses and feline calicivirus, determined their IEP, and examined their size and electrical charge using a Zetasizer Nano ZS apparatus. Shape and size were also visualized using transmission electron microscopy. IEPs were found close to pH 4. Net charge increased as the pH deviated from the IEP. VLPs were negatively charged at all IS tested and showed a gradual decrease in charge with increasing IS. At low temperature, VLPs were 20-45 nm in diameter at pH far from their IEP and under almost all IS conditions, while aggregates appeared at or near the IEP. At increased temperatures, aggregates appeared at or near the IEP and at high IS. Aggregation at the IEP was also confirmed by microscopy. This suggests that electrostatic interactions would be the predominant factor in VLPs adhesion at pH far from 4 and at low ionic strength. In contrast, non-electrostatic interactions would prevail at around pH 4 and would be reinforced by aggregates, since size generally favors multiple bonding with sorbents.

  16. Zn(II) and Cu(II) adsorption and retention onto iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles: effects of particle aggregation and salinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron oxyhydroxides are commonly found in natural aqueous systems as nanoscale particles, where they can act as effective sorbents for dissolved metals due to their natural surface reactivity, small size and high surface area. These properties make nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides a relevant option for the remediation of water supplies contaminated with dissolved metals. However, natural geochemical processes, such as changes in ionic strength, pH, and temperature, can cause these particles to aggregate, thus affecting their sorption capabilities and remediation potential. Other environmental parameters such as increasing salinity may also impact metal retention, e.g. when particles are transported from freshwater to seawater. Results After using synthetic iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles and nanoparticle aggregates in batch Zn(II) adsorption experiments, the addition of increasing concentrations of chloride (from 0.1 M to 0.6 M) appears to initially reduce Zn(II) retention, likely due to the desorption of outer-sphere zinc surface complexes and subsequent formation of aqueous Zn-Cl complexes, before then promoting Zn(II) retention, possibly through the formation of ternary surface complexes (supported by EXAFS spectroscopy) which stabilize zinc on the surface of the nanoparticles/aggregates. In batch Cu(II) adsorption experiments, Cu(II) retention reaches a maximum at 0.4 M chloride. Copper-chloride surface complexes are not indicated by EXAFS spectroscopy, but there is an increase in the formation of stable aqueous copper-chloride complexes as chloride concentration rises (with CuCl+ becoming dominant in solution at ~0.5 M chloride) that would potentially inhibit further sorption or encourage desorption. Instead, the presence of bidentate edge-sharing and monodentate corner-sharing complexes is supported by EXAFS spectroscopy. Increasing chloride concentration has more of an impact on zinc retention than the mechanism of nanoparticle aggregation, whereas

  17. Influence of particle aggregation on deposition of distal tephra from the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, S.N.; Sigurdsson, H.

    1982-08-10

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced an extensive ashfall deposit in Washington, Idaho, and Montana with a minimum volume of 0.55 km/sup 3/ (tephra). An unusual feature of the deposit is the occurrence of a second thickness maximum 325 km ENE of MSH near Ritzville, Washington. Grain size and component abundance analysis of samples along the main is very fine grained (mean size, 2 ..mu..m), poorly sorted, polymodal, and rich in glass shards and pumice fragments. A computer simulation of ash fallout from an atmospherically dispersed eruption plume was developed to evaluate various hypotheses for the origin of the distal ash characteristics, particularly the thickness versus distance relationship. The model was constrained by observations of the eruption column height, elevation of major ash transport, lateral spreading of the eruption plume, and atmospheric wind structure in the vicinity of MSH. Results of different simulations indicate that the second thickness maximum cannot be attributed to either decreased wind velocities over central Washington or injection of fine ash above the horizontal wind velocity maximum near the tropopause. For the model to fit the observed characteristics of the deposit, significant particle aggregation of ash finer than 63 ..mu..m must be invoked. The best fit occurs when ash less than 63 ..mu..m is aggregated into particles several hundred microns in diameter with a settling velocity of 0.35 m/s. Support for this process comes from the observation and collection of fragile ash clusters of similar size which fell at Pullman, Washington, during the May 18 eruption (Sorem, 1982). The premature fallout of fine ash as particle aggregates is a fundamental process in the origin of the grain size characteristics, variations in component abundances, and thickness versus distance relationship of the May 18 MSH ash fall deposit.

  18. Relating particle formation to salt- and pH-dependent phase separation of non-native aggregates of alpha-chymotrypsinogen A.

    PubMed

    Kroetsch, Andrew M; Sahin, Erinc; Wang, Hsiang-yun; Krizman, Sintia; Roberts, Christopher J

    2012-10-01

    Visible and subvisible particle formation during the storage of protein solutions is of increasing concern for pharmaceutical products. Previous work (Li Y, Ogunnaike BA, Roberts CJ. 2010. J Pharm Sci 99:645-662) showed that the model protein, alpha-chymotrypsinogen A (aCgn), forms non-native aggregates under accelerated (heated) conditions, but the size and morphology of the resulting aggregates depended sensitively on pH and NaCl. Here, it is shown that aggregates created as high-molecular-weight soluble aggregates undergo a pH- and salt-dependent reversible phase transition to a condensed or insoluble phase of suspended microparticles, whereas monomers remain completely soluble in the same regime. The location of the phase boundary is quantitatively consistent with the different regimes of kinetic behavior observed previously for aCgn. This suggests that the while kinetics is important for controlling the rates of monomer loss during non-native aggregation, it may be possible to tune solution thermodynamics and phase behavior to suppress otherwise soluble aggregates from propagating to form visible or large subvisible particles. Interestingly, the aggregate phase boundary is sensitive to the identity of salt anions in solution, highlighting the importance of electrostatics and preferential salt interactions in mediating aggregate condensation and particle formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Simulation of Deformation and Aggregation of Two Red Blood Cells in a Stenosed Microvessel by Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lanlan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shuo; Fu, Bingmei

    2016-12-01

    The motion of two red blood cells in a stenosed microvessel was simulated using dissipative particle dynamics. The effects of intercellular interaction, red blood cell deformability and the initial cell orientation on the deformation and aggregation of the RBCs and on the flow resistance were investigated. The red blood cell membrane was treated as a three-dimensional coarse-grained network model and the intercellular interaction was modeled by the Morse potential based on a depletion-mediated assumption. It is shown that the flow resistance increases dramatically when the red blood cells enter into the stenosis and decreases rapidly as RBCs move away from the stenosis. Particularly, for a pair of stiffer red blood cells with the initial inclination angle of 90°, the maximum value of the flow resistance is larger; while a higher flow resistance can also come from a stronger aggregation. For a pair of stiffer red blood cells moving parallel to the main flow, when their positions are closer to the vessel wall at the upstream of the stenosis, the flow resistance increases due to the migration to the vessel center at the stenosis. In addition, for a pair of red blood cells with the initial inclination angle of 0°, the flow resistance from the aggregate formed by a pair of red blood cells with a larger deformation is higher.

  20. A time domain two-particle approximation to calculate the absorption and circular dichroism line shapes of molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kai; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) method has recently emerged as an effective approach to simulate linear and nonlinear spectroscopic signals of molecular aggregates in the intermediate coupling regime. However, its application to large systems is still limited when there are a large number of molecules in the molecular aggregate. In this work, we propose a time domain two-particle approximation (TPA) in combination with the HEOM method to calculate the absorption and circular dichroism line shapes of molecular aggregates. The new method is shown to reduce the number of auxiliary density operators (ADOs) significantly for large systems, and a further truncation of the two-bath-set excited terms based on geometric considerations can lead to a linear increase of the number of ADOs with the system size. The validity of the HEOM-TPA method is first tested on one-dimensional model systems. The new method is then applied to calculate the absorption and circular dichroism line shapes of the Photosystem I core complex, as well as the population evolution of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  1. High-resolution single-molecule fluorescence imaging of zeolite aggregates within real-life fluid catalytic cracking particles.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-02-02

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50-150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Impact of traffic intensity and pavement aggregate size on road dust particles loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, F.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Lozano, A.; Contreras González, J.; Querol, X.

    2013-10-01

    Road dust emissions severely hamper PM10 urban air quality and their burden is expected to increase relatively to primary motor exhaust emissions. Beside the large influence of climate and meteorology, the emission potential varies widely also from one road to another due to numerous factors such as traffic conditions, pavement type and external sources. Nevertheless none of these factors is sufficiently known for a reliable description in emission modelling and for decision making in air quality management. In this study we carried out intensive road dust measurement campaigns in South Spain, with the aim of investigating the relationship between emission potential (i.e. road dust load) and traffic intensity, pavement aggregate size and distance from braking zones. Results indicate that, while no impact from braking activity can be drawn on the bulk road dust mass, an increase in traffic intensity or mean pavement aggregate size clearly reduce the single vehicle emission potential.

  3. An interacting particle system modelling aggregation behavior: from individuals to populations.

    PubMed

    Morale, Daniela; Capasso, Vincenzo; Oelschläger, Karl

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the stochastic modelling of a spatially structured biological population subject to social interaction. The biological motivation comes from the analysis of field experiments on a species of ants which exhibits a clear tendency to aggregate, still avoiding overcrowding. The model we propose here provides an explanation of this experimental behavior in terms of "long-ranged" aggregation and "short-ranged" repulsion mechanisms among individuals, in addition to an individual random dispersal described by a Brownian motion. Further, based on a "law of large numbers", we discuss the convergence, for large N, of a system of stochastic differential equations describing the evolution of N individuals (Lagrangian approach) to a deterministic integro-differential equation describing the evolution of the mean-field spatial density of the population (Eulerian approach).

  4. Statistical characteristics of quasi-elastically scattered light in analysis of size of aggregated biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolevich, A. N.; Prigun, N. P.

    2002-12-01

    The spectra of the intensity fluctuations of light scattered by large (erythrocytes of whole blood) and small (vesicles of surgical bile) particles in natural conditions were studied. It is shown that photon correlation spectroscopy can be used in analysis of variations in the size of biological particles in normal and pathological conditions and as an express method of noninvasive diagnostics of diseases.

  5. A particle-based model to simulate the micromechanics of single-plant parenchyma cells and aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Liedekerke, P.; Ghysels, P.; Tijskens, E.; Samaey, G.; Smeedts, B.; Roose, D.; Ramon, H.

    2010-06-01

    This paper is concerned with addressing how plant tissue mechanics is related to the micromechanics of cells. To this end, we propose a mesh-free particle method to simulate the mechanics of both individual plant cells (parenchyma) and cell aggregates in response to external stresses. The model considers two important features in the plant cell: (1) the cell protoplasm, the interior liquid phase inducing hydrodynamic phenomena, and (2) the cell wall material, a viscoelastic solid material that contains the protoplasm. In this particle framework, the cell fluid is modeled by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a mesh-free method typically used to address problems with gas and fluid dynamics. In the solid phase (cell wall) on the other hand, the particles are connected by pairwise interactions holding them together and preventing the fluid to penetrate the cell wall. The cell wall hydraulic conductivity (permeability) is built in as well through the SPH formulation. Although this model is also meant to be able to deal with dynamic and even violent situations (leading to cell wall rupture or cell-cell debonding), we have concentrated on quasi-static conditions. The results of single-cell compression simulations show that the conclusions found by analytical models and experiments can be reproduced at least qualitatively. Relaxation tests revealed that plant cells have short relaxation times (1 µs-10 µs) compared to mammalian cells. Simulations performed on cell aggregates indicated an influence of the cellular organization to the tissue response, as was also observed in experiments done on tissues with a similar structure.

  6. A particle-based model to simulate the micromechanics of single-plant parenchyma cells and aggregates.

    PubMed

    Van Liedekerke, P; Ghysels, P; Tijskens, E; Samaey, G; Smeedts, B; Roose, D; Ramon, H

    2010-05-26

    This paper is concerned with addressing how plant tissue mechanics is related to the micromechanics of cells. To this end, we propose a mesh-free particle method to simulate the mechanics of both individual plant cells (parenchyma) and cell aggregates in response to external stresses. The model considers two important features in the plant cell: (1) the cell protoplasm, the interior liquid phase inducing hydrodynamic phenomena, and (2) the cell wall material, a viscoelastic solid material that contains the protoplasm. In this particle framework, the cell fluid is modeled by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a mesh-free method typically used to address problems with gas and fluid dynamics. In the solid phase (cell wall) on the other hand, the particles are connected by pairwise interactions holding them together and preventing the fluid to penetrate the cell wall. The cell wall hydraulic conductivity (permeability) is built in as well through the SPH formulation. Although this model is also meant to be able to deal with dynamic and even violent situations (leading to cell wall rupture or cell-cell debonding), we have concentrated on quasi-static conditions. The results of single-cell compression simulations show that the conclusions found by analytical models and experiments can be reproduced at least qualitatively. Relaxation tests revealed that plant cells have short relaxation times (1 micros-10 micros) compared to mammalian cells. Simulations performed on cell aggregates indicated an influence of the cellular organization to the tissue response, as was also observed in experiments done on tissues with a similar structure.

  7. Regime of aggregate structures and magneto-rheological characteristics of a magnetic rod-like particle suspension: Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Kazuya; Satoh, Akira

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we address a suspension composed ferromagnetic rod-like particles to elucidate a regime change in the aggregate structures and the magneto-rheological characteristics. Monte Carlo simulations have been employed for investigating the aggregate structures in thermodynamic equilibrium, and Brownian dynamics simulations for magneto-rheological features in a simple shear flow. The main results obtained here are summarized as follows. For the case of thermodynamic equilibrium, the rod-like particles aggregate to form thick chain-like clusters and the neighboring clusters incline in opposite directions. If the external magnetic field is increased, the thick chain-like clusters in the magnetic field direction grow thicker by adsorbing the neighboring clusters that incline in the opposite direction. Hence, a significant phase change in the particle aggregates is not induced by an increase in the magnetic field strength. For the case of a simple shear flow, even a weak shear flow induces a significant regime change from the thick chain-like clusters of thermodynamic equilibrium into wall-like aggregates composed of short raft-like clusters. A strong external magnetic field drastically changes these aggregates into wall-like aggregates composed of thick chain-like clusters rather than the short raft-like clusters. The internal structure of these aggregates is not strongly influenced by a shear flow, and the formation of the short raft-like clusters is maintained inside the aggregates. The main contribution to the net viscosity is the viscosity component due to magnetic particle-particle interaction forces in relation to the present volumetric fraction. Hence, a larger magnetic interaction strength and also a stronger external magnetic field give rise to a larger magneto-rheological effect. However, the dependence of the viscosity on these factors is governed in a complex manner by whether or not the wall-like aggregates are composed mainly of short raft

  8. Submillimetre-sized dust aggregate collision and growth properties. Experimental study of a multi-particle system on a suborbital rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisset, J.; Heißelmann, D.; Kothe, S.; Weidling, R.; Blum, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. In the very first steps of the formation of a new planetary system, dust agglomerates grow inside the protoplanetary disk that rotates around the newly formed star. In this disk, collisions between the dust particles, induced by interactions with the surrounding gas, lead to sticking. Aggregates start growing until their sizes and relative velocities are high enough for collisions to result in bouncing or fragmentation. With the aim of investigating the transitions between sticking and bouncing regimes for colliding dust aggregates and the formation of clusters from multiple aggregates, the Suborbital Particle and Aggregation Experiment (SPACE) was flown on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket. Aims: The collisional and sticking properties of sub-mm-sized aggregates composed of protoplanetary dust analogue material are measured, including the statistical threshold velocity between sticking and bouncing, their surface energy and tensile strength within aggregate clusters. Methods: We performed an experiment on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket. The protoplanetary dust analogue materials were micrometre-sized monodisperse and polydisperse SiO2 particles prepared into aggregates with sizes around 120 μm and 330 μm, respectively and volume filling factors around 0.37. During the experimental run of 150 s under reduced gravity conditions, the sticking of aggregates and the formation and fragmentation of clusters of up to a few millimetres in size was observed. Results: The sticking probability of the sub-mm-sized dust aggregates could be derived for velocities decreasing from ~22 to 3 cm s-1. The transition from bouncing to sticking collisions happened at 12.7+2.1-1.4 cm s-1 for the smaller aggregates composed of monodisperse particles and at 11.5+1.9-1.3 and 11.7+1.9-1.3 cm s-1 for the larger aggregates composed of mono- and polydisperse dust particles, respectively. Using the pull-off force of sub-mm-sized dust aggregates from the clusters, the surface energy of the

  9. Adjusting particle-size distributions to account for aggregation in tephra-deposit model forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Durant, Adam J.

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are used to forecast tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. Model accuracy is limited by the fact that fine-ash aggregates (clumps into clusters), thus altering patterns of deposition. In most models this is accounted for by ad hoc changes to model input, representing fine ash as aggregates with density ρagg, and a log-normal size distribution with median μagg and standard deviation σagg. Optimal values may vary between eruptions. To test the variance, we used the Ash3d tephra model to simulate four deposits: 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens; 16-17 September 1992 Crater Peak (Mount Spurr); 17 June 1996 Ruapehu; and 23 March 2009 Mount Redoubt. In 192 simulations, we systematically varied μagg and σagg, holding ρagg constant at 600 kg m-3. We evaluated the fit using three indices that compare modeled versus measured (1) mass load at sample locations; (2) mass load versus distance along the dispersal axis; and (3) isomass area. For all deposits, under these inputs, the best-fit value of μagg ranged narrowly between ˜ 2.3 and 2.7φ (0.20-0.15 mm), despite large variations in erupted mass (0.25-50 Tg), plume height (8.5-25 km), mass fraction of fine ( < 0.063 mm) ash (3-59 %), atmospheric temperature, and water content between these eruptions. This close agreement suggests that aggregation may be treated as a discrete process that is insensitive to eruptive style or magnitude. This result offers the potential for a simple, computationally efficient parameterization scheme for use in operational model forecasts. Further research may indicate whether this narrow range also reflects physical constraints on processes in the evolving cloud.

  10. Role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation and settling of suspended particles in the Mississippi River Delta plain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Ji, S.; Dong, H.; Blake, R.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Kim, J.

    2008-01-01

    River-dominated delta areas are primary sites of active biogeochemical cycling, with productivity enhanced by terrestrial inputs of nutrients. Particle aggregation in these areas primarily controls the deposition of suspended particles, yet factors that control particle aggregation and resulting sedimentation in these environments are poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation of suspended particles in the Mississippi Delta. Three representative sites along the salinity gradient were selected and sediments were collected from the sediment-water interface. Based on quantitative mineralogical analyses 88-89 wt.% of all minerals in the sediments are clays, mainly smectite and illite. Consumption of SO421 and the formation of H2S and pyrite during microbial Fe(III) reduction of the non-sterile sediments by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in artificial pore water (APW) media suggest simultaneous sulfate and Fe(III) reduction activity. The pHPZNPC of the sediments was ??? 3.5 and their zeta potentials at the sediment-water interface pH (6.9-7.3) varied from -35 to -45 mV, suggesting that both edges and faces of clay particles have negative surface charge. Therefore, high concentrations of cations in pore water are expected to be a predominant factor in particle aggregation consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Experiments on aggregation of different types of sediments in the same APW composition revealed that the sediment with low zeta potential had a high rate of aggregation. Similarly, addition of external Fe(II) (i.e. not derived from sediments) was normally found to enhance particle aggregation and deposition in all sediments, probably resulting from a decrease in surface potential of particles due to specific Fe(II) sorption. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images showed predominant face-to-face clay aggregation in native

  11. Kinetics of aggregation and crystallization of polyaspartic Acid stabilized calcium phosphate particles at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Krogstad, Daniel V; Wang, Dongbo; Lin-Gibson, Sheng

    2015-05-11

    Bone is an important material to study due to its exceptional mechanical properties and relevance with respect to hard tissue regeneration and repair. A significant effort has been directed toward understanding the bone formation process and the production of synthetic bone mimicking materials. Here, the formation and structural evolution of calcium phosphate (CaP) was investigated in the presence of relatively high concentrations of calcium, phosphate, and polyaspartic acid (pAsp) using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The incipient CaP aggregates were comprised of spherical nanoparticles (diameter ≈ 3-4 nm); they became preferentially aligned over time and eventually transformed into nanorods. The nanorods remained stable in suspension with no signs of further aggregation for at least four months. Detailed cryo-TEM suggested that the CaP nanorods formed through an oriented attachment mechanism. These results show that the reaction concentration greatly influences the mechanism and final properties of CaP. Mechanistic insights gained from this study will facilitate better design and fabrication of bioinspired materials.

  12. Steelmaking slag as aggregate for mortars: effects of particle dimension on compression strength.

    PubMed

    Faraone, Nicola; Tonello, Gabriele; Furlani, Erika; Maschio, Stefano

    2009-11-01

    The present paper reports on the results of some experiments obtained from the production, hydration and subsequent measurement of the mechanical properties of several mortars prepared using a commercial CII/B-LL Portland cement, steelmaking slag, superplasticizer and water. Relevant parameters for the mortar preparation are the weight ratios of cement/water, the weight ratio superplasticizer/cement and between fine and granulated coarse particles. It has been demonstrated that optimisation of such parameters leads to the production of materials with mechanical properties suitable for civil engineering applications. Moreover, materials with improved compressive strength can be prepared by the use of slag containing extensive amounts of large particles.

  13. Adjusting particle-size distributions to account for aggregation in tephra-deposit model forecasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Van Eaton, Alexa; Durant, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are used to forecast tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. Model accuracy is limited by the fact that fine-ash aggregates (clumps into clusters), thus altering patterns of deposition. In most models this is accounted for by ad hoc changes to model input, representing fine ash as aggregates with density ρagg, and a log-normal size distribution with median μagg and standard deviation σagg. Optimal values may vary between eruptions. To test the variance, we used the Ash3d tephra model to simulate four deposits: 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens; 16–17 September 1992 Crater Peak (Mount Spurr); 17 June 1996 Ruapehu; and 23 March 2009 Mount Redoubt. In 192 simulations, we systematically varied μagg and σagg, holding ρagg constant at 600 kg m−3. We evaluated the fit using three indices that compare modeled versus measured (1) mass load at sample locations; (2) mass load versus distance along the dispersal axis; and (3) isomass area. For all deposits, under these inputs, the best-fit value of μagg ranged narrowly between  ∼  2.3 and 2.7φ (0.20–0.15 mm), despite large variations in erupted mass (0.25–50 Tg), plume height (8.5–25 km), mass fraction of fine ( <  0.063 mm) ash (3–59 %), atmospheric temperature, and water content between these eruptions. This close agreement suggests that aggregation may be treated as a discrete process that is insensitive to eruptive style or magnitude. This result offers the potential for a simple, computationally efficient parameterization scheme for use in operational model forecasts. Further research may indicate whether this narrow range also reflects physical constraints on processes in the evolving cloud.

  14. The partitioning of water in aggregates of undigested and digested dietary particles.

    PubMed

    Hardacre, Allan K; Yap, Sia-Yen; Lentle, Roger G; Janssen, Patrick W M; Monro, John A

    2014-01-01

    The hydration of fibre particles derived from wheat and wood was quantified, before and after in vitro digestion, and compared with fibre particles from the colonic digesta of pigs and from human faeces. Total water and the extra- and intra-particulate water components were determined using a combination of centrifugation, drying, gas pycnometry and image analysis. The water of saturation (WS) of wood particles and AllBran® measured after in vitro digestion was up to double that of wheat fibres after in vitro digestion, and increased with particle size and loss of soluble material, but was not associated with the chemical composition of the fibres. Fibre that had undergone in vitro gastric digestion and that had been recovered from the colon or faeces, sequestered about 3% of the Ws into intra-particulate spaces, the remainder occupying extra-particulate spaces. The authors speculate that large quantities of fibre must be eaten to sequester toxins that locate into the intra-particulate space.

  15. Injectability of calcium phosphate pastes: Effects of particle size and state of aggregation of β-tricalcium phosphate powders.

    PubMed

    Torres, P M C; Gouveia, S; Olhero, S; Kaushal, A; Ferreira, J M F

    2015-07-01

    The present study discloses a systematic study about the influence of some relevant experimental variables on injectability of calcium phosphate cements. Non-reactive and reactive pastes were prepared, based on tricalcium phosphate doped with 5 mol% (Sr-TCP) that was synthesised by co-precipitation. The varied experimental parameters included: (i) the heat treatment temperature within the range of 800-1100°C; (ii) different milling extents of calcined powders; (iii) the liquid-to-powder ratio (LPR); (iv) the use of powder blends with different particle sizes (PS) and particle size distributions (PSD); (v) the partial replacement of fine powders by large spherical dense granules prepared via freeze granulation method to simulate coarse individual particles. The aim was contributing to better understanding of the effects of PS, PSD, morphology and state of aggregation of the starting powders on injectability of pastes produced thereof. Powders heat treated at 800 and 1000°C with different morphologies but with similar apparent PSD curves obtained by milling/blending originated completely injectable reactive cement pastes at low LPR. This contrasted with non-reactive systems prepared thereof under the same conditions. Hypotheses were put forward to explain why the injectability results collected upon extruding non-reactive pastes cannot be directly transposed to reactive systems. The results obtained underline the interdependent roles of the different powder features and ionic strength in the liquid media on determining the flow and injectability behaviours.

  16. Burst analysis spectroscopy: a versatile single-particle approach for studying distributions of protein aggregates and fluorescent assemblies.

    PubMed

    Puchalla, Jason; Krantz, Kelly; Austin, Robert; Rye, Hays

    2008-09-23

    Many essential cellular functions depend on the assembly and disassembly of macromolecular complexes. The size, form, and distribution of these assemblies can be heterogeneous and complex, rendering their detailed characterization difficult. Here we describe a simple non-correlation-based method capable of directly measuring population distributions at very low sample concentrations. Specifically, we exploit the highest signal-to-noise light bursts from single fluorescent particles transiting a confocal excitation spot to recursively determine the brightness and size distribution of complex mixtures of fluorescent objects. We refer to this method as burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS) and demonstrate the sensitivity of this technique by examining the free-solution, time-resolved distribution of assembled protein aggregates by using two fluorescently labeled proteins: the aggregation-prone, chaperonin-dependent, folding model protein ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), and an amyloidogenic fragment of the yeast prion protein Sup35. We find that the assembly kinetics of both proteins display complex multimodal behavior not readily quantifiable with other methods.

  17. Effect of HPV16 L1 virus-like particles on the aggregation of non-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palomino-Vizcaino, Giovanni; Valencia Reséndiz, Diana Gabriela; Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Martínez-Acuña, Natalia; Tapia-Vieyra, Juana Virginia; Bahena, Daniel; Díaz-Sánchez, Mauricio; García-González, Octavio Patricio; Alvarez-Sandoval, Brenda Arizaí; Alvarez-Salas, Luis Marat

    2017-09-04

    Colorimetric assays based on gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are of considerable interest for diagnostics because of their simplicity and low-cost. Nevertheless, a deep understanding of the interaction between the GNPs and the intended molecular target is critical for the development of reliable detection technologies. The present report describes the spontaneous interaction between HPV16 L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) and non-functionalized GNPs (nfGNPs) resulting in the inhibition of nfGNPs salt-induced aggregation and the stabilization of purified VLPs. Ionic-competition experiments suggested that the nature of nfGNPs-VLPs interaction is non-covalent. Adsorption of an RNA aptamer on nfGNPs surface showed an additive aggregation-inhibitory effect. The use of mutant VLPs confirmed that the interaction nfGNPs-VLPs is not mediated by the opposing superficial electrostatic charges, suggesting that non-electrostatic forces participate in the arrangement of nfGNPs on the VLPs surface. Competition experiments using increasing ethanol concentrations on nfGNPs-VLPs complexes suggested hydrophobic interactions as the main stabilizing force. Therefore, the nfGNPs-VLPs interaction described here should facilitate the development of adsorption assays based on nfGNPs for HPV detection and cervical cancer prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Adsorption and Aggregation Properties of Norovirus GI and GII Virus-like Particles Demonstrate Differing Responses to Solution Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    DA SILVA, ALLEGRA K.; KAVANAGH, OWEN V.; ESTES, MARY K.; ELIMELECH, MENACHEM

    2014-01-01

    The transport properties (adsorption and aggregation behavior) of virus-like particles (VLPs) of two strains of norovirus (“Norwalk” GI.1 and “Houston” GII.4) were studied in a variety of solution chemistries. GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs were found to be stable against aggregation at pH 4.0–8.0. At pH 9.0, GI.1 VLPs rapidly disintegrated. The attachment efficiencies (α) of GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs to silica increased with increasing ionic strength in NaCl solutions at pH 8.0. The attachment efficiency of GI.1 VLPs decreased as pH was increased above the isoelectric point (pH 5.0), whereas at and below the isoelectric point, the attachment efficiency was erratic. Ca2+ and Mg2+ dramatically increased the attachment efficiencies of GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs, which may be due to specific interactions with the VLP capsids. Bicarbonate decreased attachment efficiencies for both GI.1 and GII.4 VLPs, whereas phosphate decreased the attachment efficiency of GI.1, while increasing GII.4 attachment efficiency. The observed differences in GI.1 and GII.4 VLP attachment efficiencies in response to solution chemistry may be attributed to differential responses of the unique arrangement of exposed amino acid residues on the capsid surface of each VLP strain. PMID:21121659

  19. Burst analysis spectroscopy: A versatile single-particle approach for studying distributions of protein aggregates and fluorescent assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Puchalla, Jason; Krantz, Kelly; Austin, Robert; Rye, Hays

    2008-01-01

    Many essential cellular functions depend on the assembly and disassembly of macromolecular complexes. The size, form, and distribution of these assemblies can be heterogeneous and complex, rendering their detailed characterization difficult. Here we describe a simple non-correlation-based method capable of directly measuring population distributions at very low sample concentrations. Specifically, we exploit the highest signal-to-noise light bursts from single fluorescent particles transiting a confocal excitation spot to recursively determine the brightness and size distribution of complex mixtures of fluorescent objects. We refer to this method as burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS) and demonstrate the sensitivity of this technique by examining the free-solution, time-resolved distribution of assembled protein aggregates by using two fluorescently labeled proteins: the aggregation-prone, chaperonin-dependent, folding model protein ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), and an amyloidogenic fragment of the yeast prion protein Sup35. We find that the assembly kinetics of both proteins display complex multimodal behavior not readily quantifiable with other methods. PMID:18780782

  20. Silicate core-organic refractory mantle particles as interstellar dust and as aggregated in comets and stellar disks.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J M; Li, A

    1997-01-01

    The principal observational properties of silicate core-organic refractory mantle interstellar dust grains in the infrared at 3.4 microns and at 10 microns and 20 microns are discussed in terms of the cyclic evolution of particles forming in stellar atmospheres and undergoing subsequent accretion, photoprocessing and destruction (erosion). Laboratory plus space emulation of the photoprocessing of laboratory analog ices and refractories are discussed. The aggregated interstellar dust model of comets is summarized. The same properties required to explain the temperature and infrared properties of comet coma dust are shown to be needed to account for the infrared silicate and continuum emission of the beta Pictoris disk as produced by a cloud of comets orbiting the star.

  1. Rapid and high-throughput colorimetric screening for anti-aggregation reagents of protein conformational diseases by using gold nanoplasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Young; Kwon, Jung A; Kang, Taewook; Choi, Inhee

    2017-05-01

    Cellular deposition of destabilized proteins and their aggregates is considered one of the most indisputable factors implicated in protein conformational diseases. Here, we report an innovative high-throughput screening method for discovering anti-aggregation reagents out of numerous potential candidates by using gold nanoplasmonic particles. In our method, nanoparticles act as catalytic activators to accelerate protein aggregation and simultaneously exhibit a colorimetric response according to their embedded shape on the protein aggregates. Using this principle, we observed the colorimetric response to the anti-aggregation effect of amyloid β (Aβ) with the naked eye within a few minutes. Investigation of the anti-aggregation effects of select candidates under three different protein aggregation stages showed that the anti-aggregation efficiency could relate to disease progression. Finally, results obtained with spiked samples in cerebrospinal fluid as well as under various denaturation conditions and different Aβ compositions show the feasibility of future personalized medicine considering individual patient's disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. T-Matrix: Codes for Computing Electromagnetic Scattering by Nonspherical and Aggregated Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterman, Peter; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2015-11-01

    The T-Matrix package includes codes to compute electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles in fixed and random orientations, randomly oriented two-sphere clusters with touching or separated components, and multi-sphere clusters in fixed and random orientations. All codes are written in Fortran-77. LAPACK-based, extended-precision, Gauss-elimination- and NAG-based, and superposition codes are available, as are double-precision superposition, parallelized double-precision, double-precision Lorenz-Mie codes, and codes for the computation of the coefficients for the generalized Chebyshev shape.

  3. Aggregate stability and magnetic characteristics of colloidal Fe m O n -SiO2 particles obtained by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezo, O. S.; Gareev, K. G.; Korolev, D. V.; Kuryshev, I. A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Sergienko, E. S.; Kharitonskii, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    Composite Fe m O n -SiO2 particles have been obtained by precipitation of iron oxide from aqueous solution with the addition of tetraethoxysilane. The shapes and sizes of separate single particles and their aggregates have been determined by scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the stability of the colloidal suspension due to external magnetic field and the addition of NaCl have been evaluated. Based on magnetization curves obtained on a vibrating-sample magnetometer and characteristics calculated within the theoretical model of magnetostatically interacting particles, it is shown that the composite particles are superparamagnetic.

  4. Aggregation of amphiphilic polymers in the presence of adhesive small colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baulin, Vladimir A.; Johner, Albert; Avalos, Josep Bonet

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of amphiphilic polymers with small colloids, capable to reversibly stick onto the chains, is studied. Adhesive small colloids in solution are able to dynamically bind two polymer segments. This association leads to topological changes in the polymer network configurations, such as looping and cross-linking, although the reversible adhesion permits the colloid to slide along the chain backbone. Previous analyses only consider static topologies in the chain network. We show that the sliding degree of freedom ensures the dominance of small loops, over other structures, giving rise to a new perspective in the analysis of the problem. The results are applied to the analysis of the equilibrium between colloidal particles and star polymers, as well as to block copolymer micelles. The results are relevant for the reversible adsorption of silica particles onto hydrophilic polymers, used in the process of formation of mesoporous materials of the type SBA or MCM, cross-linked cyclodextrin molecules threading on the polymers and forming the structures known as polyrotaxanes. Adhesion of colloids on the corona of the latter induce micellization and growth of larger micelles as the number of colloids increase, in agreement with experimental data.

  5. Charging and aggregation of latex particles in aqueous solutions of ionic liquids: towards an extended Hofmeister series.

    PubMed

    Oncsik, Tamas; Desert, Anthony; Trefalt, Gregor; Borkovec, Michal; Szilagyi, Istvan

    2016-03-14

    The effect of ionic liquid (IL) constituents and other monovalent salts on the stability of polystyrene latex particles was studied by electrophoresis and light scattering in dilute aqueous suspensions. The surface charge and the aggregation rate were both sensitive to the type of ion leading to different critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values. Systematic variation of the type of IL cation and anion allows us to place these ions within the Hofmeister series. We find that the dicyanoamide anion should be placed between iodide and thiocyanate, while all 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations can be positioned to the left of the tetramethylammonium and ammonium ions. The hydrophobicity of the 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium (BMPL(+)) ion is intermediate between 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMIM(+)) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM(+)). With increasing alkyl chain length, the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations adsorb on the latex particles very strongly, and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium (HMIM(+)) and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium (OMIM(+)) lead to pronounced charge reversal and to an intermediate restabilization region.

  6. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of deformation and aggregation of healthy and diseased red blood cells in a tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we report simulation results assessing the deformation and aggregation of mixed healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow. A three dimensional particle model based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is developed to predict the tube flow containing interacting cells. The cells are also modelled by DPD, with a Morse potential to characterize the cell-cell interaction. As validation tests, a single RBC in a tube flow and two RBCs in a static flow are simulated to examine the cell deformation and intercellular interaction, respectively. The study of two cells, one healthy and the other malaria-infected RBCs in a tube flow demonstrates that the malaria-infected RBC (in the leading position along flow direction) has different effects on the healthy RBC (in the trailing position) at the different stage of parasite development or at the different capillary number. With parasitic development, the malaria-infected RBC gradually loses its deformability, and in turn the corresponding trailing healthy RBC also deforms less due to the intercellular interaction. With increasing capillary number, both the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are likely to undergo an axisymmetric motion. The minimum intercellular distance becomes small enough so that rouleaux is easily formed, i.e., the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are difficultly disaggregated.

  7. Aggregation Kinetics of Hematite Particles in the Presence of Outer Membrane Cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Anxu; Liu, Feng; Shi, Liang; Liu, Juan

    2016-09-20

    The aggregation behavior of 9, 36, and 112 nm hematite particles was studied in the presence of OmcA, a bacterial extracellular protein, in aqueous dispersions at pH 5.7 through time-resolved dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and circular dichroism spectra, respectively. At low salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of hematite particles in all sizes first increased, then decreased, and finally remained stable with the increase of OmcA concentration, indicating the dominant interparticle interaction changed along with the increase in the protein-to-particle ratio. Nevertheless, at high salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of all hematite samples gradually decreased with increasing OmcA concentration, which can be attributed to increasing steric force. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of OmcA-hematite conjugates was more correlated to total particle-surface area than primary particle size. It was further established that OmcA could stabilize hematite nanoparticles more efficiently than bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model plasma protein, due to the higher affinity of OmcA to hematite surface. This study highlighted the effects of particle properties, solution conditions, and protein properties on the complicated aggregation behavior of protein-nanoparticle conjugates in aqueous environments.

  8. Discrimination between silicone oil droplets and protein aggregates in biopharmaceuticals: a novel multiparametric image filter for sub-visible particles in microflow imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Strehl, René; Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Diez, Manuel; Egodage, Kamal; Bluemel, Markus; Jeschke, Margit; Koulov, Atanas V

    2012-02-01

    Accurate monitoring of the sub-visible particle load in protein biopharmaceuticals is increasingly important to drug development. Manufacturers are expected to characterize and control sub-visible protein particles in their products due to their potential immunogenicity. Light obscuration, the most commonly used analytical tool to count microscopic particles, does not allow discrimination between potentially harmful protein aggregates and harmless pharmaceutical components, e.g. silicone oil, commonly present in drug products. Microscopic image analysis in flow-microscopy techniques allows not only counting, but also classification of sub-visible particles based on morphology. We present a novel approach to define software filters for analysis of particle morphology in flow-microscopic images enhancing the capabilities of flow-microscopy. Image morphology analysis was applied to analyze flow-microscopy data from experimental test sets of protein aggregates and silicone oil suspensions. A combination of four image morphology parameters was found to provide a reliable basis for automatic distinction between silicone oil droplets and protein aggregates in protein biopharmaceuticals resulting in low misclassification errors. A novel, custom-made software filter for discrimination between proteinaceous particles and silicone oil droplets in flow-microscopy imaging analysis was successfully developed.

  9. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  10. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  11. Kinetics of intramembrane charge movement and sodium current in frog node of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Intramembrane charge movement (Q) and sodium current (INa) were monitored in isolated voltage-clamped frog nodes of Ranvier, ON charge movements (QON) for pulses from the holding potential (-100 mV) to potentials V less than or equal to 0 mV followed single exponential time courses, whereas two exponentials were found for pulses to V greater than or equal to 20 mV. The voltage dependence of both QON and its time constant tauON indicated that the two ON components resolved at V greater than or equal to 20 mV were also present, though not resolvable, for pulses to V less than or equal to 0 mV. OFF charge movements (QOFF) monitored at various potentials were well described by single exponentials. When QOFF was monitored at -30 or -40 mV after a 200-microsecond pulse to +20 mV and QON was monitored at the same potential using pulses directly from -100 mV, tauON/tauOFF = 2.5 +/- 0.3. At a set OFF potential (-90 to -70 mV), tauOFF first increased with increasing duration tON of the preceding pulse to a given potential (0 to +30 mV) and then decreased with further increases in tON. The declining phase of tauOFF followed a time course similar to that of the decline in QOFF with tON. For the same pulse protocol, the OFF time constant tauNa for INA also first increased with tON but then remained constant over the tON interval during which tauOFF and QOFF were declining. After 200- or 300-microsecond pulses to +20, +20, or +50 mV, tauOFF/tauNa at -70 to -90 mV was 1.2 +/- 0.1. Similar tauOFF/tauNa ratios were predicted by channel models having three identical charged gating particles that can rapidly and reversibly form an immobile dimer or trimer after independently crossing the membrane from their OFF to their ON locations. PMID:6279757

  12. Intramembrane Cavitation as a Predictive Bio-Piezoelectric Mechanism for Ultrasonic Brain Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Michael; Shoham, Shy; Kimmel, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasonic waves can remotely and nondestructively excite central nervous system (CNS) neurons. While diverse applications for this effect are already emerging, the biophysical transduction mechanism underlying this excitation remains unclear. Recently, we suggested that ultrasound-induced intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane could underlie the biomechanics of a range of observed acoustic bioeffects. In this paper, we show that, in CNS neurons, ultrasound-induced cavitation of these nanometric bilayer sonophores can induce a complex mechanoelectrical interplay leading to excitation, primarily through the effect of currents induced by membrane capacitance changes. Our model explains the basic features of CNS acoustostimulation and predicts how the experimentally observed efficacy of mouse motor cortical ultrasonic stimulation depends on stimulation parameters. These results support the hypothesis that neuronal intramembrane piezoelectricity underlies ultrasound-induced neurostimulation, and suggest that other interactions between the nervous system and pressure waves or perturbations could be explained by this new mode of biological piezoelectric transduction.

  13. Poisson-Boltzmann description of interaction forces and aggregation rates involving charged colloidal particles in asymmetric electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Trefalt, Gregor; Szilagyi, Istvan; Borkovec, Michal

    2013-09-15

    Forces and aggregation rates involving spherical particles are studied numerically within the theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) for asymmetric and mixed electrolytes. Thereby, the double layer interactions are treated at the Debye-Hückel (DH) and Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) levels. The DH model is applicable for weakly charged systems, and effects of ion valence enter only implicitly through the ionic strength. The PB model is necessary for more highly charged systems, and depends on the actual ionic composition. One finds that forces in asymmetric electrolytes at fixed ionic strength weaken when the valence of the counterions is increased or when the valence of the coions is decreased. In symmetric electrolytes, the effect of counterions is more important than the one of the coions. For weakly charged systems, the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) decreases with the square of the valence in symmetric electrolytes, while this decrease is weaker in asymmetric ones. With increasing charge density, the dependence of the CCC on the valence becomes stronger, but the classical Schulze-Hardy decrease with the sixths power of the valence is only recovered for unrealistically high charge densities. Mixtures of electrolytes are treated within the same framework, and one observes that already small amounts of multivalent ions affect the system considerably. An empirical mixing rule is proposed to describe the calculated CCCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. BCL11B expression in intramembranous osteogenesis during murine craniofacial suture development.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Greg; van Bakel, Harm; Zhou, Xueyan; Losic, Bojan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Sutures, where neighboring craniofacial bones are separated by undifferentiated mesenchyme, are major growth sites during craniofacial development. Pathologic fusion of bones within sutures occurs in a wide variety of craniosynostosis conditions and can result in dysmorphic craniofacial growth and secondary neurologic deficits. Our knowledge of the genes involved in suture formation is poor. Here we describe the novel expression pattern of the BCL11B transcription factor protein during murine embryonic craniofacial bone formation. We examined BCL11B protein expression at E14.5, E16.5, and E18.5 in 14 major craniofacial sutures of C57BL/6J mice. We found BCL11B expression to be associated with all intramembranous craniofacial bones examined. The most striking aspects of BCL11B expression were its high levels in suture mesenchyme and increasingly complementary expression with RUNX2 in differentiating osteoblasts during development. BCL11B was also expressed in mesenchyme at the non-sutural edges of intramembranous bones. No expression was seen in osteoblasts involved in endochondral ossification of the cartilaginous cranial base. BCL11B is expressed to potentially regulate the transition of mesenchymal differentiation and suture formation within craniofacial intramembranous bone.

  15. BCL11B expression in intramembranous osteogenesis during murine craniofacial suture development

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Greg; van Bakel, Harm; Zhou, Xueyan; Losic, Bojan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Sutures, where neighboring craniofacial bones are separated by undifferentiated mesenchyme, are major growth sites during craniofacial development. Pathologic fusion of bones within sutures occurs in a wide variety of craniosynostosis conditions and can result in dysmorphic craniofacial growth and secondary neurologic deficits. Our knowledge of the genes involved in suture formation is poor. Here we describe the novel expression pattern of the BCL11B transcription factor protein during murine embryonic craniofacial bone formation. We examined BCL11B protein expression at E14.5, E16.5, and E18.5 in 14 major craniofacial sutures of C57BL/6J mice. We found BCL11B expression to be associated with all intramembranous craniofacial bones examined. The most striking aspects of BCL11B expression were its high levels in suture mesenchyme and increasingly complementary expression with RUNX2 in differentiating osteoblasts during development. BCL11B was also expressed in mesenchyme at the non-sutural edges of intramembranous bones. No expression was seen in osteoblasts involved in endochondral ossification of the cartilaginous cranial base. BCL11B is expressed to potentially regulate the transition of mesenchymal differentiation and suture formation within craniofacial intramembranous bone. PMID:25511173

  16. Salting-out and salting-in: competitive effects of salt on the aggregation behavior of soy protein particles and their emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Neng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Lianfu

    2015-08-07

    Emulsions stabilized by protein particles have gained increasing research attention due to their combined advantages of biocompatibility and superior stability. In this study, colloidal particles consisting of soy protein isolates (SPIs) prepared through a heat-treatment procedure are used to make oil-in-water emulsions at a protein concentration of 10 g L(-1) and a pH of 5.91. We investigate parallelly the effects of NaCl on the stability and rheological properties of the particle suspensions and their stabilized emulsions at salt concentrations of 0, 100 and 400 mM. The aggregation behavior of the particles is strongly dependent on the NaCl concentration, showing signs of sedimentation at low NaCl concentration (100 mM) but redispersion again at high NaCl concentration (400 mM). The extensive particle aggregation is beneficial to the formation of a continuous interfacial film for the emulsions, and hence results in a remarkable increase of creaming stability and interfacial viscoelastic moduli. The results can be explained in terms of two competitive effects of NaCl: salting-out and salting-in, which are attributed to complex electrostatic interactions between the particles as a function of NaCl concentration. The delicate balance between salting-out and salting-in provides an interesting insight into the nature of underlying protein particle interactions in aqueous suspensions and a possible mechanism for tailoring their emulsifying properties via salt effects.

  17. A Dual Laser Scanning Confocal and Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Intracellular Localization, Aggregation and Particle Formation of African Horse Sickness Virus Major Core Protein VP7.

    PubMed

    Wall, Gayle V; Rutkowska, Daria A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Huismans, Henk; van Staden, Vida

    2017-02-01

    The bulk of the major core protein VP7 in African horse sickness virus (AHSV) self-assembles into flat, hexagonal crystalline particles in a process appearing unrelated to viral replication. Why this unique characteristic of AHSV VP7 is genetically conserved, and whether VP7 aggregation and particle formation have an effect on cellular biology or the viral life cycle, is unknown. Here we investigated how different small peptide and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) insertions into the VP7 top domain affected VP7 localization, aggregation, and particle formation. This was done using a dual laser scanning confocal and transmission electron microscopy approach in conjunction with analyses of the solubility, aggregation, and fluorescence profiles of the proteins. VP7 top domain modifications did not prevent trimerization, or intracellular trafficking, to one or two discrete sites in the cell. However, modifications that resulted in a misfolded and insoluble VP7-eGFP component blocked trafficking, and precluded protein accumulation at a single cellular site, perhaps by interfering with normal trimer-trimer interactions. Furthermore, the modifications disrupted the stable layering of the trimers into characteristic AHSV VP7 crystalline particles. It was concluded that VP7 trafficking is driven by a balance between VP7 solubility, trimer forming ability, and trimer-trimer interactions.

  18. The impact of homogeniser speed, dispersing aggregate size and centrifugation on particle size analyses of pork as a measure of myofibrillar fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ngapo, T M; Vachon, L

    2017-11-01

    Particle size analysis has been proposed as a measure of myofibrillar fragmentation resulting from post-mortem proteolysis in meat. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of homogenisation speed, dispersing aggregate size and centrifugation on particle size characteristics of pork loin. Particle size characteristics were significantly (P≤0.023) greater for samples aged 2 than 8d for all but the 80 and 90% quantiles. Differentiation with ageing was only achieved when homogenised at 11,000rpm using the smaller dispersing aggregate (9 vs 13mm rotor diameters). Centrifugation had no effect on particle size characteristics. Significant correlations with MFI (r=-0.40 to -0.81, P<0.001) and shear force in meat aged at 3.7°C (r=0.36-0.47; P<0.001) were observed. Weak or inconsistent correlations with shear force suggest adoption of particle size analyses as a method of tenderness classification unlikely. Rather, value lies in the detailed profiles of particle size distributions with meat ageing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Micro-flow imaging analyses reflect mechanisms of aggregate formation: Comparing protein particle data sets using the Kullback-Leibler divergence.

    PubMed

    Maddux, Nathaniel R; Daniels, Austin L; Randolph, Theodore W

    2017-01-31

    Sub-visible particles in therapeutic protein formulations are an increasing manufacturing and regulatory concern due to their potential to cause adverse immune responses. Flow imaging microscopy is used extensively to detect sub-visible particles and investigate product deviations, typically by comparing imaging data using histograms of particle descriptors. Such an approach discards much information, and requires effort to interpret differences, which is problematic when comparing many data sets. We propose to compare imaging data by using the Kullback-Leibler divergence, an information theoretic measure of the difference of distributions.(1) We use the divergence to generate scatter plots representing the similarity between data sets, and to classify new data into previously determined categories. Our approach is multidimensional, automated and less biased than traditional techniques. We demonstrate the method with FlowCAM® imagery of protein aggregates acquired from monoclonal antibody samples subjected to different stresses. The method succeeds in classifying aggregated samples by stress condition, and, once trained, is able to identify the stress that caused aggregate formation in new samples. In addition to potentially detecting subtle incipient manufacturing faults, the method may have applications to verification of product uniformity after manufacturing changes, identification of counterfeit products, and development of closely matching bio-similar products.

  20. Aggregation and Particle Formation of Therapeutic Proteins in Contact With a Novel Fluoropolymer Surface Versus Siliconized Surfaces: Effects of Agitation in Vials and in Prefilled Syringes.

    PubMed

    Teska, Brandon M; Brake, Jeffrey M; Tronto, Gregory S; Carpenter, John F

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of an accelerated agitation protocol on 2 protein therapeutics, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and Avastin (bevacizumab), in contact with a novel fluoropolymer surface and more typical siliconized surfaces. The fluoropolymer surface provides "solid-phase" lubrication for the syringe plunger-obviating the need for silicone oil lubrication in prefilled syringes. We tested the 2 surfaces in a vial system and in prefilled glass syringes. We also examined the effects of 2 buffers, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and 0.2-M glycine, with and without the addition of polysorbate 20, on agitation-induced aggregation of IVIG. Aggregation was monitored by measuring subvisible particle formation and soluble protein loss. In both vials and syringes, protein particle formation was much lower during agitation with the fluoropolymer surface than with the siliconized surface. Also, particle formation was greater in PBS than in glycine buffer, an effect attributed to lower colloidal stability of IVIG in PBS. Polysorbate 20 in the formulation greatly inhibited protein particle formation. Overall, the fluoropolymer plunger surface in an unsiliconized glass barrel was demonstrated to be a viable solution for eliminating silicone oil droplets from prefilled syringe formulations and providing a consistent system for rationale formulation development and simplified particle analysis.

  1. The influence of aggregation of latex particles on membrane fouling attachments & ultrafiltration performance in ultrafiltration of latex contaminated water and wastewater.

    PubMed

    Abdelrasoul, Amira; Doan, Huu; Lohi, Ali; Cheng, Chil-Hung

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the influence of latex particle aggregation on membrane fouling attachments and the ultrafiltration performance of simulated latex effluent using Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant. Hydrophilic polysulfone and ultrafilic flat heterogeneous membranes, with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 60,000 and 100,000, respectively, as well as hydrophobic polyvinylidene difluoride with MWCO of 100,000, were used under a constant flow rate and cross-flow mode in ultrafiltration of latex solution. In addition, a polycarbonate flat membrane with uniform pore size of 0.05μm was likewise used during the experiment. The effects of CTAB on the latex particle size distribution were investigated at various concentrations, different treatment times, and diverse agitation duration times. The effects of CTAB on the zeta potential of membrane surfaces and latex particles were also investigated. The data obtained indicate that the particle size distribution of treated latex effluent experienced significant shifts in the peaks toward a larger size range caused by the aggregation of particles. As a result, the mass of fouling contributing to pore blocking and the irreversible fouling were noticeably reduced. The optimum results occurred in the instance when CTAB was added at the critical micelle concentration of 0.36g/L, for the duration of 10min and with minimal agitation. Notably, a higher stirring rate had an overall negative effect on the membrane fouling minimization.

  2. Features of Pro-σK Important for Cleavage by SpoIVFB, an Intramembrane Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kangming; Xiang, Xianling; Gu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases regulate diverse processes by cleaving substrates within a transmembrane segment or near the membrane surface. Bacillus subtilis SpoIVFB is an intramembrane metalloprotease that cleaves Pro-σK during sporulation. To elucidate features of Pro-σK important for cleavage by SpoIVFB, coexpression of the two proteins in Escherichia coli was used along with cell fractionation. In the absence of SpoIVFB, a portion of the Pro-σK was peripherally membrane associated. This portion was not observed in the presence of SpoIVFB, suggesting that it serves as the substrate. Deletion of Pro-σK residues 2 to 8, addition of residues at its N terminus, or certain single-residue substitutions near the cleavage site impaired cleavage. Certain multiresidue substitutions near the cleavage site changed the position of cleavage, revealing preferences for a small residue preceding the cleavage site N-terminally (i.e., at the P1 position) and a hydrophobic residue at the second position following the cleavage site C-terminally (i.e., P2′). These features appear to be conserved among Pro-σK orthologs. SpoIVFB did not tolerate an aromatic residue at P1 or P2′ of Pro-σK. A Lys residue at P3′ of Pro-σK could not be replaced with Ala unless a Lys was provided farther C-terminally (e.g., at P9′). α-Helix-destabilizing residues near the cleavage site were not crucial for SpoIVFB to cleave Pro-σK. The preferences and tolerances of SpoIVFB are somewhat different from those of other intramembrane metalloproteases, perhaps reflecting differences in the interaction of the substrate with the membrane and the enzyme. PMID:23585539

  3. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the interleukin-1 receptor II by alpha-, beta-, and gamma-secretase.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Marjaux, Els; Imhof, Axel; De Strooper, Bart; Haass, Christian; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2007-04-20

    Ectodomain shedding and intramembrane proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by alpha-, beta- and gamma-secretase are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Increased proteolytic processing and secretion of another membrane protein, the interleukin-1 receptor II (IL-1R2), have also been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. IL-1R2 is a decoy receptor that may limit detrimental effects of IL-1 in the brain. At present, the proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 remains little understood. Here we show that IL-1R2 can be proteolytically processed in a manner similar to APP. IL-1R2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells first undergoes ectodomain shedding in an alpha-secretase-like manner, resulting in secretion of the IL-1R2 ectodomain and the generation of an IL-1R2 C-terminal fragment. This fragment undergoes further intramembrane proteolysis by gamma-secretase, leading to the generation of the soluble intracellular domain of IL-1R2. Intramembrane cleavage of IL-1R2 was abolished by a highly specific inhibitor of gamma-secretase and was absent in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in gamma-secretase activity. Surprisingly, the beta-secretase BACE1 and its homolog BACE2 increased IL-1R2 secretion resulting in C-terminal fragments nearly identical to the ones generated by the alpha-secretase-like cleavage. This suggests that both proteases may act as alternative alpha-secretase-like proteases. Importantly, BACE1 and BACE2 did not cleave several other membrane proteins, demonstrating that both proteases do not contribute to general membrane protein turnover but only cleave specific proteins. This study reveals a similar proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 and APP and may provide an explanation for the increased IL-1R2 secretion observed in AD.

  4. Quality assessment for recycling aggregates from construction and demolition waste: An image-based approach for particle size estimation.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Bianconi, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Baglioni, Stefano; Marionni, Moreno

    2016-02-01

    The size distribution of aggregates has direct and important effects on fundamental properties of construction materials such as workability, strength and durability. The size distribution of aggregates from construction and demolition waste (C&D) is one of the parameters which determine the degree of recyclability and therefore the quality of such materials. Unfortunately, standard methods like sieving or laser diffraction can be either very time consuming (sieving) or possible only in laboratory conditions (laser diffraction). As an alternative we propose and evaluate the use of image analysis to estimate the size distribution of aggregates from C&D in a fast yet accurate manner. The effectiveness of the procedure was tested on aggregates generated by an existing C&D mechanical treatment plant. Experimental comparison with manual sieving showed agreement in the range 81-85%. The proposed technique demonstrated potential for being used on on-line systems within mechanical treatment plants of C&D.

  5. Induction of fully stabilized cortical bone defects to study intramembranous bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Razidlo, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bone is a regenerative tissue with an innate ability to self-remodel in response to environmental stimuli and the need to repair damage. Rodent models of fracture healing, and in particular genetic mouse models, can be used to study the contributions of specific molecular switches to skeletal repair, as well as to recreate and exacerbate biological development and repair mechanisms in postnatal skeletons. Here, we describe methodology for producing fully stabilized, single-cortex defects in mouse femurs to study mechanisms of intramembranous bone regeneration. PMID:25331051

  6. Analysis by FT-IR of three different bone regions: healthy, endochondral and intramembranous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Taciana D.; Rodrigues Santos, Arnaldo; Rodrigues, Ana Amélia; Batista, Nilza; Dias Belangero, William; Pereira Simas, Maryana; Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2013-03-01

    The study of bone composition is very important for the development of new technologies, for instance, the improvement of biocompatible implants and artificial bone matrix. Some kinds of bone matrix as tibia might be regenerated by two different routes, the endochondral and the intramembranous. In this work We analyze the composition of regenerated tibia by the two mentioned routes. They are compared with the composition of the healthy portion of a normal tissue. Our results show mainly differences in the quantity of lipids, water and in the vibrations of Amide I and Amide II.

  7. Integrated modeling approach for fate and transport of submerged oil and oil-particle aggregates in a freshwater riverine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Johnson, Rex; Zhu, Zhenduo; Waterman, David; McCulloch, Richard D.; Hayter, Earl; Garcia, Marcelo H.; Boufadel, Michel C.; Dekker, Timothy; Hassan, Jacob S.; Soong, David T.; Hoard, Christopher J.; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The Enbridge Line 6B pipeline release of diluted bitumen into the Kalamazoo River downstream of Marshall, Michigan, U.S.A., in July 2010 was one of the largest oil spills into freshwater in North American history. A portion of the oil interacted with river sediment and submerged requiring the development and implementation of new approaches for detection and recovery of oil mixed with river sediment. Hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling became an integral part of containment and recovery operations for decision support about the potential fate and migration of submerged oil and oiled sediment. Three models were developed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to cover a range of spatial scales of interest to onsite operations. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport models from the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code and the sediment bed model SEDZLJ1 were used to simulate potential resuspension, migration, and deposition of submerged oil and oiled sediment along a 38-mile reach of the Kalamazoo River affected by the oil from Marshall to Kalamazoo. An algorithm was added to SEDZLJ to represent three additional particle size classes of oilparticle aggregates (OPAs) with a range of sizes, specific gravities, and settling velocities. Field and laboratory experiments and flume tests were done to support the numerical modeling of OPAs. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate hydrodynamics and OPA tracking through Morrow Lake, the most downstream impoundment. This model incorporated wind and dam operations into high and low flow, lake drawdown, and containment simulations. Finally, a 2D unstructured grid model, HydroSed2D, was used to simulate flows and sediment transport along 1- to 2-mile segments of the Kalamazoo River around islands and through side channels and backwater areas that are particularly prone to submerged oil deposition.Integrated models could be developed quickly due to the availability of

  8. Effect of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion on intramembranous charge movement in frog cut muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cut muscle fibers from Rana temporaria (sarcomere length, 3.3-3.5 microns; temperature, 13-16 degrees C) were mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber and equilibrated for at least an hour with an internal solution that contained 20 mM EGTA and phenol red and an external solution that contained predominantly TEA-gluconate; both solutions were nominally Ca-free. The increase in total myoplasmic concentration of Ca (delta[CaT]) produced by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release was estimated from the change in pH produced when the released Ca was complexed by EGTA (Pape, P.C., D.-S. Jong, and W.K. Chandler. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:259-336). The resting value of SR Ca content, [CaSR]R (expressed as myoplasmic concentration), was taken to be equal to the value of delta[CaT] obtained during a step depolarization (usually to -50 to -40 mV) that was sufficiently long (200-750 ms) to release all of the readily releasable Ca from the SR. In ten fibers, the first depolarization gave [CaSR]R = 839-1,698 microM. Progressively smaller values were obtained with subsequent depolarizations until, after 30-40 depolarizations, the value of [CaSR]R had usually been reduced to < 10 microM. Measurements of intramembranous charge movement, Icm, showed that, as the value of [CaSR]R decreased, ON-OFF charge equality held and the amount of charge moved remained constant. ON Icm showed brief initial I beta components and prominent I gamma "humps", even after the value of [CaSR]R was < 10 microM. Although the amplitude of the hump component decreased during depletion, its duration increased in a manner that preserved the constancy of ON charge. In the depleted state, charge movement was steeply voltage dependent, with a mean value of 7.2 mV for the Boltzmann factor k. These and other results are not consistent with the idea that there is one type of charge, Q beta, and that I gamma is a movement of Q beta caused by SR Ca release, as proposed by Pizarro, Csernoch, Uribe

  9. Gelation of a monoclonal antibody at the silicone oil-water interface and subsequent rupture of the interfacial gel results in aggregation and particle formation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyam B; Lewus, Rachael; Bee, Jared S; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2015-04-01

    The formation of viscoelastic gels by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) at the silicone oil-water interface was studied using interfacial shear rheology. At a concentration of 50 μg/mL, the mAb formed gels in less than 1 h, and the gelation time decreased with increasing protein concentration. To probe the effects of mechanical rupture of the interfacial gel layers, a layer of silicone oil was overlaid on the surface of aqueous solutions of mAb, and the interface was ruptured periodically with a needle. Rupture of the interfacial gel resulted in formation of subvisible particles and substantial losses of mAb monomer, which were detected by microflow imaging and quantified by size-exclusion chromatography, respectively. Resonance mass measurement showed that levels of both protein particles and silicone oil droplets increased as the gel was repeatedly ruptured with a needle. In contrast, in samples wherein the interfacial gels were not ruptured, much lower levels of aggregates and particles were detected. Addition of nonionic surfactants (polysorbate 20 or polysorbate 80) protected against aggregation and protein particle formation, with increased protection seen with increasing surfactant levels, and with the greatest inhibition observed in samples containing polysorbate 80.

  10. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Propylene Epoxidation by Alumina-Supported Silver Aggregates. The Role of the Particle / Support Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Yin, Chunrong; Mehmood, Faisal; Liu, Bin; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, R. E.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, Robert; Vajda, S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2013-11-21

    Sub-nanometer Ag aggregates on alumina supports have been found to be active toward direct propylene epoxidation to propylene oxide by molecular oxygen at low temperatures, with a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation (Science 328, p. 224, 2010). In this work, we computationally and experimentally investigate the origin of the high reactivity of the sub-nanometer Ag aggregates. Computationally, we study O2 dissociation and propylene epoxidation on unsupported Ag19 and Ag20 clusters, as well as alumina-supported Ag19. The O2 dissociation and propylene epoxidation apparent barriers at the interface between the Ag aggregate and the alumina support are calculated to be 0.2 and 0.2~0.4 eV, respectively. These barriers are somewhat lower than those on sites away from the interface. The mechanism at the interface is similar to what was previously found for the silver trimer on alumina and can account for the high activity observed for the direct oxidation of propylene on the Ag aggregates. The barriers for oxygen dissociation on these model systems both at the interface and on the surfaces are small compared to crystalline surfaces, indicating that availability of oxygen will not be a rate limiting step for the aggregates, as in the case of the crystalline surfaces. Experimentally, we investigate Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD)-supported silver aggregates under reactive conditions of propylene partial oxidation. The UNCD-supported Ag clusters are found to be not measurably active toward propylene oxidation, in contrast to the alumina supported Ag clusters. This suggests that the lack of metal-oxide interfacial sites of the Ag-UNCD catalyst, limits the epoxidation catalytic activity. This combined computational and experimental study shows the importance of the metal-oxide interface as well as the non-crystalline nature of the alumina-supported sub-nanometer Ag aggregate catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  11. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-05-01

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination.

  12. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-05-21

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au(3+) reduction to metallic Au(0) is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au(0) exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination.

  13. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination. PMID:25994222

  14. Tetanus toxoid-loaded cationic non-aggregated nanostructured lipid particles triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Jyoti, Kiran; Rai, Shweta; Sidhu, Rupinder; Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Jain, Upendra Kumar; Katyal, Anju; Madan, Jitender

    2016-05-01

    In the present investigation, non-aggregated cationic and unmodified nanoparticles (TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1) were prepared of about 49.2 ± 6.8-nm and 40.8 ± 8.3-nm, respectively. In addition, spherical shape, crystalline architecture and cationic charge were also noticed. Furthermore, integrity and conformational stability of TT were maintained in both TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1, as evidenced by symmetrical position of bands and superimposed spectra, respectively in SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism. Cellular uptake in RAW264.7 cells indicating the concentration-dependent internalisation of nanoparticles. Qualitatively, CLSM exhibited enhanced cellular uptake of non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 owing to interaction with negatively charged plasma membrane and clevaloe mediated/independent endocytosis. In last, in vivo immunisation with non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 elicited strong humoral (anti-TT IgG) and cellular (IFN-γ) immune responses at day 42, as compared to non-aggregated TT-NLPs1 and TT-Alum following booster immunisation at day 14 and 28. Thus, non-aggregated cationic lipid nanoparticles may be a potent immune-adjuvant for parenteral delivery of weak antigens.

  15. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Plaksin, Michael; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control.

  16. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity Are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL3.

    PubMed

    Hamblet, Corinne E; Makowski, Stefanie L; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-03-15

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. In this article, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27(+)CD11b(+) and CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knockin mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL31

    PubMed Central

    Hamblet, Corinne E.; Makowski, Stefanie L.; Tritapoe, Julia M.; Pomerantz, Joel L.

    2016-01-01

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. Here, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC Class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27+CD11b+ and CD27−CD11b+ NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knock-in mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. PMID:26851218

  18. Osteal macrophages promote in vivo intramembranous bone healing in a mouse tibial injury model.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kylie A; Chang, Ming K; Maylin, Erin R; Kohler, Thomas; Müller, Ralph; Wu, Andy C; Van Rooijen, Nico; Sweet, Matthew J; Hume, David A; Raggatt, Liza J; Pettit, Allison R

    2011-07-01

    Bone-lining tissues contain a population of resident macrophages termed osteomacs that interact with osteoblasts in vivo and control mineralization in vitro. The role of osteomacs in bone repair was investigated using a mouse tibial bone injury model that heals primarily through intramembranous ossification and progresses through all major phases of stabilized fracture repair. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that at least two macrophage populations, F4/80(+) Mac-2(-/low) TRACP(-) osteomacs and F4/80(+) Mac-2(hi) TRACP(-) inflammatory macrophages, were present within the bone injury site and persisted throughout the healing time course. In vivo depletion of osteomacs/macrophages (either using the Mafia transgenic mouse model or clodronate liposome delivery) or osteoclasts (recombinant osteoprotegerin treatment) established that osteomacs were required for deposition of collagen type 1(+) (CT1(+)) matrix and bone mineralization in the tibial injury model, as assessed by quantitative immunohistology and micro-computed tomography. Conversely, administration of the macrophage growth factor colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) increased the number of osteomacs/macrophages at the injury site significantly with a concurrent increase in new CT1(+) matrix deposition and enhanced mineralization. This study establishes osteomacs as participants in intramembranous bone healing and as targets for primary anabolic bone therapies. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Conservation of intramembrane proteolytic activity and substrate specificity in prokaryotic and eukaryotic rhomboids.

    PubMed

    Urban, Sinisa; Schlieper, Daniel; Freeman, Matthew

    2002-09-03

    Rhomboid is an intramembrane serine protease responsible for the proteolytic activation of Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands. Although nothing is known about the function of the approximately 100 currently known rhomboid genes conserved throughout evolution, a recent analysis suggests that a Rhomboid from the pathogenic bacterium Providencia stuartii is involved in the production of a quorum-sensing factor. This suggests that an intercellular signaling mechanism may have been conserved between prokaryotes and metazoans. However, the function of prokaryotic Rhomboids is unknown. We have examined the ability of eight prokaryotic Rhomboids to cleave the three Drosophila EGFR ligands. Despite their striking sequence divergence, Rhomboids from one Gram-positive and four Gram-negative species, including Providencia, specifically cleaved Drosophila substrates, but not similar proteins such as Transforming Growth Factor alpha (TGFalpha) and Delta. Although the sequence similarity between these divergent Rhomboids is very limited, all contain the putative serine catalytic triad residues, and their specific mutation abolished protease activity. Therefore, despite low overall homology, the Rhomboids are a family of ancient, functionally conserved intramembrane serine proteases, some of which also have conserved substrate specificity. Moreover, a function for Rhomboids in activating intercellular signaling appears to have evolved early.

  20. Untangling structure-function relationships in the rhomboid family of intramembrane proteases.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Cory L; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2013-12-01

    Rhomboid proteases are a family of integral membrane proteins that have been implicated in critical regulatory roles in a wide array of cellular processes and signaling events. The determination of crystal structures of the prokaryotic rhomboid GlpG from Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae has ushered in an era of unprecedented understanding into molecular aspects of intramembrane proteolysis by this fascinating class of protein. A combination of structural studies by X-ray crystallography, and biophysical and spectroscopic analyses, combined with traditional enzymatic and functional analysis has revealed fundamental aspects of rhomboid structure, substrate recognition and the catalytic mechanism. This review summarizes these remarkable advances by examining evidence for the proposed catalytic mechanism derived from inhibitor co-crystal structures, conflicting models of rhomboid-substrate interaction, and recent work on the structure and function of rhomboid cytosolic domains. In addition to exploring progress on aspects of rhomboid structure, areas for future research and unaddressed questions are emphasized and highlighted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  1. Adult stem cell mobilization enhances intramembranous bone regeneration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Margaret A; Virdi, Amarjit S; Christopherson, Kent W; Sena, Kotaro; Frank, Robin R; Sumner, Dale R

    2012-09-01

    Stem cell mobilization, which is defined as the forced egress of stem cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood (PB) using chemokine receptor agonists, is an emerging concept for enhancing tissue regeneration. However, the effect of stem cell mobilization by a single injection of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) antagonist AMD3100 on intramembranous bone regeneration is unclear. We therefore asked: Does AMD3100 mobilize adult stem cells in C57BL/6 mice? Are stem cells mobilized to the PB after marrow ablation? And does AMD3100 enhance bone regeneration? Female C57BL/6 mice underwent femoral marrow ablation surgery alone (n = 25), systemic injection of AMD3100 alone (n = 15), or surgery plus AMD3100 (n = 57). We used colony-forming unit assays, flow cytometry, and micro-CT to investigate mobilization of mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and hematopoietic stem cells to the PB and bone regeneration. AMD3100 induced mobilization of stem cells to the PB, resulting in a 40-fold increase in mesenchymal stem cells. The marrow ablation injury mobilized all three cell types to the PB over time. Administration of AMD3100 led to a 60% increase in bone regeneration at Day 21. A single injection of a CXCR4 antagonist lead to stem cell mobilization and enhanced bone volume in the mouse marrow ablation model of intramembranous bone regeneration.

  2. Models for the optical simulations of fractal aggregated soot particles thinly coated with non-absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Light absorption enhancement of aged soot aerosols is highly sensitive to the morphologies and mixing states of soot aggregates and their non-absorbing coatings, such as organic materials. The quantification of these effects on the optical properties of thinly coated soot aerosols is simulated using an effective model with fixed volume fractions. Fractal aggregated soot was simulated using the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm and discretized into soot dipoles. The dipoles of non-absorbing aerosols, whose number was fixed by the volume fraction, were further generated from the neighboring random edge dipoles. Their optical properties were calculated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method and were compared with other commonly used models. The optical properties of thinly coated soot calculated using the fixed volume fraction model are close to (less than ~10% difference) the results of the fixed coating thickness model, except their asymmetry parameters (up to ~25% difference). In the optical simulations of thinly coated soot aerosols, this relative difference of asymmetry parameters and phase functions between these realistic models may be notable. The realizations of the fixed volume fraction model may introduce smaller variation of optical results than those of the fixed coating thickness model. Moreover, the core-shell monomers model and homogeneous aggregated spheres model with the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) theory may underestimate (up to ~20%) the cross sections of thinly coated soot aggregates. The single core-shell sphere model may largely overestimate (up to ~150%) the cross sections and single scattering albedo of thinly coated soot aggregates, and it underestimated (up to ~60%) their asymmetry parameters. It is suggested that the widely used single core-shell sphere approximation may not be suitable for the single scattering calculations of thinly coated soot aerosols.

  3. Poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol) microspheres for immunodiagnostics. Principle of a novel latex test based on combined electrophoretic mobility and particle aggregation measurements.

    PubMed

    Radomska-Galant, Izabela; Basinska, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The principle of a novel latex agglutination test based on combined results of electrophoretic mobility and particle aggregation measurements is described. Poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres were synthesized by a one step soap-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol macromonomer with number average molecular weight Mn = 2700 (polydispersity [Mw]/[Mn] = 1.10). Particles with monomodal size distribution (number average diameter Dn = 220 nm) and surface fraction of polyglycidol equal to f = 0.42 mol % were obtained. Human serum albumin (HSA) was covalently bound onto the surface of P(S/PGL) microspheres activated with 1,3,5-trichlorotriazine. In a model immunodiagnostic assay for anti-HSA, in which P(S/PGL) particles with covalently bound HSA have been used, the electrophoretic mobility and aggregation of microspheres were measured simultaneously. This approach allowed detection of anti-HSA in the serum in the range of anti-HSA concentrations from 0.1 to 150 microg/mL. The highest changes in electrophoretic mobility were registered for microspheres with surface concentration of immobilized HSA equal to Gamma = 9.2 x 10(-4) g/m2.

  4. Label-free DNA quantification via a 'pipette, aggregate and blot' (PAB) approach with magnetic silica particles on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyi; Liu, Qian; Alsamarri, Hussein; Lounsbury, Jenny A; Haversitick, Doris M; Landers, James P

    2013-03-07

    Reliable measurement of DNA concentration is essential for a broad range of applications in biology and molecular biology, and for many of these, quantifying the nucleic acid content is inextricably linked to obtaining optimal results. In its most simplistic form, quantitative analysis of nucleic acids can be accomplished by UV-Vis absorbance and, in more sophisticated format, by fluorimetry. A recently reported new concept, the 'pinwheel assay', involves a label-free approach for quantifying DNA through aggregation of paramagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field. Here, we describe a simplified version of that assay adapted for execution using only a pipet and filter paper. The 'pipette, aggregate, and blot' (PAB) approach allows DNA to induce bead aggregation in a pipette tip through exposure to a magnetic field, followed by dispensing (blotting) onto filter paper. The filter paper immortalises the extent of aggregation, and digital images of the immortalized bead conformation, acquired with either a document scanner or a cell phone camera, allows for DNA quantification using a noncomplex algorithm. Human genomic DNA samples extracted from blood are quantified with the PAB approach and the results utilized to define the volume of sample used in a PCR reaction that is sensitive to input mass of template DNA. Integrating the PAB assay with paper-based DNA extraction and detection modalities has the potential to yield 'DNA quant-on-paper' devices that may be useful for point-of-care testing.

  5. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VI. EROSION OF LARGE AGGREGATES AS A SOURCE OF MICROMETER-SIZED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen

    2011-06-20

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-infrared excess of classical T Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect, the erosion halts for impact velocities up to {approx}30 m s{sup -1} within our error bars. For higher velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a next step, we build an analytical disk model and implement the experimentally found erosive effect. The model shows that erosion is a strong source of micrometer-sized particles in a protoplanetary disk. Finally, we use the stationary solution of this model to explain the amount of micrometer-sized particles in the observational infrared data of Furlan et al.

  6. Cryopreservation of embryonic stem cell-derived multicellular neural aggregates labeled with micron-sized particles of iron oxide for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanwei; Sart, Sébastien; Calixto Bejarano, Fabian; Muroski, Megan E; Strouse, Geoffrey F; Grant, Samuel C; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an effective approach to track labeled pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) for neurological disorder treatments after cell labeling with a contrast agent, such as an iron oxide derivative. Cryopreservation of pre-labeled neural cells, especially in three-dimensional (3D) structure, can provide a uniform cell population and preserve the stem cell niche for the subsequent applications. In this study, the effects of cryopreservation on PSC-derived multicellular NPC aggregates labeled with micron-sized particles of iron oxide (MPIO) were investigated. These NPC aggregates were labeled prior to cryopreservation because labeling thawed cells can be limited by inefficient intracellular uptake, variations in labeling efficiency, and increased culture time before use, minimizing their translation to clinical settings. The results indicated that intracellular MPIO incorporation was retained after cryopreservation (70-80% labeling efficiency), and MPIO labeling had little adverse effects on cell recovery, proliferation, cytotoxicity and neural lineage commitment post-cryopreservation. MRI analysis showed comparable detectability for the MPIO-labeled cells before and after cryopreservation indicated by T2 and T2* relaxation rates. Cryopreserving MPIO-labeled 3D multicellular NPC aggregates can be applied in in vivo cell tracking studies and lead to more rapid translation from preservation to clinical implementation.

  7. Leaching characteristics of EDTA-enhanced phytoextraction of Cd and Pb by Zea mays L. in different particle-size fractions of soil aggregates exposed to artificial rain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yayin; Luo, Dinggui; Lai, An; Liu, Guowei; Liu, Lirong; Long, Jianyou; Zhang, Hongguo; Chen, Yongheng

    2017-01-01

    Chelator-assisted phytoextraction is an alternative and effective technique for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils, but the potential for heavy metal leaching needs to be assessed. In the present study, a soil column cultivation-leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the Cd and Pb leaching characteristics during assisted phytoextraction of metal-contaminated soils containing different particle-size soil aggregates. The columns were planted with Zea mays "Zhengdan 958" seedlings and treated with combined applications of EDTA and simulated rainfall (pH 4.5 or 6.5). The results were as follows: (1) The greatest uptake of Cd and Pb by Z. mays was observed after treatment with EDTA (2.5 mmol kg(-1) soil) and soil aggregates of <1 mm; uptake decreased as the soil aggregate size increased. (2) Simulated rainfall, especially acid rain (pH 4.5), after EDTA applications led to the increasing metal concentrations in the leachate, and EDTA significantly increased the concentrations of both Cd and Pb in the leachate, especially with soil aggregates of <1 mm; metal leachate concentrations decreased as soil particle sizes increased. (3) Concentrations of Cd and Pb decreased with each continuing leachate collection, and data were fit to linear regression models with coefficients of determination (R (2)) above 0.90 and 0.87 for Cd and Pb, respectively. The highest total amounts of Cd (22.12%) and Pb (19.29%) were observed in the leachate of soils treated with EDTA and artificial acid rain (pH 4.5) with soil aggregates of <1 mm. The application of EDTA during phytoextraction method increased the leaching risk in the following order: EDTA2.5-1 (pH 4.5) > EDTA2.5-1 (pH 6.5) > EDTA2.5-2 (pH 4.5) > EDTA2.5-4 (pH 4.5) > EDTA2.5-2 (pH 6.5) > EDTA2.5-4 (pH 6.5).

  8. Part I: Steady States in Two-Species Particle Aggregation. Part II: Sparse Representations for Multiscale PDE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Kim , Chris Anderson, Will Feldman, James von Brecht, Hui Sun, Marcus Roper, Joseph Teran, and Russell Caflisch have all supported me in their own ways...cum laude 2011- 2012 Graduate Teaching Assistant, UCLA 2012 Summer Undergraduate Research Project Mentor, UCLA REU 2012 -2015 Graduate Research...Methods in Applied Sciences, 22(supp01), 2012 . [7] Andrea L Bertozzi, Thomas Laurent, and Jesús Rosado. Lp theory for the multidimensional aggregation

  9. Enhancement of particle aggregation in the presence of organic matter during neutralization of acid drainage in a stream confluence and its effect on arsenic immobilization.

    PubMed

    Arce, Guillermo; Montecinos, Mauricio; Guerra, Paula; Escauriaza, Cristian; Coquery, Marina; Pastén, Pablo

    2017-08-01

    Acid drainage (AD) is an important environmental concern that impacts water quality. The formation of reactive Fe and Al oxyhydroxides during the neutralization of AD at river confluences is a natural attenuation process. Although it is known that organic matter (OM) can affect the aggregation of Fe and Al oxyhydroxides and the sorption of As onto their surfaces, the role of OM during the neutralization of AD at river confluences has not been studied. Field and experimental approaches were used to understand this role, using the Azufre River (pH 2) - Caracarani River (pH 8.6) confluence (northern Chile) as model system. Field measurements of organic carbon revealed a 10-15% loss of OM downstream the confluence, which was attributed to associations with Fe and Al oxyhydroxides that settle in the river bed. Laboratory mixtures of AD water with synthetic Caracarani waters under varying conditions of pH, concentration and type of OM revealed that OM promoted the aggregation of Fe oxyhydroxides without reducing As sorption, enhancing the removal of As at slightly acidic conditions (pH ∼4.5). At acidic conditions (pH ∼3), aggregation of OM - metal complexes at high OM concentrations could become the main removal mechanism. One type of OM promoted bimodal particle size distributions with larger mean sizes, possibly increasing the settling velocity of aggregates. This work contributes to a better understanding of the role of OM in AD affected basins, showing that the presence of OM during processes of neutralization of AD can enhance the removal of toxic elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bringing bioactive compounds into membranes: the UbiA superfamily of intramembrane aromatic prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weikai

    2016-01-01

    The UbiA superfamily of intramembrane prenyltransferases catalyzes a key biosynthetic step in the production of ubiquinones, menaquinones, plastoquinones, hemes, chlorophylls, vitamin E, and structural lipids. These lipophilic compounds serve as electron and proton carriers for cellular respiration and photosynthesis, as antioxidants to reduce cell damage, and as structural components of microbial cell walls and membranes. This article reviews the biological functions and enzymatic activities of representative members of the superfamily, focusing on the remarkable recent research progress revealing that the UbiA superfamily is centrally implicated in several important physiological processes and human diseases. Because prenyltransferases in this superfamily have distinctive substrate preferences, two recent crystal structures are compared to illuminate the general mechanism for substrate recognition. PMID:26922674

  11. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N; Janecke, Andreas R; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-07-06

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development.

  12. Functional requirement of CCN2 for intramembranous bone formation in embryonic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaki, Harumi; Kubota, Satoshi; Suzuki, Akiko; Yamada, Tomohiro; Matsumura, Tatsushi; Mandai, Toshiko; Yao, Mayumi; Maeda, Takeyasu; Lyons, Karen M.; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    CCN2 is best known as a promoter of chondrocyte differentiation among the CCN family members, and Ccn2 null mutant mice display skeletal dysmorphisms. However, little is known concerning the roles of CCN2 during bone formation. We herein present a comparative analysis of wild-type and Ccn2 null mice to investigate the roles of CCN2 in bone development. Multiple histochemical methods were employed to analyze the effects of CCN2 deletion in vivo, and effects of CCN2 on the osteogenic response were evaluated with the isolated and cultured osteoblasts. As a result, we found a drastic reduction of the osteoblastic phenotype in Ccn2 null mutants. Importantly, addition of exogenous CCN2 promoted every step of osteoblast differentiation and rescued the attenuated activities of the Ccn2 null osteoblasts. These results suggest that CCN2 is required not only for the regulation of cartilage and subsequent events, but also for the normal intramembranous bone development. PMID:18067859

  13. Structures of an intramembrane vitamin K epoxide reductase homolog reveal control mechanisms for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixuan; Cheng, Wei; Fowle Grider, Ronald; Shen, Guomin; Li, Weikai

    2014-01-01

    The intramembrane vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) supports blood coagulation in humans and is the target of the anticoagulant warfarin. VKOR and its homologues generate disulphide bonds in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Here, to better understand the mechanism of VKOR catalysis, we report two crystal structures of a bacterial VKOR captured in different reaction states. These structures reveal a short helix at the hydrophobic active site of VKOR that alters between wound and unwound conformations. Motions of this 'horizontal helix' promote electron transfer by regulating the positions of two cysteines in an adjacent loop. Winding of the helix separates these 'loop cysteines' to prevent backward electron flow. Despite these motions, hydrophobicity at the active site is maintained to facilitate VKOR catalysis. Biochemical experiments suggest that several warfarin-resistant mutations act by changing the conformation of the horizontal helix. Taken together, these studies provide a comprehensive understanding of VKOR function.

  14. Steric trapping reveals a cooperativity network in the intramembrane protease GlpG

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongyu; Kim, Miyeon; Sungsuwan, Suttipun; Huang, Xuefei; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Hong, Heedeok

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are assembled through balanced interactions among protein, lipids and water. Studying their folding while maintaining the native lipid environment is necessary but challenging. Here we present methods for analyzing key elements in membrane protein folding including thermodynamic stability, compactness of the unfolded state and folding cooperativity under native conditions. The methods are based on steric trapping which couples unfolding of a doubly-biotinylated protein to binding of monovalent streptavidin (mSA). We further advanced this technology for general application by developing versatile biotin probes possessing spectroscopic reporters that are sensitized by mSA binding or protein unfolding. By applying these methods to an intramembrane protease GlpG of Escherichia coli, we elucidated a widely unraveled unfolded state, subglobal unfolding of the region encompassing the active site, and a network of cooperative and localized interactions to maintain the stability. These findings provide crucial insights into the folding energy landscape of membrane proteins. PMID:26999782

  15. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  16. Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis and Degradation of Murine Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule mEpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Hachmeister, Matthias; Bobowski, Karolina D.; Hogl, Sebastian; Dislich, Bastian; Fukumori, Akio; Eggert, Carola; Mack, Brigitte; Kremling, Heidi; Sarrach, Sannia; Coscia, Fabian; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Gires, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-)stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM) is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF) are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation. PMID:24009667

  17. Particle size analysis of dispersed oil and oil-mineral aggregates with an automated ultraviolet epi-fluorescence microscopy system.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Cogswell, A; Li, Z; Lee, K

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes recent advances in microscopic analysis for quantitative measurement of oil droplets. Integration of a microscope with bright-field and ultraviolet epi-fluorescence illumination (excitation wavelengths 340-380 nm; emission wavelengths 400-430 nm) fitted with a computer-controlled motorized stage, a high resolution digital camera, and new image-analysis software, enables automatic acquisition of multiple images and facilitates efficient counting and sizing of oil droplets. Laboratory experiments were conducted with this system to investigate the size distribution of chemically dispersed oil droplets and oil-mineral aggregates in baffled flasks that have been developed for testing chemical dispersant effectiveness. Image acquisition and data processing methods were developed to illustrate the size distribution of chemically dispersed oil droplets, as a function of energy dissipation rate in the baffled flasks, and the time-dependent change of the morphology and size distribution of oil-mineral aggregates. As a quantitative analytical tool, epifluorescence microscopy shows promise for application in research on oil spill response technologies, such as evaluating the effectiveness of chemical dispersant and characterizing the natural interaction between oil and mineral fines and other suspended particulate matters.

  18. Rigid Aggregate Formation (and Destruction) as a Mechanism for Emergent Particle Properties in Saturn's Outer A Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.

    2010-10-01

    We continue our studies modeling rigid bonding within dense N-body systems in local coordinates, such as may occur in Saturn's A and B rings. Laboratory experiments [1] suggest that such bonding is common if the particles are coated in a layer of frost, and recent work [2, 3] shows that such "sticky” particles may account for unexplained dynamics within the dense rings. Our modified version of pkdgrav [4] includes the unique capability to model the creation and destruction of rigid bonds of arbitrary strength between colliding particles in a non-inertial rotating frame. Particles impacting below a user-defined speed threshold form a rigid bond that may subsequently break (without deformation), given sufficient impact speed or stress. While the strength of these frosty bonds remains uncertain, our work begins with plausible assumptions based on currently available data. We present results from 3D simulations of ring material (approximately a third of a square km in area) that explore the parameter space, including a range of merging and fragmentation thresholds, bond strengths, ring surface densities, and particle sizes. We show that a reasonable range of these parameters is consistent with data for emergent particle properties in the A ring, as seen by Voyager [5]. In matching to these observables, this range provides constraints on the bonding process potentially at work in the dense rings of Saturn. This work is supported primarily by a NASA Earth and Space Sciences Fellowship (NESSF). References: [1] Eg. Hatzes et al. (1991), Icarus 89, 113-121. [2] Tremaine (2003), Astron. J. 125, 894-901. [3] Porco et al. (2008), Astron. J. 136, 2172. [4] Perrine et al. (2010), Icarus, submitted. [5] Zebker et al. (1985), Icarus 64, 531-548.

  19. Setting limits for acceptable change in sediment particle size composition: testing a new approach to managing marine aggregate dredging.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Keith M

    2013-08-15

    A baseline dataset from 2005 was used to identify the spatial distribution of macrofaunal assemblages across the eastern English Channel. The range of sediment composition found in association with each assemblage was used to define limits for acceptable change at ten licensed marine aggregate extraction areas. Sediment data acquired in 2010, 4 years after the onset of dredging, were used to assess whether conditions remained within the acceptable limits. Despite the observed changes in sediment composition, the composition of sediments in and around nine extraction areas remained within pre-defined acceptable limits. At the tenth site, some of the observed changes within the licence area were judged to have gone beyond the acceptable limits. Implications of the changes are discussed, and appropriate management measures identified. The approach taken in this study offers a simple, objective and cost-effective method for assessing the significance of change, and could simplify the existing monitoring regime. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Character, mass, distribution, and origin of tephra-fall deposits from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska—Highlighting the significance of particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Kristi L.; Schaefer, Janet R.; Coombs, Michelle L.

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano included 20 tephra-producing explosions between March 15, 2009 and April 4, 2009 (UTC). Next-Generation radar (NEXRAD) data show that plumes reached heights between 4.6 km and 19 km asl and were distributed downwind along nearly all azimuths of the volcano. Explosions lasted between < 1 and 31 min based on the signal duration at a distal seismic station (86 km). From Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data, we estimate that over 80,000 km2 received at least minor ash fall (> 0.8 mm thick), including communities along the Kenai Peninsula (80-100 km) and the city of Anchorage (170 km). Trace ash (< 0.8 mm) was reported as far as Fairbanks, 550 km NNE of the volcano. We estimate the total mass of tephra-fall deposits at 54.6 × 109 kg with a total DRE volume of 20.6 × 106 m3. On March 15, a small (4.6 km asl) phreatic explosion containing minor, non-juvenile ash, erupted through the summit ice cap. The first five magmatic explosions (events 1-5) occurred within a 6-hour period on March 23. Plumes rose to heights between 5.5 km and 14.9 km asl during 2- to 20-minute-duration explosions, and were dispersed mainly along a NNE trajectory. Trace ash fall was reported as far as Fairbanks. Owing to a shift in wind direction and heavy snowfall during these events, field discrimination among many of these layers was possible. All deposits comprise a volumetrically significant amount of particle aggregates, yet only event 5 deposits contain coarse clasts including glacier ice. The most voluminous tephra fall was deposited on March 24 (event 6) from a 15 minute explosion that sent a plume to 18.3 km asl, and dispersed tephra to the WNW. Within 10 km of the vent, this deposit contains 1-11 cm pumice clasts in a matrix of 1-2 mm aggregate lapilli. A small dome was presumably emplaced between March 23 and March 26 and was subsequently destroyed during 1-14 minute magmatic explosions of events 7-8 (March 26

  1. On the observation of the need for an unusually high concentration of cysteine and homocysteine to induce aggregation of polymer-stabilized gold nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakumary, C.; Sreenivasan, K.

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the interaction of chitosan-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CH-AuNPs) with cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcys) in aqueous media at pH 1.4. Since the polymer precipitates at higher pH, and the amino acids Cys and HCys are soluble at acidic pH, we kept the pH around 1.4 for stabilizing the particles. Zeta potential of CH-AuNPs was found to be positive and it is reasonable to assume that +ve Cys or Hcys at pH 1.4 will experience repulsive force. However, TEM images and absorption spectra indicated formation of aggregates including rod-like assembly. An interesting observation was the need for unusually high concentration of analytes (Cys and Hcys) to induce the assembly of CH-AuNPs. We also found time bound variation of the optical properties probably indicating the interaction is kinetically controlled and only a fraction of the analyte molecules having sufficient energy can bind onto the particles. We observed that at elevated temperature, the reaction was faster with a lower concentration of Cys or Hcys. These observations were supported by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory which describes the interparticle interaction and the colloidal stability in solution. Only molecules possessing enough energy to cross this force barrier can cause the aggregation. We also noted a time lag between Cys and Hcys to influence optical properties reflecting the possibility of using this simple approach to discriminate these two clinically relevant molecules. Our observation shows that simple sensing as well as generation of novel nanostructures could be manipulated by a judicious choice of conditions such as stabilizing agents, pH, etc.

  2. A Method of Lyophilizing Vaccines Containing Aluminum Salts into a Dry Powder Without Causing Particle Aggregation or Decreasing the Immunogenicity Following Reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinran; Thakkar, Sachin G.; Ruwona, Tinashe B.; Williams, Robert O.; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    Many currently licensed and commercially available human vaccines contain aluminum salts as vaccine adjuvants. A major limitation with these vaccines is that they must not be exposed to freezing temperatures during transport or storage such that the liquid vaccine freezes, because freezing causes irreversible coagulation that damages the vaccines (e.g., loss of efficacy). Therefore, vaccines that contain aluminum salts as adjuvants are formulated as liquid suspensions and are required to be kept in cold chain (2–8°C) during transport and storage. Formulating vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts into dry powder that can be readily reconstituted before injection may address the limitation. Spray freeze-drying of vaccines with low concentrations of aluminum salts and high concentrations of trehalose alone, or a mixture of sugars and amino acids, as excipients can convert vaccines containing aluminum salts into dry powder, but fails to preserve the particle size and/or immunogenicity of the vaccines. In the present study, using ovalbumin as a model antigen adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide or aluminum phosphate, a commercially available tetanus toxoid vaccine adjuvanted with potassium alum, a human hepatitis B vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide, and a human papillomavirus vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, it was shown that vaccines containing a relatively high concentration of aluminum salts (i.e., up to ~1%, w/v, of aluminum hydroxide) can be converted into a dry powder by thin-film freezing followed by removal of the frozen solvent by lyophilization while using low levels of trehalose (i.e., as low as 2% w/v) as an excipient. Importantly, the thin-film freeze-drying process did not cause particle aggregation, nor decreased the immunogenicity of the vaccines. Moreover, repeated freezing-and-thawing of the dry vaccine powder did not cause aggregation. Thin-film freeze-drying is a viable platform technology to produce dry powders of

  3. Ultrasound propagation in a magnetic fluid. I. Inclusion of particle aggregation: derivation and analysis of the dispersion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Gogosov, V.V.; Martynov, S.I.; Tsurikov, S.N.; Shaposhnikova, G.A.

    1987-10-01

    In the interest of establishing a scenario for the ultrasonic testing and quality control of magnetic liquids based on dispersions of magnetite the authors construct a mathematical model depicting the propagation of ultrasonic waves through the liquid under conditions of magnetization and magnetohydrodynamics imposed by an external magnetic field. The model analyzes the agglomerating properties of the magnetite particles and the effect of their agglomeration on ultrasonic wave propagation.

  4. Caffeine enhances intramembranous charge movement in frog skeletal muscle by increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, N; Ríos, E

    1996-01-01

    1. Currents of intramembranous charge movement were recorded, together with intracellular [Ca2+], in single muscle fibres subjected to voltage-clamp depolarization and 'pulses' of extracellular solution with a Ca2+ release-inducing concentration of caffeine (10 mM). 2. When caffeine was present prior to and during the voltage pulses, the charge transferred by pulses to between -60 and -40 mV increased by about 40%. 3. In fibres depleted of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), caffeine had no effect on charge transfer or kinetics. 4. Whenever the prior exposure to caffeine resulted in a large elevation in [Ca2+]i at the start of the depolarizing pulse, there was an increase in I beta, the monotonically decaying component of charge movement. When the presence of caffeine enhanced Ca2+ release induced by the pulse, there was increase in I gamma, the hump-like component. 5. The charge transferred during a pulse to -50 mV increased with time of exposure to caffeine. Ca2+ release induced by the voltage pulse grew during the first second of caffeine exposure, then decreased with longer exposure time. The enhancement of charge transfer by caffeine was therefore not due to the increase in Ca2+ release caused by the drug. 6. The increase in charge transfer was a uniform, monotonically increasing function of the [Ca2+]i attained at the end of the voltage pulse. 7. Charge transfer, as a function of [Ca2+]i, pulse voltage and time, was simulated with a model, used previously, in which Ca2+ binds to intracellular sites and increases the electrical potential near the voltage sensors. Two sites were needed to fit the observations, with dissociation constants of 60 nM and 2 to 10 microM. 8. In the presence of caffeine, the voltage-driven movement of a given amount of intra-membranous charge resulted in greater activation of release permeability. 9. All effects of caffeine observed in this and the preceding paper could be explained assuming a single action: caffeine increases

  5. Structural characterization of the intra-membrane histidine kinase YbdK from Bacillus subtilis in DPC micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Pil; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Young-Chang; Jeon, Young Ho

    2010-01-15

    Bacterial histidine kinases (HKs) play a critical role in signal transduction for cellular adaptation to environmental conditions and stresses. YbdK from Bacillus subtilis is a 320-residue intra-membrane sensing HK characterized by a short input domain consisting of two transmembrane helices without an extracytoplasmic domain. While the cytoplasmic domains of HKs have been studied in detail, the intra-membrane sensing domain systems are still uncharacterized due to difficulties in handling the transmembrane domain. Here, we successfully obtained pure recombinant transmembrane domain of YbdK (YbdK-TM) from E. coli and analyzed the characteristics of YbdK-TM using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and other biophysical methods. YbdK-TM was found to form homo-dimers in DPC micelles based on cross-linking assays and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses. We estimated the size of the YbdK-TM DPC complex to be 46 kDa using solution state NMR T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} relaxation analyses in DPC micelles. These results provide information that will allow functional and structural studies of intra-membrane sensing HKs to begin.

  6. Absence of B cells does not compromise intramembranous bone formation during healing in a tibial injury model.

    PubMed

    Raggatt, Liza J; Alexander, Kylie A; Kaur, Simranpreet; Wu, Andy C; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Pettit, Allison R

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have generated conflicting results regarding the contribution of B cells to bone formation during physiology and repair. Here, we have investigated the role of B cells in osteoblast-mediated intramembranous anabolic bone modeling. Immunohistochemistry for CD45 receptor expression indicated that B cells had no propensity or aversion for endosteal regions or sites of bone modeling and/or remodeling in wild-type mice. In the endocortical diaphyseal region, quantitative immunohistology demonstrated that young wild-type and B-cell deficient mice had similar amounts of osteocalcin(+) osteoblast bone modeling surface. The degree of osteoblast-associated osteomac canopy was also comparable in these mice inferring that bone modeling cellular units were preserved in the absence of B cells. In a tibial injury model, only rare CD45 receptor positive B cells were located within areas of high anabolic activity, including minimal association with osterix(+) osteoblast-lineage committed mesenchymal cells in wild-type mice. Quantitative immunohistology demonstrated that collagen type I matrix deposition and macrophage and osteoclast distribution within the injury site were not compromised by the absence of B cells. Overall, osteoblast distribution during normal growth and bone healing via intramembranous ossification proceeded normally in the absence of B cells. These observations support that in vivo, these lymphoid cells have minimal influence, or at most, make redundant contributions to osteoblast function during anabolic bone modeling via intramembranous mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surfactant adsorption and aggregate structure of silica nanoparticles: a versatile stratagem for the regulation of particle size and surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Savita; Rohilla, Deepak; Mehta, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    The area of silica nanoparticles is incredibly polygonal. Silica particles have aroused exceptional deliberation in bio-analysis due to great progress in particular arenas, for instance, biocompatibility, unique properties of modifiable pore size and organization, huge facade areas and pore volumes, manageable morphology and amendable surfaces, elevated chemical and thermal stability. Currently, silica nanoparticles participate in crucial utilities in daily trade rationales such as power storage, chemical and genetic sensors, groceries dispensation and catalysis. Herein, the size-dependent interfacial relation of anionic silica nanoparticles with twelve altered categories of cationic surfactants has been carried out in terms of the physical chemical facets of colloid and interface science. The current analysis endeavours to investigate the virtual consequences of different surfactants through the development of the objective composite materials. The nanoparticle size controls, the surface-to-volume ratio and surface bend relating to its interaction with surfactant will also be addressed in this work. More importantly, the simulated stratagem developed in this work can be lengthened to formulate core-shell nanostructures with functional nanoparticles encapsulated in silica particles, making this approach valuable and extensively pertinent for employing sophisticated materials for catalysis and drug delivery.

  8. Down-Regulation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase by Presenilin-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foveau, Bénédicte; Ancot, Frédéric; Leroy, Catherine; Petrelli, Annalisa; Reiss, Karina; Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giordano, Silvia; Fafeur, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) acts through the membrane-anchored Met receptor tyrosine kinase to induce invasive growth. Deregulation of this signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and involves, in most cases, overexpression of the receptor. We demonstrate that Met is processed in epithelial cells by presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (PS-RIP) independently of ligand stimulation. The proteolytic process involves sequential cleavage by metalloproteases and the γ-secretase complex, leading to generation of labile fragments. In normal epithelial cells, although expression of cleavable Met by PS-RIP is down-regulated, uncleavable Met displayed membrane accumulation and induced ligand-independent motility and morphogenesis. Inversely, in transformed cells, the Met inhibitory antibody DN30 is able to promote Met PS-RIP, resulting in down-regulation of the receptor and inhibition of the Met-dependent invasive growth. This demonstrates the original involvement of a proteolytic process in degradation of the Met receptor implicated in negative regulation of invasive growth. PMID:19297528

  9. Systemic application of growth hormone for enhancement of secondary and intramembranous fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Bail, Hermann J; Kolbeck, Stefan; Krummrey, Gert; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Haas, Norbert P; Raschke, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Hormones are known to influence bone metabolism and cellular mechanisms of fracture healing. Recent technologies in molecular biology offer recombinant production of hormones, which makes them applicable for pharmacological use. To investigate the effect of systemic growth hormone (GH) application experiments were performed in micropig animal models. Systemic daily subcutaneous injection of species-specific recombinant GH was investigated in Yucatan micropigs to evaluate the effect on secondary fracture healing in a standardized gap model (1 cm) and on intramembranous bone formation in distraction osteogenesis (DO). Quantitative computed tomography (qCT), biomechanical testing, measurement of systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels as well as histomorphometric analyses were performed to investigate differences in regenerate formation. Systemic GH administration significantly increased the torsional stability of the regenerate in comparison to the contralateral side in both experiments. qCT showed accelerated fracture bridging in the GH-treated animals in bone defect healing, while in DO histomorphometry elicited larger callus areas in the case of GH application. Systemic IGF-1 levels were significantly increased in both GH-treated groups. These experiments show that the systemic administration of recombinant GH accelerates fracture healing in standardized animal models. Clinical studies have now been initiated in order to prove the safety and the effectiveness of this therapeutical option.

  10. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate-peptide complex structures.

    PubMed

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Skerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-10-16

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the 'water retention site', suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG.

  11. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  12. A method of lyophilizing vaccines containing aluminum salts into a dry powder without causing particle aggregation or decreasing the immunogenicity following reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Thakkar, Sachin G; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Williams, Robert O; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-04-28

    Many currently licensed and commercially available human vaccines contain aluminum salts as vaccine adjuvants. A major limitation with these vaccines is that they must not be exposed to freezing temperatures during transport or storage such that the liquid vaccine freezes, because freezing causes irreversible coagulation that damages the vaccines (e.g., loss of efficacy). Therefore, vaccines that contain aluminum salts as adjuvants are formulated as liquid suspensions and are required to be kept in cold chain (2-8°C) during transport and storage. Formulating vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum salts into dry powder that can be readily reconstituted before injection may address this limitation. Spray freeze-drying of vaccines with low concentrations of aluminum salts and high concentrations of trehalose alone, or a mixture of sugars and amino acids, as excipients can convert vaccines containing aluminum salts into dry powder, but fails to preserve the particle size and/or immunogenicity of the vaccines. In the present study, using ovalbumin as a model antigen adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide or aluminum phosphate, a commercially available tetanus toxoid vaccine adjuvanted with potassium alum, a human hepatitis B vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide, and a human papillomavirus vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, it was shown that vaccines containing a relatively high concentration of aluminum salts (i.e., up to ~1%, w/v, of aluminum hydroxide) can be converted into a dry powder by thin-film freezing followed by removal of the frozen solvent by lyophilization while using low levels of trehalose (i.e., as low as 2% w/v) as an excipient. Importantly, the thin-film freeze-drying process did not cause particle aggregation, nor decreased the immunogenicity of the vaccines. Moreover, repeated freezing-and-thawing of the dry vaccine powder did not cause aggregation. Thin-film freeze-drying is a viable platform technology to produce dry powders of

  13. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) undergoes ectodomain shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP).

    PubMed

    Houri, Nadia; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule originally characterized as a virus receptor but subsequently shown to be involved in physiological processes such as neuronal and heart development, epithelial tight junction integrity, and tumour suppression. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules and a wide variety of other cell surface proteins serves as a mechanism for protein turnover and, in some cases, cell signaling. Metalloproteases such as A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) family members cleave cell surface receptors to release their substrates' ectodomains, while the presenilin/ɣ-secretase complex mediates regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), releasing intracellular domain fragments from the plasma membrane. In the case of some substrates such as Notch and amyloid precursor protein (APP), the released intracellular domains enter the nucleus to modulate gene expression. We report that CAR ectodomain is constitutively shed from glioma cells and developing neurons, and is also shed when cells are treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. We identified ADAM10 as a sheddase of CAR using assays involving shRNA knockdown and rescue, overexpression of wild-type ADAM10 and inhibition of ADAM10 activity by addition of its prodomain. In vitro peptide cleavage, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis revealed the amino acids M224 to L227 of CAR as the site of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain cleavage. CAR also undergoes RIP by the presenilin/γ-secretase complex, and the intracellular domain of CAR enters the nucleus. Ectodomain shedding is a prerequisite for RIP of CAR. Thus, CAR belongs to the increasing list of cell surface molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding and that are substrates for ɣ-secretase-mediated RIP.

  14. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) Undergoes Ectodomain Shedding and Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP)

    PubMed Central

    Houri, Nadia; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule originally characterized as a virus receptor but subsequently shown to be involved in physiological processes such as neuronal and heart development, epithelial tight junction integrity, and tumour suppression. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules and a wide variety of other cell surface proteins serves as a mechanism for protein turnover and, in some cases, cell signaling. Metalloproteases such as A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) family members cleave cell surface receptors to release their substrates’ ectodomains, while the presenilin/ɣ-secretase complex mediates regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), releasing intracellular domain fragments from the plasma membrane. In the case of some substrates such as Notch and amyloid precursor protein (APP), the released intracellular domains enter the nucleus to modulate gene expression. We report that CAR ectodomain is constitutively shed from glioma cells and developing neurons, and is also shed when cells are treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. We identified ADAM10 as a sheddase of CAR using assays involving shRNA knockdown and rescue, overexpression of wild-type ADAM10 and inhibition of ADAM10 activity by addition of its prodomain. In vitro peptide cleavage, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis revealed the amino acids M224 to L227 of CAR as the site of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain cleavage. CAR also undergoes RIP by the presenilin/γ-secretase complex, and the intracellular domain of CAR enters the nucleus. Ectodomain shedding is a prerequisite for RIP of CAR. Thus, CAR belongs to the increasing list of cell surface molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding and that are substrates for ɣ-secretase-mediated RIP. PMID:24015300

  15. Intramembrane cavitation as a unifying mechanism for ultrasound-induced bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Krasovitski, Boris; Frenkel, Victor; Shoham, Shy; Kimmel, Eitan

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to develop a unified model capable of explaining the mechanisms of interaction of ultrasound and biological tissue at both the diagnostic nonthermal, noncavitational (<100 mW · cm(-2)) and therapeutic, potentially cavitational (>100 mW · cm(-2)) spatial peak temporal average intensity levels. The cellular-level model (termed "bilayer sonophore") combines the physics of bubble dynamics with cell biomechanics to determine the dynamic behavior of the two lipid bilayer membrane leaflets. The existence of such a unified model could potentially pave the way to a number of controlled ultrasound-assisted applications, including CNS modulation and blood-brain barrier permeabilization. The model predicts that the cellular membrane is intrinsically capable of absorbing mechanical energy from the ultrasound field and transforming it into expansions and contractions of the intramembrane space. It further predicts that the maximum area strain is proportional to the acoustic pressure amplitude and inversely proportional to the square root of the frequency (ε A,max ∝ P(A)(0.8f - 0.5) and is intensified by proximity to free surfaces, the presence of nearby microbubbles in free medium, and the flexibility of the surrounding tissue. Model predictions were experimentally supported using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of multilayered live-cell goldfish epidermis exposed in vivo to continuous wave (CW) ultrasound at cavitational (1 MHz) and noncavitational (3 MHz) conditions. Our results support the hypothesis that ultrasonically induced bilayer membrane motion, which does not require preexistence of air voids in the tissue, may account for a variety of bioeffects and could elucidate mechanisms of ultrasound interaction with biological tissue that are currently not fully understood.

  16. Complex Formed between Intramembrane Metalloprotease SpoIVFB and Its Substrate, Pro-σK*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Halder, Sabyasachi; Kerr, Richard A.; Parrell, Daniel; Ruotolo, Brandon; Kroos, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Intramembrane metalloproteases (IMMPs) are conserved from bacteria to humans and control many important signaling pathways, but little is known about how IMMPs interact with their substrates. SpoIVFB is an IMMP that cleaves Pro-σK during Bacillus subtilis endospore formation. When catalytically inactive SpoIVFB was coexpressed with C-terminally truncated Pro-σK(1–126) (which can be cleaved by active SpoIVFB) in Escherichia coli, the substrate dramatically improved solubilization of the enzyme from membranes with mild detergents. Both the Pro(1–20) and σK(21–126) parts contributed to improving SpoIVFB solubilization from membranes, but only the σK part was needed to form a stable complex with SpoIVFB in a pulldown assay. The last 10 residues of SpoIVFB were required for improved solubilization from membranes by Pro-σK(1–126) and for normal interaction with the substrate. The inactive SpoIVFB·Pro-σK(1–126)-His6 complex was stable during affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. Disulfide cross-linking of the purified complex indicated that it resembled the complex formed in vivo. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry analysis resulted in an observed mass consistent with a 4:2 SpoIVFB·Pro-σK(1–126)-His6 complex. Stepwise photobleaching of SpoIVFB fused to a fluorescent protein supported the notion that the enzyme is tetrameric during B. subtilis sporulation. The results provide the first evidence that an IMMP acts as a tetramer, give new insights into how SpoIVFB interacts with its substrate, and lay the foundation for further biochemical analysis of the enzyme·substrate complex and future structural studies. PMID:26953342

  17. Protein aggregation and prionopathies.

    PubMed

    Renner, M; Melki, R

    2014-06-01

    Prion protein and prion-like proteins share a number of characteristics. From the molecular point of view, they are constitutive proteins that aggregate following conformational changes into insoluble particles. These particles escape the cellular clearance machinery and amplify by recruiting the soluble for of their constituting proteins. The resulting protein aggregates are responsible for a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jacob, Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington diseases. In addition, there are increasing evidences supporting the inter-cellular trafficking of these aggregates, meaning that they are "transmissible" between cells. There are also evidences that brain homogenates from individuals developing Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases propagate the disease in recipient model animals in a manner similar to brain extracts of patients developing Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease. Thus, the propagation of protein aggregates from cell to cell may be a generic phenomenon that contributes to the evolution of neurodegenerative diseases, which has important consequences on human health issues. Moreover, although the distribution of protein aggregates is characteristic for each disease, new evidences indicate the possibility of overlaps and crosstalk between the different disorders. Despite the increasing evidences that support prion or prion-like propagation of protein aggregates, there are many unanswered questions regarding the mechanisms of toxicity and this is a field of intensive research nowadays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Marine Synechococcus Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuer, S.; Deng, W.; Cruz, B. N.; Monks, L.

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to play an important role in the oceanic biological carbon pump, especially in oligotrophic regions. But as single cells are too small to sink, their carbon export has to be mediated by aggregate formation and possible consumption by zooplankton producing sinking fecal pellets. Here we report results on the aggregation of the ubiquitous marine pico-cyanobacterium Synechococcus as a model organism. We first investigated the mechanism behind such aggregation by studying the potential role of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP) and the effects of nutrient (nitrogen or phosphorus) limitation on the TEP production and aggregate formation of these pico-cyanobacteria. We further studied the aggregation and subsequent settling in roller tanks and investigated the effects of the clays kaolinite and bentonite in a series of concentrations. Our results show that despite of the lowered growth rates, Synechococcus in nutrient limited cultures had larger cell-normalized TEP production, formed a greater volume of aggregates, and resulted in higher settling velocities compared to results from replete cultures. In addition, we found that despite their small size and lack of natural ballasting minerals, Synechococcus cells could still form aggregates and sink at measureable velocities in seawater. Clay minerals increased the number and reduced the size of aggregates, and their ballasting effects increased the sinking velocity and carbon export potential of aggregates. In comparison with the Synechococcus, we will also present results of the aggregation of the pico-cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus in roller tanks. These results contribute to our understanding in the physiology of marine Synechococcus as well as their role in the ecology and biogeochemistry in oligotrophic oceans.

  19. STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect

    Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

    2005-04-01

    Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

  20. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  1. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  2. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  3. Intramembrane charge movement and sarcoplasmic calcium release in enzymatically isolated mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Szentesi, P; Jacquemond, V; Kovács, L; Csernoch, L

    1997-01-01

    1. Single muscle fibres were dissociated enzymatically from the extensor digitorum longus and communis muscles of rats and guinea-pigs. The fibres were mounted into a double Vaseline gap experimental chamber and the events in excitation-contraction coupling were studied under voltage clamp conditions. 2. The voltage dependence of intramembrane charge movement followed a two-state Boltzmann distribution with maximal available charge of 26.1 +/- 1.5 and 26.1 +/- 1.3 nC microF-1, mid-point voltage of -35.1 +/- 5.0 and -42.2 +/- 1.2 mV and steepness of 16.7 +/- 2.2 and 17.0 +/- 1.9 mV (means +/- S.E.M., n = 7 and 4) in rats and guinea-pigs, respectively. 3. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored using the calcium-sensitive dyes antipyrylazo III, fura-2 and mag-fura-5. Resting [Ca2+]i was similar in rats and guinea-pigs with 125 +/- 18 and 115 +/- 8 nM (n = 10 and 9), respectively, while the maximal increase for a 100 ms depolarization to 0 mV was larger in rats (6.3 +/- 1.0 microM; n = 7), than in guinea-pigs (2.8 +/- 0.3; n = 4). 4. The rate of calcium release (Rrel) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) displayed an early peak followed by a fast and a slow decline to a quasi maintained steady level. After normalizing Rrel to the estimated SR calcium content (1.2 +/- 0.1 and 0.9 +/- 0.1 mM in rats and guinea-pigs, respectively) and correcting for depletion of calcium in the SR the peak and steady levels at 0 mV, respectively, were found to be 2.50 +/- 0.08 and 0.81 +/- 0.06% ms-1 in rats and 2.43 +/- 0.25 and 0.88 +/- 0.01% ms-1 in guinea-pigs. The voltage dependence was essentially the same in both species, but different from that in amphibians. 5. These experiments show that enzymatic isolation yields functionally intact mammalian skeletal muscle fibres for Vaseline gap experiments. The data also suggest a close connection in the regulation of the different kinetic components of SR calcium release in mammalian skeletal muscle. PMID:9423180

  4. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinzhong; Wan, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Lei, Xiling; Niu, Qi; Jiang, Lanxin; Passtoors, Willemijn M; Zang, Aiping; Fraering, Patrick C; Wu, Fang

    2017-04-01

    Deregulation of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has recently been demonstrated to predominately promote survival and chemoresistance of cancer cells. Intramembrane proteolysis mediated by presenilin/γ-secretase is known to regulate the homeostasis of some RTKs. In the present study, we demonstrate that AXL, but not TYRO3 or MERTK, is efficiently and sequentially cleaved by α- and γ-secretases in various types of cancer cell lines. Proteolytic processing of AXL redirected signaling toward a secretase-mediated pathway, away from the classic, well-known, ligand-dependent canonical RTK signaling pathway. The AXL intracellular domain cleavage product, but not full-length AXL, was further shown to translocate into the nucleus via a nuclear localization sequence that harbored a basic HRRKK motif. Of interest, we found that the γ-secretase-uncleavable AXL mutant caused an elevated chemoresistance in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that AXL can undergo sequential processing mediated by various proteases kept in a homeostatic balance. This newly discovered post-translational processing of AXL may provide an explanation for the diverse functions of AXL, especially in the context of drug resistance in cancer cells.-Lu, Y., Wan, J., Yang, Z., Lei, X., Niu, Q., Jiang, L., Passtoors, W. M., Zang, A., Fraering, P. C., Wu, F. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  5. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yinzhong; Wan, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Lei, Xiling; Niu, Qi; Jiang, Lanxin; Passtoors, Willemijn M.; Zang, Aiping; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Deregulation of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has recently been demonstrated to predominately promote survival and chemoresistance of cancer cells. Intramembrane proteolysis mediated by presenilin/γ-secretase is known to regulate the homeostasis of some RTKs. In the present study, we demonstrate that AXL, but not TYRO3 or MERTK, is efficiently and sequentially cleaved by α- and γ-secretases in various types of cancer cell lines. Proteolytic processing of AXL redirected signaling toward a secretase-mediated pathway, away from the classic, well-known, ligand-dependent canonical RTK signaling pathway. The AXL intracellular domain cleavage product, but not full-length AXL, was further shown to translocate into the nucleus via a nuclear localization sequence that harbored a basic HRRKK motif. Of interest, we found that the γ-secretase–uncleavable AXL mutant caused an elevated chemoresistance in non–small-cell lung cancer cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that AXL can undergo sequential processing mediated by various proteases kept in a homeostatic balance. This newly discovered post-translational processing of AXL may provide an explanation for the diverse functions of AXL, especially in the context of drug resistance in cancer cells.—Lu, Y., Wan, J., Yang, Z., Lei, X., Niu, Q., Jiang, L., Passtoors, W. M., Zang, A., Fraering, P. C., Wu, F. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells. PMID:28034848

  6. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control. PMID:27390775

  7. Asparagine-proline sequence within membrane-spanning segment of SREBP triggers intramembrane cleavage by Site-2 protease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jin; Davé, Utpal P.; Grishin, Nick V.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    The NH2-terminal domains of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are released into the cytosol by regulated intramembrane proteolysis, after which they enter the nucleus to activate genes encoding lipid biosynthetic enzymes. Intramembrane proteolysis is catalyzed by Site-2 protease (S2P), a hydrophobic zinc metalloprotease that cleaves SREBPs at a membrane-embedded leucine-cysteine bond. In the current study, we use domain-swapping methods to localize the residues within the SREBP-2 membrane-spanning segment that are required for cleavage by S2P. The studies reveal a requirement for an asparagine-proline sequence in the middle third of the transmembrane segment. We propose a model in which the asparagine-proline sequence serves as an NH2-terminal cap for a portion of the transmembrane α-helix of SREBP, allowing the remainder of the α-helix to unwind partially to expose the peptide bond for cleavage by S2P. PMID:10805775

  8. Stoichiometry and Physical Chemistry of Promiscuous Aggregate-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coan, Kristin E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Many false positives in early drug discovery owe to nonspecific inhibition by colloid-like aggregates of organic molecules. Despite their prevalence, little is known about aggregate concentration, structure, or dynamic equilibrium; the binding mechanism, stoichiometry with, and affinity for enzymes remain uncertain. To investigate the elementary question of concentration, we counted aggregate particles using flow cytometry. For seven aggregate-forming molecules, aggregates were not observed until the concentration of monomer crossed a threshold, indicating a “critical aggregation concentration” (CAC). Above the CAC, aggregate count increased linearly with added organic material, while the particles dispersed when diluted below the CAC. The concentration of monomeric organic molecule is constant above the CAC, as is the size of the aggregate particles. For two compounds that form large aggregates, nicardipine and miconazole, we measured particle numbers directly by flow cytometry, determining that the aggregate concentration just above the CAC ranged from 5 to 30 fM. By correlating inhibition of an enzyme with aggregate count for these two drugs, we determined that the stoichiometry of binding is about 10 000 enzyme molecules per aggregate particle. Using measured volumes for nicardipine and miconazole aggregate particles (2.1 × 1011 and 4.7 × 1010 Å3, respectively), computed monomer volumes, and the observation that past the CAC all additional monomer forms aggregate particles, we find that aggregates are densely packed particles. Finally, given their size and enzyme stoichiometry, all sequestered enzyme can be comfortably accommodated on the surface of the aggregate. PMID:18588298

  9. Intramembranous Bone Healing Process Subsequent to Tooth Extraction in Mice: Micro-Computed Tomography, Histomorphometric and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Repeke, Carlos Eduardo; Ferreira Junior, Samuel de Barros; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Assis, Gerson Francisco; Taga, Rumio; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray) characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After the initial clot dominance (0h), the development of a provisional immature granulation tissue is evident (7d), characterized by marked cell proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammatory cells infiltration; associated with peaks of growth factors (BMP-2-4-7,TGFβ1,VEGFa), cytokines (TNFα, IL-10), chemokines & receptors (CXCL12, CCL25, CCR5, CXCR4), matrix (Col1a1-2, ITGA4, VTN, MMP1a) and MSCs (CD105, CD106, OCT4, NANOG, CD34, CD146) markers expression. Granulation tissue is sequentially replaced by more mature connective tissue (14d), characterized by inflammatory infiltrate reduction along the increased bone formation, marked expression of matrix remodeling enzymes (MMP-2-9), bone formation/maturation (RUNX2, ALP, DMP1, PHEX, SOST) markers, and chemokines & receptors associated with healing (CCL2, CCL17, CCR2). No evidences of cartilage cells or tissue were observed, strengthening the intramembranous nature of bone healing. Bone microarchitecture analysis supports the evolving healing, with total tissue and bone volumes as trabecular number and thickness showing a progressive increase over time. The extraction socket healing process is considered complete (21d) when the dental socket is filled by trabeculae bone with well-defined medullary canals; it being the expression of mature bone markers prevalent at this period. Our data confirms the intramembranous bone healing nature of the model used, revealing parallels between the gene expression profile and the histomorphometric

  10. Intramembranous bone healing process subsequent to tooth extraction in mice: micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Repeke, Carlos Eduardo; Ferreira Junior, Samuel de Barros; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Assis, Gerson Francisco; Taga, Rumio; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray) characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After the initial clot dominance (0 h), the development of a provisional immature granulation tissue is evident (7 d), characterized by marked cell proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammatory cells infiltration; associated with peaks of growth factors (BMP-2-4-7,TGFβ1,VEGFa), cytokines (TNFα, IL-10), chemokines & receptors (CXCL12, CCL25, CCR5, CXCR4), matrix (Col1a1-2, ITGA4, VTN, MMP1a) and MSCs (CD105, CD106, OCT4, NANOG, CD34, CD146) markers expression. Granulation tissue is sequentially replaced by more mature connective tissue (14 d), characterized by inflammatory infiltrate reduction along the increased bone formation, marked expression of matrix remodeling enzymes (MMP-2-9), bone formation/maturation (RUNX2, ALP, DMP1, PHEX, SOST) markers, and chemokines & receptors associated with healing (CCL2, CCL17, CCR2). No evidences of cartilage cells or tissue were observed, strengthening the intramembranous nature of bone healing. Bone microarchitecture analysis supports the evolving healing, with total tissue and bone volumes as trabecular number and thickness showing a progressive increase over time. The extraction socket healing process is considered complete (21 d) when the dental socket is filled by trabeculae bone with well-defined medullary canals; it being the expression of mature bone markers prevalent at this period. Our data confirms the intramembranous bone healing nature of the model used, revealing parallels between the gene expression profile and the

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  12. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  13. Decreased function of the class B tetracycline efflux protein Tet with mutations at aspartate 15, a putative intramembrane residue.

    PubMed Central

    McMurry, L M; Stephan, M; Levy, S B

    1992-01-01

    The aspartate 15 residue within the first predicted intramembrane helix of the tetracycline efflux protein Tet has been conserved in four tetracycline resistance determinants from gram-negative bacteria. Its replacement in class B Tet by tyrosine, histidine, or asparagine resulted in a 60 to 85% loss of tetracycline resistance and a similar loss of tetracycline-proton antiport. The tyrosine and histidine substitutions lowered the Vmax of the efflux system by some 90% but did not alter the Km. The asparagine substitution raised the Km over 13-fold, while the Vmax was equal to or greater than that of the wild type. Therefore, although the nature of its role is unclear, aspartate 15 is important for normal Tet function. Images PMID:1328154

  14. Rhomboid intramembrane protease RHBDL4 triggers ER-export and non-canonical secretion of membrane-anchored TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Wunderle, Lina; Knopf, Julia D.; Kühnle, Nathalie; Morlé, Aymeric; Hehn, Beate; Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Freeman, Matthew; Lemberg, Marius K.

    2016-01-01

    Rhomboid intramembrane proteases are the enzymes that release active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in Drosophila and C. elegans, but little is known about their functions in mammals. Here we show that the mammalian rhomboid protease RHBDL4 (also known as Rhbdd1) promotes trafficking of several membrane proteins, including the EGFR ligand TGFα, from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus, thereby triggering their secretion by extracellular microvesicles. Our data also demonstrate that RHBDL4-dependent trafficking control is regulated by G-protein coupled receptors, suggesting a role for this rhomboid protease in pathological conditions, including EGFR signaling. We propose that RHBDL4 reorganizes trafficking events within the early secretory pathway in response to GPCR signaling. Our work identifies RHBDL4 as a rheostat that tunes secretion dynamics and abundance of specific membrane protein cargoes. PMID:27264103

  15. Calcium release and intramembranous charge movement in frog skeletal muscle fibres with reduced (<250 μM) calcium content

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Paul C; Carrier, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that activation of voltage sensors in the T-tubular membranes is a critical step of excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate further whether the Qγ component (delayed [hump] component) of the intramembranous charge movement current (Icm) results from movement of these voltage sensors. Ca2+ release and Icm were measured in voltage-clamped frog cut fibres mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber. In order to reduce effects of Ca2+ feedback mechanisms, the calcium content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during rest was reduced to < 250 μm (referred to volume of myoplasm) and maintained approximately constant. The early (Qβ) and Qγ components of charge movement were estimated by fitting the sum of two Boltzmann functions to the total steady-state intramembranous charge vs. voltage data. The average voltage steepness factor (k) and half-maximal voltage (V-) for Qγ were 4.3 and −57.4 mV (n = 6), respectively. The SR membrane permeability for Ca2+ release was assessed when a constant amount of calcium remained in the SR (usually about 60 μm). A single Boltzmann function fitted to these data gave values on average for k and V- of 4.7 and −45.3 mV, respectively. The similarity of the values of k for Qγ and Ca2+ release supports the idea that Qγ reflects movement of voltage sensors for Ca2+ release. The greater value of V- for Ca2+ release compared to Qγ is consistent with multi-state models of the voltage sensor involving movement of Qγ charge during non-activating transitions. PMID:11850517

  16. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  17. Intramembranous charge movement in frog cut twitch fibers mounted in a double vaseline-gap chamber

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Intramembranous charge movement was measured in cut twitch fibers mounted in a double Vaseline-gap chamber with either a tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA.Cl) or a TEA2.SO4 solution (13-14 degrees C) in the central pool. Charge vs. voltage data were fitted by a single two-state Boltzmann distribution function. The average values of V (the voltage at which steady-state charge is equally distributed between the two Boltzmann states), k (the voltage dependence factor), and qmax/cm (the maximum charge divided by the linear capacitance, both per unit length of fiber) were V = -53.3 mV (SEM, 1.1 mV), k = 6.3 mV (SEM, 0.3 mV), qmax/cm = 18.0 nC/microF (SEM, 1.1 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = -35.1 mV (SEM, 1.8 mV), k = 10.5 mV (SEM, 0.9 mV), qmax/cm = 36.3 nC/microF (SEM, 3.2 nC/microF) in the TEA2.SO4 solution. These values of k are smaller than those previously reported for cut twitch fibers and are as small as those reported for intact fibers. If a correction is made for the contributions of currents from under the Vaseline seals, V = -51.2 mV (SEM, 1.1 mV), k = 7.2 mV (SEM, 0.4 mV), qmax/cm = 22.9 nC/microF (SEM, 1.4 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = -34.0 mV (SEM, 1.9 mV), k = 10.1 mV (SEM, 1.1 mV), qmax/cm = 38.8 nC/microF (SEM, 3.2 nC/microF) in the TEA2.SO4 solution. With this correction, however, the fit of the theoretical curve to the data is poor. A good fit with this correction can be obtained with a sum of two Boltzmann distribution functions. The first has average values V = -33.0 mV (SEM, 2.8 mV), k = 11.0 mV (SEM, 0.5 mV), qmax/cm = 10.6 nC/microF (SEM, 1.0 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = - 20.0 mV (SEM, 3.3 mV), k = 17.0 mV (SEM, 2.0 mV), qmax/cm = 36.4 nC/microF (SEM, 2.3 nC/microF) in the TEA2.SO4 solution. The second has average values V = -56.5 mV (SEM, 1.3 mV), k = 2.9 mV (SEM, 0.4 mV), qmax/cm = 13.2 nC/microF (SEM, 1.0 nC/microF) in the TEA.Cl solution; and V = -41.6 mV (SEM, 1.4 mV), k = 2.5 mV (SEM, 0.8 mV), qmax

  18. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  19. Improvements in Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis To Measure Particle Aggregation and Mass Distribution: A Case Study on Engineered Nanomaterial Stability in Incineration Landfill Leachates.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi, Kamyar; Nowack, Bernd; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Mitrano, Denise M

    2017-05-16

    Numerous nanometrology techniques have been developed in recent years to determine the size, concentration, and a number of other characteristics of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in environmental matrices. Among the many available techniques, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) can measure individual particles to create a size distribution and measure the particle number. Therefore, we explore the possibility to use these data to calculate the particle mass distribution. Additionally, we further developed the NTA methodology to explore its suitability for analysis of ENM in complex matrices by measuring ENM agglomeration and sedimentation in municipal solid waste incineration landfill leachates over time. 100 nm Au ENM were spiked into DI H2O and synthetic and natural leachates. We present the possibility of measuring ENM in the presence of natural particles based on differences in particle refractivity indices, delineate the necessity of creating a calibration curve to adjust the given NTA particle number concentration, and determine the instruments linear range under different conditions. By measuring the particle size and the particle number distribution, we were able to calculate the ENM mass remaining in suspension. By combining these metrics together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses, we could assess the extent of both homo- and heteroagglomeration as well as particle sedimentation. Reporting both size and mass based metrics is common in atmospheric particle measurements, but now, the NTA can give us the possibility of applying the same approach also to aqueous samples.

  20. Imbibition kinetics of spherical aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébraud, Pascal; Lootens, Didier; Debacker, Alban

    The imbibition kinetics of a millimeter-sized aggregate of 300 nm diameter colloidal particles by a wetting pure solvent is studied. Three successive regimes are observed : in the first one, the imbibition proceeds by compressing the air inside the aggregate. Then, the solvent stops when the pressure of the compressed air is equal to the Laplace pressure at the meniscus of the wetting solvent in the porous aggregate. The interface is pinned and the aggregate slowly degases, up to a point where the pressure of the entrapped air stops decreasing and is controlled by the Laplace pressure of small bubbles. Depending on the curvature of the bubble, the system may then be in an unstable state. The imbibition then starts again, but with an inner pressure in equilibrium with these bubbles. This last stage leads to the complete infiltration of the aggregate.

  1. Morphological properties of atmospheric aerosol aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Friedlander, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (smaller than about 0.1 μm) are often emitted from combustion and other high-temperature processes in the form of fractal-like aggregates composed of solid nanoparticles. Results of a study of atmospheric aggregates are reported. Particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids fitted on the last two stages of a single-jet eight-stage low-pressure impactor for periods of a few minutes. Photomicrographs of transmission electron microscope grids from the impactor stages were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (Df) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. Df increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180. Total particle concentrations in size ranges roughly equivalent to the low-pressure impactor stages were measured with a mobility analyzer and condensation particle counter. In one set of measurements, the fraction of the particles present as aggregates was about 60% for particles with aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 75 nm and 34% for the range 75 to 120 nm. The total aggregate concentration in the 50- to 120-nm size range was about 400 ml−1. The primary particles that make up atmospheric aggregates are more polydisperse than soot aggregates generated from a single laboratory source, an ethane/oxygen flame. Most measurements were made in the Los Angeles area, where the aggregates may represent a signature for diesel emissions. Rural aggregate concentrations in the size range 50 to 120 nm were less than 1% of the concentrations at urban sites. The data will permit better estimates of atmospheric aggregate residence times, transport, and deposition in the lung, optical extinction, and heterogenous nucleation. PMID:11592995

  2. Morphological properties of atmospheric aerosol aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Friedlander, S K

    2001-10-09

    Ultrafine particles (smaller than about 0.1 microm) are often emitted from combustion and other high-temperature processes in the form of fractal-like aggregates composed of solid nanoparticles. Results of a study of atmospheric aggregates are reported. Particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids fitted on the last two stages of a single-jet eight-stage low-pressure impactor for periods of a few minutes. Photomicrographs of transmission electron microscope grids from the impactor stages were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (D(f)) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. D(f) increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180. Total particle concentrations in size ranges roughly equivalent to the low-pressure impactor stages were measured with a mobility analyzer and condensation particle counter. In one set of measurements, the fraction of the particles present as aggregates was about 60% for particles with aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 75 nm and 34% for the range 75 to 120 nm. The total aggregate concentration in the 50- to 120-nm size range was about 400 ml(-1). The primary particles that make up atmospheric aggregates are more polydisperse than soot aggregates generated from a single laboratory source, an ethane/oxygen flame. Most measurements were made in the Los Angeles area, where the aggregates may represent a signature for diesel emissions. Rural aggregate concentrations in the size range 50 to 120 nm were less than 1% of the concentrations at urban sites. The data will permit better estimates of atmospheric aggregate residence times, transport, and deposition in the lung, optical extinction, and heterogeneous nucleation.

  3. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-02-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration.

  4. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration. PMID:26381537

  5. Silt-clay aggregates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1979-01-01

    Viking observations suggest abundant silt and clay particles on Mars. It is proposed that some of these particles agglomerate to form sand size aggregates that are redeposited as sandlike features such as drifts and dunes. Although the binding for the aggregates could include salt cementation or other mechanisms, electrostatic bonding is considered to be a primary force holding the aggregates together. Various laboratory experiments conducted since the 19th century, and as reported here for simulated Martian conditions, show that both the magnitude and sign of electrical charges on windblown particles are functions of particle velocity, shape and composition, atmospheric pressure, atmospheric composition and other factors. Electrical charges have been measured for saltating particles in the wind tunnel and in the field, on the surfaces of sand dunes, and within dust clouds on earth. Similar, and perhaps even greater, charges are proposed to occur on Mars, which could form aggregates of silt and clay size particles

  6. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  7. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  8. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  10. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  12. Self-organised aggregation of a pair of particles with different resonant frequencies and electric dipole moments of transitions, controlled by an external quasi-resonant field

    SciTech Connect

    Slabko, V V; Tsipotan, A S; Aleksandrovsky, A S

    2013-05-31

    The influence of the oscillation phases of the dipole moments induced in metal nanoparticles and quantum dots by an external laser field on their interaction energy is considered. It is shown that a difference in resonant frequencies leads to the formation of additional minima and maxima, which are absent in the spectral dependence of the interaction energy of identical particles at similar orientations of the pair of particles with respect to the plane of polarisation of radiation. These features are due to the fact that the oscillation phase difference of the induced dipole moments of particles reaches values close to {pi}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. An intramembranous ossification model for the in silico analysis of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites.

    PubMed

    Corredor-Gómez, Jennifer Paola; Rueda-Ramírez, Andrés Mauricio; Gamboa-Márquez, Miguel Alejandro; Torres-Rodríguez, Carolina; Cortés-Rodríguez, Carlos Julio

    2016-07-21

    The accurate modeling of biological processes allows us to predict the spatiotemporal behavior of living tissues by computer-aided (in silico) testing, a useful tool for the development of medical strategies, avoiding the expenses and potential ethical implications of in vivo experimentation. A model for bone healing in mouth would be useful for selecting proper surgical techniques in dental procedures. In this paper, the formulation and implementation of a model for Intramembranous Ossification is presented aiming to describe the complex process of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites. The model consists in a mathematical description of the mechanisms in which different types of cells interact, synthesize and degrade extracellular matrices under the influence of biochemical factors. Special attention is given to angiogenesis, oxygen-dependent effects and growth factor-induced apoptosis of fibroblasts. Furthermore, considering the depth-dependent vascularization of mandibular bone and its influence on bone healing, a functional description of the cell distribution on the severed periodontal ligament (PDL) is proposed. The developed model was implemented using the finite element method (FEM) and successfully validated by simulating an animal in vivo experiment on dogs reported in the literature. A good fit between model outcome and experimental data was obtained with a mean absolute error of 3.04%. The mathematical framework presented here may represent an important tool for the design of future in vitro and in vivo tests, as well as a precedent for future in silico studies on osseointegration and mechanobiology.

  14. Sustained Induction of Collagen Synthesis by TGF-β Requires Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis of CREB3L1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyue; Lee, Ching-En; Denard, Bray; Ye, Jin

    2014-01-01

    CREB3L1 (cAMP response element binding protein 3-like 1), a transcription factor synthesized as a membrane-bound precursor and activated through Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP), is essential for collagen production by osteoblasts during bone development. Here, we show that TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β), a cytokine known to stimulate production of collagen during wound healing and fibrotic diseases, induces proteolytic activation of CREB3L1 in human A549 cells. This activation results from inhibition of expression of TM4SF20 (transmembrane 4 L6 family member 20), which normally inhibits RIP of CREB3L1. Cleavage of CREB3L1 releases its NH2-terminal domain from membranes, allowing it to enter the nucleus where it binds to Smad4 to activate transcription of genes encoding proteins required for assembly of collagen-containing extracellular matrix. Our findings raise the possibility that inhibition of RIP of CREB3L1 could prevent excess deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic diseases. PMID:25310401

  15. Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a is required for CD74 intramembrane proteolysis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Kruchen, Anne; Fluhrer, Regina; Müller, Ingo; Saftig, Paul; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Martin, Christa L; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The invariant chain (CD74) mediates targeting of the MHCII complex to endosomal compartments, where CD74 undergoes degradation allowing MHCII to acquire peptides. We demonstrated recently that intramembrane proteolysis of the final membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) of CD74 is catalysed by Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) and that this process is indispensable for development and function of B lymphocytes in mice. In SPPL2a−/− mice, homeostasis of these cells is disturbed by the accumulation of the unprocessed CD74 NTF. So far, evidence for this essential role of SPPL2a is restricted to mice. Nevertheless, inhibition of SPPL2a has been suggested as novel approach to target B cells for treating autoimmunity. Here, we characterize human B cell lines with a homozygous microdeletion on chromosome 15. We demonstrate that this deletion disrupts the SPPL2a genomic locus and leads to loss of SPPL2a transcript. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with this deletion exhibit absence of SPPL2a at the protein level and show an accumulation of the CD74 NTF comparable to B cells from SPPL2a−/− mice. By this means, we present evidence that the role of SPPL2a in CD74 proteolysis is conserved in human B cells and provide support for modulation of SPPL2a activity as a therapeutic concept. PMID:25035924

  16. Folding and Intramembraneous BRICHOS Binding of the Prosurfactant Protein C Transmembrane Segment*

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, Alejandra; Presto, Jenny; Lara, Patricia; Akinyi-Oloo, Laura; García-Fojeda, Belén; Nilsson, IngMarie; Johansson, Jan; Casals, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a novel amyloid protein found in the lung tissue of patients suffering from interstitial lung disease (ILD) due to mutations in the gene of the precursor protein pro-SP-C. SP-C is a small α-helical hydrophobic protein with an unusually high content of valine residues. SP-C is prone to convert into β-sheet aggregates, forming amyloid fibrils. Nature's way of solving this folding problem is to include a BRICHOS domain in pro-SP-C, which functions as a chaperone for SP-C during biosynthesis. Mutations in the pro-SP-C BRICHOS domain or linker region lead to amyloid formation of the SP-C protein and ILD. In this study, we used an in vitro transcription/translation system to study translocon-mediated folding of the WT pro-SP-C poly-Val and a designed poly-Leu transmembrane (TM) segment in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Furthermore, to understand how the pro-SP-C BRICHOS domain present in the ER lumen can interact with the TM segment of pro-SP-C, we studied the membrane insertion properties of the recombinant form of the pro-SP-C BRICHOS domain and two ILD-associated mutants. The results show that the co-translational folding of the WT pro-SP-C TM segment is inefficient, that the BRICHOS domain inserts into superficial parts of fluid membranes, and that BRICHOS membrane insertion is promoted by poly-Val peptides present in the membrane. In contrast, one BRICHOS and one non-BRICHOS ILD-associated mutant could not insert into membranes. These findings support a chaperone function of the BRICHOS domain, possibly together with the linker region, during pro-SP-C biosynthesis in the ER. PMID:26041777

  17. Titan's aerosols. I - Laboratory investigations of shapes, size distributions, and aggregation of particles produced by UV photolysis of model Titan atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Stone, Bradley M.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments in which C2H2, C2H4, and HCN were photolyzed separately and as a mixture in UV light have been conducted in order to ascertain the physical properties of model Titan atmosphere aerosols. Aerosols formed from photolysis of C2H4 were physically similar to those formed from C2H2; protolysis of HCN rapidly generated particles that did not grow to sizes greater than 0.09 microns. While the formation of particles from C4H2 was observed within minutes, formation was slowed by a factor of 4 when C2H2 and HCN were added.

  18. Reduction of HAuCl4 by Na2S revisited: The case for Au nanoparticle aggregates and against Au2S/Au core/shell particles

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartzberg, A. M.; Grant, C. D.; van Buuren, Tony; ...

    2007-03-10

    The reaction of sodium sulfide with chloroauric acid has been surrounded by a controversy over the structure of the resulting product. The original report proposed a Au2S/Au core/shell structure based on strong near-IR resonance and limited transmission electron microscopy. Subsequent reports used the same model without further attempts to determine the structure of the products. With a significant body of experimental work compiled over a period of several years, we have shown that the major product of this reaction is aggregated spherical nanoparticles of gold with a minority component consisting of triangular and rod-like structures. This is in contradiction tomore » the core/shell structures as originally proposed. Recently, there have been additional reports that again suggest a Au2S/Au core/shell structure or irregularly shaped Au nanoparticles as an explanation for the near-IR resonance. To help resolve this issue, we have carried out further experiments to determine how the reaction products may depend on experimental conditions such as concentration and aging of the reactants, particularly Na2S. It has been determined that sodium thiosulfate is the likely product from Na2S aging. In addition, persistent spectral hole burning experiments have been conducted on gold nanoparticle aggregate (GNA) samples at excitation intensities that are lower than that required to melt the nanostructures. We have observed a decrease in optical absorption on resonance with the excitation laser wavelength, with simultaneous increases in absorption to the blue and red of this wavelength region. However, in the presence of the stabilizer poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), no increase in absorbance was observed but rather a blue shifting and decrease in intensity of the near-IR plasmon resonance. These results imply that the non-stabilized GNAs are able to break apart and reform into off resonant aggregate structures. In contrast, this behavior is suppressed in PVP stabilized GNAs

  19. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  20. A competitive aggregation model for flash nanoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Janine Chungyin; Vigil, R D; Fox, R O

    2010-11-15

    Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP) is a novel approach for producing functional nanoparticles stabilized by amphiphilic block copolymers. FNP involves the rapid mixing of a hydrophobic active (organic) and an amphiphilic di-block copolymer with a non-solvent (water) and subsequent co-precipitation of nanoparticles composed of both the organic and copolymer. During this process, the particle size distribution (PSD) is frozen and stabilized by the hydrophilic portion of the amphiphilic di-block copolymer residing on the particle surface. That is, the particle growth is kinetically arrested and thus a narrow PSD can be attained. To model the co-precipitation process, a bivariate population balance equation (PBE) has been formulated to account for the competitive aggregation of the organic and copolymer versus pure organic-organic or copolymer-copolymer aggregation. Aggregation rate kernels have been derived to account for the major aggregation events: free coupling, unimer insertion, and aggregate fusion. The resulting PBE is solved both by direct integration and by using the conditional quadrature method of moments (CQMOM). By solving the competitive aggregation model under well-mixed conditions, it is demonstrated that the PSD is controlled primarily by the copolymer-copolymer aggregation process and that the energy barrier to aggregate fusion plays a key role in determining the PSD. It is also shown that the characteristic aggregation times are smaller than the turbulent mixing time so that the FNP process is always mixing limited.

  1. Positive dielectrophoresis and aggregation in suspensions of highly polarized particles subjected to high-gradient AC electric fields in macro-scale flow and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acrivos, Andreas; Qiu, Zhiyong; Khusid, Boris; Markarian, Nikolai

    2001-11-01

    The recent surge of activity in the area of electro-hydrodynamics of suspensions subjected to strong electric fields ( several kV/mm) is motivated not only by scientific curiosity but also by numerous technological applications from separation to filtration to microfluidics. We will present the results of theoretical and experimental studies of particle motions and segregation in a suspension subjected to high-gradient strong fields and shear. To study macro-scale electro-hydrodynamic phenomena in suspensions of highly polarized, heavy particles, we developed a setup in which a suspension flows through a channel rotating around a horizontal axis along with a special technique to energize the electrodes. At the rotation speed of several tens rpm, the buoyancy force averaged over the period of rotation equals zero whereas the centrifugal force appears to be negligibly small. Next we fabricated several electro-hydrodynamic microfluidics, each consisting of silicon and glass wafers bonded together and containing an array of 174 individually operated electric chambers (6 mm in length with the 3 mm X 30 um cross-section). These chambers are equipped with electrodes having the thickness of 2-um, 5-um, and 10-um. We found that the particle behavior in micro- and macro-flows appears to be quite similar and can be predicted by our theoretical models. The work was supported in parts by grants from NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and the New Jersey Commission on Science & Technology MEMS Initiative. The measurements of the suspension complex dielectric permittivity and the particle size distribution were conducted using the instrumentation of the NJIT W.M. Keck Foundation Laboratory for Electro-hydrodynamics of Suspensions.

  2. Prostaglandin E2 regulation of amnion cell vascular endothelial growth factor expression: relationship with intramembranous absorption rate in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Beardall, Michael K; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates amniotic fluid transport across the amnion by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in amnion cells and that amniotic PGE2 concentration correlates positively with intramembranous (IM) absorption rate in fetal sheep. The effects of PGE2 at a range of concentrations on VEGF 164 and caveolin-1 gene expressions were analyzed in cultured ovine amnion cells. IM absorption rate, amniotic fluid (AF) volume, and PGE2 concentration in AF were determined in late-gestation fetal sheep during control conditions, isovolumic fetal urine replacement (low IM absorption rate), or intra-amniotic fluid infusion (high IM absorption rate). In ovine amnion cells, PGE2 induced dose- and time-dependent increases in VEGF 164 mRNA levels and reduced caveolin-1 mRNA and protein levels. VEGF receptor blockade abolished the caveolin-1 response, while minimally affecting the VEGF response to PGE2. In sheep fetuses, urine replacement reduced amniotic PGE2 concentration by 58%, decreased IM absorption rate by half, and doubled AF volume (P < 0.01). Intra-amniotic fluid infusion increased IM absorption rate and AF volume (P < 0.01), while amniotic PGE2 concentration was unchanged. Neither IM absorption rate nor AF volume correlated with amniotic PGE2 concentration under each experimental condition. Although PGE2 at micromolar concentrations induced dose-dependent responses in VEGF and caveolin-1 gene expression in cultured amnion cells consistent with a role of PGE2 in activating VEGF to mediate AF transport across the amnion, amniotic PGE2 at physiological nanomolar concentrations does not appear to regulate IM absorption rate or AF volume.

  3. Human stanniocalcin-1 or -2 expressed in mice reduces bone size and severely inhibits cranial intramembranous bone growth.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jennifer; Ramos-Valdes, Yudith; Stanton, Lee-Anne; Ladhani, Sadia; Beier, Frank; Dimattia, Gabriel E

    2010-12-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) and -2 (STC2) are highly related, secreted, homodimeric glycoproteins that are significantly upregulated by different forms of stress including high phosphate levels. Transgenic mice that constitutively express either human STC1 or STC2 exhibit intra-uterine growth restriction and permanent post-natal growth retardation. STC1 is expressed in chondrocytic and osteoblastic cells during murine development and can enhance differentiation of calvarial cells in culture. Therefore, there is mounting evidence that stanniocalcins (STCs) modulate bone development in vivo. To further define the effects of stanniocalcins on skeletal development, we performed a series of measurements on components of the axial, appendicular, and cranial skeleton in transgenic and wildtype mice. We show that skeletal growth is retarded and that the intramembranous bones of the cranium exhibit a particularly severe delay in suture closure. The posterior frontal suture remains patent throughout the lifetime of human STC1 and STC2 transgenic mice. We did not observe significant effects on chondrogenesis: however, calvarial cells exhibited reduced viability, proliferation and delayed differentiation, indicating that developing osteoblasts are particularly sensitive to the levels of STCs. Given the evidence linking STC1 to cellular phosphate homeostasis, we assessed the expression of a variety of phosphate regulators in transgenic and wildtype calvarial cells and found significantly lower levels of Mepe, Dmp1, Sfrp4 in transgenic cells without a change in Pit1 or Pit2. Collectively these data support a direct regulatory role for STCs in osteoblasts and suggest that overexposure to these factors inhibits normal skeletal development without significant changes in patterning.

  4. Type IV pilins regulate their own expression via direct intramembrane interactions with the sensor kinase PilS

    PubMed Central

    Kilmury, Sara L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Type IV pili are important virulence factors for many pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transcription of the major pilin gene—pilA—is controlled by the PilS-PilR two-component system in response to unknown signals. The absence of a periplasmic sensing domain suggested that PilS may sense an intramembrane signal, possibly PilA. We suggest that direct interactions between PilA and PilS in the inner membrane reduce pilA transcription when PilA levels are high. Overexpression in trans of PilA proteins with diverse and/or truncated C termini decreased native pilA transcription, suggesting that the highly conserved N terminus of PilA was the regulatory signal. Point mutations in PilA or PilS that disrupted their interaction prevented autoregulation of pilA transcription. A subset of PilA point mutants retained the ability to interact with PilS but could no longer decrease pilA transcription, suggesting that interaction between the pilin and sensor kinase is necessary but not sufficient for pilA autoregulation. Furthermore, PilS’s phosphatase motif was required for the autoregulation of pilA transcription, suggesting that under conditions where PilA is abundant, the PilA–PilS interaction promotes PilR dephosphorylation and thus down-regulation of further pilA transcription. These data reveal a clever bacterial inventory control strategy in which the major subunit of an important P. aeruginosa virulence factor controls its own expression. PMID:27162347

  5. Classification and Characterization of Therapeutic Antibody Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Marisa K.; Luo, Quanzhou; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Wypych, Jette; Narhi, Linda O.

    2011-01-01

    A host of diverse stress techniques was applied to a monoclonal antibody (IgG2) to yield protein particles with varying attributes and morphologies. Aggregated solutions were evaluated for percent aggregation, particle counts, size distribution, morphology, changes in secondary and tertiary structure, surface hydrophobicity, metal content, and reversibility. Chemical modifications were also identified in a separate report (Luo, Q., Joubert, M. K., Stevenson, R., Narhi, L. O., and Wypych, J. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25134–25144). Aggregates were categorized into seven discrete classes, based on the traits described. Several additional molecules (from the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes as well as intravenous IgG) were stressed and found to be defined with the same classification system. The mechanism of protein aggregation and the type of aggregate formed depends on the nature of the stress applied. Different IgG molecules appear to aggregate by a similar mechanism under the same applied stress. Aggregates created by harsh mechanical stress showed the largest number of subvisible particles, and the class generated by thermal stress displayed the largest number of visible particles. Most classes showed a disruption of the higher order structure, with the degree of disorder depending on the stress process. Particles in all classes (except thermal stress) were at least partially reversible upon dilution in pH 5 buffer. High copper content was detected in isolated metal-catalyzed aggregates, a stress previously shown to produce immunogenic aggregates. In conclusion, protein aggregates can be a very heterogeneous population, whose qualities are the result of the type of stress that was experienced. PMID:21454532

  6. Biological framework for soil aggregation: Implications for ecological functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregation is heuristically understood as agglomeration of primary particles bound together by biotic and abiotic cementing agents. The organization of aggregates is believed to be hierarchical in nature; whereby primary particles bond together to form secondary particles and subsequently merge to form larger aggregates. Soil aggregates are not permanent structures, they continuously change in response to internal and external forces and other drivers, including moisture, capillary pressure, temperature, biological activity, and human disturbances. Soil aggregation processes and the resulting functionality span multiple spatial and temporal scales. The intertwined biological and physical nature of soil aggregation, and the time scales involved precluded a universally applicable and quantifiable framework for characterizing the nature and function of soil aggregation. We introduce a biophysical framework of soil aggregation that considers the various modes and factors of the genesis, maturation and degradation of soil aggregates including wetting/drying cycles, soil mechanical processes, biological activity and the nature of primary soil particles. The framework attempts to disentangle mechanical (compaction and soil fragmentation) from in-situ biophysical aggregation and provides a consistent description of aggregate size, hierarchical organization, and life time. It also enables quantitative description of biotic and abiotic functions of soil aggregates including diffusion and storage of mass and energy as well as role of aggregates as hot spots of nutrient accumulation, biodiversity, and biogeochemical cycles.

  7. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  8. Light-scattering properties of random-oriented aggregates: Do they represent the properties of an ensemble of aggregates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ziegler, Klaus; Mann, Ingrid

    2006-07-01

    We question a common assumption that orientation-averaged light-scattering properties of a single aggregate represent the properties of an ensemble of random aggregates which have the same number of the same constituent particles. Using the T-matrix code for calculation of light scattering by aggregates of spheres, we obtain efficiencies and scattering-angle dependences of intensity and polarization for several samples of aggregates. The aggregates are built using ballistic particle cluster and cluster cluster aggregation procedures. Their constituent particles have the same size and the same properties but their arrangement (i.e. specific positions) in the aggregates are different. We have found that the random-oriented efficiencies and asymmetry parameter, as well as the angular dependence of the intensity, vary significantly from one aggregate to another. Linear polarization appears to be not very sensitive to the arrangement of particles within the aggregate, whereas circular polarization has been found the most affected characteristics, which can be zero, positive or negative for the aggregates that differ only in the arrangement of their constituents. This effect originates from the violation of mirror symmetry in aggregates, which reveals itself even at random orientation. Thus, the correct description of light scattering by an ensemble of aggregates requires a realistic averaging over a variety of random aggregates. Such an averaging can be provided by the random-matrix approach.

  9. The role of short-ranged and long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation of colloidal particle in colloid-polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao

    2014-11-01

    Colloidal Gels i.e. disordered arrested systems has been studied extensively during the past decades both experimentally and computationally. Despite their widespread applications in various industries e.g. cosmetic, food, their physical principals are still far beyond being understood. The interplay between different types of interactions e.g. quantum scale, short-ranged, and long-ranged turned dynamics and thermodynamics of the colloidal systems to one the most intriguing areas in Physics. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force e.g. colloid-polymer mixtures. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) and MD is limited considering the time and length scale of gel formation and long-time dynamics. In this presentation we used Core-modified dissipative particle dynamics (CM-DPD) with modified depletion potential, as a coarse-grain model, to address the gel formation process in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. Due to the possibility to study short- and long-ranged HI separately in this method we studied the effect of each of those interactions on the final morphology and report on one of the controversial question in this field. In the second part of the presentation, we include colloidal-polymer interactions to extend/modify the Asakura-Oosawa potential model to semi-dilute region of polymer solution.

  10. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  11. Hetero-aggregation of oppositely charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Pooja; Deshpande, Abhijit P; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2017-04-15

    Hetero-aggregation refers to aggregation of particles that are not identical i.e. particles of different physical-chemical properties. The investigation of this phenomenon is important because of the fascinating structures that can be formed and their application in several fields including the synthesis of porous materials and particle stabilized emulsions. We report an experimental study of hetero-aggregation behaviour of oppositely charged nanoparticles of similar size. In this study, the hetero-aggregation phenomenon is investigated using a combination of visual observation, zeta potential measurements, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and rheology measurements. We report details of aggregate size, structure, flow properties to provide understanding of hetero-aggregation by a careful examination of different phases formed upon mixing oppositely charged particles. The experiments were carried out at different mixing fraction (defined as the mass of positive particle in the dispersion divided by total mass of particles in the dispersion) varying from 0 to 1 with total concentration of particles ranging from 0.05 to 30wt% (0.023-13.82vol%). At low total particle concentration, four different states of the mixture were observed which includes sediment with turbid supernatant, sediment with clear supernatant, turbid sample with no sediment and a clear dispersion. However, at higher concentration above ∼7.5wt% (3.45vol%), the mixture of oppositely charged particles form - a particulate gel with turbid supernatant at low mixing fraction (from 0.1 to 0.3), a solid-like gel at intermediate mixing fraction (from ∼0.3 to 0.7) and a turbid sample at high mixing fractions from 0.7 to 1.0. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Model incorporating deposition, diffusion, and aggregation in submonolayer nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Pablo; Barabási, Albert-László; Larralde, Hernán; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-07-01

    We propose a model for describing diffusion-controlled aggregation of particles that are continually deposited on a surface. The model incorporates deposition, diffusion, and aggregation. We find that the diffusion and aggregation of randomly deposited particles ``builds'' a wide variety of fractal structures, all characterized by a common length scale L1. This length L1 scales as the ratio of the diffusion constant over the particle flux to the power 1/4. We compare our results with several recent experiments on two-dimensional nanostructures formed by diffusion-controlled aggregation on surfaces.

  13. Improvement of Bearing Capacity in Recycled Aggregates Suitable for Use as Unbound Road Sub-Base

    PubMed Central

    Garach, Laura; López, Mónica; Agrela, Francisco; Ordóñez, Javier; Alegre, Javier; Moya, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates are specified as types of aggregates with lower densities, higher water absorption capacities, and lower mechanical strength than natural aggregates. In this paper, the mechanical behaviour and microstructural properties of natural aggregates, recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates were compared. Different specimens of unbound recycled mixtures demonstrated increased resistance properties. The formation of new cement hydrated particles was observed, and pozzolanic reactions were discovered by electronon microscopy in these novel materials. The properties of recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates suggest that these recycled materials can be used in unbound road layers to improve their mechanical behaviour in the long term. PMID:28793747

  14. Improvement of Bearing Capacity in Recycled Aggregates Suitable for Use as Unbound Road Sub-Base.

    PubMed

    Garach, Laura; López, Mónica; Agrela, Francisco; Ordóñez, Javier; Alegre, Javier; Moya, José Antonio

    2015-12-16

    Recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates are specified as types of aggregates with lower densities, higher water absorption capacities, and lower mechanical strength than natural aggregates. In this paper, the mechanical behaviour and microstructural properties of natural aggregates, recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates were compared. Different specimens of unbound recycled mixtures demonstrated increased resistance properties. The formation of new cement hydrated particles was observed, and pozzolanic reactions were discovered by electronon microscopy in these novel materials. The properties of recycled concrete aggregates and mixed recycled aggregates suggest that these recycled materials can be used in unbound road layers to improve their mechanical behaviour in the long term.

  15. GEOMETRIC CROSS SECTIONS OF DUST AGGREGATES AND A COMPRESSION MODEL FOR AGGREGATE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Toru; Wada, Koji; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2012-07-10

    Geometric cross sections of dust aggregates determine their coupling with disk gas, which governs their motions in protoplanetary disks. Collisional outcomes also depend on geometric cross sections of initial aggregates. In a previous paper, we performed three-dimensional N-body simulations of sequential collisions of aggregates composed of a number of sub-micron-sized icy particles and examined radii of gyration (and bulk densities) of the obtained aggregates. We showed that collisional compression of aggregates is not efficient and that aggregates remain fluffy. In the present study, we examine geometric cross sections of the aggregates. Their cross sections decrease due to compression as well as to their gyration radii. It is found that a relation between the cross section and the gyration radius proposed by Okuzumi et al. is valid for the compressed aggregates. We also refine the compression model proposed in our previous paper. The refined model enables us to calculate the evolution of both gyration radii and cross sections of growing aggregates and reproduces well our numerical results of sequential aggregate collisions. The refined model can describe non-equal-mass collisions as well as equal-mass cases. Although we do not take into account oblique collisions in the present study, oblique collisions would further hinder compression of aggregates.

  16. Structure and kinetics of shear aggregation in turbulent flows. I. Early stage of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Bäbler, Matthäus U; Moussa, Amgad S; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-17

    Aggregation of rigid colloidal particles leads to fractal-like structures that are characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) which is a key parameter for describing aggregation processes. This is particularly true in shear aggregation where d(f) strongly influences aggregation kinetics. Direct measurement of d(f) in the early stages of shear aggregation is however difficult, as the aggregates are small and few in number. An alternative method for determining d(f) is to use an aggregation model that when fitted to the time evolution of the cluster mass distribution allows for estimating d(f). Here, we explore three such models, two of which are based on an effective collision sphere and one which directly incorporates the permeable structure of the aggregates, and we apply them for interpreting the initial aggregate growth measured experimentally in a turbulent stirred tank reactor. For the latter, three polystyrene latexes were used that differed only in the size of the primary particles (d(p) = 420, 600, and 810 nm). It was found that all three models describe initial aggregation kinetics reasonably well using, however, substantially different values for d(f). To discriminate among the models, we therefore also studied the regrowth of preformed aggregates where d(f) was experimentally accessible. It was found that only the model that directly incorporates the permeable structure of the aggregates is able to predict correctly this second type of experiments. Applying this model to the initial aggregation kinetics, we conclude that the actual initial fractal dimension is d(f) = 2.07 +/- 0.04 as found from this model.

  17. COLLISIONAL GROWTH CONDITIONS FOR DUST AGGREGATES

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Koji; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Suyama, Toru; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2009-09-10

    Collisions between dust aggregates are the key to understand the formation of planetesimals because the collision inevitably takes place in protoplanetary disks. To clarify whether or not dust aggregates can grow through their mutual collisions at relatively high velocities, we carry out more than 4000 runs of three-dimensional numerical simulations of collisions between icy equal-mass clusters formed under ballistic particle-cluster aggregation (BPCA) as well as those of ballistic cluster-cluster aggregation, including offset collisions with various values of the impact parameter. Since our BPCA clusters have a fractal dimension of 3 and a relatively compact structure, their results enable us to determine the criteria for growth and disruption of compressed aggregates at their collisions in protoplanetary disks. The results show that ice dust aggregates are able to grow at collisions with velocities up to 50 m s{sup -1}, in spite of their initial structures and impact parameters. We also find that the mass of ejecta relative to the total mass of colliding aggregates decreases with increasing the size of the aggregates. These results demonstrate the feasibility of growth and survival for dust aggregates through their mutual collisions with relatively high velocities in protoplanetary disks.

  18. Bouncing behavior of microscopic dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Kley, W.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Bouncing collisions of dust aggregates within the protoplanetary disk may have a significant impact on the growth process of planetesimals. Yet, the conditions that result in bouncing are not very well understood. Existing simulations studying the bouncing behavior used aggregates with an artificial, very regular internal structure. Aims: Here, we study the bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates that are constructed applying different sample preparation methods. We analyze how the internal structure of the aggregate alters the collisional outcome and we determine the influence of aggregate size, porosity, collision velocity, and impact parameter. Methods: We use molecular dynamics simulations where the individual aggregates are treated as spheres that are made up of several hundred thousand individual monomers. The simulations are run on graphic cards (GPUs). Results: Statistical bulk properties and thus bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates depend heavily on the preparation method. In particular, there is no unique relation between the average volume filling factor and the coordination number of the aggregate. Realistic aggregates bounce only if their volume filling factor exceeds 0.5 and collision velocities are below 0.1 ms-1. Conclusions: For dust particles in the protoplanetary nebula we suggest that the bouncing barrier may not be such a strong handicap in the growth phase of dust agglomerates, at least in the size range of ≈100 μm.

  19. Reversible and irreversible aggregation of magnetic liposomes.

    PubMed

    García-Jimeno, Sonia; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José; Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo

    2017-10-12

    Understanding stabilization and aggregation in magnetic nanoparticle systems is crucial to optimizing the functionality of these systems in real physiological applications. Here we address this problem for a specific, yet representative, system. We present an experimental and analytical study on the aggregation of superparamagnetic liposomes in suspension in the presence of a controllable external magnetic field. We study the aggregation kinetics and report an intermediate time power law evolution and a long time stationary value for the average aggregate diffusion coefficient, both depending on the magnetic field intensity. We then show that the long time aggregate structure is fractal with a fractal dimension that decreases upon increasing the magnetic field intensity. By scaling arguments we also establish an analytical relation between the aggregate fractal dimension and the power law exponent controlling the aggregation kinetics. This relation is indeed independent on the magnetic field intensity. Despite the superparamagnetic character of our particles, we further prove the existence of a population of surviving aggregates able to maintain their integrity after switching off the external magnetic field. Finally, we suggest a schematic interaction scenario to rationalize the observed coexistence between reversible and irreversible aggregation.

  20. Aggregation kinetics and dissolution of coated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Lenhart, John J; Walker, Harold W

    2012-01-17

    Determining the fate of manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is contingent upon understanding how stabilizing agents influence the stability of nanoparticles in aqueous systems. In this study, the aggregation and dissolution tendencies of uncoated silver nanoparticles and the same particles coated with three common coating agents, trisodium citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and Tween 80 (Tween), were evaluated. Early stage aggregation kinetics of the uncoated and coated silver nanoparticles were assessed by dynamic light scattering over a range of electrolyte types (NaCl, NaNO(3), and CaCl(2)) and concentrations that span those observed in natural waters. Although particle dissolution was observed, aggregation of all particle types was still consistent with classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The aggregation of citrate-coated particles and SDS-coated particles were very similar to that for the uncoated particles, as the critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) of the particles in different electrolytes were all approximately the same (40 mM NaCl, 30 mM NaNO(3), and 2 mM CaCl(2)). The Tween-stabilized particles were significantly more stable than the other particles, however, and in NaNO(3) aggregation was not observed up to an electrolyte concentration of 1 M. Differences in the rate of aggregation under diffusion-limited aggregation conditions at high electrolyte concentrations for the SDS and Tween-coated particles, in combination with the moderation of their electrophoretic mobilities, suggest SDS and Tween imparted steric interactions to the particles. The dissolution of the silver nanoparticles was inhibited by the SDS and Tween coatings, but not by the citrate coating, and in chloride-containing electrolytes a secondary precipitate of AgCl was observed bridging the individual particles. These results indicate that coating agents could significant influence the fate of silver nanoparticles in aquatic systems, and in some

  1. Marine Snow Aggregates: Size Specific Settling Speeds, Abundance, and Size Specific Ratios of Settling to Total Abundance of Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, Arne-Roland

    1995-01-01

    Determining in situ settling speeds, vertical profiles of total aggregate abundance, and the amount of settling aggregates as a ratio of the total aggregate abundance were the main objectives of this research. Aggregate abundance was determined with the MAGENUM (Marine AGgregate ENUMerator) camera system (modified after Honjo et al., 1984). Aggregate flux and settling speeds were determined with the MAFIA (Marine Aggregate Flux Investigation Apparatus), a combination of aggregate camera system and sediment trap. In situ settling speed data (MAFIA) of aggregates from the central Black Sea and the northern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for five size classes of aggregates, showed a wide variation in settling speeds in the individual size classes. Neither environment studied showed a positive correlation of aggregate settling speed to aggregate diameter, indicating that particle density was the more important factor in determining the aggregates settling speed. Marine snow abundance data from the Equatorial Pacific were analyzed using discrete fourier transform analysis to estimate size specific settling speeds of aggregates ranging from 1 to 10 mm spherical diameter. Settling speeds of aggregates followed the exponential function: rm Settling^eed = 22.3 e^ {(0.147 {aggregate diameter [ mm]})} (r^2 of 0.65). The ratio of the abundance of settling aggregates to the total abundance of aggregates, termed S-ratio, was calculated from MAFIA data from the central Black Sea and the northern Gulf of Mexico for six size classes of aggregates. In both locations ratios greater than one were calculated. This suggested that the MAGENUM did not record the total aggregate abundance, as assumed, but only a fraction of the aggregates present in the water column. The abundance of fine particles was compared to profiles of abundance of marine snow aggregates. Interactions were qualitatively discussed between these two size classes. In most profiles aggregates and fine particles showed

  2. Prediction of the intramembranous tissue formation during perisprosthetic healing with uncertainties. Part 1. Effect of the variability of each biochemical factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Faverjon, B; Dureisseix, D; Swider, P; Kessissoglou, N

    2016-10-01

    A stochastic model is proposed to predict the intramembranous process in periprosthetic healing in the early post-operative period. The methodology was validated by a canine experimental model. In this first part, the effects of each individual uncertain biochemical factor on the bone-implant healing are examined, including the coefficient of osteoid synthesis, the coefficients of haptotactic and chemotactic migration of osteoblastic population and the radius of the drill hole. A multi-phase reactive model solved by an explicit finite difference scheme is combined with the polynomial chaos expansion to solve the stochastic system. In the second part, combined biochemical factors are considered to study a real configuration of clinical acts.

  3. Integral equation study of particle confinement effects in a polymer/particle mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D; Trokhymchuk, A; Kalyuzhnyi, Y; Gee, R; Lacevic, N

    2007-05-09

    Integral equation theory techniques are applied to evaluate the structuring of the polymer when large solid particles are embedded into a bulk polymer melt. The formalism presented here is applied to obtain an insight into the filler particle aggregation tendency. We find that with the employed polymer-particle interaction model it is very unlikely that the particles will aggregate. We believe that in such a system aggregation and clustering can occur when the filler particles are dressed by tightly bound polymer layers.

  4. Conformational characterization of oligomeric intermediates and aggregates in β-lactoglobulin heat aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Carrotta, Rita; Bauer, Rogert; Waninge, Rianne; Rischel, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In one of the first studies of isolated intermediates in protein aggregation, we have used circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize metastable oligomers that are formed in the early steps of β-lactoglobulin heat aggregation. The intermediates show typical molten globule characteristics (secondary structure content similar to the native and less tight packing of the side chains), in agreement with the belief that partly folded states play a key role in protein aggregation. The far-UV CD signal bears strong resemblance to that of a known folding intermediate. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of the aggregates reveals spherical particles with a diameter of about 50 nm and an internal threadlike structure. Isolated oligomers as well as larger aggregates bind the dye thioflavin T, usually a signature of the amyloid superstructures found in many protein aggregates. This result suggests that the structural motif recognized by thioflavin T can be formed in small oligomers. PMID:11420433

  5. Kinetic studies on the aggregation of Aspergillus niger conidia.

    PubMed

    Grimm, L H; Kelly, S; Hengstler, J; Göbel, A; Krull, R; Hempel, D C

    2004-07-20

    Morphology has a crucial effect on productivity and the supply of substrate for cultures of filamentous fungi. However, cultivation parameters leading to the desired morphology are often chosen empirically as the mechanisms governing the processes involved are usually unknown. For coagulating microorganisms like Aspergillus niger the morphological development is considered to start with the aggregation of conidia right after inoculation. To elucidate the mechanism of this process, kinetic studies were carried out using an in-line particle size analyzer. Based on the data obtained from these experiments a model for conidial aggregation is proposed in this article. It consists of two separate aggregation steps. The first one takes place immediately after inoculation, but only leads to a small decrease of total particle concentration. Most suspended conidia aggregate after a second aggregation step triggered by germination and hyphal growth. Aggregation velocity of this second phase is linearly dependent on the particle growth rate.

  6. The 2.1 Å resolution structure of cyanopindolol-bound β1-adrenoceptor identifies an intramembrane Na+ ion that stabilises the ligand-free receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller-Gallacher, Jennifer L; Nehmé, Rony; Warne, Tony; Edwards, Patricia C; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Leslie, Andrew G W; Tate, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    The β1-adrenoceptor (β1AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated by the endogenous agonists adrenaline and noradrenaline. We have determined the structure of an ultra-thermostable β1AR mutant bound to the weak partial agonist cyanopindolol to 2.1 Å resolution. High-quality crystals (100 μm plates) were grown in lipidic cubic phase without the assistance of a T4 lysozyme or BRIL fusion in cytoplasmic loop 3, which is commonly employed for GPCR crystallisation. An intramembrane Na+ ion was identified co-ordinated to Asp872.50, Ser1283.39 and 3 water molecules, which is part of a more extensive network of water molecules in a cavity formed between transmembrane helices 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7. Remarkably, this water network and Na+ ion is highly conserved between β1AR and the adenosine A2A receptor (rmsd of 0.3 Å), despite an overall rmsd of 2.4 Å for all Cα atoms and only 23% amino acid identity in the transmembrane regions. The affinity of agonist binding and nanobody Nb80 binding to β1AR is unaffected by Na+ ions, but the stability of the receptor is decreased by 7.5°C in the absence of Na+. Mutation of amino acid side chains that are involved in the co-ordination of either Na+ or water molecules in the network decreases the stability of β1AR by 5-10°C. The data suggest that the intramembrane Na+ and associated water network stabilise the ligand-free state of β1AR, but still permits the receptor to form the activated state which involves the collapse of the Na+ binding pocket on agonist binding.

  7. Microbially-driven soil aggregate structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, Nadezda; Vladimirov, Artem; Matveev, Sergey; Smirnov, Alexander; Tyrtyshnikov, Eugene; Shein, Evgeny

    2017-04-01

    We propose a novel approach to mathematical modelling of soil aggregate structure formation. The model is self-consistent and describes physical process of soil particles aggregation/fragmentation as a result of organic matter micro-biochemical cycle. The model consists of two parts, first part describes biochemical cycle and is formulated as a system of chemical kinetic equations. The second part describes soil particles aggregation and fragmentation and is formulated as Smoluchowski equation, with coefficients dependent on the chemical composition, obtained by solving the first part of the model. The presented model allows observation of a complex aggregate structure development starting from a simple system of homogeneous mineral particles, organic matter solution and inoculant of microorganisms. With the help of numerical simulations we study fundamental mechanisms leading to multimodality of soil micro-aggregates size distributions and how it is affected by soil organic matter content. As an example, the model allows further consideration of soil physical occlusion effect on organic matter decomposition rates in soil aggregates.

  8. Aggregation kinetics of coalescing polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Jia, Zichen; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    The aggregation behavior of a soft, rubbery colloidal system with a relatively low glass transition temperature, T(g) approximately -20 degrees C, has been investigated. It is found that the average gyration and hydrodynamic radii, R(g) and R(h), measured by light scattering techniques, evolve in time in parallel, without exhibiting the crossover typical of rigid particle aggregation. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images reveal sphere-like clusters, indicating that complete coalescence between particles occurs during aggregation. Since coalescence leads to a reduction in the total colloidal surface area, the surfactant adsorption equilibrium, and thus the colloidal stability, change in the course of aggregation. It is found that to simulate the observed kinetic behavior based on the population balance equations, it is necessary to assume that all the clusters are spherical and to account for variations in the colloidal stability of each aggregating particle pair with time. This indicates that, for the given system, the coalescence is very fast, i.e., its time scale is much smaller than that of the aggregation.

  9. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  10. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  11. Population balance modeling of the conidial aggregation of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Lin, P-J; Grimm, L H; Wulkow, M; Hempel, D C; Krull, R

    2008-02-01

    Numerous biotechnological production processes are based on the submerse cultivation of filamentous fungi. Process design, however, is often hampered by the complex growth pattern of these organisms. In the morphologic development of coagulating filamentous fungi, like Aspergillus niger, conidial aggregation is the first step of filamentous morphogenesis. For a proper description of this phenomenon it is necessary to characterize conidial populations. Kinetic studies performed with an in-line particle size analyzer suggested that two distinct aggregation steps have to be considered. The first step of conidial aggregation starts immediately after inoculation. Both the rate constants of formation and disintegration of aggregates have been determined by measuring the concentration of conidia at the beginning of the cultivation and the concentration of particles at steady state during the first hours of cultivation. In contrast to the first aggregation step, where the collision of conidia is presumed to be responsible for the process, the second aggregation step is thought to be initiated by germination of conidia. Growing hyphae provide additional surface for the attachment of non- germinated conidia, which leads to a strong decrease in particle concentration. The specific hyphal length growth rate and the ratio of particle concentration to the growing adhesion hyphal surface are decisive matters of the second aggregation step. Both aggregation steps can be described by population dynamics and simulated using the program package PARSIVAL (PARticle SIze eVALution) for the treatment of general particle population balances.

  12. Aggregate growth in a protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chuchu; Carballido, Augusto; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2017-01-01

    We present a method to model the growth of neutral and charged dusts in a turbulent protoplanetary disk, and analyze their collision probabilities. Coagulation of dust aggregates plays an important role in the formation of planets and is of key importance to the evolution of protoplanetary disks. In our method, the temporal evolution of the dusts is followed by Monte Carlo algorithm, and the inter-particle interactions are calculated by Aggregate_Builder (AB), which is a code used to model the collision process of aggregates. First an aggregate library is built and all the aggregates are binned according to their sizes. In each iteration, the collision rate for aggregates from any two bins are computed, which determines the time it takes for the next collision to happen and which two aggregates are selected for collision. Then the AB codes are used to calculate the interaction of the two aggregates. The relative velocity between the two aggregates is the vector sum of Brownian velocity and the turbulent velocity. The latter is calculated by ATHENA, which is a grid-based code for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics. In each iteration, it’s determined whether the two aggregates hit or miss. In the case of hit, it either sticks or bounces as determined by the critical velocity. As a result, the neutral aggregates are more porous than the charged ones. For a certain size of incoming aggregates, the neutral ones have a higher collision probability than the charged ones. Also, similarly-sized aggregates have lower collision probabilities than aggregates with large size dispersions. This research enables us to determine which physical properties have a greater impact on the collision rate. By tracing the dust size distribution, we can identify the stage when they settle out to the mid-plane and how long it takes to develop to that stage. In the hit-stick regime, our results are consistent with the experiments which shows that when the velocity is smaller than the

  13. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    In agricultural areas the soil erosion and soil loss estimation is vital information in long-term planning. During the initial period of the erosion a part of the soil particles and aggregates get transportable and nutrients and organic matter could be transported due to the effect of water or wind. This preliminary phase was studied with laboratory-scale rainfall simulator. Developed surface crust and aggregate size composition of the runoff was examined in six different slope-roughness-moisture content combination of a Cambisol and a Regosol. The ratio of micro- and macro aggregates in the runoff indicate the stability of the aggregates and determine the transport capacity of the runoff. Both soil samples were taken from field where the water erosion is a potential hazard. During the experiment the whole amount of runoff and sediment was collected through sieve series to a bucket to separate the micro- and macro aggregates. In case of both samples the micro aggregates dominate in the runoff and the runoff rates are similar. Although the runoff of the Regosol - with dominant >1000μm macro aggregate content - contained almost nothing but <50μm sized micro aggregates. Meanwhile the runoff of the Cambisol - with more balanced micro and macro aggregate content - contained dominantly 50-250μm sized micro aggregates and in some case remarkable ratio 250-1000μm sized macro aggregates. This difference occurred because the samples are resistant against drop erosion differently. In case of both sample the selectivity of the erosion and substance matrix redistribution manifested in mineral crusts in the surface where the quartz deposited in place while the lighter organic matter transported with the sediment. The detachment of the aggregates and the redistribution of the particles highly effect on the aggregate composition of the runoff which is connected with the quality of the soil loss. So while the estimation of soil loss quantity is more or less is easy, measuring

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do∝Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  15. On mean type aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yager, R R

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of mean aggregation of a collection of n numbers. We point out that the lack of associativity of this operation compounds the problem of the extending mean of n numbers to n+1 numbers. The closely related concepts of self identity and the centering property are introduced as one imperative for extending mean aggregation operators. The problem of weighted mean aggregation is studied. A new concept of prioritized mean aggregation is then introduced. We next show that the technique of selecting an element based upon the performance of a random experiment can be considered as a mean aggregation operation.

  16. Mass aggregation of diatom blooms: Insights from a mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alldredge, Alice L.; Gotschalk, Chris; Passow, Uta; Riebesell, Ulf

    While the aggregation and mass settlement of diatoms at the termination of blooms results in significant export of carbon from the surface ocean, the mechanisms of bloom aggregation have been poorly understood. The aggregation of a multispecies diatom bloom was investigated under controlled conditions in a 1200 liter, nutrient-enriched, laboratory mesocosm in order to elucidate the parameters sufficient to accurately predict bloom aggregation. A diverse bloom of diatoms dominated by several species of Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira progressed through a classic pattern of exponential, stationary, and senescent phases in the mesocosm. Aggregates larger than 0.5 mm became detectable on the eighth day after inoculation, and aggregates >1 mm increased exponentially from Day 10 onward producing the appearance of a mass aggregation event late on Day 10. The bloom aggregated sequentially with Thalassiosira dominating early aggregates and Chaetoceros dominating later ones. Chaetoceros resting spores formed only in aggregates. Aggregation was not linked to nutrient depletion or to the physiological state of the cells since the onset of aggregation and the mass aggregation event occurred 1 to 3 days prior to nutrient depletion and while carbon:nitrogen ratios of cells were still very low and growth rates high. Moreover, visible aggregates did not form in the mesocosm until cell abundances were considerably higher than abundances observed to aggregate in nature, suggesting that aggregation was not strongly linked to phytoplankton cell concentration. Complementary studies in this volume clarify the role of non-phytoplankton particles in aggregation of the mesocosm bloom. The mesocosm approach proved highly effective in producing an aggregating diatom bloom under controlled conditions.

  17. Irreversible shear-activated aggregation in non-Brownian suspensions.

    PubMed

    Guery, J; Bertrand, E; Rouzeau, C; Levitz, P; Weitz, D A; Bibette, J

    2006-05-19

    We have studied the effect of shear on the stability of suspensions made of non-Brownian solid particles. We demonstrate the existence of an irreversible transition where the solid particles aggregate at remarkably low volume fractions (phi approximately 0.1). This shear-induced aggregation is dramatic and exhibits a very sudden change in the viscosity, which increases sharply after a shear-dependent induction time. We show that this induction time is related exponentially to the shear rate, reflecting the importance of the hydrodynamic forces in reducing the repulsive energy barrier that prevents the particles from aggregating.

  18. Air agglomeration of hydrophobic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The agglomeration of hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension was accomplished by introducing small amounts of air into the suspension while it was agitated vigorously. The extent of aggregation was proportional both to the air to solids ratio and to the hydrophobicity of the solids. For a given air/solids ratio, the extent of aggregation of different materials increased in the following order: graphite, gilsonite, coal coated with heptane, and Teflon. The structure of agglomerates produced from coarse Teflon particles differed noticeably from the structure of bubble-particle aggregates produced from smaller, less hydrophobic particles.

  19. Particles size distribution in diluted magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Constantine V.

    2017-06-01

    Changes in particles and aggregates size distribution in diluted kerosene based magnetic fluids is studied by dynamic light scattering method. It has been found that immediately after dilution in magnetic fluids the system of aggregates with sizes ranging from 100 to 250-1000 nm is formed. In 50-100 h after dilution large aggregates are peptized and in the sample stationary particles and aggregates size distribution is fixed.

  20. Aggregate formation in 3D turbulent-like flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, A.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2006-11-01

    Aggregate formation is an important process in industrial and environmental turbulent flows. In oceans turbulence play an important role on Marine Snow (aggregate) formation. For a proper description, the study of aggregate formation in turbulent flows requires a particle based model i.e. following trajectories of single particles. For these to be done, it is required to model three main processes: the flow, the motion of the particles and the encounter and coalescence of particles. In this study we use 3-D kinematic simulations to model the turbulent flow. A simplified version of the Maxey-Riley equation is used, with Stokes drag, bouyancy and added mass forces. In the collision and aggregate formation module a geometrical collision check is used. When the distance between two particles, is smaller than the sum of their radii, a collision takes place. All the particles that collide stay together to form an aggregate. To account for the porosity of the aggregates a Fractal Growth Model is used. In this study we will explore the effects of different parameters on the aggregate formation (e.g. St; Wst; φ; Re) and the effects of two different background populations: constant and decaying.

  1. Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

    2009-12-10

    New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

  2. Active matter model of Myxococcus xanthus aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, Adam; Bahar, Fatmagul; Liu, Guannan; Thutupalli, Shashi; Welch, Roy; Yllanes, David; Shaevitz, Joshua; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil-dwelling bacterium that exhibits several fascinating collective behaviors including streaming, swarming, and generation of fruiting bodies. A striking feature of M. xanthus is that it periodically reverses its motility direction. The first stage of fruiting body formation is characterized by the aggregation of cells on a surface into round mesoscopic structures. Experiments have shown that this aggregation relies heavily on regulation of the reversal rate and local mechanical interactions, suggesting motility-induced phase separation may play an important role. We have adapted self-propelled particle models to include cell reversal and motility suppression resulting from sporulation observed in aggregates. Using 2D molecular dynamics simulations, we map the phase behavior in the space of Péclet number and local density and examine the kinetics of aggregation for comparison to experiments.

  3. Aggregate breakup in a contracting nozzle.

    PubMed

    Soos, Miroslav; Ehrl, Lyonel; Bäbler, Matthäus U; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-01-05

    The breakup of dense aggregates in an extensional flow was investigated experimentally. The flow was realized by pumping the suspension containing the aggregates through a contracting nozzle. Variation of the cluster mass distribution during the breakage process was measured by small-angle light scattering. Because of the large size of primary particles and the dense aggregate structure image analysis was used to determine the shape and structure of the produced fragments. It was found, that neither aggregate structure, characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) = 2.7, nor shape, characterized by an average aspect ratio equal to 1.5, was affected by breakage. Several passes through the nozzle were required to reach the steady state. This is explained by the radial variation of the hydrodynamic stresses at the nozzle entrance, characterized through computational fluid dynamics, which implies that only the fraction of aggregates whose strength is smaller than the local hydrodynamic stress is broken during one pass through the nozzle. Scaling of the steady-state aggregate size as a function of the hydrodynamic stress was used to determine the aggregate strength.

  4. Colloidal aggregation and dynamics in anisotropic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Mondiot, Frédéric; Botet, Robert; Snabre, Patrick; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the collective behavior of submicrometer-sized particles immersed in a nematic micellar solution. We use latex spheres with diameters ranging from 190 to 780 nm and study their aggregation properties due to the interplay of the various colloidal forces at work in the system. We found that the morphology of aggregates strongly depends on the particle size, with evidence for two distinct regimes: the biggest inclusions clump together within minutes into either compact clusters or V-like structures that are completely consistent with attractive elastic interactions. On the contrary, the smallest particles form chains elongated along the nematic axis, within comparable timescales. In this regime, Monte Carlo simulations, based on a modified diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, strongly suggest that the anisotropic rotational Brownian motion of the clusters combined with short-range depletion interactions dominate the system coarsening; elastic interactions no longer prevail. The simulations reproduce the sharp transition between the two regimes on increasing the particle size. We provide reasonable estimates to interpret our data and propose a likely scenario for colloidal aggregation. These results emphasize the growing importance of the diffusion of species at suboptical-wavelength scales and raise a number of fundamental issues. PMID:24715727

  5. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERAE INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association, or modification of antecedent growth conditions. During the course of investigating a major water-borne Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA inv...

  6. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERAE INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association, or modification of antecedent growth conditions. During the course of investigating a major water-borne Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA inv...

  7. Stress fracture healing: fatigue loading of the rat ulna induces upregulation in expression of osteogenic and angiogenic genes that mimic the intramembranous portion of fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Gregory R; Towler, Dwight A; Silva, Matthew J

    2009-02-01

    Woven bone is formed in response to fatigue-induced stress fractures and is associated with increased local angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms that regulate this woven bone formation are unknown. Our objective was to measure the temporal and spatial expression of osteo- and angiogenic genes in woven bone formation in response to increasing levels of fatigue-induced damage. We used the rat forelimb compression model to produce four discrete levels of fatigue damage in the right ulna of 115 male Fischer rats. Rats were killed at 0 (1 h), 1, 3 and 7 days after loading. Using qRT-PCR, we quantified gene expression associated with osteogenesis (BMP2, Msx2, Runx2, Osx, BSP, Osc), cell proliferation (Hist4), and angiogenesis (VEGF, PECAM-1) from the central half of the ulna. The spatial distribution of BMP2, BSP and PCNA was assessed by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization in transverse histological sections 1, 4, and 7 mm distal to the ulnar mid-diaphysis. One hour after loading, BMP2 was significantly upregulated in neurovascular structures in the medial ulnar periosteum. Expression of angiogenic markers (VEGF, PECAM-1) increased significantly between Day 0 and 1 and, as with BMP2 expression, remained upregulated through Day 7. While Osx and BSP were upregulated on Day 1, the other osteogenic genes (Msx2, Runx2, Osx, BSP and Osc) were induced on Day 3 in association with the initiation of periosteal woven bone formation and continued through Day 7. The magnitude of osteogenic gene expression, particularly matrix genes (BSP, Osc) was significantly proportional the level of fatigue damage. The woven bone response to fatigue injury is remarkably similar to the "intramembranous" portion of fracture repair - rapid formation of periosteal woven bone characterized by early BMP2 expression, cell proliferation, and upregulation of osteogenic genes. We speculate that woven bone repair of fatigue damage may be an abbreviated fracture response without the requirement

  8. Aggregation of Adenovirus 2 in Source Water and Impacts on Disinfection by Chlorine

    PubMed Central

    Cromeans, Theresa L.; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Humphrey, Charles D.; Hill, Vincent R.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that viral particles in source water are likely to be found as aggregates attached to other particles. For this reason, it is important to investigate the disinfection efficacy of chlorine on aggregated viruses. A method to produce adenovirus particle aggregation was developed for this study. Negative stain electron microscopy was used to measure aggregation before and after addition of virus particles to surface water at different pH and specific conductance levels. The impact of aggregation on the efficacy of chlorine disinfection was also examined. Disinfection experiments with human adenovirus 2 (HAdV2) in source water were conducted using 0.2 mg/L free chlorine at 5 °C. Aggregation of HAdV2 in source water (≥3 aggregated particles) remained higher at higher specific conductance and pH levels. However, aggregation was highly variable, with the percentage of particles present in aggregates ranging from 43 to 71 %. Upon addition into source water, the aggregation percentage dropped dramatically. On average, chlorination CT values (chlorine concentration in mg/L × time in min) for 3-log10 inactivation of aggregated HAdV2 were up to three times higher than those for dispersed HAdV2, indicating that aggregation reduced the disinfection rate. This information can be used by water utilities and regulators to guide decision making regarding disinfection of viruses in water. PMID:26910058

  9. Aggregation of Adenovirus 2 in Source Water and Impacts on Disinfection by Chlorine.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Amy M; Cromeans, Theresa L; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Humphrey, Charles D; Hill, Vincent R

    2016-06-01

    It is generally accepted that viral particles in source water are likely to be found as aggregates attached to other particles. For this reason, it is important to investigate the disinfection efficacy of chlorine on aggregated viruses. A method to produce adenovirus particle aggregation was developed for this study. Negative stain electron microscopy was used to measure aggregation before and after addition of virus particles to surface water at different pH and specific conductance levels. The impact of aggregation on the efficacy of chlorine disinfection was also examined. Disinfection experiments with human adenovirus 2 (HAdV2) in source water were conducted using 0.2 mg/L free chlorine at 5 °C. Aggregation of HAdV2 in source water (≥3 aggregated particles) remained higher at higher specific conductance and pH levels. However, aggregation was highly variable, with the percentage of particles present in aggregates ranging from 43 to 71 %. Upon addition into source water, the aggregation percentage dropped dramatically. On average, chlorination CT values (chlorine concentration in mg/L × time in min) for 3-log10 inactivation of aggregated HAdV2 were up to three times higher than those for dispersed HAdV2, indicating that aggregation reduced the disinfection rate. This information can be used by water utilities and regulators to guide decision making regarding disinfection of viruses in water.

  10. Aggregation of asbestos fibers in water: role of solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Ortiz, C. P.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Aggregation kinetics and stability of colloidal particles have been extensively studied using bulk techniques such as dynamic light scattering; these techniques involve large ensembles of particles and interpretation of results is difficult when particles are non-spherical and poorly characterized, as is always the case with non-ideal natural hazardous materials such as asbestos fibers. These difficulties hinder greatly progress on fundamental understanding of whether the classic colloidal aggregation theories can be applied to natural materials and how the heterogeneity of particles (e.g., shape) affects the colloidal aggregation kinetics and structure. By using in-situ microscopy and particle tracking techniques, we were able to observe the particle-by-particle growth of aggregated formed by elongated particles (synthetic glass rods and natural asbestos fibers) and demonstrated the rod-shaped geometry induced novel structures and growth dynamics that challenge existing theory. In this study, we continue to use asbestos as model system of elongated colloidal contaminant, and investigate the effects of changing solution chemistry (e.g., ionic strength, pH, and natural organic matter (NOM)), on growth dynamics and aggregates structure. The results show that aggregate growth curves are self-similar with a characteristic timescale that increases with increasing pH. By varying ionic strength for fixed pH values, we determine that the ccc is sensitive to pH. Fractal dimension decreases slightly with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength, indicating that stronger inter-particle repulsion create sparser aggregates; however, the magnitude of the solution chemistry effects is much smaller than that of colloid shape. In monovalent solutions, regardless of their concentration, HA drastically reduces the aggregation kinetics of asbestos fiber. This work may lead to enhanced prediction of the colloidal contaminants' mobility in the environment, bioavailability, and

  11. Equilibrium studies of protein aggregates and homogeneous nucleation in protein formulation.

    PubMed

    Kiese, Sylvia; Pappenberger, Astrid; Friess, Wolfgang; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2010-02-01

    Shaking or heat stress may induce protein aggregates. Aggregation behavior of an IgG1 stressed by shaking or heat following static storage at 5 and 25 degrees C was investigated to determine whether protein aggregates exist in equilibrium. Aggregates were detected using different analytical methods including visual inspection, turbidity, light obscuration, size exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering. Significant differences were evident between shaken and heated samples upon storage. Visible and subvisible particles (insoluble aggregates), turbidity and z-average diameter decreased whilst soluble aggregate content increased in shaken samples over time. Insoluble aggregates were considered to be reversible and dissociate into soluble aggregates and both aggregate types existed in equilibrium. Heat-induced aggregates had a denatured protein structure and upon static storage, no significant change in insoluble aggregates content was shown, whilst changes in soluble aggregates content occurred. This suggested that heat-induced insoluble aggregates were irreversible and not in equilibrium with soluble aggregates. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of unstressed IgG1 after spiking with heavily aggregated material (shaken or heat stressed) was studied. The aggregation behavior was not significantly altered, independent of the spiking concentration over time. Thus, neither mechanically stressed native nor temperature-induced denatured aggregates were involved in nucleating or propagating aggregation.

  12. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  13. Evaluating platelet aggregation dynamics from laser speckle fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are key to maintaining hemostasis and impaired platelet aggregation could lead to hemorrhage or thrombosis. We report a new approach that exploits laser speckle intensity fluctuations, emanated from a drop of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP), to profile aggregation. Speckle fluctuation rate is quantified by the speckle intensity autocorrelation, g2(t), from which the aggregate size is deduced. We first apply this approach to evaluate polystyrene bead aggregation, triggered by salt. Next, we assess dose-dependent platelet aggregation and inhibition in human PRP spiked with adenosine diphosphate and clopidogrel. Additional spatio-temporal speckle analyses yield 2-dimensional maps of particle displacements to visualize platelet aggregate foci within minutes and quantify aggregation dynamics. These findings demonstrate the unique opportunity for assessing platelet health within minutes for diagnosing bleeding disorders and monitoring anti-platelet therapies. PMID:28717586

  14. Aggregation and sinking behaviour of resuspended fluffy layer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, Kai; Forster, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The influence of pelagic diatom addition ( Skeletonema costatum) on aggregation dynamics of resuspended fluffy layer material containing natural microorganism assemblages (bacteria and pennate diatoms) was studied during two roller table experiments. Sediment samples were taken at a fine sand site (16 m water depth) located in Mecklenburg Bight, south-western Baltic Sea. Fluff was experimentally resuspended from sediment cores and aggregation processes with and without S. costatum were studied in rotating tanks. Total particulate matter was incorporated into artificial aggregates in equal shares after both roller table experiments. However, biogenic parameters (particulate organic carbon, particulate organic nitrogen, and carbohydrate equivalents), as well as cell numbers of bacteria and pennate diatoms were found in higher percentages in S. costatum aggregates compared to aggregates without S. costatum. Transparent exopolymer particles were apparently irrelevant in the aggregation process during both experiments. Settling velocities of S. costatum aggregates exceeding 1000 μm in diameter showed a significantly higher mean settling velocity compared to aggregates without S. costatum of the same size. The pronounced effect of pelagic diatoms on aggregation processes of fluff in terms of particle attributes, size, and therewith sinking velocities could be demonstrated and may lead to further insight into near bed particle transport in coastal waters.

  15. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation, and exhibited time independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic micro-particle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. PMID:18306403

  16. Phosphorus recovery from wastewater by struvite crystallization: property of aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhilong; Shen, Yin; Ye, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoji; Chen, Shaohua; Shi, Jianwen

    2014-05-01

    Struvite crystallization is a promising method to remove and recover phosphorus from wastewater to ease both the scarcity of phosphorus rock resources and water eutrophication worldwide. To date, although various kinds of reactor systems have been developed, supporting methods are required to control the struvite fines flushing out of the reactors. As an intrinsic property, aggregation is normally disregarded in the struvite crystallization process, although it is the key factor in final particle size and therefore guarantees phosphorus recovery efficiency. The present study developed a method to analyze the characteristics of struvite aggregates using fractal geometry, and the influence of operational parameters on struvite aggregation was evaluated. Due to its typical orthorhombic molecular structure, struvite particles are prone to crystallize into needle or rod shapes, and aggregate at the corners or edges of crystals. The determined fractal dimension (Dpf) of struvite aggregates was 1.52-1.31, with the corresponding range of equivalent diameter (d0.5) at 295.9-85.4 μm. Aggregates formed in relatively low phosphorus concentrations (3.0-5.0 mmol/L) and mildly alkaline conditions (pH 9.0-9.5) displayed relatively compact structures, large aggregate sizes and high aggregation strength. Increasing pH values led to continuous decrease of aggregate sizes, while the variation of Dpf was insignificant. As to the aggregate evolution, fast growth in a short time followed by a long steady stage was observed.

  17. Stable Colloidal Drug Aggregates Catch and Release Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Christopher K.; Duan, Da; Ganesh, Ahil N.; Torosyan, Hayarpi

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule aggregates are considered nuisance compounds in drug discovery, but their unusual properties as colloids could be exploited to form stable vehicles to preserve protein activity. We investigated the co-aggregation of seven molecules chosen because they had been previously intensely studied as colloidal aggregators, co-formulating them with bis-azo dyes. The co-formulation reduced colloid sizes to <100 nm, and improved uniformity of the particle size distribution. The new colloid formulations are more stable than previous aggregator particles. Specifically, co-aggregation of Congo Red with sorafenib, tetraiodophenolphthalein (TIPT) or vemurafenib produced particles that are stable in solutions of high ionic strength and high protein concentrations. Like traditional, single compound colloidal aggregates, the stabilized colloids adsorbed and inhibited enzymes like β-lactamase, malate dehydrogenase and trypsin. Unlike traditional aggregates, the co-formulated colloid-protein particles could be centrifuged and re-suspended multiple times, and from re-suspended particles, active trypsin could be released up to 72 hours after adsorption. Unexpectedly, the stable colloidal formulations can sequester, stabilize, and isolate enzymes by spin-down, resuspension and release. PMID:26741163

  18. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  19. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  20. B cell survival, surface BCR and BAFFR expression, CD74 metabolism, and CD8− dendritic cells require the intramembrane endopeptidase SPPL2A

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Hannes; Yabas, Mehmet; Short, Alanna; Miosge, Lisa; Barthel, Nadine; Teh, Charis E.; Roots, Carla M.; Bull, Katherine R.; Jeelall, Yogesh; Horikawa, Keisuke; Whittle, Belinda; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Sjollema, Geoff; Bertram, Edward M.; Mackay, Fabienne; Rimmer, Andrew J.; Cornall, Richard J.; Field, Matthew A.; Andrews, T. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Druggable proteins required for B lymphocyte survival and immune responses are an emerging source of new treatments for autoimmunity and lymphoid malignancy. In this study, we show that mice with an inactivating mutation in the intramembrane protease signal peptide peptidase–like 2A (SPPL2A) unexpectedly exhibit profound humoral immunodeficiency and lack mature B cell subsets, mirroring deficiency of the cytokine B cell–activating factor (BAFF). Accumulation of Sppl2a-deficient B cells was rescued by overexpression of the BAFF-induced survival protein B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) but not BAFF and was distinguished by low surface BAFF receptor and IgM and IgD B cell receptors. CD8-negative dendritic cells were also greatly decreased. SPPL2A deficiency blocked the proteolytic processing of CD74 MHC II invariant chain in both cell types, causing dramatic build-up of the p8 product of Cathepsin S and interfering with earlier steps in CD74 endosomal retention and processing. The findings illuminate an important role for the final step in the CD74–MHC II pathway and a new target for protease inhibitor treatment of B cell diseases. PMID:23267016

  1. Intra-membrane Signaling Between the Voltage-Gated Ca2+-Channel and Cysteine Residues of Syntaxin 1A Coordinates Synchronous Release

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Trus, Michael; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of syntaxin 1A (Sx1A) with voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) is required for depolarization-evoked release. However, it is unclear how the signal is transferred from the channel to the exocytotic machinery and whether assembly of Sx1A and the calcium channel is conformationally linked to triggering synchronous release. Here we demonstrate that depolarization-evoked catecholamine release was decreased in chromaffin cells infected with semliki forest viral vectors encoding Sx1A mutants, Sx1AC271V, or Sx1AC272V, or by direct oxidation of these Sx1A transmembrane (TM) cysteine residues. Mutating or oxidizing these highly conserved Sx1A Cys271 and Cys272 equally disrupted the Sx1A interaction with the channel. The results highlight the functional link between the VGCC and the exocytotic machinery, and attribute the redox sensitivity of the release process to the Sx1A TM C271 and C272. This unique intra-membrane signal-transduction pathway enables fast signaling, and triggers synchronous release by conformational-coupling of the channel with Sx1A. PMID:23567899

  2. B cell survival, surface BCR and BAFFR expression, CD74 metabolism, and CD8- dendritic cells require the intramembrane endopeptidase SPPL2A.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Hannes; Yabas, Mehmet; Short, Alanna; Miosge, Lisa; Barthel, Nadine; Teh, Charis E; Roots, Carla M; Bull, Katherine R; Jeelall, Yogesh; Horikawa, Keisuke; Whittle, Belinda; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Sjollema, Geoff; Bertram, Edward M; Mackay, Fabienne; Rimmer, Andrew J; Cornall, Richard J; Field, Matthew A; Andrews, T Daniel; Goodnow, Christopher C; Enders, Anselm

    2013-01-14

    Druggable proteins required for B lymphocyte survival and immune responses are an emerging source of new treatments for autoimmunity and lymphoid malignancy. In this study, we show that mice with an inactivating mutation in the intramembrane protease signal peptide peptidase-like 2A (SPPL2A) unexpectedly exhibit profound humoral immunodeficiency and lack mature B cell subsets, mirroring deficiency of the cytokine B cell-activating factor (BAFF). Accumulation of Sppl2a-deficient B cells was rescued by overexpression of the BAFF-induced survival protein B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) but not BAFF and was distinguished by low surface BAFF receptor and IgM and IgD B cell receptors. CD8-negative dendritic cells were also greatly decreased. SPPL2A deficiency blocked the proteolytic processing of CD74 MHC II invariant chain in both cell types, causing dramatic build-up of the p8 product of Cathepsin S and interfering with earlier steps in CD74 endosomal retention and processing. The findings illuminate an important role for the final step in the CD74-MHC II pathway and a new target for protease inhibitor treatment of B cell diseases.

  3. Effect of intra-membrane C60 fullerenes on the modulus of elasticity and the mechanical resistance of gel and fluid lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai; Contera, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    Penetration and partition of C60 to the lipid bilayer core are both relevant to C60 toxicity, and useful to realise C60 biomedical potential. A key aspect is the effect of C60 on bilayer mechanical properties. Here, we present an experimental study on the mechanical effect of the incorporation of C60 into the hydrophobic core of fluid and gel phase zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers. We demonstrate its incorporation inside the hydrophobic lipid core and the effect on the packing of the lipids and the vesicle size using a combination of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser light scattering. Using AFM we measured the Young's modulus of elasticity (E) of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) in the absence (presence) of intra-membranous C60 at 24.5 °C. E of fluid phase supported bilayers is not altered by C60, but E increases with incorporation of C60 in gel phase bilayers. The increase is higher for longer hydrocarbon chains: 1.6 times for DPPC and 2 times for DSPC. However the mechanical resistance of gel phase bilayers of curved bilayered structures decreases with the incorporation of C60. Our combined results indicate that C60 causes a decrease in gel phase lipid mobility, i.e. an increase in membrane viscosity.

  4. Utilization of sewage sludge in the manufacture of lightweight aggregate.

    PubMed

    Franus, Małgorzata; Barnat-Hunek, Danuta; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the possibility of sewage sludge management in a sintered ceramic material such as a lightweight aggregate. Made from clay and sludge lightweight aggregates were sintered at two temperatures: 1100 °C (name of sample LWA1) and 1150 °C (name of sample LWA2). Physical and mechanical properties indicate that the resulting expanded clay aggregate containing sludge meets the basic requirements for lightweight aggregates. The presence of sludge supports the swelling of the raw material, thereby causing an increase in the porosity of aggregates. The LWA2 has a lower value of bulk particle density (0.414 g/cm(3)), apparent particle density (0.87 g/cm(3)), and dry particle density (2.59 g/cm(3)) than it is in the case of LWA1 where these parameters were as follows: bulk particle density 0.685 g/cm(3), apparent particle density 1.05 g/cm(3), and dry particle density 2.69 g/cm(3). Water absorption and porosity of LWA1 (WA = 14.4 %, P = 60 %) are lower than the LWA2 (WA = 16.2 % and P = 66 %). This is due to the higher heating temperature of granules which make the waste gases, liberating them from the decomposition of organic sewage sludge. The compressive strength of LWA2 aggregate is 4.64 MPa and for LWA1 is 0.79 MPa. Results of leaching tests of heavy metals from examined aggregates have shown that insoluble metal compounds are placed in silicate and aluminosilicate structure of the starting materials (clays and sludges), whereas soluble substances formed crystalline skeleton of the aggregates. The thermal synthesis of lightweight aggregates from clay and sludge mixture is a waste-free method of their development.

  5. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  6. Diatom-associated bacteria are required for aggregation of Thalassiosira weissflogii

    PubMed Central

    Gärdes, Astrid; Iversen, Morten H; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Passow, Uta; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2011-01-01

    Aggregation of algae, mainly diatoms, is an important process in marine systems leading to the settling of particulate organic carbon predominantly in the form of marine snow. Exudation products of phytoplankton form transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), which acts as the glue for particle aggregation. Heterotrophic bacteria interacting with phytoplankton may influence TEP formation and phytoplankton aggregation. This bacterial impact has not been explored in detail. We hypothesized that bacteria attaching to Thalassiosira weissflogii might interact in a yet-to-be determined manner, which could impact TEP formation and aggregate abundance. The role of individual T. weissflogii-attaching and free-living new bacterial isolates for TEP production and diatom aggregation was investigated in vitro. T. weissflogii did not aggregate in axenic culture, and striking differences in aggregation dynamics and TEP abundance were observed when diatom cultures were inoculated with either diatom-attaching or free-living bacteria. The data indicated that free-living bacteria might not influence aggregation whereas bacteria attaching to diatom cells may increase aggregate formation. Interestingly, photosynthetically inactivated T. weissflogii cells did not aggregate regardless of the presence of bacteria. Comparison of aggregate formation, TEP production, aggregate sinking velocity and solid hydrated density revealed remarkable differences. Both, photosynthetically active T. weissflogii and specific diatom-attaching bacteria were required for aggregation. It was concluded that interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and diatoms increased aggregate formation and particle sinking and thus may enhance the efficiency of the biological pump. PMID:20827289

  7. Paper Sludge Reuse in Lightweight Aggregates Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chen, How-Ji; Hsueh, Ying-Chih; Peng, Ching-Fang; Tang, Chao-Wei

    2016-10-27

    The lightweight aggregates used by the civil engineering market are sintered at a high temperature, about 1200 °C. In times of high energy prices and regulation of carbon dioxide emissions, lightweight aggregate products of the high-temperature process in sales marketing are not readily accepted. This study developed a sintered-type paper sludge lightweight aggregate. In order to reduce energy consumption, substitution of some reservoir sediment clay in paper sludge substitutes is to be expected. The study used two types of paper sludge (green clay paper sludge and paper pulp sludge). The sintering temperature was reduced effectively as the green clay paper sludge was substituted for some of the reservoir sediment clay, and the optimum substitute ranges of green clay paper sludge were 10%-50%. The optimum substitute ranges of the paper pulp sludge were 10%-40%. Test results show that the properties of aggregates have a particle density of 0.66-1.69 g/cm³, a water absorption of 5%-30%, and a loss on ignition of 10%-43%. The loss on ignition of aggregate became greater with the increase in paper sludge content. This means that the calorific value provided by the paper sludge will increase as paper sludge content increases. Paper sludge can therefore be considered a good material to provide heat energy for sintering lightweight aggregate.

  8. Paper Sludge Reuse in Lightweight Aggregates Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, How-Ji; Hsueh, Ying-Chih; Peng, Ching-Fang; Tang, Chao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The lightweight aggregates used by the civil engineering market are sintered at a high temperature, about 1200 °C. In times of high energy prices and regulation of carbon dioxide emissions, lightweight aggregate products of the high-temperature process in sales marketing are not readily accepted. This study developed a sintered-type paper sludge lightweight aggregate. In order to reduce energy consumption, substitution of some reservoir sediment clay in paper sludge substitutes is to be expected. The study used two types of paper sludge (green clay paper sludge and paper pulp sludge). The sintering temperature was reduced effectively as the green clay paper sludge was substituted for some of the reservoir sediment clay, and the optimum substitute ranges of green clay paper sludge were 10%–50%. The optimum substitute ranges of the paper pulp sludge were 10%–40%. Test results show that the properties of aggregates have a particle density of 0.66–1.69 g/cm3, a water absorption of 5%–30%, and a loss on ignition of 10%–43%. The loss on ignition of aggregate became greater with the increase in paper sludge content. This means that the calorific value provided by the paper sludge will increase as paper sludge content increases. Paper sludge can therefore be considered a good material to provide heat energy for sintering lightweight aggregate. PMID:28773997

  9. Utilization of fly ash as engineering pellet aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Haydar; Baykal, Gokhan

    2006-07-01

    It has been recognized that there exists a serious need for recovery and reuse of industrial wastes. Agglomeration by pelletization method can alleviate the problems associated with fly ash. The objective of this study was to evaluate the material properties of manufactured aggregates produced from fly ash and cement mixing by pelletization method. Engineering properties of the manufactured aggregates were evaluated experimentally. Crushing strength, specific gravity, water absorption, particle size distribution, surface characteristics and shear strength properties of the manufactured aggregates were evaluated. For all practical purposes, the study showed that the manufactured aggregates are a good alternative for wide range civil engineering applications.

  10. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  11. Aggregates and their distributions determined from LOPC observations made using an autonomous profiling float

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, Colleen M.; Jackson, George A.; Checkley, David M., Jr.

    2013-04-01

    The vertical flux of particles in the ocean drives the movement of organic carbon to the deep ocean. We have been studying the distribution and flux of these particles using the SOLOPC, a profiling Lagrangian (SOLO) float with a Laser Optical Particle Counter (LOPC). We have been able to distinguish between aggregate-like and zooplankton-like particles with diameters >2mm but needed a way to separate the smaller particles into aggregates and zooplankton. Observations included a lognormal-shaped fraction in the normalized volume distribution similar to that observed in results for simulations of particles in the euphotic zone. By fitting a lognormal distribution to the volume spectrum of particles with diameters ≤2mm, we have been successful at making a separation of marine snow material from other, presumably living, particles. The particle volumes derived using the separations are positively correlated with fluorescence, particulate organic carbon, and the volume of larger particles classified as aggregate-like, which supports the conclusion that these particles are truly aggregates, in some cases derived from phytoplankton. The residual volumes (total less the above fit) are highly correlated with the volumes of large, zooplankton-like particles. Downward velocities of the aggregate fraction calculated from time series of particle profiles are consistent with previous estimates of particle settling rates (20-70md-1). We now have a tool to estimate aggregate distributions, properties, and vertical fluxes in the euphotic zone, including when and where they change.

  12. Stability of volcanic ash aggregates and break-up processes.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sebastian B; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ametsbichler, Jonathan; Cimarelli, Corrado; Merrison, Jonathan P; Poret, Matthieu; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-08-07

    Numerical modeling of ash plume dispersal is an important tool for forecasting and mitigating potential hazards from volcanic ash erupted during explosive volcanism. Recent tephra dispersal models have been expanded to account for dynamic ash aggregation processes. However, there are very few studies on rates of disaggregation during transport. It follows that current models regard ash aggregation as irrevocable and may therefore overestimate aggregation-enhanced sedimentation. In this experimental study, we use industrial granulation techniques to artificially produce aggregates. We subject these to impact tests and evaluate their resistance to break-up processes. We find a dependence of aggregate stability on primary particle size distribution and solid particle binder concentration. We posit that our findings could be combined with eruption source parameters and implemented in future tephra dispersal models.

  13. Formation and structure of stable aggregates in binary diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-López, J. M.; Moncho-Jordá, A.; Schmitt, A.; Hidalgo-Álvarez, R.

    2005-09-01

    Binary diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation processes are studied as a function of the relative concentration of the two species. Both, short and long time behaviors are investigated by means of three-dimensional off-lattice Brownian Dynamics simulations. At short aggregation times, the validity of the Hogg-Healy-Fuerstenau approximation is shown. At long times, a single large cluster containing all initial particles is found to be formed when the relative concentration of the minority particles lies above a critical value. Below that value, stable aggregates remain in the system. These stable aggregates are composed by a few minority particles that are highly covered by majority ones. Our off-lattice simulations reveal a value of approximately 0.15 for the critical relative concentration. A qualitative explanation scheme for the formation and growth of the stable aggregates is developed. The simulations also explain the phenomenon of monomer discrimination that was observed recently in single cluster light scattering experiments.

  14. Insights into Particle Cycling from Thorium and Particle Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Marchal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine particles are a main vector by which the biological carbon pump in the ocean transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean. Marine particles exist in a continuous spectrum of sizes, but they can be functionally grouped into a small, suspended class (which constitutes most of the total particle mass) and a large, sinking class (which contributes most of the particle flux). These two classes are connected by aggregation and disaggregation processes. The interplay of processes that create, aggregate, and destroy marine particles determines the strength and transfer efficiency of the biological pump. Measurements of radiocarbon, barium, and organic biomarkers on suspended and sinking particles have provided qualitative insights into particle dynamics, and measurements of thorium isotopes have provided quantitative estimates of rates. Here, we review what has been learned so far about particle dynamics in the ocean from chemical measurements on suspended and sinking particles. We then discuss future directions for this approach.

  15. Insights into particle cycling from thorium and particle data.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phoebe J; Marchal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine particles are a main vector by which the biological carbon pump in the ocean transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean. Marine particles exist in a continuous spectrum of sizes, but they can be functionally grouped into a small, suspended class (which constitutes most of the total particle mass) and a large, sinking class (which contributes most of the particle flux). These two classes are connected by aggregation and disaggregation processes. The interplay of processes that create, aggregate, and destroy marine particles determines the strength and transfer efficiency of the biological pump. Measurements of radiocarbon, barium, and organic biomarkers on suspended and sinking particles have provided qualitative insights into particle dynamics, and measurements of thorium isotopes have provided quantitative estimates of rates. Here, we review what has been learned so far about particle dynamics in the ocean from chemical measurements on suspended and sinking particles. We then discuss future directions for this approach.

  16. Reduction in soil aggregate size distribution due to wind erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion process by wind causes emission of fine soil particles, and thus alters the topsoil's properties, fertility, and erodibility. Topsoil resistance to erosion depends on its physicochemical properties, especially on the soil aggregation. Although the key role of aggregates in soil erodibility, quantitative information on the relations between soil aggregate size distribution (ASD) and erosion is still lucking. This study focuses on ASD analyses before and after soil erosion by wind. Wind tunnel experiments and soil analyses were conducted on semiarid loess topsoils with different initial conditions of aggregation. The results show that in all initial soil conditions saltation of sand particles caused the breakdown of macro-aggregates > 500 µm, resulting in increase of micro-aggregates (63-250 µm). The micro-aggregate production increases with the wind shear velocity (up to 0.61 m s-1) for soils with available macro-aggregates. The findings highlight dynamics in soil aggregation in response to erosion process, and therefore the significance of ASD in quantifying soil degradation and soil loss potential.

  17. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  18. Propagation of Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-30

    Since 2009, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau aggregates form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of Tau aggregates is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighbouring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induced the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Short fibrils constituted the major species of seed-competent Tau. The existence of several human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  19. Marine aggregate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The direction and scope of the Office of Naval Research's Marine Aggregate Dynamics Accelerated Research Initiative will be the topic of an open-house style meeting February 14, 7:30-10:00 P.M. in Ballroom D of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans at the Louisiana Superdome. This meeting is scheduled during the AGU/American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Ocean Sciences Meeting February 12-16 in New Orleans.The critical focus of the ARI is the measurement and modeling of the dynamics of the biological, physical, chemical and molecular processes that drive aggregation and produce aggregates. This new ARI will provide funding in Fiscal Years 1991-1995 to identify and quantify mechanisms that determine the distribution, abundance and size spectrum of aggregated particulate matter in the ocean.

  20. Aggregation and Averaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.

    The arithmetic processes of aggregation and averaging are basic to quantitative investigations of employment, unemployment, and related concepts. In explaining these concepts, this report stresses need for accuracy and consistency in measurements, and describes tools for analyzing alternative measures. (BH)

  1. Aggregation of retail stores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Pablo; Boisson, Jean; Larralde, Hernán

    2005-06-01

    We propose a simple model to understand the economic factors that induce aggregation of some businesses over small geographical regions. The model incorporates price competition with neighboring stores, transportation costs and the satisfaction probability of finding the desired product. We show that aggregation is more likely for stores selling expensive products and/or stores carrying only a fraction of the business variety. We illustrate our model with empirical data collected in the city of Lyon.

  2. Magnetic microparticle aggregation for viscosity determination by MR.

    PubMed

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2008-03-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of MR imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time-dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation and exhibited time-independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic microparticle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Simulation of red blood cell aggregation in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lim, B; Bascom, P A; Cobbold, R S

    1997-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear flow. It is based on a description of the collision rates of RBC, the probability of particles sticking together, and the breakage of aggregates by shear forces. The influence of shear rate, hematocrit, aggregate fractal dimension, and binding strength on aggregation kinetics were investigated and compared to other theoretical and experimental results. The model was used to simulate blood flow in a long large diameter tube under steady flow conditions at low Reynolds numbers. The time and spatial distribution of the state of aggregation are shown to be in qualitative agreement with previous B-mode ultrasound studies in which a central region of low echogenicity was noted. It is suggested that the model can provide a basis for interpreting prior measurements of ultrasound echogenicity and may help relate them to the local state of aggregation.

  4. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  5. Polyacrylamide effects on aggregate and structure stability of soils with different clay mineralogy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adding anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) to soils stabilizes existing aggregates and improves bonding between and aggregation of soil particles. However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent with soils having different clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil samples...

  6. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fractal dimension of the protein aggregates can be estimated by dynamic mechanical methods when the particle aggregates are imbedded in a polymer matrix. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB) latex, followe...

  7. Relationships between aggregates size classes and SOC content using aggregate settling velocity measurements in interrill areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Laura; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Navas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is one of the main factors of soil physics and structure. Formation and stabilization of soil aggregates facilitates soil carbon sequestration and reduces the susceptibility of soil to erosion. The gain or loss of C in agricultural systems is largely influenced by aggregate-associated soil organic carbon that affects the settling velocity and C content of soils. Settling velocity measurements are useful to provide direct information on soil aggregate size distribution that can be used as indicators of the potential soil erodibility. This study aims to analyze the effect of settling velocity on soil aggregate dynamics and the relationships between the particle size distributions and the associated carbon in a cultivated field of typical Mediterranean agroecosystems in mountain landscapes. Calcisol topsoil samples (n=10) were collected in an interrill area within the field at two contrasting slope positions (i.e. upslope and downslope). Furthermore, a total of ten Calcisol soil samples were collected in an adjacent area under forest vegetation cover and stable conditions. According to Stokes's Law, the fine soil fraction <2 mm was fractionated into five velocity settling classes: > 0.045, 0.045-0.015, 0.015-0.003, 0.003-0.001 and < 0.001 m s-1 using a settling tube procedure followed by the analysis of the SOC content of each settling size classes. The results evidenced the inverse correlation between grain size and SOC content, smaller and lighter settling size classes were enriched in SOC and the effect of cultivation on soil aggregation by the lower proportion of macroaggregates compared to forest soils. Moreover, it was found a preferential transport of fine particles from upslope to downslope during interrill erosion processes. In this study, settling velocity measurements provide a useful tool for assessing changes in soil aggregation under different land uses and for identifying the relationship between aggregates size classes and SOC

  8. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.; Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  9. Mutational analysis of the intramembranous H10 loop of yeast Nhx1 reveals a critical role in ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kallay, Laura; Brett, Christopher L; Rao, Rajini

    2006-08-15

    Yeast Nhx1 [Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger 1] is an intracellular Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger, localizing to the late endosome where it is important for ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking. Phylogenetic analysis of NHE (Na+/H+ exchanger) sequences has identified orthologous proteins, including HsNHE6 (human NHE6), HsNHE7 and HsNHE9 of unknown physiological role. These appear distinct from well-studied mammalian plasma membrane isoforms (NHE1-NHE5). To explore the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular NHEs and understand the link between ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking, we examined the consequence of replacing residues in the intramembranous H10 loop of Nhx1 between transmembrane segments 9 and 10. The critical role for the carboxy group of Glu355 in ion transport is consistent with the invariance of this residue in all NHEs. Surprisingly, residues specifically conserved in the intracellular isoforms (such as Phe357 and Tyr361) could not be replaced with closely similar residues (leucine and phenylalanine) found in the plasma membrane isoforms without loss of function, revealing unexpected side chain specificity. The trafficking phenotypes of all Nhx1 mutants, including hygromycin-sensitivity and missorting of carboxypeptidase Y, were found to directly correlate with pH homoeostasis defects and could be proportionately corrected by titration with weak base. The present study demonstrates the importance of the H10 loop of the NHE family, highlights the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular isoforms and shows that trafficking defects are tightly coupled with pH homoeostasis.

  10. Mutational analysis of the intramembranous H10 loop of yeast Nhx1 reveals a critical role in ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kallay, Laura; Brett, Christopher L.; Rao, Rajini

    2006-01-01

    Yeast Nhx1 [Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger 1] is an intracellular Na+(K+)/H+ exchanger, localizing to the late endosome where it is important for ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking. Phylogenetic analysis of NHE (Na+/H+ exchanger) sequences has ident-ified orthologous proteins, including HsNHE6 (human NHE6), HsNHE7 and HsNHE9 of unknown physiological role. These appear distinct from well-studied mammalian plasma membrane isoforms (NHE1–NHE5). To explore the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular NHEs and understand the link between ion homoeostasis and vesicle trafficking, we examined the consequence of replacing residues in the intramembranous H10 loop of Nhx1 between transmembrane segments 9 and 10. The critical role for the carboxy group of Glu355 in ion transport is consistent with the invariance of this residue in all NHEs. Surprisingly, residues specifically conserved in the intracellular isoforms (such as Phe357 and Tyr361) could not be replaced with closely similar residues (leucine and phenylalanine) found in the plasma membrane isoforms without loss of function, revealing unexpected side chain specificity. The trafficking phenotypes of all Nhx1 mutants, including hygromycin-sensitivity and missorting of carboxypeptidase Y, were found to directly correlate with pH homoeostasis defects and could be proportionately corrected by titration with weak base. The present study demonstrates the importance of the H10 loop of the NHE family, highlights the differences between plasma membrane and intracellular isoforms and shows that trafficking defects are tightly coupled with pH homoeostasis. PMID:16671892

  11. Matrix Gla Protein Is a Developmental Regulator of Chondrocyte Mineralization And, When Constitutively Expressed, Blocks Endochondral and Intramembranous Ossification in the Limb

    PubMed Central

    Yagami, Kimitoshi; Suh, Jo-Young; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Koyama, Eiki; Abrams, William R.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Pacifici, Maurizio; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    1999-01-01

    Matrix GLA protein (MGP), a γ-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA)–rich, vitamin K–dependent and apatite-binding protein, is a regulator of hypertrophic cartilage mineralization during development. However, MGP is produced by both hypertrophic and immature chondrocytes, suggesting that MGP's role in mineralization is cell stage–dependent, and that MGP may have other roles in immature cells. It is also unclear whether MGP regulates the quantity of mineral or mineral nature and quality as well. To address these issues, we determined the effects of manipulations of MGP synthesis and expression in (a) immature and hypertrophic chondrocyte cultures and (b) the chick limb bud in vivo. The two chondrocyte cultures displayed comparable levels of MGP gene expression. Yet, treatment with warfarin, a γ-carboxylase inhibitor and vitamin K antagonist, triggered mineralization in hypertrophic but not immature cultures. Warfarin effects on mineralization were highly selective, were accompanied by no appreciable changes in MGP expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, or cell number, and were counteracted by vitamin K cotreatment. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that mineral forming in control and warfarin-treated hypertrophic cell cultures was similar and represented stoichiometric apatite. Virally driven MGP overexpression in cultured chondrocytes greatly decreased mineralization. Surprisingly, MGP overexpression in the developing limb not only inhibited cartilage mineralization, but also delayed chondrocyte maturation and blocked endochondral ossification and formation of a diaphyseal intramembranous bone collar. The results show that MGP is a powerful but developmentally regulated inhibitor of cartilage mineralization, controls mineral quantity but not type, and appears to have a previously unsuspected role in regulating chondrocyte maturation and ossification processes. PMID:10579728

  12. Cytoplasmic fragment of Alcadein α generated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis enhances amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) transport into the late secretory pathway and facilitates APP cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-09

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the virulence activator TcpP in Vibrio cholerae is initiated by the tail-specific protease (Tsp).

    PubMed

    Teoh, Wei Ping; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae uses a multiprotein transcriptional regulatory cascade to control expression of virulence factors cholera toxin and toxin-co-regulated pilus. Two proteins in this cascade are ToxR and TcpP - unusual membrane-localized transcription factors with relatively undefined periplasmic domains and transcription activator cytoplasmic domains. TcpP and ToxR function with each other and two other membrane-localized proteins, TcpH and ToxS, to activate transcription of toxT, encoding the direct activator of toxin and pilus genes. Under some conditions, TcpP is degraded in a two-step proteolytic pathway known as regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), thereby inactivating the cascade. The second step in this proteolytic pathway involves the zinc metalloprotease YaeL; V. cholerae cells lacking YaeL accumulate a truncated yet active form of TcpP termed TcpP*. We hypothesized that a protease acting prior to YaeL degrades TcpP to TcpP*, which is the substrate of YaeL. In this study, we demonstrate that a C-terminal protease called Tsp degrades TcpP to form TcpP*, which is then acted upon by YaeL. We present evidence that TcpH and Tsp serve to protect full-length TcpP from spurious proteolysis by YaeL. Cleavage by Tsp occurs in the periplasmic domain of TcpP and requires residues TcpPA172 and TcpPI174 for wild-type activity.

  14. Residues in Conserved Loops of Intramembrane Metalloprotease SpoIVFB Interact with Residues near the Cleavage Site in Pro-σK

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Luethy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Intramembrane metalloproteases (IMMPs) control critical biological processes by cleaving membrane-associated proteins within a transmembrane segment or at a site near the membrane surface. Phylogenetic analysis divides IMMPs into four groups. SpoIVFB is a group III IMMP that regulates Bacillus subtilis endospore formation by cleaving Pro-σK and releasing the active sigma factor from a membrane. To elucidate the enzyme-substrate interaction, single-cysteine versions of catalytically inactive SpoIVFB and C-terminally truncated Pro-σK(1-126) (which can be cleaved by active SpoIVFB) were coexpressed in Escherichia coli, and proximity was tested by disulfide cross-linking in vivo. As expected, the results provided evidence that catalytic residue Glu-44 of SpoIVFB is near the cleavage site in the substrate. Also near the cleavage site were two residues of SpoIVFB in predicted conserved loops; Pro-135 in a short loop and Val-70 in a longer loop. Pro-135 corresponds to Pro-399 of RseP, a group I IMMP, and Pro-399 was reported previously to interact with substrate near the cleavage site, suggesting a conserved interaction across IMMP subfamilies. Val-70 follows a newly recognized conserved motif, PXGG (X is a large hydrophobic residue), which is in a hydrophobic region predicted to be a membrane reentrant loop. Following the hydrophobic region is a negatively charged region that is conserved in IMMPs of groups I and III. At least two residues with a negatively charged side chain are required in this region for activity of SpoIVFB. The region exhibits other features in IMMPs of groups II and IV. Its possible roles, as well as that of the short loop, are discussed. New insights into IMMP-substrate interaction build toward understanding how IMMPs function and may facilitate manipulation of their activity. PMID:23995631

  15. A polymer physics perspective on driving forces and mechanisms for protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Rohit V; Wang, Xiaoling; Vitalis, Andreas; Crick, Scott L

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a commonly occurring problem in biology. Cells have evolved stress-response mechanisms to cope with problems posed by protein aggregation. Yet, these quality control mechanisms are overwhelmed by chronic aggregation-related stress and the resultant consequences of aggregation become toxic to cells. As a result, a variety of systemic and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with various aspects of protein aggregation and rational approaches to either inhibit aggregation or manipulate the pathways to aggregation might lead to an alleviation of disease phenotypes. To develop such approaches, one needs a rigorous and quantitative understanding of protein aggregation. Much work has been done in this area. However, several unanswered questions linger, and these pertain primarily to the actual mechanism of aggregation as well as to the types of inter-molecular associations and intramolecular fluctuations realized at low protein concentrations. It has been suggested that the concepts underlying protein aggregation are similar to those used to describe the aggregation of synthetic polymers. Following this suggestion, the relevant concepts of polymer aggregation are introduced. The focus is on explaining the driving forces for polymer aggregation and how these driving forces vary with chain length and solution conditions. It is widely accepted that protein aggregation is a nucleation-dependent process. This view is based mainly on the presence of long times for the accumulation of aggregates and the elimination of these lag times with "seeds". In this sense, protein aggregation is viewed as being analogous to the aggregation of colloidal particles. The theories for polymer aggregation reviewed in this work suggest an alternative mechanism for the origin of long lag times in protein aggregation. The proposed mechanism derives from the recognition that polymers have unique dynamics that distinguish them from other aggregation-prone systems such as

  16. A polymer physics perspective on driving forces and mechanisms for protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Vitalis, Andreas; Crick, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a commonly occurring problem in biology. Cells have evolved stress-response mechanisms to cope with problems posed by protein aggregation. Yet, these quality control mechanisms are overwhelmed by chronic aggregation-related stress and the resultant consequences of aggregation become toxic to cells. As a result, a variety of systemic and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with various aspects of protein aggregation and rational approaches to either inhibit aggregation or manipulate the pathways to aggregation might lead to an alleviation of disease phenotypes. To develop such approaches, one needs a rigorous and quantitative understanding of protein aggregation. Much work has been done in this area. However, several unanswered questions linger, and these pertain primarily to the actual mechanism of aggregation as well as to the types of intermolecular associations and intramolecular fluctuations realized at low protein concentrations. It has been suggested that the concepts underlying protein aggregation are similar to those used to describe the aggregation of synthetic polymers. Following this suggestion, the relevant concepts of polymer aggregation are introduced. The focus is on explaining the driving forces for polymer aggregation and how these driving forces vary with chain length and solution conditions. It is widely accepted that protein aggregation is a nucleation-dependent process. This view is based mainly on the presence of long times for the accumulation of aggregates and the elimination of these lag times with “seeds”. In this sense, protein aggregation is viewed as being analogous to the aggregation of colloidal particles. The theories for polymer aggregation reviewed in this work suggest an alternative mechanism for the origin of long lag times in protein aggregation. The proposed mechanism derives from the recognition that polymers have unique dynamics that distinguish them from other aggregation-prone systems such

  17. Modeling Aggregation-Fragmentation Processes Based on Nonlinear Collision Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, A. J.; Sahin, C.; Sheremet, A.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate estimations of the