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Sample records for intramural esophagic hematoma

  1. Intramural esophagic hematoma secondary to coumarinic anticoagulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Esophagic Intramural Hematoma is an uncommon clinical condition, with a prognosis which is essentially benign. On most cases, a predisposing or precipitating factor may be seen, with the most common ones being the history of esophagic instrumentation, food impactations and thrombocytopenia. In the following manuscript, the authors present the case of a 54-years-old male with history of valve replacement surgery, who was treated at the Clinica Cardiovascular (Medellin, Colombia), with a clinical case of Intramural Esophagic Hematoma that was later confirmed to be due to a Coumarinic overanticoagulation. On this case, it is evidenced that Intramural Esophagic Hematoma is an unrecognized complication of Courmarinic anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20069068

  2. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Samuel; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Araújo Correia, Luís

    2016-08-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with sudden left quadrant abdominal pain and hematochezia. There was no history of trauma. He denied other symptoms or taking off-the-counter medication. His medical history was relevant for ischemic and aortic-mitral valve disease with prosthetic valves for which he was medicated with aspirin and warfarin. On physical examination the patient presented normal vital signs with tenderness on palpation of the left side of the abdomen. Laboratory tests revealed moderate anemia (10.8 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (135.000x10^9 U/L) with therapeutic international normalized ratio (2.53). Colonoscopy revealed an extensive area of erythematous and bluish mucosa with an apparent torsion of the proximal descending colon around a volumous hematoma measuring 6.5x3 cm (Figure 1 A-C). Urgent abdominal CT confirmed the presence of a large intramural hematoma of the descending colon (Figure 2 A-B). A conservative approach was adopted with temporary suspension of anticoagulation. Given the high thrombotic risk, abdominal ultrasound was performed after 72 hours showing considerable reduction in the size of the hematoma. Anti-coagulation was then resumed without complications. One month later, colonoscopy was repeated showing complete healing of the mucosa. The increasing use of anti-aggregating and anti-coagulant therapy, especially in elderly patients, explains the increasing incidence of bleeding events seen in this population. However, gastrointestinal hematomas are estimated to occur in only 1 for every 250.000 anti-coagulated patients. Diagnosis is based on characteristic radiologic findings. While most parietal hematomas can be approached conservatively, surgery is indicated in the presence of complications or persistence of the hematoma. PMID:27554386

  3. Coronary Intramural Hematoma Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takenobu; Kadota, Kazushige; Kubo, Shunsuke; Habara, Seiji; Mitsudo, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of intramural hematoma without ongoing myocardial ischemia that healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. A 37-year-old woman was admitted due to chest pain. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the distal portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, where intravascular ultrasound showed a hematoma, but optical coherence tomography could not detect the entry point. Therefore, we identified the intramural hematoma as the etiology. Because the coronary flow was maintained and chest pain disappeared, we chose conservative treatment. Fifteen days after admission, coronary computed tomography showed an improvement in the intramural hematoma. PMID:27477409

  4. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  5. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  6. A Lethal Complication of Endoscopic Therapy: Duodenal Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Calhan, Turan; Kahraman, Resul; Soydaş, Barış; Tosun, Ali; Cebeci, Egemen

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal intramural hematoma (DIH) usually occurs in childhood and young adults following blunt abdominal trauma. It may also develop in the presence of coagulation disorders and may rarely be an iatrogenic outcome of endoscopic procedures. Management of DIH is usually a conservative approach. A case of intramural duodenal hematoma that developed following endoscopic epinephrine sclerotherapy and/or argon plasma coagulation and that was nonresponsive to conservative therapy in a patient with chronic renal failure who died from sepsis is being discussed in this report. Clinicians should be aware of such possible complications after endoscopic hemostasis in patients with coagulation disorders. PMID:26697240

  7. Spontaneous intestinal intramural hematoma: What to do and not to do

    PubMed Central

    Yoldaş, Tayfun; Erol, Varlık; Çalışkan, Cemil; Akgün, Erhan; Korkut, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Spontaneous intestinal intramural hematoma is a rare complication of anticoagulant treatment. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with the diagnosis of intramural hematoma of the small intestine who were followed-up and treated in our clinic, and we aimed to determine current approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of intramural hematoma. Material and Methods: Between February 2010–October 2012, 14 patients diagnosed with small intestinal intramural hematoma were retrospectively analyzed. Nine patients were followed due to clinical findings and 5 patients underwent operation with a histopathological diagnosis of intramural hematoma. Results: Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated ileal and jejunal wall thickening in 10 patients, while findings were consistent with mesenteric vascular disease in four. Five patients were operated due to mechanical bowel obstruction and acute abdomen. The other 9 patients were followed up with medical treatment and 8 of these patients were already using warfarin due to cardiac bypass and valve replacement. Conclusion: Spontaneous intestinal intramural hematoma is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction due to intramural hematoma, which is encountered even more rarely. An intramural hematoma should be considered among differential diagnosis of patients who present with abdominal pain and symptoms of obstruction with a history of anticoagulant drug use and elevated International Normalized Ratio (INR) levels. Early diagnosis and medical follow-up can provide a good response to treatment in the majority of patients without requiring surgery. PMID:25931850

  8. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis and Concomitant Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Michael A; Garg, Ankit; Ro, Brandon; Wang, Christopher; Yang, Tony T C; Plener, Ian S; Grin, Andrea; Colak, Errol; Grover, Samir C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is an idiopathic benign chronic disease characterized by flask-like outpouchings of the esophageal wall. It is unknown whether there is a genuine association between EIPD and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Aims. To investigate a possible relationship between EIPD and EoE. Methods. Patients with radiographic or endoscopic evidence of pseudodiverticulosis were identified from the database at a single academic center. Cases were analyzed in three areas: clinical information, endoscopic findings, and course. Results. Sixteen cases of esophageal pseudodiverticulosis were identified. Five patients had histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis. Patients with EoE had pseudodiverticula in the mid-to-distal esophagus while those with EIPD had pseudodiverticula predominantly in the proximal esophagus (p < 0.001). EoE with pseudodiverticulosis occurred in younger patients (p < 0.019). Food bolus obstructions were more common in patients with EoE and pseudodiverticulosis than in EIPD (p < 0.034). Conclusions. This is the first case series supporting a potential association between EoE and pseudodiverticulosis. We also identify characteristic features of pseudodiverticulosis that may raise clinical suspicion of underlying eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:27648438

  9. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis and Concomitant Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Michael A.; Garg, Ankit; Ro, Brandon; Wang, Christopher; Yang, Tony T. C.; Plener, Ian S.; Grin, Andrea; Colak, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is an idiopathic benign chronic disease characterized by flask-like outpouchings of the esophageal wall. It is unknown whether there is a genuine association between EIPD and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Aims. To investigate a possible relationship between EIPD and EoE. Methods. Patients with radiographic or endoscopic evidence of pseudodiverticulosis were identified from the database at a single academic center. Cases were analyzed in three areas: clinical information, endoscopic findings, and course. Results. Sixteen cases of esophageal pseudodiverticulosis were identified. Five patients had histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis. Patients with EoE had pseudodiverticula in the mid-to-distal esophagus while those with EIPD had pseudodiverticula predominantly in the proximal esophagus (p < 0.001). EoE with pseudodiverticulosis occurred in younger patients (p < 0.019). Food bolus obstructions were more common in patients with EoE and pseudodiverticulosis than in EIPD (p < 0.034). Conclusions. This is the first case series supporting a potential association between EoE and pseudodiverticulosis. We also identify characteristic features of pseudodiverticulosis that may raise clinical suspicion of underlying eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:27648438

  10. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis and Concomitant Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Michael A.; Garg, Ankit; Ro, Brandon; Wang, Christopher; Yang, Tony T. C.; Plener, Ian S.; Grin, Andrea; Colak, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is an idiopathic benign chronic disease characterized by flask-like outpouchings of the esophageal wall. It is unknown whether there is a genuine association between EIPD and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Aims. To investigate a possible relationship between EIPD and EoE. Methods. Patients with radiographic or endoscopic evidence of pseudodiverticulosis were identified from the database at a single academic center. Cases were analyzed in three areas: clinical information, endoscopic findings, and course. Results. Sixteen cases of esophageal pseudodiverticulosis were identified. Five patients had histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis. Patients with EoE had pseudodiverticula in the mid-to-distal esophagus while those with EIPD had pseudodiverticula predominantly in the proximal esophagus (p < 0.001). EoE with pseudodiverticulosis occurred in younger patients (p < 0.019). Food bolus obstructions were more common in patients with EoE and pseudodiverticulosis than in EIPD (p < 0.034). Conclusions. This is the first case series supporting a potential association between EoE and pseudodiverticulosis. We also identify characteristic features of pseudodiverticulosis that may raise clinical suspicion of underlying eosinophilic esophagitis.

  11. [Intramural hematoma of the ileum complicating anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, B; Sánchez González, F; Aguirrezabalaga González, J; Crespo García, C; Lago Novoa, M; Blanco Freire, N

    1994-07-01

    The development of abdominal pain in the patient receiving anticoagulant therapy is more likely to pose a diagnostic dilemma. A group of intra-abdominal bleeding syndromes, which are extremely rare in patients with normal haemostasis, have been described in patients on anticoagulant therapy. Theses syndromes are of particular interest to surgeons because they simulate acute surgical conditions of the abdomen. We herein report the preoperative diagnosis of a spontaneous intramural hematoma of the small bowel by computed tomography. The authors conclude that CT should be used early in the diagnostic evaluation of abdominal pain and of acute abdomen in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. Indications for the operative management of these patients include active bleeding, pneumoperitoneum, failure to improve with conservative management within 72 hours, worsening of symptoms, and uncertain diagnosis.

  12. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis as a diagnostic and therapeutic problem

    PubMed Central

    Gątarek, Juliusz; Orłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the case of a 68-year-old patient with alcohol dependence syndrome, who was admitted, in serious condition, to the Department of Surgery due to esophageal intramural lesions of unclear etiology. The imaging studies showed no signs of transmural perforation of the esophageal wall. Esophagogastroscopy revealed intramural fluid reservoirs and small oval cavities with smooth edges in the esophageal mucosa. The patient was treated conservatively with parenteral nutrition and rehabilitation. Subsequently, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit because of cardiorespiratory failure. Despite adequate pharmacological treatment, the patient died. PMID:27785146

  13. Computed tomography of intramural hematoma of the small intestime: a report of 3 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Plojoux, O.; Hauser, H.; Wettstein, P.

    1982-08-01

    CT findings in 3 cases of intramural hematoma of the small intestine are described. One patient needed surgery. CT characteristics were specific and included a region of increased density (50-80 H) representing the hematoma. The differential diagnosis includes tumor (lymphoma or melanoma) and inflammatory disease (Crohn disease or pancreatic cyst.)

  14. Outcomes and management of type A intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Harleen K.; Tanaka, Akiko; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M.; Afifi, Rana O.; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Initial optimal management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) with intramural hematoma (ATAIMH) remains controversial, especially between centers in the Eastern vs. Western worlds. We examined the literature and our experience to report outcomes after repair of ATAIMH. Methods We reviewed the hospital, follow-up clinic records and online mortality databases for all patients who presented to our center for open repair of ATAAD between 1999 and 2014. Preoperative characteristics, early and long-term outcomes were compared between classic ATAAD vs. ATAIMH. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank statistics. Results Of the 523 repaired ATAAD, 101 patients (19%) presented with IMH and 422 (81%) had classic dissection. ATAIMH were significantly older (64.8±12.9 vs. 56.8±14.6 years; P<0.001), more commonly females (39% vs. 26%; P=0.010), had poor baseline renal function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate) (P<0.017), more retrograde dissections (27% vs. 8.3%; P<0.001), and less distal malperfusion (5% vs. 15%; P<0.001). Age greater than 60 years, female sex, retrograde dissection, and Marfan syndrome were strongly correlated with ATAIMH. Time to repair for ATAIMH was longer (median, 55.3 vs. 9.8 hours; P<0.001) with one death in ATAIMH within three days of presentation (0.9% vs. 6%; P=0.040). In all, 30-day mortality in ATAIMH was not different from classic ATAAD (12% vs.16%; P=0.289). A significantly lower incidence of postoperative dialysis in ATAIMH was noted (10% vs. 19%; P=0.034). When adjusted for age and renal function, late survival was improved with IMH (P<0.039). Conclusions ATAIMH continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, comparable to classic aortic dissection. A multidisciplinary management approach involving aggressive medical management and risk stratification for timely surgical intervention, along with genetic profiling, is recommended for optimal care. Long-term monitoring is mandatory to assess

  15. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  16. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week. PMID:21814382

  17. Laparoscopic drainage of a post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Banieghbal, Behrouz; Vermaak, Cobus; Beale, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Duodenal intramural hematoma owing to blunt abdominal trauma is a relatively rare condition and is normally managed non-operatively. In this paper, we present the case of an 11-year-old boy with a post-traumatic duodenal hematoma, who after failing conservative management, underwent laparoscopic drainage. A four-port approach in a similar position to the laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used. After disentangling the inflammatory mass, the duodenal serosa was opened by simple hook diathermy and the hematoma evacuated. The child recovered uneventfully and was discharged home 48 hours later. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this condition has been successfully treated laparoscopically.

  18. Spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma in type 2B von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Eichele, Derrick D; Ross, Meredith; Tang, Patrick; Hutchins, Grant F; Mailliard, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Intramural duodenal hematoma is a rare cause of a proximal gastrointestinal tract obstruction. Presentation of intramural duodenal hematoma most often occurs following blunt abdominal trauma in children, but spontaneous non-traumatic cases have been linked to anticoagulant therapy, pancreatitis, malignancy, vasculitis and endoscopy. We report an unusual case of spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma presenting as an intestinal obstruction associated with acute pancreatitis in a patient with established von Willebrand disease, type 2B. The patient presented with abrupt onset of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography imaging identified an intramural duodenal mass consistent with blood measuring 4.7 cm × 8.7 cm in the second portion of the duodenum abutting on the head of the pancreas. Serum lipase was 3828 units/L. Patient was managed conservatively with bowel rest, continuous nasogastric decompression, total parenteral nutrition, recombinant factor VIII (humateP) and transfusion. Symptoms resolved over the course of the hospitalization. This case highlights an important complication of an inherited coagulopathy. PMID:24222967

  19. Intramural Hematoma of the Thoracic Aorta as a Form of Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Pukacki, Fryderyk; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Waclaw

    2007-09-15

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the thoracic aorta is a complication with unknown etiology and a poorly predictable prognosis. There is also considerable controversy about the management and prognosis of IMH as well as the treatment. We present two cases of endovascular treatment of IMH with stent-graft placement. On the basis of references, we discuss risks of progression of the given pathology and possible complications. Despite the lack of uniform opinion about the management of this disorder, we present our observations of and experiences with endovascular treatment of IMH of the thoracic aorta.

  20. Intramural duodenal hematoma after submucosal injection of epinephrine for a bleeding ulcer: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    DIBRA, A.; KËLLIÇI, S.; ÇELIKU, E.; DRAÇINI, Xh.; MATURO, A.; ÇELIKU, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of endoscopic therapy for a bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with no evidence of other pathologies. A 18-year-old man was admitted in emergency room with gastrointestinal bleeding manifested by melena. Previous medical history revealed that he had endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer 5 months before. Endoscopy revealed a Forrest 2a ulcer in the duodenal bulb and sclerotherapy was performed by injecting 10 ml of 0.2% epinephrine and 20 ml of NaCl 0.9% solution. Upper occlusion’s signs appeared 36 hours after the procedure. The hematoma, that was identified by endoscopy and confirmed by MRI and CT scan of the abdomen, caused transient duodenal obstruction. Combined conservative management with nasogastric tube and total parenteral nutrition resulted in reduction of obstructive symptoms within 4 weeks. PMID:25827667

  1. Diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes: dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Bonaca, Marc P; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndromes constitute a spectrum of conditions characterized by disruptions in the integrity of the aortic wall that may lead to potentially catastrophic outcomes. They include classic aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Although imaging studies are sensitive and specific, timely diagnosis can be delayed because of variability in presenting symptoms and the relatively low frequency with which acute aortic syndromes are seen in the emergency setting. Traditional classification systems, such as the Stanford system, facilitate early treatment decision-making through recognition of the high risk of death and major complications associated with involvement of the ascending aorta (type A). These patients are treated surgically unless intractable and severe co-morbidities are present. Outcomes with dissections that do not involve the ascending aorta (type B) depend on the presence of acute complications (e.g., malperfusion, early aneurysm formation, leakage), the patency and size of the false lumen, and patient co-morbidities. Patients with uncomplicated type B dissections are initially treated medically. Endovascular techniques have emerged as an alternative to surgery for the management of complicated type B dissections when intervention is necessary. Patients with acute aortic syndromes require aggressive medical care, risk stratification for additional complications and targeted genetic assessment as well as careful long-term monitoring to assess for evolving complications. The optimal care of patients with acute aortic syndrome requires the cooperation of members of an experienced multidisciplinary team both in the acute and chronic setting.

  2. Aortic Branch Artery Pseudoaneurysms Associated with Intramural Hematoma: When and How to Do Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Giancarlo; Williams, David M.

    2013-04-15

    To describe when and how to perform endovascular embolization of aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B intramural hematoma (IMH) involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) that increased significantly in size during follow-up. Sixty-one patients (39 men; mean {+-} standard deviation age 66.1 {+-} 11.2 years) with acute IMH undergoing at least two multidetector computed tomographic examinations during follow-up for 12 months or longer were enrolled. Overall, 48 patients (31 men, age 65.9 {+-} 11.5) had type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III). Among the 48 patients, 26 (54 %; 17 men, aged 64.3 {+-} 11.4 years) had 71 aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms. Overall, during a mean follow-up of 22.1 {+-} 9.5 months (range 12-42 months), 31 (44 %) pseudoaneurysms disappeared; 22 (31 %) decreased in size; two (3 %) remained stable; and 16 (22 %) increased in size. Among the 16 pseudoaneurysms with increasing size, five of these (three intercostal arteries, one combined intercostobronchial/intercostal arteries, one renal artery), present in five symptomatic patients, had a significant increase in size (thickness >10 mm; width and length >20 mm). These five patients underwent endovascular embolization with coils and/or Amplatzer Vascular Plug. In all patients, complete thrombosis and exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysm and relief of back pain were achieved. Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) may be considered relatively benign lesions. However, a small number may grow in size or extend longitudinally with clinical symptoms during follow-up, and in these cases, endovascular embolization can be an effective and safe procedure.

  3. Dengue hemorrhagic fever presenting with hemorrhagic pancreatitis and an intramural hematoma of the duodenal wall: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Yuan; Tsai, Hung-Chin; Lee, Susan Shin-jung; Lin, Chun-Ku; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Chen, Yao-Shen

    2013-05-01

    Dengue fever may present with atypical manifestations. Here we report a 47 year-old male presenting with fever and sore throat for 2 days, followed by epigastric pain and tarry stool for 4 days. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple ulcers with a nodular margin in the duodenal bulb and second portion of the duodenum. A MRI of the abdomen revealed hemorrhagic pancreatitis, with a large intramural hematoma in the second portion of duodenum. The final diagnosis was dengue hemorrhagic fever, grade II, complicated with hemorrhagic pancreatitis and an intramural hematoma of the duodenal wall. Physicians should be aware of the atypical abdominal presentations of dengue fever.

  4. Surgical management of complicated intra-mural duodenal hematoma: A case-report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Elmoghazy, Walid; Noaman, Islam; Mahfouz, Ahmed-Emad; Elaffandi, Ahmed; Khalaf, Hatem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH) is a rare pathological entity that occurs as a complication of trauma, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer disease or endoscopic biopsy procedures. In this report, we present a case of IDH related to a duodenal diverticulum that was complicated by intra-abdominal bleeding and peritonitis. Presentation of case We report a 31-year old male who presented with pancreatitis that was complicated with IDH, as diagnosed using endoscopy and CT scan of the abdomen. The condition was related to a duodenal diverticulum as appears on imaging. The patient was treated conservatively over a course of 1 week when he started to have intra-abdominal bleeding and developed peritonitis. The patient was successfully treated with laparotomy, drainage of intra-abdominal abscess, evacuation of IDH and repair of duodenal perforation. We discuss this case in the context of the current indications of surgery in cases of IDH. Conclusion Despite shift towards conservative management of IDH cases over last few decades, these cases should be handled carefully as they might develop life-threatening complications. PMID:26595897

  5. Esophageal dissection and hematoma associated with obstruction in an Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus).

    PubMed

    Phair, Kristen A; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Pye, Geoffrey W; Pessier, Allan P; Clippinger, Tracy L

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old female Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) developed a sudden onset of excessive salivation and dysphagia. Esophageal obstruction was suspected; possibly related to palm frond ingestion. Esophageal endoscopy revealed a mat of plant material in the distal esophagus. An initial attempt at relieving the obstruction was unsuccessful, but subsequent use of custom-made instruments along with insufflation and hydropulsion enabled partial removal of the material. Postimmobilization care included aggressive intravenous and rectal fluids, anti-inflammatory and antibiotic administration, and fasting. Despite treatment, the dysphagia persisted and the elephant was euthanized due to lack of improvement and grave prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed remaining plant material in the esophagus, complicated by an esophageal dissection, mural hematoma, and secondary bacterial infection. Iatrogenic trauma may have contributed to the extent of esophageal injury. Although treatment was ultimately unsuccessful, the supportive care employed could potentially aid recovery in cases of less severe esophageal trauma. PMID:25000713

  6. Primary Esophageal Intramural Squamous Cell Carcinoma Masquerading as a Submucosal Tumor: A Rare Presentation of a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S.; Surude, Ravindra G.; Pawar, Vinay B.; Udgirkar, Suhas; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the commonest primary malignant esophageal tumor, which typically presents as endoscopically visible surface mucosal ulcerations, irregularities, or polyploidal masses. We here report a rare case of primary ESCC with completely intramural growth under a normal looking intact nondysplastic surface squamous epithelium disguising as a submucosal tumor. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy-guided mucosal biopsy was negative for malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed a heteroechoic solid mass originating from the muscularis propria of the distal esophagus. Cytological study of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration from the mass was suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma, which was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. There was no evidence of metastatic origin of this tumor or continuous cancer involvement from the surrounding structures, including the head, neck, and lungs on bronchoscopy, computed tomography scan, and positron emission tomography scan. Exclusive intramural squamous cell carcinoma with normal overlying mucosa is an exceedingly rare presentation of primary ESCC with only four cases reported in the literature so far. A high index of suspicion is required by the gastroenterologists and pathologists in diagnosing these cases as these tumors closely mimic the mesenchymal submucosal tumors such as lipoma, leiomyoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. EUS is an indispensable tool in making a preoperative diagnosis and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27721663

  7. [Intramural duodenal hematoma and acute pancreatitis as a complication of diagnostic biopsy of a duodenal 6-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Krzesiek, Elżbieta; Iwańczak, Barbara; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Hematoma duodenum is a very rare complication of diagnostic endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract when biopsy of the duodenum is performed (average frequency is estimated as 1:1,250 biopsies). Most often, it affects children and young adults without any risk factors. Symptoms result from obstruction of the duodenum and compression of the adjacent structures. Conservative treatment, which consists of parenteral nutrition and aspiration of gastric contents until the absorption of hematoma and patency of the gastrointestinal tract returns, is preferred. This paper describes a 6-year-old boy diagnosed due to short stature and low weight in whom the diagnostic biopsy of the duodenum caused formation of a hematoma in the descending duodenum and led to total ileus and acute pancreatitis. The boy was treated conservatively with good result and complete resolution of symptoms was achived.

  8. Intramural Superstars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spindt, Gary B.

    1981-01-01

    A junior high intramural athletic program was developed to foster enthusiasm among the junior high school student body. Twenty different sports were offered. A Superstar Competition was comprised of eight events including the 100-yard dash, shot put, basketball shoot, and obstacle course. (JN)

  9. [Function of the upper esophageal sphincter after denervation of recurrent laryngeal nerves and intramural nerves of the cervical esophagus in dogs].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Y; Higashino, M; Osugi, H; Tokuhara, T; Kinoshita, H

    1994-09-01

    The upper esophageal sphincter prevents reflux into the pharynx. If it functions improperly, aspiration pneumonia can result. We studied the functioning of the sphincter in unanesthetized dogs after denervation under anesthesia of the recurrent laryngeal nerves. The pressure of the sphincter at rest was measured by manometry with a transducer that measured pressure around the tip of a catheter. Then the pressure in response to inflation of a balloon to the diameter of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 cm at 5 and 10 cm aboral to the sphincter was measured. Next, the pressure during perfusion of 0.1 N HCl or NaOH 10 cm aboral to the sphincter was measured. These studies were done first in 10 dogs that had undergone only gastrostomy for measurements (controls). Measurements were repeated after the left recurrent laryngeal nerve in the controls was cut (L group), after the right recurrent laryngeal nerve in the L group was cut (B group), and after transection of the esophagus 7 cm aboral to the sphincter in the B group (T group). The differences in the pressure at rest were not significant. In each group, balloon inflation to any diameter tested and at either position made the pressure rise above that at rest. This pressure in the L, B, and T groups, however, was significantly lower than in the controls. When the balloon was inflated to 2.5 cm when it was 10 cm aboral to the sphincter, the pressure in the T group was significantly lower than in the B group. When HCl or NaOH were perfused, the pressure increased gradually in the controls, but not in the other groups. In conclusion, although recurrent laryngeal nerves did not affect the function of the sphincter at rest, they were the afferent routes of the contraction by the sphincter as a reflex following distension or chemical stimulation of the esophagus. The intramural nerve network of the cervical esophagus may be another reflex route of contraction of the upper esophageal sphincter.

  10. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  11. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling of the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that leads from the back of the mouth to the stomach. Causes Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid ...

  12. Organizing an Intramural Triathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Suggestions for developing an intramural triathlon consisting of a 1000-yard swim, 15-mile bike ride, and 5-mile run are presented in this article. Topics to consider when organizing this event include course selection, publicity, personnel, equipment, and awards. (DF)

  13. Ralleyball: A Tennis Intramural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Stanley J.; Duncan, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Physical education teachers often look for ways to bring any activity to life and give it meaning with all-out participation from students. To showcase the talents of each sports-enthusiast-students, schools facilitate an intramural activity. The authors of this article present an intramural program titled Ralleyball, which is an ideal way to…

  14. A New Twist to Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildersleeve, Robert; Williams, Jill

    The intramural program at Arizona State University has recently undergone major reorganization. Three highlights of this year's program were the "Run to Tucson," the powerlifting meet, and the rodeo. The "Run to Tucson" involved a 126-mile football relay race from Arizona State University's campus in Tempe to the University of Arizona's campus in…

  15. [Intramural abscesses of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Denis, J; Ganansia, R; Arnous-Dubois, N; du Puy-Montbrun, T; Lemarchand, N

    1983-05-01

    Intramural abscesses of the rectum developed in the complex longitudinal layer may be isolated or associated with a transphincteric fistula. They may be acute or subacute and are diagnosed by intrarectal palpation. The only treatment is surgical: the abscess is opened into the rectal cavity, except in case of association with suprasphincteric fistula, when it must be drained through the skin. Postoperative complications are minor ones and relapses are rare (1.75% of cases). PMID:6222301

  16. Postoperative extradural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Angelo; Ruggeri, Andrea; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative extradural hematoma (POEH) is a possible complication after head surgery, often neglected in the literature. In a single surgeon experience we found 13 cases of POEH (0.8%). We distinguished two subtypes: (1) larger hematomas (>40 cc) with typical features and overt clinical picture that always needed evacuation, and (2) smaller hematomas (<40 cc) with insidious clinical onset and different radiological features compared with traumatic and spontaneous extradural hematomas. On the basis of our experience, we propose that clinical picture and radiologic appearance lead the decision between conservative or interventional treatment of type II hematomas.

  17. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    esophageal leiomyomas had overlapping imaging features, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, more heterogeneous, and more enhancing on CT and were markedly FDG avid on PET. Given their malignant potential, esophageal GISTs should be included in the differential diagnosis of intramural esophageal neoplasms. PMID:25055264

  18. Intramurals: New and Innovative Ideas for a School Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastore, Donna L.

    Intramurals have been a part of elementary and secondary schools since the early part of this century. Intramurals are considered to be an important part of the educational process. Often many schools offer traditional intramural activities, such as basketball, softball, tennis, and volleyball. The purpose of this session is to present new and…

  19. New Directions in Intramurals and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabian, Louis A.

    This survey attempts to verify and delineate the trends in intramural physical education. Surveys were mailed to 395 colleges and universities in November of 1975. Two hundred and thirty three (56.6%) were returned for statistical analysis, but the number of responses to questions varied because not all questions were applicable to every…

  20. Merging Men's and Women's Intramural Sports Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    One reaction to Title IX's basic requirement for equal opportunity for physical activity and sports, regardless of sex, was the widespread reevaluation of separate programs in physical education, intramurals, and athletics. To insure that all individuals would have equal opportunity in a given physical activity program, many administrators ordered…

  1. The Social Benefits of Intramural Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artinger, Lori; Clapham, Lisa; Hunt, Carla; Meigs, Matthew; Milord, Nadia; Sampson, Bryan; Forrester, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of collegiate student recreational sports complexes is the sense of community that is intentionally introduced in the programs and services that occur within these facilities. Intramural sports programs provide a powerful medium for student interaction (Belch, Gebel, & Mass, 2001). This study was designed to…

  2. Traumatic epidural hematoma in children.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Giovanni; Caroli, Emanuela; Raco, Antonino; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of childhood acute epidural hematoma and to report our experience in recent years. A series of 35 patients below the age of 15 years treated for acute epidural hematoma at our institution between June 1991 and December 2000 was analyzed in detail. Pediatric epidural hematoma presents both age-related and atypical features when compared with epidural hematoma in adults. In selected cases, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma results in an excellent outcome. Outcomes seem to be directly related to the patient's preoperative neurologic status and the presence of associated intracranial lesions.

  3. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  4. Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion from an aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms are a rare type of visceral artery aneurysm, whose rupture is associated with high mortality. These aneurysms are of particular interest because local haemodynamic change caused by coeliac artery obstruction plays an important role in their development. However, the pathophysiological mechanism of coeliac artery obstruction is not completely understood. Pressure from the median arcuate ligament is most frequently reported cause. Although it is well-known that stenosis or occlusion of the visceral vessels may be caused by aortic syndrome, reports of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion due to aortic syndrome are extremely rare. Our case indicates a new aetiology for a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm and demonstrates the rapid deterioration of the patient affected. PMID:27122676

  5. Rupture of uterine serosal hematoma: delayed complication of uterine perforation.

    PubMed

    Seol, H J; Ki, K D

    2015-01-01

    Uterine perforation, a major complication of dilatation and curettage (D&C), is typically recognized at the time of the procedure. Large defects in the uterine wall or injury to other intraabdominal organs can result in an acute abdomen requiring immediate surgical treatment. On the other hand, small perforations usually resolve on their own without any long-term consequences. Here, the authors report a case of delayed hemoperitoneum, ten days after the D&C evacuation of an early pregnancy. Initially, intramural pregnancy was the suspected etiology. However, histopathology suggested that the inciting event was the rupture of a serosal uterine hematoma, which likely resulted from an incomplete uterine perforation during D&C. The patient did well after undergoing an uneventful laparoscopy.

  6. University Student Participation and Perception of Intramural Program Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuercher, Suzanne; And Others

    A sample of 286 University of Maryland, College Park, undergraduates were surveyed on their participation in and their perception of the intramural sports program and related activities of the institution. Ninety-three percent of those surveyed was aware of the intramural program and 43 percent indicated that they participated (70 percent male, 30…

  7. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  8. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  9. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  10. [Diagnosis of duodenal wall hematoma].

    PubMed

    Zapf, S; Düber, C; Kuhn, F P; Lauff, V

    1988-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the epigastrium is becoming an increasingly important cause of injury and may result in retroperitoneal haematoma involving the head of the pancreas as well as the descending duodenum. Ultrasound seems to be of great advantage in the diagnosis of the effects and complications of blunt abdominal trauma such as obstruction of the biliary tree, the gastric outlet and the inferior vena cava. Direct involvement of the descending duodenum seems to be relatively uncommon, intramural haematoma of the duodenum is described only rarely in the literature. Three additional cases of intramural haematoma of the duodenum are reported with particular reference to the recent literature.

  11. Intramural myomas: to treat or not to treat

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mayra J; Carr, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    A debate among gynecologic and reproductive surgeons is whether or not there is a clinical need to treat all intramural myomas. Considerations include myoma size and number, ability to access them, whether or not they compromise the endometrium, and treatment effect on gynecologic, reproductive, and obstetric outcomes. We conducted a detailed study regarding intramural myomas, their prevalence in subject populations, the imaging methods used to detect them, their growth rate, their suspected adverse effects on gynecologic, fertility, and obstetric outcomes, and the effectiveness of various treatment methods. The growing body of evidence reported in the literature supports the need to manage intramural myomas and to treat them appropriately. PMID:27274313

  12. Spontaneous soft tissue hematomas.

    PubMed

    Dohan, A; Darnige, L; Sapoval, M; Pellerin, O

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous muscle hematomas are a common and serious complication of anticoagulant treatment. The incidence of this event has increased along with the rise in the number of patients receiving anticoagulants. Radiological management is both diagnostic and interventional. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the main tool for the detection of hemorrhage to obtain a positive, topographic diagnosis and determine the severity. Detection of an active leak of contrast material during the arterial or venous phase is an indication for the use of arterial embolization. In addition, the interventional radiological procedure can be planned with CTA. Arterial embolization of the pedicles that are the source of the bleeding is an effective technique. The rate of technical and clinical success is 90% and 86%, respectively. PMID:26066549

  13. Intramurals and Recreational Sports: Perspectives Beyond the Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonanno, Diane; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This series of six articles is designed to provide an understanding of the value beyond the competition of intramural and recreational sports. The use of awards, development of leadership, fitness activities, and special events are discussed. (MT)

  14. [Breast hematoma masking a sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Relea Sarabia, A; Bahamonde Cabria, S; González Rebollo, M; Encinas Gaspar, M B

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas account for less than 1% of malignant breast tumors. We present the case of a sarcoma (malignant fibrous histiocytoma) of the breast that debuted as a lump. The patient associated the lump with trauma, and the clinical, sonographic, and cytological findings were suggestive of a hematoma. The lump grew rapidly, and the follow-up sonogram one month later clearly revealed hypervascular solid poles. This atypical presentation is useful for reviewing the management of lesions suggestive of hematomas, which are often associated with nonspecific findings and occasionally with signs that raise suspicion of malignancy. The emergence of what appears to be a hematoma in the breast, even when accompanied by a history of trauma or a tendency toward bleeding, calls for prudence: very short-term follow-up and biopsy, even excisional biopsy, are recommended if the lesion does not evolve like a hematoma. PMID:26160042

  15. Surgical management of intracerebral hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsementzis, S.A.

    1985-04-01

    Traditional and recent developments in the management of spontaneous intracranial hematomas are reviewed. A comprehensive account of the epidemiological characteristics worldwide with an etiological analysis including prevention and prophylaxis introduce the size and clinical significance of this neurological problem. The usefulness and limitations of the available diagnostic methods are described. Most of the emphasis, however, is placed on the management and medicosurgical treatment of intracranial hematomas in correlation with their clinical presentation and localization. 80 references.

  16. Eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Saurabh; Baruah, Bhaskar Jyoti; Makharia, Govind; Ahuja, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity characterised by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia on esophageal mucosal biopsies in the absence of other causes of esophageal eosinophilia. It is a chronic inflammatory condition of esophagus often characterized by refractory reflux symptoms in children and dysphagia in adults. It occurs as a result of Th2 inflammatory response to environmental triggers (food antigens) in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnostic criteria include symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, esophageal eosinophilia (> 15/hpf), and a PPI trial (persistent eosinophilia after 8 weeks of PPI). Mainstay of treatment at present is topical steroids and dietary therapy. Maintenance treatment should be considered to prevent long term complications. PMID:27522734

  17. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that suppress or weaken your immune system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Herpes simplex virus ( ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Benjamin R; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-09-01

    Esophageal cancer carries a poor prognosis among gastrointestinal malignancies. Although esophageal squamous cell carcinoma predominates worldwide, Western nations have seen a marked rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma that parallels the obesity epidemic. Efforts directed toward early detection have been difficult, given that dysplasia and early cancer are generally asymptomatic. However, significant advances have been made in the past 10 to 15 years that allow for endoscopic management and often cure in early stage esophageal malignancy. New diagnostic imaging technologies may provide a means by which cost-effective, early diagnosis of dysplasia allows for definitive therapy and ultimately improves the overall survival among patients. PMID:27546839

  19. [Esophageal dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Thumshirn, M

    2007-04-01

    Dysphagia can be caused by a number of disorders such as benign or malignant obstruction of the esophagus, inflammatory alterations of the mucosa or primary esophageal motility disorders. Endoscopic evaluation is recommended for all patients to exclude malignancy and to establish or confirm a diagnosis. This article provides an overview of the most frequent inflammatory and functional esophageal disorders causing dysphagia. Clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic management of primary esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm as well as of GERD and eosinophilic esophagitis are discussed. The diagnosis of achalasia is made by barium swallow with fluoroscopy and by manometry. Therapeutic options for achalasia are pneumatic dilatation of the esophagogastric junction, laparoscopic cardiomyotomy combined with fundoplication and botulinum toxin injection of the lower esophageal sphincter Diffuse esophageal spasm is manometrically characterized by normal peristalsis intermittently interrupted by simultaneous contractions. Potential medical therapies are PPIs for underlying GERD, smooth-muscle relaxants and antidepressant medications. GERD is a multifaceted disease caused by abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leading to chronic symptoms or mucosal damage. Therapy includes lifestyle modifications, acid suppressive medications mainly by PPI and laparoscopic fundoplication in selected patients. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus diagnosed histologically. The main symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis is dysphagia for solid food with imminent risk of food impaction. Systemic or topical corticosteroids are the therapy of choice.

  20. Pocket Hematoma: A Call for Definition.

    PubMed

    DE Sensi, Francesco; Miracapillo, Gennaro; Cresti, Alberto; Severi, Silva; Airaksinen, Kari Eino Juhani

    2015-08-01

    Pocket hematoma is a common complication of cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and a potential risk factor for device infections, especially in patients on oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment. There is a wide variability in the incidence of pocket hematoma and bleeding complications in the literature and the major cause for this seems to be the variability of the used definitions for hematomas. The lack of generally accepted definition for pocket hematoma renders the comparisons across the studies difficult. In this article, we briefly review the current literature on this issue and propose a uniform definition for pocket hematoma and criteria for grading the severity of hematoma in clinical practice and research.

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis.

  3. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  4. Infected renal hematoma complicating anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Morduchowicz, G; Rabinovitz, M; Neuman, M; Pitlik, S

    1987-03-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous infection of a renal hematoma complicating warfarin sodium anticoagulant therapy. The infected hematoma was successfully drained by sonar-guided fine-needle aspiration. All reported cases of renal hematomas complicating anticoagulant therapy are reviewed.

  5. Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, April Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Intramural activities are conducted on virtually every college campus throughout the United States, but there is a debate as to the role of intramurals in the overall development of the student (Rothwell & Theodore, 2006). Specifically for females, not every sport is offered for participation at youth or higher levels, but intramural sports is…

  6. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... object or caustic chemicals, such as household cleaners, disk batteries, and battery acid Trauma or injury to ... may have esophageal perforation. Prevention These injuries are hard to prevent. Alternative Names Perforation of the esophagus ...

  7. Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma concurrent with cranial subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Wonjun; Joo, Wonil; Chough, Jeongki; Park, Haekwan

    2013-07-01

    A 39-year old female presented with chronic spinal subdural hematoma manifesting as low back pain and radiating pain from both legs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) extending from L4 to S2 leading to severe central spinal canal stenosis. One day after admission, she complained of nausea and severe headache. Computed tomography of the brain revealed chronic SDH associated with midline shift. Intracranial chronic SDH was evacuated through two burr holes. Back pain and radiating leg pain derived from the spinal SDH diminished about 2 weeks after admission and spinal SDH was completely resolved on MRI obtained 3 months after onset. Physicians should be aware of such a condition and check the possibility of concurrent cranial SDH in patients with spinal SDH, especially with non-traumatic origin.

  8. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Sim, Sook Young

    2015-10-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  9. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  10. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  11. Preputial hematoma in a stallion.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; McClure, J J; Usenik, E A

    1987-09-01

    An 8-year-old Quarter Horse stallion was admitted with a swelling involving the prepuce, dorsal part of the scrotum, and root of the penis. The swelling was first noticed 10 days after breeding, with no evidence that it had resulted from a kick by the mare. The penis was retracted into the prepuce, except for a 10- to 15-cm protrusion of the glans penis. Treatment included warm hydrotherapy, massage, stockinette compression, antidiuretics, antibiotics, penile support, and exercise, without success. At necropsy, a massive preputial hematoma was found extending forward from the root of the penis to 12 cm proximal to the glans penis. The exact origin of the hematoma could not be determined. Most likely, bleeding had originated from the vascular plexus lying subfascially on the surface of the penis outside the intact tunica albuginea or from a branch of the external pudendal artery.

  12. Esophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  13. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  15. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. PMID:27126244

  16. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas.

  17. Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma mimicking traumatic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ogose, A; Hotta, T; Yamamura, S; Shioya, Y; Yazawa, T

    1998-01-01

    We describe the clinical course of a 16-year-old baseball player with a history of recurrent hematoma of the thigh. The lesion was aspirated percutaneously several times and curetted under the diagnosis of traumatic hematoma. Microscopical examination revealed massive hemorrhage, necrosis, and a small number of Ewing's sarcoma cells. He died of multiple metastases. With recurrent hematoma in the soft tissue, neoplastic lesions should be ruled out.

  18. Pill esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kikendall, J W

    1999-06-01

    Nine hundred seventy-nine cases of pill esophagitis due to nearly 100 different medications are reviewed. Pill-induced injuries occur when caustic medicinal pills dissolve in the esophagus rather than passing rapidly into the stomach as intended. Most patients suffer only self-limited pain, but esophageal hemorrhage, stricture, and perforation may occur, and fatal injuries have been reported. The incidence of this iatrogenic injury can be reduced but not eliminated by emphasizing the importance of taking pills while upright and with plenty of fluids. PMID:10372925

  19. Presynaptic inhibition: an intramural mechanism regulating cardiac afferentation

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.A.; Bilibin, D.P.; Shevelev, O.A.

    1986-09-01

    The authors attempt to show the existence of extracardiac and intracardiac influences able to limit the conductivity of afferent channels belonging to the spinal afferent system of the heart. The data presented serve as the basis for the hypothesis that total or partial afferent blockade of this kind is affected through activation of a mechanism of presynaptic inhibition, acting at the intramural level. The results described were obtained in several series of acute experiments on 20 mature cats anesthetized with chloralose and curarized. Ultrathin sections of the heart were cut on the ultramicrotome, stained with lead hydroxide and uranyl acetate, and examined with an electron microscope. It is shown that presynaptic inhibition is evidently the principal intramural physiological mechanism restricting conductivity of the spinal afferent channel of the heart.

  20. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Neely, John C; Jones, Blaise V; Crone, Kerry R

    2008-03-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma.

  1. [Computed tomographic semiotics of chronic subdural hematomas].

    PubMed

    El'-Kadi, Kh A; Likhterman, L B; Kornichenko, V N

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the results of investigation of 72 patients with verified chronic subdural hematomas (CSH) has revealed their CT dense characteristics, the peculiarities of their structure compared with the time of their formation, the patients' age, the clinical stage of disease, and operative findings. Direct and indirect CT signs of uni- and bilateral hemispherical chronic subdural hematomas were described.

  2. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology. PMID:26048608

  3. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology.

  4. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes.

  5. Subcapsular hematoma after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Matheus Miranda; da Silva, Rodrigo Donalisio; Jaworski, Paulo; Kim, Fernando J; Molina, Wilson R

    2016-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is an uncommon complication after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy. We report on a 38-year-old male with an 8 mm lower pole stone who underwent a left ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy. The stone was successfully fragmented. Several hours after being discharged home, the patient returned complaining of back pain and hematuria. He was hemodynamically stable. Laboratory exams were normal. A CT study showed a crescent renal subcapsular hematoma surrounding the left kidney. The patient was admitted to the ward for conservative treatment. No additional intervention was necessary. Most subcapsular hematomas tend to resolve spontaneously. PMID:27544565

  6. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Kentaro; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation. PMID:27738545

  7. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... radiofrequency ablation . This procedure uses radio waves to heat and destroy abnormal cells, which may become cancer. ...

  8. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release.

  9. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release. PMID:26835213

  10. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  11. Multiple spontaneous visceral hematomas revealing polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Allanore, Yannick; Rosenberg, Carole; Vignaux, Olivier; Legmann, Paul; Kanev, K; Menkes, Charles J; Kahan, Andre

    2004-09-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare life-threatening disease characterized by necrotizing vasculitis of small and median arteries. We describe the exceptional case of a 28-year-old man with successive spontaneous visceral hematomas of the kidney, bladder, and liver. Arteriography was performed for a recent spontaneous hepatic hematoma and a microaneurysm was detected, allowing the diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa and prescription of appropriate treatment.

  12. Clinical and Pathological Characteristics of Organized Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Nobuo; Watanabe, Tomoo; Ito, Tsukasa; Kubota, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yusuke; Ishida, Akihiro; Aoyagi, Masaru; Matsubara, Atsushi; Izuhara, Kenji; Kakehata, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To study the clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with organized hematoma with malignant features in maxillary sinuses. Subjects and Methods. This was a retrospective study of five patients who were treated surgically for organized hematoma. The preoperative CT and MRI findings were studied clinically. The expressions of CD31, CD34, and periostin in surgical samples were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results. The clinical features of organized hematoma, such as a mass expanding from the maxillary sinus with bone destruction, resembled those of maxillary carcinoma. However, CT and MRI provided sufficient and useful information to differentiate this condition from malignancy. Surgical resection was the first-line treatment because of the presence of a firm capsule. Characteristic histopathological findings were a mixture of dilated vessels, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibrosis, hyalinization, and neovascularization. The expressions of periostin, CD31, and CD34 were observed in organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. Conclusion. The expressions of periostin, CD31, and CD34 were observed in organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus. Organized hematoma is characterized pathologically by a mixture of bleeding, dilated vessels, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibrosis, hyalinization, and neovascularization. CT and MRI show heterogeneous findings reflecting a mixture of these pathological entities. PMID:23533421

  13. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  14. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  15. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  16. Desloratadine Induced Pill Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Alkim, Huseyin; Iscan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Pill induced esophagitis is a rare complication mostly seen in patients using tetracycline and its derivatives or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here we present a 37 years old female patient experiencing pill esophagitis after taking desloratadine without liquid immediately before going to bed. This was the first pill esophagitis case related with desloratadine reported in the literature. Pill esophagitis is a preventable complication that consists of giving simple advice of how and when to take medication.

  17. Laparoscopic evacuation of a subcapsular renal hematoma causing symptomatic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Graham, C W; Lynch, S C; Muskat, P C; Mokulis, J A

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a subcapsular hematoma following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy which presented as symptomatic hypertension. When medical therapy proved ineffective, laparoscopic decompression of the hematoma corrected the hypertension.

  18. Subcorneal hematomas in excessive video game play.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Maria; Rizzo, Jason; Lennox, Luke; Rothman, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcorneal hematomas caused by excessive video game play in a 19-year-old man. The hematomas occurred in a setting of thrombocytopenia secondary to induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. It was concluded that thrombocytopenia subsequent to prior friction from heavy use of a video game controller allowed for traumatic subcorneal hemorrhage of the hands. Using our case as a springboard, we summarize other reports with video game associated pathologies in the medical literature. Overall, cognizance of the popularity of video games and related pathologies can be an asset for dermatologists who evaluate pediatric patients. PMID:26919354

  19. Subcorneal hematomas in excessive video game play.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Maria; Rizzo, Jason; Lennox, Luke; Rothman, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcorneal hematomas caused by excessive video game play in a 19-year-old man. The hematomas occurred in a setting of thrombocytopenia secondary to induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. It was concluded that thrombocytopenia subsequent to prior friction from heavy use of a video game controller allowed for traumatic subcorneal hemorrhage of the hands. Using our case as a springboard, we summarize other reports with video game associated pathologies in the medical literature. Overall, cognizance of the popularity of video games and related pathologies can be an asset for dermatologists who evaluate pediatric patients.

  20. [Isolated ipsilateral lateropulsion caused by bulbar hematoma].

    PubMed

    Hommel, M; Borgel, F; Gaio, J M; Lavernhe, G; Perret, J

    1985-01-01

    A case of hematoma involving probably the reticular formation of the medulla oblongata is reported. Examination showed a soft palate paresis and an ipsilateral axial lateropulsion without vertigo or oculomotor disorders. The mechanism of the lateropulsion is discussed. During the spontaneous recovery a transient hydrocephalus was observed.

  1. Intramural Comparison of NIST Laser and Optical Fiber Power Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, John H.; Vayshenker, Igor; Livigni, David J.; Hadler, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The responsivity of two optical detectors was determined by the method of direct substitution in four different NIST measurement facilities. The measurements were intended to demonstrate the determination of absolute responsivity as provided by NIST calibration services at laser and optical-communication wavelengths; nominally 633 nm, 850 nm, 1060 nm, 1310 nm, and 1550 nm. The optical detectors have been designated as checks standards for the purpose of routine intramural comparison of our calibration services and to meet requirements of the NIST quality system, based on ISO 17025. The check standards are two optical-trap detectors, one based on silicon and the other on indium gallium arsenide photodiodes. The four measurement services are based on: (1) the laser optimized cryogenic radiometer (LOCR) and free field collimated laser light; (2) the C-series isoperibol calorimeter and free-field collimated laser light; (3) the electrically calibrated pyroelectric radiometer and fiber-coupled laser light; (4) the pyroelectric wedge trap detector, which measures light from a lamp source and monochromator. The results indicate that the responsivity of the check standards, as determined independently using the four services, agree to within the published expanded uncertainty ranging from approximately 0.02 % to 1.24 %. PMID:27366611

  2. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    2016-01-01

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention. PMID:27331918

  3. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  4. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    PubMed

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists. PMID:24553773

  5. Orbital subperiosteal hematoma from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, Clark; Angelidis, Matthew; Devita, Diane

    2010-09-01

    Only a few cases of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma due to scuba diving have been reported, and this is the first of such cases that underwent surgical intervention. This injury results from negative pressure within the face mask, suctioning orbital tissues into the mask after incomplete equilibration of pressure on descent. Valsalva maneuver is a second mechanism implicated in the etiology of this injury. Recognition of this injury is of the utmost importance because vision loss is a possible complication if there is compression of the optic nerve or increased intraocular pressure. In many cases of nontraumatic orbital hematoma, conservative management is adequate; however, this case was an exception due to worsening exam findings. Divers may be able to prevent this injury by frequent and gentle equilibration of mask pressure on descent.

  6. [Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tosato, F; Palermo, S; Carnevale, L; Paolini, A

    2000-01-01

    The A.A. present a case report of retroperitoneal spontaneous hematoma and put in evidence the difficulties in making an etiopathogenetic diagnosis of spontaneous renal cyst rupture. The patient was a 72 years old man admitted to the hospital in emergency for a painful ipogastric syntomatology and biliary vomit. The ecography showed a distanced gallbladder and the endoscopy evidenced a duodenal stenosis with compression of the gastric posterior wall, so that we were initially directed towards a pancreatic tumor even if the modest increase of the serum bilirubinemy and mostly the fact that direct component was almost normal, gave us strong doubts. The spiral TC gave finally the diagnosis of retroperitoneal hematoma and the presence of a bilateral polycystic kidney with several subcapsular cyst, let us suggest, as well as the anamnestic report of a physical stress, a renal origin of the bleeding. A wild literature review did not evidence other similar cases, but the ecclusion of other possible causes of retroperitoneal hematoma, suggested this conclusion.

  7. Spontaneous intrathyroidal hematoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A.E.; Dhaliwal, Sandeep; Tam, Samantha; Low, T. Hubert; Hughes, Brian; Fung, Kevin; MacNeil, S. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage is a rare occurrence that results in pain, discomfort, and occasionally compressive symptoms. Infrequently, extensive thyroid hemorrhage can result in a rapidly expanding hematoma resulting in airway compromise. This is a case of an otherwise healthy young woman, 3 months postpartum, with a slowly expanding spontaneous thyroid hemorrhage that measured at 7 × 5.5 × 5 cm by computed tomography. She ultimately required intubation to manage respiratory distress and subsequently a hemithyroidectomy for definitive treatment. The case presentation is followed by a literature review where known etiologies of thyroid hematoma including traumatic and nontraumatic causes, precipitating anticoagulation, and spontaneous rupture of branches of the external carotid artery are outlined. The potential links to pregnancy are explored. The roles of bedside thyroid ultrasound in the emergency department and lateral neck roentgenogram in diagnosis are explored. The importance of airway management and indications for conservative versus surgical treatments are discussed. Conclusions: This is a case of a spontaneous intrathyroidal hemorrhage, which progressed over days to ultimately cause airway compromise. It is imperative that physicians are educated on the appropriate detection and management of the potentially life-threatening spontaneous thyroid hematoma. PMID:27583841

  8. Surgical treatment of supra- and infratentorial epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang; Guoping, Li

    2013-01-01

    Supra- and infratentorial acute epidural hematoma (SIEDH) is a common type of posterior fossa epidural hematoma (PFEDH), representing 11- 64% of all PFEDHs. Although SIEDH is associated with typical characteristics, it might be difficult to diagnose when presenting as infratentorial acute epidural hematoma, which is clinically silent and has nonspecific symptoms. However, this type of hematoma can often be rapidly deteriorating, causing a sharp rise in intracranial pressure that leads to a life-threatening foramen magnum herniation. Early diagnosis and management of SIEDH are imperative. Traditional surgical management has always required relatively large craniotomies, larger than the hematoma itself, to expose its edge, and then tack up the dura matter). It usually opens the window and emphasizes retention of the bone bridge outside the transverse sinus. This method can effectively eliminate the hematoma, but it is associated with larger postoperative wound, longer operation time, larger skull defect, and more complications. Hence, exploration into a better surgical method is direly needed.

  9. Transposition of Great Arteries with Intramural Coronary Artery: Experience with a Modified Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amit; Jain, Anil; Hinduja, Manish; Wadhawa, Vivek; Patel, Ramesh; Vaidhya, Nikunj; Rodricks, Dayesh; Patel, Hardik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Transposition of the great arteries is a common congenital heart disease. Arterial switch is the gold standard operation for this complex heart disease. Arterial switch operation in the presence of intramural coronary artery is surgically the most demanding even for the most experienced hands. We are presenting our experience with a modified technique for intramural coronary arteries in arterial switch operation. Methods: This prospective study involves 450 patients undergoing arterial switch operation at our institute from April 2006 to December 2013 (7.6 years). Eighteen patients underwent arterial switch operation with intramural coronary artery. The coronary patterns and technique used are detailed in the text. Results: The overall mortality found in the subgroup of 18 patients having intramural coronary artery was 16% (n=3). Our first patient had an accidental injury to the left coronary artery and died in the operating room. A seven-day old newborn died from intractable ventricular arrhythmia fifteen hours after surgery. Another patient who had multiple ventricular septal defects with type B arch interruption died from residual apical ventricular septal defect and sepsis on the eleventh postoperative day. The remainder of the patients are doing well, showing a median follow-up duration of 1235.34±815.26 days (range 369 - 2730). Conclusion: Transposition of the great arteries with intramural coronary artery is demanding in a subset of patients undergoing arterial switch operation. We believe our technique of coronary button dissection in the presence of intramural coronary arteries using coronary shunt is simple and can be a good addition to the surgeons' armamentarium. PMID:27074270

  10. New observations in scintigraphy of subdural and extradural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smoak, W.M.; Gilson, A.J.; Janowitz, W.; Zusmer, N.; Maturo, V.

    1980-11-01

    Static radionuclide images of subacute subdural hematomas demonstrate significant variations in findings over a 3-hr period in the same patient. The lesion can appear, disappear, and reconstitute in an entirely different pattern. This transformation has not appeared in extradural hematomas, and may provide a differential diagnostic sign. In patients with a clinical history or physical findings suspicious for these intracranial hematomas, immediate and sequential delayed static imaging is recommended.

  11. Idea on prevention from postoperative intraorbital hematoma in orbital surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, D G

    2014-01-01

    The retrobulbar hematoma is a rare complication after orbital surgery. Despite of its rareness, the retrobulbar hematoma may be disastrous to the patient's vision (Chen et al. in J Craniofac Surg 20:963--967, 2009). Since 2007, I have applied the combined use of a scalp vein set and a vacuumed blood sampling bottle in all of the orbital surgeries. In my study, I achieved a good result, and I will introduce this simple method as one of alternatives for the prevention from the postoperative intraorbital hematoma including the retrobulbar hematoma. PMID:24533408

  12. A death due to perirenal hematoma complicating extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Koichi; Takahashi, Sayuri; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Nakajima, Makoto; Saka, Kanju; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2008-03-01

    Perirenal hematoma is an occasional complication of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) which does not usually require treatment. A 79-year-old woman died 23 h after ESWL. Forensic autopsy was performed to determine whether medical treatment contributed to her death. The cause of death was hemorrhagic shock due to massive hematoma from a ruptured small vein in the perirenal adipose capsule. No injury to other organs was found and the patient had neither coagulation abnormality nor venous disease. Perirenal hematoma can easily be diagnosed with abdominal sonography, if pain or symptoms of anemia develop. Doctors must be aware of the possibilities of severe renal hematomas after ESWL.

  13. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  14. Has the Decline of Intramural Sports Contributed to the Youth Obesity Epidemic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Warhol, John; Overton, Kim; Wiet, Chad E.; Freeman, Cassy; Bourbeau, John; Moon, Stephen; Crawford, Scott A. G. M.

    2005-01-01

    It is believed hat there are several factors that have contributed to the obesity epidemic that is affecting youths. Certainly a decline in intramural sports is one factor. One should look at the underlying trends that have contributed to this decline. Those trends are: (1) Personnel Issues--How many teachers and coaches have support of a viable…

  15. The Culture of High-Risk Alcohol Use among Club and Intramural Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andes, Stacy; Poet, Kathryn; McWilliams, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the drinking patterns of club and intramural college athletes and compare their alcohol consumption, perceived norms around the excessive use of alcohol, experience of negative consequences, and employment of protective strategies with those of campus varsity athletes. Participants: A total of…

  16. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Cademartori, M S; Mamani, R S; Beltrame, C M; Cademartori, C G

    1984-03-01

    A case of spontaneous dorso- lumbar spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy is reported. The hematoma was removed 8 hours after the onset of paraplegia, and there was no evidence of vascular malformation. The motor deficit remained unchanged post-operatively. The etiology, clinical findings and the value of early laminectomy are discussed.

  17. Intracerebral hematoma extends via perivascular spaces and perineurium.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Lü, Tian-Ming; Qiu, Guang; Huang, Rui-Yu; Fang, Min; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Duan; Liu, Xiao-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. ICH results in the formation of hematoma that affects not only the primary site of injury but also the remote regions. In fact, hematoma can extend via perivascular spaces (also called Virchow-Robin spaces, VRS) and perineurium in an animal model of ICH. In the present study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to investigate the characteristics of the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH. A total of 20 ICH patients without secondary subarachnoid and secondary intraventricular hemorrhages were recruited. Brain MRI scans, including SWI, T1, and T2-weighted images, were performed between 17 h to 7 days after the onset of ICH. MRI with SWI revealed that paramagnetic substances spread along the VRS or the perineurium. Such distribution could cause the formation of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). However, the distribution of remote hemorrhagic lesions varied, depending on the size and location of the original hematoma. The unenhanced CT scans of the 20 patients did not show any hyperdensity around the blood vessels and nerve tracts outside the hematoma. These results indicate the perivascular and perineural extensions of hematomas in patients with ICH, which is formed by the leakage of the original hematoma via the VRS or perineurium. We also provide a new explanation for the series of pathological processes involved in ICH, including the remote effects of hematoma and the formation of CMBs in patients with ICH. PMID:23812162

  18. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  19. A Case of Gastric Cancer with Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Components, and Intramural Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Keishiro; Kizaki, Junya; Isobe, Taro; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Gastric cancer with neuroendocrine carcinoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Total gastrectomy • splenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Many neuroendocrine carcinomas exhibit medullary infiltration and expanded proliferation. Differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma is frequently seen in the superficial region in many neuroendocrine carcinoma cases. However, the present case showed non-medullary infiltration and signet ring cell carcinoma in the superficial region, with intramural metastases distributed throughout the whole of the stomach. Case Report: A 67-year-old man was referred to our institution for treatment of gastric cancer. Type IIc-like advanced gastric cancer was detected in the greater curvature of the middle body of the stomach. The patient underwent total gastrectomy, splenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection, and Roux-en-Y reconstruction with curative resection. The tumor was diagnosed as a large-cell endocrine carcinoma of the stomach. A solid growth of signet ring cells was seen in the mucosa and submucosa. Intramural metastases were observed in many other depressed lesions. Large-cell carcinoma invaded the submucosa, mainly in the intramural metastatic site. Metastasis to one lesser curvature lymph node was also seen on histological examination. The final diagnosis was a gastric cancer of type 0–IIc (T4a) [M] (with intramural metastases) at T4aN1H0P0M0 Stage IIIA. This patient has remained alive without recurrence for 72 months after surgery. Conclusions: We recommend close preoperative examination of neuroendocrine carcinoma, taking intramural metastases into consideration. PMID:27102318

  20. Kernohan's notch phenomenon in chronic subdural hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lee, Jung-Kil; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Jung, Shin; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han; Kang, Sam-Suk

    2007-10-01

    We report two cases of Kernohan's notch phenomenon secondary to chronic subdural hematoma detected by MRI. In the first case, the patient was drowsy with an oculomotor palsy and a hemiparesis ipsilateral to the chronic subdural hematoma. MRI in the post-operative period showed no abnormal signal or deformity of the crus cerebri. The neurological signs immediately resolved after trephination. In the second case, the patient was admitted with progressive decrease in their level of consciousness and ipsilateral hemiparesis with the chronic subdural hematoma. MRI on admission revealed an abnormal signal in the contralateral crus cerebri against the chronic subdural hematoma. After surgery, the mental state gradually recovered to normal with some degree of residual hemiparesis. In patients with chronic subdural hematoma, a compressive deformity of the crus cerebri, without abnormal signal on MRI, may predict a better neurological recovery in patients with Kernohan's notch phenomenon.

  1. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  2. [Minimal Change Esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2016-01-25

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as a condition which develops when the reflux of gastric contents causes troublesome symptoms and long-term complications. GERD can be divided into erosive reflux disease and non-erosive reflux disease based on endoscopic findings defined by the presence of mucosal break. The Los Angeles classification excludes minimal changes as an evidence of reflux esophagitis because of poor interobserver agreement. In the Asian literature, minimal changes are considered as one of the endoscopic findings of reflux esophagitis, but the clinical significance is still controversial. Minimal change esophagitis is recognized quite frequently among patients with GERD and many endoscopists recognize such findings in their clinical practice. This review is intended to clarify the definition of minimal change esophagitis and their histology, interobserver agreement, and symptom association with GERD.

  3. Imaging of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, R; DuBrow, R

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a relatively uncommon gastrointestinal malignancy but carries a poor prognosis unless it is of early stage and can be surgically resected for cure. Resectability is determined by the stage of disease at diagnosis and therefore accurate staging is of importance in patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Imaging studies that play a role in the evaluation of esophageal cancer include barium studies, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography. Imaging provides important information regarding the local extent and any distant spread of disease, which in turn helps in determining optimal management for these patients. This review discusses the imaging findings that may be encountered with various imaging modalities in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of esophageal cancer. PMID:18250021

  4. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack. PMID:24063522

  5. Spontaneous subperiosteal hematoma precipitated by anxiety attack.

    PubMed

    Swanenberg, Irene M; Rizzuti, Allison E; Shinder, Roman

    2013-12-01

    A 60-year-old woman presented with diplopia and left periorbital edema and pressure, which developed during an anxiety attack the previous day. Examination revealed left inferotemporal globe dystopia, periorbital edema, ecchymosis, and limitation in supraduction. Orbital MRI confirmed the diagnosis of a superior subperiosteal orbital hematoma. The patient's signs and symptoms rapidly resolved with administration of oral corticosteroids. The patient remains asymptomatic with complete resolution of orbital signs at 3-month follow-up. Subperiosteal orbital hematoma (SOH) is a rare condition in which blood accumulates between the bony orbit and separated periosteum, and is often due to blunt head trauma. Non-traumatic SOH (NTSOH) is exceedingly rare and usually associated with known coagulopathies or tendency to bleed. However, few cases of spontaneous NTSOH have been reported without any such predisposition and are thought to be caused by sudden elevations in intrathoracic and intracranial venous pressure such as vomiting, coughing, SCUBA diving, weight lifting and labor. We herein describe the presentation, radiography and outcome of a unique case of spontaneous NTSOH following an anxiety attack.

  6. Traumatic extradural hematoma of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Garza-Mercado, R

    1989-03-01

    An example of a traumatic extradural hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred in a 32-year-old man who suffered from chronic ankylosing spondylitis is reported. Progressive sensory and motor deficit ensued some 3 hours after the patient fell from a standing position. The patient landed on his back, striking his head on the floor. After being helped up, he was able to walk unassisted to a nearby chair, where he sat down until his left lower extremity--and shortly afterwards, the right one--became numb and weak. On admission, the patient was found to have tetraparesis that was more pronounced in the lower extremities and associated with incomplete sensation to pinprick at level T7-T10. He also had painless distention of the urinary bladder. After a few hours, the weakness in his limbs increased and his sensory level rose to C5 bilaterally. A horizontal diastatic fracture across the vertebral body of C7 was discovered on plain x-ray films of the spine, and an extradural hematoma extending dorsally from C5 to T1 was revealed by emergency magnetic resonance imaging. After an emergency decompressive cervical laminectomy and removal of the clot, the patient rapidly regained complete neurological function, except with regard to both the urinary bladder and the rectum, which remained abnormal for almost 7 weeks after the operation.

  7. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome.

  8. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: update 2012].

    PubMed

    Jo, Yunju

    2012-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) with adults, as a new disease emerging during the last decade, is a clinicopathologic disorder of the esophagus characterized by a dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration and typical esophageal symptoms. As numerous studies about EoE had been reported during last several years, updated consensus of EoE was reported in July 2011. The conceptual definition of EoE is coming. EoE is defined as a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominat inflammation. Other important addition is genotyping feature that implicates thymic stromal lymphopoietin genes or filagrrin as EoE susceptibility genes. The majority of patients has the concurrent allergic disease, especially food or aeroallergen sensitization. Main therapeutic options include topical steroids and dietary modification. Recent issues of EoE include a new concept for proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia that it should be excluded to diagnose EoE.

  9. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  10. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  11. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Surgical Management of Aneurysmal Hematomas: Prognostic Factors and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Meneghelli, P; Cozzi, F; Hasanbelliu, A; Locatelli, F; Pasqualin, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    From 1991 until 2013, 304 patients with intracranial hematomas from aneurysmal rupture were managed surgically in our department, constituting 17 % of all patients with aneurysmal rupture. Of them, 242 patents presented with isolated intracerebral hematomas (in 69 cases associated with significant intraventricular hemorrhage), 50 patients presented with combined intracerebral and subdural hematomas (in 11 cases associated with significant intraventricular hemorrhage), and 12 presented with an isolated subdural hematoma. The surgical procedure consisted of simultaneous clipping of the aneurysm and evacuation of the hematoma in all cases. After surgery, 16 patients (5 %) submitted to an additional decompressive hemicraniectomy, and 66 patients (21 %) submitted to a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Clinical outcomes were assessed at discharge and at 6 months, using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS); a favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) was observed in 10 % of the cases at discharge, increasing to 31 % at 6 months; 6-month mortality was 40 %. Applying uni- and multivariate analysis, the following risk factors were associated with a significantly worse outcome: age >60; preoperative Hunt-Hess grades IV-V; pupillary mydriasis (only on univariate); midline shift >10 mm; hematoma volume >30 cc; and the presence of hemocephalus (i.e., packed intraventricular hemorrhage). Based on these results, an aggressive surgical treatment should be adopted for most cases with aneurysmal hematomas, excluding patients with bilateral mydriasis persisting after rescue therapy. PMID:27637622

  13. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  14. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  15. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  16. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    McCann, F; Michaud, L; Aspirot, A; Levesque, D; Gottrand, F; Faure, C

    2015-04-01

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a rare clinical condition but is frequently associated with esophageal atresia (EA). The aim of this study is to report the diagnosis, management, and outcome of CES associated with EA. Medical charts of CES-EA patients from Lille University Hospital, Sainte-Justine Hospital, and Montreal Children's Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Seventeen patients (13 boys) were included. The incidence of CES in patients with EA was 3.6%. Fifteen patients had a type C EA, one had a type A EA, and one had an isolated tracheoesophageal fistula. Seven patients had associated additional malformations. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.6 months. All but two patients had non-specific symptoms such as regurgitations or dysphagia. One CES was diagnosed at the time of surgical repair of EA. In 12 patients, CES was suspected based on abnormal barium swallow. In the remaining four, the diagnostic was confirmed by esophagoscopy. Eleven patients were treated by dilation only (1-3 dilations/patient). Six patients underwent surgery (resection and anastomosis) because of failure of attempted dilations (1-7 dilations/patient). Esophageal perforation was encountered in three patients (18%). Three patients had histologically proven tracheobronchial remnants. CES associated with EA is frequent. A high index of suspicion for CES must remain in the presence of EA. Dilatation may be effective to treat some of them, but perforation is frequent. Surgery may be required, especially in CES secondary to ectopic tracheobronchial remnants.

  17. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  18. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  19. [Spontaneous hematoma of the atrial wall].

    PubMed

    Iglesias López, A; Rodríguez Pan, A; Pazos Silva, V

    2014-01-01

    The clinical signs of heart masses tend to be nonspecific, generally depending more on their repercussions on heart function caused by their location rather than on their type. Imaging techniques make it possible to limit the differential diagnosis of heart masses based on their location, morphology, and characteristics of echogenicity, density, or intensity, depending on the technique used to study them. We present the case of a woman with squeezing mid chest pain irradiating to her shoulder and positive cardiac markers in whom a left atrial mass was identified at echocardiography. This finding was confirmed at chest CT. The signs at chest CT were compatible with a mural hematoma and this diagnosis was confirmed after intraoperative biopsy.

  20. Epidural hematoma after minor oral trauma.

    PubMed

    Rice, J O; Walters, C; Olson, R E; Pearson, D

    1976-07-01

    A case report was presented in which a 15-year-old boy was beaten about the head with a baseball bat. Intraoral trauma and facial lacerations were repaired. Since results of the neurological examination were within normal limits, the patient was discharged. The next day, the patient became lethargic; however, the patient's mother did not bring the patient back to the hospital until the routine postoperative visit. At that time, the patient had right hemiparesis, was unable to speak, and was clearly obtunded. A carotid angiogram disclosed a left venous epidural hematoma in the parietal area. A craniotomy was performed with good results. The importance of follow-up neurologic examinations in cases of trauma to the face and head is stressed.

  1. [Retroperitoneal hematoma secondary to traumatic rupture of the psoas muscle].

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga, M; Benítez, J; Gallardo, C; Garrido, R; Casanueva, T

    1990-01-01

    Rupturing of the psoas muscle by closed injury as a result of the formation of a retroperitoneal hematoma is a very uncommon pathological entity, which may rise problems of differential diagnosis with kidney lesions. Supplementary explorations do not always clear up diagnostic doubts, and it is surgery, if indicated, that confirms the picture. We present a case of retroperitoneal hematoma of traumatic origin in a one-kidney ipsilateral patient, in whom the abdominal CAT revealed affection of the renal capsule associated with rupture of teh psoas. In the surgery carried out due to formation of an abscess in the hematoma we verified that the kidney was undamaged.

  2. Life-threatening paraspinal muscle hematoma after percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Nam-Su; Lee, Jae-Heon; Lee, Han-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and hematoma formation is rarely reported in percutaneous vertebroplasty procedure. An 84 year old male presented with a large paraspinal muscle hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty. The patient had neither any prior bleeding disorder nor any anticoagulant treatment. Vital signs of the patient were unstable, and his hemoglobin level decreased daily. After a month of conservative treatment, including transfusion, cryotherapy, pain control and bed rest, his hemoglobin level remained stable and he showed relief from pain. Four months later, hematoma resolved spontaneously and he could walk without back pain. PMID:27746502

  3. Dabigatran-related intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in hematoma expansion.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Claus Z; Steiner, Thorsten; Tietze, Anna; Damgaard, Dorte

    2014-02-01

    Warfarin-related intracerebral hemorrhage carries a particularly high risk of neurologic deterioration and death because of a high rate of hematoma expansion of about 50%. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs)--apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban--have a significantly smaller risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, two facts make this situation complicated: First, the risk of hematoma expansion is unknown for NOACs. Second, there is no specific antidote for neither of the NOACs. We present a case that suggests that hematoma expansion may occur after NOAC-related ICH. PMID:24103671

  4. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  5. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  6. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to subcapsular renal hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Balci, N C; Sirvanci, M; Tüfek, I; Onat, L; Duran, C

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare intraabdominal bleeding. In this report we present a case of a nontraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma. A 54-year-old patient who was under warfarin therapy, developed subcapsular right renal hematoma. Subcapsular and retroperitoneal hemorrhage were low signal on T1- and T2-weighted images consistent with acute stage of blood. The source of subcapsular hematoma was shown to be the rupture of hemorrhagic renal cyst on MRI. Extension of hemorrhage into the retroperitoneal space anterior to right psoas muscle was also successfully shown on MRI. Patient underwent nephrectomy and retroperitoneal blood was evacuated.

  7. [Roentgenographic aspects of subcapsular renal hematomas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, G; Villoutreix, H

    1975-03-01

    About four cases, the authors exhibit roentgenographic features of subcapsular hematomas. They particularly emphasize the interest of nephrotomography and angiography two provide the typical signs; i.e.: flattening of the lacteral border of the renal parenchyma, absence of acute edges between normal renal outline and flattened portion, and at last, displaced capsular artery and/or renal capsule itself. Between flattening of kidney and capsular artery or capsule, one may individualize a mass of soft tissue density, convex or biconvex, corresponding to the hematomas. Particular attention is required concerning differential diagnosis with renal cyst, and possibility of a small neoplasm, sometimes indetectable at angiography, as a cause of "spontaneous" subcapsular hematoma.

  8. Endoscopic Management of Anastomotic Esophageal Strictures Secondary to Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The reported incidence of anastomotic stricture after esophageal atresia repair has varied in case series from as low as 9% to as high as 80%. The cornerstone of esophageal stricture treatment is dilation with either balloon or bougie. The goal of esophageal dilation is to increase the luminal diameter of the esophagus while also improving dysphagia symptoms. Once a stricture becomes refractory to esophageal dilation, there are several treatment therapies available as adjuncts to dilation therapy. These therapies include intralesional steroid injection, mitomycin C, esophageal stent placement, and endoscopic incisional therapy. PMID:26616905

  9. Intramural solitary fibrous tumor of the ileum: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiao; Yue, Jun-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare spindle cell tumor, which has never been reported to be derived from the wall of the small intestine. To describe a case of ileum intramural SFT. An ileum intramural SFT was observed in a healthy 26-year-old woman during cesarean section. Complete resection was performed to remove the tumor. Surgical specimens were used for pathological examination and immunohistochemistry, which confirmed the diagnosis of SFT. The patient had an uneventful recovery from the operation without any complications, recurrence, or metastasis during the 4-month follow-up. This report shows for the first time that SFT can occur in the intestinal wall and that complete resection can successfully remove the tumor with promising short-term prognosis. Thus, SFT should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any mesenchymal lesion arising from the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Esophageal phytobezoar in a horse.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, M H; Richardson, D W; Morse, C C

    1987-12-01

    A 23-year-old Thoroughbred stallion was admitted to the hospital for treatment of acute esophageal obstruction. Clinical examination and contrast radiography confirmed the presence of an esophageal obstruction. The horse was euthanatized, and examination revealed a bolus of feed material occluding the esophageal lumen 6 cm caudal to the thoracic inlet, with underlying necrosis of the esophageal mucosa. A large pulsion diverticulum was identified in the caudocervical portion of the esophagus. Apparently, the phytobezoar was formed within the esophageal diverticulum and subsequently became dislodged, occluding the esophagus.

  11. [Esophageal motility disorders].

    PubMed

    Dughera, L; Battaglia, E; Emanuelli, G

    2001-09-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are usually diagnosed when esophageal manometry is performed in patients with unexplained non-cardiac chest pain, non obstructive dysphagia or as a part of the preoperative evaluation for surgery of gastroesophageal reflux. Classification of these abnormalities has been a subject of controversy. These esophageal contraction abnormalities can be separated manometrically from the motor pattern seen in normal subjects, however, their clinical relevance is still unclear and debated. Many patients demonstrate motility abnormalities in the manometry laboratories, but may lack correlation with their presenting symptoms. Medical treatment can decrease symptoms particularly chest pain or acid reflux but there is no significant changes in the manometric patterns. Such motor abnormalities may not reflect a true disease state, but they could be markers of other abnormalities and they can modify the initial manometric findings in time.

  12. National Esophageal Atresia Register.

    PubMed

    Sfeir, Rony; Michaud, Laurent; Sharma, Duyti; Richard, Florence; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    National Esophageal Atresia was created in 2008 by the National Reference Center for Esophageal Congenital Abnormalities created in 2006. Primary goal was estimation of live birth prevalence in France. A national network of surgeons and pediatricians was initiated and entire teams dealing with esophageal atresia accepted to participate in an exhaustive national register. A questionnaire was validated by a national committee and data were centralized in our center. Scientific exploitation showed that such database is useful for health authorities as for medical professionals. Live birth prevalence in France is at 1.9/10,000 births. Prenatal diagnosis is more common but its effect on prevalence is not yet fully understood. Associated congenital abnormalities are frequent and major malformations with termination of pregnancy can influence prevalence. PMID:26642387

  13. EPICARDIAL AND INTRAMURAL EXCITATION DURING VENTRICULAR PACING: EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Taccardi, Bruno; Punske, Bonnie B.; Macchi, Emilio; MacLeod, Robert S.; Ershler, Philip R.

    2009-01-01

    Published studies show that ventricular pacing in canine hearts produces three distinct patterns of epicardial excitation: elliptical isochrones near an epicardial pacing site, with asymmetrical bulges; areas with high propagation velocity, up to 2 or 3 m/s and numerous breakthrough sites; lower velocity areas (< 1 m/s) where excitation moves across the epicardial projection of the septum. With increasing pacing depth the magnitude of epicardial potential maxima becomes asymmetrical. The electrophysiological mechanisms that generate the distinct patterns have not been fully elucidated. In this study we investigated those mechanisms experimentally. Under pentobarbital anesthesia epicardial and intramural excitation isochrone and potential maps have been recorded from 22 exposed or isolated dog hearts, by means of epicardial electrode arrays and transmural plunge electrodes. In 5 experiments, a ventricular cavity was perfused with diluted Lugol solution. Results The epicardial bulges result from electrotonic attraction from the helically shaped subepicardial portions of the wave front. The high velocity patterns and the associated multiple breakthroughs are due to involvement of the Purkinje network. The low velocity at the septum crossing is due to the missing Purkinje involvement in that area. The asymmetric magnitude of the epicardial potential maxima and the shift of the breakthrough sites provoked by deep stimulation are a consequence of the epi-endocardial obliqueness of the intramural fibers. These results improve our understanding of intramural and epicardial propagation during PVCs and paced beats. This can be useful for interpreting epicardial maps recorded at surgery or inversely computed from body surface ECGs. PMID:18263708

  14. A contact line pinning based microfluidic device for modeling intramural and interstitial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Krupa, Oleh; Apaydin, Elif; Liou-Jiun, J. R.; Diaz-Santana, Anthony; Stroock, Abraham; Wu, Mingming

    2013-03-01

    Fluid flows critically regulate a number of important physiological processes in living systems such as vascular tissue development, immune cell and tumor cell trafficking. However, tools for creating well defined intramural (flow within a vascular tube) and interstitial (flow within a tissue) flows in a physiologically realistic, 3D setting are limited. We will present a contact line pinning based microfluidic platform that is able to create a spatially uniform interstitial flow within a cell embedded biomatrix (type I collagen); and an intramural flow within an engineered vascular tube lined with HUVECs. The created interstitial flow were characterized using a Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP), to be in the range of 1.2 - 16 μm/s. The intramural flow was measured using a particle tracking method, to be in the range of 6 - 30 μm/s. We further demonstrate that interstitial fluid flows modulate breast tumor cell (MDA-MD-231) morphology heterogeneity and plasticity. We will also discuss the influence of fluid flow on cancer cell migration. Support for this work is provided by National Health Institute R21CA138366. This work was performed in part at the Cornell NanoScale Facility and Nanobiotechnology Center.

  15. A comparison of smokeless tobacco and smoking practices of university varsity and intramural baseball players.

    PubMed

    Gingiss, P L; Gottlieb, N H

    1991-01-01

    To examine the smokeless tobacco (ST) and smoking practices of collegiate varsity and intramural baseball players, 284 undergraduate athletes at two major Southwestern universities were surveyed using a questionnaire previously developed to measure use among this population. About one-fourth of all athletes were current ST users and 4% smokers. Over half of varsity players (53%) compared to 25.9% of intramural players used one or both forms of ST. Varsity players were about 20 times more likely to use ST as to smoke, while intramural players were about five times as likely to use ST than to smoke. On both teams, use of chewing tobacco was associated with use of snuff. Smoking was not associated with ST use in either group. Mean ages for initiation for all products was 15, and for quitting, 18. There was no evidence that one form of tobacco served as a gateway for the other among these young adult athletes. Over a fourth of all users started after age 17, suggesting that college is an appropriate locus for both ST prevention and cessation programming. Such programs for this population must address the unique characteristics of the social environment in collegiate baseball.

  16. [Treatment of subungual hematoma in office and outdoor conditions].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Treptising with an glowing spike or paperclip can be performed everywhere without local anesthesia and even by non-professionals. Evacuation of hematoma with a Insulin-Syringe/Needle in small nails (children, toe 2 - 5) is an interesting alternative.

  17. [An operated case of a meningioma causing acute subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Koyama, Shinya; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sannohe, Seiya; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Midorikawa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2013-03-01

    We report a rare case of a meningioma causing acute hematoma. A 67-year-old woman presented with sudden headache. No evidence of trauma was seen. CT demonstrated a subdural hematoma in the convexity of the fronto-temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity in the convexity of the frontal lobe. One week later, the patient underwent hematoma evacuation and tumor resection including the attached dura mater. The histological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma. The clot was connected directly to the tumor and the origin of the subdural hematoma was identified as the meningioma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the headache improved. Meningiomas have a relatively benign course but rarely present with hemorrhage. Surgical exploration is the effective and recommended treatment.

  18. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  19. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow’s relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:27499977

  20. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  1. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  2. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  3. [Cervicodorsal subdural hematoma caused by coumarinic rodenticide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Ruel, J H; Ffrench, P; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1990-01-01

    A 59-year old man developed subacute tetraparesis following severe sudden neck pain. MRI showed a subdural cervical hematoma. Prothrombin complex activity was low. An unusual coagulopathy after rodenticides exposure was found. Diphenacoum, an effective antagonist of vitamin K1, was present in the patients plasma. Specific medical management led to a complete recovery. Follow-up MRI seventy days later confirmed the complete disappearance of the hematoma. PMID:2330467

  4. [Subcapsular hematoma of the liver after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Ishizuka, E; Iwasaki, A; Saito, R

    1998-03-01

    We experienced a case of a hepatic subcapsular hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for a right renal stone. To our knowledge this presentation is the second case in the Japanese literature. A 63-year-old female with a right renal stone received 2,800 shots of 14.0 kilo-volts shockwave with Sonolith 3,000. Preoperative examination of the blood disclosed no abnormalities in the coagulating system except slight reduction of platelet count and slight impairment of liver function. Postoperative routine ultrasound echograms revealed a hepatic subcapsular hematoma although she had no symptom. The size of the hematoma measured 11.0 x 5.0 cm in computed tomograms (CT). She was carefully observed without any treatments because the hematoma did not increase in size. CT scans 6 months after the ESWL treatment demonstrated neither hematoma nor masses in the liver. As a complication of ESWL for urolithiasis a hepatic subcapsular hematoma is very rare. We herein presented the case and discussed the complications of ESWL briefly in the literature.

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma infected by propionibacterium acnes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  6. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  7. Esophagitis in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Esophagitis is the end result of a variety of insults to epithelial homeostasis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a manifestation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy that most commonly affects the esophagus of males who have other atopic phenomena. Reflux esophagitis reflects repeated exposure to acidic gastric contents because of failure of the normal protections afforded by the LES. Because certain histologic features can be present in either condition, endoscopic biopsy alone does not distinguish them. Their symptoms overlap, but the treatment options are very different, such that making a formal diagnosis by following consensus guidelines is essential. A treatment protocol designed to manage the inflammation by controlling the provocative factors (acid for GERD and food antigens for EoE) or suppressing the inflammation (ie, topical steroids for EoE) should result in normalization of the mucosa and resolution of symptoms. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic condition that rarely remits spontaneously, so any therapeutic modality will need to be continued indefinitely. PMID:27363230

  8. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  10. A tale of two acute extradural hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Jite, Ikechi E.; Smith, Omolara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In much of the Western hemisphere, mortality from traumatic acute extradural hematomas (AEDH) has been drastically brought down toward 0%. This is still not the case however in most developing countries. Case Description: This report represents a tragi-comic tale of two cases of traumatic AEDH managed by an academic neurosurgeon in a neurosurgically ill-resourced private health facility during a nationwide industrial strike action preventing clinical-surgical care in the principal author's University Teaching Hospital. A young man presented with altered consciousness, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 14/15, following a road accident. The cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained only 9 h after its request, long after the man had actually deteriorated to GCS 7/15 with pupillary changes. The neurosurgeon, summoned from the nearby University Teaching Hospital for the operative care of this man, arrived on-site and was about moving the patient into the operative room when he took the final breaths and died, all within 2 h of the belated neuroimaging. This scenario repeated itself in the same health facility just 24 h later with another young man who presented GCS 7/15 and another identical CT evidence of traumatic AEDH. With more financially able relations, the diagnostic/surgical care of this second patient was much more prompt. He made a very brisk recovery from neurosurgical operative intervention. He is alive and well, 5-month postoperative. Conclusions: In most low-resourced health systems of the developing countries, a significant proportion of potentially salvageable cases of AEDH still perish from this disease condition. PMID:27213108

  11. Esophageal, pharyngeal and hemorrhagic complications occurring in anterior cervical surgery: Three illustrative cases

    PubMed Central

    Paradells, Víctor Rodrigo; Pérez, Juan Bosco Calatayud; Vicente, Francisco Javier Díar; Florez, Luciano Bances; de la Viuda, Marta Claramonte; Villagrasa, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of esophageal and pharyngeal perforations occurring in anterior cervical surgeries ranges from 0.25% to 1% and 0.2% to 1.2%, respectively. Symptoms usually appear postoperatively and are attributed to: Local infection, fistula, sepsis, or mediastinitis. Acute postoperative hematoma, although very rare (<1%), is the first complication to rule out due to its life-threatening complications (e.g. acute respiratory failure). Case Description: Over a 36-year period, the author(s) described three severe esophageal/pharyngeal complications attributed to anterior cervical surgery. As these complications were appropriately recognized/treated, patients had favorable outcomes. Conclusions: Anterior cervical spine surgery is a safe approach and is associated with few major esophageal/pharyngeal complications, which most commonly include transient dysphagia and dysphonia. If symptoms persist, patients should be assessed for esophageal/pharyngeal defects utilizing appropriate imaging studies. Notably, even if the major complications listed above are adequately treated, optimal results are in no way guaranteed. PMID:24843808

  12. Eosinophilic esophagitis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Redd, Matthew; Schey, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new entity with a significant amount of increased recognition over the last decade. The mainstay treatments of EoE are designed to eliminate the causative allergens or to reduce their effects on the esophageal mucosa. Common treatments include dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, systemic and topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic treatments. As the pathogenesis of EoE is explored, new and novel treatments are being studied that target specific pathways and chemokines identified in as precipitating agents of EoE. This is a rapidly evolving field with significant ongoing research and clinical studies. Our review will therefore focus on current and novel treatment approaches to the disease.

  13. Esophageal carcinoma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Quint, L.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-04-01

    Preoperative CT scans of 33 patients with esophageal cancer were reviewed to assess staging accuracy and define the role of CT in patients being considered for transhiatal blunt esophagectomy. Surgical and pathological verification was obtained in all cases. Only 13 tumors were staged correctly according to the TNM classification. In addition, CT was not useful in assessing resectability because of its low accuracy in evaluating aortic invasion and the fact that few patients had tracheobronchial or aortic invasion or hepatic metastases at presentation.

  14. A case of right renal infarction and subcapsular hematoma that simultaneously developed after cardiac angiography.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S H; Cho, H C; Lee, S W; Kim, D Y; Joo, W C; Lee, W H; Song, J H; Kim, M-J

    2009-01-01

    Of the several complications known to develop after cardiac catheterization, simultaneous acute renal infarction and renal subcapsular hematoma is rare. Here, the authors report a case of acute renal infarction with subcapsular hematoma that developed 4 hours after cardiac catheterization.

  15. Postoperative chronic subdural hematoma following craniotomy--four case reports.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Ohkura, A; Sugita, Y; Sugita, S; Miyagi, J; Shigemori, M

    1995-02-01

    Postoperative chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) following craniotomy developed in only four of 372 patients undergoing craniotomy for aneurysm surgery (1 patient) and brain tumor surgery (3 patients) between April, 1991 and November, 1993, an incidence of only 1.1%. There were three males and one female, aged from 32 to 66 years (mean 56 yrs). The period between craniotomy and development of CSH ranged from 3 to 5 months (mean 4.3 mos). Postoperative hematomas were located on the operative sides in three patients and the contralateral side in the other. Early postoperative computed tomographic scans found subdural fluid collection in all patients. Magnetic resonance images showed linear meningeal enhancement in all patients. Postoperative CSH may be caused by mixture of blood in subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection which persists due to reduced brain elasticity and wide subarachnoid membrane opening resulting in neomembrane formation and finally development of hematoma. PMID:7753312

  16. [Qualitative histological diagnostics of the remoteness of traumatic subdural hematomas].

    PubMed

    Nedugov, G V

    2011-01-01

    The present histological study was based on the examination of dura mater, capsules, and contents of 200 subdural hematomas (SDH) obtained from the corpses of subjects with a non-penetrating craniocerebral injury within a period from 1 hour to 2.5 years after the trauma. A total of 14 well-reproducible qualitative morphological criteria have been identified for diagnostics of the prescription of subdural hematomas; the probability and the exact earliest and latest times of their manifestation at different dates of the posttraumatic period were calculated. Sensitivity, specificity, and prognostic value of the proposed qualitative morphological criteria for the prescription of traumatic subdural hematomas were evaluated. The results of the study can be used in the practical work of forensic medical experts.

  17. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  18. Staging Early Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Old, O J; Isabelle, M; Barr, H

    2016-01-01

    Staging esophageal cancer provides a standardized measure of the extent of disease that can be used to inform decisions about therapy and guide prognosis. For esophageal cancer, the treatment pathways vary greatly depending on stage of disease, and accurate staging is therefore crucial in ensuring the optimal therapy for each patient. For early esophageal cancer (T1 lesions), endoscopic resection can be curative and simultaneously gives accurate staging of depth of invasion. For tumors invading the submucosa or more advanced disease, comprehensive investigation is required to accurately stage the tumor and assess suitability for curative resection. A combined imaging approach of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) offers complementary diagnostic information and gives the greatest chance of accurate staging. Staging laparoscopy can identify peritoneal disease and small superficial liver lesions that could be missed on CT or PET, and alters management in up to 20 % of patients. Optical diagnostic techniques offer the prospect of further extending the possibilities of endoscopic staging in real time. Optical coherence tomography can image superficial lesions and could provide information on depth of invasion for these lesions. Real-time lymph node analysis using optical diagnostics such as Raman spectroscopy could be used to support immediate endoscopic therapy without waiting for results of cytology or further investigations. PMID:27573772

  19. Mesenteric Hematoma: Is there a Role for Selective Management?

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Murdock, Alan; Alarcon, Louis; Puyana, Juan C

    2016-04-01

    Mesenteric hematomas may present as a radiologic finding after blunt abdominal trauma that may be associated with surgically significant mesenteric and/or bowel injury. The question of whether to operate or not to operate on patients with mesenteric hematoma remains a topic of debate, especially with the improved imaging technology. This study sought to identify clinical and radiological characteristics for patient selection for operative management (OM) of mesenteric hematoma. A retrospective review of 33 adults with blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric hematoma on CT scan (2009-2012) was performed. Patients with other intra-abdominal injuries, penetrating trauma, isolated gastric hematoma, contrast extravasation, extraluminal air, and Glasgow Coma Scale < 14 were excluded. Patients requiring surgical treatment within 24 hours of admission were compared with those who did not using chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, and t test. Parameters included age, gender, race, Glasgow Coma Scale, vital signs, pain, tenderness, ecchymosis, Injury Severity Score, length of stay, and inhospital mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine positive associations with OM. Of the 33 patients, 19 underwent OM and 14 did not. Both groups were similar at baseline. Regression analysis revealed association for pain [odds ratio (OR) = 9.6, confidence interval (CI) = 1.8-49.9, P < 0.01], tenderness (OR = 32, CI = 4.6-222.2, P < 0.01), and free fluid (OR = 10.3, CI = 1.8-60, P < 0.01) with need for operative intervention. Nonoperative management patients had 100 per cent success rate. Of the OM patients, 100 per cent underwent therapeutic laparotomies. Findings of mesenteric hematoma on CT scan in examinable patients with no abdominal pain, tenderness, or free fluid predict successful nonoperative management.

  20. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  1. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  2. [Intramural nervous apparatus of jejunum and rectum in experimental portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, I V; Tikhonova, L P; Chepur, S V; Nichiporuk, G I

    2004-01-01

    Using histological and electron microscopical methods, the state of intramural nervous structures of jejunum and rectum was studied in 92 dogs with experimental portal hypertension. Three phases of changes of portal pressure were detected and its influence upon the intramural nervous apparatus was observed. In phase 1 (first 4-5 days after the surgery) the reactive changes of the nervous apparatus were shown that were more pronounced in jejunum. In phase 2 (day 5 to 2.5 months) the portal pressure was shown to drop; this was accompanied by some signs of regeneration in jejunum and by an aggravation of destructive processes in rectum. In phase 3 of the repeated rise of portal pressure (2.5 to 6.5 months after the surgery), destructive changes in the nervous apparatus were demonstrated that were similar to those found in phase 1. However, the differences in the reaction of nervous structures in different layers of intestinal tube and the heterogeneity of the changes of the nervous apparatus in jejunum and rectum were absent. The association of time of appearance and of severity of structural changes with the elevation of portal pressure suggests the significant role of vascular factor in the morphogenesis of alterations observed in phase 3 of hemodynamic changes.

  3. Distribution and chemical coding of intramural neurons in the porcine ileum during proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pidsudko, Z; Kaleczyc, J; Wasowicz, K; Sienkiewicz, W; Majewski, M; Zajac, W; Lakomy, M

    2008-01-01

    Enteric neurons are highly adaptive in their response to various pathological processes including inflammation, so the aim of this study was to describe the chemical coding of neurons in the ileal intramural ganglia in porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE). Accordingly, juvenile Large White Polish pigs with clinically diagnosed Lawsonia intracellularis infection (PPE; n=3) and a group of uninfected controls (C; n=3) were studied. Ileal tissue from each animal was processed for dual-labelling immunofluorescence using antiserum specific for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) in combination with antiserum to one of: vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY) or galanin (GAL). In infected pigs, enteric neurons were found in ganglia located within three intramural plexuses: inner submucosal (ISP), outer submucosal (OSP) and myenteric (MP). Immunofluorescence labelling revealed increases in the number of neurons containing GAL, SOM, VIP and CGRP in pigs with PPE. Neuropeptides may therefore have an important role in the function of porcine enteric local nerve circuits under pathological conditions, when the nervous system is stressed, challenged or afflicted by disease such as PPE. However, further studies are required to determine the exact physiological relevance of the observed adaptive changes. PMID:18061202

  4. Congenital Esophageal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Dysphagia in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S.; Surude, Ravindra G.; Mohite, Ashok R.; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital embryonal gastrointestinal (GI) malformation which is diagnosed most commonly in childhood. In adults, they can present with a variety of symptoms ranging from dysphagia, chest pain, epigastric discomfort, and vomiting to more serious complications including infections, hemorrhage, and ulcerations. A 30-year-old male presented with gradually progressive dysphagia to solids for 4 months without significant weight loss. Clinical examination and routine laboratory examination were unrevealing. Upper GI endoscopy revealed a well-defined submucosal lesion bulging into the esophageal lumen involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal esophagus. The overlying mucosa was normal with mild luminal narrowing but gastroscope could be negotiated across this narrowing. Differential diagnosis included lipoma, leiomyoma or GI stromal tumors. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of thorax revealed a 3.5 × 2.3 × 3 cm well-defined homogenous hypodense lesion involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal thoracic esophagus with likely possibility of submucosal or intramural lesion. Subsequently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a 3.3 × 2.8 cm homogenous hypoechoic lesion without any vascularity involving the distal esophagus wall suggestive of duplication cyst. The lesion was intramural in location as muscularis propria was seen to go around the lesion. Bronchogenic cyst was excluded due to absence of cartilage and close proximity of the cyst to lumen. Fine-needle aspiration was not attempted in view of high risk of introducing infection. Being symptomatic, the patient underwent complete surgical excision of the cyst with exteriorization of the base which on histopathology confirmed duplication cyst. Esophageal duplication cysts are exceedingly rare congenital embryonal malformations with estimated prevalence of 0.0122% arising from aberration of posterior division of embryonic foregut at 3 - 4 weeks of

  5. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  6. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  7. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively. PMID:23293672

  8. Delayed Acute Subdural Hematoma Associated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed acute subdural hematoma (DASH) is a subdural hematoma which is detected later. An initial computed tomography (CT) does not reveal any intracranial hemorrhage at all. Few patients of DASH after mild traumatic brain injury associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been published. Patient Presentation: A 63-year-old woman presented with cardiac pulmonary arrest due to acute myocardial infarction and lethal arrhythmia. She had hit her head on the road. The initial CT did not reveal any hemorrhage in the intra-cranium. She fully recovered after PCI. However, 1 hour after PCI, she lost consciousness and immediate CT showed acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The period from losing consciousness to brain herniation presenting as anisocoria was very short—only 30 minutes in our patient. Although emergent evacuation of hematoma and external decompression were performed, the patient died 1 day after the operation. Conclusion: The authors encountered a patient of DASH after PCI that resulted in death. Clinicians should be aware that subdural hemorrhage can occur after PCI if no hemorrhage is noted in the initial head CT, and the operation should be performed as soon as possible when the consciousness level decreases. PMID:27526240

  9. [Prevalence of erosive esophagitis and peptic esophageal strictures].

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, D I; Skurikhin, S S; Luft, A V; Mednikov, S N; Silant'ev, D S; Kulagin, V I; Dvoretskiĭ, S Iu; Bagnenko, S F

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread among population in economically developed countries including Russia. It was analyzed the results of 34 903 endoscopic examinations of upper gastrointestinal tract in ethnically and socially homogeneous population of Leningrad region with symptoms of gastric dispepsia. Procedures were performed for the period 2007-2013. Prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 4.9%. Peptic esophageal strictures due to chronic reflux-associated inflammation were revealed in 0.2% of examined patients (3.7% of patients with erosive esophagitis). Obtained data allow to considergastroesophageal reflux disease as a socially significant problem in Russia requiring close attention and further study.

  10. Intraluminal esophageal diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, O; Soma, Y; Takasugi, T; Munakata, A; Yoshida, Y

    1990-02-01

    An intraluminal esophageal diverticulum (IED) is an uncommon entity defined as a double-layered mucosal pouch lying within the lumen of the esophagus. Its characteristic radiological finding is an intraluminal barium collection surrounded by a radiolucent halo. True IED, which is different from a transient radiological artifact, has not been previously reported in the international literature. This article describes the first case of true IED. Differential diagnosis between a true lesion and a transient flow artifact on barium meal is discussed. PMID:2106464

  11. The Resource Allocation Program at the University of California, San Francisco: Getting More from Intramural Funding Bucks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Emanuela; Kiser, Gretchen; Henry, Roland; Giacomini, Kathy; Volberding, Paul; Waldman, Frederic; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Intramural funding programs within both large and small research institutions are an essential mechanism to foster collaborative, novel, or preliminary research activity, and to further institutional research strategic goals. At most research institutions in the United States, these funding opportunities are managed by each funding agency or…

  12. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  13. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with esophageal involvement.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, J W; Sheahan, D G; Behar, J

    1977-06-01

    A patient with a lifelong history of asthma and hay fever was investigated because of symptoms of esophageal spasm. Esophageal biopsies revealed elongated papillae and basal zone hyperplasia of the epithelial layer with eosinophilic infiltration of the lamina propria and muscularis mucosae. There was no evidence of reflux. Small bowel biopsies revealed a flat mucosal pattern with absent or blunted villi, tall columar surface epithelium, and eosinophilic infiltration of the lamina propria. He did not respond to a gluten-free diet. This patient is thought to have eosinophilic gatroenteritis with esophageal involvement, the first such case reported.

  14. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  15. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  16. Modeling and Simulations on the Intramural Thermoelectric Generator of Lower-Re-fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Zheng, Ding; Chen, Yushan

    The thermoelectric conversion with lower Renault number (Re) fluid, such as waste heat from industry boiler, and engine's circled cooling water, which can be designed as intramural generator structure. In this research, a thermoelectric project analysis model and the description of an intensified system are presented, its generator with the aligned or staggered platoon structure has strengthened heat-transfer property, and the heat convection coefficient ratio has increased times than plain tube; For the fluid kinetic energy's loss is influenced by the whirlpool, the pressure difference is several hundred Pa level which changes along with geometric parameters of transform components; what's more, heat transfer area increase distinctly under the same generator volume, which has built the foundation for the enhancement output electric power.

  17. Jump-landing differences between varsity, club, and intramural athletes: the Jump-ACL Study.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Justin L; Gerber, J Parry; Cameron, Kenneth L; Beutler, Anthony I; Marshall, Stephen W; Distefano, Lindsay J; Padua, Darin A; de la Motte, Sarah J; Miller, Joseph M; Yunker, Craig A

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal movement patterns have been identified as important prospective risk factors for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament injury. Specifically, poor neuromuscular control during the early landing phase has been associated with increased injury risk. Although it is commonly assumed that higher division collegiate athletes generally exhibit better movement patterns than lower division athletes, few studies compare the biomechanical differences on basic tasks such as jump landing between various levels of athletic groups. The objective of this study was to evaluate jump-landing and fitness differences among college-aged Intramural, Competitive Club, and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level athletes. Two hundred seventy-seven student-athletes (222 men, 55 women; age 19.3 ± 0.8 years) categorized as NCAA Division I, Competitive Club, or Intramural level athletes were evaluated during a jump-landing task using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), a validated qualitative movement assessment. Fitness was measured using the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Results showed no significant differences in landing errors between the levels of athletic group (F(2,267) = 0.36, p = 0.70). There was a significant difference in landing errors between genders (F(1,268) = 3.99, p = 0.05). Significant differences in APFT scores were observed between level of athletic group (F(2,267) = 11.14, p < 0.001) and gender (F(1,268) = 9.27, p = 0.003). There was no significant correlation between the APFT and LESS scores (p = 0.26). In conclusion, higher level athletes had better physical fitness as measured by the APFT but did not as a group exhibit better landing technique. The implications of this research suggest that "high-risk" movement patterns are prevalent in all levels of athletes. PMID:23820560

  18. Jump-landing differences between varsity, club, and intramural athletes: the Jump-ACL Study.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Justin L; Gerber, J Parry; Cameron, Kenneth L; Beutler, Anthony I; Marshall, Stephen W; Distefano, Lindsay J; Padua, Darin A; de la Motte, Sarah J; Miller, Joseph M; Yunker, Craig A

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal movement patterns have been identified as important prospective risk factors for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament injury. Specifically, poor neuromuscular control during the early landing phase has been associated with increased injury risk. Although it is commonly assumed that higher division collegiate athletes generally exhibit better movement patterns than lower division athletes, few studies compare the biomechanical differences on basic tasks such as jump landing between various levels of athletic groups. The objective of this study was to evaluate jump-landing and fitness differences among college-aged Intramural, Competitive Club, and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level athletes. Two hundred seventy-seven student-athletes (222 men, 55 women; age 19.3 ± 0.8 years) categorized as NCAA Division I, Competitive Club, or Intramural level athletes were evaluated during a jump-landing task using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), a validated qualitative movement assessment. Fitness was measured using the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Results showed no significant differences in landing errors between the levels of athletic group (F(2,267) = 0.36, p = 0.70). There was a significant difference in landing errors between genders (F(1,268) = 3.99, p = 0.05). Significant differences in APFT scores were observed between level of athletic group (F(2,267) = 11.14, p < 0.001) and gender (F(1,268) = 9.27, p = 0.003). There was no significant correlation between the APFT and LESS scores (p = 0.26). In conclusion, higher level athletes had better physical fitness as measured by the APFT but did not as a group exhibit better landing technique. The implications of this research suggest that "high-risk" movement patterns are prevalent in all levels of athletes.

  19. False esophageal hiatus hernia caused by a foreign body: a fatal event.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Ping; Yao, Ming; Zhou, Xu-Yan; Huang, Bing; Qi, Wei-Bo; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Xu, Long-Sheng

    2014-10-21

    Foreign body ingestion is a common complaint in gastrointestinal clinics. It is usually not difficult to diagnose because most of the patients report a definitive history of accidental foreign body ingestion. However, in rare cases, patients do not have a clear history. Thus, the actual condition of the patient is difficult to diagnosis or is misdiagnosed; consequently, treatment is delayed or the wrong treatment is administered, respectively. This report describes a fatal case of esophageal perforation caused by an unknowingly ingested fishbone, which resulted in lower esophageal necrosis, chest cavity infection, posterior mediastinum fester, and significant upper gastrointestinal accumulation of blood. However, his clinical symptoms and imaging data are very similar with esophageal hiatal hernia. Unfortunately, because the patient was too late in consulting a physician, he finally died of chest infection and hemorrhage caused by thoracic aortic rupture. First, this case report underlines the importance of immediate consultation with a physician as soon as symptoms are experienced so as not to delay diagnosis and treatment, and thus avoid a fatal outcome. Second, diagnostic imaging should be performed in the early stage, without interference by clinical judgment. Third, when computed tomography reveals esophageal hiatus hernia with stomach incarceration, posterior mediastinal hematoma, and pneumatosis caused by esophageal, a foreign body should be suspected. Finally, medical professionals are responsible for making people aware of the danger of foreign body ingestion, especially among children, those who abuse alcohol, and those who wear dentures, particularly among the elderly, whose discriminability of foreign bodies is decreased, to avoid dire consequences. PMID:25339840

  20. [Ectopic connection of the left coronary artery with the contralateral sinus with or without intramural pathway: how and why differentiating them?].

    PubMed

    Aubry, P; Honton, B; Leurent, G; Halna du Fretay, X; Dupouy, P; Ou, P; Juliard, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Among the wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities of coronary arteries, a left coronary artery connected with the contralateral sinus is considered as an anatomical high-risk while associated with a proximal preaortic course. The ectopic connection may be associated with or without intramural pathway regarding the aortic wall. An intramural pathway is a characteristic to be considered because it is able to be involved in myocardial ischemia-related adverse events of which the sudden death. Therefore, making an identification of an intramural pathway is essential for the ectopic connections of the left coronary artery associated with a preaortic course. PMID:25450989

  1. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  2. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  3. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future. PMID:26890720

  5. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  6. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25216909

  7. Cutaneous Metastases From Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Stamatina; Georgia, Doulami; Gavriella-Zoi, Vrakopoulou; Dimitrios, Mpistarakis; Stulianos, Katsaragakis; Theodoros, Liakakos; Georgios, Zografos; Dimitrios, Theodorou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present 2 rare cases of cutaneous metastases originated from adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, thus, underline the need for early diagnosis and possible treatment of suspicious skin lesions among patients with esophageal malignancy. Metastatic cancer to the skin originated from internal malignancies, mostly lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, constitute 0.5 to 9% of all metastatic cancers.5,8,15 Skin metastases, mainly from squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus, are rarely reported. Cutaneous metastasis is a finding indicating progressiveness of the disease.17 More precisely, median survival is estimated approximately 4.7 months.2,14 This study is a retrospective review of 2 cases of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and a review of the literature. Two patients aged 60 and 32 years old, respectively, underwent esophagectomy. Both pathologic reports disclosed adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction staged T3 N2 M0 (stage IIIB). During follow-up time, the 2 patients were diagnosed with cutaneous metastases originated from the primary esophageal tumor 11 and 4 months after surgery, respectively. The first patient is alive 37 months after diagnosis, while the second one died 16 months after surgery. Cutaneous metastasis caused by esophageal adenocarcinoma is possible. Therefore, follow-up of patients who were diagnosed with esophageal malignancy and underwent esophagectomy is mandatory in order to reveal early surgical stages. PMID:25785344

  8. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  9. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    PubMed

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  10. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain. PMID:27056873

  11. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  12. Congenital afibrinogenemia: a case report of a spontaneous hepatic hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Malaquin, Stephanie; Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Badoux, Louise; Mahjoub, Yazine; Dupont, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Afibrinogenemia is a rare coagulation disorder. Clinical features of spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma, or after surgery have been described as well as thrombo-embolic complications. In this article, we presented the case of a 19-year old female with congenital afibrinogenemia who was admitted with a spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. Conclusions: Supportive treatment including transfusion and fibrinogen administration, associated with repeated packing surgeries and selective embolization, were successfully performed. PMID:27428204

  13. Are acute subdural hematomas possible without head trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Garbossa, D.; Altieri, R.; Specchia, F. M. Calamo; Agnoletti, A.; Pilloni, G.; Lanotte, M.; Spaziante, R.; Ducati, A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are rarely reported in the literature. In general, it is due to head trauma, but if the traumatic event is very mild, it is inadequate to explain the ASDH occurrence. Risk factors for the development of spontaneous ASDH include hypertension, vascular abnormalities and deficit of coagulation. We present two cases of ASDH in patients with the coagulation deficit and review of the literature to understand the coagulation factors role and platelet role in the management of ASDHs. PMID:25685219

  14. Are acute subdural hematomas possible without head trauma?

    PubMed

    Garbossa, D; Altieri, R; Specchia, F M Calamo; Agnoletti, A; Pilloni, G; Lanotte, M; Spaziante, R; Ducati, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) are rarely reported in the literature. In general, it is due to head trauma, but if the traumatic event is very mild, it is inadequate to explain the ASDH occurrence. Risk factors for the development of spontaneous ASDH include hypertension, vascular abnormalities and deficit of coagulation. We present two cases of ASDH in patients with the coagulation deficit and review of the literature to understand the coagulation factors role and platelet role in the management of ASDHs.

  15. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  16. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  17. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome.

  18. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  19. Chronic expanding hematoma with bronchopleural fistula and empyema space.

    PubMed

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Imai, Tadashi

    2009-06-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma of the thorax is not typically accompanied by a bronchopleural fistula or purulent lesion. We report an extremely rare case of chronic expanding hematoma with a bronchopleural fistula and empyema space in a 66-year-old man with a history of tuberculous pleurisy admitted because of fever and bloody sputa. Computed tomography and a magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge mass and an air space in the right thorax. A fiber-optic bronchoscope examination showed hemorrhagic effusion from the apical bronchus of the right lower lobe. First, open-window thoracostomy was undertaken to control the septic state and to prevent aspiration of infected pleural fluid. At operation, air leakage was found at the most superior portion in the rear of the thoracic empyema space; this was thought to be from the bronchopleural fistula. Enterococcus casseliflavus was detected in cultures for bacteria of the effusion from the empyema space. After an improvement of his general condition, a radical operation, including the complete extirpation of the hematoma and intrathoracic muscle transposition using the latissimus dorsi muscle, was successfully performed. PMID:19597392

  20. Delayed intracranial hematoma following stereoelectroencephalography for intractable epilepsy: case report.

    PubMed

    Derrey, Stéphane; Lebas, Axel; Parain, Dominique; Baray, Marie Gilles; Marguet, Christophe; Freger, Pierre; Proust, François

    2012-12-01

    Intracranial bleeding following stereoelectroencephalography (sEEG) is rare and commonly occurs early after electrode implantation. The authors report the case of a delayed intracranial hematoma following sEEG. This 10-year-old boy was referred to the authors' department to undergo an sEEG study for intractable epilepsy, with the hypothesis of a single localized epileptic zone in the left precentral region. To perform the exploration, 14 depth electrodes were implanted under stereotactic conditions. The results of a postoperative CT scan performed routinely at the end of the surgical procedure were normal. Eight days later, following an epileptic seizure, the child's condition worsened. The neurological examination revealed a left hemiparesis, agitation, and coma due to a right subdural hematoma with intraparenchymal bleeding. Despite a surgical evacuation followed by a decompressive craniectomy, the curative treatments were stopped 1 week later due to severe diffuse ischemic lesions found on MRI studies. This is the first observation of a delayed hematoma following an sEEG procedure. The mechanism underlying this complication remains unclear, but the rupture of a growing pseudoaneurysm caused by the electrode's implantation or the tearing of a neighboring vessel by an electrode were suspected. In consequence, physicians must remain vigilant during the entire sEEG recording period and probably also several days after electrode removal.

  1. Traumatic tentorial hematoma in two-wheeler riders: Correlation with helmet use

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Dawar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tentorial hematoma is frequently seen in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, especially in motorized two-wheeler riders following head injury. However its relevance and prognostic significance are not known. Objective: To evaluate patients of TBI with tentorial hematoma using a simple grading system and attempt to correlate this grading with factors like helmet use and neurological outcome. Materials and Methods: This prospective study over a 1-year period included patients with TBI who had tentorial hematoma in the initial plain head. Patients were divided into three grades based on the initial CT findings: Grade I: Isolated tentorial hematoma, grade II: tentorial hematoma with midline shift but open cisterns and grade III: Tentorial hematoma with effaced cisterns. Clinical and radiological records of patients including admission GCS and GOS at discharge were assessed in all cases. Observations: A total of 1786 patients of TBI were admitted during the study period. Of these, 106 (5.9%) patients had tentorial hematoma. 84.9% (n = 90) were male and 15.1% (n = 16) were female with the mean age being 36.5 years (range 2-66 years). The mean admission GCS was 13, 11 and 8 in patients with grade I, II and III tentorial hematoma respectively. 43.4% (n = 46) of the patients had grade I, 32.1% (n = 34) had grade II and 24.5% (n = 26) patients had grade III tentorial hematoma. Seventy-one patients (84.5%) were riding motorized two wheelers with 63 (89%) wearing helmets. The majority of the patients wearing helmets (58.8%) had grade I hematoma with 35% (n = 22) having grade II hematoma and only 6.3% (n = 4) having grade III hematoma. Overall, there were 20 deaths. 50% (n = 10) of the deaths were in patients with grade III hematoma and 40% (n = 8) of the deaths were in patients with grade II hematoma. There were two (10%) deaths in patients with grade I hematoma (both unrelated to head injury). The mean GOS at the time of discharge was 5, 4.1 and 2.2 in patients

  2. Traumatic tentorial hematoma in two-wheeler riders: Correlation with helmet use

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Dawar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tentorial hematoma is frequently seen in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, especially in motorized two-wheeler riders following head injury. However its relevance and prognostic significance are not known. Objective: To evaluate patients of TBI with tentorial hematoma using a simple grading system and attempt to correlate this grading with factors like helmet use and neurological outcome. Materials and Methods: This prospective study over a 1-year period included patients with TBI who had tentorial hematoma in the initial plain head. Patients were divided into three grades based on the initial CT findings: Grade I: Isolated tentorial hematoma, grade II: tentorial hematoma with midline shift but open cisterns and grade III: Tentorial hematoma with effaced cisterns. Clinical and radiological records of patients including admission GCS and GOS at discharge were assessed in all cases. Observations: A total of 1786 patients of TBI were admitted during the study period. Of these, 106 (5.9%) patients had tentorial hematoma. 84.9% (n = 90) were male and 15.1% (n = 16) were female with the mean age being 36.5 years (range 2-66 years). The mean admission GCS was 13, 11 and 8 in patients with grade I, II and III tentorial hematoma respectively. 43.4% (n = 46) of the patients had grade I, 32.1% (n = 34) had grade II and 24.5% (n = 26) patients had grade III tentorial hematoma. Seventy-one patients (84.5%) were riding motorized two wheelers with 63 (89%) wearing helmets. The majority of the patients wearing helmets (58.8%) had grade I hematoma with 35% (n = 22) having grade II hematoma and only 6.3% (n = 4) having grade III hematoma. Overall, there were 20 deaths. 50% (n = 10) of the deaths were in patients with grade III hematoma and 40% (n = 8) of the deaths were in patients with grade II hematoma. There were two (10%) deaths in patients with grade I hematoma (both unrelated to head injury). The mean GOS at the time of discharge was 5, 4.1 and 2.2 in patients

  3. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  8. Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 ± 5.2 vs 77.2 ± 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 ± 8.0 vs 83.8 ± 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 ± 5.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.9, 8.4 ± 4.6 vs 2.0 ± 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.1, 7.3 ± 4.0 vs 1.8 ± 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 ± 0.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 ± 1.1 vs 5.3 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased

  9. [Acute epidural hematoma with extravasation on cerebral angiogram in an infant (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oseki, J; Oana, K; Kobayashi, T; Kawada, Y; Kanaya, H

    1977-03-01

    The authors recently operated on a boy four years of age with acute epidural hematoma showing an extravasation on the cerebral angiogram. The hematoma (hematoma volume 125 ml) was evacuated 7 hours after the head injury. The postoperative course was quite uneventful, and he was discharged a month after surgery without any neurologic deficits. The authors reviewed the literature and found 4 cases of acute epidural hematoma with extravasations in infants and children. In all cases the operative results were good. The age incidence and frequency of occurence overall for acute epidural hematomas, extravasations on cerebral angiograms and their mechanism, and the length of time from injury to operation were also discussed. It should be emphasized that, for acute epidural hematoma in infants and children, the early diagnosis and early surgery are essential to save the patients.

  10. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Conclusion: Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage. PMID:26862454

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  12. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  13. A Rare Case of Left Ventricular Intramural Hemangioma Diagnosed Using 1.5-T Cardiac MRI with Histopathological Correlation and Successfully Treated by Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Gianluca; Sciacca, Sergio D'Ancona, Giuseppe Pilato, Michele; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-02-15

    Hemangiomas are vascular tumors composed of blood vessels, frequently localized in the skin and subcutaneous muscles; their localization in the heart is exceptional. The most common localizations are the lateral walls of the left ventricle, the anterior wall, and the septum. Mostly, these tumors grow intracavitarily, rarely intramurally. We describe a singular case of left ventricular intramural hemangioma, detected and diagnosed using newer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, confirmed by histopathological results, and treated successfully by surgery.

  14. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  15. Subcapsular hematoma due to ESWL: risk factors. A study of 4,247 patients.

    PubMed

    Kostakopoulos, A; Stavropoulos, N J; Macrychoritis, C; Deliveliotis, C; Antonopoulos, K P; Picramenos, D

    1995-01-01

    A study of 4,247 shockwave lithotripsy treatment was performed to identify and analyze the risk factors for the development of post-extracorporeal shock-wave lithotropsy hematomas. The Dornier HM-3 and HM-4 lithotriptors were used. We recognized 23 hematomas in 23 patients (0.54%). Various factors were examined to identify the certain predisposing risk factors. There was no correlation of sex, age, stone number, stone size, stone location, number of shock waves and voltage used with the occurrence rate of hematoma. We found that patients with pre-existing hypertension and especially those with poor control of it had a significantly increased incidence of perinephric hematoma.

  16. Outcomes of esophageal surgery, especially of the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Siboni, Stefano; Saino, Greta I; Cavadas, Demetrio; Braghetto, Italo; Csendes, Attila; Korn, Owen; Figueredo, Edgar J; Swanstrom, Lee L; Wassenaar, Eelco

    2013-10-01

    This paper includes commentaries on outcomes of esophageal surgery, including the mechanisms by which fundoduplication improves lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure; the efficacy of the Linx™ management system in improving LES function; the utility of radiologic characterization of antireflux valves following surgery; the correlation between endoscopic findings and reported symptoms following antireflux surgery; the links between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and decreased LES pressure, endoscopic esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the less favorable outcomes following fundoduplication among obese patients; the application of bioprosthetic meshes to reinforce hiatal repair and decrease the incidence of paraesophageal hernia; the efficacy of endoluminal antireflux procedures, and the limited efficacy of revisional antireflux operations, underscoring the importance of good primary surgery and diligent work-up to prevent the necessity of revisional procedures. PMID:24117632

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis in an octogenarian

    PubMed Central

    Trifan, Anca; Stoica, Oana; Chihaia, Catalin-Alexandru; Danciu, Mihai; Stanciu, Carol; Singeap, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by a marked eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophageal mucosa. What was once considered a rare disease has nowadays become one of the most frequent esophageal diseases in the Western countries, occupying a place just next to the gastroesophageal reflux disease. EoE etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown, although most studies consider that allergic and genetic factors play the most important role. Methods: We report the case of EoE in an elderly male (octogenarian), giving a brief review of the current data related to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Results: Dysphagia to solid foods was the leading symptom, and endoscopic findings included white exudates, longitudinal furrows, and concentric mucosal rings, all suggestive for EoE. Diagnosis relied on histological findings in esophageal mucosal biopsies (>30 eosinophils per high power field). He was treated with topical steroids for 8 weeks, symptoms improved gradually and the patient remained in remission at the 8-month follow-up. Conclusion: This case emphasizes that EoE may occur in very old patients and gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion of this disorder in any elderly with dysphagia and endoscopic relevant features. PMID:27741150

  18. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  19. Interdisciplinary expert consensus on management of type B intramural haematoma and penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Arturo; Czerny, Martin; Nienaber, Christoph; Schepens, Marc; Rousseau, Hervé; Cao, Piergiorgio; Moral, Sergio; Fattori, Rossella

    2015-02-01

    An expert panel on the treatment of type B intramural haematoma (IMH) and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) consisting of cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists reviewed the literature to develop treatment algorithms using a consensus method. Data from 46 studies considered relevant were retrieved for a total of 1386 patients consisting of 925 with IMH, and 461 with PAU. The weighted mean 30-day mortality from IMH was 3.9%, 3-year aortic event-related mortality with medical treatment 5.4%, open surgery 23.2% and endovascular therapy 7.1%. In patients with PAU early and 3-year aortic event-mortality rates with open surgery were 15.9 and 25.0%, respectively, and with TEVAR were 7.2 and 10.4%, respectively. According to panel consensus statements, haemodynamic instability, persistent pain, signs of impending rupture and progressive periaortic haemorrhage in two successive imaging studies require immediate surgical or endovascular treatment. In the absence of these complications, medical treatment is warranted, with imaging control at 7 days, 3 and 6 months and annually thereafter. In the chronic phase, aortic diameter >55 mm or a yearly increase ≥ 5 mm should be considered indications for open surgery or thoracic endovascular treatment, with the latter being preferred. In complicated type B aortic PAU and IMH, endovascular repair is the best treatment option in the presence of suitable anatomy.

  20. Branching patterns of intramural coronary vessels determined by microangiography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Mori, H; Tanaka, E; Mohammed, M U; Tanaka, Y; Sekka, T; Ito, K; Shinozaki, Y; Hyodo, K; Ando, M; Umetani, K; Tanioka, K; Kubota, M; Abe, S; Handa, S; Nakazawa, H

    1999-06-01

    The intramural coronary artery (IMCA) with a diameter of 50-500 micrometers is critical for blood supply to the inner layers of heart muscle. We introduced digital measurement to microangiography using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and quantified branching patterns of the IMCA, the epicardial coronary artery (EPCA), and the distal ileal artery (DIA). The pre- and postbranching diameters were measured (95-1,275 micrometers) in seven dogs. A typical arterial segment divided into two nearly equivalent branches, and a regression line of daughter-to-mother diameter plots was almost identical among the EPCA (y = 0.838x - 16.7 in micrometers), IMCA (y = 0.737x - 2.18), and DIA (y = 0.755x + 8.63). However, a considerable difference was present at a segment where a proximal IMCA branched off from an EPCA (y = 0.182x + 90.2). Moreover, a proximal IMCA diameter had no relationship to the branching order from an EPCA. The precision of this method was confirmed by the good correlation of diameter measurements between two independent observers (r = 0.999, y = 1.02x - 1.07). In conclusion, using digital microangiography we demonstrated that the self-similar branching pattern of coronary arteries was discrete at the connection between the IMCA and EPCA.

  1. Arteriolar reactivity in vivo is influenced by an intramural diffusion barrier.

    PubMed

    Lew, M J; Duling, B R

    1990-08-01

    The endothelium of the hamster cheek pouch arteriole in vitro is able to greatly reduce the potency of luminally applied water-soluble drugs by acting as a barrier to diffusion from the lumen to the smooth muscle [Lew, Rivers, and Duling. Am. J. Physiol. 257 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 26): H10-H16, 1989]. Lipid-soluble drugs appear unaffected by the diffusion barrier, presumably because their ability to cross cell membranes allows them to freely cross the endothelium. We compared the effects of two alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists, phenylephrine (water soluble) and SKF 89748A (lipid soluble), on systemic blood pressure and the arterioles of the hamster cheek pouch in vivo. Both agonists were able to activate the arterioles when applied topically to the outside of the arterioles (extraluminal application). The agonists were also injected as a brief bolus into the aortic arch at doses chosen to elicit similar peak pressor responses. At all levels of pressor response, the arteriolar responses to phenylephrine were smaller than those to SKF 89748A. In the cremasteric vasculature SKF 89748A was similarly found to be more effective in activating the arterioles after intravascular administration than was phenylephrine. We conclude that an intramural diffusion barrier exists in the arteriolar wall in vivo and that it can influence vascular reactivity. PMID:1974741

  2. Spontaneous Expulsion of Intramural Fibroid Six Weeks after Emergency Caesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Balvinder; Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Ghaleb, G.; Brown, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present a thirty-six-year-old woman with a high risk pregnancy, complicated by multiple congenital anomalies, severe hyperemesis, a pulmonary embolus, and a large intramural fibroid. This fibroid grew in size during the pregnancy. At 34 + 5 weeks, there were reduced fetal movements and a pathological CTG. A live infant was delivered by an emergency cesarean section. Five weeks postpartum, she presented with abdominal pain, offensive vaginal discharge, and fevers. She was given antibiotics and ferrous sulphate. An abdominal ultrasound showed an 11 × 12 × 9 cm fibroid with a coarse degenerative appearance. Clinically, she showed signs of sepsis; a CT scan and laparotomy performed under general anesthetic did not find any collections as a source of sepsis. When stable, she was discharged. She re-presented two days later with a large mass (necrotic fibroid) in her vagina. This is the first case of spontaneous expulsion of fibroid six weeks after caesarean section. Presentation of pain and fever after the delivery may be due to red degeneration of the fibroid, caused by diminished blood supply, ischaemia, and necrosis. This case highlights the importance of considering fibroids as a cause for abdominal pain during and after pregnancy, even up to 6 weeks after delivery. PMID:26380133

  3. [Caustic esophagitis: surgical management].

    PubMed

    Huamán, M; Santibáñez, G; Ayala, L; Jáuregui, F; Madalengoitia, G

    1990-01-01

    The authors present 28 report cases of severe caustic esophagitis who underwent surgery at the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins I.P.S.S., from 1987 to February 1991. All were treated by esophagocoloplasty and when the proximal cervical esophagus was injured, by pharingocoloplasty. Eighteen patients (64.28%) were female and 10 (35.72%) male. Whose ages ranged between 15 and 75 years with an average of 34 years. Ten patients (36%) suffered pharingocoloplasty and in the remaining 18 (64%) a esophagocoloplasty (esophagogastric colonic interposition) was made. Postoperative morbidity corresponded in 5 cases (18%) to respiratory Infections, in 3 cases (11%) pneumothorax, in 2 cases (7%) pleural effusions and only one case presented a small cervical leak. All of them were satisfactory solved by conservatory medical treatment. Only two cases (7%) with late postoperative stenosis required reintervention and a simple cervical plasty was made. There were no complications as mediastinitis, necrosis of the colon graft hemorrhage. Operatory mortality was 0% and the long term follow up of all patients is satisfactory, having our first report cases more than 4 years of postoperative follow up.

  4. Hyperthermochemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer (review).

    PubMed

    Maehara, Y; Kuwano, H; Kitamura, K; Matsuda, H; Sugimachi, K

    1992-01-01

    Hyperthermia is effective for the treatment of cancer when applied concomitantly with chemotherapy and irradiation. However, it is difficult to heat deep portions of the body including the esophagus. Cancer of the esophagus still poses considerable treatment problems, with a poor 5-year survival rate after surgery, an even worse outlook after radiation and surgery, and a not very satisfactory response to chemotherapy. We, therefore, devised an electrode for radio frequency, and we have been successfully using this electrode in the treatment of esophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rates of patients with esophageal cancer, given either preoperative hyperthermochemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, were 43.2 and 14.7%, respectively. Immediate improvement of subjective complaints and decrease or elimination of the cancer lesion are so distinct that this treatment, by means of an endotract antenna, shows promise as a modality for esophageal lesions.

  5. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  6. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI.

  7. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  8. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  9. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions.

  10. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  11. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:27631225

  12. Dietary treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-06-01

    Emerging evidence supports impaired epithelial barrier function as the key initial event in the development of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and other allergic diseases. Symptom resolution, histologic remission, and prevention of both disease and treatment-related complications are the goals of treatment. Successful dietary treatments include elemental, empirical elimination and allergy test directed diets. Dietary therapy with exclusive elemental diet offers the best response. Cow's milk, wheat, egg, soy, peanut/tree nut, and fish/shellfish are the 6 food antigens most likely to induce esophageal inflammation.

  13. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions.

  14. Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Altinel, Faruk; Altin, Cihan; Gezmis, Esin; Altinors, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH. PMID:26396617

  15. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions. PMID:27695560

  16. Primary Renal Lymphoma Mimicking a Subcapsular Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  17. Primary renal lymphoma mimicking a subcapsular hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D

    2013-08-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  18. Seventeen cases with subungual hematoma treated by CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Deming

    1996-09-01

    In order to find a therapy which doesn't have any influence upon the patients working and living and also makes no pain to the patients, CO2 laser is used to treat the 17 patients with subungual hematoma (SM). Satisfactory curative effect is obtained. Through the clinical observation on the treatment of the 17 cases with SM, the effective rate reached 98 percent. CO2 laser is sure to provide safe, simple operation and short curative course with no pain to the patients, it has a certain practical value for clinical application.

  19. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  20. Epidural hematoma secondary to sinusitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Olshinka, Noam; Cherniavsky, Evgenia; Forer, Boaz; Bibi, Haim

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma is a potentially life threatening event that demands prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment, usually following head trauma. We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with no history of head trauma, and who was diagnosed with epidural hematoma secondary to frontal sinusitis; and the medical literature was reviewed. PMID:24370469

  1. CT Fluoroscopy-guided Aspiration of Intracerebral Hematomas: Technique and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kihwan; Kwon, O-Ki; Bang, Jae Seung; Oh, Chang Wan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The authors evaluated the feasibility and targeting accuracy of CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided catheter placement and aspiration of intracerebral hematoma (ICH)s. Materials and Methods Nine patients (mean age, 63.3 ± 15.3 years) were treated by CTF-guided hematoma aspiration under local anesthesia. The targeting errors in the lesion center, volume of the aspirated hematoma, accuracy of the final catheter position, procedure time, and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results All catheters were successfully placed in the center of the hematoma. The mean volume of the aspirated hematoma was 20.6 ± 8.8 mL (pre-treatment, 44.7 ± 20.1 mL; post-treatment, 24.1 ± 13.8 mL). The average procedure time was 25.1 minutes (range, 18-32 minutes). In one case with a scanty residual hematoma, the catheter was removed at the end of the procedure. In the remaining eight cases, the catheter was left in the residual hematoma for drainage and all catheter tips were accurately located in the final position. There were no procedure-related complications, including rebleeding and infection. Conclusion CTF-guided ICH aspiration is a feasible, quick, and accurate procedure which could substitute for stereotactic methods. The accurate catheter position provided by real-time observation enables an effective aspiration and drainage of hematomas. PMID:25874179

  2. Spontaneous sublingual space hematoma secondary to hypertension: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Shouvanik; Guha, Rajdeep; Satpathy, Anupama; Guha, Paromita

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual hematoma is a rare complication of oral anticoagulant use. Spontaneous sublingual hematoma secondary to hypertension is even rarer and their management remains enigmatic. We present such a case that we successfully managed conservatively along with a review of relevant literatures. PMID:26668463

  3. Noninvasive, optoacoustic detection and characterization of intra- and extracranial hematomas and cerebral hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of intracranial hematomas is necessary to improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT and MRI can diagnose intracranial hematomas, but cannot be used until the patient arrives at a major healthcare facility, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Near infrared spectroscopy may suggest the presence of unilateral intracranial hematomas, but provides minimal information on hematoma type and location due to limitations associated with strong light scattering. We have used optoacoustics (which combines high endogenous optical contrast with the resolution of ultrasound) to diagnose hematomas and monitor cerebral oxygenation. We performed animal and clinical studies on detection and characterization of hematomas and on monitoring cerebral hypoxia by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Recently, we built a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPO-based optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range. We developed new patient interfaces for noninvasive, transcranial measurements in the transmission mode in the presence of dense hair and used it in patients with TBI. The optoacoustic system was capable of detecting and characterizing intra- and extracranial hematomas. SSS blood oxygenation was measured as well with the new interface. The obtained results indicate that the optoacoustic system in the transmission mode provides detection and characterization of hematomas in TBI patients, as well as cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring. The transmission mode approach can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  4. Thoracoscopic radical esophagectomy and laparoscopic transhiatal lymph node dissection for superficial esophageal cancer associated with lymph node metastases in the dorsal area of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Itasu; Okamoto, Koichi; Tsukada, Tomoya; Saito, Hiroto; Fushida, Sachio; Ikeda, Hiroko; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal cancer invading the muscularis mucosa sometimes involves regional lymph node metastases. However, lymph node metastases are rare in the dorsal area of the thoracic aorta. We describe a patient with an intramucosal esophageal cancer invading the muscularis mucosa, accompanied by lymph node metastases in the dorsal area of the thoracic aorta. These lesions were successfully resected by hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery using a transhiatal approach. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed with superficial esophageal cancer during a routine health examination. Endoscopic examination and ultrasonography revealed a superficial cancer, of diameter 6.0 cm, invading the submucosal layer and intramural metastases caudal to the primary tumor. Enhanced computed tomography and F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography demonstrated the two metastatic lymph nodes, one in the dorsal area of the thoracic aorta and the other near the left gastric artery. Thoracoscopic radical esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection was performed. The metastatic lymph node in the dorsal area of the thoracic aorta was successfully removed by hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery using a transhiatal approach. Histopathological examination showed primary cancer invading the muscularis mucosa and intramural metastases in the lamina propria mucosa and submucosal layer. The pathological diagnosis according to the Japanese classification of esophageal cancer was MtLt, 47 mm, 0-IIa + IIb, pT1a-MM, ie(+), INF-b, ly3, v0, pN4(4a), pIM1, M0, and pstage IVa. The patient underwent two courses of adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of CDDP and 5-fluorouracil. At present, 1 year and 8 months after surgery, the patient remains alive without tumor recurrence. Although the lymph node in the dorsal area of the thoracic aorta is not recognized as regional nodes of thoracic esophageal cancer, solitary mediastinal metastases from a mucosal cancer may indicate the existence of direct lymphatic flow

  5. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  6. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  7. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated.

  8. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. The annular hematoma of the shrew yolk-sac placenta.

    PubMed

    King, B F; Enders, A C; Wimsatt, W A

    1978-05-01

    The annular hematoma of the shrew, Blarina brevicauda, is a specialized portion of the yolk-sac wall. In this study, we have examined the fine structure of the different cellular components of the anular hematoma. Small pieces of the gestation sacs from seven pregnant shrews were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and processed for transmission electron microscopy. In the area of the trophoblastic curtain, the maternal capillary endothelial cells were hypertrophied and syncytial trophoblast surrounded the capillaries. Cellular trophoblast covered part of the luminal surface of the curtain region, whereas masses of apparently degenerating syncytium were present on other areas of the surface. Maternal erythrocytes, released into the uterine lumen from the curtain region, were phagocytized and degraded by the columnar cells of the trophoblastic annulus. No evidence of iron or pigment accumulation was evident in the parietal endodermal cells underlying the annular trophoblast. Parietal endodermal cells were characterized by cuboidal shape, widely dilated intercellular spaces, and cytoplasm containing granular endoplasmic reticulum. Endodermal cells of the visceral yolk-sac accumulated large numbers of electron-dense granules as well as glycogen in their cytoplasm. Hemopoietic areas and vitelline capillaries were found subjacent to the visceral endoderm. The various portions of the yolk-sac wall of Blarina appear to perform complementary functions which are probably important in maternal-fetal iron transfer. PMID:677046

  10. Esophageal wall blood perfusion during contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Kim, Young Sun

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that esophageal contraction reduces esophageal wall perfusion in an animal study. Our aim was to determine esophageal wall blood perfusion (EWBP) during esophageal contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in humans. We studied 12 healthy volunteers. A custom-designed laser Doppler probe was anchored to the esophageal wall, 4–6 cm above the LES, by use of the Bravo pH system so that the laser light beam stay directed toward the esophageal mucosa. A high-resolution manometry equipped with impedance electrodes recorded esophageal pressures and reflux events. Synchronized pressure, impedance, pH, and EWBP recordings were obtained during dry and wet swallows and following a meal. Stable recordings of laser Doppler EWBP were only recorded when the laser Doppler probe was firmly anchored to the esophageal wall. Esophageal contractions induced by dry and wet swallows resulted in 46 ± 9% and 60 ± 10% reduction in the EWBP, respectively (compared to baseline). Reduction in EWBP was directly related to the amplitude (curvilinear fit) and duration of esophageal contraction. Atropine reduced the esophageal contraction amplitude and decreased the EWBP reduction associated with esophageal contraction. TLESRs were also associated with reduction in the EWBP, albeit of smaller amplitude (29 ± 3%) but longer duration (19 ± 2 s) compared with swallow-induced esophageal contractions. We report 1) an innovative technique to record EWBP for extended time periods in humans and 2) contraction of circular and longitudinal muscle during peristalsis and selective longitudinal muscle contraction during TLESR causes reduction in the EWBP; 3) using our innovative technique, future studies may determine whether esophageal wall ischemia is the cause of esophageal pain/heartburn. PMID:22790599

  11. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction. PMID:24281163

  12. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective. PMID:26981295

  13. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett's esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett's esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett's esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett's esophagus.

  14. The National Institutes of Health/National Institutes of Nursing Research intramural research program and the development of the National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model.

    PubMed

    Cashion, Ann K; Grady, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) intramural research program conducts basic and biobehavioral symptom science research and provides training opportunities to the next generation of scientists. Recently, the NINR developed the Symptom Science Model to guide research. The model begins by identifying a complex symptom, which is then characterized into a phenotype with biological and clinical data, followed by the application of genomic and other discovery methodologies to illuminate targets for therapeutic and clinical interventions. Using the Symptom Science Model, the intramural program organizes and implements biobehavioral, symptom management, and tissue injury research. The model is also used as a framework for training and career development opportunities including on-campus trainings and research fellowship. The scientific goal of the intramural program is to enhance patient outcomes including health-related quality of life. Achieving this goal requires a long-term vision, continued resource investments, and a commitment to mentoring our next generation of scientists.

  15. Mis-sizing of stent promotes intimal hyperplasia: impact of endothelial shear and intramural stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Henry Y.; Sinha, Anjan K.; Choy, Jenny S.; Zheng, Hai; Sturek, Michael; Bigelow, Brian; Bhatt, Deepak L.

    2011-01-01

    Stent can cause flow disturbances on the endothelium and compliance mismatch and increased stress on the vessel wall. These effects can cause low wall shear stress (WSS), high wall shear stress gradient (WSSG), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and circumferential wall stress (CWS), which may promote neointimal hyperplasia (IH). The hypothesis is that stent-induced abnormal fluid and solid mechanics contribute to IH. To vary the range of WSS, WSSG, OSI, and CWS, we intentionally mismatched the size of stents to that of the vessel lumen. Stents were implanted in coronary arteries of 10 swine. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to size the coronary arteries and stents. After 4 wk of stent implantation, IVUS was performed again to determine the extent of IH. In conjunction, computational models of actual stents, the artery, and non-Newtonian blood were created in a computer simulation to yield the distribution of WSS, WSSG, OSI, and CWS in the stented vessel wall. An inverse relation (R2 = 0.59, P < 0.005) between WSS and IH was found based on a linear regression analysis. Linear relations between WSSG, OSI, and IH were observed (R2 = 0.48 and 0.50, respectively, P < 0.005). A linear relation (R2 = 0.58, P < 0.005) between CWS and IH was also found. More statistically significant linear relations between the ratio of CWS to WSS (CWS/WSS), the products CWS × WSSG and CWS × OSI, and IH were observed (R2 = 0.67, 0.54, and 0.56, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that both fluid and solid mechanics influence the extent of IH. Stents create endothelial flow disturbances and intramural wall stress concentrations, which correlate with the extent of IH formation, and these effects were exaggerated with mismatch of stent/vessel size. These findings reveal the importance of reliable vessel and stent sizing to improve the mechanics on the vessel wall and minimize IH. PMID:21926337

  16. Different perceived foreign accents in one patient after prerolandic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Christoph, D H; de Freitas, G R; Dos Santos, D P; Lima, M A S D; Araújo, A Q C; Carota, A

    2004-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS), a rare disorder characterized by the emergence of a new accent perceived as foreign by listeners, is usually reported with left brain damage. We here report the case of a 28-year-old native Brazilian who appeared, to the examiner, to show a North American accent during recovery from Broca's aphasia. The lesion was due to a frontal hematoma. Without referring specifically to speech, we asked 10 independent observers to comment on a videotape of the patient's interview. Seven reported that the patient had a foreign accent, while 3 simply noted a 'strange' accent. The observers did not agree on the origin of the accent, 5 identifying it as Spanish, 1 as German, and 1 as south Brazilian. These findings suggest that FAS is not due to the acquisition of a specific foreign accent, but to impairment of the suprasegmental linguistic abilities (tone, accent, pauses, rhythm, and vocal stress) that make it possible to distinguish native language.

  17. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  18. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  19. Obturator Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Hematoma After Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun H.; Abbott, Daniel; Gewirtz, Eric; Hauck, Ellen; Eun, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obturator nerve injury is a known injury after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and patients often present with motor and sensory deficits in the immediate postoperative period. We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with motor deficits, indicative of obturator neurapraxia after RALP upon waking from anesthesia. Work-up revealed an expansile hematoma possibly compressing the obturator nerve. After evacuation of the hematoma, the patient had immediate improvement of his neurologic deficits. Our patient's clinical vignette illustrates the importance of considering postsurgical hematoma in the differential diagnosis when patients present with signs and symptoms of obturator neurapraxia after RALP. PMID:27579444

  20. Successful Nonoperative Management of Spontaneous Splenic Hematoma and Hemoperitoneum due to CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lianos, Georgios; Ignatiadou, Eleftheria; Bali, Christina; Harissis, Haralampos; Katsios, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous splenic hematoma or splenic rupture due to CMV infection in immunocompetent adults is rare and life-threatening. Case Report. Herein we report a rare case of spontaneous splenic hematoma and hemoperitoneum due to CMV infection in a 23-year-old Caucasian male in whom conservative management was successful. Conclusion. Spontaneous splenic hematoma and spontaneous splenic rupture are extremely rare conditions during primary CMV infection. Though rare, they must be always considered by the operating surgeon, because any misinterpretation may result in unfavorable outcomes. PMID:23227374

  1. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation-induced perinephric hematoma with acute renal failure in a solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lee C; Chan, Sarah W; Macejko, Amanda M; Lin, William W

    2008-07-01

    Iatrogenic occurrences (including radiologically guided renal biopsy, shockwave lithotripsy, and minimally invasive ablative procedures) of subcapsular hematoma that lead to acute renal failure are rare but serious. The advancement of minimally invasive procedures has led to an increase in this complication, especially in patients with a solitary kidney. Fortunately, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma in these patients allows decompression of the renal parenchyma and recovery of renal function. We report a case of acute renal failure in a patient with a solitary kidney that resulted from a subcapsular hematoma as a complication of radiofrequency ablation.

  2. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; de Asis Lorente, Francisco; Rivero, David; Eiras, José; Ara, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia) and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration. PMID:19838395

  3. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  4. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  5. Obturator Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Pelvic Hematoma After Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun H; Kaplan, Joshua R; Abbott, Daniel; Gewirtz, Eric; Hauck, Ellen; Eun, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Obturator nerve injury is a known injury after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and patients often present with motor and sensory deficits in the immediate postoperative period. We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with motor deficits, indicative of obturator neurapraxia after RALP upon waking from anesthesia. Work-up revealed an expansile hematoma possibly compressing the obturator nerve. After evacuation of the hematoma, the patient had immediate improvement of his neurologic deficits. Our patient's clinical vignette illustrates the importance of considering postsurgical hematoma in the differential diagnosis when patients present with signs and symptoms of obturator neurapraxia after RALP. PMID:27579444

  6. Treatment of thoracic hemorrhage due to rupture of traumatic mediastinal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Fang; Cao, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Patients in traffic accidents are usually presented with pain and bleeding due to fractures or soft tissue injury. On some occasions, more severe complications may be triggered by the trauma. A review of the published English language literature reveals no survival case once the traumatic mediastinal hematoma is ruptured. In our case, a 54-year-old man suffering motorcycle accident was admitted to emergency department. Computed tomography scan revealed subdural hematoma combined with posterior mediastinal hematoma. The patient was saved and discharged with a satisfactory outcome. Here we hope to share our treatment experience in dealing with the patient with severe multiple trauma. PMID:27033275

  7. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality. PMID:23892829

  8. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  9. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-07-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or "black esophagus" is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  10. ["Esophageal" angina and angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, M; Labriola, E; Sarti, P; Brunelli, F; Mazza, M; Barbara, L

    1991-04-15

    In the last few years the non cardiac angina-like chest pain has encompassed more and more agitation not only in many patients but also in cardiologists, gastroenterologists and psychologists, as it involves socio-economic, pathophysiologic and therapeutic problems. The socio-economic aspect is well explained by the fact that in the USA at least 200,000 patients a year suffering from non cardiac angina-like chest pain, even when coronary arteriography has demonstrated normal coronary vessels, nevertheless continue to require cardiologic examinations and, if no one has clearly demonstrated the origin of their pain, they continue to live as invalids in constant fear of myocardial infarction. The discovery that the esophagus may be one of the causes of chest pain in these patients presenting with a previous diagnosis of "atypical" angina pectoris, unfortunately cannot resolve definitively the problem. An association of esophageal angina in patients with angina pectoris treated for long periods of time with Ca-antagonists and nitroderivatives has been described. In addition, the provocative or spontaneous tests to demonstrate the esophageal origin of chest pain give only a "likely" and not a "definite" diagnosis of esophageal angina. This also means to no "gold standard" text exist. Lastly, the "likely" diagnosis of esophageal angina is made in only about 50% of patients leaving the problem of the remaining 50% unanswered. These uncertainties induce some psychologists to assert that the cause of non cardiac angina-like chest pain is in the head ("panic disorder") and not in the esophagus, where the observed motor disorders should be an epiphenomenon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2067672

  11. An NIH intramural percubator as a model of academic-industry partnerships: from the beginning of life through the valley of death.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 the NIH publicly announced five strategic goals for the institutes that included the critical need to translate research discoveries into public benefit at an accelerated pace, with a commitment to find novel ways to engage academic investigators in the process. The emphasis on moving scientific advancements from the laboratory to the clinic is an opportune time to discuss how the NIH intramural program in Bethesda, the largest biomedical research center in the world, can participate in this endeavor. Proposed here for consideration is a percolator-incubator program, a 'percubator' designed to enable NIH intramural investigators to develop new medical interventions as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  12. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    PubMed

    Fillon, Sophie A; Harris, J Kirk; Wagner, Brandie D; Kelly, Caleb J; Stevens, Mark J; Moore, Wendy; Fang, Rui; Schroeder, Shauna; Masterson, Joanne C; Robertson, Charles E; Pace, Norman R; Ackerman, Steven J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST). We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15) and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome. PMID:22957025

  13. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  14. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  15. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  16. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  17. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  18. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  19. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  20. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  1. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  2. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  3. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  4. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  5. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  6. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology.

  7. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator....

  8. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology. PMID:27325223

  9. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  10. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Jing; Yu, Hong-Quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27630696

  11. Case report: chronic sub-dural hematoma following high-speed ejection.

    PubMed

    Warburton, R

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports a case of chronic sub-dural hematoma occurring in a pilot after a high-speed ejection that was within the survival envelope of the Mark 10 Martin Baker ejection seat. The events leading up to the ejection, his subsequent hospitalization for treatment of immediate injuries and late development of neurological signs, 6 weeks after the ejection, are presented. (A thorough search of literature has failed to reveal any previously published account of chronic sub-dural hematoma as a post-ejection complication.) His surgical treatment, recovery, and final assessment are discussed together with the possible causes of his sub-dural hematoma. Flight surgeons should take careful note of the events in this case. Sub-dural hematoma is frequently difficult to diagnose but it should not be discounted as a potential late complication from an ejection which is within the parameters of survivability and which yields, initially, only signs of relatively minor injury. PMID:8338501

  12. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27630696

  13. Bilateral Traumatic Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage Associated With Epidural Hematoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; M. Rubiano, Andres; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic basal ganglia hematoma is a rare condition defined as presence of hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia or adjacent structures suchas internal capsule, putamen and thalamus. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma are among the devastating and rare condition. We herein report a 28-year old man, a victim of car-car accident who was brought to our surgical emergency room by immediate loss of consciousness and was diagnosed to have hyperdense lesion in the basal ganglia bilaterally, with the presence of right parietal epidural hematoma. Craniotomy and epidural hematoma drainage were considered, associated to conservative management of gangliobasal traumatic contusions. On day 7 the patient had sudden neurologic deterioration, cardiac arrest unresponsive to resuscitation. Management of these lesions is similar to any other injury in moderate to severe traumatic injury. The use of intracranial pressure monitoring must be guaranteed. PMID:27162882

  14. Nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma in a scuba diver: CT and MR findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C; Kucharczyk, W

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma occurring in a young adult scuba diver. The clinical presentation, imaging findings (CT and magnetic resonance), and pathogenesis are discussed.

  15. [Endoscopic surgery for benign esophageal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Soji

    2006-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal achalasia are common benign esophageal diseases. Today minimally invasive surgery is recommended to treat these diseases. Surgical indications for GERD are failure of medical management, medical complications attributable to a large hiatal hernia, 'atypical' symptoms (asthma, hoarseness, cough, chest pain, aspiration), etc. according to the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) guidelines. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has emerged as the most widely accepted procedure for GERD patients with normal esophageal motility. Partial fundoplication (e.g., Toupet fundoplication) is also considered to decrease the possibility of postoperative dysphagia. Although pneumatic dilatation has been the first line treatment for esophageal achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy and partial fundoplication (e.g., Dor fundoplication) to prevent reflux is preferred by most gastroenterologists and surgeons as the primary treatment modality. Laparoscopic surgery for GERD and esophageal achalasia are effective in most patients and safe in all patients. Finally, laparoscopic surgery should be performed only by skilled surgeons.

  16. Unusual Presentation of a Metastatic Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Orlicka, Katarzyna; Maynard, Stéphanie; Bouin, Mickael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms. PMID:22679417

  17. Expanding Hematoma's Life-Threatening Neck and Face Emergency Management of Ballistic Injuries.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to bring attention to the morbidity and fatality of hemorrhage, how expanding hematoma and air compromise neck/face N/F injuries and present challenges. Large neck vessel ballistic injuries may lead to hemorrhage and expanding hematoma, resulting in airway compromise, due to injuries to the internal and/or external carotid arteries, internal jugular veins "internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, internal jugular vein," and the external carotid artery deep branches. This also leads to injuries to the cervical fascial layers (barriers of deep spaces) that facilitate pooling blood and hematoma into compartmental and large potential space which effects the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, and trachea.The expanding hematomas distort neck anatomical landmarks so "no neck zones" classifications are applicable. As the spectrum of injuries continues to evolve, the clinical characterization needs a new categorization based on compartmental hematoma and potential space anatomical location like retropharyngeal, parapharyngeal, sublingual, submandibular spaces, retrobulbar, and cheek compartment space hematomas.Presence of symptoms and location of the hematoma generally dictate what type of procedure is needed and how urgently it needs to be appropriately performed.Two unusual patients of pseudoaneurysms facial artery injuries with extravasation of blood producing a pulsating hematoma are referred to. Another patient considers large internal carotid artery injuries pseudoaneurysms revealed in angiography.The immediate management of life-saving patients requires aggressive airway maintenance at the scene, conscious victim will often obtain a posture that clears his airway and the semiconscious or unconscious put him in prone position. Air compromise may need emergency intubation, large bore cannula cricothyroidotomy, cricothyrotomy and at medical facilities tracheostomy. PMID:27315316

  18. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome.

  19. Adrenal Hematoma and Right Hemothorax after Echis Carinatus Bite: An Unusual Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Singh, Jagdish; Gandhi, Ronak; Bhansali, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Common bleeding manifestations after viperine bite include bleeding from site of bite, bleeding gums, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, hematemesis, and intracranial bleed. Bleeding in the adrenal gland is a rare manifestation. We report here a patient of viperine bite who developed right adrenal hematoma and right hemothorax after 3 days of bite. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of adrenal hematoma and right hemothorax after Echis carinatus bite. PMID:25948976

  20. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-karim, Abdul-rahman R.; Main, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  1. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Karim, Abdul-Rahman R; Vo, Minh; Main, Michael L; Grantham, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a favorable outcome. PMID:27668097

  2. [Clinical features and pathophysiology of acute esophageal mucosal lesion].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yutaro; Hizawa, Kazuoki; Fujita, Kouhei; Matsuno, Yuichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Esaki, Motohiro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Acute esophageal mucosal lesions (AEMLs) are categorized into black esophagitis (type B) and non-black esophagitis (type NB) on endoscopy. To clarify the distinct pathophysiology, we compared the clinical features and hematological findings at onset among 17 patients with type B esophagitis and 6 patients with type NB esophagitis. In type B esophagitis, time to endoscopy after onset was significantly shorter, and blood levels of lactate, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and glucose were higher than in type NB esophagitis. However, there were no significant intergroup differences in the incidences of other predisposing factors, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or esophageal hernias. These findings suggest that AEMLs are caused by acid reflux and peripheral vascular insufficiency, the latter being more associated with type B esophagitis by its etiology. In addition, blood lactate may indicate the severity of AEML, leading to black esophagitis. PMID:27052393

  3. Vaccum drainage system application in the management of operation-related non-regional epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidural intracranial hematoma is one of the most common complications of surgeries for intracranial tumors. The non-regional epidural hematoma is related to severe fluctuation of the intracranial pressure during the operation. The traditional management of hematoma evacuation through craniotomy is time-consuming and may aggravate intracranial pressure imbalance, which causes further complications. We designed a method using vaccum epidural drainage system, and tried to evaluate advantage and the disadvantage of this new technique. Methods Seven patients of intracranial tumors were selected. All of the patients received tumor resection and intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma was confirmed through intra-operative ultrasound or CT scan. The vaccum drainage system was applied. Another ten patients who received craniotomy for intra-operative non-regional epidural hematoma evacuation were selected as comparison. Regular tests, like serial CT scan, were performed afterward to evaluate the effectiveness and to help deciding when to remove the drainage system. Results The vaccum drainage method was effective in epidual hemotoma clearance and prevented recurrent epidural hemorrhage. The drainage systems were removed within 4 days. All of the patients recovered well. No complications related to the drainage system were observed. Conclusions Compared to the traditional craniotomy, the new method of epidural hemoatoma management using vaccum epidural drainage system proved to be as effective in hematoma clearance, and was less-invasive and easier to perform, with less complication, shorter hospitalization, less economic burden, and better prognosis. PMID:23842198

  4. Non-traumatic Bilateral Orbital Subperiosteal Hematoma in a Person Who Attempted Suicide by Hanging.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keiji; Morita, Seiji; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mariko; Taira, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-09-01

    Orbital subperiosteal hematomas are rare and most often result from facial trauma; however, occurrence of these hematomas due to non-traumatic causes is extremely rare. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department because he became comatose after attempting suicide by hanging. He underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck. CT findings revealed a bilateral orbital subperiosteal hematoma. We then performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head for definite diagnosis of hematoma. There is no consensus regarding if this condition should be treated conservatively or surgically. Conservative management was selected for this patient because he was in deep coma. Some non-traumatic causes of orbital subperiosteal hematoma include weight lifting, coughing, vomiting, Valsalva maneuver, labor, and scuba diving. Sudden elevations in cranial pressure may be the mechanism underlying this condition. Although suicide attempt by hanging could have caused a sudden elevation in cranial pressure, this is the first report of the occurrence of this condition. Patients with orbital subperiosteal hematomas generally complain of blurred vision, eye pain, or exophthalmos. However, identifying this sign may be difficult in patients with disturbed consciousness. PMID:25248423

  5. Non-traumatic Bilateral Orbital Subperiosteal Hematoma in a Person Who Attempted Suicide by Hanging.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Keiji; Morita, Seiji; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Mariko; Taira, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-09-01

    Orbital subperiosteal hematomas are rare and most often result from facial trauma; however, occurrence of these hematomas due to non-traumatic causes is extremely rare. Herein, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department because he became comatose after attempting suicide by hanging. He underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck. CT findings revealed a bilateral orbital subperiosteal hematoma. We then performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head for definite diagnosis of hematoma. There is no consensus regarding if this condition should be treated conservatively or surgically. Conservative management was selected for this patient because he was in deep coma. Some non-traumatic causes of orbital subperiosteal hematoma include weight lifting, coughing, vomiting, Valsalva maneuver, labor, and scuba diving. Sudden elevations in cranial pressure may be the mechanism underlying this condition. Although suicide attempt by hanging could have caused a sudden elevation in cranial pressure, this is the first report of the occurrence of this condition. Patients with orbital subperiosteal hematomas generally complain of blurred vision, eye pain, or exophthalmos. However, identifying this sign may be difficult in patients with disturbed consciousness.

  6. Giant mid-esophageal diverticulum. Conservative treatment of postoperative leakage.

    PubMed

    Dallatomasina, S; Casaccia, M; Chessa, M; Serrano, J; Nardi, I; Troilo, B; Miggino, M; Valente, U

    2009-01-01

    Mid-esophageal diverticula are rare entities. Only symptomatic patients usually receive surgical treatment. Esophageal leakage is one of the most common complications after these procedures. Though in literature, operative management is the preferred treatment for esophageal fistula, conservative approach is described in case of small leaks. We report a case of an operated giant mid-esophageal diverticulum complicated with an esophageal fistula. The patient underwent a surgical treatment and recovered completely.

  7. Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violette, Ronald W.

    This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

  8. VIP and PHI coexist with an NPY-like peptide in intramural neurones of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, E; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1984-12-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are neuropeptides present in all layers of the small intestine. NPY-immunoreactive fibres in the gut seem to derive from two sources. One population is of extramural (sympathetic) origin and contains noradrenaline, another is of intramural origin and does not contain noradrenaline. In the present study of mouse, rat and pig, immunocytochemistry showed immunoreactive PHI to coexist completely with immunoreactive VIP. This was predictable, since VIP and PHI derive from the same precursor. In addition, however, VIP and PHI were found to coexist with immunoreactive NPY in non-adrenergic (but not in adrenergic) nerve fibres and nerve cell bodies. This coexistence was unexpected, since the VIP precursor does not contain NPY-like sequences.

  9. [Possibilities of radiologic methods (ultrasonography, computed tomography) in the preoperative evaluation of intramural invasion of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, A N; Meshkov, V M; Gracheva, N I; Zaritskaia, V A

    2001-01-01

    By analyzing the findings in 72 patients with gastric cancer, the authors show the potentialities of noninvasive techniques of radiation diagnosis (transabdominal ultrasonography (USG) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative evaluation of the T-stage of gastric cancer. Ultrasound and computed tomographic semiotics of intramural invasion of gastric carcinoma is made. Ultrasonography was found to have the highest specificity in detecting early-stage gastric cancers prior to computed tomography. In the authors' opinion, a complex use of the data obtained by these techniques reveals the degree of invasion of gastric carcinoma and its extent with high precision. Transabdominal USG and CT should rank with the initial methods used for diagnosing gastric cancer. Transabdominal USG should be most expediently used as an initial technique of the above studies, by taking into account its wide accessibility, easiness-to-use, and lack of radiation load.

  10. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed 'placental infarction hematoma' is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such a lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This paper describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma.

  12. Role of advanced diagnostics for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), diagnostic tests aid in the identification of pathophysiologic consequences and accurate detection of the disease. The EoE Endoscopic Reference Score (EREFS) classifies and grades the severity of the five major endoscopically identified esophageal features of EoE (edema, rings, exudates, furrows and strictures). The EREFS may be useful in the evaluation of disease severity and as an objective outcome of response to therapy. pH monitoring identifies the presence of abnormal degrees of acid exposure in the esophagus that characterizes gastroesophageal reflux disease. The presence of acid reflux, however, does not indicate that the reflux is responsible for esophageal eosinophilia. Esophageal manometry has not demonstrated a characteristic abnormality with sufficient sensitivity to make the test of diagnostic value in clinical practice. On the other hand, manometric characteristics of esophageal pressurization and longitudinal muscle dysfunction may help identify important pathophysiologic consequences of EoE. Esophageal impedance testing has demonstrated increased baseline mucosal impedance that correlates with increased epithelial permeability in EoE. Reduced mucosal integrity may provide intraluminal allergens access to antigen-presenting cells, serving as an early event in the pathogenesis of EoE. The functional luminal impedance probe (FLIP) provides quantitative assessment of esophageal mural compliance, a physiologic correlate of remodeling in EoE. Studies using FLIP have associated reductions in esophageal distensibility in EoE with the important outcome of food impaction risk. Finally, confocal endomicroscopy, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and novel eosinophil-enhancing contrast agents are emerging methods that may allow for in vivo visualization of esophageal eosinophilic inflammation, thereby improving the detection and understanding of this emerging disease. PMID:24603385

  13. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  14. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Amy; Cha, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers. However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors, and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers. PMID:16718845

  15. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP. PMID:27144142

  16. [Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, S; Ando, N; Ohgami, M; Kitagawa, Y; Kitajima, M

    2000-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia was first reported by Shimi et al. in 1991. Subsequently the procedure has been performed all over the world and laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication (Heller and Dor operation) is now thought to be the operation of first choice. It is indicated for patients who are resistant to medical therapy (calcium blocker etc.) or have pneumatic dilatation and those with frequent aspiration at night. As Csendes et al. reported that surgical treatment was better than pneumatic dilatation and as laparoscopic surgery is less invasive, the indications for the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation can include all achalasia patients except those who respond to medical therapy, do not accept surgery, or cannot tolerate surgery. We successfully performed the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation on 22 patients, all of whom had an uneventful postoperative course. Manometric evaluation, endoscopic examination, and 24-hour pH monitoring showed good results. There are six important technical points: 1) flexible laparoscopy; 2) pneumoperitoneum; 3) gauze in the abdominal cavity to absorb blood; 4) laparosonic coagulating shears; 5) extracorporeal knot-tying technique; and 6) intracorporeal knot-tying technique. If an experienced surgeon is in charge, the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation is an ideal, minimally invasive treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  17. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  18. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with an arachnoid cyst in a juvenile taekwondo athlete: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic subdural hematoma and arachnoid cysts are common lesions in neurosurgical practice. Arachnoid cysts are a well-known predisposing factor for chronic subdural hematoma. Here, we present a 12-year-old taekwondo athlete with chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts. The chronic subdural hematoma was evacuated through 2 burr holes and the patient was discharged in good condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of chronic subdural hematoma with associated arachnoid cysts in a taekwondo athlete. We also review the literature on sports-related chronic subdural hematomas associated with arachnoid cysts in children. PMID:22832284

  19. Palliative Treatment of Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad; Goosenberg; Frucht; Coia

    1994-07-01

    Palliative interventions for advanced esophageal cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, chemoradiation, endoscopic procedures, and combinations of the above. Palliative esophagectomy or bypass procedures are difficult to justify in these patients because their life expectancy is so short. Palliative external beam radiation to doses of 50 to 60 Gy is successful in 50% to 70% of patients. The addition of brachytherapy may improve these results. One third to one half of patients treated with radiation develop benign or maglinant stricture. Although response rates to combination chemotherapy are only 50% at best, the majority of patients do have improvement of dysphagia. These regimens are commonly used as part of a multidisciplinary approach with radiation andøor surgery, rather than as a sole modality of treatment. Chemoradiation regimens results in better survival than treatment with radiation alone, and provide palliation of dysphagia in up to 90% of patients. Although acute toxicity of chemoradiation is more severe than radiation alone, this is of limited duration. Chemoradiation may be the treatment of choice for the majority of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Endoscopic techniques are available that provide palliation of dysphagia. The most commonly used technique is esophageal dilatation, either alone or before performing other palliative procedures such as laser therapy or stent placement. The most significant limitation of dilatation alone is that palliation is short-lived and most patients require repeat dilatations. Esophageal stents offer a high degree of palliation, but procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates are not insignificant. Expandable metal stents are associated with few complications but tumor ingrowth through the metallic mesh is frequent. Conventional plastic stents are not affected by tumor ingrowth but can migrate. Endoscopic laser therapy also provides symptoms relief and complication rates are

  20. Managing eosinophilic esophagitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisha A; Albert, Dustin M; Hall, Noah M; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive immune-mediated condition defined by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. Therapies consist of anti-eosinophilic medications and specialized diets aimed to decrease the progression of EoE and alleviate its symptoms, namely, dysphagia and food impaction. Assessing response to therapy remains challenging, as treatment end points are not well defined and currently consist of clinical, histologic, and endoscopic features. Newer validated measures may help standardize treatment end points. Emerging data support the use of maintenance therapy, which may reduce disease progression. Optimal dosages, delivery techniques, and duration of treatment need to be determined. When features of fibrostenosis develop, esophageal dilation is a safe and effective adjunctive strategy for improving symptoms. In EoE cases refractory to conventional treatments, newer therapies targeting inflammatory mediators and cytokines are on the horizon. PMID:27695356

  1. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  2. Managing eosinophilic esophagitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisha A; Albert, Dustin M; Hall, Noah M; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive immune-mediated condition defined by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. Therapies consist of anti-eosinophilic medications and specialized diets aimed to decrease the progression of EoE and alleviate its symptoms, namely, dysphagia and food impaction. Assessing response to therapy remains challenging, as treatment end points are not well defined and currently consist of clinical, histologic, and endoscopic features. Newer validated measures may help standardize treatment end points. Emerging data support the use of maintenance therapy, which may reduce disease progression. Optimal dosages, delivery techniques, and duration of treatment need to be determined. When features of fibrostenosis develop, esophageal dilation is a safe and effective adjunctive strategy for improving symptoms. In EoE cases refractory to conventional treatments, newer therapies targeting inflammatory mediators and cytokines are on the horizon.

  3. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  4. Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160133.html Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk A third ... now linked to 11 types of cancer and alcohol links to six," she said in an institute ...

  5. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients.

  6. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  7. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. PMID:25573637

  8. Endoscopic drainage of orbital subperiosteal hematoma secondary to acute rhinosinusitis in a child.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Honkura, Yohei; Ozawa, Daiki; Okumura, Yuri; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Takenori; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kenichi; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with secondary orbital infection, most commonly subperiosteal abscess. Although orbital subperiosteal abscess is a deadly disease that might lead to blind and cavernous sinus thrombosis, recent review of literature showed that immediate surgical intervention might not always be necessary for subperiosteal abscess. Orbital inflammation secondary to sinusitis is common in children, whereas orbital subperiosteal hematoma secondary to sinusitis is extremely rare, with only 11 reported cases, including one case in children. All the cases were treated with surgical intervention. Here we present a 12-year-old girl with rhinosinusitis and proptosis. Emergent endoscopic sinus surgery with partial removal of the lamina papyracea revealed dark brown fluid in the subperiosteal space. The patient was symptom-free 2 weeks after surgery. The present case was treated exclusively via an endonasal approach, whereas all 11 previous cases of subperiosteal hematoma were treated with external incision. The endonasal approach is favorable, especially for young female patients. Our review of literature shows that sudden onset, afebrile, and few signs of inflammation on blood test in patients with subperiosteal lesion may indicate subperiosteal hematoma. Surgery rather than antibiotic administration should be considered for the treatment of suspected subperiosteal hematoma. Treatment through only the endonasal approach is possible even if the hematoma is located in the roof of the orbit. PMID:24965687

  9. [Acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa in a case of von Willebrand's disease].

    PubMed

    Takenaka, N; Mine, T; Ikeda, E; Iwai, H; Kusano, S

    1988-01-01

    A rare case of acute epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with von Willebrand's disease is reported. A 9-year-old boy fell down and hit his occipital region against a floor. Soon after he came home and slept, but three hours later he began to vomit and became drowsiness. He visited our hospital and his Glasgow Coma Scale showed 13 points. CT scan on admission showed acute epidural hematoma of left posterior fossa and contusional hematoma in the right temporal lobe. The bleeding time was over 18 minutes. He had been suspected to be suffering from von Willebrand's disease two years ago. Then fresh blood, fresh frozen plasma and anti-hemophilic globulin were prepared. Ten hours after injury, the operation was begun. Fresh epidural hematoma existed as a clot beyond transverse sinus. During the procedure of dural tenting suture, diffuse bleeding from bone, muscle, subcutaneous tissue and dura occurred and it was difficult to stop the bleeding. By using fresh blood and anti-hemophilic globulin, the bleeding was controlled, and then the operation was achieved. In the postoperative course a new epidural hematoma was found in the left temporal region and a new but asymptomatic retinal hemorrhage was found in his right eye. He was discharged without any neurological deficits 25 days after operation.

  10. Amniotic fluid 'sludge' detected in patients with subchorionic hematoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, E; Tomimatsu, T; Kanagawa, T; Sawada, K; Kinugasa, Y; Mimura, K; Kimura, T

    2009-04-01

    Amniotic fluid 'sludge' is defined as the presence of dense aggregates of particulate matter in close proximity to the internal cervical os. It is of clinical significance in asymptomatic patients at high risk for spontaneous delivery, and in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Subchorionic hematoma is another ultrasound finding that is associated with a higher incidence of threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery. We report two cases of occurrence of amniotic fluid sludge in patients with previously detected large subchorionic hematoma. In the first case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasonography at 13 + 1 and 18 + 6 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption and emergency Cesarean section. In the second case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasound at 11 + 3 and 15 + 5 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by miscarriage with histological chorioamnionitis. The coincidence of subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge in these cases points to a possible connection between these two significant ultrasound findings. PMID:19308930

  11. Amniotic fluid 'sludge' detected in patients with subchorionic hematoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tskitishvili, E; Tomimatsu, T; Kanagawa, T; Sawada, K; Kinugasa, Y; Mimura, K; Kimura, T

    2009-04-01

    Amniotic fluid 'sludge' is defined as the presence of dense aggregates of particulate matter in close proximity to the internal cervical os. It is of clinical significance in asymptomatic patients at high risk for spontaneous delivery, and in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes. Subchorionic hematoma is another ultrasound finding that is associated with a higher incidence of threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery. We report two cases of occurrence of amniotic fluid sludge in patients with previously detected large subchorionic hematoma. In the first case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasonography at 13 + 1 and 18 + 6 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by preterm premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption and emergency Cesarean section. In the second case subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge were detected by ultrasound at 11 + 3 and 15 + 5 weeks' gestation, respectively, followed by miscarriage with histological chorioamnionitis. The coincidence of subchorionic hematoma and amniotic fluid sludge in these cases points to a possible connection between these two significant ultrasound findings.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ESOPHAGITIS GRADES AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Patrícia Fernanda Saboya; KUBRUSLY, Luiz Fernandao; NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; RIBEIRO, Irma Cláudia Saboya; BERTOLDI, Andressa de Souza; BATISTÃO, Venessa Caroline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The Helicobacter pylori infection (HP) is related to the development of gastric lesions and lymphoma; however, it is not known if there is a relation with gastroesophageal reflux disease and reflux esophagitis. Aim: To evaluate HP's relationship with esophagitis in patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Methods: Observational, retrospective and cross-sectional study, being evaluated 9576 patients undergoing outpatient endoscopic examination during the period between January and December 2015. Were included patients with any esophageal alteration at the examination; greater than 18; of both genders; independent of the complaint or the reason for the examination, illness or drug use. Were excluded those with active bleeding during the examination and in use of anticoagulants. The variables gender, age, esophagitis and result of the urease test, were studied. For statistical analysis was used the Epi Info software 7.1.5.2. Results: Most of the samples consisted of women and the overall average age was 46.54±16.32 years. The presence of infection was balanced for gender: 1204 (12.56%) women and 952 (13.92%) men. Relating degree of esophagitis HP- and HP+ was observed that the type A was the most common (58.79%, n=1460); 604 (24.32%) had grade B; 334 (13.45%) grade C, and 85 (3.42%) grade D. In the relation between the grade of esophagitis with gender, esophagitis A was predominant in women and present in 929 (63.33%), followed by type B, 282 (46.68%), 136 C (40.71%) and D 30 (35.29%). In men 531 (36.36%) showed type A, 322 (53.31%) B, 198 (59.28%) C, and 55 (64.70%) D. Among the groups 40-50 and over 60 years there was a significant difference in whether have or not have HP+. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between HP infection and the different grades of esophagitis. PMID:27759772

  13. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  14. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s. PMID:27625387

  15. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  16. Inflammatory response of esophageal epithelium in combined-type esophagitis in rats: a transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Kuroda, Masaaki; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Akagiri, Satomi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that esophageal mucosal inflammatory response is involved in the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The aim of the present study was to identify specific gene expression profiles of the esophageal mucosa in a rat model of combined-type chronic reflux esophagitis. Esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis was carried out in male Wistar rats by anastomosing the jejunum to the gastroesophageal junction under diethyl-ether inhalation anesthesia. Esophageal epithelial cells were obtained from esophagi of rats by laser capture microdissection. Preparation of cRNA and target hybridization were performed according to the Affymetrix GeneChip eukaryotic small sample target labeling assay protocol. The gene expression profile was evaluated by the rat toxicology U34 GeneChip. Array data analysis was carried out using Affymetrix GeneChip operating software, ingenuity pathway analysis software, and Gene Springs software. A comparison between esophagitis and sham-operated rats 2 weeks after the operation revealed that 368 probes (36%) were significantly affected, i.e. 185 probes were up-regulated, and 183 probes were down-regulated, both at levels of at least 1.5-fold in the esophagitis rats. Ingenuity signal analysis of 207 affected probes revealed the interleukin-6 signaling pathway as the most significantly affected caronical pathway. In addition, the expression of many genes associated with cytokine and transcription factor was enhanced in the esophagitis rats. This transcriptome approach provided insight into genes and putative genetic pathways thought to be affected by stimulation with gastroduodenal refluxates.

  17. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  18. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  19. A “Pseudo-cavernoma” – an encapsulated Hematoma of the Choroid Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Turner, Michael S.; Pytel, Peter; Awad, Issam A.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first report of an intraventricular encapsulated hematoma, mimicking cavernous malformation on imaging and gross lesion appearance. A 47-year-old female on anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation presented with left upper extremity apraxia, neglect, and mild gait imbalance. Her brain CT scan and MRI revealed multilobulated lesions involving the choroid plexus in the atria of both lateral ventricles. The intraoperative appearance was that of encapsulated mass, with blood clots at different stages of liquefaction and organization, all consistent with the gross appearance of a cavernous malformation. However, histopathologic examination demonstrated hematoma with components at different ages, and normal vessel infiltration without any hint of cavernous malformation histology, or underlying neoplasia. Encapsulated hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic intraventricular masses. PMID:21435884

  20. A "pseudo-cavernoma" - an encapsulated hematoma of the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Turner, Michael S; Pytel, Peter; Awad, Issam A

    2011-06-01

    We present the first report of an intraventricular encapsulated hematoma, mimicking cavernous malformation on imaging and gross lesion appearance. A 47-year-old female on anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation presented with left upper extremity apraxia, neglect, and mild gait imbalance. Her brain CT scan and MRI revealed multilobulated lesions involving the choroid plexus in the atria of both lateral ventricles. The intraoperative appearance was that of encapsulated mass, with blood clots at different stages of liquefaction and organization, all consistent with the gross appearance of a cavernous malformation. However, histopathologic examination demonstrated hematoma with components at different ages, and normal vessel infiltration without any hint of cavernous malformation histology, or underlying neoplasia. Encapsulated hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic intraventricular masses.

  1. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  2. Identification of Hematomas in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using an Index of Quantitative Brain Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Naunheim, Rosanne; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Mould, W. Andrew; Hanley, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rapid identification of traumatic intracranial hematomas following closed head injury represents a significant health care need because of the potentially life-threatening risk they present. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of an index of brain electrical activity used to identify intracranial hematomas in traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage located on the forehead of 394 closed head injured patients who were referred for CT scans as part of their standard ED assessment. A total of 116 of these patients were found to be CT positive (CT+), of which 46 patients with traumatic intracranial hematomas (CT+) were identified for study. A total of 278 patients were found to be CT negative (CT−) and were used as controls. CT scans were subjected to quanitative measurements of volume of blood and distance of bleed from recording electrodes by blinded independent experts, implementing a validated method for hematoma measurement. Using an algorithm based on brain electrical activity developed on a large independent cohort of TBI patients and controls (TBI-Index), patients were classified as either positive or negative for structural brain injury. Sensitivity to hematomas was found to be 95.7% (95% CI=85.2, 99.5), specificity was 43.9% (95% CI=38.0, 49.9). There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and distance of the bleed from recording sites (F=0.044, p=0.833), or volume of blood measured F=0.179, p=0.674). Results of this study are a validation and extension of previously published retrospective findings in an independent population, and provide evidence that a TBI-Index for structural brain injury is a highly sensitive measure for the detection of potentially life-threatening traumatic intracranial hematomas, and could contribute to the rapid, quantitative evaluation and treatment of such patients. PMID:25054838

  3. Evaluation of gastric tube with esophageal thermister (Thermosump).

    PubMed

    Koyama, K; Ochiai, R; Takahashi, J; Takeda, J; Sekiguchi, H; Fukushima, K

    1992-07-01

    The accuracy and the feasibility of esophageal temperature measured by a new gastric tube. Thermosump, which is incorporated with a esophageal thermister, was evaluated in anesthetized dogs (n = 6) and men (n = 59). In dogs, esophageal temperature measured by Thermosump was correlated well with the temperatures measured by the conventional esophageal thermister, and also by the pulmonary artery catheter (r = 0.98, 0.98, respectively). In anesthetized men, correlation between esophageal temperature by Thermosump and rectal, or bladder temperature was good during surgery of extremities (r = 0.81, 0.80, respectively). But during abdominal surgery, correlation between esophageal and bladder temperature was relatively poor (r = 0.50). Insertion of the tube, and suction of gastric fluid through the tube were easy without any complication. This newly developed gastric tube with a esophageal thermister was safe, and useful for measuring esophageal temperature.

  4. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  5. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  6. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  7. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI.

  8. Bilateral Chronic Subdural Nontraumatic Hematoma in a Woman Affected by AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Luongo, M.; Grassi, M.; Godano, U.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a condition frequently seen in neurosurgical practice, especially among the elderly. It is often preceded by head injury, even a trivial trauma. Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a disorder involving extracellular tissue deposition of misfolded native proteins called amyloids. The several types of amyloidosis differ by source of proteins, organ involvement, treatment, and prognosis. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman affected by AL amyloidosis, harboring surgically treated bilateral chronic nontraumatic subdural hematoma, and we suggest a possible correlation between the clinical entities of CSDH and AL amyloidosis. PMID:26251797

  9. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Velickovic, Mirko; Ballhause, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention. PMID:27803810

  10. Retropharyngeal hematoma secondary to whiplash injury in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nurata, Hakan; Yilmaz, Muhammet Bahadır; Borcek, Alp Ozgun; Oner, Ali Yusuf; Baykaner, M Kemali

    2012-01-01

    Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD) has been reported as an adult phenomenon. Whiplash injury has classically been described as a cervical soft tissue hyperextension- flexion injury after a trauma such as a rear end impact car crash, contact sport injuries, blows to the head from a falling object or a punch and shaken baby syndrome and is mostly seen in adults . It is important as it may cause severe disability due to spinal cord injury, decrease work productivity and even retropharyngeal hematoma resulting airway obstruction and mortality due to bleeding amongst deep cervical fascias. We describe a case of retropharyngeal hematoma after whiplash injury in a childhood.

  11. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, José A; Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  12. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  13. Blunt traumatic superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as gluteal hematoma without bony injury: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Annu; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Pawan; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Atin

    2016-08-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries to the superior gluteal artery are rare in clinic. A majority of injuries present as aneurysms following penetrating trauma, fracture pelvis or posterior dislocation of the hip joint. We reported a rare case of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma presenting as large expanding right gluteal hematoma without any bony injury. The gluteal hematoma was suspected clinically, confirmed by ultrasound and the arterial injury was diagnosed by CT angiography that revealed a large right gluteal hematoma with a focal contrast leakage forming a pseudoaneurysm within the hematoma. Pseudoaneurysm arose from the superior gluteal branch of right internal iliac artery, which was successfully angioembolized. The patient was discharged on day 4 of hospitalization with resolving gluteal hematoma. This report highlighted the importance of considering an arterial injury following blunt trauma to the buttocks with subsequent painful swelling. Acknowledgment of this rare injury pattern was necessary to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27578385

  14. Acute symptomatic hematoma with defined etiology seven years after breast reconstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Akhil K; Kim, John YS

    2010-01-01

    Augmentation mammaplasty with implants can be complicated by hematoma formation. The majority of hematomas occur in the immediate postoperative period. There are, however, some reports of hematomas with a delayed presentation. These hematomas in the late postoperative period are rare, and many of these cases do not have a definitive mechanism of injury or develop symptoms immediately after the triggering event. A case of late capsular hematoma seven years after breast reconstruction with a saline implant following mastectomy is presented. In contrast to the majority of published cases, the patient presented with both a known and traceable cause of her bleed and with symptoms that developed immediately after the initial event. Furthermore, the mechanism of her injury was consistent with a bleeding capsular tear that was observed intraoperatively. The present case emphasizes the importance of thorough evaluation and management of patients with a history of breast reconstruction. PMID:21629619

  15. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  16. Review of the Burden of Esophageal Cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Wan-Nor-Asyikeen, Wan Adnan; Norsa'adah, Bachok

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the top leading causes of cancer-related deaths in Malaysia. To date, neither the prevalence nor incidence of esophageal cancer nationally have been recorded. Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem even if it is not common in Malaysia. The late presentation of esophageal cancer makes it a difficult and challenging medical problem. Therefore, more governmental and non-governmental organizations of Malaysia should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies. PMID:27644604

  17. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  18. Concomitant herpetic and eosinophilic esophagitis--a causality dilemma.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, P; Almeida, N; Cipriano, M A; Gouveia, H; Sofia, C

    2012-09-01

    Eosinophilic and herpetic esophagitis are listed as independent causes of dysphagia, especially in young adult males. However, herpetic esophagitis rarely affects immunocompetent individuals. We report the case of a young, not immunocompromised patient, admitted because of severe dysphagia secondary to herpes simplex virus esophagitis. After complete resolution, an endoscopic and histologic reevaluation established the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The potential association between the two conditions is discussed.

  19. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, José Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ‪The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  20. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  1. Remodeling of Intramural Thrombus and Collagen in an Ang-II Infusion ApoE−/− Model of Dissecting Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Schriefl, A.J.; Collins, M.J.; Pierce, D.M.; Holzapfel, G.A.; Niklason, L.E.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen endows the normal aortic wall with significant stiffness and strength and similarly plays important roles in many disease processes. For example, because of the marked loss of elastic fibers and functional smooth cells in aortic aneurysms, collagen plays a particularly important role in controlling the dilatation of these lesions and governing their rupture potential. Recent findings suggest further that collagen remodeling may also be fundamental to the intramural healing of arterial or aneurysmal dissections. To explore this possibility further, we identified and correlated regions of intramural thrombus and newly synthesized fibrillar collagen in a well-established mouse model of dissecting aortic aneurysms. Our findings suggest that intramural thrombus that is isolated from free-flowing blood creates a permissive environment for the synthesis of fibrillar collagen that, albeit initially less dense and organized, could protect that region of the dissected wall from subsequent expansion of the dissection or rupture. Moreover, alpha-smooth muscle actin positive cells appeared to be responsible for the newly produced collagen, which co-localized with significant production of glycosaminoglycans. PMID:22560850

  2. [Acute necrotizing esophagitis (black esophagus) with secondary severe stenosis].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Álvaro A; Guerrero, Diego; Hani, Albis C; Cañadas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 67 years old patient with a history of diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and chronic renal failure, who developed diabetic ketoacidosis and severe sepsis, later presenting an acute necrotizing esophagitis, and then a esophageal stenosis requiring treatment with self-expanding esophageal prosthesis with good clinical results. PMID:26802889

  3. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  4. [Esophageal reconstruction--using gastric tube instead of whole stomach].

    PubMed

    Chen, Keneng

    2014-09-01

    Stomach is the first choice for esophageal reconstruction following esophagectomy. In the earlier days, however, whole stomach pulling-up was the major surgery, which had some shortcomings. Recently, gastric tube has gained wide acceptance for esophageal reconstruction. This paper summarized the anatomical and physiological advantage of stomach, the disadvantage of whole stomach, and benefits of gastric tube for esophageal reconstruction.

  5. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  6. Nematode-associated intramural alimentary nodules in pumas are histologically similar to gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, C D; Barr, B C; Woods, L W; Spangler, T; Murphy, B

    2013-05-01

    Intramural alimentary nodules in the gastric pylorus and proximal duodenum are a common finding in free-ranging pumas (Puma concolor) in North America, and are often associated with the presence of an indwelling nematode (most commonly Cylicospirura spp.). This study compares the histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical appearance of three proximal gastrointestinal nodules in pumas with four cases of eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia in domestic cats. Histologically, the pattern of inflammation and repair was strikingly similar, consisting of lamillated anastomosing trabeculae of dense sclerotic collagen with interspersed inflammatory cells and reactive fibroblasts. The stromal trabeculae were histologically reminiscent of osteoid and were uniformly positive for collagenous protein by Masson's trichrome stain and negative for mineralized osteoid deposits with Von Kossa's stain. Trabecular cells expressed osteonectin, but not osteocalcin immunohistochemically. Collectively, these findings are most consistent with a stroma comprised of dense collagenous trabeculae that resembles, but is distinct, from osteoid. Both the puma and domestic cat lesions demonstrated an eosinophilic inflammatory component; however, eosinophils were present in small numbers in the puma nodules relative to the nodules in domestic cats. These entities likely represent a unique and stereotypic gastrointestinal repair response of felids, given their similar histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical profiles.

  7. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  8. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  9. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  10. The Tumor Microenvironment in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric W.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Hicks, Philip D.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease, ranking sixth among all cancers in mortality. Despite incremental advances in diagnostics and therapeutics, esophageal cancer still carries a poor prognosis, and thus there remains a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease. There is accumulating evidence that a comprehensive understanding of the molecular composition of esophageal cancer requires attention to not only tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment, which contains diverse cell populations, signaling factors, and structural molecules that interact with tumor cells and support all stages of tumorigenesis. In esophageal cancer, environmental exposures can trigger chronic inflammation, which leads to constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that promote survival and proliferation. Anti-tumor immunity is attenuated by cell populations such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as immune checkpoints like programmed death-1 (PD-1). Other immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages can have other pro-tumorigenic functions, including the induction of angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete growth factors and alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a tumor niche and enhance tumor cell migration and metastasis. Further study of how these TME components relate to the different stages of tumor progression in each esophageal cancer subtype will lead to development of novel and specific TME-targeting therapeutic strategies, which offer considerable potential especially in the setting of combination therapy. PMID:26923327

  11. Chronic Recurrent Esophageal Diverticulitis - A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Ashish; Smith, Ioana; Hatchett, Jeremy; Juneau, Jeffrey; Kodali, Sudha; Malik, Talha A.; Weber, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we seek to shed light on a 44-year-old Caucasian male with a known history of an esophageal diverticulum, who was transferred to our facility after an upper endoscopy at an outside hospital suggested a purulent discharge emanating from the mouth of a mid-esophageal diverticulum. A barium swallow done at the outside institution had reportedly demonstrated an 8 cm long barium collection parallel to and anterolateral to the mid-and distal esophagus which terminated several centimeters proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. At our facility, antibiotics (piperacillin/tazobactam) were continued, and a double-contrast esophagram was performed. The presence of an unusual mid-esophageal diverticulum was confirmed. He clinically improved after a 3-day course of intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics. No surgical or endoscopic repair was elected as the patient opted for continued medical management. While esophageal diverticula are not rare in humans, to our knowledge, this is the first report of development of esophageal diverticulitis in humans. We believe that antibiotic coverage in addition to dietary restriction is the logical mainstay of acute therapy. Optimal antibiotic coverage should likely include oral flora aerobes and anaerobes. Once symptoms resolve, diverticula may be managed expectantly.

  12. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

  13. Management for traumatic chronic subdural hematoma patients with well-controlled shunt system for hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shoko Mitrrt; Tomia, Yusuke; Murakami, Hideki; Nakane, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic CSDH enlarged in two cases with VP or LP shunt system although the shunt valve pressure was increased to 200 mmH2O. In surgery, the hematoma cavity pressure was found to be 130 and 140 mmH2O, suggesting that to raise the shunt valve pressure is not effective for decreasing CSDH volume.

  14. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  15. Fatal retropleural hematoma complicating internal jugular vein catheterization. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kontozoglou, T; Mambo, N

    1983-06-01

    This report describes a case of fatal retropleural hematoma complicating percutaneous insertion of a central vein catheter. The patient was a 55-year-old female undergoing surgery for severe rheumatic mitral valve disease. Factors responsible for this catastrophic incident are the anticoagulation of the patient, the edematous state of the soft tissues, and the multiple punctures of the wall of the jugular vein.

  16. Spontaneously Resolved Recurrent Cervical Epidural Hematoma in a 37-Week Primigravida.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Deguchi, Masao; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kanamono, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To describe a patient with a recurrent spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) during pregnancy that had spontaneous remission. Methods A 27-year-old primigravida at 37 weeks' gestation suddenly felt a strong left shoulder pain without any trauma. She had a history of fenestration for a spontaneous cervical hematoma when she was 18 years old. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a recurrence of the cervical epidural hematoma at the C4-T1 level, but she had no paralysis. Results The patient subsequently underwent a cesarean section and delivered a healthy male infant. Her spinal epidural hematoma disappeared. Multislice computed tomography showed no evidence for a vascular malformation or tumor. Three years after the initial cesarean section, she underwent a second one and delivered another male infant. Conclusions We report on a rare case of recurrent SSEH during pregnancy with no neurologic deficits that was treated nonoperatively with close observation and resulted in spontaneous resolution. In such patients with no neurologic deficits, nonoperative management with close observation may be a reasonable alternative. PMID:26430600

  17. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  18. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  19. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  20. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  1. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  2. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Alfredo A; Farma, Jeffrey M; Meredith, Kenneth L; Shah, Nilay R; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-10-01

    Esophageal cancer represents a major public health problem worldwide. Several minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) techniques have been described and represent a safe alternative for the surgical management of esophageal cancer in selected centers with high volume and expertise in them. This article reviews the most recent and largest series evaluating MIE techniques. Recent larger series have shown MIE to be equivalent in postoperative morbidity and mortality rates to conventional surgery. MIE has been associated with less blood loss, less postoperative pain, and decreased intensive care unit and hospital length of stay compared with conventional surgery. Despite limited data, conventional surgery and MIE have shown no significant difference in survival, stage for stage. The myriad of MIE techniques complicates the debate of defining the optimal surgical approach for treating esophageal cancer. Randomized controlled trials comparing MIE with conventional open esophagectomy are needed to clarify the ideal procedure with the lowest postoperative morbidity, best quality of life after surgery, and long-term survival.

  3. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  4. [Endoscopic ultrasonic diagnosis of esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kouzu, T; Ogino, Y; Isono, K

    1986-08-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) has been developed rapidly and is becoming a new routine examination of the digestive diseases. In this thesis, the usefulness of EUS with reference to the diagnosis of the depth and the margins of the cancer invasion and the metastatic lymph nodes is described. Furthermore, the judgment of the efficacy of the combined therapy including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy will be possible with EUS. The information from EUS is useful to determine the treatment plan of esophageal cancer. Therefore, EUS is expected to become a preoperative necessary examination of cases with esophageal cancer. PMID:3537360

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  6. Esophageal web in Plummer-Vinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, H; Tsutsumi, S; Inaki, S; Mori, T

    1988-09-01

    In Plummer-Vinson syndrome, esophagography often reveals a web at the anterior wall of the cervical esophagus. The pathogenesis of the esophageal web and the cause of dysphagia in this syndrome were investigated radiographically, endoscopically, manometrically, and histologically. It was considered that the web seen in the esophagogram may have been formed due to the restriction of dilation of the esophageal wall, which results from repetitive inflammation and the subsequent healing process. Dysphagia in this syndrome may be explained by a decrease in swallowing power. Iron deficiency anemia may play the main role in the above histological changes and the resulting decrease in swallowing power.

  7. Distal Esophageal Duplication Cyst with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease: A Rare Association and a Management Challenge.

    PubMed

    Jan, Iftikhar Ahmad; Al Nuaimi, Asma; Al Hamoudi, Basma; Al Naqbi, Khalid; Bilal, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities of the foregut and may be associated with other conditions. Association of esophageal duplication with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) has not been reported in children. We are reporting a case of a 16 months baby who had antenatal diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia. Postnatal CTchest, however, suggested a distal esophageal duplication cyst and a contrast esophagogram showed grade-IV GER. A thoracoscopy in another hospital excluded esophageal duplication at that time. Later, he presented with hematemesis in our department and was re-evaluated. Repeat CTconfirmed a persistent 2.5 x 1.3 cm cyst in distal esophagus. Upper GI endoscopy suggested grade-II esophagitis with a wide patent gastro-esophageal junction. The child was treated with left thoracotomy, excision of the duplication cyst and thoracic fundoplication. He had an uneventful post-operative recovery and is doing well at 6 months follow-up. PMID:26876405

  8. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p < 0.001). In particular, those individuals whose both parents with esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95% CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk.

  9. PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: More similarities than differences

    PubMed Central

    Eluri, Swathi; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features, pathogenesis, and disease mechanisms of proton pump inhibitor–responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), and to highlight similarities and differences with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Recent findings PPI-REE is a condition in which patients have clinical and histologic findings similar to EoE, but achieve complete remission with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. More than one-third of patients who have esophageal symptoms associated with esophageal eosinophilia respond to PPI treatment. Emerging data elucidating the pathogenesis of PPI-REE have shown that Th2-related inflammatory factors such as IL-13, IL-5, eotaxin-3, and major basic protein (MBP) are elevated in PPI-REE, similar to EoE. PPI-REE also shares a genetic expression signature with EoE that reverses with PPI treatment. Mechanisms proposed to explain the PPI response include an acid-independent, anti-inflammatory action of PPIs and PPI-induced restoration of esophageal barrier function. Summary Multiple features of PPI-REE overlap extensively with EoE. This raises the question of whether PPI-REE is merely a subtype of EoE rather than an independent condition. This similarity may have future implications for algorithms informing evaluation and treatment of esophageal eosinophilia. PMID:26039722

  10. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  11. Preoperative therapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Goel, Aakanksha; Gaur, Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive malignancy associated with dismal treatment outcomes. Presence of two distinct histopathological types distinguishes it from other gastrointestinal tract malignancies. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment in locally advanced esophageal cancer (T2 or greater or node positive); however, a high rate of disease recurrence (systemic and loco-regional) and poor survival justifies a continued search for optimal therapy. Various combinations of multimodality treatment (preoperative/perioperative, or postoperative; radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy) are being explored to lower disease recurrence and improve survival. Preoperative therapy followed by surgery is presently considered the standard of care in resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer as postoperative treatment may not be feasible for all the patients due to the morbidity of esophagectomy and prolonged recovery time limiting the tolerance of patient. There are wide variations in the preoperative therapy practiced across the centres depending upon the institutional practices, availability of facilities and personal experiences. There is paucity of literature to standardize the preoperative therapy. Broadly, chemoradiotherapy is the preferred neo-adjuvant modality in western countries whereas chemotherapy alone is considered optimal in the far East. The present review highlights the significant studies to assist in opting for the best evidence based preoperative therapy (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy) for locally advanced esophageal cancer.

  12. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (≥15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented.

  13. Esophageal testing: What we have so far

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  14. 21 CFR 868.5650 - Esophageal obturator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal obturator. 868.5650 Section 868.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient during emergency resuscitation by occluding (blocking) the esophagus, thereby permitting...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5650 - Esophageal obturator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal obturator. 868.5650 Section 868.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient during emergency resuscitation by occluding (blocking) the esophagus, thereby permitting...

  16. Perception of Syllable Stress in Esophageal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Christopher Niles; Morris, Hughlett L.

    1988-01-01

    Ten esophageal speakers and ten normal speakers produced repetitions of the disyllable /mama/ using five different conditions of syllable stress. Nine normal listeners judged both relative and absolute syllable stress. Reliable judgments were made of the syllable stress, and speakers were able to effect systematic changes in listener perceptions…

  17. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  18. Outcome and prognostic factors for dogs with a histological diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy: 35 cases (2001-2013).

    PubMed

    Patten, Steve G; Boston, Sarah E; Monteith, Gabrielle J

    2016-08-01

    Canine splenic hematoma can be indistinguishable from hemangiosarcoma on clinical presentation and grossly at the time of surgery. However, hemangiosarcoma represents an aggressive malignancy and a misdiagnosis of hematoma would forgo indications for chemotherapy. This study describes a long-term follow-up of cases with a histologic diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy to determine if the clinical course of the disease corroborated the diagnosis. Thirty-five dogs were evaluated to determine survival and prognostic associations with signalment and clinical data. Overall median survival time was 647 days (range: 0 to 3287 days). Statistically significant variables included a palpable abdominal mass during physical examination, sub-clinical coagulopathy, and metastasis. Four cases (11%) had reported evidence of metastasis at the time of euthanasia; 1 case was histologically confirmed. Overall prognosis for splenic hematoma appears excellent, as expected, but a small proportion of cases may have an undiagnosed malignant component. PMID:27493283

  19. The distribution and chemical coding of intramural neurons supplying the porcine stomach - the study on normal pigs and on animals suffering from swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Kaleczyc, J; Klimczuk, M; Franke-Radowiecka, A; Sienkiewicz, W; Majewski, M; Łakomy, M

    2007-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the expression of biologically active substances by intramural neurons supplying the stomach in normal (control) pigs and in pigs suffering from dysentery. Eight juvenile female pigs were used. Both dysenteric (n = 4; inoculated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae) and control (n = 4) animals were deeply anaesthetized, transcardially perfused with buffered paraformalehyde, and tissue samples comprising all layers of the wall of the ventricular fundus were collected. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5) and their chemical coding using antibodies against vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter (VAChT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), galanin (GAL), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), Leu(5)-enkephalin (LENK), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). In both inner and outer submucosal plexuses of the control pigs, the majority of neurons were SP (55% and 58%, respectively)- or VAChT (54%)-positive. Many neurons stained also for CGRP (43 and 45%) or GAL (20% and 18%) and solitary perikarya were NOS-, SOM- or VIP-positive. The myenteric plexus neurons stained for NOS (20%), VAChT (15%), GAL (10%), VIP (7%), SP (6%) or CGRP (solitary neurons), but they were SOM-negative. No intramural neurons immunoreactive to LENK were found. The most remarkable difference in the chemical coding of enteric neurons between the control and dysenteric pigs was a very increased number of GAL- and VAChT-positive nerve cells (up to 61% and 85%, respectively) in submucosal plexuses of the infected animals. The present results suggest that GAL and ACh have a specific role in local neural circuits of the inflamed porcine stomach in the course of swine dysentery.

  20. Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chest Pain and Normal Coronary Arteriogram.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, S C; Hodges, K; Hersh, T; Jinich, H

    1981-02-01

    Evaluation of the esophagus is helpful in determining the source of chest pain. Eighteen per cent of 72 patients with a normal coronary angiogram had esophageal disease as a source of chest pain. Eight had diffuse esophageal spasm, four had reflux esophagitis and one had an esophageal ulcer. Five of eight patients with diffuse esophageal spasm had relief of symptoms with nitroglycerin. Despite normal coronary arteriogram and normal esophageal manometry 42 of 49 other patients had relief of chest pain with nitroglycerin.

  1. Characteristics and frequency of transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1988-09-01

    Electromyogram of the submental muscles, esophageal manometry, and pH studies were simultaneously performed in an unselected group of 12 patients with subjective and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease to determine the frequency of transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and mechanisms of GER. Findings from these patients were compared with data from 10 asymptomatic healthy volunteers. Recordings were obtained for 1 h in the fasting state and 3 h after a standard 850-kcal meal. Transient relaxation of the LES was the only mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects and accounted for 73.0% of the episodes of acid reflux in patients with GER disease. In both normal subjects and patients with GER, a large number of transient relaxations were associated at their onset with an attenuated submental EMG complex, a small pharyngeal contraction, and an esophageal contraction. The incidences of these associated events were similar in the two study populations. The frequency of transient relaxation of the LES in patients with GER was identical to that of controls. The frequency did not differ even in 9 patients with GER disease who had endoscopic esophagitis. Thirty-six percent of transient relaxations in the normal subjects were accompanied by pH evidence of reflux, but in the GER patients with endoscopic esophagitis 65% of the transient LES relaxations resulted in a reflux event. Acid reflux at the moment of deep inspiration was the second most common mechanism of GER in our patients. Four patients who demonstrated this mechanism had hiatal hernias and more severe esophagitis than the rest of the group. Our findings confirm that transient relaxation of the LES is the major mechanism of GER in patients with reflux esophagitis. However, the similar frequency of this relaxation in GER patients and in healthy asymptomatic subjects suggests that factors other than transient LES relaxation play an important role in the pathogenesis of

  2. [A Case of Organizing Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Endoscopic Burr-Hole Surgery Using a Curettage and Suction Technique].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Oshiro, Shinya; Koga, Takaomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-09-01

    A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital because of difficulty with discrete movement of the right upper limb and dysarthria. Computed tomography(CT)of the head revealed a chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH)on the left side. The patient underwent single burr-hole irrigation and drainage on the same day. In addition to the burr hole, a cross-shaped dural incision was made which revealed a thick outer membrane and solidified hematoma. We removed as much of the clotted hematoma as possible using a curved suction tube under neuroendoscopy. The postoperative CT revealed that the hematoma was partially removed and the mass effect was reduced. As a result, the patient's neurological deficits improved. We reached a diagnosis of organizing CSDH following histologic examination of the removed hematoma that showed inflammatory cell infiltration and multiplication of fibroblasts. Neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation via a burr hole is minimally invasive and may be a useful procedure in the treatment of some cases of organizing CSDH. PMID:27605476

  3. Bilateral posterior fossa chronic subdural hematoma treated with craniectomy: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Yushin; Matsumoto, Jun; Ohta, Kazutaka; Hasegawa, Shu; Miura, Masaki; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior chronic subdural hematomas (pCSHs) are rare. Their diagnosis and treatment are difficult. Description: A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with nausea, headache, and mild consciousness disturbance. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral pCSH. To prevent further neurological deterioration, we performed surgery under general anesthesia by midline suboccipital craniectomy. Unexpected bleeding from a developed circuitous occipital sinus was stopped with hemoclips. After hematoma removal, she recovered and was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. By the 19th postoperative day, she had developed no neurologic deficits. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates the risk of blind surgical therapy in patients with pCSH. In such patients, posterior fossa craniectomy may be preferable in terms of diagnosis and safe treatment. PMID:27213111

  4. Extradural hematoma surgery in a child with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: Perioperative concerns.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Upendra; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Patra, Chitralekha; Ganjoo, Pragati

    2013-05-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by premature ageing, severe growth failure, and very early onset atherosclerosis. Psychologically and emotionally child-like, these patients suffer from physiological changes of old age. Early and progressive atherosclerosis of intra-cranial vessels in HGPS patients, along with a thin skin and fragile vessels, make these patients susceptible to intra-cranial hematomas following relatively trivial injuries and to severe intra-cranial disease. Anesthetizing HGPS patients for surgery can be challenging due to the presence of a possible difficult airway, multi-system derangements, and associated skin, bone and joint disease. We report here one such child with HGPS who underwent craniotomy and evacuation of an extradural hematoma that developed after minor head trauma. Securing his airway during surgery was difficult.

  5. Spontaneous Resolution of a Large Chronic Subdural Hematoma Which Required Surgical Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Seok; Park, Young Seok; Min, Kyung Soo; Lee, Mou Seop

    2015-09-01

    We report on a case of an 87-year-old woman who showed spontaneous resolution of a large chronic subdural hematoma which required surgical decompression. She had suffered from confused mentality and right side weakness of motor grade II for 10 days. The initial brain CT scan showed a 22 mm thick low density lesion located in the left fronto-temporo-parietal region with midline shift (12 mm) which required emergency decompression. However, because she and her family did not want surgery, she was followed up in the outpatient clinic. Five months later, follow up brain CT showed that the CSDH had disappeared and the patient became neurologically normal. The reasons for spontaneous resolution of CSDH remain unclear. We discuss the possible relation between mechanisms of physio-pathogenesis and spontaneous resolution of a large chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) in an elderly patient. PMID:26539279

  6. A missed Behçet’s case presenting with spontaneous epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Levent; Mengi, Gönen; Özyemişçi-Taşkıran, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Spinal vascular events related to Behçet’s disease are relatively uncommon. Deep vein thrombosis is the most frequent vascular involvement. Anticoagulant therapy is a debated issue in Behçet’s disease. In this case report, we present a patient with a delayed diagnosis of Behçet’s disease after development of cervical epidural hematoma following anticoagulant therapy due to deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy without immunosuppressive therapy leading to uncontrolled systemic inflammation may be the cause of spinal epidural hematoma. On the other hand, epidural vascular involvement as a vasculitic manifestation of Behçet’s disease in conjunction with anticoagulant therapy may have predisposed to spontaneous bleeding via increased fragility or microaneurysms in epidural arteries. In this case report, the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to Behçet’s disease is emphasized.

  7. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Hassan, Samer; Thumallapally, Nishitha; Dai, Qun

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs) led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH). Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine. PMID:26543654

  8. Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Eccentric Exercise Using a Vibrating Belt Machine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hey-Ran; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in a 75-year-old man after exercise using a vibrating belt machine on the head. He suffered from headache and intermittent left side numbness for ten days. He denied any head injuries except eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt on his own head for 20 days. An MRI revealed bilateral CSDH. The hematoma was isodense on the CT scan. We made burr-holes on the both sides under local anesthesia. We identified the neomembrane and dark red subdural fluid on both sides. In the postoperative CT scan, we found an arachnoid cyst on the left temporal pole. Although the arachnoid cyst itself is asymptomatic, trivial injury such as vibrating the head may cause a CSDH. PMID:24278662

  9. Traumatic pelvic hematoma after a military static-line parachute jump: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barbee, George A; Booms, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The authors report five cases of pelvic hematoma without associated pelvic fracture after military static-line parachute operations, a significantly underreported injury. The case reports and discussion include initial emergency department presentation, stabilization requirements, and imaging, disposition, and management recommendations. Data were collected retrospectively through review of medical records from a single institution over the course of a single calendar year, 2012-2013. Pelvic hematoma should be strongly considered in the patient with lower abdominal, hip, or pelvic pain after blunt injury from parachute landing fall even in the absence of associated fracture. The cases discussed display this underreported injury and highlight the frequent necessity for admission to a high-acuity care center for close monitoring. PMID:25344704

  10. Traumatic pelvic hematoma after a military static-line parachute jump: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barbee, George A; Booms, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The authors report five cases of pelvic hematoma without associated pelvic fracture after military static-line parachute operations, a significantly underreported injury. The case reports and discussion include initial emergency department presentation, stabilization requirements, and imaging, disposition, and management recommendations. Data were collected retrospectively through review of medical records from a single institution over the course of a single calendar year, 2012-2013. Pelvic hematoma should be strongly considered in the patient with lower abdominal, hip, or pelvic pain after blunt injury from parachute landing fall even in the absence of associated fracture. The cases discussed display this underreported injury and highlight the frequent necessity for admission to a high-acuity care center for close monitoring.

  11. Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis with Subsequent Pulmonary Thromboembolism: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min Kwak, Ho-Sung; Jin, Gong-Young; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2006-06-15

    A 38-year-old male was initially admitted for left leg swelling. He was diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left leg and a pulmonary thromboembolism by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) with delayed lower extremity CT. The DVT was treated by thrombolysis and a venous stent. Four hours later, he complained of severe back pain and a sensation of separation of his body and lower extremities; he experienced paraplegia early in the morning of the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal epidural hematoma between T11 and L2, which decompressed following surgery. We, therefore, report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma after thrombolysis in a case of DVT with a pulmonary thromboembolism.

  12. Spontaneous subdural hematoma and antiplatelet therapy: Does efficacy of Ticagrelor come with added risk?

    PubMed

    Suryanarayana Sharma, Pattanagere Manjunatha; Tekkatte Jagannatha, Aniruddha; Javali, Mahendra; Hegde, Anupama Venkatasubba; Mahale, Rohan; Madhusudhan; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy has established clinical benefit on cardiovascular outcome and has reduced the rates of re-infarction/in stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes. Major bleeding episodes can occur with antiplatelet therapy and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most feared complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Identification of high risk groups and judicious use of antiplatelet therapy reduces the bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is a newer P2Y12 receptor antagonist with established clinical benefit. However, risks of having an ICH with these newer molecules cannot be ignored. Here, we report a case of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma developing in a patient on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor. Early recognition, discontinuation of the medication and appropriate management resulted in resolution of hematoma and good clinical outcome. Authors have reviewed the antithrombotic drugs and their tendencies in causing intracranial bleeds from a neurophysicians perspective. PMID:26995425

  13. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  14. Fungal Esophagitis in a Child with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Zaidi, Zafar; Alsheikh, Abdulmalik

    2016-08-01

    Esophagitis in children is not uncommon, mostly due to gastro-esophageal reflux. Other conditions like eosinophilic and infective esophagitis need to be elucidated in differential diagnoses. Fungal orCandida esophagitisusually occurs in high risk children who are immune-compromised, malnourished, on steroid therapy or have uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. An eleven-year girl presented with uncontrolled type I diabetes mellitus and recurrent epigastric pain with vomiting. Her oral intake was satisfactory. There was no dysphagia and odynophagia. Physical examination was normal with good oral hygiene. Failure in responding to conventional medications led to endoscopic evaluation, which revealed white patches and esophageal inflammation and diagnosed as fungal esophagitis on histopathology. Although infective esophagitis is encountered sporadically in pediatric age group, but it should always be considered in high risk individuals and when conventional medication fails to resolve the symptoms. PMID:27539771

  15. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  16. Genes Regulating Epithelial Polarity Are Critical Suppressors of Esophageal Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Min; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Li-Li; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive disease featured by early lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The proper formation of apicobasal polarity is essential for normal epithelium physiology and tissue homeostasis, while loss of polarity is a hallmark of cancer development including esophageal oncogenesis. In this review, we summarized the stages of esophageal cancer development associated with the loss or deregulation of epithelial cell apicobasal polarity. Loss of epithelial apicobasal polarity exerts an indispensable role in the initiation of esophageal oncogenesis, tumor progression, and the advancement of tumors from benign to malignant. In particular, we reviewed the involvement of several critical genes, including Lkb1, claudin-4, claudin-7, Par3, Lgl1, E-cadherin, and the Scnn1 gene family. Understanding the role of apicobasal regulators may lead to new paradigms for treatment of esophageal tumors, including improvement of prognostication, early diagnosis, and individually tailored therapeutic interventions in esophageal oncology. PMID:26185530

  17. [Post-traumatic hematoma simulating a left-sided adrenal gland tumor].

    PubMed

    Will, C H; Hoeppener, H J; Beutler, W

    1990-01-01

    Typical signs of posttraumatic adrenal gland haematoma in computer-tomography are, besides an enlargement of the adrenal gland, a stripy infiltration of surrounding tissue and a thickening of the homolateral crus of the diaphragma, located primarily in the right adrenal gland. We report a case of an isolated enlargement of the left adrenal gland with normal surrounding tissue, which histologically proved to be a posttraumatic hematoma within the adrenal gland medulla.

  18. Time interval to surgery and outcomes following the surgical treatment of acute traumatic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Kwon, Churl-Su; Phillips, H Westley; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-12-01

    Although the pre-surgical management of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma prioritizes rapid transport to the operating room, there is conflicting evidence regarding the importance of time interval from injury to surgery with regards to outcomes. We sought to determine the association of surgical timing with outcomes for subdural hematoma. A retrospective review was performed of 522 consecutive patients admitted to a single center from 2006-2012 who underwent emergent craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma. After excluding patients with unknown time of injury, penetrating trauma, concurrent cerebrovascular injury, epidural hematoma, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL, there remained 45 patients identified for analysis. Using a multiple regression model, we examined the effect of surgical timing, in addition to other variables on in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), as well as the need for tracheostomy or gastrostomy (secondary outcome). We found that increasing injury severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.035-1.270; p=0.009) and age (OR1.066; 95%CI 1.006-1.129; p=0.031) were associated with in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis. In this model, increasing time to surgery was not associated with mortality, and in fact had a significant effect in decreasing mortality (OR 0.984; 95%CI 0.971-0.997; p=0.018). Premorbid aspirin use was associated with a paradoxical decrease in mortality (OR 0.019; 95%CI 0.001-0.392; p=0.010). In this patient sample, shorter time interval from injury to surgery was not associated with better outcomes. While there are potential confounding factors, these findings support the evaluation of rigorous preoperative resuscitation as a priority in future study. PMID:25065950

  19. No more Doritos and lobster tails: a case report of life-threatening sublingual hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Huma; Gilani, Javed M; Khan, Omar A

    2009-07-01

    This case report highlights a life-threatening complication of mild hemophilia A. We report the onset of airway compromise through a massive sublingual hematoma in a 67-year-old male suffering from the mild form of hemophilia A. This case emphasizes the need for prompt medical attention and recognition of potentially serious complications of the disease in patients suffering with even mild form of this bleeding diathesis. PMID:19902776

  20. [Retroperitoneal hematoma revealing a tumor of the inferior vena cava: about a case].

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, Karim; Malki, Sidi Mohamed; Er-Raji, Ihssane; Derkaoui, Ali; Shimi, Abdelkrim; Khatouf, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the inferior vena cava are rare, their most common histology is represented by leiomyosarcoma. They have few specific clinical features, however, the literature does not report hemorrhagic manifestations. Preoperative diagnosis is based on tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); it is confirmed by histology. We report a case with retroperitoneal hematoma revealing a tumor of the inferior vena cava. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological findings. PMID:27642432

  1. Ultrasonographic evaluation of neck hematoma and block salvage after failed neurostimulation-guided interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stephen M; Unger, M W Todd; Colson, James D; Serafini, Mario

    2010-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthetic techniques have shown some advantages over conventional paresthesia and neurostimulation techniques. We report the case of a neurostimulation-guided continuous interscalene block that would have ended in complication were it not for experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Familiarity with ultrasound-guided block techniques permitted assessment of a neck hematoma during interscalene block and ultimately allowed successful peripheral nerve block.

  2. Ventricular tachycardia from intracardiac hematoma in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Solhpour, Amirreza; Ananaba-Ekeruo, Ijeoma; Memon, Nada B; Kantharia, Bharat K

    2014-01-01

    In the victims of motor vehicle accidents, unrecognized myocardial injuries may pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we present a case of a 17-year-old man who developed multiple ventricular premature complexes and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. We discuss significance of the electrocardiographic abnormalities in making an accurate diagnosis of cardiac hematoma and its management. PMID:24581106

  3. Delayed Diagnosis of Pelvic Hematoma without Fracture Due to Military Parachuting.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cord W; Kotwal, Russ S; Kragh, John F

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has been conducting static-line parachute jumps for nearly a century. Beginning with World War II, military forces have also employed full-scale airborne operations as a method for insertion into combat. Through the years, injuries from blunt trauma as a result of static-line parachute jumps have evolved little with the refinement of equipment, training, and tactics. Parachute jumps continue to invoke primarily musculoskeletal injuries, especially to the lower extremities, back, neck, and head. These injuries are usually straightforward in their presentation and diagnosis. We describe the delayed diagnosis of a pelvic hematoma due to an uncommon blunt trauma jump injury. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of injury patterns during paratrooper operations, as well as to review the diagnosis and management of occult hemorrhage. Specific objectives for the readers are to (1) know the common injury types and patterns for airborne operations, (2) know the descent rate of T-10C/D parachutes and factors influencing the rate, (3) recognize signs and symptoms associated with a pelvic hematoma, and (4) recognize common complications resulting from a pelvic hematoma.

  4. [Postoperative epidural hematoma remote from the site of craniotomy for STA-MCA anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Ohata, Hiroto; Yamada, Tadanori; Dohi, Shuji

    2008-06-01

    We experienced a case in which the cause of acute brain swelling following resection of dura matter could not be recognized until the postoperative CT scan. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of Moyamoya disease. Right hemiplegia developed a month before operation, so that the anti-platelet therapy was continued. At the end of dural resection the brain started to bulge and the brain swelling increased progressively. The patient was immediately placed on a head up position and received a rapid administration of mannitol for the treatment. The operator performed the echo examination for clarifying the cause of the brain swelling, but they could not find it. As the brain swelling slightly improved by the treatment, the surgery was performed continuously At the end of the operation the patient was moved for a CT scan and it showed mass effect caused by epidural hematoma over the left temporal region distant from the site of craniotomy. Evacuation of the hematoma was carried out urgently. At discharge, she was conscious and had no focal neurological deficits. The occurrence of the epidural hematoma is one of the reasons for unknown brain swelling during surgery. We strongly recommend that any sudden deterioration during the operation should be treated with emergency CT scan. PMID:18546910

  5. [Improvement of MRI effectiveness in the detection of intracerebral hematoma. Double inversion recovery].

    PubMed

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Guseva, O I; Shumm, B A; Fomenkov, S A; Prokhorov, A V; Khetchikov, G V; Barkova, L A

    2009-01-01

    A study aimed at developing the pulse consequence, the double inversion recovery (DIR), using low field magnetic tomography, and assessing its effectiveness in the detection of intracerebral hematoma. The research has been conducted at "Ellipse" MR tomograph. The new pulse sequence has been created by the modification of the regular FLAIR, its technical parameters were as follows: the first TI - 90 ms, the second TI - 1300 ms, TR - 4665 ms, echo - 3. Twenty-seven patients have been enrolled in the study. The tissue contrast coefficients on FLAIR and DIR images have been compared. It has been shown that the contrast coefficient of normal brain structures and brain lesions on the DIR images in regard to the white matter are significantly higher than on the FLAIR images. Results of the study revealed that the dynamics of MR symptoms of intracerebral hematoma is faster on the DIR images compared to the FLAIR ones. This finding can be used for detection of intracerebral hematoma in difficult clinical cases.

  6. Rare complication after a transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a giant retroperitoneal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Chiancone, Francesco; Mirone, Vincenzo; Fedelini, Maurizio; Meccariello, Clemente; Pucci, Luigi; Carrino, Maurizio; Fedelini, Paolo

    2016-05-24

    Common complications related to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic needle biopsy are hematuria, hematospermia, and hematochezia. To the best of our knowledge, we report the second case of a very large hematoma extending from the pelvis into the retroperitoneal space in literature.A 66-year-old man with a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5.4 ng/ml was admitted to our department for a TRUS-guided prostatic needle biopsy. Laboratory values on the day before biopsy, including coagulation studies, were all normal. The patients did not take any anticoagulant drugs. No immediate complications were encountered. Nevertheless, 7 hours after the biopsy, the patient reached our emergency department with severe diffuse abdominal pain, hypotension, tachycardia, and confusional state. He underwent an ultrasonography and then a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed "a blood collection in the pelvis that extending to the lower pole of left kidney associated with a focus of active contrast extravasation, indicating active ongoing prostate bleeding." Consequently, he underwent a diagnostic angiography that showed no more contrast extravasation, without the need of embolization. Management of hematoma has been conservative and hematoma was completely reabsorbed 4 months later.

  7. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Therapeutic Strategies and Outcomes of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Koichi; MIMA, Tatsuo; AKIBA, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has increasingly been recognized, and it is well known that SIH is sometimes complicated by chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, 55 cases of SIH with SDH were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on therapeutic strategies and outcomes. Of 169 SIH cases (75 males, 84 females), 55 (36 males, 19 females) were complicated by SDH. SIH was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, neuroimaging, and/or low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Presence of orthostatic headache and diffuse meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging were regarded as the most important criteria. Among 55 SIH with SDH cases, 13 improved with conservative treatment, 25 initially received an epidural blood patch (EBP), and 17 initially underwent irrigation of the hematomas. Of the 25 initially treated with EBP, 7 (28.0%) needed SDH surgery and 18 (72.0%) recovered fully without surgery. Of 17 SDH cases initially treated with surgery, 6 (35.7%) required no EBP therapy and the other 11 (64.3%) needed EBP and/or additional SDH operations. In the latter group, 2 cases had transient severe complications during and after the procedures. One of these 2 cases developed a hoarse voice complication. Despite this single, non-severe complication, all enrolled in this study achieved good outcomes. The present study suggests that patients initially receiving SDH surgery may need additional treatments and may occasionally have complications. If conservative treatment is insufficient, EBP should be performed prior to hematoma irrigation. PMID:26489406

  8. Acute carotid artery dissection treated with stenting and hematoma aspiration guided by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liming; Zha, Changsong; Liu, Hao; Xu, Jianjun; Xiang, Yuexia; Zou, Zhongmin

    2013-10-01

    We report the successful treatment of dissection with stenosis of the carotid artery by stenting and aspiration of hematoma. A male patient, presenting with acute blurred vision and weakness and numbness of the right side of his body, was diagnosed with common carotid artery (CCA) dissection and severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery and CCA by digital subtraction arteriography and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU). Two stents were separately implanted into the left internal carotid artery and CCA to restore blood flow and seal the opening of the dissection. The hematoma inside the CCA dissection was transcutaneously aspirated under CDU guidance after thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator. Three days after the operation, the dissection was still sealed. The patient was discharged 1 week later without any signs or symptoms. Follow-up examination at 70 days confirmed complete healing of the CCA dissection. Transcutaneous intradissection hematoma aspiration with CDU guidance may be applicable in treating arterial dissection, especially when conservative treatments cannot be expected to improve severe flow disturbances. PMID:22941665

  9. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma management with minimally invasive surgery through tubular retractors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chao-Feng; Zhuang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Cai, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhao, Wei; Ahmada, Said Idrissa; Devi, Ramparsad Doorga; Kibria, Md Golam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To report a minimally invasive paraspinal approach in the treatment of a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). We additionally aim to review the relevant literature to enhance our knowledge of this disease. SSEH is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic disease. Currently, most appropriate management is emergence decompression laminectomy and hematoma evacuation. An 81-year-old woman was admitted to the neurology department with a chief complaint of bilateral numbness and weakness of the lower limbs and difficulty walking for 4 days with progressive weakness developed over the following 3 days accompanied with pain in the lower limbs and lower back. No history of trauma was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spine demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from T-12 to L-5 with thecal sac and cauda equina displacement anterior. The patient was treated in our department with a minimally invasive approach. This operation method had been approved by Chinese Independent Ethics Committee. Three months following the operation, the patient had regained the ability to walk with the aid of a cane and myodynamia tests revealed normal results for the left lower limb and a 4/5 grade for the right limb. Importantly, no complications were exhibited from the surgical operation. The minimally invasive paraspinal approach through tubular retractors is demonstrated here as an effective alternative method for the treatment of SSEH. PMID:27367986

  10. [A case of acute intracranial epidural hematoma caused by chronic nasal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kazunori; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial acute epidural hematoma(EDH)is rare. It is mostly caused by coagulation disorders, dural metastasis, or vascular malformations of the dura. We report a case of non-traumatic acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis and review the literature comprising 10 cases of acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis. A 16-year-old boy visited our outpatient clinic with a 2-day history of severe headache. He did not have fever or neurological abnormalities and showed no evidence of head trauma. Cranial computed tomography(CT)revealed sphenoid sinusitis and a small amount of epidural air in the middle fossa, but no other intracranial abnormalities. After eight days with no subsequent history of trauma, radiological exams showed a massive acute epidural hematoma in the left middle fossa and temporal convexity without any vascular lesion or skull fracture. The patient underwent a hematoma evacuation that revealed neither a skull fracture nor a vascular abnormality. In this adolescent, chronic nasal sinusitis caused fragility of the meningeal artery wall, an air collection in the epidural space, and the detachment of the dura mater from the inner surface of the skull, thereby resulting in a non-traumatic acute EDH.

  11. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD.

  12. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. PMID:24447643

  13. Delayed Diagnosis of Pelvic Hematoma without Fracture Due to Military Parachuting.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cord W; Kotwal, Russ S; Kragh, John F

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has been conducting static-line parachute jumps for nearly a century. Beginning with World War II, military forces have also employed full-scale airborne operations as a method for insertion into combat. Through the years, injuries from blunt trauma as a result of static-line parachute jumps have evolved little with the refinement of equipment, training, and tactics. Parachute jumps continue to invoke primarily musculoskeletal injuries, especially to the lower extremities, back, neck, and head. These injuries are usually straightforward in their presentation and diagnosis. We describe the delayed diagnosis of a pelvic hematoma due to an uncommon blunt trauma jump injury. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of injury patterns during paratrooper operations, as well as to review the diagnosis and management of occult hemorrhage. Specific objectives for the readers are to (1) know the common injury types and patterns for airborne operations, (2) know the descent rate of T-10C/D parachutes and factors influencing the rate, (3) recognize signs and symptoms associated with a pelvic hematoma, and (4) recognize common complications resulting from a pelvic hematoma. PMID:24419827

  14. Thoracoscopic esophageal atresia repair made easy. An applicable trick.

    PubMed

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Shojaeian, Reza; Gharavi Fard, Mohammad; Joodi, Marjan; Sabzevari, Alireza; Nazarzade, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia is becoming more popular but technical difficulties in handsewn anastomosis still remain challenging. This article presents an easy and applicable maneuver by passing the trans-esophageal tube before starting to suture in order to minimize the gap, reduce the tension over primary sutures and provide a better visualization of posterolateral parts of the anastomosis in thoracoscopic esophageal atresia repair. Using this maneuver makes tying easier and minimizes grasping and crushing damages to the anastomotic site.

  15. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  16. Adult-Onset Esophageal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasarala, George; Durrett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal involvement is rarely seen in adults, especially at the initial diagnosis of CD. Esophageal symptoms as primary manifestations of the disease are extremely rare. We report a case of a CD with esophageal involvement at the time of her initial diagnosis of CD. PMID:27761477

  17. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PEREIRA, Douglas Rizzanti; do AMARAL, Paula Casals; LIMA, Juliana Carolina Alves; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. Aim To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Methods Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. Results The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with

  18. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, J D; KC, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenb, M E

    2014-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3 (DSG3). Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin, a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as periostin. PMID:24220297

  19. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, J D; Kc, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenberg, M E

    2014-05-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3. Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin (POSTN), a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as POSTN. PMID:24220297

  20. [A case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Mitani, Maki; Kawamoto, Kunihiko; Funakawa, Itaru; Jinnai, Kenji

    2005-08-01

    In 1992, a 63 year-old woman complained of dysphagia and chest pain, and was diagnosed with esophageal achalasia. Three years later, she developed resting tremor, cog-wheel rigidity, and retro-pulsion, and was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and given appropriate medication. Several years later, intractable vomitting and aspiration pneumonia developed, and the lower esophageal sphincter was dilated using a pneumatic balloon dilator under gastroscopic guidance in 2004. That procedure improved her symptoms and the esophageal dilation was visualized on chest CT images. Herein, we report this rare case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease and discuss the relationship between the two diseases.

  1. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  2. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Hiroki; Sato, Chiaki; Hokierti, Chananya

    2014-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is one of the alternative treatment for achalasia. Due to concept of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), it becomes popular and widely accepted. With the endoluminal technique, submucosal tunnel was created followed by endoscopic myotomy. POEM is not only indicated in classical achalasia but also other abnormal esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, failures of endoscopic treatment or surgical attempted cases are not contraindicated for POEM. The second attempted POEM is also safe and technically feasible. Even though the legend of success of POEM is fruitful, the possible complications are very frightened. Good training and delicate practice will reduce rate of complications. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art of POEM, including indication equipments, technique and complications. This perfect procedure may become the treatment of choice of achalasia and some esophageal motility disorders in the near future. PMID:25333007

  3. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  4. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  5. Difficult esophageal atresia: trick and treat.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Andrea; Morini, Francesco; Bagolan, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    Although most patients with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) may benefit from "standard" management, which is deferred emergency surgery, some may present unexpected elements that change this paradigm. Birth weight, associated anomalies, and long gap can influence the therapeutic schedule of the patients with EA/TEF and can make their treatment tricky. As a consequence, detailed information on these aspects gives the power to develop a decision-making process as correct as possible. In this article, we will review the most important factors influencing the treatment of patients with EA/TEF and will share our experience on the diagnostic and therapeutic tips that may provide pivotal help in the management of such patients.

  6. Early esophageal cancer screening in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Yan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    In China, the incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) and its related mortality are high. Screening strategies aiming at early diagnosis can improve the prognosis. Researches on detection of early EC, especially in China are reviewed. Compared to esophageal balloon cytology or routine endoscopy, chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining and biopsy appears to be the gold standard for early EC diagnosis in China today. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy, Confocal Laser endomicroscopy and other novel diagnostic approaches are more and more widely used in developed urban areas, but cost and lack of essential training to the endoscopists have made their use limited in rural areas. No specific biomarkers or serum markers were strongly commended to be used in screening strategies currently, which need to be evaluated in future. Trials on organized screening have been proposed in some regions of china with high disease prevalence. Screening in these areas has been shown to be cost effective. PMID:26651250

  7. Current strategies in chemoradiation for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has an important role in the treatment of esophageal cancer in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy is generally given to 41.4-50.4 Gy with platinum or paclitaxel based chemotherapy. The most common definitive dose in the U.S. is 50-50.4 Gy. New advances in CRT for esophageal cancer have come from looking for ways to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy. Recent investigations for minimizing toxicity have focused advanced radiation techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy, have sought to further define normal tissue tolerances, and have examined the use of tighter fields with less elective clinical target volume coverage. Efforts to maximize efficacy have included the use of early positron emission tomography (PET) response directed therapy, molecularly targeted therapies, and the use of tumor markers that predict response. PMID:24982764

  8. Early esophageal cancer screening in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Yan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    In China, the incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) and its related mortality are high. Screening strategies aiming at early diagnosis can improve the prognosis. Researches on detection of early EC, especially in China are reviewed. Compared to esophageal balloon cytology or routine endoscopy, chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining and biopsy appears to be the gold standard for early EC diagnosis in China today. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy, Confocal Laser endomicroscopy and other novel diagnostic approaches are more and more widely used in developed urban areas, but cost and lack of essential training to the endoscopists have made their use limited in rural areas. No specific biomarkers or serum markers were strongly commended to be used in screening strategies currently, which need to be evaluated in future. Trials on organized screening have been proposed in some regions of china with high disease prevalence. Screening in these areas has been shown to be cost effective.

  9. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  10. Advances in Clinical Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Liacouras, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    EoE is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsies, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and PPI-REE. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (current incidence of 1/10,000 new cases per year and prevalence of 0.5-1/1,000 cases per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and non-directed empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenostic complications of EoE. There are number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment endpoints, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines—EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

  11. Elucidation of the role of biological factors and device design in cerebral NIRS using an in vivo hematoma model based on high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Huang, Stanley; Myers, Matthew; Chen, Yu; Welle, Cristin; Pfefer, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging medical countermeasure for rapid, field detection of hematomas caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Bench and animal tests to determine NIRS sensitivity and specificity are needed. However, current animal models involving non-invasively induced, localized neural damage are limited. We investigated an in vivo murine hematoma model in which cerebral hemorrhage was induced noninvasively by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with calibrated positioning and parameters. To characterize the morphology of induced hematomas, we used skull-intact histological evaluation. A multi-wavelength fiber-optic NIRS system with three source-detector separation distances was used to detect hematoma A 1.1 MHz transducer produced consistent small-to-medium hematoma localized to a single hemisphere, along with bruising of the scalp, with a low mortality rate. A 220 kHz transducer produced larger, more diffuse hematomas, with higher variability in size and a correspondingly higher mortality rate. No skin bruising or blood accumulation between the skin and skull was observed following injury application with the 220 kHz transducer. Histological analysis showed higher sensitivity for larger hematomas (>4x4 mm2). NIRS optical density change after HIFU was able to detect all hematomas, with sensitivity dependent on wavelength and separation distance. While improvements in methods for validating cerebral blood distribution are needed, the HIFU hematoma model provided useful insights that will inform development of biologically relevant, performance test methods for cerebral NIRS systems.

  12. [Minimally Invasive Treatment of Esophageal Benign Diseases].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    As a minimally invasive treatment of esophageal achalasia per-oral endoscopic myotomy( POEM) was developed in 2008. More than 1,100 cases of achalasia-related diseases received POEM. Success rate of the procedure was more than 95%(Eckerdt score improvement 3 points and more). No serious( Clavian-Dindo classification III b and more) complication was experienced. These results suggest that POEM becomes a standard minimally invasive treatment for achalasia-related diseases. As an off-shoot of POEM submucosal tumor removal through submucosal tunnel (per-oral endoscopic tumor resection:POET) was developed and safely performed. Best indication of POET is less than 5 cm esophageal leiomyoma. A novel endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was developed. Anti-reflux mucosectomy( ARMS) is nearly circumferential mucosal reduction of gastric cardia mucosa. ARMS is performed in 56 consecutive cases of refractory GERD. No major complications were encountered and excellent clinical results. Best indication of ARMS is a refractory GERD without long sliding hernia. Longest follow-up case is more than 10 years. Minimally invasive treatments for esophageal benign diseases are currently performed by therapeutic endoscopy. PMID:27440038

  13. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  15. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: A Diagnosis of Increasing Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shirley; Saxena, Aditi; Waljee, Akbar; Piraka, Cyrus; Purdy, Julianne; Appelman, Henry; McKenna, Barbara; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Singal, Amit G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite being found with increasing frequency on esophageal biopsies, the clinical significance of lymphocytic esophagitis (LE) remains poorly understood. Goals The primary aim of our study was to characterize the clinical presentation and natural history of LE among adult patients. Study We retrospectively reviewed records for all 81 adult patients at the University of Michigan Medical Center who had a histopathological diagnosis of LE between January 1998 and November 2009. Patient demographics, clinical history, laboratory data, and imaging results from the time of diagnosis were obtained through review of computerized medical records. A telephone survey was conducted to collect natural history data. Results The number of LE diagnoses increased over time, with 81.5% (n=66) of patients being diagnosed in the last three years. The most frequent symptoms at the time of presentation were dysphagia (n=54), chest/abdominal pain (n=36), and heartburn (n=38). The majority (58.6%) of patients reported improvement in their initial gastrointestinal symptoms – most commonly associated with initiation of a proton pump inhibitor. Upon follow-up, most patients reported a good quality of life and satisfaction with their current health status. Conclusions Lymphocytic esophagitis is a new clinical entity with an increasing incidence. LE appears to have a benign natural history, with most patients reporting an improvement in symptoms and satisfaction with their health-related quality of life. Prospective studies are needed to better characterize the natural history and potential treatments for this clinical entity. PMID:22751335

  16. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  17. Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms Predictive of Candida Esophagitis and Erosive Esophagitis in HIV and Non-HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuta; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Watanabe, Koji; Aoki, Tomonori; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Mimori, Akio; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but the difference of GI symptom severity between 2 groups remains unknown. Candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis, 2 major types of esophagitis, are seen in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but differences in GI symptoms that are predictive of esophagitis between 2 groups remain unknown. We aimed to determine whether GI symptoms differ between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, and identify specific symptoms of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis between 2 groups. We prospectively enrolled 6011 patients (HIV, 430; non-HIV, 5581) who underwent endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Nine upper GI symptoms (epigastric pain, heartburn, acid regurgitation, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia) were evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. Associations between esophagitis and symptoms were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and proton pump inhibitors. Endoscopy revealed GI-organic diseases in 33.4% (2010/6.011) of patients. The prevalence of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis was 11.2% and 12.1% in HIV-infected patients, respectively, whereas it was 2.9% and 10.7 % in non-HIV-infected patients, respectively. After excluding GI-organic diseases, HIV-infected patients had significantly (P < 0.05) higher symptom scores for heartburn, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia than non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients, any symptom was not significantly associated with CD4 cell count. In multivariate analysis, none of the 9 GI symptoms were associated with candida esophagitis in HIV-infected patients, whereas dysphagia and odynophagia were independently (P < 0.05) associated with candida esophagitis in non-HIV-infected patients. However, heartburn and acid regurgitation were independently (P < 0

  18. [Morphological changes in esophageal mucosa in children with overweight].

    PubMed

    Dubrovskaia, M I; Tertychnyĭ, A S; Mukhina, Iu G; Volodina, I I; Mamchenko, S I

    2010-01-01

    In present work we studied the morphological features of the esophageal mucosa in 63 children with endoscopic diagnosis of the distal esophagitis having overweight and normal weight of a body. The biopsies were taken at level of 3 cm above a Z-line and at level of 1 cm above a Z-line. Dystrophic and dysregenerative changes were revealed at the majority of children and half of children had inflammatory changes of the esophageal mucosa regardless of weight of a body. These changes are more pronounced at level of 1 cm above a Z-line, their occurrence decreases with a distance from low esophageal sphincter. We used the pathology score system for assess the esophageal biopsies. According our scale we obtained following results: at level of 1 cm above Z-lines at 95% of children had the normal, minimum or mild features of esophagitis regardless of weight of a body. Morphological evidence of a reflux esophagitis was diagnosed statistically more often at level of 1 cm above Z lines in comparison with level of 3 cm above Z-lines (p < 0.01) as among children with overweight of the body (78 and 43% accordingly), and among children with normal weight of the body (78 and 35% accordingly). The obtained data will be allowed to avoid hyperdiagnostics of esophageal lesions in children. PMID:20405708

  19. Prevention of esophageal strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Ohki, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Hosoi, Takahiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have recently been accepted as less invasive methods for treating patients with early esophageal cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia of Barrett’s esophagus. However, the large defects in the esophageal mucosa often cause severe esophageal strictures, which dramatically reduce the patient’s quality of life. Although preventive endoscopic balloon dilatation can reduce dysphagia and the frequency of dilatation, other approaches are necessary to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. This review describes several strategies for preventing esophageal strictures after ESD, with a particular focus on anti-inflammatory and tissue engineering approaches. The local injection of triamcinolone acetonide and other systemic steroid therapies are frequently used to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. Tissue engineering approaches for preventing esophageal strictures have recently been applied in basic research studies. Scaffolds with temporary stents have been applied in five cases, and this technique has been shown to be safe and is anticipated to prevent esophageal strictures. Fabricated autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets to cover the defective mucosa similarly to how commercially available skin products fabricated from epidermal cells are used for skin defects or in cases of intractable ulcers. Fabricated autologous oral-mucosal-epithelial cell sheets have already been shown to be safe. PMID:25386058

  20. Complementary role of CT and In-111 leukocyte scans in the diagnosis of infected hematoma and thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Floyd, W.; Raval, B.; Sandler, C.; Gobuty, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with traumatic hematomas or those with indwelling catheters who subsequently develop fever and sepsis without clinical localizing signs to indicate an inflammatory focus can present a diagnostic dilemma. Early diagnosis of an infected hematoma or thrombus is important to optimal management. CT can provide, exquisite delineation of anatomy identifying and localizing a post-traumatic fluid collection but cannot reliably distinguish hematoma from abscess in all cases. A thrombus at a catheter tip may be too small to be resolved; when identified, the question of infection again remains. In-111 leukocyte scanning provides a method for identifying or ruling out infection in these situations. The authors performed In-111 leukocyte scans on 15 patients with indwelling catheters. Five of these patients were febrile with positive blood cultures. In-111 leukocyte scans showed positive findings in 8 patients: 5 showed surgically confirmed infected hematomas in the abdomen (3 in the pelvis, 1 in a kidney, 1 in the splenic bed), and 3 showed infected thrombosis in catheter tips. The authors conclude that CT scanning and In-111 leukocyte scanning play complementary roles in the evaluation of traumatic hematomas and thrombosis, the former providing precise anatomic delineation and the latter providing evidence of inflammation.

  1. Atrial fibrillation driven by micro-anatomic intramural re-entry revealed by simultaneous sub-epicardial and sub-endocardial optical mapping in explanted human hearts

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Brian J.; Zhao, Jichao; Csepe, Thomas A.; Moore, Brandon T.; Li, Ning; Jayne, Laura A.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Lim, Praise; Bratasz, Anna; Powell, Kimerly A.; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Higgins, Robert S.D.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Weiss, Raul; Hummel, John D.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The complex architecture of the human atria may create physical substrates for sustained re-entry to drive atrial fibrillation (AF). The existence of sustained, anatomically defined AF drivers in humans has been challenged partly due to the lack of simultaneous endocardial–epicardial (Endo–Epi) mapping coupled with high-resolution 3D structural imaging. Methods and results Coronary-perfused human right atria from explanted diseased hearts (n = 8, 43–72 years old) were optically mapped simultaneously by three high-resolution CMOS cameras (two aligned Endo–Epi views (330 µm2 resolution) and one panoramic view). 3D gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (GE-MRI, 80 µm3 resolution) revealed the atrial wall structure varied in thickness (1.0 ± 0.7–6.8 ± 2.4 mm), transmural fiber angle differences, and interstitial fibrosis causing transmural activation delay from 23 ± 11 to 43 ± 22 ms at increased pacing rates. Sustained AF (>90 min) was induced by burst pacing during pinacidil (30–100 µM) perfusion. Dual-sided sub-Endo–sub-Epi optical mapping revealed that AF was driven by spatially and temporally stable intramural re-entry with 107 ± 50 ms cycle length and transmural activation delay of 67 ± 31 ms. Intramural re-entrant drivers were captured primarily by sub-Endo mapping, while sub-Epi mapping visualized re-entry or ‘breakthrough’ patterns. Re-entrant drivers were anchored on 3D micro-anatomic tracks (15.4 ± 2.2 × 6.0 ± 2.3 mm2, 2.9 ± 0.9 mm depth) formed by atrial musculature characterized by increased transmural fiber angle differences and interstitial fibrosis. Targeted radiofrequency ablation of the tracks verified these re-entries as drivers of AF. Conclusions Integrated 3D structural–functional mapping of diseased human right atria ex vivo revealed that the complex atrial microstructure caused significant differences between Endo vs. Epi activation during pacing and sustained AF driven by intramural re-entry anchored

  2. A Rare Disease of the Digestive Tract: Esophageal Melanosis

    PubMed Central

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Erbil, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal melanosis which is characterized by melanocytic proliferation in the squamous epithelium of the esophagus and melanin accumulatin of esophageal mucosa (EM) is a rare disease of the digestive system. Although esophageal melanosis is considered to be a benign disease, its etiology is not cleared and has been reported to be the precursor lesion of esophageal primary melanomas. In this report, we aimed to note esophageal melanosis in a 55-year-old female case who applied to our clinic with difficulty in swallowing, burning behind the breastbone in the stomach, heartburn, indigestion, and pain in the upper abdomen after endoscopic and pathologic evaluation. Complaints dropped with anti-acid therapy and case was followed by intermittent endoscopic procedures because of precursor melanocytic lesions. PMID:27785326

  3. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  4. Emerging techniques and efficacy of endoscopic esophageal reconstruction and lumen restoration for complete esophageal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Perbtani, Yaseen; Suarez, Alejandro L.; Wagh, Mihir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Complete esophageal obstruction (CEO) is a rare occurrence characterized by progressive esophageal stricture, which eventually causes lumen obliteration. With recent advances in flexible endoscopy, various innovative techniques exist for restoring luminal continuity. The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of patients undergoing combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation for CEO at our institution. The secondary aim was to review and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes, and adverse events after endoscopic treatment of CEO. Patients and methods: Our electronic endoscopy database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who underwent combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopy for CEO. Patient and procedural data collected included gender, age, technical success, pre- and post-dysphagia scores, and adverse events. Results: Six patients (67 % male, mean age 71.6 years [range 63 – 80]) underwent technically successful esophageal reconstruction with combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopy. All patients noted improvement in dysphagia with mean pre-procedure dysphagia score of 4 reduced to 1.33 (range 0 – 3) post-procedure. There were no adverse events and mean follow-up time was 17.3 months (range 3 – 48). Conclusions: Combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopic therapy for CEO is feasible and safe. We present our experience with endoscopic management of complete esophageal obstruction, and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes and adverse events related to this minimally invasive modality. PMID:26878039

  5. A new approach for the management of esophageal atresia without tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Nandini K; Grewal, Alka G; Rathore, Shubhra; George, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Long gap esophageal atresia (OA) is a challenging condition. While discussing the various methods of management available to us, we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging in a case of pure OA to judge the gap between two ends of the esophagus. PMID:27365910

  6. Patterns of esophageal inhibition during swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and transient LES relaxation. Lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and esophageal body inhibition co-occur during esophageal peristalsis but not necessarily during pharyngeal stimulation or transient LES relaxation (tLESR). This study examined these relationships and the impact on reflux. Nine young volunteers were studied. An artificial high-pressure zone (HPZ) was established, and pH was recorded 8 and 5 cm proximal to the LES. Pharyngeal stimulation was by water injection and gastric distension with liquid or gas. Peristalsis, pharyngeal stimulation, and spontaneous events were recorded. Swallowing relaxed the LES in 100% of trials (the HPZ in 80%) and caused no reflux. Pharyngeal stimulation relaxed the LES in two-thirds of trials, had no effect on the HPZ, and caused no reflux. Gastric distension was associated with 117 tLESRs, 48% with acid reflux, and 32% with gas reflux; there was no effect on the HPZ. We conclude that LES relaxation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for reflux. LES relaxation and esophageal body inhibition are independent events that may be concurrent (swallowing) or dissociated (tLESR).

  7. Upper Airway Hematoma Secondary to Warfarin Therapy: A Systematic Review of Reported Cases

    PubMed Central

    Karmacharya, Paras; Pathak, Ranjan; Ghimire, Sailu; Shrestha, Pragya; Ghimire, Sushil; Poudel, Dilli Ram; Khanal, Raju; Shah, Shirin; Aryal, Madan Raj; Alweis, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Upper airway hematoma (UAH) is a rare but life-threatening complication of oral anticoagulants requiring early recognition. However, no consensus exists regarding the best approach to treatment. We therefore, sought to systematically review the published literature on UAH to elaborate its demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, complications, and outcomes. A systematic electronic search of PubMed and EMBASE for case reports, case series, and related articles of UAH related to warfarin published from inception (November 1950) to March 2015 was carried out. Categorical variables were expressed as percentage and continuous variables as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. All cases were reported to have UAH as a complication of anticoagulation therapy with warfarin. Demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, complications and outcomes of UAH were studied. Thirty-eight cases of UAH were identified from 34 reports in the literature. No gender preponderance (male = 52.78%) was seen and the average age of presentation was 60.11 ± 12.50 years. Dysphagia, sore throat, and neck swelling were the most common symptoms and the mean international normalized ratio (INR)at presentation was 8.07 ± 4.04. Most cases had sublingual hematoma (66.57%) followed by retropharyngeal hematoma (27.03%). Of the cases, 48.65% were managed conservatively while the rest underwent either cricothyrotomy or intubation with the time to resolution being 7.69 ± 5.44 days. UAH is a rare butpotentially serious complication of warfarin therapy. It is more common in the elderly population with supratherapeutic INR; inciting events were present in many cases. Overall, it has a good prognosis with significant morbidity present only if concomitant respiratory compromise is present. Reversal of anticoagulation with low threshold for artificial airway placement in the event of airway

  8. Generation and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Esophageal Myofibroblast Line.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Chauhan, Uday; Gargus, Matthew; Shaker, Anisa

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells with a myofibroblast phenotype present in the normal human esophagus are increased in individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We have previously demonstrated that myofibroblasts stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion using primary cultures of myofibroblasts established from normal human esophagus. While primary cultures have the advantage of reflecting the in vivo environment, a short life span and unavoidable heterogeneity limits the usefulness of this model in larger scale in vitro cellular signaling studies. The major aim of this paper therefore was to generate a human esophageal myofibroblast line with an extended lifespan. In the work presented here we have generated and characterized an immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast line by transfection with a commercially available GFP-hTERT lentivirus. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts demonstrate phenotypic, genotypic and functional similarity to primary cultures of esophageal myofibroblasts we have previously described. We found that immortalized esophageal myofibroblasts retain myofibroblast spindle-shaped morphology at low and high confluence beyond passage 80, and express α-SMA, vimentin, and CD90 myofibroblast markers. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also express the putative acid receptor TRPV1 and TLR4 and retain the functional capacity to respond to stimuli encountered in GERD with secretion of IL-6. Finally, immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also support the stratified growth of squamous esophageal epithelial cells in 3D organotypic cultures. This newly characterized immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast cell line can be used in future cellular signaling and co-culture studies. PMID:27055018

  9. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Contributes to Esophageal Remodeling and Reverses with Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Akhtar, Noorain; Woodruff, Samantha A.; Rea, Bryan A.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Mukkada, Vincent; Parashette, Kalyan R.; Du, Jian; Fillon, Sophie; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Lee, James J.; Amsden, Katie; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Capocelli, Kelley E.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Ackerman, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying esophageal remodeling with subepithelial fibrosis in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) have not been delineated. Objectives To explore a role for Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) in EoE, and whether EMT resolves with treatment. Methods Esophageal biopsies from 60 children were immunostained for epithelial (cytokeratin) and mesenchymal (vimentin) EMT biomarkers, and EMT quantified. Subjects studied had EoE (n=17), EoE-indeterminate (n=15), GERD (n=7) or normal esophagus (n=21). EMT was analyzed for relationships to diagnosis, eosinophils, and indices of subepithelial fibrosis, eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) and TGF-β immunostaining. EMT was assessed in pre- and post-treatment biopsies from 18 EoE subjects treated with elemental diet, six-food elimination diet, or topical corticosteroids (n=6/group). Results TGF-β1 treatment of esophageal epithelial cells in vitro for 24hrs induced upregulation of mesenchymal genes characteristic of EMT including N-cadherin (3.3-fold), vimentin (2.1-fold) and fibronectin (7.5-fold). EMT in esophageal biopsies was associated with EoE (or indeterminate EoE), but not GERD or normal esophagus, and was correlated to eosinophils (r=0.691), EPX (r=0.738) and TGF-β (r=0.520) immunostaining, and fibrosis (r=0.644) indices. EMT resolved with EoE treatments that induced clinicopathologic remission with reduced eosinophils. EMT decreased significantly post-treatment by 74.1% overall in the 18 treated EoE subjects; pre- vs. post-treatment EMT scores–3.17±0.82 vs. 0.82±0.39 (p<0.001), with similar decreases within treatment groups. Pre-/post-treatment EMT was strongly correlated with eosinophils for combined (r=0.804, p< 0.001) and individual treatment groups. Conclusions EMT likely contributes to subepithelial fibrosis in EoE, resolves with treatments that decrease esophageal inflammation, and its resolution correlates with decreased numbers of esophageal eosinophils. PMID:22465212

  10. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  11. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  12. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  13. Pin-site epidural hematoma: A catastrophic complication of cranial fixation in a child

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Prasad; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Kartikueyan, Rajaraman; Patel, Sachinkumar Maheshbhai

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fixation with pins is a routine adjunct in neurosurgery and is usually considered safe. A rarely reported complication is skull fracture at the pin site and consequent epidural hematoma. Usually, these are picked up only postoperatively and rarely, intraoperatively if there is unexplained “brain bulge” in which case the operation should be terminated and urgent imaging has to be done. We describe such a complication that occurred while operating on a 12-year-old child with a posterior fossa tumor and review the available literature dealing with such events. PMID:27114664

  14. Dialysis-induced Subdural Hematoma in an Arachnoid Cyst Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a neurological complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although an AC can increase the risk of a subdural hematoma, the clinical presentation of bleeding into an AC associated with ADPKD is not well known. We herein report the case of a 59-year-old woman in whom the initiation of hemodialysis for renal failure led to AC bleeding. A change of anticoagulant from heparin to nafamostat mesilate allowed dialysis to continue without rebleeding. These findings suggest that hemodialysis in patients with an AC associated with ADPKD may increase the risk of bleeding. Nafamostat mesilate may be useful in such cases. PMID:27477416

  15. [Acute Subdural Hematoma in Snowboarders:A Multivariate Analysis of 79 Cases].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinya; Fukuda, Osamu; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Snowboarding-related head injuries have become less common as the number of snowboarders has decreased;however, severe head injuries, such as acute subdural hematomas, occur every snowboarding season. We investigated the characteristics of cases of snowboarding-related acute subdural hematoma treated at our hospital. A total of 3,632 patients with snowboarding-related head injuries seen at our hospital between the 1995/96 and 2012/13 snowboarding seasons were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine(2.2%)patients were diagnosed with acute subdural hematomas using computed tomography. We statistically analyzed the patient questionnaire responses, clinical records, and radiological findings. We compared the findings of the acute subdural hematoma(ASDH)group with those of the non-ASDH group. Among beginners, falling on a slope, incidents involving gentle slopes, and injuries of unknown origin were significantly more common in the ASDH group. On the other hand, among the intermediate snowboarders, incidents involving jumps, jump failure, and collisions with other snowboarders were more common in the non-ASDH group. Secondly, in an analysis involving subjects who had an ASDH, we compared the beginner group with the intermediate/advanced group. Falling on a slope, incidents involving gentle slopes, pure ASDH, diffuse brain swelling, and death were more common in the beginner group, and ASDH combined with contusions or subarachnoid hemorrhaging and incidents involving a jump were more common in the intermediate/advanced group. Finally, we summarized the cases of 10 subjects with an ASDH as well as diffuse brain swelling. Nine of the 10 patients died, 8 were first-timers or beginners, 6 had incidents involving flat or gentle slopes, and 5 had fallen on a slope. Snowboarding is a recreational sport;therefore, snowboarders must take responsibility for their actions. However, snowboarders, especially beginners, could decrease their risk of ASDH if they are informed about ASDH and

  16. [Percutaneous gastrostomy complicated with abdominal wall hematoma; severe anemia secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Chu, D; Chamorro, S; Arrieta, F; Cobo, M E; Calañas, A; Botella, J I; Balsa, J; Zamarrón, I; Vázquez, C

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) is a safe and effective procedure that offers clear advantages over nasogastric tube feeding to ensure adequate nutrition in patients with swallowing problems who have an intact digestive tract. With proper placement and monitoring methodology there are few complications in both the peritrack procedure as in the long run. However, despite being considered a safe technique it is not devoided of serious complications. We report a patient with dysphagia, requiring percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement developing a severe anemia with severe subcutaneous hematoma, given the exceptional case and literature review.

  17. Rate of Contrast Extravasation on CT Angiography Predicts Hematoma Expansion and Mortality in Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, H. Bart; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Musial, Hayley H.; Ciura, Viesha A.; Falcone, Guido J.; Ayres, Alison M.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Viswanathan, Anand; Anderson, Christopher D.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Pomerantz, Stuart R.; Ortiz, Claudia J.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Rosand, Jonathan; Romero, Javier M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the presence of contrast extravasation following CT angiography (CTA), termed the ‘spot sign’, predicts hematoma expansion and mortality. Since the biological underpinnings of the spot sign are not fully understood, we investigated whether the rate of contrast extravasation - which may reflect the rate of bleeding - predicts expansion and mortality beyond the simple presence of the spot sign. Methods Consecutive ICH patients with first-pass CTA followed by a 90-second delayed post-contrast CT (delayed CTA) were included. CTAs were reviewed for spot sign presence by two blinded readers. Spot sign volumes on first-pass and delayed CTA and ICH volumes were measured using semi-automated software. Extravasation rates were calculated and tested for association with hematoma expansion and mortality using uni- and multivariable logistic regression. Results 162 patients were included, 48 (30%) of whom had ≥1 spot sign. Median spot sign volume was 0.04mL on first-pass CTA and 0.4mL on delayed CTA. Median extravasation rate was 0.23mL/min overall, and 0.30mL/min among expanders versus 0.07mL/min in non-expanders. Extravasation rates were also significantly higher in patients who died in hospital: 0.27mL/min versus 0.04mL/min. In multivariable analysis, the extravasation rate was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (OR1.09 [95%CI 1.04–1.18], p=0.004), 90-day mortality (OR1.15 [95%CI 1.08–1.27], p=0.0004), and hematoma expansion (OR1.03 [95%CI 1.01–1.08], p=0.047). Conclusions Contrast extravasation rate, or spot sign growth, further refines the ability to predict hematoma expansion and mortality. Our results support the hypothesis that the spot sign directly measures active bleeding in acute ICH. PMID:26243220

  18. Spinal subdural hematoma with cauda equina syndrome: A complication of combined spinal epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Sethi, Priyanka; Jain, Jitesh Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) is considered safe in lower limb surgeries. We report a case of sudden neurological deterioration in a stable postoperative patient who was given CSE for total knee replacement and low molecular weight heparin in postoperative period. On the 4th postoperative day, she developed sudden onset weakness in left lower limb along with bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging spine revealed a subdural hematoma at L2-L3 level. Immediate laminectomy along with cord decompression was done and patient recovered well except for a persistent foot drop on left side. PMID:25948911

  19. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  20. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104