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Sample records for intramural esophagic hematoma

  1. Intramural esophagic hematoma secondary to coumarinic anticoagulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Esophagic Intramural Hematoma is an uncommon clinical condition, with a prognosis which is essentially benign. On most cases, a predisposing or precipitating factor may be seen, with the most common ones being the history of esophagic instrumentation, food impactations and thrombocytopenia. In the following manuscript, the authors present the case of a 54-years-old male with history of valve replacement surgery, who was treated at the Clinica Cardiovascular (Medellin, Colombia), with a clinical case of Intramural Esophagic Hematoma that was later confirmed to be due to a Coumarinic overanticoagulation. On this case, it is evidenced that Intramural Esophagic Hematoma is an unrecognized complication of Courmarinic anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20069068

  2. Intramural esophageal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Katarzyna; Rębowski, Marek; Kozak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramural esophageal tumors (IET) are located between unchanged mucous membrane and muscularis mucosae. They can be both benign and malignant. Aim To evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of IET. Material and methods During the years 2010–2015, 11 patients with IET were treated in our clinic. Diagnostics included gastroscopy, computed tomography of the chest, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle biopsy, and positron emission tomography (PET) of the esophagus in cases with no histopathological confirmation. Results Based on the conducted analysis we diagnosed 1 case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 case of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of esophageal cysts. In another 7 cases radiological images resembled leiomyoma but with no histopathological confirmation. Esophagectomy was performed in 2 cases of malignant tumors and 1 case of a large benign tumor. In other cases surgical enucleation of tumors was performed. Postoperatively we diagnosed 6 cases of leiomyoma, 1 case of schwannoma, 2 esophageal cysts, 1 case of GIST and 1 of esophageal cancer. Conclusions Intramural esophageal tumors is a very diverse group of tumors, both malignant and benign. In every case of IET we should seek histopathological conformation. Treatment of IET depends on localization, size and histopathological type of lesion. PMID:28096828

  3. Left atrial intramural hematoma after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Franks, Russell J; de Souza, Anthony; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare complication of a complex chronic total occlusion recanalization procedure. Perforation of a distal right coronary artery collateral results in a left atrial intramural hematoma with consequent circulatory collapse. Access to prompt transoesophageal echocardiography and urgent surgical intervention were lifesaving and the case highlights possible implications on the planning of complex chronic total occlusion recanalization procedures.

  4. [Post-traumatic intramural hematoma of the duodenum].

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Hulin, A; Desbordes, J M

    1986-01-01

    A post-traumatic intramural hematoma of duodenum in a 9 year old child was detected during exploratory laparotomy but left undisturbed. Postoperative follow up during parenteral feeding included surveillance by repeated gastrografin follow through examinations, normal transit being restored by the 12th day. Intramural hematoma of duodenum is usually due to injury and often affects male children. Symptomatology is that of upper digestive occlusion. The principal investigation should be gastro-duodenal follow through examinations with gastrografin, because of the risk of an associated perforation, to reveal possible partial or total duodenal obstruction. Conservative treatment is possible, but in case of failure or in adults surgery is indicated with evacuation of the hematoma and in some cases a gastro-jejunostomy.

  5. Spontaneous Intramural Duodenal Hematoma: Pancreatitis, Obstructive Jaundice, and Upper Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Somsap, Kulyada; Ruangwannasak, Somchai; Sripanaskul, Anan

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic intramural duodenal hematoma can cause upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, jaundice, and pancreatitis and may be present in patients with normal coagulation. However the pathogenesis of the condition and its relationship with acute pancreatitis remain unknown. We present a case of spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma and a case of successful nonoperative treatments. PMID:27891286

  6. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis as a diagnostic and therapeutic problem

    PubMed Central

    Gątarek, Juliusz; Orłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the case of a 68-year-old patient with alcohol dependence syndrome, who was admitted, in serious condition, to the Department of Surgery due to esophageal intramural lesions of unclear etiology. The imaging studies showed no signs of transmural perforation of the esophageal wall. Esophagogastroscopy revealed intramural fluid reservoirs and small oval cavities with smooth edges in the esophageal mucosa. The patient was treated conservatively with parenteral nutrition and rehabilitation. Subsequently, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit because of cardiorespiratory failure. Despite adequate pharmacological treatment, the patient died. PMID:27785146

  7. Medical and Surgical Management of a Descending Aorta Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer and Associated Ascending Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Braverman, Alan C.; Sanchez, Luis; Lawton, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with chest pain and a computed tomography scan demonstrated an acute penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) of the proximal descending aorta with an associated intramural hematoma (IMH) extending retrograde to the aortic root and distally to the renal arteries. He successfully underwent endovascular repair of the PAU and medical management of the associated ascending intramural hematoma with complete resolution at 6 months. PMID:26798718

  8. Computed tomography of intramural hematoma of the small intestime: a report of 3 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Plojoux, O.; Hauser, H.; Wettstein, P.

    1982-08-01

    CT findings in 3 cases of intramural hematoma of the small intestine are described. One patient needed surgery. CT characteristics were specific and included a region of increased density (50-80 H) representing the hematoma. The differential diagnosis includes tumor (lymphoma or melanoma) and inflammatory disease (Crohn disease or pancreatic cyst.)

  9. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  10. Outcomes and management of type A intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Harleen K.; Tanaka, Akiko; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M.; Afifi, Rana O.; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Initial optimal management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) with intramural hematoma (ATAIMH) remains controversial, especially between centers in the Eastern vs. Western worlds. We examined the literature and our experience to report outcomes after repair of ATAIMH. Methods We reviewed the hospital, follow-up clinic records and online mortality databases for all patients who presented to our center for open repair of ATAAD between 1999 and 2014. Preoperative characteristics, early and long-term outcomes were compared between classic ATAAD vs. ATAIMH. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank statistics. Results Of the 523 repaired ATAAD, 101 patients (19%) presented with IMH and 422 (81%) had classic dissection. ATAIMH were significantly older (64.8±12.9 vs. 56.8±14.6 years; P<0.001), more commonly females (39% vs. 26%; P=0.010), had poor baseline renal function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate) (P<0.017), more retrograde dissections (27% vs. 8.3%; P<0.001), and less distal malperfusion (5% vs. 15%; P<0.001). Age greater than 60 years, female sex, retrograde dissection, and Marfan syndrome were strongly correlated with ATAIMH. Time to repair for ATAIMH was longer (median, 55.3 vs. 9.8 hours; P<0.001) with one death in ATAIMH within three days of presentation (0.9% vs. 6%; P=0.040). In all, 30-day mortality in ATAIMH was not different from classic ATAAD (12% vs.16%; P=0.289). A significantly lower incidence of postoperative dialysis in ATAIMH was noted (10% vs. 19%; P=0.034). When adjusted for age and renal function, late survival was improved with IMH (P<0.039). Conclusions ATAIMH continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, comparable to classic aortic dissection. A multidisciplinary management approach involving aggressive medical management and risk stratification for timely surgical intervention, along with genetic profiling, is recommended for optimal care. Long-term monitoring is mandatory to assess

  11. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-04-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week.

  12. Conservatively treated Type B intramural hematoma: Progression into acute aortic dissection followed by spontaneous resolution, assessed by CT.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Guadalupe; Vasaturo, Sabina; Kroft, Lucia J M

    2014-01-01

    This case report shows the full spectrum evolution of type B intramural hematoma under conservative treatment, with initial progression into a true aortic dissection, followed by extremely rare near-complete healing of the dissection at followup.

  13. Conservatively treated Type B intramural hematoma: Progression into acute aortic dissection followed by spontaneous resolution, assessed by CT

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Guadalupe; Vasaturo, Sabina; Kroft, Lucia J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This case report shows the full spectrum evolution of type B intramural hematoma under conservative treatment, with initial progression into a true aortic dissection, followed by extremely rare near-complete healing of the dissection at followup. PMID:27186244

  14. Sonographic diagnosis of spontaneous intramural small bowel hematoma in a case of warfarin overdose.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Kuo-Chih; Ko, Shih-Yu; Wong, Chung-Shun; Chong, Chee-Fah

    2008-01-01

    A 38-year-old man who had been treated with warfarin since mitral valve replacement 10 years earlier presented with acute onset of epigastralgia and melena. Coagulation tests were abnormal with a prolonged prothrombin time of >60 seconds and a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of >120 seconds. Abdominal sonographic examination revealed duodenal intramural hematoma that was confirmed on CT. Warfarin therapy was stopped and the patient was treated conservatively with vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma. Recovery was uneventful, and the patient was re-warfarinized 2 weeks later. Duodenal hematoma can be readily diagnosed with bedside sonography.

  15. Intraoperative Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chan; Ravindranathan, Sharmila; Choksi, Vivek; Kattalan, Jestin Pudussery; Shankar, Uday; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Gastric intramural hematoma Symptoms: Bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accident Background: Intramural hematomas primarily present in the esophagus or duodenum. We report a case of intramural hematoma in the gastric wall (GIH) secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in a setting of platelet dysfunction. Case Report: This case study reviews the hospitalization of a 73-year-old male with a history of chronic kidney disease who was admitted for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and mitral valve repair. During his complicated hospital course, he inadvertently required the placement of a PEG tube. His coagulation profile prior to this procedure was within normal limits. The patient had no history of coagulopathy and was taking aspirin 81 mg per day. PEG tube placement was withheld due to an expanding hematoma that was noted at the site of needle insertion in the gastric wall. A single dose of intravenous desmopressin (0.3 microgram/kilogram) was administered under the suspicion of uremic bleeding. No further gastrointestinal bleeding events were observed. A platelet function assay (PFA) and collagen/epinephrine closure time indicated platelet dysfunction. Three days later, we again attempted a PEG tube placement. His PFA prior to this procedure had normalized due to aspirin discontinuation and improvement of renal function. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed an area of flat bluish gastric submucosal bruising at the site of the previous hematoma. The PEG tube was placed successfully at an adjacent site. Over the course of the following month, the patient underwent uneventful feeding through the PEG tube. Conclusions: To our knowledge, cases of GIH are rarely documented in literature. Multidisciplinary vigilance is required to maintain a high index of suspicion for this

  16. Intramural hematomas of the gastrointestinal system: a 5-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Osman; Gonenc, Murat; Karabulut, Mehmet; Akarsu, Cevher; Gok, Ilhan; Bozkurt, M. Abdussamet; Ilhan, Mehmet; Alıs, Halil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although spontaneous intramural hematomas of the gastrointestinal tract are very rare, they may be observed with the use of oral anticoagulant, though less frequently in cases of hematological malignancy and other bleeding disorders. Cases diagnosed as spontaneous intramural hematoma have been assessed in our clinic. Methods The cases, which were diagnosed as spontaneous intramural hematoma in the gastrointestinal tract (SIHGT) following anamnesis, physical examination, biochemical, radiological and endoscopic findings from July 2008 to July 2012, have been assessed retrospectively. Results Seven out of 13 cases were women and the mean age was 65.1 years (34 to 82 years). The most frequent complaint on admission was abdominal pain. The most frequent location of SIHGT was the ileum (n = 8). Oral anticoagulant use was the most common cause of etiology (n = 12). In 10 cases, International normalized ratio values were higher than treatment range (2 to 3, where mechanical valve replacement was 2.5 to 3.5) and mean value was 7.6 (1.70 to 23.13). While 12 cases were discharged without problems with medical treatment, one case with acute myeloid leukemia died in the intensive care unit following cerebrovascular attack. Conclusion Spontaneus bleeding and hematomas that may arise in connection with bleeding diathesis may be fatal in cases with long-term oral anticoagulant treatment and insufficient follow-up. In management of these cases, it may be necessary to arrange conservative follow up and/or initialize low molecular weight heparin, and administer vitamin K as well as replace blood products and coagulation factors when indicated. PMID:23908961

  17. Intramural hematoma of the thoracic aorta as a form of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Wacław

    2007-01-01

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the thoracic aorta is a complication with unknown etiology and a poorly predictable prognosis. There is also considerable controversy about the management and prognosis of IMH as well as the treatment. We present two cases of endovascular treatment of IMH with stent-graft placement. On the basis of references, we discuss risks of progression of the given pathology and possible complications. Despite the lack of uniform opinion about the management of this disorder, we present our observations of and experiences with endovascular treatment of IMH of the thoracic aorta.

  18. Intraoperative Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chan; Ravindranathan, Sharmila; Choksi, Vivek; Pudussery Kattalan, Jestin; Shankar, Uday; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-12-19

    BACKGROUND Intramural hematomas primarily present in the esophagus or duodenum. We report a case of intramural hematoma in the gastric wall (GIH) secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in a setting of platelet dysfunction. CASE REPORT This case study reviews the hospitalization of a 73-year-old male with a history of chronic kidney disease who was admitted for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and mitral valve repair. During his complicated hospital course, he inadvertently required the placement of a PEG tube. His coagulation profile prior to this procedure was within normal limits. The patient had no history of coagulopathy and was taking aspirin 81 mg per day. PEG tube placement was withheld due to an expanding hematoma that was noted at the site of needle insertion in the gastric wall. A single dose of intravenous desmopressin (0.3 microgram/kilogram) was administered under the suspicion of uremic bleeding. No further gastrointestinal bleeding events were observed. A platelet function assay (PFA) and collagen/epinephrine closure time indicated platelet dysfunction. Three days later, we again attempted a PEG tube placement. His PFA prior to this procedure had normalized due to aspirin discontinuation and improvement of renal function. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed an area of flat bluish gastric submucosal bruising at the site of the previous hematoma. The PEG tube was placed successfully at an adjacent site. Over the course of the following month, the patient underwent uneventful feeding through the PEG tube. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, cases of GIH are rarely documented in literature. Multidisciplinary vigilance is required to maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in patients with uremia or other coagulopathies to aid in prompt diagnosis.

  19. Cardiac Mass, Aortic Intramural Hematoma, and IgG4-related Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Luocheng; Wang, Zhiwei; Xu, Peng; Ruan, Yongle; Jiang, Wanli; Wu, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    As a designated entity within medicine, immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is relatively new. It is immune-mediated origin, characterized by a tendency for formation of tumefactive lesions, the infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, and frequent but not invariable elevations of IgG4 levels in the serum. IgG4-related cardiac mass accompanying aortic intramural hematoma is an extremely rare clinical presentation. Herein we present the case of a patient who was admitted to our department complaining of severe chest pain. Computed tomographic angiography examination revealed a cardiac mass accompanying an aortic intramural hematoma. He underwent a surgical resection of the cardiac mass and a replacement of the ascending aorta with Hemashield Platinum graft and made an uneventful recovery. A diagnosis of an IgG4-related disease was made based on laboratory results and pathological examination. Corticosteroids were administered postoperatively. This case shows that the heart itself can also be a potential site for IgG4-related disease.

  20. The potential value of intravascular ultrasound imaging in diagnosis of aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Schiele, Francois; Meneveau, Nicolas; Seronde, Marie-France; Legalery, Pierre; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Chocron, Sidney; Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential value of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging in the diagnosis of aortic intramural hematoma (AIH). Methods From September 2002 to May 2005, a consecutive series of 15 patients with suspected aortic dissection (AD) underwent both IVUS imaging and spiral computed tomography (CT). Six patients diagnosed as acute type B AIH by CT or IVUS composed the present study group. Results The study group consisted of five males and one female with mean age of 66 years old. All of them had chest or back pain. In one patient, CT omitted a localized AIH and an associated penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU), which were detected by IVUS. In another patient, CT mistaken a partly thrombosed false lumen as an AIH, whereas IVUS detected a subtle intimal tear and slow moving blood in the false lumen. In the four rest patients, both CT and IVUS made the diagnosis of AIH, however, IVUS detected three PAUs in three of them, only one of them was also detected by CT, and two of them escaped initial CT and were confirmed by follow up CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions IVUS imaging is a safe examination and has high accuracy in the diagnosis of AIH, particularly for diagnosing localized AIH, distinguishing AIH with thrombosed classic AD and detecting accompanied small PAUs. PMID:22783309

  1. Aortic Branch Artery Pseudoaneurysms Associated with Intramural Hematoma: When and How to Do Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Giancarlo; Williams, David M.

    2013-04-15

    To describe when and how to perform endovascular embolization of aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B intramural hematoma (IMH) involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) that increased significantly in size during follow-up. Sixty-one patients (39 men; mean {+-} standard deviation age 66.1 {+-} 11.2 years) with acute IMH undergoing at least two multidetector computed tomographic examinations during follow-up for 12 months or longer were enrolled. Overall, 48 patients (31 men, age 65.9 {+-} 11.5) had type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III). Among the 48 patients, 26 (54 %; 17 men, aged 64.3 {+-} 11.4 years) had 71 aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms. Overall, during a mean follow-up of 22.1 {+-} 9.5 months (range 12-42 months), 31 (44 %) pseudoaneurysms disappeared; 22 (31 %) decreased in size; two (3 %) remained stable; and 16 (22 %) increased in size. Among the 16 pseudoaneurysms with increasing size, five of these (three intercostal arteries, one combined intercostobronchial/intercostal arteries, one renal artery), present in five symptomatic patients, had a significant increase in size (thickness >10 mm; width and length >20 mm). These five patients underwent endovascular embolization with coils and/or Amplatzer Vascular Plug. In all patients, complete thrombosis and exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysm and relief of back pain were achieved. Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) may be considered relatively benign lesions. However, a small number may grow in size or extend longitudinally with clinical symptoms during follow-up, and in these cases, endovascular embolization can be an effective and safe procedure.

  2. Evaluation of esophageal intramural pseudo-diverticulosis using high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Masahito; Mikami, Hironobu; Izumi, Daisuke; Okimoto, Eiko; Tada, Yasumasa; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ishimura, Norihisa; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudo-diverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare disease characterized by multiple small flask-shaped pouches in the esophageal wall, with the predominant symptom of chronic progressive or intermittent dysphagia. However, its etiology and pathogenesis remain unknown. We present a case of EIPD evaluated with high-resolution manometry in a 75-year-old man with food impaction after eating beef, who came to our emergency department. The patient experienced similar episodes three times previously, though the cause was unknown. Computed tomography (CT) findings revealed diffuse wall thickness in the upper intrathoracic esophagus, while esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed multiple small depressions and several white plaque patches, and a barium meal esophagogram showed characteristic multiple small outpouching areas. From these findings, we diagnosed the patient with EIPD. In addition, high-resolution manometry revealed strong contractions in the distal esophagus. We started an administration of isosorbide dinitrate, because abnormal esophageal motility may have been causative of the condition and development of pseudo-diverticulosis. Thereafter, the patient had a good clinical course without food impaction. Elevated intra-esophageal luminal pressure caused by abnormal esophageal motility seems to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of EIPD in some cases.

  3. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis, a rare cause of food impaction: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Siba, Yahuza; Gorantla, Saritha; Gupta, Anand; Lung, Edward; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare, benign condition of uncertain etiology and pathogenesis, which usually presents with either progressive or intermittent dysphagia. Acute presentation with food impaction, requiring emergency esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD), is rare. We report a case of EIPD presenting as food bolus impaction in an elderly black female. The patient had no previous history of dysphagia or odynophagia. Currently accepted risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic alcoholism, and reflux esophagitis, were not present in our patient. Emergency EGD established the diagnosis and also dislodged the food bolus. Histopathological evaluation of the mucosa diagnosed co-existent acute candidal infection. Medical treatment with proton pump inhibitor and azole antifungal led to resolution of her symptoms. Review of the literature revealed that stenosis, strictures, perforation, gastro-intestinal bleed, and fistula formation are potential complications of EIPD. Multiple motility abnormalities have been described but are not consistent. Treatment of the underlying inflammatory and or infectious condition is the mainstay of management of this unusual condition. PMID:24951515

  4. Long-term follow-up after dilation in symptomatic esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis: an observational study in 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Bechtler, Matthias; Vollmer, Heiko; Vetter, Stephan; Fuchs, Erik-Sebastian; Weickert, Uwe; Jakobs, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Endoscopic bougienage seems to be the most effective therapy for dysphagia in esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD), but nothing is known about the long-term success of this treatment option. This report presents long-term results for 21 of 22 patients with EIPD who were treated with bougienage. A total of 103 sessions of bougienage up to a diameter of 18 mm were performed, without major complications and with 100 % clinical success. During follow-up, symptom recurrence with further bougienage occurred in 12 /21 patients (57 %), who had variable symptom-free intervals (range 1.5 - 96 months). Symptom recurrence was associated with concomitant reflux esophagitis. Although this series demonstrates that bougienage is an effective method for relieving dysphagia in EIPD, the long-term effectiveness is limited.

  5. Primary Esophageal Intramural Squamous Cell Carcinoma Masquerading as a Submucosal Tumor: A Rare Presentation of a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S.; Surude, Ravindra G.; Pawar, Vinay B.; Udgirkar, Suhas; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the commonest primary malignant esophageal tumor, which typically presents as endoscopically visible surface mucosal ulcerations, irregularities, or polyploidal masses. We here report a rare case of primary ESCC with completely intramural growth under a normal looking intact nondysplastic surface squamous epithelium disguising as a submucosal tumor. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy-guided mucosal biopsy was negative for malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed a heteroechoic solid mass originating from the muscularis propria of the distal esophagus. Cytological study of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration from the mass was suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma, which was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. There was no evidence of metastatic origin of this tumor or continuous cancer involvement from the surrounding structures, including the head, neck, and lungs on bronchoscopy, computed tomography scan, and positron emission tomography scan. Exclusive intramural squamous cell carcinoma with normal overlying mucosa is an exceedingly rare presentation of primary ESCC with only four cases reported in the literature so far. A high index of suspicion is required by the gastroenterologists and pathologists in diagnosing these cases as these tumors closely mimic the mesenchymal submucosal tumors such as lipoma, leiomyoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. EUS is an indispensable tool in making a preoperative diagnosis and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27721663

  6. Intramural hemorrhage simulating gastric neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sheward, S E; Davis, M; Amparo, E G; Gogel, H K

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of benign gastric ulcer with secondary extensive intramural hemorrhage causing a radiographic appearance consistent with a large ulcerated gastric neoplasm. This is the second such case reported and the first studied with sonography and computed tomographic scan. A brief review of the literature on intramural gastric hematoma is presented.

  7. Esophageal transection

    PubMed Central

    Özçınar, Beyza; Peker, Kıvanç Derya; Demirel, Sertaç; Yanar, Fatih; Tuncer, Koray; İğci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a case of intramural esophageal dissection is reported and the literature is reviewed. Intramural esophageal dissection is a rare but well described condition that is characterized by a laceration between the esophageal mucosa and submucosa but without perforation. A female patient aged 86 years was hospitalized with a diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. After placement of an aortic stent, she was started on intravenous heparin. After the procedure, the patient had retching and vomiting due to sedative drugs. On the first day after the procedure, the patient experienced sudden-onset chest pain, hematemesis, back pain and odynophagia. A hematoma was detected in the thoracic esophagus, which was opened during endoscopy and began to bleed suddenly owing to air insufflation. A false lumen was visualized within the esophagus. There was no perforation. The patient was followed up conservatively and discharged from the hospital uneventfully. In conclusion, we propose that esophageal transection, a condition that is widely regarded as relatively benign in the literature, has the potential to lead to perforation. It would be expected that most cases of esophageal transection would be managed conservatively. PMID:28149126

  8. Intramural Office Organization and Training Intramural Secretaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry; Van Der Kamp, Judy

    The intramural secretary position is crucial for the smooth, efficient operation of an intramural office. Interest in intramurals and recreation sports is a must if the secretary is to do a good job. The highly motivated secretary will function like another intramural staff member in terms of knowledge of the program and service to students. Since…

  9. Effective Intramural Publicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, R. Wayne

    1978-01-01

    Suggestions for publicizing a college intramural athletic program include preschool orientation, telephone hot-line, articles in the school newspaper, and commercial newspaper and television promotion. (MJB)

  10. Intramural Gymnastics Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, William L.

    1981-01-01

    An intramural gymnastic competition, if properly organized, can foster student and community interest in gymnastics. Aspects of organization and essential preplanning include: directing, judging, scoring, and managing. (JN)

  11. Commericial Involvement in Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Gerry

    Sport in general has long had ties with commercial interests, the most popular and widespread involving publicity. Intramural sports programs, however, have not cultivated many commercial involvements in publicity. The approach in intramural sports advertising is simple. A commercial interest pays for space or time in a given communication media…

  12. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritates the tissue. This problem is called gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). An autoimmune disorder called eosinophilic esophagitis also ... include: Cough Difficulty swallowing Painful swallowing Heartburn (acid reflux) Hoarseness Sore throat Exams and Tests The doctor ...

  13. Organizing an Intramural Triathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Suggestions for developing an intramural triathlon consisting of a 1000-yard swim, 15-mile bike ride, and 5-mile run are presented in this article. Topics to consider when organizing this event include course selection, publicity, personnel, equipment, and awards. (DF)

  14. Ralleyball: A Tennis Intramural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Stanley J.; Duncan, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Physical education teachers often look for ways to bring any activity to life and give it meaning with all-out participation from students. To showcase the talents of each sports-enthusiast-students, schools facilitate an intramural activity. The authors of this article present an intramural program titled Ralleyball, which is an ideal way to…

  15. Intracranial Hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessel ruptures within your brain or between your skull and your brain. The collection of blood (hematoma) ... slide forcefully against the inner wall of your skull and become bruised. Although some head injuries — such ...

  16. Subdural Hematoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    greater than 21 days old. They have a tendency to present in older patients and after non- accidental trauma in children and may be associated with...of head trauma. In children, chronic subdural hematoma may be caused by unrecognized or unreported accidental trauma, nonaccidental trauma or...whiplash force caused by violent shaking. Subdural hematomas in infants are only rarely caused by accidental injury. A heterogeneous subdural

  17. ASER core curriculum illustration project: aortic intramural hematoma (IMH).

    PubMed

    Perez-Girbes, Alexandre; Dunham, Gregor M; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-04-01

    This is the 23rd installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  18. A New Twist to Intramurals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildersleeve, Robert; Williams, Jill

    The intramural program at Arizona State University has recently undergone major reorganization. Three highlights of this year's program were the "Run to Tucson," the powerlifting meet, and the rodeo. The "Run to Tucson" involved a 126-mile football relay race from Arizona State University's campus in Tempe to the University of…

  19. Rectal colonic mural hematoma following enema for constipation while on therapeutic anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Rentea, Rebecca M.; Fehring, Charles H.

    2017-01-01

    Causes of colonic and recto-sigmoid hematomas are multifactorial. Patients can present with a combination of dropping hemoglobin, bowel obstruction and perforation. Computed tomography imaging can provide clues to a diagnosis of intramural hematoma. We present a case of rectal hematoma and a review of current management literature. A 72-year-old male on therapeutic anticoagulation for a pulmonary embolism, was administered an enema resulting in severe abdominal pain unresponsive to blood transfusion. A sigmoid colectomy with end colostomy was performed. Although rare, colonic and recto-sigmoid hematomas should be considered as a possible diagnosis for adults with abdominal pain on anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28108634

  20. Spontaneous intramural rupture and intramural haematoma of the oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, W F

    1980-01-01

    Spontaneous intramural rupture or intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is a rare cause of acute pain in the chest and upper abdomen. Much less ominous than spontaneous complete rupture from which it must be distinguished, it seldom if ever necessitates operation. Five new cases are described and reviewed together with 15 collected from published reports. The dominant symptom of every case was severe and constant retrosternal or epigastric pain; concomitant dysphagia was mentioned in 11 cases. In seven the pain was preceded by or coincided with vomiting. The condition was related to other stresses in three and appeared to be truly spontaneous in 10. In approximately one-third of cases it started suddenly but more often it began as discomfort worsening rapidly. Fourteen patients vomited blood after experiencing pain but only four were given transfusions. In contradistinction to complete rupture, none had surgical emphysema and plain chest radiographs were unremarkable. All had abnormal gastrografin or barium swallows. Intramural haematomas with or without mucosal tears were seen in the 11 cases in which oesophagoscopy was performed. Fifteen patients made rapid and complete recoveries on conservative management. Of the four who did not respond satisfactorily, one had the oesophagus repaired, two had drainage of the mediastinum after failure to find the false lumen at thoracotomy, and one had only an abdominal exploration. The only death in the whole series occurred after a disastrous emergency exploration and subsequent total oesophagectomy. Images PMID:6973833

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  2. Subserosal hematoma of the sigmoid colon after vaginal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bacalbașa, N; Bohîlțea, RE; Dumitru, M; Turcan, N; Cîrstoiu, MM

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is an obstetrical emergency that represents the leading cause of maternal mortality. Severe hemorrhagic complications that could appear postpartum are the abdomino-pelvic hematomas, which result from the rupture of the pelvic vessels. We reported a very rare case of puerperal retroperitoneal subserosal hematoma of sigmoid colon following vaginal delivery, which was successfully managed by conservative methods. As far as we know, there are only a few case reports of intramural hematoma of sigmoid colon in literature, having other etiologies than vaginal delivery trauma. The particularities of the case consisted in the association of hemangiomas and the low risk thrombophilia. Diagnosis was based on the clinical exam and the paraclinical founding. Laparotomy is generally considered the last choice, in life threatening cases with hemodynamic instability, compression signs, and presence of contrast leakage on noninvasive imaging methods, but avoiding colonic resection after dissection represented the true challenge of the case. PMID:28255383

  3. Diagnosis and management of intramural ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kimberly; Fernandez, Carlos; Rojas, David; Levine, Elliot M; Locher, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Intramural pregnancy, a gestation completely surrounded by the myometrium located within the uterine wall with separation from the uterine cavity, is an extremely unusual form of pregnancy. Complications resulting from intramural pregnancy include inevitable uterine rupture with resultant hemorrhage and possible hysterectomy if diagnosis is not made early and treatment is not initiated. An asymptomatic patient was initially diagnosed with a missed abortion at approximately 6 weeks of gestation after a routine ultrasound. Suction curettage was performed approximately 1 month after the initial diagnosis. The pathology specimen failed to reveal placental villi. Ultimately, the diagnosis of intramural pregnancy was made via ultrasound and a computed tomography scan. She was treated with a single dose of systemically administered methotrexate. Over a period of 4 months, β-human chorionic gonadotropin levels trended downward; however, the intramural pregnancy failed to resolve completely, and a persistent mass remained. The intramural pregnancy was removed using the da Vinci laparoscopic procedure (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). If the diagnosis of intramural ectopic pregnancy is made sufficiently early, conservative measures can be taken, which can preserve a patient's future fertility.

  4. Endoscopic Management of an Intramural Sinus Leak After Per- Oral Endoscopic Myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Al Taii, Haider; Confer, Bradley; Gabbard, Scott; Kroh, Matthew; Jang, Sunguk; Rodriguez, John; Parsi, Mansour A.; Vargo, John J.; Ponsky, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was developed less than a decade ago for the treatment of achalasia. Its minimally invasive approach and the favorable short-term outcome have led to rapid adoption of the technique throughout the world. As with any new technique, there will be adverse events, and it is important that effective treatments for these adverse events be discussed. We present a case of successful endoscopic management of an intramural sinus leak after a POEM procedure using tandem fully covered esophageal stents. PMID:27921057

  5. Nasal septal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, C M

    1998-04-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication of nasal trauma. Proper management consists of early recognition, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, and antimicrobial therapy if a secondary nasal septal abscess is suspected. Clindamycin is recommended as initial therapy until the results of cultures and susceptibility studies are available.

  6. The Social Benefits of Intramural Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artinger, Lori; Clapham, Lisa; Hunt, Carla; Meigs, Matthew; Milord, Nadia; Sampson, Bryan; Forrester, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of collegiate student recreational sports complexes is the sense of community that is intentionally introduced in the programs and services that occur within these facilities. Intramural sports programs provide a powerful medium for student interaction (Belch, Gebel, & Mass, 2001). This study was designed to…

  7. New Directions in Intramurals and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabian, Louis A.

    This survey attempts to verify and delineate the trends in intramural physical education. Surveys were mailed to 395 colleges and universities in November of 1975. Two hundred and thirty three (56.6%) were returned for statistical analysis, but the number of responses to questions varied because not all questions were applicable to every…

  8. Facility Consideration for Handicapped Intramural Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvaddy, Jim

    The author discusses the specifics of planning new facilities and restructuring existing ones for intramural and recreational use by handicapped and normal individuals. Detailed are suggestions for general accessibility (including parking, ramps and door hardware aspects), toilet facilities, swimming pools, and such miscellaneous facilities as…

  9. Nasal septal hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001292.htm Nasal septal hematoma To use the sharing features on this page, ... heal. References Chegar BE, Tatum SA III. Nasal fractures. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund VJ, et ...

  10. CO2 demonstration of multiple extravasations into a subcapsular hematoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Noboru; Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Hattori, Yuki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Sanada, Junichiro

    2004-01-01

    In a case of esophageal cancer with liver metastases, rupture of a liver metastasis resulted in subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Digital subtraction angiography with carbon dioxide showed multiple extravasations at the surface of the liver suggesting multiple ruptures of the penetrating hepatic capsular arteries. It was suggested that these findings are not rare in cases of subcapsular hematoma; however, they have received little attention.

  11. CO{sub 2} Demonstration of Multiple Extravasations into a Subcapsular Hematoma of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Terayama, Noboru Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Hattori, Yuki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Sanada, Junichiro

    2004-09-15

    In a case of esophageal cancer with liver metastases, rupture of a liver metastasis resulted in subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Digital subtraction angiography with carbon dioxide showed multiple extravasations at the surface of the liver suggesting multiple ruptures of the penetrating hepatic capsular arteries. It was suggested that these findings are not rare in cases of subcapsular hematoma; however, they have received little attention.

  12. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  13. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  14. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  15. Symptomatic calcified subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Mahapatra, A; Pawar, S J; Sousa, J; Athale, S D

    1999-09-01

    Two unique cases of chronic calcified subdural hematomas are reported in children as a long-term complication of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Both the patients had undergone shunt procedures in infancy for congenital hydrocephalus. In one patient, the cause of the hydrocephalus was aqueduct stenosis, while in the second patient, a lumbar meningomyelocele was associated with hydrocephalus. In both these patients, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was done in infancy. In one of them, following the shunt surgery, a bilateral subdural collection was noticed which required burr hole evacuation. Both the patients remained asymptomatic for 9 years, when they presented to our center with acute raised intracranial pressure and contralateral hemiparesis. Both the patients had a relatively short history and had altered sensorium at admission. Surprisingly, in both the patients, the CT scan showed significant mass effect producing calcified subdural hematomas. The shunt systems were found to be working well at surgery. Craniotomy and excision of the calcified subdural hematomas was undertaken. Postoperatively, the patients showed satisfactory recovery, and at discharge the patients were doing well. At the follow-up at the outpatient clinic, the patients were asymptomatic.

  16. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  17. Intramurals for Handicapped Students at Kent State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoy, Winona

    1981-01-01

    As an outgrowth of a student project, a recreational swimming program for handicapped students at Kent State University proved to be such a success that intramural basketball competitions were organized for students confined to wheelchairs. (JN)

  18. The 25% Intramural Director Who Works for 100% Student Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodring, Chip

    1979-01-01

    Palm Beach Atlantic College has overcome time, budget, and facility limitations to develop an active intramural sports program by using community facilities, extensive publicity, and team and individual competition. (JMF)

  19. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that suppress or weaken your immune system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Herpes simplex virus ( ...

  20. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  1. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  2. Contralateral development of chronic subdural hematoma after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sucu, H Kamil; Gökmen, M; Bezircioglu, H; Tektaş, S

    2006-09-01

    Contralateral acute complications such as acute epi/subdural hematomas can be encountered after evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma, though they are rare. We found only one case of chronic subdural hematoma following the surgery for contralateral chronic subdural hematoma, have been published in English language literature. A 73-year-old male admitted to our hospital with a right-sided subdural hematoma. The subdural hematoma was evacuated through a burr-hole. A left-sided subdural higroma appeared after operation and turned into classical subdural hematoma in the course of time. After evacuation of contralateral chronic subdural hematoma, the patient recovered completely. All stages of the development of contralateral chronic subdural hematomas were shown by serial computed tomograms. It was suggested that traumatic chronic subdural hematomas develop from mostly subdural higromas. If contralateral subdural higroma is seen after surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma, the possibility of development of contralateral chronic subdural hematoma must be kept on mind.

  3. Intersecting Identities of Female College Student Intramural Sports Officials: A Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, April Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Intramural activities are conducted on virtually every college campus throughout the United States, but there is a debate as to the role of intramurals in the overall development of the student (Rothwell & Theodore, 2006). Specifically for females, not every sport is offered for participation at youth or higher levels, but intramural sports is…

  4. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is found, the better the chance of recovery; however, esophageal cancer is often found at an ... has decreased, the tubes will be removed. Recovery Recovery As with any surgery or operation, there are ...

  5. Esophageal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a congenital defect. This means it occurs before birth. There are several types. In most cases, the ... the lower esophagus and stomach. Most infants with EA have another defect called tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). This ...

  6. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition where infiltration of eosinophils into the esophageal mucosa leads to symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. It has rapidly emerged as an important cause of upper GI morbidity in patients of all ages and is encountered in a substantial proportion of patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy. This review discusses the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE and presents the most recent guidelines for diagnosis of EoE. It describes selected diagnostic dilemmas including distinguishing EoE from gastroesophageal reflux disease and addressing the newly recognized clinical entity of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It also highlights evidence to support both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments, including topical corticosteroids, dietary elimination therapy, and endoscopic dilation. PMID:23452635

  7. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and ...

  8. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - esophageal ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  9. Esophageal spasm

    MedlinePlus

    Kahrilas PJ, Pandolfino JE. Esophageal neuromuscular function and motility disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 43. Read More Achalasia Esophageal spasm Gastroesophageal reflux disease Review Date 8/ ...

  11. Annotated Bibliography of Intramural Research on Long-Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    As components of the National Center for Health Services Research Division of Intramural Research, the Long-Term Care Studies Program and the Aging Studies Program were established to define the problems of caring for the chronically ill and the elderly and to study the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services to these…

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  13. Esophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  15. [Chronic subdural hematoma: historical studies].

    PubMed

    Guénot, M

    2001-11-01

    The first description of a chronic subdural hematoma was made in 1658 by J.J. Wepfer, followed in 1761 by Morgagni. A possible case was described by Honoré de Balzac in 1840 including its traumatic origin and surgical treatment. Virchow, in 1857, denied a traumatic origin, and gave the name of "pachymeningitis hemorrhagica interna" to this pathology which he explained by inflammatory processes. The traumatic etiology of chronic subdural hematoma was recognized in the XXth century, especially by Trotter in 1914. Pathophysiology was considered later on in the XXth century.

  16. Inferior vena caval filter strut perforation causing intramural duodenal haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Zoheb Berry; Organ, Nicole M.; Deane, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of intramural duodenal haematoma caused by inferior vena caval (IVC) filter strut perforation requiring innovative open and endovascular retrieval. A 32-year-old woman presents in shock with dull epigastric pain and non-bilious vomiting. She had previously had an IVC filter for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Computed tomography demonstrated strut perforation into the second part of the duodenum, causing intramural haematoma and duodenal obstruction. Laparotomy facilitated evacuation of the duodenal haematoma, while the IVC filter was retrieved by endovascular means. Causes of duodenal haematoma include blunt trauma, haematologic malignancy, coagulopathy, percutaneous or endoscopic procedures, pancreatic pathology, peptic ulcer disease and aortoenteric fistula. Duodenal haematoma is rare and is usually managed conservatively or by percutaneous drainage. While this patient had a typical presentation, IVC filter strut perforation has not been described in the literature as a cause for duodenal haematoma. PMID:27887016

  17. Herpetic esophagitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpetic esophagitis is a herpes simplex infection causing inflammation and ulcers of the esophagus. Symptoms include difficulty swallowing and pain (dysphagia). Herpetic esophagitis can be effectively ...

  18. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  19. Hemorrhagic Shock as Complication of Intramural Intestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Mohamed Ali; Mhajba, Walid; Doghri, Hamdi Hamdène; Hassouna, Malek; Hechmi, Youssef Zied El; Jerbi, Zouheir; Ben Hassen, Ines; Daghfous, Mohamed Habib

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Mural intestinal hematoma (MIH) is an uncommon complication of anticoagulant therapy. Hemorrhagic shock has been rarely reported as a revealing modality. Results. We report two cases of shock induced by mural intestinal hematoma in patients under oral anticoagulant for aortic prosthetic valve and atrial fibrillation. Patients were admitted to the ICU for gastrointestinal tract bleeding associated with hemodynamic instability. After resuscitation, an abdominal CT scan has confirmed the diagnosis showing an extensive hematoma. Medical treatment was sufficient and there was no need for surgery. Conclusion. Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with shock in patients treated by oral anticoagulant should alert physicians to research a probable MIH. Urgent diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment can avoid surgical interventions. PMID:28299212

  20. Chronic Expanding Hematoma Following Abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, Sayo; Morioka, Daichi; Murakami, Naoki; Ohkubo, Fumio

    2017-02-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma (CEH) is a relatively rare complication of trauma or surgery. We report a patient with CEH as a late complication of abdominoplasty. A 58-year-old woman underwent conventional abdominoplasty and thereafter refused to use a compression binder, citing discomfort. One month postoperatively, she presented with a gradually enlarging, painful abdominal mass. The results of ultrasonography and computed tomography were highly suspicious for CEH. The lesion was completely removed, together with surrounding fibrous tissue. Histopathology revealed a chronic hemorrhage collection with a fibrous capsule, consistent with CEH. This condition as a late complication of abdominoplasty has not previously been reported in the literature. However, an online medical consultation site features several abdominoplasty patients asking about persistent hematomas that sound suspicious for CEH. CEH might be underdiagnosed by surgeons. Although a postoperative binder may increase the risk of skin necrosis and deep vein thrombosis, appropriate compression treatment is necessary to prevent hematoma formation. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  1. Management of esophageal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  2. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas.

  3. Intramyocardial Hematoma After Ebstein Anomaly Repair.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joel Kian Boon; Lee, Jan Hau; Mok, Yee Hui; Chen, Ching Kit; Loh, Yee Jim

    2017-01-01

    Intramyocardial hematoma is a rare condition and is an incomplete form of myocardial rupture, which may occur after myocardial infarction, cardiac surgery, trauma, percutaneous coronary intervention, or spontaneously. We describe a case of a 16-year-old girl with intramyocardial hematoma mimicking an intracavitary thrombus following repair of Ebstein anomaly. The intramyocardial hematoma was incorrectly diagnosed on echocardiography as a right ventricular thrombus, and the true nature of the lesion was only realized during repeat surgical intervention for severe tricuspid regurgitation. The hematoma was managed conservatively and spontaneously resolved.

  4. First-Generation College Students: Personal Best Leadership Experiences and Intramural Sports Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milone, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of interest in this exploratory case study was the self-reported leadership skills of first-generation college students who were actively participating in intramural sports. Specifically, the purpose was to describe participants' reports of engaging in behaviors or actions, during intramural sports, that are aligned with the…

  5. Cellular composition of the initial fracture hematoma compared to a muscle hematoma: a study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Schell, Hanna; Kolar, Paula; Pfaff, Michael; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank; Duda, Georg; Lienau, Jasmin

    2009-09-01

    Bone fracture leads to a cycle of inflammation, cellular migration, and proliferation to restore tissue integrity. Immune cells at the site of injury are involved especially in the early phase of the healing process, but little is known about the cells present in the initial fracture hematoma. The hypothesis of this study was that the cellular composition in a fracture hematoma differs from that found in a muscle hematoma and that these divergences get more pronounced over time. By using a reproducible osteotomy model and muscle trauma in sheep the distributions of the immune cell subpopulations were evaluated 1 and 4 h after surgery. The cell amount within the first 4 h increased in both hematoma. The number of dead cells was higher in the muscle hematoma. One hour postoperatively the initial fracture hematoma revealed a lower granulocyte percentage compared to the muscle hematoma. The ratio of T helper to cytotoxic T cells was higher in the fracture hematoma compared to the muscle hematoma at both investigated time points. B cell percentage increased in the fracture but not in the muscle hematoma from 1 to 4 h. This is the first study that compares the immune cell subpopulations of a fracture and muscle hematoma.

  6. Cervical epidural hematoma after chiropractic spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Jason D

    2009-10-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially devastating complication of spinal manipulation therapy. This is a case report of a healthy pregnant female who presented to the emergency department with a cervical epidural hematoma resulting from chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy that responded to conservative treatment rather than the more common route of surgical management.

  7. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits.

  8. [Retroperitoneal hematoma in pelvic fractures].

    PubMed

    Purghel, F; Jemna, C; Ciuvică, R

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal trauma implies a wide variety of organs in multiple systems (digestive, urinary, circulatory, musculoskeletal); although their common result is the retroperitoneal hematoma, their management is completely different, an intervention indicated for a particular lesion being able to completely decompensate other lesions in case of insufficient diagnostic. The present material highlights the recent diagnostic and therapeutic particularities in retroperitoneal hematoma from pelvic fractures. We noted a recent trend in diminishing the role of the fracture pattern on standard pelvis X-ray in assessing the risk of hemodinamic instability, new markers being indicated as more predictive. CT scan with contrast substance, when applies, remains the gold standard in identifying the source of the vascular bleeding and in guiding the subsequent therapeutic maneuvers. The angiographic embolisation in arterial lesions remains the main therapeutic procedure in hemodinamical unstable patients, with the possibility of repeating it when needed; the C-clamp external fixator application is associated. The pre-peritoneal packing constantly gains support as an emergency hemostasis maneuver. The treatment should be adapted in each case, the hemodinamic instability being the trigger in initiation and repetition of the emergency therapeutic interventions mentioned above.

  9. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  10. [Esophageal moniliasis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Degollado, J; Martínez Aguilar, A; Peniche Bojórquez, J

    1978-01-01

    Esophageal moniliasis is found rarely. It has been described mainly in chronically ill patients, who receive antibiotics and corticoesteroids. Early diagnosis and treatment betters their prognosis. Nine patients, 5 males and 4 females were studies in Hospital General del Centro Medico Nacional in Mexico City. Their agesranged from 26 to 77 years, with a mean of 49 years. All patients were chronically ill and 7 of them were treated in the intensive care unit. Three had disphagia, 3 retrosternal pain, and 2 gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Eight patients had high W.B.C., 3 irregular filling defects on X ray studies, and on endoscopy, all showed a pseudomembranous white yellowish exudate, underneath it the mucosa was inflamed, irregular and bled scantily. In 5 out of 9 patients biopsy and a smear confirmed the diagnosis. Eight patients treated with nystatin were cured. This disorder must be suspected in patients with disphagia and retrosternal pain; esophagoscopy is the prefered procedure to establish this diagnosis.

  11. Factors predicting contralateral hematoma growth after unilateral drainage of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Shigeta; Ishikawa, Osamu; Miura, Keisuke; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Goto, Haruo; Maeda, Keiichiro

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a recurrence rate of 9.2%-26.5% after bur hole surgery. Occasionally patients with bilateral CSDH undergo unilateral surgery because the contralateral hematoma is deemed to be asymptomatic, and in some of these patients the contralateral hematoma may subsequently enlarge, requiring additional surgery. The authors investigated the factors related to the growth of these hematomas. METHODS Ninety-three patients with bilateral CSDH who underwent unilateral bur hole surgery at Aizu Chuo Hospital were included in a retrospective analysis. Findings on preoperative MRI, preoperative thickness of the drained hematoma, and the influence of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs were considered and evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS The overall growth rate was 19% (18 of 93 hematomas), and a significantly greater percentage of the hematomas that were iso- or hypointense on preoperative T1-weighted imaging showed growth compared with other hematomas (35.4% vs 2.3%, p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that findings on preoperative T1-weighted MRI were the sole significant predictor of hematoma growth, and other factors such as antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug use, patient age, patient sex, thickness of the treated hematoma, and T2-weighted MRI findings were not significantly related to hematoma growth. The adjusted odds ratio for hematoma growth in the T1 isointense/hypointense group relative to the T1 hyperintense group was 25.12 (95% CI 3.89-51.58, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS The findings of preoperative MRI, namely T1-weighted sequences, may be useful in predicting the growth of hematomas that did not undergo bur hole surgery in patients with bilateral CSDH.

  12. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes. PMID:27299131

  13. Delayed intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Steve M M; Reekers, Jim A; Dwars, Boudewijn J

    2012-01-01

    Intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a rare complication and is potentially life threatening. When radiologic studies confirm the presence of the hematoma, the decision to follow a conservative treatment should involve clinical monitoring. If there are signs of infection, the collection can safely be drained percutaneously. If there are signs of active bleeding, a selective embolization should be attempted first. If unsuccessful, subsequent surgical evacuation should be performed. We report the case of a patient with an intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which occurred 6 weeks after surgery, and review the literature concerning the management of these bleedings.

  14. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  15. Biomechanics of Esophageal Function in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease. PMID:23105995

  16. Biomechanics of esophageal function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew J; Pandolfino, John E

    2012-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease.

  17. A rare case of infected splenic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Godkar, Darshan; Anandacoomarswamy, Dharshan; Bansal, Goldy; Patel, Rajnikant; Recco, Recco

    2007-01-01

    Splenic hematoma is a relatively benign condition in consideration that a majority are spontaneously absorbed. Rarely, they can become infected, a condition that is difficult to diagnose and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. We present a patient with a known history of intravenous drug abuse and recent abdominal trauma who was found to have infective endocarditis and subsequently an infected splenic hematoma. The related literature is also discussed.

  18. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention.

  19. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  20. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    in esophageal tissue (arrowheads) in WT than IL21R-/- mice (A) is quantified morphometrically in (B). Quantitative PCR (C) for esophageal...microscopy and morphometric analysis was used to measure IL21 receptor expression in patient esophageal biopsies. RESULTS: A number of genetic variants...most highly associated variants in the locus. Immunofluorescent microscopy and morphometric analysis demonstrate a marked increase in IL21 receptor

  1. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  2. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, K. Thanvir Mohamed; Raja, Dharmesh Kumar; Prakash, R.; Balaji, V. R.; Manikandan, D.; Ulaganathan, G.; Yoganandha, R.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture. PMID:27829776

  3. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  4. Chronic subdural hematoma in capoeira sport.

    PubMed

    Türkoğlu, Erhan; Serbes, Gökhan; Sanli, Metin; Sari, Onur; Sekerci, Zeki

    2008-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas in young people is extremely rare and has some provoking factors such as V-P shunts, arachnoid cyst, anticoagulant drug usage, vigorous sports and coagulopathies. A static or dynamic mechanical load is almost always delivered to skull associated with either mild or severe head trauma. A 25-year old-man who was previously healthy has complained of intermittent headache for six months. He had been interested in capoiera (Brazilian exciting sport) for two years and has had no any evidence of head injury. After admission, he was operated immediately because of chronic subdural hematoma. We report a patient who is the first chronic subdural hematoma in the literature due to playing capoeira.

  5. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by Subepicardial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Philippe; Nef, Holger; Böning, Andreas; Niemann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Background Bleeding from bypass anastomosis leakage occurs early after coronary artery bypass grafting. Later, once the anastomosis is covered by intima, spontaneous bleeding is unlikely. Case Description A 63-year-old male patient developed a pseudoaneurysm-like, subepicardial late-term bleeding resulting in a hematoma that compromised coronary artery flow by increasing extracoronary pressure. This resulted in severe angina pectoris (Canadian Cardiovascular Society IV) and myocardial ischemia within the affected area. After surgical removal of the hematoma and repair of the anastomosis, the patient's symptoms disappeared and no signs of myocardial ischemia were present. Conclusion Surgical removal is an efficient therapy for subepicardial hematoma inducing myocardial ischemia. PMID:28352501

  6. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  7. Subcorneal hematomas in excessive video game play.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Maria; Rizzo, Jason; Lennox, Luke; Rothman, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcorneal hematomas caused by excessive video game play in a 19-year-old man. The hematomas occurred in a setting of thrombocytopenia secondary to induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. It was concluded that thrombocytopenia subsequent to prior friction from heavy use of a video game controller allowed for traumatic subcorneal hemorrhage of the hands. Using our case as a springboard, we summarize other reports with video game associated pathologies in the medical literature. Overall, cognizance of the popularity of video games and related pathologies can be an asset for dermatologists who evaluate pediatric patients.

  8. Transposition of Great Arteries with Intramural Coronary Artery: Experience with a Modified Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amit; Jain, Anil; Hinduja, Manish; Wadhawa, Vivek; Patel, Ramesh; Vaidhya, Nikunj; Rodricks, Dayesh; Patel, Hardik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Transposition of the great arteries is a common congenital heart disease. Arterial switch is the gold standard operation for this complex heart disease. Arterial switch operation in the presence of intramural coronary artery is surgically the most demanding even for the most experienced hands. We are presenting our experience with a modified technique for intramural coronary arteries in arterial switch operation. Methods: This prospective study involves 450 patients undergoing arterial switch operation at our institute from April 2006 to December 2013 (7.6 years). Eighteen patients underwent arterial switch operation with intramural coronary artery. The coronary patterns and technique used are detailed in the text. Results: The overall mortality found in the subgroup of 18 patients having intramural coronary artery was 16% (n=3). Our first patient had an accidental injury to the left coronary artery and died in the operating room. A seven-day old newborn died from intractable ventricular arrhythmia fifteen hours after surgery. Another patient who had multiple ventricular septal defects with type B arch interruption died from residual apical ventricular septal defect and sepsis on the eleventh postoperative day. The remainder of the patients are doing well, showing a median follow-up duration of 1235.34±815.26 days (range 369 - 2730). Conclusion: Transposition of the great arteries with intramural coronary artery is demanding in a subset of patients undergoing arterial switch operation. We believe our technique of coronary button dissection in the presence of intramural coronary arteries using coronary shunt is simple and can be a good addition to the surgeons' armamentarium. PMID:27074270

  9. Retroperitoneal hematoma following radical orchiectomy: Two cases

    PubMed Central

    Glicksman, Rachel; Hamilton, Robert J.; Chung, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of testicular cancer is dependent on the stage of disease at presentation. Stage 1 testicular cancer is treated with radical orchiectomy, followed by active surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. Occasionally, unusual and unexpected postoperative changes can be seen on computed tomography (CT), and may raise concern for metastatic disease. Here, we present two cases of testicular cancer patients who developed retroperitoneal hematomas post-radical orchiectomy, one as a classical clinical presentation, and the other as an atypical radiological entity only. The first is a case of a 38-year-old male with a non-seminoma testicular cancer, who developed severe flank pain, hemodynamic instability, and progressive anemia from a retroperitoneal hematoma in the immediate (<24 hours) postoperative period, requiring urgent surgical evacuation. The second is a case of a 33-year-old male with a testicular seminoma who had a large, suspicious retroperitoneal mass on a staging CT scan concerning for metastatic disease, which was later diagnosed as a retroperitoneal hematoma. These cases reveal the clinical variability with which a retroperitoneal hematoma post-radical orchiectomy may present. In addition, the second case demonstrates the importance of recognizing radiological postoperative changes and ensuring that these findings are not mistaken for and treated as metastatic disease. PMID:28163811

  10. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  11. [Primary esophageal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Manoel; Piauilino, Marcos Amorim; Oliveira, Humberto Alves; Vaz Neto, Jorge Pinto

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 54 year old woman seen with an esophageal mass diagnosed as a primary esophageal lymphoma. The main symptom was dysphagia of seven months duration. The treatment consisted in resection of the tumor, and reconstruction of the defect with a reversed pleural flap, followed by a chemotherapy regimen that consisted of five drugs, cyclophosphamid, prednisone, doxorubicin, rituximab and vincristine (R-CHOP). The patient developed an esophageal pleural fistula treated with pleural drainage and irrigation that closed in 45 days. Two and one half years later she is doing well and disease free.

  12. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  13. The Culture of High-Risk Alcohol Use among Club and Intramural Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andes, Stacy; Poet, Kathryn; McWilliams, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the drinking patterns of club and intramural college athletes and compare their alcohol consumption, perceived norms around the excessive use of alcohol, experience of negative consequences, and employment of protective strategies with those of campus varsity athletes. Participants: A total of…

  14. Has the Decline of Intramural Sports Contributed to the Youth Obesity Epidemic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Warhol, John; Overton, Kim; Wiet, Chad E.; Freeman, Cassy; Bourbeau, John; Moon, Stephen; Crawford, Scott A. G. M.

    2005-01-01

    It is believed hat there are several factors that have contributed to the obesity epidemic that is affecting youths. Certainly a decline in intramural sports is one factor. One should look at the underlying trends that have contributed to this decline. Those trends are: (1) Personnel Issues--How many teachers and coaches have support of a viable…

  15. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus. These may include household cleaners, lye, disc batteries, or battery acid. Treatment of esophageal varices Symptoms Symptoms may ... Prognosis) The stricture may come back in the future. This would require a repeat dilation. Possible Complications ...

  16. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  17. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed.

  18. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... consortium of three translational research centers studying the origins and pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes and decreasing the burden of the disease. One center is studying the genetic basis of ...

  19. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome.

  20. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    staining for major basic protein in esophageal tissue (arrowheads) in WT than IL21R-/- mice (A) is quantified morphometrically in (B). Quantitative PCR... morphometric analysis was used to measure IL21 receptor expression in patient esophageal biopsies. RESULTS: A number of genetic variants on chromosome 4q26-27...variants in the locus. Immunofluorescent microscopy and morphometric analysis demonstrate a marked increase in IL21 receptor- expressing cells within

  1. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  2. Fibrin glue injection into the hematoma cavity for refractory chronic subdural hematoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Saiko; Amagasaki, Kenichi; Shono, Naoyuki; Nakaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repeat burr hole irrigation and drainage has been effective in most cases of recurrent chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), however, refractory cases require further procedures or other interventions. Case Description: An 85-year-old male presented with left CSDH, which recurred five times. The hematoma was irrigated and drained through a left frontal burr hole during the first to third surgery and through a left parietal burr hole during the fourth and fifth surgery. The hematoma had no septation and was well-evacuated during each surgery. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing ischemic heart disease was stopped after the second surgery, the hematoma cavity was irrigated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid at the third surgery, and the direction of the drainage tube was changed to reduce the postoperative subdural air collection at the fourth surgery. However, none of these interventions was effective. He was successfully treated by fibrin glue injection into the hematoma cavity after the fifth surgery. Conclusion: This procedure may be effective for refractory CSDH in elderly patients. PMID:27999712

  3. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space.

  4. Orbital subperiosteal hematoma from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, Clark; Angelidis, Matthew; Devita, Diane

    2010-09-01

    Only a few cases of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma due to scuba diving have been reported, and this is the first of such cases that underwent surgical intervention. This injury results from negative pressure within the face mask, suctioning orbital tissues into the mask after incomplete equilibration of pressure on descent. Valsalva maneuver is a second mechanism implicated in the etiology of this injury. Recognition of this injury is of the utmost importance because vision loss is a possible complication if there is compression of the optic nerve or increased intraocular pressure. In many cases of nontraumatic orbital hematoma, conservative management is adequate; however, this case was an exception due to worsening exam findings. Divers may be able to prevent this injury by frequent and gentle equilibration of mask pressure on descent.

  5. Ultra-delayed lumbar surgical wound hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Merritt D.; Nakhla, Jonathan; Brown, Kenroy; Bhashyam, Niketh; Yassari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: There exists an inherent risk of increased venous thromboembolism (VTE) in surgical spine patients, which is independent of their existing risk factors. Prophylaxis and treatment of VTE is an imprecise practice and may have serious complications even well after the initial surgery. Furthermore, there are no clear guidelines on how to manage postoperative spine patients with regards to the timing of anticoagulation. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a middle-aged male, status post L2/3 laminectomy and discectomy who developed bilateral below the knee deep venous thrombosis. He was started on Enoxaparin and transitioned to Warfarin and returned with axial back pain, and was found to have a postoperative hematoma almost 3 weeks later in a delayed fashion. Conclusion: Delayed surgical wound hematoma with neural compression is an important complication to identify and should remain high on the differential diagnosis in patients on warfarin who present with axial spinal pain. PMID:28144491

  6. [Six cases of organized chronic subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Naoyuki; Sato, Hideki; Murakami, Taro; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Seyama, Go; Oki, Shuichi

    2008-12-01

    Surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) are performed using various methods on the basis of burr hole irrigation and drainage, but treatment for organized CSDH is rarely required. Primary operation for CSDH was performed in our hospital for 535 patients (391 men, 144 woman; age, 8 months to 104 years) between December 1991 and March 2007. Of these, 6 patients diagnosed with organized CSDH were reviewed. Five patients had a history of burr hole surgery. Computed tomography showed membranous structure and heterogenous distribution of air after burr hole surgery had perforated the subdural space. As for treatment, craniotomy was performed in all cases (small craniotomy, n=4; enlarged craniotomy, n=2), and additional treatment was required in 2 patients. Diagnosis of organized CSDH is not easy before a primary operation, but removal of both organized CSDH and the outer membrane by craniotomy in proportion to hematoma expansion is important once the presence of organized CSDH has been determined.

  7. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported.

  8. Urologic manifestations of the iliacus hematoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colapinto, V; Comisarow, R H

    1979-08-01

    Anticoagulated patients may have a characteristic syndrome of femoral neuropathy from an iliacus muscle hematoma. They may present with urologic signs and symptoms, including groin, flank and thigh pain, groin tenderness, an iliac fossa mass and hematuria. Urography may reveal an enlarged psoas shadow and hydronephrosis from ureteral obstruction. Prompt diagnosis is essential so that early operative decompression of the femoral nerve can be done. The urologist has an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome.

  9. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation. PMID:28357164

  10. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  11. An obscure case of hepatic subcapsular hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ndzengue, Albert; Hammoudeh, Fadi; Brutus, Pierre; Ajah, Ofem; Purcell, Roland; Leadon, Joseph; Rafal, Richard B; Balmir, Simon; Enriquez, Danilo A; Posner, Gerald L; Jaffe, Eric A; Chandra, Pradeep

    2011-04-13

    Spontaneous liver bleeding is often reported in preeclampsia. It is otherwise rare and has been linked to gross anatomical lesions and coagulopathy. We report a case of subcapsular hematoma of the liver without any apparent lesion and in the absence of coagulopathy. A 41-year-old male, paraplegic for 16 years, presented to the emergency department 3 days after sudden onset of right upper quadrant and shoulder pain. He had been on vitamins and 5,000 units subcutaneous heparin 12-hourly at the nursing home for the last month. He was in no distress, afebrile, with stable vitals. Physical examination showed a diverting colostomy, tender hepatomegaly and sacral decubiti. A fecal occult blood test was negative. There was spastic paraplegia below the level of T12. Two days after admission, the patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. PTT, PT, liver profile, BUN and creatinine were all normal, however his hemoglobin had dropped from 11.3 to 7.6 g/dl. An abdominal CT scan revealed an isolated 9.0 × 1.8 cm subcapsular hematoma. The patient received blood transfusion in the intensive care unit and was discharged 7 days later. In conclusion, spontaneous liver hemorrhage occurs in the nonobstetrical population in the setting of gross anatomical lesions or coagulopathy. This is the first report of an isolated subcapsular liver hematoma.

  12. Chronic expanding hematoma: a late complication 45 years after thoracoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    A chronic expanding hematoma is a hematoma with long term, continuous growth. A 69-year-old male presented with an extra-thoracic chronic expanding hematoma 45 years after thoracoplasty. Six months prior to his visit with us, he had noticed a slight swelling on his back. Three months before his visit with us, the size of the swollen area gradually increased after bowling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an extra-thoracic lesion measuring 120 mm in diameter. Heterogeneous signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images inside the lesion was reflected as hematoma of various ages. The hematoma was successfully resected after preoperative embolization. Chronic expanding hematoma can be a delayed complication after thoracoplasty. PMID:28203429

  13. Chronic expanding hematoma: a late complication 45 years after thoracoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Akio; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    A chronic expanding hematoma is a hematoma with long term, continuous growth. A 69-year-old male presented with an extra-thoracic chronic expanding hematoma 45 years after thoracoplasty. Six months prior to his visit with us, he had noticed a slight swelling on his back. Three months before his visit with us, the size of the swollen area gradually increased after bowling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an extra-thoracic lesion measuring 120 mm in diameter. Heterogeneous signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images inside the lesion was reflected as hematoma of various ages. The hematoma was successfully resected after preoperative embolization. Chronic expanding hematoma can be a delayed complication after thoracoplasty.

  14. New Variant of Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Harne, Swapnil; Pathak, Manish; Rattan, Kamal Nayan

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) associated with distal congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a well-known entity. We encountered three patients of EA/TEF associated with long and unusual CES. PMID:28083495

  15. Renal subcapsular hematoma associated with brodifacoum toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Thompson, Larry J

    2004-04-01

    A 5-y-old female dog died acutely and was presented for postmortem examination. Hemorrhage in the thoracic and peritoneal cavities and a large subcapsular renal hematoma were present at necropsy. Brodifacoum, a second-generation coumarin anticoagulant, was detected in the liver by HPLC analysis. Renal subcapsular hematoma is a well known, but uncommon condition in man. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a brodifacoum-associated renal subcapsular hematoma in a non-human species.

  16. Diagnosis and Management of HELLP Syndrome Complicated by Liver Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ditisheim, Agnès; Sibai, Baha M

    2017-03-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of preeclampsia and hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome. It may present with nonspecific signs and symptoms, none of which are diagnostic, and can mimic pulmonary embolism of cholecystitis. There is no consensus on the management of subcapsular liver hematoma. Unruptured liver hematoma can be conservatively managed. When rupture occurs, surgical, endovascular approaches and, rarely, liver transplantation, may be required. Actual literature is scant and retrospective in nature. Data on follow-up, time to resolution and outcome of subsequent pregnancies are very limited. We here review the diagnosis and management of liver hematoma.

  17. Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashish; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery have both played prominent roles in the treatment of esophageal cancer since the beginning of the 20th century. Although the use of radiotherapy alone to treat esophageal cancer has a long history, it has not demonstrated improved outcomes compared with surgery alone. The disappointing rates of survival and local control associated with single-modality therapy and the need for effective nonsurgical management led to the development of definitive chemoradiotherapy paradigms for esophageal cancer. Adding cytotoxic chemotherapy to radiotherapy for additive or synergistic effect was described as early as 1968, and over time, treatment has shifted from single-modality therapy toward combined-modality therapy using chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This approach eventually demonstrated superior outcomes in patients with esophageal cancer when compared to radiotherapy alone. Maximum benefit of this therapy depends on the appropriate addition of surgery and the optimization of radiosensitizing chemotherapy. A burgeoning area of research has focused on improving definitive chemoradiotherapy strategies through the incorporation of newer chemotherapeutic agents and targeted biologic agents. An overview of the history of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer is presented, as well as a discussion of ongoing studies and future areas of promising research. PMID:19461907

  18. Esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luc, Guillaume; Durand, Marlène; Collet, Denis; Guillemot, Fabien; Bordenave, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    Esophageal tissue engineering is still in an early state, and ideal methods have not been developed. Since the beginning of the 20th century, advances have been made in the materials that can be used to produce an esophageal substitute. Three approaches to scaffold-based tissue engineering have yielded good results. The first development concerned non-absorbable constructs based on silicone and collagen. The need to remove the silicone tube is the main disadvantage of this material. Polymeric absorbable scaffolds have been used since the 1990s. The main polymeric material used is poly (glycolic) acid combined with collagen. The problem of stenosis remains prevalent in most studies using an absorbable construct. Finally, decellularized scaffolds have been used since 2000. The promises of this new approach are unfulfilled. Indeed, stenosis occurs when the esophageal defect is circumferential regardless of the scaffold materials. Cell supplementation can decrease the rate of stenosis, but the type(s) of cells and their roles have not been defined. Finally, esophageal tissue engineering cannot provide a functional esophageal substitute, and further development is necessary prior to conducting human clinical studies.

  19. Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma mimicking acute epidural hematoma on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Fujita, Keishi; Katayama, Wataru; Sato, Masayuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira; Sakashita, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    An 87-year-old woman presented with an atypical case of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) manifesting as disturbance of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography revealed a high density lentiform lesion in the right convexity, which was thought to be acute epidural hematoma preoperatively. Emergent decompressive craniotomy revealed an encapsulated solid fresh clot in the subdural space and a bleeding small cortical artery under the clot. The arachnoid membrane and the brain parenchyma were intact, and no other abnormal feature such as aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation was observed. The encapsulated ASDH was removed en bloc and the patient fully recovered. Histological examination confirmed that both the outer thicker and the inner membrane were fibrinous single structures without vasculature. The red blood cells constituting the clot in the capsule maintained their cell structure. The reported pathological mechanisms of lentiform ASDH are adhesion of the arachnoid membrane and the dura mater or intracapsular bleeding from sinusoidal vessels in the outer membrane of the chronic subdural hematoma. However, in our case, the arachnoid membrane had not adhered to the dura mater and the capsule was a fibrinous single structural membrane without vasculature, which probably resulted from a previous hematoma due to initial bleeding from the cortical artery. The possible mechanism in our case was that the re-bleeding dissected and flowed into the fibrinous single structural membrane, resulting in formation of the lentiform ASDH.

  20. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  1. The OPPIuM technique: office hysteroscopic technique for the preparation of partially intramural leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Cicinelli, Ettore; Mitsopoulos, Vasileios; Fascilla, Fabiana D; Sioutis, Dimos; Bettocchi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Uterine fibroids, also known as leiomyomas, represent the most common benign tumors of the female genital tract. Submucosal leiomyomas are classified into three grades: G0, GI, GII according to the degree of their intramural proportion. A recently developed technique enables the preparation of G1 and G2 leiomyomas for their subsequent successful resection in a second step. The OPPIuM (office preparation of partially intramural leiomyomas) technique aims to downgrade type I and II leiomyomas, in order to facilitate a subsequent easier and safer resectoscopy. Hysteroscopic resection of large GI or GII submucosal fibroids is a complex procedure. OPPIuM technique has been invented and seems to achieve the downgrading of these types of leiomyomas in approximately 93% of cases, without any significant surgical complications or the need of hormonal agents' administration. In this way, the safer and quicker subsequent complete myomectomy is facilitated.

  2. Tumefactive intramural gossypiboma of the urinary bladder mimicking an invasive adnexal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shivi; Verma, Ashish; Jain, Madhu; Trivedi, Sameer; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A surgical swab retained in the body after surgery is known as ‘Gossypiboma’. The purpose of this report is to highlight an intramural vesical gossypiboma mimicking an invasive adnexal malignancy. A 28-year-old multiparous, with open-tubal ligation three years ago, presented with painless hematuria and a nontender mass on vaginal examination. USG suggested ‘pelvic endometriosis’ infiltrating into the bladder and cystoscopy showed no intraluminal extension of the mass. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) misdiagnosed it as invasive malignancy of the fallopian tube. Exploratory laparotomy found it to be an intramural vesical gossypiboma. A pelvic gossypiboma infiltrating into the wall of the urinary bladder may easily be misinterpreted as an invasive pelvic malignancy on imaging and may make one consider unwarranted radical surgery. PMID:25969644

  3. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  4. Unusual clotted haemothorax caused by spontaneous intramural haematoma of the oesophagus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenglin; Mei, Jiandong; Guan, Pujun; Lin, Feng; Pu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intramural haematoma of the oesophagus (SIHO) is a relatively rare event with benign courses. Most of the patients with SIHO may experience spontaneous healing without complications. We report a case of SIHO with clotted haemothorax. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was successfully applied as a diagnostic and therapeutic method. Although conservative treatment is adequate for the majority of patients with SIHO, uniportal VATS may be a suitable option if there was clotted haemothorax. PMID:28149589

  5. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Epidemiology and Natural History.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wuyang; Huang, Judy

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the epidemiology and natural history of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), a common disease prevalent in the elderly population. The incidence of CSDH ranges from 1.72 to 20.6 per 100,000 persons per year. Risk factors include advancing age, male gender, and antiplatelet or anticoagulant use. Clinical progression is separated into 3 distinct periods, including the initial traumatic event, the latency period, and the clinical presentation period. The recurrence of CSDH and nonsurgical predictive factors are described in detail to provide a comprehensive understanding of the outcome of this disease.

  6. Bilateral occipital extradural hematoma in a child

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sharad; Sharma, Vivek; Shinde, Neeraj; Sharma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Extradural hematoma (EDH) occurs in approximately 2% of all patients with head injuries. Bilateral EDHs account for 2–10% of all acute EDHs in adults but are exceedingly rare in children. Posterior fossa EDHs occurs in 5% of all cases of EDHs. EDHs in children are more frequently venous (from tears of a dural sinus or diploic veins) and consequently have a better prognosis than EDHs in adults. Once the diagnosis of BEH is confirmed, urgent surgical treatment should be considered. We are reporting such rare form of injury as bilateral occipital EDH with supratentorial extension in 12 years child following road traffic accident. PMID:26557174

  7. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  8. Performance and Clinical Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound Fine Needle Aspiration for Diagnosing Gastrointestinal Intramural Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Park, Eun Young; Moon, Sung Jin; Lim, Chul Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the performance, clinical role, and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in gastrointestinal intramural lesions. Methods Procedural and pathologic data were reviewed from consecutive patients undergoing EUS-FNA for intramural lesions. Final diagnoses were determined by surgical histopathologic conformation and the diagnosis of malignancy, including clinical follow-up with repeat imaging. Results Forty-six patients (mean age, 47 years; 24 males) underwent EUS-FNA. Lesions were located in the stomach (n=31), esophagus (n=5), and duodenum (n=10). The median lesion size was 2 cm (range, 1 to 20.6). Final diagnoses were obtained in 22 patients (48%). EUS-FNA was diagnostic in 40 patients (87%). The diagnostic accuracy of cytology for differentiating between benign and malignant lesions was 82%; diagnostic error occurred in three patients (6%). The cytologic results influenced clinical judgment in 78% cases. The primary reasons for negative or no clinical impact were false-negative results, misdirected patient management, and inconclusive cytology. Conclusions EUS-FNA exhibited an 87% diagnostic yield for gastrointestinal intramural lesions; the accuracy of cytology for differentiating malignancy was 82%. The limitations of EUS-FNA were primarily because of nondiagnostic sampling (9%) and probable diagnostic error (6%); these factors may influence the clinical role of EUS-FNA. PMID:24340255

  9. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, N. J.; Bot, G. M.; Sahabi, S.; Aliu, S.; Usman, B.; Shilong, D. J.; Obande, J. O.; Shehu, B. B.

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema. PMID:25972947

  10. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N J; Bot, G M; Sahabi, S; Aliu, S; Usman, B; Shilong, D J; Obande, J O; Shehu, B B

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema.

  11. Subcapsular liver hematoma causing cardiac tamponade in HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kinthala, S; Fakoory, M; Greaves, T; Kandamaran, L; Thomas, H; Moe, S

    2012-07-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets) syndrome is an obstetric complication with heterogeneous presentation, multisystem involvement and variable prognosis, but which usually resolves after delivery. We report a case of HELLP syndrome with subcapsular hematoma of the liver causing extrapericardial cardiac tamponade. The subcapsular hematoma and cardiac tamponade were managed conservatively.

  12. Subcapsular Liver Hematoma in Metastatic GIST Complicating Imatinib (Gleevec) Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sridhar

    2007-01-01

    We report two patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who had large subcapsular hepatic hematomas that developed while on imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) therapy. We describe the pertinent radiologic features of the subcapsular hematomas in these patients, and discuss possible etiologies for the bleeding in each patient.

  13. Balzac's 'Pierette'. An early description of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    van den Doel, E M

    1986-12-01

    In his novel Pierrette, written in 1840, Balzac describes a case of chronic subdural hematoma, including its traumatic origin and surgical treatment. The description was written at a time when subdural hematoma was not seen as a separate clinical entity, and was generally thought to be the result of inflammation.

  14. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  15. [Spontaneous epidural hematoma after open heart surgery: case report].

    PubMed

    Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T; Furukawa, Y; Nagashima, T; Kumate, M

    1999-11-01

    Acute epidural hematoma not associated with head injury is rarely encountered and is known as spontaneous epidural hematoma. To our knowledge, only five cases with epidural hematoma after open-heart surgery have been published. Pathogenesis and preventive measures have not yet been determined. We report a case of such spontaneous epidural hematoma and consider the possible pathogenesis. A 12-year-old female received a radical operation for severe subaortic stenosis. The intraoperative course was uneventful except for massive hemorrhage which was adequately controlled. Postoperatively, she was moved to the CCU still not having aroused from anesthesia. Eleven hours later, it was found that her pupils were fixed and dilated. CT scan demonstrated a huge bifrontal epidural hematoma with disappearance of the basal cistern. Even though immediate emergency evacuation was performed, the patient died of acute brain swelling four days after the operation.

  16. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  17. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  18. Can esophageal dilation be avoided in the treatment of severe esophageal stricture caused by eosinophilic esophagitis?

    PubMed

    Silva, D; Santos, F; Piedade, S; Morais-Almeida, M

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory immune-mediated disease with predominant eosinophilic inflammation characterized by the presence of esophageal dysfunction symptoms. Treatment delay can be associated with disease complications, like esophageal strictures, that can justify the use of invasive procedures which are not deprived of side effects. We present a case report of a 14 year old child with severe esophageal stricture secondary to EoE, that was treated with topical and systemic corticosteroid before any invasive procedure was considered. After 26 weeks of medical treatment, significant improvement of esophageal dysfunction occurred with histological remission and stricture resolution. In patients with severe esophageal strictures secondary to EoE, the need for esophageal dilation procedures should be considered only after anti-inflammatory treatment.

  19. Developing a model of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingyang; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition that has a high incidence in the increasing elderly population of many countries. Pathologically, it is defined as a persistent liquefied hematoma in the subdural space more than 3 weeks old that is generally encased by a membraneous capsule. CSDHs likely originate after minor head trauma, with a key factor in its development being the potential for a subdural cavity to permit its expansion within, which is usually due to craniocerebral disproportion. The pathogenesis of CSDH has been attributed to osmotic or oncotic pressure differences, although measurements of these factors in the CSDH fluid do not support this theory. Current belief is that CSDH arises from recurrent bleeding in the subdural space, caused by a cycle of local angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation and ongoing fibrinolysis. However, because of a lack of detailed knowledge about the precise mechanisms, treatment is often limited to surgical interventions that are invasive and often prone to recurrence. Thus, it is possible that an easily reproducible and representative animal model of CSDH would facilitate research in the pathogenesis of CSDH and aid with development of treatment options.

  20. Helical (spiral) CT in the evaluation of emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, S; Stuk, J L; Kaufman, J A

    1999-05-01

    For the near future, CT will play the critical and dominant role in the evaluation of patients presenting with emergent aortic syndromes. Its convenience, accuracy, and utility in the rapid evaluation of not just the aorta, but the entire thorax, make it ideally suited for use in emergency settings. Further benefits are likely to be realized in speed and resolution with multislice CT, although it is as yet not widely available.

  1. [Infected subdural hematoma having a surgery of chronic subdural hematoma 1 year ago:a case report].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Chikao; Ando, Shunpei; Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of an infected subdural hematoma that occurred 1 year after burr-hole irrigation for chronic subdural hematoma. A 78-year-old woman who had developed left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography(CT)scan revealed the presence of a chronic subdural hematoma in the right hemisphere. Her clinical symptoms improved immediately after emergency burr-hole irrigation, which allowed her discharge from the hospital. One year after the initial surgery, she developed an infection of the urinary tract infection, which led to severe pyelonephritis and septic shock. Treatment of the urological symptoms eliminated the systemic inflammation. One month after the urinary infection, the patient was readmitted to the hospital in a comatose state. A CT scan showed regrowth of a residual subdural hematoma surrounded by a thick capsule, causing a midline shift in the brain. An emergency operation for removal of the subdural hematoma by burr-hole irrigation was performed, and pus was drained from the subdural mass. Microbiological cultures of the abscess revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. After surgery, the patient was administered an antibiotic treatment for three weeks and she was discharged with no neurological deficits. Cultures of blood from the septic shock as well as from the abscess both revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. Therefore, a diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma, which was caused by hematogenous infection, was made. We conclude that attention should be paid to the risk of infection of the hematoma capsule in subdural hematomas.

  2. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Natalia; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Ghetmiri, Ehsan; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave's syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children) and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE. PMID:24899902

  3. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10 cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. Discussion The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. Conclusion In this case, the patient’s symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. PMID:26143577

  4. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  6. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  7. Esophageal motility disorders: medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Weiser, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of chest pain and dysphagia are common in the adult population. Most patients initially undergo an evaluation to exclude anatomic causes (ie, esophagitis, stricture) and cardiovascular disease as the etiology of these symptoms. Patients with persistent symptoms may then be referred for specialized testing of the esophagus, including esophageal manometry. Disorders of esophageal motility, which include achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and ineffective motility are often identified in these patients. Unfortunately, the etiology of these disorders has not been well characterized and the treatment has not been standardized. This review will briefly discuss the impact, etiology, and diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders, and then focus on the medical management of these disorders using evidence from well-designed, prospective studies, where available.

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  9. Retroperitoneal hematoma following trauma: its clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Grieco, J G; Perry, J F

    1980-09-01

    Records of 100 consecutive patients treated in 1973 through 1977 with post-traumatic retroperitoneal hematomas (RH) were studied. Eighty RH followed blunt injury and 20 were due to penetrating trauma. Overall mortality was 26%. The worst prognosis was associated with RH from automobile accidents and pedestrian injuries. Pelvic RH were almost uniformly associated with pelvic fracture and were the primary cause of 39% of deaths. Blunt perinephric RH required renal exploration in 47% of patients. Blunt RH in other locations were associated with major visceral or vascular injury in half the patients and were the cause of death in five. Sixty-five per cent of RH due to penetrating trauma had visceral or vascular injury requiring operative correction. Contained rupture of descending choracic aorta presented as retrogastric RH in two patients. RH from penetrating trauma should be explored routinely, since 65% are associated with visceral or vascular injury.

  10. [Spontaneous hematoma of the atrial wall].

    PubMed

    Iglesias López, A; Rodríguez Pan, A; Pazos Silva, V

    2014-01-01

    The clinical signs of heart masses tend to be nonspecific, generally depending more on their repercussions on heart function caused by their location rather than on their type. Imaging techniques make it possible to limit the differential diagnosis of heart masses based on their location, morphology, and characteristics of echogenicity, density, or intensity, depending on the technique used to study them. We present the case of a woman with squeezing mid chest pain irradiating to her shoulder and positive cardiac markers in whom a left atrial mass was identified at echocardiography. This finding was confirmed at chest CT. The signs at chest CT were compatible with a mural hematoma and this diagnosis was confirmed after intraoperative biopsy.

  11. Atypical traumatic craniocervical junction focal spinal subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Aydin, M Volkan; Sen, Orhan; Tufan, Kadir; Caner, Hakan

    2006-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare entity and post-traumatic cervical SSDH is very rare. Review of the literature revealed 8 reported cases of traumatic SSDH and only 2 were cervical. The exact mechanism and pathogenesis of SSDHs are unclear. There are still controversies about the source of bleeding and mechanisms of formation of a hematoma. Here we report a case of a unique traumatic craniocervical junction focal subdural hematoma in an 8-year-old boy and discuss the possible mechanisms of SSDHs in trauma cases.

  12. Life-threatening paraspinal muscle hematoma after percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Nam-Su; Lee, Jae-Heon; Lee, Han-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and hematoma formation is rarely reported in percutaneous vertebroplasty procedure. An 84 year old male presented with a large paraspinal muscle hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty. The patient had neither any prior bleeding disorder nor any anticoagulant treatment. Vital signs of the patient were unstable, and his hemoglobin level decreased daily. After a month of conservative treatment, including transfusion, cryotherapy, pain control and bed rest, his hemoglobin level remained stable and he showed relief from pain. Four months later, hematoma resolved spontaneously and he could walk without back pain. PMID:27746502

  13. Dabigatran-related intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in hematoma expansion.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Claus Z; Steiner, Thorsten; Tietze, Anna; Damgaard, Dorte

    2014-02-01

    Warfarin-related intracerebral hemorrhage carries a particularly high risk of neurologic deterioration and death because of a high rate of hematoma expansion of about 50%. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs)--apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban--have a significantly smaller risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, two facts make this situation complicated: First, the risk of hematoma expansion is unknown for NOACs. Second, there is no specific antidote for neither of the NOACs. We present a case that suggests that hematoma expansion may occur after NOAC-related ICH.

  14. Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... congenital abnormalities, cyanosis, esophageal atresia, fistula, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastrointestinal defects, GERD, high alimentary tract obstruction, patent ductus arteriosus, pneumonia, polyhydramnios, tetralogy ...

  15. Eosinophilic esophagitis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Redd, Matthew; Schey, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new entity with a significant amount of increased recognition over the last decade. The mainstay treatments of EoE are designed to eliminate the causative allergens or to reduce their effects on the esophageal mucosa. Common treatments include dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, systemic and topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic treatments. As the pathogenesis of EoE is explored, new and novel treatments are being studied that target specific pathways and chemokines identified in as precipitating agents of EoE. This is a rapidly evolving field with significant ongoing research and clinical studies. Our review will therefore focus on current and novel treatment approaches to the disease.

  16. Mechanism of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anil

    2009-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a newly recognized disease and is an emerging entity throughout developing and developed countries, including the United States. Therefore, understanding the causes, natural history, diagnosis, and management is important for future therapeutic interventions. The pathogenesis of EoE is still not clear, but a growing body of evidence has established that this condition represents a T-cell-mediated immune response involving several proinflammatory mediators and chemoattractants known to regulate eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-3 and eotaxin-1, -2, and -3. Determining the mechanism or mechanisms through which human esophageal-derived factors ultimately induce the functional abnormalities observed, and to which antigens patients who have EoE are sensitized that lead to the manifestation of symptoms, is of significant interest.

  17. [Achalasia and esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Corti, R E; Monastra, L; Fernández Marty, P; Barco, J C; Ferro, F E; Galindo, F; Musi, A O; Kogan, Z

    1992-01-01

    During the period included between January 1970 and December 1990, we studied 242 patients with manometric and radiological diagnosis of esophageal achalasia. Eight of these patients (3.3%) developed during the evolution of their disease an esophageal carcinoma. Eight cases showed histologic type of epidermoid carcinoma: 3 differentiated, 3 semi-differentiated and 2 anaplastic. Therapy for achalasia was: one patient, Heller myotomy, 4 patients, dilatations with bougies in numerous opportunities, and the other two patients receive no treatment for achalasia. Two patients reported tracheobronchial fistulas as complication of carcinoma. Treatment received for carcinoma included: three patients, radiotherapy (4000 rads); one patient, chemotherapy; one patient, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one resection surgery and two patients feeding gastrostomy. All of the eight patients died within the year of diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma.

  18. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  19. Compressive hematoma and deep arteriovenous malformation: Emergency endovascular occlusion via a venous approach with surgical evacuation of the hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yves; Sachet, Marina; Cattet, Florian; Lonjon, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Compressive hematoma associated with deep arterio-venous malformation is a difficult surgery. Arterial presurgical embolization is often indicated but rarely effective. Endovascular occlusion via a venous approach is a technique that has recently been undertaken successfully to treat certain types of sub-pial vascular malformation. The venous endovascular approach has succeeded in a 20-year-old man of who presented with a compressive hematoma due to rupture of a deep arteriovenous malformation. By fully endovascular occlusion, the surgery consisted of surgical removal of the hematoma, with reduced cortical damage. PMID:26825136

  20. Compressive hematoma and deep arteriovenous malformation: Emergency endovascular occlusion via a venous approach with surgical evacuation of the hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Sachet, Marina; Cattet, Florian; Lonjon, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Compressive hematoma associated with deep arterio-venous malformation is a difficult surgery. Arterial presurgical embolization is often indicated but rarely effective. Endovascular occlusion via a venous approach is a technique that has recently been undertaken successfully to treat certain types of sub-pial vascular malformation. The venous endovascular approach has succeeded in a 20-year-old man of who presented with a compressive hematoma due to rupture of a deep arteriovenous malformation. By fully endovascular occlusion, the surgery consisted of surgical removal of the hematoma, with reduced cortical damage.

  1. Transmission from intramural inhibitory nerves to the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R; Burnstock, G; Holman, M

    1966-02-01

    1. Membrane potential changes of smooth muscle cells were recorded during stimulation of the intramural inhibitory nerves to the taenia coli.2. Stimulation across the taenia coli with single pulses of 200 musec duration excites the intramural nerves and not the muscle directly.3. The membrane potential changes due to stimulation of the intramural inhibitory nerves were different from those produced by perivascular inhibitory nerve stimulation in the following ways: hyperpolarizations (i.j.p.'s) of up to 25 mV were produced in response to single pulses; the latency, i.e. the time taken for the membrane to hyperpolarize after a stimulus of maximal strength, was as short as 80 msec; when the nerves were stimulated repetitively the membrane was hyperpolarized by up to 35 mV and all spontaneous activity was abolished; the mean hyperpolarization due to repetitive stimulation increased with the frequency of stimulation up to 10 pulses/sec and then remained constant; the hyperpolarization due to stimulation at frequencies greater than 5 pulses/sec was not maintained but decreased after 3-5 sec of stimulation; and finally when stimulation had ceased action potentials commenced firing at frequencies greater than normal.4. The amplitude and rate of hyperpolarization of the i.j.p. increased with increasing strength of stimulation until a maximum amplitude and rate of hyperpolarization was reached. The recovery or depolarizing phase of the i.j.p. was exponential with a time constant which varied from about 250 msec to 500 msec and could not therefore be due to the discharge of the membrane capacitance. In some cases there was an inflexion on this depolarizing phase and in these cases recovery led directly into an action potential.5. Spontaneous hyperpolarizations of the membrane were seen in some cells, and these hyperpolarizations were similar to those recorded on submaximal stimulation of the intramural nerves.6. There were no changes in the characteristics of the i.j.p. in

  2. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  3. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  4. Acute cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to head injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Yul; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of traumatic cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to intracranial injury. There has been no report on traumatic cervical spinal subdrual hematoma not related to intracranial injury. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room due to severe neck pain and right arm motor weakness after car collision. On admission, she presented with complete monoplegia and hypoesthesia of right arm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed subdural hematoma compressing spinal cord. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 210,000 red blood cells/mm(3). She was managed conservatively by administrations of steroid pulse therapy and CSF drainage. Her muscle power of right arm improved to a Grade III 16 days after admission. Follow-up MRI taken 16th days after admission revealed almost complete resolution of the hematoma. Here, the authors report a traumatic cervical spinal SDH not associated with intracranial injury.

  5. Case report: subcapsular hepatic hematoma: retraction injury during laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gerald H; Dunn, Matthew D

    2006-02-01

    We present a case of subcapsular hepatic hematoma resulting from retraction of the liver during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. We discuss the management and prevention of this rare and important complication.

  6. Acute femoral neuropathy secondary to an iliacus muscle hematoma.

    PubMed

    Seijo-Martínez, M; Castro del Río, M; Fontoira, E; Fontoira, M

    2003-05-15

    We present a patient with a spontaneous iliacus muscle hematoma, appearing immediately after a minor physical maneuver, presenting with pain and femoral neuropathy initially evidenced by massive quadriceps muscle fasciculations. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the pelvic area confirmed the diagnosis, showing a hematoma secondary to a partial muscle tear. The patient was managed conservatively, and the continuous muscle activity ceased in 3 days, with progressive improvement of the pain and weakness. The recovery was complete. Femoral neuropathy is uncommon and usually due to compression from psoas muscle mass lesions of diverse nature, including hematomas. Usually subacute, femoral neuropathy may present acutely in cases of large or strategically placed compressive femoral nerve lesions, and may require surgical evacuation. The case presented herein is remarkable since the muscle hematoma appeared after a nonviolent maneuver, fasciculations were present at onset, and conservative management was sufficient for a full recovery.

  7. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  8. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  9. Spontaneous Intracranial Extradural Hematoma in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    N'dri Oka, Dominique; Tokpa, André; Bah, Alpha; Derou, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous extradural hematoma is rare in patients with sickle cell disease. We report a clinical case of a 19-year-old young man with sickle cell anemia who presented a sickle cell crisis complicated by the development of multiple acute extradural and subgaleal hematomas that had not been treated surgically. We discuss the physiopathology of this event. Although it is rare, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon as part of a spectrum of neurologic complications in these patients. PMID:26251822

  10. Congenital Esophageal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Dysphagia in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S; Surude, Ravindra G; Mohite, Ashok R; Rathi, Pravin M

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital embryonal gastrointestinal (GI) malformation which is diagnosed most commonly in childhood. In adults, they can present with a variety of symptoms ranging from dysphagia, chest pain, epigastric discomfort, and vomiting to more serious complications including infections, hemorrhage, and ulcerations. A 30-year-old male presented with gradually progressive dysphagia to solids for 4 months without significant weight loss. Clinical examination and routine laboratory examination were unrevealing. Upper GI endoscopy revealed a well-defined submucosal lesion bulging into the esophageal lumen involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal esophagus. The overlying mucosa was normal with mild luminal narrowing but gastroscope could be negotiated across this narrowing. Differential diagnosis included lipoma, leiomyoma or GI stromal tumors. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of thorax revealed a 3.5 × 2.3 × 3 cm well-defined homogenous hypodense lesion involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal thoracic esophagus with likely possibility of submucosal or intramural lesion. Subsequently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a 3.3 × 2.8 cm homogenous hypoechoic lesion without any vascularity involving the distal esophagus wall suggestive of duplication cyst. The lesion was intramural in location as muscularis propria was seen to go around the lesion. Bronchogenic cyst was excluded due to absence of cartilage and close proximity of the cyst to lumen. Fine-needle aspiration was not attempted in view of high risk of introducing infection. Being symptomatic, the patient underwent complete surgical excision of the cyst with exteriorization of the base which on histopathology confirmed duplication cyst. Esophageal duplication cysts are exceedingly rare congenital embryonal malformations with estimated prevalence of 0.0122% arising from aberration of posterior division of embryonic foregut at 3 - 4 weeks of

  11. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  12. Immunological characterization of the early human fracture hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Gaber, T; Strehl, C; Schmidt-Bleek, K; Lang, A; Huscher, D; Burmester, G R; Schmidmaier, G; Perka, C; Duda, G N; Buttgereit, F

    2016-12-01

    The initial inflammatory phase of fracture healing is of great importance for the clinical outcome. We aimed to develop a detailed time-dependent analysis of the initial fracture hematoma. We analyzed the composition of immune cell subpopulations by flow cytometry and the concentration of cytokines and chemokines by bioplex in 42 samples from human fractures of long bones <72 h post-trauma. The early human fracture hematoma is characterized by maturation of granulocytes and migration of monocytes/macrophages and hematopoietic stem cells. Both T helper cells and cytotoxic T cells proliferate within the fracture hematoma and/or migrate to the fracture site. Humoral immunity characteristics comprise high concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8, IFNγ and TNFα, but also elevated concentration of anti-inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-10. Furthermore, we found that cells of the fracture hematoma represent a source for key chemokines. Even under the bioenergetically restricted conditions that exist in the initial fracture hematoma, immune cells are not only present, but also survive, mature, function and migrate. They secrete a cytokine/chemokine cocktail that contributes to the onset of regeneration. We hypothesize that this specific microenvironment of the initial fracture hematoma is among the crucial factors that determine fracture healing.

  13. [A case of infected subdural hematoma accompanied by cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Norio; Naito, Yuichiro; Takanashi, Shigehiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Infected subdural hematoma(ISH)is a rare disease caused by hematogenous infection of a preexisting subdural hematoma. We report a rare case of ISH accompanied by cerebral infarction. A 76-year-old man who had suffered a closed head injury 3 months before presented fever, headache and left hemiparesis during the medical treatment of acute cholangitis and obstructive jaundice with pancreatic cancer at the department of surgical gastroenterology. At the consultation, computed tomography(CT)scan indicated right chronic subdural hematoma. We performed a burr hole opening surgery on the same day. Abscess and hematoma was aspirated from the subdural space, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)was detected in this specimen. Thus the diagnosis of the infected subdural hematoma was confirmed. However, despite the antibiotics therapy, follow-up CT showed a low-density area close to the residual abscess, which suggested cerebral infarction. Cerebral angiography showed a vasospasm at the cortical segment of the right middle cerebral artery near the residual abscess. Eventually we carried out a small craniotomy to evacuate the abscess. Our case showed that prompt surgical treatment is required in case of ISH and the whole hematoma and abscess should be removed as soon as possible with an image diagnosis and an additional surgical operation.

  14. Primary enlarged craniotomy in organized chronic subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Callovini, Giorgio Maria; Bolognini, Andrea; Callovini, Gemma; Gammone, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance--mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the "long standing" of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH.

  15. Esophageal motility disorders after gastric banding.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Deveney, C W; McConnell, D B; Wolfe, B M; Jobe, B A

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effects of gastric banding on esophageal function are not well described. This report describes a 28-year-old woman who developed signs and symptoms of abnormal esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter hypotension after gastric banding for morbid obesity. The current literature addressing the effects of gastric banding on esophageal function in light of this case report is discussed.

  16. Esophageal scintigraphy: applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Byrne, P J; Keeling, P; Hennessy, T P

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia (20), scleroderma (9), esophageal carcinoma (8), Barrett esophagus (5), and reflux esophagitis (27). We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  17. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  18. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Soo; Shin, Woo-Ram; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-10-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH.

  19. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  20. The Resource Allocation Program at the University of California, San Francisco: Getting More from Intramural Funding Bucks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Emanuela; Kiser, Gretchen; Henry, Roland; Giacomini, Kathy; Volberding, Paul; Waldman, Frederic; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Intramural funding programs within both large and small research institutions are an essential mechanism to foster collaborative, novel, or preliminary research activity, and to further institutional research strategic goals. At most research institutions in the United States, these funding opportunities are managed by each funding agency or…

  1. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  2. Acid corrosive esophagitis: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Muhletaler, C A; Gerlock, A J; de Soto, L; Halter, S A

    1980-06-01

    Thirty-nine esophagograms of 24 patients after ingestion of muriatic acid (27% HCI) in suicide attempts were reviewed. All esophagograms were obtained in the acute, subacute, and chronic phases. In the acute and subacute phases, the radiographic findings consisted of mucosal edema, submucosal edema or hemorrhage, ulcerations, sloughing of the mucosa, atony, and dilatation. Strictures of the esophagus were present in the chronic phase. These radiographic findings were not different from those found in alkaline corrosive esophagitis. The severity of the corrosive esophagitis is considered related to the concentration, amount, viscosity, and duration of contact between the caustic agent and the esophageal mucosa.

  3. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  4. Fundoplication improves disordered esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T Ryan; Behrns, Kevin E; Koruda, Mark J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Lucktong, Tananchai A; Bradshaw, Barbara; Farrell, Timothy M

    2003-02-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and disordered esophageal motility are at risk for postoperative dysphagia, and are often treated with partial (270-degree) fundoplication as a strategy to minimize postoperative swallowing difficulties. Complete (360-degree) fundoplication, however, may provide more effective and durable reflux protection over time. Recently we reported that postfundoplication dysphagia is uncommon, regardless of preoperative manometric status and type of fundoplication. To determine whether esophageal function improves after fundoplication, we measured postoperative motility in patients in whom disordered esophageal motility had been documented before fundoplication. Forty-eight of 262 patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication between 1995 and 2000 satisfied preoperative manometric criteria for disordered esophageal motility (distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude < or =30 mm Hg and/or peristaltic frequency < or =80%). Of these, 19 had preoperative manometric assessment at our facility and consented to repeat study. Fifteen (79%) of these patients had a complete fundoplication and four (21%) had a partial fundoplication. Each patient underwent repeat four-channel esophageal manometry 29.5 +/- 18.4 months (mean +/- SD) after fundoplication. Distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude and peristaltic frequency were compared to preoperative data by paired t test. After fundoplication, mean peristaltic amplitude in the distal esophagus increased by 47% (56.8 +/- 30.9 mm Hg to 83.5 +/- 36.5 mm Hg; P < 0.001) and peristaltic frequency improved by 33% (66.4 +/- 28.7% to 87.6 +/- 16.3%; P < 0.01). Normal esophageal motor function was present in 14 patients (74%) after fundoplication, whereas in five patients the esophageal motor function remained abnormal (2 improved, 1 worsened, and 2 remained unchanged). Three patients with preoperative peristaltic frequencies of 0%, 10%, and 20% improved to 84%, 88%, and 50%, respectively

  5. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  6. Splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis. Role of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Clavé, P; Guillaumes, S; Blanco, I; Martínez de Hurtado, J; Esquius, J; Marruecos, L; Fontcuberta, J; Pérez, C; Farré, A; Lluís, F

    1992-08-01

    Splenic hematomas are infrequent complications of acute pancreatitis. In some cases, local factors that may play a role in the pathogenesis of the hematoma (thrombosis of the splenic artery or veins, intrasplenic pseudocysts, perisplenic adhesions, enzymatic digestion) are found. In the absence of local factors, the etiology of splenic hemorrhage remains unknown. We report two cases of splenic hematoma occurring during an acute necro-hemorrhagic pancreatitis associated with renal failure that required renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis and continuous arteriovenous hemodialysis). In both cases, more than half of splenic parenchyma was affected by multiple infarctions. No local factors responsible for the splenic abnormalities were detected in either case. Thrombosis of the splenic arterial microcirculation and a coagulation disorder consistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation was detected in one patient. In the second patient, coagulation disorders secondary to either liver disease, pancreatitis and its septic complications, or extracorporeal circuit heparinization for renal replacement therapy were present. Coagulation disorders should be considered whenever a splenic hematoma is found in a patient with acute pancreatitis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may be the etiology of a splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis.

  7. Bilateral Traumatic Intracranial Hematomas and its Outcome: a Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sharad; Sharma, Vivek; Singh, Kulwant; Pandey, Deepa; Sharma, Mukesh; Patil, Deepak Bhanudas; Shende, Neeraj; Chauhan, Richa Singh

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the age distribution, mode of injury, type of hematomas, and their surgical outcome in patients with bilateral traumatic head injuries. The present study included 669 cases of traumatic head injury who presented at the neurosurgery emergency out of which 94 cases had bilateral head injuries from the period of August 2009 to April 2014. The data from the hospital computerized database were retrospectively analysed. Cases of bilateral traumatic head injury included 94 patients out of which 88.29 % (n = 83) were males and 11.70 % (n = 11) were females. Commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident in 56.38 % (n = 53) followed by fall from height in 29.78 % (n = 28). In our study, 25.53 % patients had epidural hematoma (EDH) with intracerebral hematoma (ICH) or contusion (n = 24), followed by EDH with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 18.08 % (n = 17). At the time of discharge, all those patients managed conservatively had good Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) while with surgical intervention 58 % patients had good GOS, 19 % had moderate disability, and 9 % remained with severe disability. In cases of bilateral hematomas, EDH is most common and should be managed in neurosurgical emergency. Other combinations of bilateral intracranial hematomas should be managed according to the surgical indication and serial CT imaging.

  8. [Multiple chronic subdural hematoma in shaken-baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haga, Sei; Ishido, Katsuya; Inada, Nariyasu; Sakata, Shuji

    2004-08-01

    We described a case of shaken-baby syndrome with multiple chronic subdural hematomas. A 10-month-old male baby was admitted to our hospital because of loss of consciousness and convulsions. CT scan revealed an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage extending into the interhemispheric fissure and supracerebellar space. The patient was treated conservatively, and discharged from the hospitaL Two months after ictus, a baby was admitted to our hospital with general fatigue. CT scan demonstrated multiple chronic subdural hematomas. Burr hole irrigation and drainage brought about complete disappearance of these lesions. Retrospectively, it was found that these multiple subdural hematomas were due to shaken-baby syndrome. Shaken-baby syndrome is a form of child abuse that can cause significant head injury, and subdural hematoma is the most common manifestation. It is well known that the outcome of shaken-baby syndrome is generally not good. It is important to suspect shaken-baby syndrome when a chronic subdural hematoma is seen in a baby.

  9. Atorvastatin May Attenuate Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Luo, Zhengxiang; Liu, Zhongkun; Yang, Jian; Kan, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a substantial recurrence rate. Atorvastatin may reduce CSDH via its anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenesis effects, but its effectiveness for preventing recurrent CSDH has never been explored. We hypothesized that atorvastatin is effective in reducing recurrence of CSDH after surgery and identified determining factors predictive of hematoma recurrence. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 168 surgical cases of CSDH.All patients were randomly assigned to the group treated with atorvastatin or control group. Clinically relevant data were compared between two groups, and subsequently between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between atorvastatin treatment and the recurrence using brain atrophy, septated and bilateral hematoma was performed. Results: Atorvastatin group conferred an advantage by significantly decreasing the recurrence rate (P = 0.023), and patients managed with atorvastatin also had a longer time-to-recurrence (P = 0.038). Admission brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma differed significantly between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients (P = 0.047 and P = 0.045). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that atorvastatin significantly reduced the probability of recurrence; severe brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma were independent risk factors for recurrent CSDH. Conclusions: Atorvastatin administration may decrease the risks of recurrence.Patients with severe brain atrophy and bilateral CSDH are prone to the recurrence. PMID:27445673

  10. Subcapsular hematoma of the graft after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Massarollo, P C B; Shiroma, M E; Rodrigues, A J; Mies, S

    2004-05-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the graft is an underreported complication of liver transplantation (LT). Among 408 LT performed from September 1, 1985, to September 1, 2000, eight patients developed a subcapsular hematoma within 30 days after LT (8/408 = 2.0%). Among the six early cases observed, five required further surgical approaches due to hematoma progression, rupture, and hemorrhage. One patient underwent liver retransplantation due to uncontrollable hepatic hemorrhage. The two more recent cases were successfully treated by early opening of the Glisson's capsule with hemostasis of the hepatic raw bleeding surface. The five patients who developed acute renal failure required dialysis. Three patients died during hospitalization. Among the survivors, two were discharged on the postoperative (PO) day 15; the others on PO day 37, 38, and 56. In conclusion, subcapsular hematoma of the graft is a potentially serious complication of LT that may produce severe hemorrhage, shock, and in extreme cases, graft loss or even death. The severity of the complication is related to the extension of the decapsulated area of the graft. An early surgical approach with intentional opening of the hematoma before progression of the lesion seems to facilitate hemostasis and improve results.

  11. A tale of two acute extradural hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Jite, Ikechi E.; Smith, Omolara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In much of the Western hemisphere, mortality from traumatic acute extradural hematomas (AEDH) has been drastically brought down toward 0%. This is still not the case however in most developing countries. Case Description: This report represents a tragi-comic tale of two cases of traumatic AEDH managed by an academic neurosurgeon in a neurosurgically ill-resourced private health facility during a nationwide industrial strike action preventing clinical-surgical care in the principal author's University Teaching Hospital. A young man presented with altered consciousness, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 14/15, following a road accident. The cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained only 9 h after its request, long after the man had actually deteriorated to GCS 7/15 with pupillary changes. The neurosurgeon, summoned from the nearby University Teaching Hospital for the operative care of this man, arrived on-site and was about moving the patient into the operative room when he took the final breaths and died, all within 2 h of the belated neuroimaging. This scenario repeated itself in the same health facility just 24 h later with another young man who presented GCS 7/15 and another identical CT evidence of traumatic AEDH. With more financially able relations, the diagnostic/surgical care of this second patient was much more prompt. He made a very brisk recovery from neurosurgical operative intervention. He is alive and well, 5-month postoperative. Conclusions: In most low-resourced health systems of the developing countries, a significant proportion of potentially salvageable cases of AEDH still perish from this disease condition. PMID:27213108

  12. Esophageal squamous papillomas with focal dermal hypoplasia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, Eric A; Heifert, Theresa A; Nylund, Cade M

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare disorder of the mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. Here we present an eight-year-old female known to have FDH who presents with poor weight gain and dysphagia. She was diagnosed with multiple esophageal papillomas and eosinophilic esophagitis. She was successfully treated with argon plasma coagulation and ingested fluticasone propionate, which has not been described previously in a child.

  13. Modeling and Simulations on the Intramural Thermoelectric Generator of Lower-Re-fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Zheng, Ding; Chen, Yushan

    The thermoelectric conversion with lower Renault number (Re) fluid, such as waste heat from industry boiler, and engine's circled cooling water, which can be designed as intramural generator structure. In this research, a thermoelectric project analysis model and the description of an intensified system are presented, its generator with the aligned or staggered platoon structure has strengthened heat-transfer property, and the heat convection coefficient ratio has increased times than plain tube; For the fluid kinetic energy's loss is influenced by the whirlpool, the pressure difference is several hundred Pa level which changes along with geometric parameters of transform components; what's more, heat transfer area increase distinctly under the same generator volume, which has built the foundation for the enhancement output electric power.

  14. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst. Two case histories with pathological observations.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Takeshi; Harada, Kunyu; Nishimura, Shigeru; Onda, Jun; Nishi, Tohru; Takagaki, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are well known to induce chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head injury. However, histological observations of the arachnoid cyst and hematoma membrane have only been rarely described. An 8-year-old boy and a 3-year-old boy presented with CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst. Surgical removal of the hematoma and biopsy of the hematoma membrane and cyst wall were performed. Clinical courses were good and without recurrence more than 1.5 years after surgery. Histological examination suggested that the cysts did not contribute to hematoma development. Pediatric hematoma membranes, similar to adult hematoma membranes, are key in the growth of CSDH. Therefore, simple hematoma evacuation is adequate as a first operation for CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst.

  15. Jump-landing differences between varsity, club, and intramural athletes: the Jump-ACL Study.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Justin L; Gerber, J Parry; Cameron, Kenneth L; Beutler, Anthony I; Marshall, Stephen W; Distefano, Lindsay J; Padua, Darin A; de la Motte, Sarah J; Miller, Joseph M; Yunker, Craig A

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal movement patterns have been identified as important prospective risk factors for lower extremity injury, including anterior cruciate ligament injury. Specifically, poor neuromuscular control during the early landing phase has been associated with increased injury risk. Although it is commonly assumed that higher division collegiate athletes generally exhibit better movement patterns than lower division athletes, few studies compare the biomechanical differences on basic tasks such as jump landing between various levels of athletic groups. The objective of this study was to evaluate jump-landing and fitness differences among college-aged Intramural, Competitive Club, and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level athletes. Two hundred seventy-seven student-athletes (222 men, 55 women; age 19.3 ± 0.8 years) categorized as NCAA Division I, Competitive Club, or Intramural level athletes were evaluated during a jump-landing task using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), a validated qualitative movement assessment. Fitness was measured using the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Results showed no significant differences in landing errors between the levels of athletic group (F(2,267) = 0.36, p = 0.70). There was a significant difference in landing errors between genders (F(1,268) = 3.99, p = 0.05). Significant differences in APFT scores were observed between level of athletic group (F(2,267) = 11.14, p < 0.001) and gender (F(1,268) = 9.27, p = 0.003). There was no significant correlation between the APFT and LESS scores (p = 0.26). In conclusion, higher level athletes had better physical fitness as measured by the APFT but did not as a group exhibit better landing technique. The implications of this research suggest that "high-risk" movement patterns are prevalent in all levels of athletes.

  16. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  17. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  20. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  1. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... test can also be done during upper GI endoscopy by clipping a pH monitor to the lining of the esophagus. ... esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  2. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  3. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  4. [Subcapsular hematoma and rupture of the liver graft].

    PubMed

    Görög, Dénes; Fehérvári, Imre; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs; Máthé, Zoltán; Kóbori, László; Járay, Jeno

    2008-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft is uncommon but serious complication of liver transplantation. It may develop spontaneously or following parenchymal injuries or percutaneous transhepatic invasive procedures. This report describes three cases of subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft with different courses among 350 liver transplantations. In the first case, the patient died due to graft rupture caused by a pseudoaneurysm after biopsy. In the second case, a small injury of the donor liver resulted in a deep rupture, which required partial resection of the graft. The patient died in sepsis later. The third patient presented with a large subcapsular haematoma during transplantation, which was successfully treated. The authors' strategies developed intraoperatively for the management of hematomas. These involve opening and removing of the haematoma, haemostasis with Argon coagulation, which resulted in an adherent Glisson's capsule to the parenchyma and covering with collagen fleece coated with fibrinogen and thrombin.

  5. Liver Subcapsular Hematoma: A Rare Cause of Sudden Unexpected Death.

    PubMed

    Oualha, Dorra; Aissaoui, Abir; Belhaj, Meriam; Mesrati, Mohamed Amin; Moussa, Adnene; Salem, Nidhal Haj; Zakhama, Abdelfateh; Chadly, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The spontaneous subcapsular hematoma of the liver is very rare. There are only a few reported cases in the literature.Most reported cases of liver hematoma often occur during pregnancy as part of the hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome. The other causes may be due to amylosis, rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma, adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, hemorrhagic cyst, or hemopathy. Idiopathic spontaneous subscapular hematoma is a rare and often fatal condition.We report a case of a 43-year-old woman having Steinert disease who died because of a fatal spontaneous liver hemorrhage occurring without any traumatism. We did not find any apparent cause that could explain this hemorrhage even after a histological study of the liver.

  6. Spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni

    2014-06-15

    Spontaneous or traumatic bleeding is a common complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We report the case of an 83 y.o. woman with right facio-brachio-crural hemiparesis, left deviation of the head and aphasia who developed, after thrombolytic therapy, a spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma that regressed few days later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of asymptomatic and spontaneous skeletal muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The occurrence of lateral cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis ipsilateral to sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma may suggest a causal relationship between local chronic inflammation of active mycobacterial infection and thrombolysis-related extravasation. This case should suggest caution in thrombolytic treatment in patients with chronic immune dysregulation and vascular inflammation such as extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

  7. [Ectopic connection of the left coronary artery with the contralateral sinus with or without intramural pathway: how and why differentiating them?].

    PubMed

    Aubry, P; Honton, B; Leurent, G; Halna du Fretay, X; Dupouy, P; Ou, P; Juliard, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Among the wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities of coronary arteries, a left coronary artery connected with the contralateral sinus is considered as an anatomical high-risk while associated with a proximal preaortic course. The ectopic connection may be associated with or without intramural pathway regarding the aortic wall. An intramural pathway is a characteristic to be considered because it is able to be involved in myocardial ischemia-related adverse events of which the sudden death. Therefore, making an identification of an intramural pathway is essential for the ectopic connections of the left coronary artery associated with a preaortic course.

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis: strictures, impactions, dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Seema; Orenstein, Susan R; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Kocoshis, Samuel A; Putnam, Philip E; Sigurdsson, Luther; Shalaby, Theresa M

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, long known to be a feature of acid reflux, has recently been described in patients with food allergies and macroscopically furrowed esophagus. The pathophysiology and optimal management of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis is unclear. We describe our clinical experience related to eosinophilic esophagitis and obstructive symptoms in children and propose etiopathogenesis and management guidelines. Twelve children with obstructive esophageal symptoms (11 male), median age 5 years, and identified to have eosinophilic esophagitis with > 5 eosinophils per high-power field (eos/hpf) are reported. Of these, four had strictures, six had impactions, and two had only dysphagia. A diagnostic evaluation included esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies in all and upper gastrointestinal series, IgE, radioallergosorbent tests, and skin tests for food allergies in some cases. Esophageal histology specimens were independently analyzed for eosinophil density by two authors. Four of five children with > 20 eos/hpf responded to elimination diets/steroids. The fifth child responded to a fundoplication. Seven children had 5-20 eos/hpf and three of them with no known food allergies responded to antireflux therapy alone. Three others in this group with positive food allergies responded to treatment with elimination diets and/or steroids. The seventh patient in this group was lost to follow-up. In conclusion, on the basis of response to therapy, eosinophilic esophagitis can be subdivided into two groups: those with likely gastroesophageal reflux disease if < 20 eos/hpf and no food allergies, and others with allergic eosinophilic esophagitis associated with food allergies and often with > 20 eos/hpf.

  9. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  10. [Chronic spinal subdural hematoma associated with chronic intracranial subdural hematoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masateru; Fukuda, Shin; Ikeda, Hisato; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with chronic spinal subdural hematoma (CSSH) associated with intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSH), manifesting as pain in the bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs. She had fallen and struck her lumbar region and occiput while walking 2 weeks previously. Neurological examination on admission demonstrated no paresis of the lower extremities. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed left CSH. Irrigation and drainage were performed the day after admission (3 weeks after injury). The gait disturbance disappeared and the pain of the bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs improved postoperatively. However, the pain reocurred 3 days after the operation. Brain CT showed no recurrence of CSH. Lumbar spinal radiography demonstrated spondylolisthesis at the L3-4 intervertebral space. Sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed CSSH extending from the T-12 level to the sacrum as isointense to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images. Axial MR imaging showed the CSSH located in the subdural space and was compressing the cauda equina anteriorly. The pain was not so severe and she refused surgery. Therefore, we selected conservative treatment and observed her clinical course as an outpatient. Her pain had gradually improved at 3 months after injury, and disappeared at 4 months. MR imaging showed reduction of the CSSH 2 months after injury, and almost complete disappearance at 5 months. CSSH is a rare disease, but early diagnosis is important because remission can be achieved by early operation. The present case illustrates spontaneous resolution is also possible, so observation may be selected if the symptoms are mild and without motor weakness. (Received: March 25, 2009, Accepted :June 16, 2009)

  11. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  12. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  13. Subcapsular hematoma of the liver after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Geeta S; Falconer, J Stuart; Benyounes, Hakim

    2005-02-01

    Two female patients underwent an uneventful laparoscopic chloecystectomy (LC) for cholelithiasis. Their past medical history was insignificant. The first patient had diclofenac sodium for her postoperative pain relief. Both patients returned in the early postoperative period with pain in the right hypochondrium. Laboratory investigations revealed elevated leucocytes, C reactive protein (CRP), and deranged liver function tests. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed subcapsular haematoma of liver. CT-guided aspiration of hematoma was done in one case. Both patients improved over a period of time and a follow-up radiological scan showed resolving hematoma. The presentation, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and possible causes are discussed.

  14. Two rare cases of intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Minaya Bravo, Ana María; González González, Enrique; Ortíz Aguilar, Manuel; Larrañaga Barrera, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The appearance of subcapsular liver hematoma after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is an infrequent complication and seldom studied. Some cases have been connected to ketorolac given during surgery and after surgery. Other described causes are : hemangiomas or small iatrogenic lesions that could be aggravated by administration of ketorolac. Coagulation dysfunction like circulating heparin as seen in hemathological diseases is cause of bleeding after aggressive procedures. We describe two cases of subcapsular liver hematoma after LC, both of them have been given intravenous ketorolac and one of them had multiple myeloma. We discuss the causes and treatment of it.

  15. Subcapsular Liver Hematoma in HELLP Syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kapan, Murat; Evsen, Mehmet Siddik; Gumus, Metehan; Onder, Akin; Tekbas, Guven

    2010-06-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma, as a rare complication of HELLP syndrome, must be managed in a tertiary center for prompt recognition and treatment with close monitoring of hemodynamic and coagulation parameters, treatment of underlying disorders, and assessment by the imaging techniques. These patients underwent different therapeutic options varying from conservative therapy to operative management, including liver transplantation. As a choice of treatment, patients with HELLP syndrome can be followed up conservatively in stable hemodynamic conditions. In this report, we presented a 32-year-old woman with subcapsular liver hematoma secondary to HELLP syndrome managed conservatively.

  16. Spontaneous Meckel's cave hematoma: A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Alafaci, Concetta; Grasso, Giovanni; Granata, Francesca; Marino, Daniele; Salpietro, Francesco M.; Tomasello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is vascular compression. However, other causes must be considered. Among these, spontaneous hematoma of the Meckel's cave (MC) causing symptomatic TN is very rare. Case Description: We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with a 2-month history of left TN and diplopia. Neuroradiological examinations revealed a well-defined hematoma in the left MC. The patient underwent surgical decompression with a progressive neurological improvement. Conclusion: Despite the number of lesions potentially affecting the MC, spontaneous hemorrhage is rare but should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26539319

  17. Chronic subdural hematoma - an up-to-date concept.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoji; Ohno, Kikuo

    2013-06-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is prevalent among elderly populations worldwide, and its mysterious pathogenesis has been discussed in the literature for decades. The issues remaining to be solved in regard to CSDH include the initiating events; the bleeding into the subdural space and the formation of the outer and inner membranes, its development; increase and liquefaction of hematoma, the optimal treatments, and the natural history. The pathophysiology is becoming more clear due to recent findings from computed tomography studies and human models of CSDH. In this work, we review previous studies on CSDH and present a new integrated concept about the development of this common condition after head injuries.

  18. Surgery for Bilateral Large Intracranial Traumatic Hematomas: Evacuation in a Single Session

    PubMed Central

    Kompheak, Heng; Kim, Dong-Sung; Shin, Dong-Sung; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Objective Management guidelines for single intracranial hematomas have been established, but the optimal management of multiple hematomas has little known. We present bilateral traumatic supratentorial hematomas that each has enough volume to be evacuated and discuss how to operate effectively it in a single anesthesia. Methods In total, 203 patients underwent evacuation and/or decompressive craniectomies for acute intracranial hematomas over 5 years. Among them, only eight cases (3.9%) underwent operations for bilateral intracranial hematomas in a single session. Injury mechanism, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, types of intracranial lesions, surgical methods, and Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated. Results The most common injury mechanism was a fall (four cases). The types of intracranial lesions were epidural hematoma (EDH)/intracerebral hematoma (ICH) in five, EDH/EDH in one, EDH/subdural hematoma (SDH) in one, and ICH/SDH in one. All cases except one had an EDH. The EDH was addressed first in all cases. Then, the evacuation of the ICH was performed through a small craniotomy or burr hole. All patients except one survived. Conclusion Bilateral intracranial hematomas that should be removed in a single-session operation are rare. Epidural hematomas almost always occur in these cases and should be removed first to prevent the hematoma from growing during the surgery. Then, the other hematoma, contralateral to the EDH, can be evacuated with a small craniotomy. PMID:25237431

  19. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  4. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  5. Rare tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Monika; Swanson, Paul E

    2016-10-01

    In spite of increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the last few decades, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) still remains the dominant subtype of esophageal cancer worldwide. Apart from conventional SCC, some rare unconventional tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa are also well known. This study provides an introduction to these and presents a brief review of the literature, including the diagnostic and prognostic importance of each variant.

  6. Delayed Acute Subdural Hematoma Associated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed acute subdural hematoma (DASH) is a subdural hematoma which is detected later. An initial computed tomography (CT) does not reveal any intracranial hemorrhage at all. Few patients of DASH after mild traumatic brain injury associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been published. Patient Presentation: A 63-year-old woman presented with cardiac pulmonary arrest due to acute myocardial infarction and lethal arrhythmia. She had hit her head on the road. The initial CT did not reveal any hemorrhage in the intra-cranium. She fully recovered after PCI. However, 1 hour after PCI, she lost consciousness and immediate CT showed acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The period from losing consciousness to brain herniation presenting as anisocoria was very short—only 30 minutes in our patient. Although emergent evacuation of hematoma and external decompression were performed, the patient died 1 day after the operation. Conclusion: The authors encountered a patient of DASH after PCI that resulted in death. Clinicians should be aware that subdural hemorrhage can occur after PCI if no hemorrhage is noted in the initial head CT, and the operation should be performed as soon as possible when the consciousness level decreases. PMID:27526240

  7. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively. PMID:23293672

  8. Rectus sheath hematoma: a complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, D; Jessel, J; Freund, U

    1992-12-01

    We describe a complication in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The routine introduction of a midclavicular secondary trocar resulted in a large hematoma of the rectus sheath. The patient developed atelectasis and pneumonia and required extended hospitalization. This previously described complication is detailed with recommendations to prevent its occurrence.

  9. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  10. Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: a rare late complication after ERCP.

    PubMed

    Servide, María José; Prieto, Mikel; Marquina, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    We present a clinical case of a 83 years old man, who consulted to the Emergency Department by continuous pain in right upper quadrant, having been discharged a week ago after ERCP for choledocholithiasis. TAC was performed showing a subcapsular hematoma without active bleeding. This complication post ERCP has been described on few occasions.

  11. [Subcapsular hepatic hematoma: an uncommon complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Baudet, Juan-Salvador; Arguiñarena, Xabier; Redondo, Ignacio; Tadeo, Eva; Navazo, Lucía; Mendiz, Javier; Montiel, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the case of a patient who developed a subcapsular hepatic hematoma 48 hours after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. She was treated by embolizing the sites of bleeding and by surgically resecting the area. We review the literature and discuss the potential mechanisms that cause this complication.

  12. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  13. [Diagnosis and management of esophageal chest pain].

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Jin

    2010-04-01

    Esophageal pain that manifests as heartburn or chest pain, is a prevalent problem. Esophageal chest pain is most often caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but can also result from inflammatory processes, infections involving the esophagus, and contractions of the esophageal muscle. The mechanisms and pathways of esophageal chest pain are poorly understood. Vagal and spinal afferent pathways carry sensory information from the esophagus. Recently, esophageal hypersensitivity is identified as an important factor in the development of esophageal pain. A number of techniques are available to evaluate esophageal chest pain such as endoscopy and/or proton-pump inhibitor trial, esophageal manometry, a combined impedance-pH study, and esophageal ultrasound imaging. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have the huge success in the treatment of GERD. Other drugs such as imipramine, trazadone, sertraline, tricyclics, and theophylline have been introduced for the control of esophageal chest pain in partial responders to PPI and the patients with esophageal hypersensitivity. Novel drugs which act on different targets are anticipated to treat esophageal pain in the future.

  14. A Rare Case of Left Ventricular Intramural Hemangioma Diagnosed Using 1.5-T Cardiac MRI with Histopathological Correlation and Successfully Treated by Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Gianluca; Sciacca, Sergio D'Ancona, Giuseppe Pilato, Michele; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-02-15

    Hemangiomas are vascular tumors composed of blood vessels, frequently localized in the skin and subcutaneous muscles; their localization in the heart is exceptional. The most common localizations are the lateral walls of the left ventricle, the anterior wall, and the septum. Mostly, these tumors grow intracavitarily, rarely intramurally. We describe a singular case of left ventricular intramural hemangioma, detected and diagnosed using newer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, confirmed by histopathological results, and treated successfully by surgery.

  15. Esophageal motility disorders in HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Zalar, Alberto E; Olmos, Martín A; Piskorz, Eduardo L; Magnanini, Fernando L

    2003-05-01

    Opportunistic esophageal infections (Candida, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus) and idiophatic esophageal ulcerations are commonly found in HIV patients. However, motility disorders of the esophagus have seldom been investigated in this population. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the presence of motility disorders in HIV patients with esophageal symptoms (with or without associated lesions detected by endoscopy) and in HIV patients without esophageal symptoms and normal esophagoscopy. Eigthteen consecutive HIV patients (10 male, 8 female, ages 20-44 years, mean age 33.5; 8 HIV positive and 10 AIDS) were studied prospectively. Nine patients complained of esophageal symptoms, e.g, dysphagia/odynophagia (group 1) and 9 had symptoms not related to esophageal disease, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, or gastrointestinal bleeding (group 2). All patients underwent upper endoscopy; mucosal biopsies were taken when macroscopic esophageal lesions were identified or when the patients were symptomatic even if the esophageal mucosa was normal. Esophageal manometry was performed in the 18 patients, using a 4-channel water-perfused system according to a standardized technique. Sixteen of the 18 patients (88.8%) had baseline manometric abnormalities. In group 1, 8/9 patients had esophageal motility disorders: nutcrackeresophagus in 1, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES) with incomplete relaxation in 2, nonspecific esophageal motility disorders (NEMD) in 3, diffuse esophageal spasm in 1, esophageal hypocontraction with low LES pressure in 1. Six of these 9 patients had lesions detected by endoscopy: CMV ulcers in 2, idiopathic ulcers in 1, candidiasis in 1, idiopathic ulcer + candidiasis in 1, nonspecific esophagitis in 1; and 3/9 had normal endoscopy and normal esophageal biopsies. In group 2, 8/9 patients had abnormal motility: hypertensive LES with incomplete relaxation in 1, nutcracker esophagus in 2, esophageal hypocontraction in 3, and NEMD

  16. [Esophageal diseases: GERD, Barrett, achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert

    2014-09-01

    At Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2014, developments in esophageal disease were presented. Highlights include: the usefulness of impedancemetry to diagnose reflux disease, or the effectiveness of PPIs for treating non-cardiac chest pain. Concerning Barrett's esophagus, its prevalence is identical in patients with and without reflux symptoms, Barrett segments less than 1cm probably do not require follow-up, and in older patients with long-segment Barrett, initial endoscopies overlooked up to 2% of significant lesions. Regarding achalasia, surgical myotomy is no more effective than endoscopic dilation and may even be less effective than peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). In terms of eosinophilic esophagitis, it is important to systematically take biopsies in patients with dysphagia so that cases of eosinophilic esophagitis are not overlooked. In addition, for this condition, routine endoscopic dilations not only do not seem useful in improving the course of the disease, but could also worsen the response to medical treatment.

  17. [A case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Young Sun; Choi, Jong Hwan; Jung, Young Kul; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2009-03-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is a very rare complication of liver abscess. We report a case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A 59-year-old man presented with right upper quadrant pain and febrile sense. Computed tomography showed a low attenuated mass with extensive subcapsular hematoma on the right hepatic lobe. The initial impression was a hematoma caused by the rupture of cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic arteriography was performed, but no active bleeding focus was found. After drainage of the subcapsular hematoma, a hematoma wall biopsy through the drainage catheter and a liver biopsy of the low attenuated mass were performed. The biopsies showed many neutrophils, macrophages, and granulation tissues consistent with an abscess, but no malignant cells were detected. After antibiotics therapy for 6 weeks, computed tomography was performed 4 months later, and revealed complete resolution of the hematoma and the low attenuated hepatic lesion.

  18. Rapid onset mediastinal hematoma due to vertebral fracture and review of relevant literature.

    PubMed

    Koksal, Vaner; Coskun, Selcuk; Coskun, Pinar Koksal

    2015-12-01

    Patients with vertebral fractures are frequently encountered and those with thoracic and lumbar spine fractures are likely to have associated injuries. Detection of a widened mediastinum after trauma is very nonspecific and most of the time it is related to aortic injury or mediastinal hematoma. Vertebral or sternal fractures can also be the cause of mediastinal hematoma with or without aortic injury. This report reviews an unusual case of rapid onset mediastinal hematoma due to vertebral fracture after a fall. In the case, there was a mediastinal hematoma adjacent to a burst fracture of the T8 vertebral body. There was a rapid increase in identified hematoma during the emergency follow up and urgent erythrocyte transfusion was carried out. We would like to raise awareness of this infrequent presentation of mediastinal hematoma, as it is insidious and possibly fatal. In the evaluation of mediastinal hematoma, the detection of osseous injuries is a requirement.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis in an octogenarian

    PubMed Central

    Trifan, Anca; Stoica, Oana; Chihaia, Catalin-Alexandru; Danciu, Mihai; Stanciu, Carol; Singeap, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by a marked eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophageal mucosa. What was once considered a rare disease has nowadays become one of the most frequent esophageal diseases in the Western countries, occupying a place just next to the gastroesophageal reflux disease. EoE etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown, although most studies consider that allergic and genetic factors play the most important role. Methods: We report the case of EoE in an elderly male (octogenarian), giving a brief review of the current data related to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Results: Dysphagia to solid foods was the leading symptom, and endoscopic findings included white exudates, longitudinal furrows, and concentric mucosal rings, all suggestive for EoE. Diagnosis relied on histological findings in esophageal mucosal biopsies (>30 eosinophils per high power field). He was treated with topical steroids for 8 weeks, symptoms improved gradually and the patient remained in remission at the 8-month follow-up. Conclusion: This case emphasizes that EoE may occur in very old patients and gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion of this disorder in any elderly with dysphagia and endoscopic relevant features. PMID:27741150

  20. The pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  1. Intramural Dissection of the Renal Collecting System During Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Computed Tomography Findings of a Rare Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Michael Dimarelos, Vasileios Stratilati, Sofia Tsitouridis, Ioannis

    2011-02-15

    Intramural dissection of the renal collecting system during percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) is a rare complication that can be challenging to diagnose. In this report, we describe the computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic findings of urothelial dissection during CT-guided PCN in a 65-year old patient with an obstructed congenital solitary left kidney due to an urinary bladder carcinoma. To our knowledge, CT findings of urothelial dissection have not yet been described.

  2. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  3. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  4. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI.

  5. Spontaneous Intramural Oesophageal Haematoma in a Patient with Uncontrolled Hypertension: An Unusual Chest Pain Aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Samantha; Caruana, Clifford; Davies, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous intramural oesophageal haematoma is a rare condition that usually occurs secondary to an acute or chronic coagulation disorder. The presenting complaint is often with retrosternal chest pain and most patients are initially investigated to exclude more common causes in the differential diagnosis, such as acute coronary syndromes. Severe life-threatening bleeding or perforation seldom, if ever, arises. Case Presentation. We present a case of spontaneous oesophageal haematoma which appears to have developed gradually in a 69-year-old female with uncontrolled hypertension and antiplatelet medication use. The diagnosis was made on computed tomography imaging and was further evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Management was conservative and a follow-up endoscopy two weeks later showed almost complete resolution of the lesion. Discussion. Spontaneous oesophageal haematomas are very rare and usually result in the separation of the mucosal layer from the underlying muscle, presenting with chest pain, haematemesis, and dysphagia. Usually the diagnosis is one of exclusion, based on computed tomography imaging and endoscopy. Conservative management is almost always successful. PMID:28316858

  6. Spontaneous Expulsion of Intramural Fibroid Six Weeks after Emergency Caesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Balvinder; Ng, Ka Ying Bonnie; Ghaleb, G.; Brown, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present a thirty-six-year-old woman with a high risk pregnancy, complicated by multiple congenital anomalies, severe hyperemesis, a pulmonary embolus, and a large intramural fibroid. This fibroid grew in size during the pregnancy. At 34 + 5 weeks, there were reduced fetal movements and a pathological CTG. A live infant was delivered by an emergency cesarean section. Five weeks postpartum, she presented with abdominal pain, offensive vaginal discharge, and fevers. She was given antibiotics and ferrous sulphate. An abdominal ultrasound showed an 11 × 12 × 9 cm fibroid with a coarse degenerative appearance. Clinically, she showed signs of sepsis; a CT scan and laparotomy performed under general anesthetic did not find any collections as a source of sepsis. When stable, she was discharged. She re-presented two days later with a large mass (necrotic fibroid) in her vagina. This is the first case of spontaneous expulsion of fibroid six weeks after caesarean section. Presentation of pain and fever after the delivery may be due to red degeneration of the fibroid, caused by diminished blood supply, ischaemia, and necrosis. This case highlights the importance of considering fibroids as a cause for abdominal pain during and after pregnancy, even up to 6 weeks after delivery. PMID:26380133

  7. Local versus global mechanical effects of intramural swelling in carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, T A; Fourman, L; Ferruzzi, J; Miller, K S; Humphrey, J D; Roccabianca, S

    2015-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are increasingly thought to play important roles in arterial mechanics and mechanobiology. We recently suggested that these highly negatively charged molecules, well known for their important contributions to cartilage mechanics, can pressurize intralamellar units in elastic arteries via a localized swelling process and thereby impact both smooth muscle mechanosensing and structural integrity. In this paper, we report osmotic loading experiments on murine common carotid arteries that revealed different degrees and extents of transmural swelling. Overall geometry changed significantly with exposure to hypo-osmotic solutions, as expected, yet mean pressure-outer diameter behaviors remained largely the same. Histological analyses revealed further that the swelling was not always distributed uniformly despite being confined primarily to the media. This unexpected finding guided a theoretical study of effects of different distributions of swelling on the wall stress. Results suggested that intramural swelling can introduce highly localized changes in the wall mechanics that could induce differential mechanobiological responses across the wall. There is, therefore, a need to focus on local, not global, mechanics when examining issues such as swelling-induced mechanosensing.

  8. [Exfoliative esophagitis while taking dabigatran].

    PubMed

    Scheppach, Wolfgang; Meesmann, Malte

    2015-04-01

    History | A 77-year-old woman was admitted with severe chest pain, heartburn, dysphagia and odynophagia. She had been on dabigatran for 13 months due to atrial fibrillation and arterial hypertension. Investigations and findings | Endoscopy of the esophagus revealed sloughing of mucosal casts, predominantly in the upper half of the organ. Treatment and course | The patient was placed on pantoprazol, local anaesthetic antacid and i. v. fluids. Dabigatran was discontinued. The symptoms disappeared within 3 days. Control endoscopy after 12 days showed complete healing of the esophageal mucosa. Conclusion | The intake of dabigatran was associated with exfoliative esophagitis, possibly due to caustic tissue damage by prolonged drug contact.

  9. Why Cannot Suction Drains Prevent Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin Woo; Yi, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative spinal epidural hematoma (POSEH) is different from spontaneous or post-spinal procedure hematoma because of the application of suction drains. However, it appeared that suction drains were not effective for prevention of POSEH in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that POSEH can be caused by hypercoagulability. Methods This was an experimental study. One hundred fifty milliliters of blood was donated from each of the 12 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery and infused into 3 saline bags of 50 mL each. One of the 3 bags in each set contained 5,000 units of thrombin. All of them were connected to 120 ± 30 mmHg vacuum suctions: drainage was started 8 minutes after connection to the vacuum system for 12 normal blood bags (BV8) and 12 thrombin-containing blood bags (TBV8) and 15 minutes after connection for the remaining 12 normal blood bags (BV15). The amount of initial and remaining hematoma at 20 minutes, 120 minutes, and 24 hours after vacuum application were measured by their weight (g). The primary endpoint was the difference between BV8 and TBV8. The secondary end point was the difference between BV8 and BV15. Results The remaining hematoma in TBV8 was significantly greater than that in BV8 at all measurement points: 46.3 ± 12.4 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.000) at 20 minutes; 33.0 ± 8.2 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 (p = 0.000) at 120 minutes; and 26.1 ± 4.0 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.000) at 24 hours after vacuum application. The remaining hematoma of BV15 was significantly greater than that of BV8 at all measurement points: 30.0 ± 12.0 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.002) at 20 minutes; 24.2 ± 7.6 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 at 120 minutes (p = 0.002); and 22.2 ± 6.6 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.004) at 24 hours after vacuum application. Conclusions With a suction drain in place, the amount of remaining hematoma could be affected by coagulability. Thrombin-containing local hemostatics and the length of time elapsed before the

  10. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  11. Esophageal dilation: simple and effective treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis and esophageal rings and narrowing.

    PubMed

    Bohm, M; Richter, J E; Kelsen, S; Thomas, R

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this article is to present the results of the long-term treatment with esophageal dilation of a consecutive series of adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE in adults is a disease of middle aged white males, with recurrent food impactions and dysphagia. The exact treatment of EoE is unknown due to the uncertainty of the pathogenesis. Currently, the long-term follow-up of adult EoE patients is limited. Sixteen consecutive adult patients (12 males/4 females between ages 27 and 58 years) with EoE underwent a detailed history and baseline upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGD) with multiple esophageal biopsies. Thirteen had esophageal dilation. Fifteen were on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. After dilation, one patient was treated with a restrictive diet. One patient took prn fluticasone. Most of the patients had allergy testing for food and aeroallergens. Follow-up evaluation with similar testing was on average 22 months (range: 12-40 months). Six patients were not available for follow-up. None of the remaining 10 patients had a food impaction; one required further esophageal dilation. Only two patients had intermittent dysphagia. The average dysphagia score decreased from 2.1 to 0.3 (P < 0.002). The average number of eosinophils at follow-up was not significantly different from baseline (120 eosinophils/HPF proximally and 165 eosinophils/HPF distally (P= 0.75). The gross endoscopy findings were unchanged in all patients except one who normalized. A total of 62% and 75% of patients had positive tests for aeroallergens and food allergens, respectively. Over an average of two years, esophageal dilation provided excellent symptomatic relief among 10 adult EoE patients despite no improvement in the mucosal eosinophilia or gross endoscopic appearance.

  12. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  14. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain.

  15. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma mimicking cystic intracavitary atrial mass.

    PubMed

    Bahnacy, Yasser; Suresh, Cheriyil; Dawoud, Hamed; Zubaid, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common benign primary tumor of the heart most commonly in the left atrium (LA). Cystic or cavitated intracardiac masses are rare. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient admitted with chest infection, hemoptysis, and severe respiratory distress, who had to be ventilated. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral lung consolidation with large mass occupying the region of the LA. Transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography showed a large intracavitary left atrial cystic mobile mass. Open-heart surgical exploration did not show any mass inside the LA. A posterior left atrial wall hematoma was found and evacuated. Biopsies confirmed the presence of blood clots. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma may appear as left atrial intracavitary cystic mass and should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic left atrial mass.

  16. Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: two neonates with disparate presentations.

    PubMed

    Anjay, Maliyackel Aiyappanpillai; Sasidharan, Chaniyil Krishnan; Anoop, Parameswaran

    2012-04-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the liver rarely occurs in neonates and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. We report two babies who had this uncommon condition in the early neonatal period. In the first baby, the hematoma was associated with ventouse delivery and presented with abdominal distension and worsening jaundice. In contrast, the other baby was relatively well, with progressive pallor as the only clinical finding. The former had no other identifiable risk factors, whereas the latter was confirmed as having classical hemophilia. The literature is briefly reviewed with regards to incidence, etiology, diagnosis and management. Awareness of this unusual entity coupled with a high index of suspicion is essential for early identification and stabilization of such babies.

  17. Postpartum spontaneous subcapsular hepatic hematoma related to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Kastanakis, Miltiades; Fragiadakis, Georgios; Karona, Paraskevi; Katsougris, Nikolaos; Bobolakis, Emmanouil

    2014-01-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the liver represents an unusual clinical phenomenon in the pregnancy and postpartum period with serious complications in terms of fetal and maternal mortality. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old primiparous female at 36 weeks of gestation, admitted to a maternity ward of a private clinic for preeclampsia. The woman underwent an emergency caesarean section with the extraction of an alive foetus. A few hours after delivery, she was transferred to the emergency department of our institution complaining of severe epigastric pain. Diagnostic work-up was suggestive of a subcapsular right lob hepatic hematoma which was successfully managed conservatively. Timely diagnosis is necessary for the prevention of life-threatening events in mother and fetus. For this reason acute care physicians have to be vigilant of the condition and consider this in the differential diagnosis of epigastric pain during pregnancy and postpartum.

  18. Do cranial subdural hematomas migrate to the lumbar spine?

    PubMed

    Moscovici, S; Paldor, I; Ramirez de-Noriega, F; Itshayek, E; Shoshan, Y; Spektor, S; Attia, M

    2011-04-01

    We report a patient with minor head trauma-related bilateral hemispheric subdural hematoma (SDH) and subsequent delayed spinal SDH or presumed migration to the lumbar spine. An acutely confused 88-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department after minor head trauma. Head CT scan revealed a small hemispheric SDH. The patient was admitted for observation. CT scan 6 hours later showed bilateral SDH with extension to the tentorium. Three days later SDH had resolved leaving bilateral subdural hygromas. Local leg weakness localized to the lumbar spine developed on day 6; spinal CT scan and MRI revealed a posterior L5-S1 collection. A pure subacute subdural hematoma compressing the cauda equina was drained after an L5 laminectomy. His lower leg weakness improved. The patient was discharged to rehabilitation two weeks after surgery. Patients with traumatic SDH who develop late-onset neurological deterioration attributable to any region of the spine should be evaluated for spinal SDH.

  19. Diplopia from Subacute Bilateral Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Getaw Worku; Kalantari, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rare, but life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. Subdural hematoma resulting from this procedure could present with vague symptoms such as chronic headache and could easily be missed. Chronic headache is one of the symptoms of chronic SDH in postpartum women. Diplopia as the presenting complaint in SDH secondary to peripartum spinal anesthesia has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. Here, we report a case of diplopia secondary to postpartum subacute bilateral SDHs with transtentorial herniation after spinal anesthesia in a healthy primagravid 25-year-old woman. SDH can expand gradually and the initial symptoms might be subtle as in our case, despite critically high intracranial pressure. PMID:22461938

  20. Treatment of septal hematomas and abscesses in children.

    PubMed

    Menger, Dirk Jan; Tabink, Ivar; Nolst Trenité, Gilbert J

    2007-11-01

    The cartilaginous part of the nasal septum of a child with a septal hematoma or abscess is at risk of destruction. Consequently, the noses of these children can collapse, causing a saddle nose deformity, and in time, the normal outgrowth of both the nose and maxilla will be disturbed. In adulthood, they will have an underdeveloped saddle nose deformity with too much upward rotation of the nasal tip and a retroposition of the midface. Sequelae like these should be prevented by prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention. In this article, the management of septal hematomas and abscesses is discussed with special focus on reconstruction of destructed septal cartilage with the use of autologous cartilage grafts fixed to a polydioxanon plate.

  1. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  2. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. [Esophageal histoplasmosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Henry, M A; Mendes, E F; Saad, L H; Rodrigues, P A; Gonçalves, I

    1996-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient with complaint of progressive disphagia. Stenoses of lower third of esophagus was revealed by radiological and endoscopic examinations. Fungi were showed in biopsy of lesion, with demonstration of Histoplasm capsulate by tissue culture. Endoscopic dilatation was performed because especific medical treatment failed but esophageal rupture was observed. Partial esophagectomy was performed with symptoms remission.

  4. Esophageal Carcinoma Following Bariatric Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Matthew F.; Richardson, J. David

    2004-01-01

    Background: The long-term success of bariatric operations for weight reduction has been well documented, but their potential effects on the risk of esophageal cancer have not been evaluated. Methods: We performed operations on 3 patients for esophageal cancer following bariatric operations: 2 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 1 underwent vertical banded gastroplasty. All of these patients had adenocarcinoma at the gastroesophageal junction; 1 involved the entire intrathoracic esophagus. Results: The intervals between the weight-loss operations and cancer diagnoses were 21, 16, and 14 years. All 3 patients had symptoms of reflux for many years before dysphagia developed and cancer was diagnosed. We performed a limited esophagogastrectomy, a classic IvorLewis procedure, and a total esophagectomy with jejunal free-tissue transfer from stomach to cervical esophagus. Two patients had positive lymph nodes. One patient is alive at 6 years; 2 died at 13 and 15 months after undergoing operation for recurrent cancer. Conclusion: The effect of bariatric operations on gastroesophageal reflux is not known, although gastric bypass has been advocated as the “ultimate antireflux procedure.” The presence of esophageal cancer in these 3 patients years after the weight loss operation is worrisome. We believe that patients who develop new symptoms should have endoscopic evaluation and that epidemiologic studies on the incidence of esophageal cancer occurring years after bariatric operation should be performed. PMID:15554284

  5. [Ruptured subcapsular hepatic hematoma associated with HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pilco, Paul; McCormack, Lucas; Perez, Daniel; Clavien, P A

    2006-01-01

    HELLP syndrome is a rare condition related to pregnancy; however, it can cause complications such as a ruptured subcapsular hepatic hematoma. In most cases, this is managed surgically, but the mortality rate is high, up to 50% of all patients. We present a case with conservative management by percutaneous embolization of the right hepatic artery with a successful outcome and we propose a modern treatment algorithm.

  6. Congenital afibrinogenemia: a case report of a spontaneous hepatic hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Malaquin, Stephanie; Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Badoux, Louise; Mahjoub, Yazine; Dupont, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Afibrinogenemia is a rare coagulation disorder. Clinical features of spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma, or after surgery have been described as well as thrombo-embolic complications. In this article, we presented the case of a 19-year old female with congenital afibrinogenemia who was admitted with a spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. Conclusions: Supportive treatment including transfusion and fibrinogen administration, associated with repeated packing surgeries and selective embolization, were successfully performed. PMID:27428204

  7. Femoral Nerve Palsy due to Anticoagulant Induced Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Orcun; Ercan, Abdulkadir; Kumtepe, Gencehan; Karal, İlker Hasan; Velioglu, Yusuf; Ener, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    A forty-one-year-old man who, sought evaluation for a sudden hip flexion contracture and groin pain with a history of mechanical mitral valve replacement, had been misdiagnosed and treated as having lumbar discopathy for two days. This patient finally was diagnosed with compressive femoral neuropathy due to warfarin-induced retroperitoneal hematoma and successfully managed nonoperatively. This case is reported in order to draw attention to this rare presentation. PMID:25386195

  8. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  9. Traumatic tentorial hematoma in two-wheeler riders: Correlation with helmet use

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Dawar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tentorial hematoma is frequently seen in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, especially in motorized two-wheeler riders following head injury. However its relevance and prognostic significance are not known. Objective: To evaluate patients of TBI with tentorial hematoma using a simple grading system and attempt to correlate this grading with factors like helmet use and neurological outcome. Materials and Methods: This prospective study over a 1-year period included patients with TBI who had tentorial hematoma in the initial plain head. Patients were divided into three grades based on the initial CT findings: Grade I: Isolated tentorial hematoma, grade II: tentorial hematoma with midline shift but open cisterns and grade III: Tentorial hematoma with effaced cisterns. Clinical and radiological records of patients including admission GCS and GOS at discharge were assessed in all cases. Observations: A total of 1786 patients of TBI were admitted during the study period. Of these, 106 (5.9%) patients had tentorial hematoma. 84.9% (n = 90) were male and 15.1% (n = 16) were female with the mean age being 36.5 years (range 2-66 years). The mean admission GCS was 13, 11 and 8 in patients with grade I, II and III tentorial hematoma respectively. 43.4% (n = 46) of the patients had grade I, 32.1% (n = 34) had grade II and 24.5% (n = 26) patients had grade III tentorial hematoma. Seventy-one patients (84.5%) were riding motorized two wheelers with 63 (89%) wearing helmets. The majority of the patients wearing helmets (58.8%) had grade I hematoma with 35% (n = 22) having grade II hematoma and only 6.3% (n = 4) having grade III hematoma. Overall, there were 20 deaths. 50% (n = 10) of the deaths were in patients with grade III hematoma and 40% (n = 8) of the deaths were in patients with grade II hematoma. There were two (10%) deaths in patients with grade I hematoma (both unrelated to head injury). The mean GOS at the time of discharge was 5, 4.1 and 2.2 in patients

  10. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Methods Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15–20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10–15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Results Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. Conclusions A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels. PMID:27444283

  11. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  12. Iliopsoas muscle hematoma secondary to alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Suguru; Tanaka, Nobutaka; Nomura, Yukihiro; Miyahara, Takuya; Furuya, Takatoshi

    2012-09-01

    Iliopsoas muscle hematoma in a patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis is rarely seen, however it has a high mortality. Thus we should cautiously make a diagnosis and treatment. This is the case of a 60-year-old male. He had a 15-year history of alcoholic liver disease and emphysema. He presented with low back pain after a fall that had happened 2 months before. Due to persistent back pain, he went to see a local physician who, after detailed examination, suspected rupture of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms and transferred the patient to our hospital. The same presumptive diagnosis was made, and on this basis, an aortic bifemoral Y-graft was implanted. He developed aspiration pneumonia and hepatic and renal dysfunction postoperatively, which led to multiple organ failure and subsequent in-hospital death on postoperative day 62. This was believed to be a case of iliopsoas muscle hematoma developed in a patient with liver cirrhosis, and considering it was a case with poor surgical risk, a conservative treatment option such as transcatheter arterial embolization should also have been considered. Although iliopsoas muscle hematoma with alcoholic liver cirrhosis is rare, an appropriate treatment plan should be determined on a case-by-case basis despite its poor prognosis.

  13. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons.

  14. Evidence that GABAA receptors mediate relaxation of rat duodenum by activating intramural nonadrenergic-noncholinergic neurones.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Manzini, S; Meli, A

    1984-06-01

    GABA produced rapid and transient relaxation of rat duodenum. Homotaurine (3-aminopropansulphonic acid) but not (+/-)-baclofen had a GABA-like effect. GABA-induced relaxation was almost completely inhibited by tetrodotoxin but was unaffected by atropine. Cross desensitization developed between GABA and homotaurine but not between GABA and (+/-)-baclofen. The concentration response curve to the relaxant effects of GABA was shifted to the right by both bicuculline and picrotoxin. However maximal relaxation was still produced by GABA in the presence of bicuculline but not in the presence of picrotoxin. GABA-induced relaxation was not affected by prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol or reserpine pretreatment. Field stimulation (0.1 Hz) of rat isolated duodenum in the presence of atropine and guanethidine produced relaxation similar to that produced by GABA. The ganglionic stimulant DMPP produced a similar effect. Neither Met-enkephalin, noradrenaline, 5-HT, histamine, VIP or arachidonic acid could be held responsible for GABA-induced neurogenic relaxation of rat duodenum. ATP produced relaxations which closely mimicked those produced by either GABA or field stimulation. Exposure to ATP desensitized responses to both GABA and field stimulation to about the same extent. ATP, GABA and field stimulation-induced relaxation was unaffected by either theophylline or indomethacin, but was significantly and selectively antagonized by apamin. In conclusion, GABA-induced relaxation of rat isolated duodenum is largely dependent upon activation of intra-mural nonadrenergic-noncholinergic neurones. The GABA receptor involved appears to be of the GABAA subtype. Circumstantial evidence is provided indicating that ATP might be the endogenous substance released by GABA.

  15. Mis-sizing of stent promotes intimal hyperplasia: impact of endothelial shear and intramural stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Henry Y; Sinha, Anjan K; Choy, Jenny S; Zheng, Hai; Sturek, Michael; Bigelow, Brian; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2011-12-01

    Stent can cause flow disturbances on the endothelium and compliance mismatch and increased stress on the vessel wall. These effects can cause low wall shear stress (WSS), high wall shear stress gradient (WSSG), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and circumferential wall stress (CWS), which may promote neointimal hyperplasia (IH). The hypothesis is that stent-induced abnormal fluid and solid mechanics contribute to IH. To vary the range of WSS, WSSG, OSI, and CWS, we intentionally mismatched the size of stents to that of the vessel lumen. Stents were implanted in coronary arteries of 10 swine. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to size the coronary arteries and stents. After 4 wk of stent implantation, IVUS was performed again to determine the extent of IH. In conjunction, computational models of actual stents, the artery, and non-Newtonian blood were created in a computer simulation to yield the distribution of WSS, WSSG, OSI, and CWS in the stented vessel wall. An inverse relation (R(2) = 0.59, P < 0.005) between WSS and IH was found based on a linear regression analysis. Linear relations between WSSG, OSI, and IH were observed (R(2) = 0.48 and 0.50, respectively, P < 0.005). A linear relation (R(2) = 0.58, P < 0.005) between CWS and IH was also found. More statistically significant linear relations between the ratio of CWS to WSS (CWS/WSS), the products CWS × WSSG and CWS × OSI, and IH were observed (R(2) = 0.67, 0.54, and 0.56, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that both fluid and solid mechanics influence the extent of IH. Stents create endothelial flow disturbances and intramural wall stress concentrations, which correlate with the extent of IH formation, and these effects were exaggerated with mismatch of stent/vessel size. These findings reveal the importance of reliable vessel and stent sizing to improve the mechanics on the vessel wall and minimize IH.

  16. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia. PMID:28119934

  17. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Samo, Salih; Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2016-08-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia.

  18. [Subcapsular liver hematoma, severe complication of pregnancy toxemia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Chenoufi, Mohamed Badis; Ouerhani, Radhia; el Hitmi, Nadia; Tbatou, Adnane; Smaili, Lamia; Sfar, Ezzedine; Chelli, Hela

    2002-04-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma is a rare and severe complication of pregnancy. This event is already known to have a poor maternal and foetal prognosis. The authors report a case of spontaneous rupture of subcapsular hematoma of the liver in 40 year old multiparous. Confirmation of diagnosis is obtained by abdominal echotomography or TOM. The surgical treatment of this hematoma joints the traumatic surgery of the liver. In every case foetal extraction by cesarean section constitutes the first therapeutic procedure.

  19. Sensitivity of radionuclide brain imaging and computerized transaxial tomography in detecting subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Razzak, M.A.; Mudarris, F.; Christie, J.H.

    1980-04-01

    In a series of 23 patients with surgically proven subdural hematoma of durations ranging between two days to seven months, the detection rate of Tc-99m-pertechnetate brain imaging was higher than computerized transaxial tomography (CT). With dynamic perfusion scanning, the detection rate was 71.5%. In contrast, CT demonstrated the hematoma in 52% of the cases. Lastly, the result of CT scanning was dependent on the size of the subdural hematoma as evaluated at the time of operation.

  20. Thoracic osteophyte: rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, S; Makarawo, T; Norton, R; Collins, F J

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a difficult problem in thoracic surgery. Esophageal perforations can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or malignant. We report two cases of esophageal perforations caused by thoracic osteophytes and different management strategies leading to successful outcomes. An 80-year-old male presented with chest pain and dysphagia following a fall. On endoscopy, an esophageal perforation and foreign body was noted which was confirmed as a thoracic osteophyte on computed tomography scan. He was managed conservatively as he declined surgery. A 63-year-old male was admitted with dysphagia following a food bolus obstruction. Following esophagoscopy and dilatation, there was clinical and radiological evidence of perforation. During surgery, a thoracic osteophyte was identified as the cause of perforation. The perforation was closed in layers and the osteophyte was trimmed. Both patients recovered well. Thoracic osteophytes are a rare cause of esophageal perforations and a high index of suspicion is required in patients with osteoarthritis who present with esophageal perforations.

  1. Unusual Cause of Esophageal Obstruction in a Neonate Presenting as Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shirin S; Dhaded, Sangappa M

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal atresia is the commonest cause of obstruction to esophageal lumen in neonates. Foreign bodies in newborns are extremely rare. We report a rare case of esophageal obstruction closely mimicking atresia due to foreign bodies inserted in a female neonate with homicidal intension. PMID:26023467

  2. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-06-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid.

  3. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  4. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  5. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  6. Laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Dhanya Venugopalan; Reddy, A. Gopala

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal cancer is rapidly increasing especially in developing countries. The major risk factors include unhealthy lifestyle practices such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and chewing tobacco to name a few. Diagnosis at an advanced stage and poor prognosis make esophageal cancer one of the most lethal diseases. These factors have urged further research in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Animal models not only aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal cancer but also help in developing therapeutic interventions for the disease. This review throws light on the various recent laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer. PMID:27956773

  7. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  8. Esophageal sensation and esophageal hypersensitivity - overview from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kondo, Takashi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Tomita, Toshihiko; Watari, Jiro

    2010-10-01

    Noxious stimuli in the esophagus activate nociceptive receptors on esophageal mucosa, such as transient receptor potential, acid-sensing ion channel and the P2X family, a family of ligand-gated ion channels responsive to ATP, and this generates signals that are transmitted to the central nervous system via either spinal nerves or vagal nerves, resulting in esophageal sensation. Among the noxious stimuli, gastric acid and other gastric contents are clinically most important, causing typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation. A conventional acid penetration theory has been used to explain the mechanism of heartburn, but much recent evidence does not support this theory. Therefore, it may be necessary to approach the causes of heartburn symptoms from a new conceptual framework. Hypersensitivity of the esophagus, like that of other visceral organs, includes peripheral, central and probably psychosocial factor-mediated hypersensitivity, and is known to play crucial roles in the pathoegenesis of nonerosive reflux disease, functional heartburn and non-cardiac chest pain. There also are esophagitis patients who do not perceive typical symptoms. This condition is known as silent gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although the pathogenesis of silent gastroesophageal reflux disease is still not known, hyposensitivity to reflux of acid may possibly explain the condition.

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease.

  10. Twist-Drill or Burr Hole Craniostomy for Draining Chronic Subdural Hematomas: How to Choose It for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Im, Soo Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although twist-drill craniostomy (TDC) has a number of procedural advantages and an equivalent outcome compared to burr hole craniostomy (BHC) for the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), the latter technique remains the preferred method. We analyzed symptomatic CSDHs in whom TDC at the pre-coronal suture entry point (PCSEP) was the primary method for hematoma drainage and BHC on the parietal was the secondary option. Methods CSDHs in 86 consecutive patients were included. TDC at the PCSEP, which is 1 cm anterior to coronal suture at the level of the superior temporal line, was the primary operational technique when the hematoma thickness was suitable, and BHC was performed via the parietal when TDC was unreasonable or failed. The clinical feasibility and outcomes of these approaches were analyzed. Results Of the 86 patients, 68 (79.1%) were treated by TDC, and 18 (20.9%) by BHC. All patients showed improvements in their symptoms after hematoma drainage. Neither morbidity nor mortality was associated with either technique, and there were no differences in drainage days between the groups. Ten patients had bilateral hematomas and were treated using TDC. Two patients were not sufficiently treated by TDC and, as a result, BHC was applied. Only six hematomas (7% of 86 hematomas) exhibited insufficient thickness on the computed tomography to perform TDC. Conclusion When the hematoma was thick enough, a majority of the CSDHs were drained using TDC at the PCSEP as the first procedure, which was especially useful for bilateral hematomas and in elderly patients. PMID:27857917

  11. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  12. The National Institutes of Health/National Institutes of Nursing Research intramural research program and the development of the National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model.

    PubMed

    Cashion, Ann K; Grady, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) intramural research program conducts basic and biobehavioral symptom science research and provides training opportunities to the next generation of scientists. Recently, the NINR developed the Symptom Science Model to guide research. The model begins by identifying a complex symptom, which is then characterized into a phenotype with biological and clinical data, followed by the application of genomic and other discovery methodologies to illuminate targets for therapeutic and clinical interventions. Using the Symptom Science Model, the intramural program organizes and implements biobehavioral, symptom management, and tissue injury research. The model is also used as a framework for training and career development opportunities including on-campus trainings and research fellowship. The scientific goal of the intramural program is to enhance patient outcomes including health-related quality of life. Achieving this goal requires a long-term vision, continued resource investments, and a commitment to mentoring our next generation of scientists.

  13. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  14. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions.

  15. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  16. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality.

  17. Optimal lymphadenectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oezcelik, A

    2013-08-01

    Recently published data have shown that an extended lymphadenectomy during the en bloc esophagectomy leads to a significant increased long-term survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand some studies indicate that the increased survival is based on stage migration and that the surgical complication rate is increased after extended lymphadenectomy. The aim of this review was to give an overview about all aspects of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The review of the literature shows clearly that the number of involved lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, an extended lymphadenectomy leads to an increased long-term survival. Some studies describe that 23 lymph nodes should be removed to predict survival; other studies 18 lymph nodes or 15 lymph nodes. Opponents indicate that the survival benefit is based on stage migration. The studies with a large study population have performed a Cox regression analyzes and identified the number of lymph nodes removed as an independent factor for improved survival, which means it is significant independently from other parameters. Under these circumstances is stage migration not an option to explain the survival benefit. An important difficulty is, that there is no standardized definition of an extended lymphadenectomy, which means the localization and number of removed lymph nodes differ depending from the performing centre. The controversies regarding the survival benefit of the lymphadenectomy is based on the lack of standardisation of the lymphadenectomy. The main goal of further studies should be to generate a clear definition of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  18. The management of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew; Aceves, Seema S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinicopathologic, chronic esophageal inflammatory disease resistant to acid suppressive therapy and is associated with variable symptoms indicative of upper gastrointestinal dysfunction. Per current guidelines established by The International Group of Eosinophil Researchers (TIGERS), the diagnosis is made in symptomatic patients after a biopsy that confirms a peak eosinophil level of ≥15 eosinophils/high-powered field (HPF). The esophagus is distinguished by pronounced tissue eosinophilia in which dietary antigens are key inciting factors for disease pathogenesis; EoE being reversed by elimination of triggering food allergens suggests that the disease is mediated in part by allergic sensitization to foods. Moreover, experimental EoE in mice can be induced not only via food exposure but also via aeroallergen exposure. Consistent with an allergic etiology rather than an acid-induced esophagitis, swallowed glucocorticoids are effective for the treatment of EoE. Evaluation by an allergist is a recommended part of the diagnostic workup, especially for management of allergic comorbidities. Clinical practice for the evaluation of patients with EoE mainly relies on prick skin tests due to the ease and validation of these tests in the context of immediate hypersensitivity. However, both atopy patch testing and serum IgE testing have been used in EoE. Herein, we reviewed the basic clinical features of EoE with a focus on the approach to diagnosing causative food allergens and to dietary therapy.

  19. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-05-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities.

  20. Current knowledge on esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Paulo Fernando Martins; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Regina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is the most common congenital anomaly of the esophagus. The improvement of survival observed over the previous two decades is multifactorial and largely attributable to advances in neonatal intensive care, neonatal anesthesia, ventilatory and nutritional support, antibiotics, early surgical intervention, surgical materials and techniques. Indeed, mortality is currently limited to those cases with coexisting severe life-threatening anomalies. The diagnosis of EA is most commonly made during the first 24 h of life but may occur either antenatally or may be delayed. The primary surgical correction for EA and TEF is the best option in the absence of severe malformations. There is no ideal replacement for the esophagus and the optimal surgical treatment for patients with long-gap EA is still controversial. The primary complications during the postoperative period are leak and stenosis of the anastomosis, gastro-esophageal reflux, esophageal dysmotility, fistula recurrence, respiratory disorders and deformities of the thoracic wall. Data regarding long-term outcomes and follow-ups are limited for patients following EA/TEF repair. The determination of the risk factors for the complicated evolution following EA/TEF repair may positively impact long-term prognoses. Much remains to be studied regarding this condition. This manuscript provides a literature review of the current knowledge regarding EA. PMID:22851858

  1. An NIH intramural percubator as a model of academic-industry partnerships: from the beginning of life through the valley of death.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2011-05-08

    In 2009 the NIH publicly announced five strategic goals for the institutes that included the critical need to translate research discoveries into public benefit at an accelerated pace, with a commitment to find novel ways to engage academic investigators in the process. The emphasis on moving scientific advancements from the laboratory to the clinic is an opportune time to discuss how the NIH intramural program in Bethesda, the largest biomedical research center in the world, can participate in this endeavor. Proposed here for consideration is a percolator-incubator program, a 'percubator' designed to enable NIH intramural investigators to develop new medical interventions as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  2. A Systematic Review of the Risk of Perforation During Esophageal Dilation for Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John William

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is associated with tissue remodeling that can result in esophageal mucosal fragility, and esophageal dilation for patients with EoE is known to cause painful mucosal lacerations. Clinicians have been admonished that patients with EoE may be exceptionally predisposed to perforation with esophageal dilation, a notion supported primarily by case reports. We have conducted a systematic review of literature on esophageal dilation in EoE in an attempt to better define the risk of perforation. Methods We searched PubMed and abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Gastroenterology to identify reports on esophageal dilation in EoE. We analyzed reports meeting the following criteria: (1) the diagnosis was established from esophageal biopsy specimens revealing ≥15 eosinophils/hpf, (2) esophageal dilation was described, (3) esophageal perforations described were the result of esophageal dilation. Results We identified 18 reports for inclusion in our systematic review. The studies comprised 468 patients who underwent a total of 671 endoscopic dilations. Esophageal mucosal tears were described in most cases, but there was only one perforation among the 671 dilations (0.1%). Conclusions Our systematic review does not reveal an inordinate frequency of esophageal perforation from dilation in patients with EoE, and it is not clear that dilation is any more hazardous for patients with EoE than for patients with other causes of esophageal stricture. Although esophageal dilation must be performed with caution in all patients, the risk of perforation in EoE appears to have been exaggerated. PMID:20238250

  3. Dengue Fever with rectus sheath hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Bhatia, Sonia; Singh, Rajendra Pratap; Malik, Gaurav

    2014-04-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  4. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions. PMID:27695560

  5. [Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: a case report and management update].

    PubMed

    Berveiller, P; Vandenbroucke, L; Popowski, T; Afriat, R; Sauvanet, E; Giovangrandi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Hepatic subcapsular hematoma (HSH) is a rare complication of pregnancy that keeps a materno-fetal high mortality rate. Given this severity, HSH management requires a prompt diagnosis and an appropriate care. Before focusing on the current management strategy of HSH, we illustrate this article with a clinical case presenting an original method of abdominal exploration, which has not been described to our knowledge. Thus, taking into account the presence of a moderate hemoperitoneum during a caesarean section procedure for HSH, introduction of laparoscopy through the same incision allowed a satisfactory evaluation of the abdominal cavity and hepatic area without performing an invasive midline laparotomy.

  6. Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Altinel, Faruk; Altin, Cihan; Gezmis, Esin; Altinors, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH. PMID:26396617

  7. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-12-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was /sup 68/Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes.

  8. Innovative management of nasal septal hematoma in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Sumitha, R.; Anandan, Ajay Kumar; Govarthanaraj, Aberna

    2015-01-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a collection of blood between the cartilage or bone and mucoperichondrium or mucoperiosteum of the nose. This condition requires immediate surgical drainage to prevent complications. All patients need nasal packing postoperatively to prevent recurrence. This causes a lot of discomforts due to mouth breathing more in infants who are obligatory nose breathers. They can go for cyanosis in the postoperative period. Here, we discuss the case report of an infant who had tubular nasal pack with endotracheal tube postoperatively to maintain the patency of nose. PMID:26015758

  9. Innovative management of nasal septal hematoma in an infant.

    PubMed

    Sumitha, R; Anandan, Ajay Kumar; Govarthanaraj, Aberna

    2015-04-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a collection of blood between the cartilage or bone and mucoperichondrium or mucoperiosteum of the nose. This condition requires immediate surgical drainage to prevent complications. All patients need nasal packing postoperatively to prevent recurrence. This causes a lot of discomforts due to mouth breathing more in infants who are obligatory nose breathers. They can go for cyanosis in the postoperative period. Here, we discuss the case report of an infant who had tubular nasal pack with endotracheal tube postoperatively to maintain the patency of nose.

  10. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  11. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Esophageal Cancer or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer

  12. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ...; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR) Brain... generic name Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector, and it is identified as a noninvasive...

  13. Ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma in pregnancy: a case report of nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kari L; Bader, Cheryl L

    2004-02-01

    Ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma in pregnancy is a rare condition that is usually managed surgically. Recently, however, surgical and obstetric literature has discussed conservative management. We describe successful conservative management of ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma in a woman with preeclampsia who had hemoperitoneum seen at cesarean section.

  14. An alarming but self-limited case of isolated large spontaneous liver hematoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Regmi, Mohan Chandra; Sah, Pannalal; Khaniya, Sudeep; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous subcapsular liver hematoma is rare but potentially life-threatening complication of pregnancy usually associated with severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets). We present here a case of such a large spontaneous liver hematoma presenting in pregnancy, but without other known associated abnormalities, which has not been described before and it resolved on itself without any intervention.

  15. Pulmonary artery thrombus and subcapsular liver hematoma in a patient with HELLP syndrome: a therapeutic conundrum.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Eduardo G; Khawar, Sarwat; Cunningham, Jennifer A; Russell, Lori D; Alpert, Martin A

    2002-03-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevation of liver enzymes, and low platelet count) occurs during pregnancy. Intrahepatic hemorrhage and subcapsular liver hematoma with or without rupture are reported complications of this syndrome. The patient described in this report developed HELLP syndrome associated with a subcapsular liver hematoma and pulmonary artery thrombus, complications that created a therapeutic conundrum.

  16. [Spontaneous peri-pancreatic hematoma associated with celiac trunk stenosis: diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    El Alaoui, Mounia; Olivié, Damien; Gandon, Yves; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2005-11-01

    We report a case of spontaneous peri-pancreatic hematoma which was associated with a celiac trunk stenosis. Hematoma was probably due to the rupture of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm. This diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma, initially retained, illustrates the difficult diagnostic process. Therapeutic modalities for preventing recurrence are discussed.

  17. Noninvasive, optoacoustic detection and characterization of intra- and extracranial hematomas and cerebral hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of intracranial hematomas is necessary to improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT and MRI can diagnose intracranial hematomas, but cannot be used until the patient arrives at a major healthcare facility, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Near infrared spectroscopy may suggest the presence of unilateral intracranial hematomas, but provides minimal information on hematoma type and location due to limitations associated with strong light scattering. We have used optoacoustics (which combines high endogenous optical contrast with the resolution of ultrasound) to diagnose hematomas and monitor cerebral oxygenation. We performed animal and clinical studies on detection and characterization of hematomas and on monitoring cerebral hypoxia by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Recently, we built a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPO-based optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range. We developed new patient interfaces for noninvasive, transcranial measurements in the transmission mode in the presence of dense hair and used it in patients with TBI. The optoacoustic system was capable of detecting and characterizing intra- and extracranial hematomas. SSS blood oxygenation was measured as well with the new interface. The obtained results indicate that the optoacoustic system in the transmission mode provides detection and characterization of hematomas in TBI patients, as well as cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring. The transmission mode approach can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  18. Enhancement of isodense subdural hematoma on delayed-high-dose contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Hinck, V.C.

    1983-02-01

    A case is presented in which bilateral, isodense subdural hematomas, not readily apparent on immediate rapid-high-dose computed tomography, became enhanced and clearly visible on delayed scans. If difficulty is encountered in interpreting the immediate scan of a patient suspected of having isodense subdural hematoma, further scans after a one-hour delay may resolve the dilemma.

  19. Cystic hematoma formation following use of a biodegradable arrow for meniscal repair.

    PubMed

    Hechtman, K S; Uribe, J W

    1999-03-01

    This is a case report of a cystic hematoma formation following the use of a biodegradable arrow for repair of a medial meniscus tear. A literature search found no previous report of this complication. Open hematoma debridement and arrow removal were effective in the treatment of this complication following all-inside meniscal repair with a biodegradable arrow.

  20. Esophageal diverticula in Parma wallabies (Macropus parma).

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Esterline, Meredith L; Coke, Rob L

    2009-03-01

    Four adult, wild caught Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) presented with intermittent, postprandial, midcervical swellings. Esophageal diverticula were discovered in the four animals. One of two wallabies was managed successfully with surgery. A third animal died of other causes. The fourth animal died with possible complications from the diverticulum. This is the first published report of esophageal diverticula in macropods.

  1. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  2. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  3. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  4. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  5. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Caygill, Christine P J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Herceg, Zdenko; Lima, Sheila C S; Pinto, Luis F R; Watson, Anthony; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers: genomic polymorphisms, the genetic and epigenetic drivers in esophageal cancers, and the collection of data in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry.

  7. In-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants and hematoma evacuation of intracerebral hematomas.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marco; Misselwitz, Björn; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kolodziej, Malgorzata; Reinges, Marcus H T; Uhl, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents is described to be a risk factor for mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the impact of antithrombotic agents on mortality in patients who undergo hematoma evacuation compared to conservatively treated patients with ICH remains controversial. This analysis is based on a prospective registry for quality assurance in stroke care in the State of Hesse, Germany. Patients' data were collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Only patients with the diagnosis of spontaneous ICH were included (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes I61.0-I61.9). Predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by univariate analysis. Predictors with P<0.1 were included in a binary logistic regression model. The binary logistic regression model was adjusted for age, initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and pre-ICH disability prior to ictus. In 8,421 patients with spontaneous ICH, pre-treatment with oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents was documented in 16.3% and 25.1%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 23.2%. In-hospital mortality was decreased in operatively treated patients compared to conservatively treated patients (11.6% versus 24.0%; P<0.001). Patients with antiplatelet pre-treatment had a significantly higher risk of death during the hospital stay after hematoma evacuation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.97; P=0.010) compared to patients without antiplatelet pre-treatment treatment (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.79-1.09; P=0.376). In conclusion a higher rate of in-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents in combination with hematoma evacuation after spontaneous ICH was observed in the presented cohort.

  8. [Clinical Manifestations of Spinal Epidural Hematoma-Stroke Mimic and Pitfalls in Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Masaru

    2017-02-01

    Clinical manifestations of spinal epidural hematoma are presented, and the cases mimicking acute ischemic stroke have been reviewed from the literature. Many reports described the cases of spinal epidural hematoma with acute hemiparesis mimicking ischemic stroke in which intravenous thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was considered. A correct diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke must be made within 4.5 hours from the onset of symptoms, a relatively short window period. A spinal epidural hematoma is a potentially important stroke mimic in a wide variety of conditions that mimic a stroke. The literature review and discussion will emphasize allowing the distinction between these hemiparetic presentation of spinal epidural hematoma and acute ischemic stroke. A spinal epidural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute onset of hemiparesis when associated with neck pain and signs of Horner's syndrome and Brown-Sēquard syndrome.

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma on the Ventral Portion of Whole Spinal Canal: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Young; Ha, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon but disabling disease. This paper reports a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma and treatment by surgical management. A 32-year-old male presented with a 30-minute history of sudden headache, back pain, chest pain, and progressive quadriplegia. Whole-spinal sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal epidural hematoma on the ventral portion of the spinal canal. Total laminectomy from T5 to T7 was performed, and hematoma located at the ventral portion of the spinal cord was evacuated. Epidural drainages were inserted in the upper and lower epidural spaces. The patient improved sufficiently to ambulate, and paresthesia was fully recovered. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma should be considered when patients present symptoms of spinal cord compression after sudden back pain or chest pain. To prevent permanent neurologic deficits, early and correct diagnosis with timely surgical management is necessary. PMID:26512277

  10. Intradiploic hematoma of the frontal bone with secondary exophthalmos in a mare.

    PubMed

    Kafarnik, Christiane; Donaldson, David; Payne, Richard; Holloway, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A 13-year-old cob mare was presented with exophthalmos and periocular swelling of the left eye. The diagnostic work-up included ocular ultrasound, sonographic examination through the thinned frontal bone, radiography, standing computed tomography of the skull and exploratory osteoplastic surgery. Histopathology was consistent with an organized hematoma. An intradiploic hematoma of the frontal bone was diagnosed 5 years after head trauma, with progressive expansion and deformation of the skull resulting in exophthalmos. Exophthalmos with facial bone deformation was the only clinical finding of intradiploic hematoma. Standing computed tomography (CT) aided the diagnosis to differentiate intradiploic hematoma from other, more common causes of facial bone distortion associated with paranasal sinus diseases. Intradiploic hematoma of possible traumatic origin is a differential diagnosis for sinonasal disease and exophthalmos in the horse.

  11. Delayed neurological deficits induced by an epidural hematoma associated with a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Soo; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman developed neurological deficits 6 weeks after the onset of a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thoracic spine revealed an epidural hematoma at the T10-L2 levels. Acute decompressive laminectomy and percutaneous vertebroplasty were performed. Following the surgery, the patient's neurologic deficits improved and follow-up MR imaging showed complete resolution of the hematoma. Spinal epidural hematomas are rare and associated delayed neurological deficits are extremely rare. Conservative treatment may be effective for epidural hematomas in neurologically intact patients, but epidural hematomas can be a cause of neural compression and symptomatic deterioration resulting in delayed neurological deficits during the follow-up period.

  12. Migration of traumatic intracranial subdural hematoma to lumbar spine causing radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Charles H.; Yew, Andrew Y.; Lu, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been rare reports of intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH) that migrated into the spine. All previous cases have been surgically managed and in this case report, we describe the first case of conservatively managed spinal hematoma secondary to migratory intracranial SDH. Case Description: A 26-year-old male presented with a left tentorial SDH after blunt trauma. He was conservatively managed and discharged home. He presented 8 days later with worsening lower back pain that was found to be secondary to a spinal SDH. Conclusion: Spinal hematomas can be a serious sequelae of migrated intracranial hematomas. Tentorial and other caudally located intracranial hematomas may be more prone to this phenomenon. PMID:23869281

  13. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  14. Large intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-04-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future.

  15. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  16. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  17. Spontaneous rapid reduction of a large acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Kang, Dong Ho; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin-Myung; Han, Jong Woo

    2009-12-01

    The majority of acute post-traumatic subdural hematomas (ASDH) require urgent surgical evacuation. Spontaneous resolution of ASDH has been reported in some cases. We report here on a case of a patient with a large amount of ASDH that was rapidly reduced. A 61-yr-old man was found unconscious following a high speed motor vehicle accident. On initial examination, his Glasgow Coma Score scale was 4/15. His pupils were fully dilated and non-reactive to bright light. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a massive right-sided ASDH. The decision was made to treat him conservatively because of his poor clinical condition. Another brain CT approximately 14 hr after the initial scan demonstrated a remarkable reduction of the previous ASDH and there was the new appearance of high density in the subdural space adjacent to the falx and the tentorium. Thirty days after his admission, brain CT revealed chronic SDH and the patient underwent surgery. The patient is currently able to obey simple commands. In conclusion, spontaneous rapid resolution/reduction of ASDH may occur in some patients. The mechanisms are most likely the result of dilution by cerebrospinal fluid and the redistribution of hematoma especially in patients with brain atrophy.

  18. Intraparenchymal hematoma as a late complication of retrograde intrarenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Yahsi, Sedat; Tonyali, Senol; Ceylan, Cavit; Yildiz, Kenan Y; Ozdal, Levent

    2017-01-01

    A 34 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with left flank pain. A non-contrast enhanced computerized tomography (NCCT) revealed a 1.5x2cm left proximal ureter stone. Patient was scheduled for ureterorenoscopy (URS) and stone removal. She was submitted to retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). At the postoperative 1st day, the patient began to suffer from left flank pain. A NCCT was taken, which revealed a subcapsular hematoma and perirenal fluid. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous fluid, antibiotic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and was discharged at the postoperative 6th day. Two weeks after the discharge the patient was admitted to emergency department with severe left flank pain, palpitation and malaise. KUB (kidney-ureter-bladder) radiography showed double-J stent (DJS) to be repositioned to the proximal ureter. Patient was evaluated with contrast enhanced CT which revealed an 8cm intraparenchymal hematoma/abscess in the middle part of the kidney. A percutaneous drainage catheter was inserted into the collection. The percutaneous drainage catheter and the DJS were removed at the 10th day of second hospitalization. RIRS surgery is an effective and feasible choice for renal stones with high success and acceptable complication rates. However, clinician should be alert to possible complications.

  19. Esophageal mucosal damage may promote dysmotility and worsen esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Tedesco, Pietro; Damani, Tanuja; Patti, Marco G

    2005-12-01

    This study determines the relationship among esophageal dysmotility, esophageal acid exposure, and esophageal mucosal injury in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 827 patients with GERD (confirmed by ambulatory pH monitoring) were divided into three groups based on the degree of mucosal injury: group A, no esophagitis, 493 patients; group B, esophagitis grades I to III, 273 patients; and group C, Barrett's esophagus, 61 patients. As mucosal damage progressed from no esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus, there was a significant decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of peristalsis in the distal esophagus, with a subsequent increase in the number of reflux episodes in 24 hours, the number of reflux episodes longer than 5 minutes, and the reflux score. These data suggest that in patients with GERD, worsening of esophageal mucosal injury may determine progressive deterioration of esophageal motor function with impairment of acid clearance and increase of esophageal acid exposure. These findings suggest that Barrett's esophagus is an end-stage form of gastroesophageal reflux, and that if surgical therapy is performed early in the course of the disease, this cascade of events might be blocked.

  20. The Esophageal Propulsive Force: Esophageal Response to Acute Obstruction*

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Daniel H.; Zboralske, F. Frank

    1967-01-01

    The response of the normal human esophagus to an obstructing intraluminal bolus was investigated and compared to the response evoked by transient intraluminal distention. A balloon, immobilized within the esophagus by external attachment to a force transducer, was inflated with from 3 to 25 ml of air for from 3 to 210 sec. Pressure phenomena occurring in the esophagus were simultaneously recorded from the body of the esophagus above and below the balloon. Transient distention (5 sec or less) with small volumes (5 ml or less) often evoked a secondary peristaltic wave in the esophagus distal to the balloon, but infrequently resulted in the registration of any force exerted upon the balloon to drive it downward. Conversely, distentions of longer duration and with greater volume elicited an esophageal propulsive force exerted upon the balloon oriented to propel it aborally, and much less often evoked a propagated wave of secondary peristalsis. The propulsive force, obviously resulting from esophageal muscular contraction, occurred promptly, and once initiated, was sustained until deflation of the balloon. It varied widely in magnitude, from 4 to 200 g, and was associated with no motor phenomena recorded from the body of the esophagus proximal or distal to the balloon which could account for its presence, onset, magnitude, or duration. The force was inhibited by deglutition, but arrival of the primary peristaltic wave at the bolus resulted in augmentation of the force. When the obstructing balloon was freed from its attachment, the persistent, stationary force was converted to a propagated one that propelled the balloon before it. It the balloon was arrested before entering the stomach, the moving contraction was also arrested and the persistent propulsive force acting upon the balloon was maintained. The velocity of the moving contraction wave was determined in great part by the resistance offered by the bolus. Unrestrained, the balloon was propelled aborally at 4-8 cm

  1. Student Reactions to Health Services Rendered by the Sports Medicine Program to Intramural Participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violette, Ronald W.

    This paper describes the activities of the Division of Sports Medicine at the University of North Carolina. The program works in the areas of (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) first aid, and (d) rehabilitation of athletic injuries sustained during intramural activities. The sports medicine staff consists of three full-time physicians, four…

  2. Activity assessment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Schoepfer, Alain; Safroneeva, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    The activity of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) can be assessed with patient-reported outcomes and biologic measures. Patient-reported outcomes include symptoms and quality of life, whereas biologic measures refer to endoscopic, histologic, and biochemical activity (e.g. blood biomarkers). So far, a validated tool to assess EoE activity in the above-mentioned dimensions is lacking. Given the lack of a standardized way to assess EoE activity in the various dimensions, the results of different clinical trials may be difficult to compare. For symptom assessment in adult patients, the symptom 'dysphagia' should be evaluated according to different standardized food consistencies. Furthermore, symptom assessment should take into account the following items: avoidance of specific food categories, food modification, and time to eat a regular meal. A distinct symptom recall period (e.g. 2 weeks) has to be defined for symptom assessment. Performing an 'esophageal stress test' with ingestion of a standardized meal to measure symptom severity bears the potential risk of acute food bolus impaction and should therefore be avoided. The description of endoscopic findings in EoE has meanwhile been standardized. Histologic evaluation of EoE activity should report either the size of the high-power field used or count the eosinophils per mm(2). There is a current lack of blood biomarkers demonstrating a good correlation with histologic activity in esophageal biopsies. The development and validation of an adult and pediatric EoE activity index is urgently needed not only for clinical trials and observational studies, but also for daily practice.

  3. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-07-16

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis.

  4. Esophageal hypersensitivity in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-09-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is an often-encountered clinical problem. Although many patients suffer from persistent or recurrent chest pain, treatment remains a challenge owing to its various possible etiologies. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of NCCP. In GERD-related NCCP, proton pump inhibitor treatment appears to be effective. However, the pathophysiology remains to be fully elucidated in NCCP patients without GERD. Treatment for non-GERD-related NCCP has been aimed at esophageal motility disorders and visceral hypersensitivity. As there is growing evidence that esophageal visceral hypersensitivity plays a role in NCCP, pain modulators have become the mainstay of therapy in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP. However, there is an unmet need for the treatment of esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP due to modest evidence for the benefit of pain modulators, including antidepressants, in non-GERD-related NCCP. Recent studies have demonstrated that esophageal mast cell infiltration and impaired mucosal integrity are related to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with NCCP. Thus, esophageal mast cell stabilization and restoration of esophageal mucosal integrity could be considered potential therapeutic targets in selected NCCP patients with hypersensitivity. However, further observations are necessary to shed light on esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP.

  5. Expulsion of Fibroids to the Endometrial Cavity after Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) Treatment of Intramural Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Hyeok; Hong, Gil Pyo; Kim, Yu-Ri; Hong, Da Gyo; Ha, Jae-Eun; Yeom, Jung In; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This report seeks to introduce some cases of the patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery (MRgFUS)-based intramural uterine fibroids treatment where the post-MRgFUS intramural uterine fibroids decreased in its volume and protruded towards the endometrial cavity to be expelled by hysteroscopy. Methods Of the 157 patients who had received MRgFUS treatment in the Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Hospital from March, 2015 to February, 2016; this study examined 6 of the cases where, after high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, intramural uterine fibroids protruded towards the endometrial cavity to be removed by hysteroscopic myomectomy. The high intensity focused ultrasound utilized in the cases were Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla MR (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) and Sonalleve HIFU system. Results The volume of fibroids ranged from 26.0 cm3 to 199.5 cm3, averaging 95.6 cm3. The major axis length ranged from 4.0 cm to 8.2 cm, averaging 6.3 cm. Fibroid location in all of the patients was in intramural uterine before treatment but after the high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, the fibroids were observed to protrude towards the endometrial cavity in at least Day 5 or up to Day 73 to allow hysteroscopic myomectomy. Conclusions In some cases, after an intramural uterine fibroid is treated with MRgFUS, fibroid volume is decreased and the fibroid protrudes towards the endometrial cavity. In this case, hysteroscopic myomectomy can be a useful solution. PMID:28119893

  6. Management of subcapsular hematoma of the graft after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Sik; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Sung, Gyu-Bo; Ko, Gi-Young; Park, Kwang-Min; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won

    2006-07-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the graft is a serious complication of liver transplantation (LT), and there has been no discussion in the literature about optimal management except in sporadic case reports. The aim of this work is to review our experience of subcapsular hematoma in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to introduce our management strategy. Among the 818 cases of adult-to-adult LDLT between February 1997 and November 2005, there have been 4 cases of subcapsular hematoma. Two of these developed after percutaneous liver biopsy and the other 2 developed after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Two developed immediately after the procedure, whereas the other 2 developed 8 and 12 days after the procedure, respectively, due to rupture of a pseudoaneurysm. Our management strategy was as follows; after performing dynamic computed tomography for initial diagnosis, these 3 steps were taken: 1) hepatic arteriography and selective embolization of bleeding focus; 2) pigtail catheter drainage (PCD) of subcapsular hematoma; and 3) hepatic vein stenting if there was a sign of outflow disturbance due to compression by a large hematoma. All 4 of our patients recovered from the insult of subcapsular hematoma. In conclusion, our results indicate that patients who develop subcapsular hematoma after LDLT can be treated nonsurgically.

  7. Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R; Kasotakis, George; Wilcox, Alison; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2005-09-01

    Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirty-seven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery.

  9. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable.

  10. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  11. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP. PMID:27144142

  12. Epidural hematomas after the implantation of thoracic paddle spinal cord stimulators.

    PubMed

    Moufarrij, Nazih A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There is little information on the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas after the implantation of paddle spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) in the thoracic spine. The purpose of this paper is to provide this metric and compare it to the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas for all other thoracic laminectomies combined. METHODS This study involved retrospectively analyzing the experience of a single surgeon in a consecutive series of patients who underwent the implantation of a thoracic paddle SCS with respect to the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma. For comparison, the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma in non-SCS thoracic laminectomies done during the same period of time was determined. RESULTS One hundred fifty-four thoracic paddle SCSs were implanted between May 2002 and February 2015. Despite perfect hemostasis and no preoperative risk factors, 4 of 154 patients (2.60%) developed postoperative lower-extremity weakness caused by an epidural hematoma. There were no other causes of a neurological deficit. In 3 of the 4 patients, the symptoms were delayed. Over the same time period, only 1 of 119 patients (0.84%) developed a postoperative motor deficit from a symptomatic epidural hematoma after a non-SCS laminectomy. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of epidural hematomas after thoracic paddle SCS implantation may be underreported. Suggestions are given to decrease its incidence. It seems paradoxical that an epidural hematoma occurred 3 times more often after small SCS thoracic laminectomies than after larger non-SCS thoracic laminectomies. If confirmed by future studies, this finding may suggest that the intrusion of instruments into a confined epidural sublaminar space or the presence of a paddle and a hematoma in this restricted space may account for this differential.

  13. Esophageal irritation due to alendronate sodium tablets: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peter, C P; Handt, L K; Smith, S M

    1998-09-01

    Animal studies were done using an in vivo dog model to examine the possible mechanism for the esophageal adverse events reported with alendronate sodium tablets. These studies showed that under low pH conditions alendronate sodium can cause esophageal irritation. No esophageal irritation occurred at pH 3.5 or higher where the drug exists primarily as the sodium salt. The animal studies also showed that alendronate sodium can exacerbate preexisting esophageal damage. Exposure of the esophageal mucosa for a prolonged period to alendronate sodium tablet can also cause mild esophageal irritation. These findings suggest that the esophageal irritation in patients taking Fosamax can be from prolonged contact with the tablet, reflux of acidic gastric contents with alendronate sodium, and exacerbation of preexisting esophageal damage. The findings also suggest that other bisphosphonates can cause esophageal injury under similar conditions.

  14. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  15. Pancreatic Pseudocyst with Splenic Artery Erosion, Retroperitoneal and Splenic Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Botianu, Petre V. H.; Dobre, Adrian S.; Botianu, Ana-Maria V.; Onisor, Danusia

    2015-01-01

    The erosion of the peripancreatic vascular structures is a rare but life-endangering complication of pancreatic diseases. We report a female patient with a multicompartmentalized pancreatic pseudocyst that eroded the splenic artery resulting in a retroperitoneal and splenic hematoma with hemodynamic instability which required emergency laparotomy with splenectomy, partial cystectomy, ligation of the splenic artery at the level of the vascular erosion, cholecystectomy (lithiasis), and multiple drainage. The postoperative course was difficult (elevated level of platelets, pancreatic fistula) but eventually favourable, with no abdominal complaints and no recurrence at 2-year follow-up. The case shows that the pancreatic pseudocysts may present with acute hemorrhagic complications with life-endangering potential and significant postoperative morbidity. PMID:26783490

  16. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  17. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; de Asis Lorente, Francisco; Rivero, David; Eiras, José; Ara, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia) and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration. PMID:19838395

  18. Cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma as a complication of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, L; Carletti, S; Frondizi, D; Spera, C; Maira, G

    1996-01-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which usually provokes severe neurological deficits. It is presumed to originate from venous or, more probably, arterial bleeding. Thrombocytopenia and other disorders of coagulation may precipitate the onset of epidural hematoma and facilitate the evolution of the disease. We report the case of a patient suffering from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with severe thrombocytopenia during a MACOP-B schedule, who presented with a spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. We discuss the etiopathological aspects, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare cause of acute cervical spinal cord compression.

  19. Two cases of sublingual hematoma as a manifestation of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Muneesh; Chiesa, Antonia E; Sirotnak, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    Common intraoral manifestations of child abuse include tears of the frenula, burns, and pharyngeal perforations. Sublingual hematomas can also occur as a result of trauma, but to the best of our knowledge, only 1 case has been previously described in the context of child abuse. We report 2 new cases of sublingual hematoma in infants that were the result of physical abuse. Cases of sublingual hematoma in infants and children without a clear and legitimate explanation of the cause should prompt consideration of child abuse.

  20. Proteomic profiling of fetal esophageal epithelium, esophageal cancer, and tumor-adjacent esophageal epithelium and immunohistochemical characterization of a representative differential protein, PRX6

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Hui; Xing, Guo-Lan; Fang, Xin-Hui; Wu, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Zong-Min; Wang, Li-Dong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To understand the molecular mechanism of esophageal cancer development and provide molecular markers for screening high-risk populations and early diagnosis. METHODS Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry were adopted to screen differentially expressed proteins in nine cases of fetal esophageal epithelium, eight cases of esophageal cancer, and eight cases of tumor-adjacent normal esophageal epithelium collected from fetuses of different gestational age, or esophageal cancer patients from a high-risk area of esophageal cancer in China. Immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase complex method) was used to detect the expression of peroxiredoxin (PRX)6 in 91 cases of esophageal cancer, tumor-adjacent normal esophageal tissue, basal cell hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ, as well as 65 cases of esophageal epithelium from fetuses at a gestational age of 3-9 mo. RESULTS After peptide mass fingerprint analysis and search of protein databases, 21 differential proteins were identified; some of which represent a protein isoform. Varying degrees of expression of PRX6 protein, which was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, were detected in adult and fetal normal esophageal tissues, precancerous lesions, and esophageal cancer. With the progression of esophageal lesions, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend (P < 0.05). In fetal epithelium from fetuses at gestational age 3-6 mo, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend with age (P < 0.05). PRX6 protein expression was significantly higher in well-differentiated esophageal cancer tissues than in poorly differentiated esophageal cancer tissues (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Development and progression of esophageal cancer result from interactions of genetic changes (accumulation or superposition). PRX6 protein is associated with fetal esophageal development and cancer differentiation. PMID:28293090

  1. [Delayed Traumatic Intracerebral Hematoma during Antiplatelet Therapy after Operations for Ruptured Left ICPC Aneurysm and Right Traumatic Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shunsuke; Iwata, Yukiya; Baba, Motoki; Kawashima, Akitsugu; Sato, Hidetaka; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-07-01

    Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma (DTICH) is a rare complication of head injury that appears suddenly after an interval of several days or months. Here, we report a case of DTICH during antiplatelet therapy for vasospasm following surgeries for a ruptured left internal carotid-posterior communicating (ICPC) aneurysm and right acute epidural hematoma (EDH). A 77-year-old man with no medical history was diagnosed with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupturing of a left ICPC aneurysm and a right linear fracture of the right parietal bone due to a head injury following the rupture. On day 2, the patient underwent successful clipping of the left ICPC aneurysm. Computed tomography (CT) performed post-clipping revealed a right acute EDH below the linear fracture of the right parietal bone, which was removed immediately. A next-day CT revealed minor contusions in both temporal poles. Fasudil, ozagrel, and cilostazol were administered from Day 3 post-clipping and EDH evacuation to prevent vasospasm. The contusions did not enlarge until Day 10. On Day 11, the patient became comatose, and a huge hematoma was identified in the right temporal lobe to frontal lobe. Although the hematoma was removed immediately, the patient died on Day 13. The hematoma was considered to be a rare case of DTICH that developed from a minor contusion of the right temporal lobe during antiplatelet therapy for vasospasm. In cases of aneurysmal SAH with head injury and contusion, we must pay attention to DTICH and select more deliberate treatment for vasospasm.

  2. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease. PMID:27994270

  3. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Marek; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  4. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE) or (EoE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the esophagus. One example is acid reflux . Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medications that help reduce ... other conditions caused by too much stomach acid. Proton-pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia or PPI-REE ...

  5. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  6. Tracheoesophageal fistula and esophageal atresia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs. These defects usually occur together: Esophageal atresia (EA) occurs when the upper part of the esophagus ... have other birth defects beside TEF and/or EA may not be able to have surgery until ...

  7. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  8. Another Obesity Downside: Higher Esophageal Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the United States, esophageal cancer is rare, accounting for only 1 percent of all new cancers ... advanced stage. Stomach cancer, likewise, is also rare, accounting for fewer than 2 percent of all new ...

  9. Managing eosinophilic esophagitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisha A; Albert, Dustin M; Hall, Noah M; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive immune-mediated condition defined by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. Therapies consist of anti-eosinophilic medications and specialized diets aimed to decrease the progression of EoE and alleviate its symptoms, namely, dysphagia and food impaction. Assessing response to therapy remains challenging, as treatment end points are not well defined and currently consist of clinical, histologic, and endoscopic features. Newer validated measures may help standardize treatment end points. Emerging data support the use of maintenance therapy, which may reduce disease progression. Optimal dosages, delivery techniques, and duration of treatment need to be determined. When features of fibrostenosis develop, esophageal dilation is a safe and effective adjunctive strategy for improving symptoms. In EoE cases refractory to conventional treatments, newer therapies targeting inflammatory mediators and cytokines are on the horizon. PMID:27695356

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of tissue , including mucous membrane , muscle, and connective tissue . Esophageal cancer starts on the inside lining of ... and spread into the muscle layer or the connective tissue layer of the esophagus wall. The cancer cells ...

  11. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  12. A case of exfoliative esophagitis with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, M; Otake, S; Naitoh, H; Shoji, H; Yamagishi, J; Suzuki, M; Yanoma, T; Kuwano, H

    2011-04-01

    Autoimmune blistering skin diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris, rarely involve the esophagus. We report a case of exfoliative esophagitis with pemphigus vulgaris. A sloughing esophageal cast observed by endoscopy was dissected esophageal squamous epithelium in all layers. Our case is the fifth case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with esophageal cast formation recorded in the medical literature. Prednisolone was administered, and both the pemphigus vulgaris and exfoliative esophagitis improved. Upon findings of exfoliative esophagitis by endoscopic examination, we should consider the coexistence of blistering skin diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris.

  13. Esophageal dysmotility is present before surgery in isolated tracheoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Caroline; Aspirot, Ann; Morris, Melanie; Faure, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    After surgical correction of esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal body motility dysfunction has been reported in nearly all patients. Using high-resolution esophageal manometry before surgical repair in 2 children with isolated tracheoesophageal fistula, we sought to determine whether dysmotility was present before any surgical insult to test the hypothesis that dysmotility associated with esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula is related to intrinsic primary factors linked to abnormal development of the esophagus. Both had an abnormal esophageal motility: one exhibited hypomotility with distal contraction, whereas the other showed a complete aperistalsis pattern. This suggests that esophageal dysmotility is congenital in nature rather than secondary to surgery.

  14. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases.

  15. Classification of Esophageal Strictures following Esophageal Atresia Repair.

    PubMed

    Macchini, Francesco; Parente, Giovanni; Morandi, Anna; Farris, Giorgio; Gentilino, Valerio; Leva, Ernesto

    2017-03-06

    Introduction The aim of this study was to stratify anastomotic strictures (AS) following esophageal atresia (EA) repair and to establish predictors for the need of dilations. Material and Methods A retrospective study on children operated on for EA between 2004 and 2014 was conducted. The stricture index (SI) was measured both radiologically (SIXR) and endoscopically (SIEND). A correlation analysis between the SI and the number of dilations was performed using Spearman's test and linear regression analysis. Results In this study, 40 patients were included: 35 (87.5%) presented with Gross's type C EA, 3 (7.5%) type A, 1 (2.5%) type B, and 1 (2.5%) type D. The mean follow-up time was 101 ± 71.1 months (range: 7.8-232.5, median: 97.6). The mean SIXR was 0.56 ± 0.16 (range: 0.15-0.86). The mean SIEND was 0.45 ± 0.22 (range: 0.15-0.85). Twenty-four patients (60%) underwent a mean of 2 endoscopic dilations (range: 1-9). The number of dilations was poorly correlated with SIXR, while significantly correlated with SIEND. Patients who did not need dilations had a SIEND < 0.33, patients who needed only one dilation had 0.33 ≤ SIEND < 0.44, and those with SIEND ≥ 0.44 needed two or more dilations. No significant association with other clinical variables was found. All patients were asymptomatic at the time of the first endoscopy. Conclusion SIEND is a useful tool to classify AS and can represent a predictor of the need for endoscopic dilation. The role of the SIEND becomes even more important as clinical characteristics have a low predictive value for the development of an AS and the need for subsequent endoscopic esophageal dilatations.

  16. Role of diagnostic tests in esophageal evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, B.D.; Pope, C.E. II

    1980-06-01

    In the evaluation of esophageal disease, the appropriate question must be asked before the correct tests can be selected. Reflux can be demonstrated by radiologic methods, pH testing or radioisotopic techniques. Esophageal mucosal damage is best evaluated by x-ray, endoscopy, or biopsy. Chest pain is demonstrated by acid infusion or by manometry. Two algorithms are presented for the evaluation of chest pain and reflux symptoms.

  17. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil adjuvant chemotherapy following three-field lymph node dissection for stage II/III N1, 2 esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Tadasuke; Nasu, Motomi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kuniyasu, Tetsuji; Inoue, Hirohumi; Sakai, Noritaka; Ouchi, Kazutomo; Amano, Takayuki; Isayama, Fuyumi; Tomita, Natsumi; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahiko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (DCF) in lymph node metastasis-positive esophageal cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 139 patients with stage II/III (non-T4) esophageal cancer with lymph node metastasis (1-6 nodes), who did not receive preoperative treatment and underwent three-field lymph node dissection in the Juntendo University Hospital between December, 2004 and December, 2009. The tumors were histologically diagnossed as squamous cell carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups, a surgery alone group (S group, 88 patients) and a group that received postoperative DCF therapy (DCF group, 51 patients). The disease-free and overall survival were compared between the groups and a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was performed. The same analysis was performed for cases classified as N1 and N2, according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences between the S and DCF groups regarding clinicopathological factors other than intramural metastasis and main tumor location. The presence of intramural metastasis, blood vessel invasion and the number of lymph nodes were identified as prognostic factors. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival were 55.8 and 57.3%, respectively, in the S group and 52.8 and 63.0%, respectively, in the DCF group. These differences were not considered to be statistically significant (P=0.789 and 0.479 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Although there were no significant differences in disease-free and overall survival between the S and DCF groups in N1 cases, both disease-free and overall survival were found to be better in the DCF group (54.2 and 61.4%, respectively) compared to the S group (29.6 and 28.8%, respectively) in N2 cases (P=0.029 and 0.020 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Therefore, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with DCF was shown to improve disease-free and

  18. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  19. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-09-13

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s.

  20. Chronic expanding hematoma extending over multiple gluteal muscles associated with piriformis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yasuyuki; Yokoyama, Munehiro; Tamai, Kensuke; Takai, Shinro

    2012-01-01

    We report on a patient with an unusual, slowly enlarging hematoma of the left buttock. A 62-year-old man presented with a 6-year history of an enlarging mass of the left buttock. He had first noted the mass 6 years earlier and had had sciatica of the left lower limb for the last 2 months. He denied any history of antecedent trauma. The lesion extended over 3 gluteal muscles (the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and piriformis). On microscopic examination, the lesion showed typical signs of chronic expanding hematoma. The sciatica was relieved after surgical removal of the lesion. The lesion had not recurred at the last follow-up 4 years after the operation. The present case suggested that chronic expanding hematoma can extend into multiple muscles due, perhaps, to long-term growth and the anatomical and functional conditions of the affected muscles. Our case also suggests that chronic expanding hematoma can be a cause of piriformis syndrome.

  1. The early fracture hematoma and its potential role in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Paula; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Schell, Hanna; Gaber, Timo; Toben, Daniel; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank; Duda, Georg N

    2010-08-01

    Research regarding the potency and potential of the fracture hematoma has begun to receive increasing attention. However, currently there is a paucity of relevant literature on the capability and composition of the fracture hematoma. This review briefly summarizes the regenerative fracture healing process and the close interplay between the skeletal and immune systems. The role of immune cells in wound healing is also discussed to clarify their involvement in immunological processes during regeneration. We attempt to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the fracture hematoma as the initial stage of the regenerative process of fracture healing. The review discusses how a better understanding of immune reactions in the hematoma may have implications for bone tissue engineering strategies. We conclude the review by emphasizing how additional investigations of the initial phase of healing will allow us to better differentiate between deleterious and beneficial aspects of inflammation, thereby facilitating improved fracture treatment strategies.

  2. Retropharyngeal hematoma secondary to cervical spine surgery: report of one fatal case.

    PubMed

    Dedouit, Fabrice; Grill, Stéphane; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Savall, Frédéric; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    A 53-year-old woman suffering from radicular pain due to cervical herniation underwent a spinal surgery consisting of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with an implantable titanium cage. Five hours after the procedure, the patient developed cervical swelling and dyspnea. An emergency surgery permitted evacuation of a deep cervical hematoma and intubation of the patient, who died some minutes later. The family of the deceased lodged a complaint with the public prosecutor because of unclear circumstances of death. After analysis of the medical records by two forensic pathologists, a medicolegal autopsy was ordered. Massive retropharyngeal and mediastinal hematomas were diagnosed. Pathological study confirmed acute cervical hemorrhage, but failed to detect the source of bleeding. The forensic pathologists concluded that death was due to mechanical asphyxia secondary to pharyngeal compression by the cervical hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, death secondary to retropharyngeal hematoma in this neurosurgical context is rarely encountered.

  3. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    PubMed

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  4. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  5. Interventional Therapy of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in China. Despite a lot of advances in diagnosis and therapy, the survival rate of patients with EC is low. There is urgent need for a variety of methods and techniques to improve the survival time and alleviate the lesions of EC. Nowadays, alternative and less invasive approaches to the treatment of ECs are being identified. Here, we review several main interventional methods at different stages of EC, including endoscopic resection, stent placement, arterial infusion, photodynamic therapy, and radiofrequency ablation. This review will focus on the indications, methods, clinical outcomes, and complications of these methods, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:27904858

  6. Cleaning up after ICH: the role of Nrf2 in modulating microglia function and hematoma clearance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiurong; Sun, Guanghua; Ting, Shun-Ming; Song, Shen; Zhang, Jie; Edwards, Nancy J; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), blood components enter brain parenchyma causing progressive damage to the surrounding brain. Unless hematoma is cleared, the reservoirs of blood continue to inflict injury to neurovascular structures and blunt the brain repair processes. Microglia/macrophages (MM Φ) represent the primary phagocytic system that mediates the cleanup of hematoma. Thus the efficacy of phagocytic function by MM Φ is an essential step in limiting ICH-mediated damage. By using primary microglia to model red blood cell (main component of hematoma) clearance, we studied the role of transcription factor Nrf2, a master-regulator of anti-oxidative defense, in the hematoma clearance process. We showed that in cultured microglia, activators of Nrf2 1) induce anti-oxidative defense components, 2) reduce peroxide formation, 3) upregulate phagocytosis-mediating scavenger receptor CD36, and 4) enhance RBC phagocytosis. Through inhibiting Nrf2 or CD36 in microglia, by DNA-decoy or neutralizing antibody, we documented the important role of Nrf2 and CD36 in RBC phagocytosis. Using autologous blood injection ICH model to measure hematoma resolution, we showed that Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane, injected to animals after the onset of ICH, induced CD36 expression in ICH-affected brain and improved hematoma clearance in rats and wild-type mice, but expectedly not in Nrf2-knockout-(KO) mice. Normal hematoma clearance was impaired in Nrf2-KO mice. Our experiments suggest that Nrf2 in microglia play an important role in augmenting the anti-oxidative capacity, phagocytosis and hematoma clearance after ICH. PMID:25328080

  7. Subcapsular liver hematoma after fibrinolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Safi, Morteza; Khaheshi, Isa; Memaryan, Mehdi; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-16

    Hemorrhagic complications of thrombolytic therapy are rare but also serious and sometimes life-threatening. Liver hematoma is a very uncommon complication following thrombolytic therapy. We present a rare case of sub-capsular liver hematoma following streptokinase therapy of acute myocardial infarction as a challenging condition. This case report highlights that emergency physicians and cardiologists should be familiar with the significant and uncommon complications of thrombolytic agents, particularly streptokinase which is used generally in under- developed countries.

  8. Complete paralysis of the quadriceps muscle caused by traumatic iliacus hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Kazuya; Kuramochi, Taro; Sakai, Hiroya; Iwami, Norio; Saotome, Koichi

    2002-01-01

    A15-year-old girl who developed traumatic iliacus hematoma and complete paralysis of the quadriceps muscle is reported. The current case and literature review revealed that incomplete quadriceps paralysis associated with traumatic iliacus hematoma is likely to progress to complete paralysis in days or weeks as a result of increased intracompartmental pressure. However, surgical decompression of the femoral nerve could produce good results even in patients who have complete quadriceps paralysis preoperatively.

  9. Evidence of abnormal esophageal motility in syndrome X by radionuclide esophageal transit test.

    PubMed

    Kao, C H; Hsieh, J F; Tsai, C S; Ho, Y J; Lee, J K

    2000-01-01

    In 30 patients with syndrome X, esophageal motility was evaluated by radionuclide esophageal transit test (RETT). Esophageal motility measurements included esophageal mean transit time (MTT), residual fraction (RF), and retrograde index (RI). In comparison with 25 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers, 66% of the patients with syndrome X had abnormal RETT findings including 50% of cases with longer MTT, 50% of cases with higher RF, and 33% of cases with higher RI. In addition, the mean values of MTT, RF, and RI in patients with syndrome X were significantly higher than those of healthy volunteers. We conclude that abnormal esophageal motility occurred in a large portion of syndrome X patients based on an simple and noninvasive RETT.

  10. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  11. Eosinophilic esophagitis after esophageal atresia: is there an association? Case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Ramon R; Heij, Hugo A; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kneepkens, C M Frank

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new condition resulting in dysphagia or symptoms resembling gastroesophageal reflux disease, symptoms that also are common in patients with a history of esophageal atresia. We present 2 patients with persistent dysphagia after repair of esophageal atresia that was caused by EoE. Although the exact etiology and pathogenesis of EoE remain unclear, it is now generally accepted that it is the result of a T-helper cell 2-type immune response with a crucial role for the eosinophil-specific chemotaxis factor eotaxin 3 and eosinophils. Because there are genetic similarities between esophageal atresia and EoE, we speculate that patients with esophageal atresia are at increased risk for developing EoE.

  12. Development of a renal subcapsular hematoma during angiography for diagnosis and subsequent treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Akihiro; Tomonari, Testu; Tanaka, Hironori; Tanaka, Kumiko; Kagawa, Miwako; Tanaka, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Tatsuya; Harada, Rie; Sato, Momoko; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2014-04-01

    A renal subcapsular hematoma rarely occurs without a history of trauma. It has been reported as a complication of urological interventions and also reported to occur spontaneously in patients with renal malignancies. However, there are no previous reports of renal subcapsular hematomas occurring in connection with abdominal angiography. We report here a case of a renal subcapsular hematoma that developed and was recognized during abdominal angiography for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An 80-year-old male was referred to our hospital for transarterial embolization for multiple HCCs. His past medical history included hypertension. His laboratory data showed slightly decreased number of platelets and hepaplastin test due to liver cirrhosis. When computed tomography angiography was performed, a 7-cm subcapsular hematoma developed and was recognized over the right kidney during the procedure. He was successfully managed supportively with blood transfusion, tranexamic acid and antibiotics. Since thrombocytopenia and hypertension are reportedly risk factors for hematoma formation, careful manipulation is required during angiography in HCC patients with liver cirrhosis and hypertension. It must be kept in mind that rare complications, such as a renal subcapsular hematoma, can happen during abdominal angiography for diagnostic and interventional treatment of HCC.

  13. Crural diaphragm inhibition during esophageal distension correlates with contraction of the esophageal longitudinal muscle in cats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianmin; Puckett, James L; Takeda, Torahiko; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2005-05-01

    Esophageal distension causes simultaneous relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and crural diaphragm. The mechanism of crural diaphragm relaxation during esophageal distension is not well understood. We studied the motion of crural and costal diaphragm along with the motion of the distal esophagus during esophageal distension-induced relaxation of the LES and crural diaphragm. Wire electrodes were surgically implanted into the crural and costal diaphragm in five cats. In two additional cats, radiopaque markers were also sutured into the outer wall of the distal esophagus to monitor esophageal shortening. Under light anesthesia, animals were placed on an X-ray fluoroscope to monitor the motion of the diaphragm and the distal esophagus by tracking the radiopaque markers. Crural and costal diaphragm electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded along with the esophageal, LES, and gastric pressures. A 2-cm balloon placed 5 cm above the LES was used for esophageal distension. Effects of baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist, were also studied. Esophageal distension induced LES relaxation and selective inhibition of the crural diaphragm EMG. The crural diaphragm moved in a craniocaudal direction with expiration and inspiration, respectively. Esophageal distension-induced inhibition of the crural EMG was associated with sustained cranial motion of the crural diaphragm and esophagus. Baclofen blocked distension-induced LES relaxation and crural diaphragm EMG inhibition along with the cranial motion of the crural diaphragm and the distal esophagus. There is a close temporal correlation between esophageal distension-mediated LES relaxation and crural diaphragm inhibition with the sustained cranial motion of the crural diaphragm. Stretch caused by the longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus during distension of the esophagus may be important in causing LES relaxation and crural diaphragm inhibition.

  14. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  15. Blunt traumatic esophageal injury: Unusual presentation and approach☆

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrahman, Husham; Ajaj, Ahmad; Shunni, Adam; El-Menyar, Ayman; Chaikhouni, Amer; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Blunt esophageal injury is extremely rare event. However, it is a potential morbid injury unless managed early. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of blunt esophageal injury for a 28-year old male who presented with history of fall of heavy object over the right side of the chest. Diagnostic work up including chest X-ray, computerized tomography scans and gastrografin esophagogram revealed lower esophageal rupture. Right mini-thoracotomy with esophageal repair was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. DISCUSSION The exact mechanism of blunt esophageal injury remains uncertain. This report described a unique location of esophageal rupture after blunt trauma that happened on the right side. Diagnosis of esophageal injury needs high index of suspicion and accurate diagnostic workup. CONCLUSION Prompt diagnosis and management are the key for better prognosis in patients with blunt esophageal injury. PMID:24394856

  16. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer associated with achalasia.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Yu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu; Kaise, Mitsuru; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is often associated with esophageal cancer. However, in many cases, esophageal cancer tends to be found in an advanced stage, with a poor prognosis. However, early-stage cancer was detected recently due to the advances in endoscopic instruments. In those cases, it is important to facilitate successful treatment by endoscopic submucosal dissection. We analyzed a total of six cases of esophageal cancer with achalasia in four patients treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection. Three features common to all six cases had a bearing on how endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. First, esophageal dilatation and diminished peristalsis facilitated the performance of successful endoscopic submucosal dissection. Second, the esophageal wall was thickened, primarily with muscular tissue. Third, the submucosal layer contained abundant blood vessels that made it difficult to minimize bleeding during dissection. Those findings suggest that endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer associated with achalasia is a safe and potentially curative procedure. It is important, therefore, to detect esophageal cancer early.

  17. Review of the Burden of Esophageal Cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Wan-Nor-Asyikeen, Wan Adnan; Norsa'adah, Bachok

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the top leading causes of cancer-related deaths in Malaysia. To date, neither the prevalence nor incidence of esophageal cancer nationally have been recorded. Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem even if it is not common in Malaysia. The late presentation of esophageal cancer makes it a difficult and challenging medical problem. Therefore, more governmental and non-governmental organizations of Malaysia should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  18. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  19. Concomitant herpetic and eosinophilic esophagitis--a causality dilemma.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, P; Almeida, N; Cipriano, M A; Gouveia, H; Sofia, C

    2012-09-01

    Eosinophilic and herpetic esophagitis are listed as independent causes of dysphagia, especially in young adult males. However, herpetic esophagitis rarely affects immunocompetent individuals. We report the case of a young, not immunocompromised patient, admitted because of severe dysphagia secondary to herpes simplex virus esophagitis. After complete resolution, an endoscopic and histologic reevaluation established the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The potential association between the two conditions is discussed.

  20. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  1. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, José Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ‪The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  2. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture.

  3. Pure esophageal atresia with normal outer appearance: case report.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Murat; Haeussler, Beatrice; Tabarelli, Walther; Maurer, Kathrin; Sergi, Consolato; Hager, Josef

    2007-08-01

    Isolated esophageal atresia is characterized by a long segment between the 2 esophageal pouches. This article presents a case of pure esophageal atresia with a 1-cm-long segment at the midportion without discontinuity that resembled the subtype II3 according to the Kluth atlas. Resection of the atretic segment and primary anastomosis were performed successfully.

  4. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  5. [Esophageal reconstruction--using gastric tube instead of whole stomach].

    PubMed

    Chen, Keneng

    2014-09-01

    Stomach is the first choice for esophageal reconstruction following esophagectomy. In the earlier days, however, whole stomach pulling-up was the major surgery, which had some shortcomings. Recently, gastric tube has gained wide acceptance for esophageal reconstruction. This paper summarized the anatomical and physiological advantage of stomach, the disadvantage of whole stomach, and benefits of gastric tube for esophageal reconstruction.

  6. Commentary: A delicate balance: weighing the effects of conflict-of-interest rules on intramural research at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, Michael M; Jaffe, Holli Beckerman

    2010-11-01

    In 2005, in response to increasing public concerns about potential conflicts of interest in biomedical research, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) tightened its ethics rules to prohibit National Institutes of Health (NIH) employees from receiving consulting fees from "significantly affected organizations." In response, NIH took steps to implement these regulations and ensure that relationships between intramural NIH researchers and industry could proceed without threatening the integrity of federally funded research. Examples of these steps include creating an ethics advisory committee to review outside activities of NIH scientists and subjecting its researchers to special scrutiny to eliminate any perception of personal profit or conflict of interest. In the authors' experiences, interactions between NIH scientists and industry have continued relatively unaffected by these regulations. The continuing success of the technology transfer program at NIH and the number and types of cooperative research and development agreements with industry are good measures of the extent of productive interactions with industry since the implementation of the 2005 ethics rules. Although recruitment of outstanding scientists to the intramural program has continued, these regulations also have challenged NIH's ability to attract and retain some of the most qualified scientists, who fear they may miss certain opportunities because of the tighter regulations. As DHHS revises the regulations governing oversight of financial conflicts of interest in the extramural community, the authors recognize that the NIH intramural experience may provide valuable lessons about developing and implementing the next generation of financial conflict-of-interest rules.

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed 'placental infarction hematoma' is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such a lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This paper describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma.

  8. Subdural hematomas in boxing: the spectrum of consequences.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vincent J; Bailes, Julian E; Cantu, Robert C; Rabb, Craig H

    2006-10-15

    Boxing is a violent sport in which every participant accepts the risk of brain damage or death. This sport has been linked to acute neurological injury and chronic brain damage. The most common life-threatening injury encountered by its participants is subdural hematoma (SDH), and the most feared consequence of chronic insult to the nervous system is dementia pugilistica, or punch drunkenness. Although advances in imaging and neuropsychological testing have improved our ability to diagnose these injuries, the unprecedented sensitivity and wide availability of these modalities have increased the detection of mild cognitive impairment and small, asymptomatic imaging abnormalities. The question has thus been raised as to where on the spectrum of these injuries an athlete should be permanently banned from the sport. In this report the authors describe six boxers who were evaluated for SDH sustained during participation in the sport, and who experienced remarkably different outcomes. Their presentations, clinical courses, and boxing careers are detailed. The athletes ranged in age from 24 to 55 years at the time of injury. Two were female and four were male; half of them were amateurs and half were professionals. Treatments ranged from observation only to decompressive craniectomy. Two of the athletes were allowed to participate in the sport after their injury (one following a lengthy legal battle), with no known sequelae. One boxer died within 48 hours of her injury and at least two suffered permanent neurological deficits. In a third, dementia pugilistica was diagnosed 40 years later, and the man died while institutionalized.

  9. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  10. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  11. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  12. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  13. Use of glucagon in relieving esophageal food bolus impaction in the era of eosinophilic esophageal infiltration.

    PubMed

    Thimmapuram, Jayaram; Oosterveen, Scott; Grim, Rodney

    2013-06-01

    Esophageal food bolus impaction may require an urgent endoscopy. Glucagon is often administered to promote spontaneous passage of the food bolus. Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized as a cause of dysphagia, and food impaction is often the presenting symptom. Our study was aimed at determining the effectiveness of glucagon in relieving esophageal foreign body obstruction in general and in the setting of esophageal eosinophilic infiltration (EEI). A retrospective chart review was performed using the ICD codes and the emergency department database of adult patients presenting with symptoms of esophageal food bolus impaction from July 2004 to October 2010. Response to glucagon was defined as symptomatic relief of obstruction prior to endoscopic intervention. A total of 213 episodes of esophageal food bolus obstruction in 192 patients were identified during the study period. Glucagon was given in 125 cases of which 41 had a response (32.8 %). A total of 170 episodes had an Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed either during the impaction event or at a later date. Of the 60 patients' biopsies, 45 had received glucagon (17 with EEI, 28 without EEI). None of the 17 episodes with EEI as compared to 8 of the 28 without EEI responded to glucagon (0 % vs. 28.5 %, p = 0.017). Glucagon is effective in about one third of patients with esophageal food bolus impaction, which is consistent with historical data. Patients with EEI appear less likely to respond to glucagon.

  14. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  15. Management of Esophageal Perforation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaman, Lileswar; Iqbal, Javid; Kundil, Byju; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Perforation of esophagus in the adult is a very morbid condition with high morbidity and mortality. The ideal treatment is controversial. The main causes for esophageal perforation in adults are iatrogenic, traumatic, spontaneous and foreign bodies. The morbidity and mortality rate is directly related to the delay in diagnosis and initiation of optimum treatment. The reported mortality from treated esophageal perforation is 10% to 25%, when therapy is initiated within 24 hours of perforation, but it could rise up to 40% to 60% when the treatment is delayed beyond 48 hours. Primary closure of the perforation site and wide drainage of the mediastinum is recommended if perforation is detected in less than 24 hours. Treatment option for delayed or missed rupture of esophagus is not very clear and is controversial. Recently a substantial number of patients with esophageal perforation are being managed by nonoperative measures. Patients with small perforations and minimal extraesophageal involvement may be better managed by nonoperative treatment Major prognostic factors determining mortality are the etiology and site of the injury, the presence of underlying esophageal pathology, the delay in diagnosis and the method of treatment. For optimum outcome for management of esophageal perforations in adults a multidisciplinary approach is needed. PMID:27942303

  16. The Tumor Microenvironment in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric W.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Hicks, Philip D.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease, ranking sixth among all cancers in mortality. Despite incremental advances in diagnostics and therapeutics, esophageal cancer still carries a poor prognosis, and thus there remains a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease. There is accumulating evidence that a comprehensive understanding of the molecular composition of esophageal cancer requires attention to not only tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment, which contains diverse cell populations, signaling factors, and structural molecules that interact with tumor cells and support all stages of tumorigenesis. In esophageal cancer, environmental exposures can trigger chronic inflammation, which leads to constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that promote survival and proliferation. Anti-tumor immunity is attenuated by cell populations such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as immune checkpoints like programmed death-1 (PD-1). Other immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages can have other pro-tumorigenic functions, including the induction of angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete growth factors and alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a tumor niche and enhance tumor cell migration and metastasis. Further study of how these TME components relate to the different stages of tumor progression in each esophageal cancer subtype will lead to development of novel and specific TME-targeting therapeutic strategies, which offer considerable potential especially in the setting of combination therapy. PMID:26923327

  17. Spontaneous bilobar subcapsular hematoma of the liver while undergoing anticoagulation therapy: our experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Behranwala, K A; Tisdall, M; Habib, N H; Canelo, R

    2004-01-01

    We report on a case of bilateral subcapsular hematoma of the liver, occurring during treatment with warfarin. A 64-year-old woman was put on long-term warfarin therapy. After a bout of severe right hypochondriac pain, computed tomography (CT) scan showed subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Subsequent CT scan, conservative policy only, showed regression of the hematoma. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 23rd day. We conclude that a nonruptured spontaneous liver hematoma should not be surgically removed. A conservative management with close observation is the mainstay therapy. A switch from warfarin therapy to another anticoagulation therapy is strongly suggested.

  18. Point-of-Care Ultrasound Use to Differentiate Hematoma and Sarcoma of the Thigh in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Le, Cathie-Kim; Harvey, Gregory; McLean, Lianne; Fischer, Jason

    2017-02-01

    Hematomas and soft tissue sarcomas can be difficult to differentiate clinically, even with the addition of traditional imaging modalities. There are several case reports of sarcomas being misdiagnosed as hematomas, most commonly with a history of mild trauma. In this case report, we described a sarcoma initially misinterpreted as a hematoma on ultrasound. Key clinical features and sonographic findings that may assist clinicians using point-of-care ultrasound to correctly differentiate sarcomas from hematomas are reviewed. A soft tissue mass larger than 5 cm, with internal vascular Doppler flow, presenting without a clear mechanism of injury or with constitutional symptoms should be considered as suspicious for malignancy.

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with an arachnoid cyst in a juvenile taekwondo athlete: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic subdural hematoma and arachnoid cysts are common lesions in neurosurgical practice. Arachnoid cysts are a well-known predisposing factor for chronic subdural hematoma. Here, we present a 12-year-old taekwondo athlete with chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts. The chronic subdural hematoma was evacuated through 2 burr holes and the patient was discharged in good condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of chronic subdural hematoma with associated arachnoid cysts in a taekwondo athlete. We also review the literature on sports-related chronic subdural hematomas associated with arachnoid cysts in children.

  20. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  1. Effects of Age on Esophageal Motility: Use of High-resolution Esophageal Impedance Manometry

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Sung, Jihee; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Disturbances of esophageal motility have been reported to be more frequent the aged population. However, the physiology of disturbances in esophageal motility during aging is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of age on esophageal motility using high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM). Methods Esophageal motor function of 268 subjects were measured using HRIM in 3 age groups, < 40 years (Group A, n = 32), 40–65 years (Group B, n = 185), and > 65 years (Group C, n = 62). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures, integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, contractile front velocity, distal latency, and pressures and duration of contraction on 4 positions along the esophagus, and complete bolus transit were measured. Results Basal UES pressure was lower in Group C (P < 0.001) but there was no significant difference in the LES pressure among groups. Contractile duration on position 3 (10 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was longer in Group C (P = 0.001), and the contractile amplitude on position 4 (5 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was lower in Group C (P = 0.005). Distal contractile integral was lower in Group C (P = 0.037). Contractile front velocity (P = 0.015) and the onset velocity (P = 0.040) was lower in Group C. There was no significant difference in impedance values. Conclusions The decrease of UES pressure, distal esophageal motility, and peristaltic velocity might be related with esophageal symptoms in the aged population. PMID:28163259

  2. Morphology and intercellular communication in glial cells of intramural ganglia from the guinea-pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Hanani, M; Maudlej, N; Härtig, W

    1999-04-16

    Neurons in most peripheral ganglia are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SCs), but these cells have so far received little attention. We used immunohistochemistry and intracellular injections of tracers to characterize SCs in the intramural ganglia of the guinea-pig urinary bladder, which are part of the parasympathetic system. Intracellular injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) revealed two morphological types: cells that surrounded neurons and are SCs proper, and bipolar cells with processes that projected into the nerve fiber bundles connecting the ganglia. SCs were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase (GS) and S100beta and immunonegative for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Injections of Lucifer yellow (LY) or biocytin (molecules known to cross gap junctions) into single SCs showed that these cells have a very low degree of intercellular coupling. A mean of 0.31 and 0.71 cells were coupled to the injected cells, using LY and biocytin, respectively. It appears that SCs in the bladder ganglia are distinct from central and enteric glial cells in the small degree of their coupling and in the absence of GFAP immunostaining.

  3. Nematode-associated intramural alimentary nodules in pumas are histologically similar to gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, C D; Barr, B C; Woods, L W; Spangler, T; Murphy, B

    2013-05-01

    Intramural alimentary nodules in the gastric pylorus and proximal duodenum are a common finding in free-ranging pumas (Puma concolor) in North America, and are often associated with the presence of an indwelling nematode (most commonly Cylicospirura spp.). This study compares the histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical appearance of three proximal gastrointestinal nodules in pumas with four cases of eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia in domestic cats. Histologically, the pattern of inflammation and repair was strikingly similar, consisting of lamillated anastomosing trabeculae of dense sclerotic collagen with interspersed inflammatory cells and reactive fibroblasts. The stromal trabeculae were histologically reminiscent of osteoid and were uniformly positive for collagenous protein by Masson's trichrome stain and negative for mineralized osteoid deposits with Von Kossa's stain. Trabecular cells expressed osteonectin, but not osteocalcin immunohistochemically. Collectively, these findings are most consistent with a stroma comprised of dense collagenous trabeculae that resembles, but is distinct, from osteoid. Both the puma and domestic cat lesions demonstrated an eosinophilic inflammatory component; however, eosinophils were present in small numbers in the puma nodules relative to the nodules in domestic cats. These entities likely represent a unique and stereotypic gastrointestinal repair response of felids, given their similar histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical profiles.

  4. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  5. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Precise tumor-staging is critical in the management of early esophageal caner. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows the endoscopist a view beyond the esophageal wall which opens the door to a variety of new gastroenterologic techniques. Endoscopic mucosal resection, laser photoablation and photodynamic therapy may be successfully employed in early esophageal cancer management. Combination radiation therapy and chemotherapy have shown better responses in advanced cancer. Expandable metallic stents may also provide palliation with inoperable esophageal cancer. The efficacy of EUS in the management of esophageal cancer is critically reviewed.

  7. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies.

  8. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-04-14

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with type I(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) experience a less favorable outcome. Second, the first multicenter randomized controlled trial published by the European Achalasia Trial group reported 2-year follow-up results indicating that laparoscopic Heller myotomy was not superior to endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD). Although the follow-up period was not long enough to reach a convincing conclusion, it merits the continued use of PD as a generally available technique in gastroenterology. Third, the novel endoscopic technique peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising option for treating achalasia, but it requires increased experience and cautious evaluation. Despite all this good news, the bottom line is a real breakthrough from the basic studies to identify the actual cause of achalasia that may impede treatment success is still anticipated.

  9. Esophageal liposarcoma: Well-differentiated rhabdomyomatous type

    PubMed Central

    Valiuddin, Hisham M; Barbetta, Arianna; Mungo, Benedetto; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Molena, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyomatous well-differentiated esophageal liposarcomas are extremely rare. As of August 2016, only one other such case has been reported in the English-language medical literature. Liposarcomas in general are one of the most common soft tissue neoplasms in adults, but the incidence of primary esophageal liposarcomas is exceptionally low. There have been only 42 reported cases of primary liposarcoma of the esophagus worldwide thus far. These malignancies are harbored within giant fibrovascular polyps, which slowly grow within the esophageal lumen causing obstructing symptoms. We hereby present the case of a 68-year-old male patient who came in with a 2-mo history of worsening intermittent dysphagia, persistent cough, and postprandial retrosternal pain. After an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a computed tomographic scan, and a diagnostic endoscopy, complete endoscopic resection was performed of the 13 cm × 6 cm × 2.6 cm fibrovascular polyp. A literature review was done and results are presented herein. PMID:28035254

  10. Early esophageal carcinoma treated with intracavitary irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1985-08-01

    Five patients with early esophageal carcinoma were treated by 6-12 Gy of intracavitary irradiation following 50-60 Gy of external irradiation as a boost therapy. Surgery was not performed in these cases. None of the patients had local recurrence after radiation therapy, as demonstrated by esophagography and endoscopy. Three patients have been alive for 1-3 years 10 months. Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation has occurred in three of the five patients; however, intracavitary irradiation is still a beneficial treatment because of its efficacy in controlling local lesions and because radiation ulceration can eventually be cured. Intracavitary irradiation is recommended to follow external irradiation as a boost therapy for the treatment of early esophageal carcinoma.

  11. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  12. Successful endoscopic hemoclipping of an esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H Y; Kim, J I; Cheung, D Y; Cho, S H; Park, S-H; Han, J-Y; Kim, J K; Han, S W; Choi, K Y; Chung, I S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of esophageal perforation that resulted from a fishbone. A 71-year-old man had had a fishbone impacted in the lower esophagus for 2 days. At presentation, the bone was dislodged at endoscopy; one round opening in a deep ulceration was detected when the fishbone was removed. The perforation was closed by endoscopic hemoclipping, after the removal of the fishbone. A thoracic computed tomography revealed air around the esophagus, aorta and bronchus and the presence of a pleural effusion. These findings suggested mediastinal emphysema and mediastinitis due to the esophageal perforation after the removal of the fishbone. Esophagography revealed a focal esophageal defect and linear contrast leakage at the distal esophagus. The mediastinal emphysema and pleural effusion successfully resolved after the endoscopic hemoclip application and conservative management of the perforation.

  13. CHRONIC SPONTANEOUS LUMBAR EPIDURAL HEMATOMA SIMULATING EXTRADURAL SPINAL TUMOR : A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    MATSUI, HIROKI; IMAGAMA, SHIRO; ITO, ZENYA; ANDO, KEI; HIRANO, KENICHI; TAUCHI, RYOJI; MURAMOTO, AKIO; MATSUMOTO, TOMOHIRO; ISHIGURO, NAOKI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is an uncommon disorder, and chronic SEHs are rarer than acute SEHs. However, there is few reported involving the bone change of the vertebral body in chronic SEHs. We present a case report of lumbar epidural hematoma that required differentiation from extramedullary spinal tumors by a long process because the CT scan revealed scalloping of the vertebral body and review the relevant literature. A 78-year-old man had experienced a gradual onset of low back pain and excruciating pain in both legs. Lumbar MRI on T1-weighted images revealed a space-occupying lesion with a hyperintense signal relative to the spinal cord with no enhancement on gadolinium adminisration. Meanwhile, T2-weighted images revealed a heterogeneous intensity change, accompanying a central area of hyperintense signals with a hypointense peripheral border at the L4 vertebra. Moreover, the CT scan demonstrated scalloping of the posterior wall of the L4 vertebral body which is generally suspected as the CT finding of spainal tumor. During the epidural space exploration, we found a dark red-colored mass surrounded by a capsular layer, which was fibrous and adhered to the flavum and dura mater. Microscopic histological examination of the resected mass revealed a mixture of the relatively new hematoma and the hematoma that was moving into the connective tissue. Accordingly, the hematoma was diagnosed as chronic SEH. The particular MRI findings of chronic SEHs are helpful for making accurate preoperative diagnoses of this pathology. PMID:25130006

  14. Airway and circulatory collapse due to retropharyngeal hematoma after blunt vertebral artery injury.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shunsuke; Fukushima, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Motonori; Furutake, Masayuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Okada, Kunihiko

    2016-12-09

    Retropharyngeal hematoma following blunt cervical spine injury is a known cause of airway obstruction, but it is not known to cause hemorrhagic shock. We report the case of a massive retropharyngeal hematoma caused by a blunt vertebral artery transection leading simultaneously to airway obstruction and hemorrhagic shock. An 83-year-old woman was injured in a motorcycle accident. In the field, the patient exhibited paradoxical breathing with no breath sounds, and her blood pressure could not be measured. Therefore, emergency intubation and fluid resuscitation were initiated and the patient was transferred to the emergency department. Computed tomography angiography revealed a massive retropharyngeal hematoma with contrast extravasation from the right vertebral artery, which caused airway obstruction and hemorrhagic shock. The right vertebral artery was transected at the C5 level, which was associated with C4/C5 dislocation. Vertebral artery transection was successfully treated by endovascular embolization, which was followed by complication of asymptomatic posterior circulation stroke. Blunt vertebral artery transection can cause massive retropharyngeal hematoma, which can rapidly expand and lead to hemorrhagic shock in addition to airway obstruction. In cases of massive retropharyngeal hematoma with hemorrhagic shock following blunt cervical spine injury, blunt vertebral artery transection should be suspected. If blunt vertebral artery transection is detected and hemorrhagic shock is persistent, endovascular embolization should be performed immediately in addition to emergency intubation.

  15. Antiplatelet Therapy and Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hematoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Walid; Mohamed, Abdelaziz; Sheikh, Muhammed; Shokr, Mohamed; Hassan, Abubaker; Weinberger, Jarrett; Afonso, Luis C.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma seconday dual antiplatelet therapy Symptoms: Anemia • knee joint pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Dual antiplatelet therapy has proven efficacy in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease with a relatively good safety profile. Review of the literature revealed 8 cases of spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma secondary to antiplatelet treatment. Case Report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male with a flare of acute gout secondary to uncontrolled chronic myeloid leukemia. The patient was started on dual antiplatelet treatment following a drug-eluted stent placement for symptomatic coronary artery disease. He suffered from an unexplained acute drop of five grams of hemoglobin from 10.4 to 5.8 g/dL and symptomatic anemia. The initial labs excluded occult GI bleeding, hemolysis, and bone marrow suppression. However, an abdominal CT scan showed an approximately 7.2×4.7×6.7 cm spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma involving the left iliacus muscle. The patient was successfully treated conservatively by discontinuing antiplatelet therapy and supportive measures. Conclusions: A spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma often presents without localizing signs and symptoms and therefore should be considered in any case of unexplained blood loss in patients on antiplatelet therapy. CT without contrast is the modality of choice to diagnose retroperitoneal hematoma. PMID:28119516

  16. Results of surgical treatment of intrasylvian hematomas due to ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Başkaya, M K; Menendez, J A; Yüceer, N; Polin, R S; Nanda, A

    2001-04-01

    In this retrospective study, the surgical outcome of patients with intrasylvian hematomas due to rupture of intracranial aneurysms was analyzed. The authors studied ten patients who underwent aneurysm surgery and evacuation of the hematoma within 12 h of the onset of bleeding. All patients had an intrasylvian hematoma classified with computerized tomography and all patients underwent pre-operative angiography. In all patients, the origin of bleeding was a middle cerebral artery aneurysm, with the exception of one patient whose bleeding originated from a posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Three patients achieved good recovery without any significant neurological deficit and four achieved good recovery with moderate disabilities. One patient died due to pneumonia and two were in a vegetative state. Notably, three patients who were comatose (Hunt and Hess Grade V) at the time of presentation achieved good recovery following surgery. In this study, neurological status at presentation did not predict the outcome. The only significant prognostic factor in those patients who had intrasylvian hematoma was early surgery within 12 h of the bleeding. We suggest that early surgical treatment be performed in patients with intrasylvian hematoma, regardless of the neurological findings and grade on admission. Pre-operative angiography seems to be essential in identifying the source of bleeding.

  17. Esophageal web in Plummer-Vinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, H; Tsutsumi, S; Inaki, S; Mori, T

    1988-09-01

    In Plummer-Vinson syndrome, esophagography often reveals a web at the anterior wall of the cervical esophagus. The pathogenesis of the esophageal web and the cause of dysphagia in this syndrome were investigated radiographically, endoscopically, manometrically, and histologically. It was considered that the web seen in the esophagogram may have been formed due to the restriction of dilation of the esophageal wall, which results from repetitive inflammation and the subsequent healing process. Dysphagia in this syndrome may be explained by a decrease in swallowing power. Iron deficiency anemia may play the main role in the above histological changes and the resulting decrease in swallowing power.

  18. Steroid treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-06-01

    Topical steroid therapy has been used to treat eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) for more than 15 years. We review the treatment trials of topical steroid therapy in adult patients with EoE. Currently, there is no commercially available preparation designed to deliver the steroid to the esophagus. Current regimens consist of swallowing steroid preparations designed for inhalation treatment for asthma. In the short term, steroids are associated with an approximately 15% to 25% incidence of asymptomatic esophageal candidiasis, but otherwise appear to be well tolerated.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  20. Frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal symptoms: a single-center Turkish experience.

    PubMed

    Altun, R; Akbas, E; Yıldırım, A E; Öcal, S; Korkmaz, M; Selcuk, H

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized with symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and eosinophil-predominant inflammation. There has been a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of this disease in recent years. The primary objective of this study was to determine the frequency of EoE in adult patients who were evaluated by gastroenterologists in our clinic with esophageal symptoms. Between November 2010 and May 2011, 311 adult patients who were evaluated in our clinic with esophageal symptoms were enrolled prospectively. All patients underwent endoscopy and had biopsies taken. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was excluded by either proton pump inhibitory treatment or 24-hour ambulatory pH monitorization. The diagnosis was confirmed by one independent pathologist. Frequency of EoE in patients with esophageal symptoms was 2.6% (n = 8; four men and four women). Mean age at diagnosis was 40.2 ± 8 years. Heartburn was the predominant symptom in patients (75% of the patients), and 87.5% (n = 7) of patients had more than one symptom at diagnosis. Nearly 38% of the patients (n = 3) had a history of allergic disease. Endoscopic findings were as follows: transient/fixed esophageal rings (25%), white exudates (25%), and normal appearance (50%). Median number of circulating eosinophils was 208 (93-659)/mm(3) . Median number of intraepithelial eosinophils in proximal-middle 1/3 part and distal 1/3 part of esophagus were 0 (0-50)/hpf and 37 (16-50)/hpf, respectively. In conclusion, EoE is not rare in Turkey, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with esophageal symptoms.

  1. Effect of physical exercise on esophageal motility in patients with esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Ravi, N; Stuart, R C; Byrne, P J; Reynolds, J V

    2005-01-01

    The most common type of esophageal dysfunction associated with chest pain is gastroesophageal reflux, which may be induced by exercise. The effect of exercise on esophageal function has mainly been investigated in normal subjects or trained athletes. Few studies have investigated exercise and esophageal motility disorders. One hundred and thirty-five patients underwent ambulatory esophageal manometry and pH monitoring, before, during and immediately after moderate exercise. Patients were divided into four groups: Normal, nutcracker, diffuse spasm and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Ambulatory manometry and pH were monitored while exercising on a treadmill during which standardized boluses of water were administered. Nutcracker and diffuse spasm patients demonstrated a significant fall in esophageal wave amplitude during exercise compared to controls, which returned rapidly to pre exercise values after resting. There was no evidence of acid reflux in the non-reflux groups during exercise. Reflux was noted in 13 patients with GERD during exercise, none of whom had evidence of reflux at the onset of exercise. When these patients were classified by reflux type, the majority, 11 patients, were found to come from the combined or supine reflux group. Esophageal amplitude in nutcracker esophagus does not increase during moderate exercise. Moderate exercise provokes reflux in GERD patients with combined or supine reflux.

  2. Ruptured hepatic subcapsular hematoma following laparoscopic cholecystectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kentaro; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Mushiake, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masato; Yamakawa, Tatsuo; Sugiyama, Yasuyuki

    2010-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now a standard procedure for cholecystolithiasis because of its minimally invasive nature compared to the conventional method. However, severe complications that have never been seen for open surgery have also been reported. Here, we report the case of a 28-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and then developed a ruptured subcapsular hematoma. On postoperative day 1, she developed shock, and postoperative bleeding was suspected. During re-operation, a ruptured subcapsular hematoma of the whole right lobe of the liver with active bleeding was found, and hemostasis was achieved. In this case, it was assumed that the rupture of the subcapsular hematoma was due to compression of the liver by the clamp for retrieving the spilled gallstones during the first operation and perioperative administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  3. Subcapsular hematoma after right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Mureo; Kozaki, Koichi; Yoshida, Toru; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Kohei; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Because right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation was introduced in adult-to-adult liver transplantation to mitigate the problems of small-for-size grafts, some technical controversies have been reported. This report describes a case of graft subcapsular hematoma due to parenchymal injury. A 53-year-old woman underwent a right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation for acute-on-chronic liver failure due to primary biliary cirrhosis. A huge subcapsular hematoma was discovered by routine Doppler echogram examination on the first posttransplantation day. Relaparotomy findings revealed that rotation of the graft for the hemostasis procedure during the transplant operation had induced a compression injury to the graft by the xiphoid process. It was speculated that a small laceration in the graft parenchyma led to the major subcapsular hematoma. This experience suggests that the graft liver must be handled with special care to prevent potential mechanical injury.

  4. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  5. The hematoma block: a simple, effective technique for closed reduction of ankle fracture dislocations.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adrianne; Catanzariti, Alan R; Mendicino, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Management of a dislocated ankle fracture can be challenging because of instability of the ankle mortise, a compromised soft tissue envelope, and the potential neurovascular compromise. Every effort should be made to quickly and efficiently relocate the disrupted ankle joint. Within the emergency department setting, narcotics and benzodiazepines can be used to sedate the patient before attempting closed reduction. The combination of narcotics and benzodiazepines provides relief of pain and muscle guarding; however, it conveys a risk of seizure as well as respiratory arrest. An alternative to conscious sedation is the hematoma block, or an intra-articular local anesthetic injection in the ankle joint and the associated fracture hematoma. The hematoma block offers a comparable amount of analgesia to conscious sedation without the additional cardiovascular risk, hospital cost, and procedure time.

  6. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  7. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature.

  8. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  9. Novel use of ultrasound in the ED: ultrasound-guided hematoma block of a proximal humeral fracture.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, Emily; Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are a common injury after falls, particularly in the elderly population. An ultrasound-guided hematoma block is a novel technique for analgesia in cases when standard intravenous analgesia is not efficacious. We present a case in which ultrasound-guided hematoma block was the ideal method for adjunctive pain control in a patient with a comminuted humeral head fracture.

  10. Clinical Course and Results of Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematomas in Patients on Drugs Affecting Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Tomasz Andrzej; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective An apparent increase of use of drugs affecting hemostasis in our neurosurgical department since the 1990s has encouraged us to investigate whether these drugs influence the clinical course and results of surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods This retrospective analysis included 178 patients admitted for CSDH from 2007 to 2011 who were divided into two groups: on drugs affecting hemostasis (40; 22%) and no bleeding disorders (138; 78%). Medications in the first group included oral anticoagulants (33; 82.5%), antiplatelets (5; 12.5%) and low molecular weight heparins (2; 5%). Results The patients on drugs affecting hemostasis were older (74.3±7.4 vs. 68.4±14.8; p-value 0.01) and the group without bleeding disorders had more head trauma history (61% vs. 38%, p-value 0.01). The groups did not differ in bilateral hematoma rates (25% vs. 20%, p-value=NS). At diagnosis, mean hematoma thickness was lower in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (18.7±7.4 mm vs. 21.9±7.9 mm, p-value<0.01). Average stay of hospital was 1 day longer in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (11.7±4.1 vs.10.9±5.3, p-value=NS) and was related to the necessity of bleeding disorder reversal. Mean neurological status at presentation was similar between the groups (p-value=NS) as was the likelihood of hematoma recurrence (p-value=NS). Glasgow Outcome Scale results were comparable. Conclusion Patients on drugs affecting hemostasis are less often aware of a head trauma history, possibly suggesting a higher CSDH risk after minor trauma in this group. In these patients, smaller hematomas are symptomatic, probably due to faster hematoma formation. Drugs affecting hemostasis do not affect treatment results. PMID:28264245

  11. Identification of hematomas in mild traumatic brain injury using an index of quantitative brain electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Prichep, Leslie S; Naunheim, Rosanne; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Mould, W Andrew; Hanley, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of traumatic intracranial hematomas following closed head injury represents a significant health care need because of the potentially life-threatening risk they present. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of an index of brain electrical activity used to identify intracranial hematomas in traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage located on the forehead of 394 closed head injured patients who were referred for CT scans as part of their standard ED assessment. A total of 116 of these patients were found to be CT positive (CT+), of which 46 patients with traumatic intracranial hematomas (CT+) were identified for study. A total of 278 patients were found to be CT negative (CT-) and were used as controls. CT scans were subjected to quantitative measurements of volume of blood and distance of bleed from recording electrodes by blinded independent experts, implementing a validated method for hematoma measurement. Using an algorithm based on brain electrical activity developed on a large independent cohort of TBI patients and controls (TBI-Index), patients were classified as either positive or negative for structural brain injury. Sensitivity to hematomas was found to be 95.7% (95% CI = 85.2, 99.5), specificity was 43.9% (95% CI = 38.0, 49.9). There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and distance of the bleed from recording sites (F = 0.044, p = 0.833), or volume of blood measured F = 0.179, p = 0.674). Results of this study are a validation and extension of previously published retrospective findings in an independent population, and provide evidence that a TBI-Index for structural brain injury is a highly sensitive measure for the detection of potentially life-threatening traumatic intracranial hematomas, and could contribute to the rapid, quantitative evaluation and treatment of such patients.

  12. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  13. Monte Carlo calculations of dose distribution for intramural delivery of radioisotopes using a direct injection balloon catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Kassing, William M.; McGoron, Anthony J.; Thomas, Stephen R.; Elson, Howard R.; Pipes, David W

    2002-03-01

    Purpose: A unique method of delivering radiation dose to the coronary vessel wall to prevent restenosis is by direct injection of radioactive compounds into the vessel wall using a specially designed angioplasty balloon catheter. The radiation dose distribution resulting from such intramural delivery was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and methods: The radioisotope source distribution was modeled for two configurations within the vessel wall: (1) uniform to a depth of 0.5 mm and (2) confined to discrete pools surrounding the delivery injection ports. Monte Carlo MCNP4B computer simulations were utilized to estimate the associated radiation dose distribution for the following radioisotopes: {sup 188}Re, {sup 186}Re, {sup 32}P, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I, and {sup 99m}Tc. Results: For the uniform case where the radioisotopes are distributed uniformly to the depth of 0.5 mm into the vessel wall, an essentially constant radiation dose is delivered within the source distribution. Outside of the source volume, the dose falls off at a rate depending on the emission properties of the particular radioisotope. The nonuniform case involving discrete pools of activity showed the dose distribution being confined largely to the regions surrounding the delivery ports with significant regions between these ports receiving very little dose. Conclusions: Direct injection of selected radioisotopes into the arterial wall appears to represent a potentially effective method for delivering radiation dose for the prevention of restenosis. Sufficiently high doses may be obtained from relatively low activity and the dose falls off rapidly outside of the target area for certain radioisotopes.

  14. Endometrial Expression of Homeobox Genes and Cell Adhesion Molecules in Infertile Women With Intramural Fibroids During Window of Implantation.

    PubMed

    Makker, Annu; Goel, Madhu Mati; Nigam, Dipti; Bhatia, Vikram; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Das, Vinita; Pandey, Amita

    2017-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the expression and cellular distribution of homeobox ( HOX) genes ( HOXA10 and HOXA11) and cell adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and β-catenin) during the window of implantation in infertile women with noncavity-distorting intramural (IM) fibroids (n = 18) and in fertile controls (n = 12). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and protein expression, respectively. When compared to fertile controls, reduced HOXA10 and HOXA11 transcript and protein levels were observed in infertile women. However, changes only in the expression of HOXA10 mRNA (-1.72-fold; P = .03) and stromal protein ( P = .001) were statistically significant. Significantly lower E-cadherin mRNA (-10.97-fold; P = .02) and protein levels were seen in infertile patients. E-cadherin immunostaining was significantly reduced both in the luminal ( P = .048) and in the glandular ( P = .014) epithelium of endometrium from infertile patients when compared to controls. No significant change was observed either in the mRNA levels or in the immunoexpression of N-cadherin and β-catenin. However, a trend toward lower N-cadherin expression in the luminal epithelium ( P = .054) and decreased β-catenin expression in the glandular epithelium ( P = .070) was observed in infertile patients. The present findings suggest that altered endometrial HOXA10 and E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression observed in infertile women with IM fibroids during the mid-secretory phase might impair endometrial receptivity leading to infertility in these patients.

  15. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  16. Human papillomavirus-related esophageal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified to be related to progression of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain controversial. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Methods: The electronic databases of MEDLINE and Excerpta Medica database were searched till April 30, 2016. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Results: Ten studies involving a total of 1184 esophageal cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio comparing HPV-positive to HPV-negative esophageal cancers was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.78–1.37), which was not significantly correlated with improved survival. However, HPV-16-positive patients might have a significantly favorable survival (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.44–1.21). Conclusion: The meta-analysis indicated that HPV infection may not be of prognostic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are encouraged to stratify survival analysis by HPV type. PMID:27861358

  17. Herpes simplex esophagitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Eymard, D; Martin, L; Doummar, G; Piché, J

    1997-11-01

    Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy.

  18. Herpes simplex esophagitis in immunocompetent hosts

    PubMed Central

    Eymard, Daniel; Martin, Luc; Doummar, Gilbert; Piché, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy. PMID:22346532

  19. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  20. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  1. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  2. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  3. Subdural hematoma in a teenager related to roller-coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Facha, M T; Martinez-Lopez, Manuel; Herrera-Mora, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    Reports about neurological injury related to roller-coaster rides mostly involve adults; we present a case of subdural hematoma in a pediatric patient presented 14 days after a roller-coaster ride. These rides show extreme up-and-down, to-and-fro, and rotatory acceleration/deceleration forces that could produce tensile and shearing stresses with tearing of bridging cerebral veins resulting in subdural hemorrhage. Pediatricians should consider roller-coaster riding a modern cause of subdural hematoma, as well as a possible cause of unexplained neurologic events in otherwise healthy adolescents.

  4. Recurrent spontaneous subdural hematoma secondary to immune thrombocytopenia in a patient with overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goh, K G; Ong, S G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune connective tissue disease may manifest as overlap syndrome with features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and myositis. Those presenting with active SLE can present with immune thrombocytopenia (IT) and may be complicated with subdural hematoma which, though rare, is potentially life-threatening. We report here a patient with overlap syndrome who had recurrent spontaneous subdural hematoma due to severe thrombocytopenia which did not respond to corticosteroids and azathioprine. Her platelet count became normal with three doses of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (IV CYC) given at 3-weekly intervals. She remained in remission with maintenance therapy with azathioprine.

  5. Spontaneous Subcapsular Hematoma of the Fetal Liver: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Maher, James E; Van Beek, Brittany; Kelly, Randall T; Hsu, Peter

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a cystic abdominal mass on ultrasound which presented a diagnostic dilemma at 32 weeks gestation. A presumptive antenatal diagnosis of a subcapsular liver hematoma (SCH) was made based on the location and ultrasound appearance similar to SCH seen in pediatric and adult patients. Sequential evaluation of the mass showed an evolving ultrasound appearance which reinforced our initial impression of a subcapsular hematoma of the fetal liver. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed the resolving SCH as well as a previously undetected echo bright lesion characteristic of an infantile focal hemangioma directly adjacent to the resolving SCH. A review of the literature is provided.

  6. Spontaneous subcapsular hematoma of liver in pregnancy of unknown etiology--conservative management: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Veenu; Shamas, Ambrin G; Cameron, Alan D; Cameron, Allan D

    2010-01-01

    Mrs. AB, a 40-year-old woman, in her second pregnancy had a spontaneous hematoma of liver of unknown etiology that was managed successfully conservatively under the umbrella of the multidisciplinary care. The subcapsular hematoma was diagnosed at 31 weeks gestational age while she was being investigated because of sudden and gross drop of hemoglobin from 12.8 to 8 g/dl in 2 weeks duration. The dilemma remains as how to manage her future pregnancies and what are the risks of recurrence.

  7. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS.

  8. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  9. A retropharyngeal–mediastinal hematoma with supraglottic and tracheal obstruction: The role of multidisciplinary airway management

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Torsten; Kröber, Stefanie; Knorr, Christian; Schiele, Albert; Bumm, Klaus; Schmidt, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    A 77-year-old man suffered hypoxemic cardiac arrest by supraglottic and tracheal airway obstruction in the emergency department. A previously unknown cervical fracture had caused a traumatic retropharyngeal–mediastinal hematoma. A lifesaving surgical emergency tracheostomy succeeded. Supraglottic and tracheal obstruction by a retropharyngeal–mediastinal hematoma with successful resuscitation via emergency tracheostomy after hypoxemic cardiac arrest has never been reported in a context of trauma. This clinically demanding case outlines the need for multidisciplinary airway management systems with continuous training and well-implemented guidelines. Only multidisciplinary staff preparedness and readily available equipments for the unanticipated difficult airway solved the catastrophic clinical situation. PMID:21063569

  10. Metastatic prostate cancer mimicking chronic subdural hematoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashikant; Veron, Ayme; Hosseini, Pegah; Bates, Rachel; Brown, Benjamin; Guthikonda, Bharat; DeSouza, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the prostate is extremely common and is well known to metastasize to the pelvic lymph nodes and axial skeleton (vertebral column, pelvis, cranium, and proximal femur). However, reports of intracranial metastasis are rare and commonly discovered postmortem. Moreover, metastatic lesions mimicking subdural hematoma are extremely rare and are uncommonly reported in the literature. We found only three such cases in the literature. We present a unique case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with headaches after head trauma with classic radiologic findings of subdural hematoma. The diagnosis may have been made sooner with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  12. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  13. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  14. Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM): the primary finding in patients with nonspecific esophageal motility disorder.

    PubMed

    Leite, L P; Johnston, B T; Barrett, J; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1997-09-01

    Nonspecific esophageal motility disorder (NEMD) is a vague category used to include patients with poorly defined esophageal contraction abnormalities. The criteria include "ineffective" contraction waves, ie, peristaltic waves that are either of low amplitude or are not transmitted. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) found during manometry testing and to evaluate esophageal acid exposure and esophageal acid clearance (EAC) in patients with IEM compared to those with other motility findings. We analyzed esophageal manometric tracings from 600 consecutive patients undergoing manometry in our laboratory following a specific protocol from April 1992 through October 1994 to identify the frequency of ineffective contractions and the percentages of other motility abnormalities present in patients meeting criteria for NEMD. Comparison of acid exposure and EAC was made with 150 patients who also had both esophageal manometry and pH-metry over the same time period. Sixty-one of 600 patients (10%) met the diagnostic criteria for NEMD. Sixty of 61 (98%) of these patients had IEM, defined by at least 30% ineffective contractions out of 10 wet swallows. Thirty-five of these patients also underwent ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Patients with IEM demonstrated significant increases in both recumbent median percentage of time of pH <4 (4.5%) and median distal EAC (4.2 min/episode) compared to those with normal motility (0.2%, 1 min/episode), diffuse esophageal spasm (0%, 0.6 min/episode), hypertensive LES (0%, 1.8 min/episode), and nutcracker esophagus (0.4% 1.6 min/episode). Recumbent acid exposure in IEM did not differ significantly from that in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc) for either variable (5.4%, 4.2 min/episode). We propose that IEM is a more appropriate term and should replace NEMD, giving it a more specific manometric identity. IEM patients demonstrate a distinctive recumbent reflux pattern

  15. Viruses, Other Pathogenic Microorganisms and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjia; Liu, Zhongshun; Bao, Qunchao; Qian, Zhikang

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is the eighth most prevalent malignant tumor and the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. Despite the technical developments in diagnosis and treatment, the 5-year survival rate is still low. The etiology of EC remains poorly understood; multiple risk factors may be involved and account for the great variation in EC incidence in different geographic regions. Summary Infection with carcinogenetic pathogens has been proposed as a risk factor for EC. This review explores the recent studies on the association of human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Helicobacter pylori and esophageal bacterial biota with EC. Key Message Among the above-mentioned pathogens, HPV most likely contributes to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in high-risk populations. New techniques are being applied to studies on the role of infection in EC, which will inevitably bring novel ideas to the field in the near future. Practical Implications Multiple meta-analyses support the finding of a higher HPV detection rate in regions associated with high risk for ESCC compared to low-risk areas. A potential role of HPV in the rise of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) was proposed recently. However, further studies are required before a firm conclusion can be drawn. Less work has been done in studying the association between EBV and ESCC, and the results are quite controversial. H. pylori infection is found to be inversely related to EC, which is probably due to the reduced incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Analysis of the esophageal bacterial biota revealed distinct clusters of bacteria in normal and diseased esophagi. A type II microbiome rich in Gram-negative bacteria potentially contributes to EAC by inducing chronic inflammation. Novel findings from such studies as these may benefit public health by justifying anti-infection measures to prevent EC. PMID:26674173

  16. The distribution and chemical coding of intramural neurons supplying the porcine stomach - the study on normal pigs and on animals suffering from swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Kaleczyc, J; Klimczuk, M; Franke-Radowiecka, A; Sienkiewicz, W; Majewski, M; Łakomy, M

    2007-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the expression of biologically active substances by intramural neurons supplying the stomach in normal (control) pigs and in pigs suffering from dysentery. Eight juvenile female pigs were used. Both dysenteric (n = 4; inoculated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae) and control (n = 4) animals were deeply anaesthetized, transcardially perfused with buffered paraformalehyde, and tissue samples comprising all layers of the wall of the ventricular fundus were collected. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5) and their chemical coding using antibodies against vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter (VAChT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), galanin (GAL), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), Leu(5)-enkephalin (LENK), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). In both inner and outer submucosal plexuses of the control pigs, the majority of neurons were SP (55% and 58%, respectively)- or VAChT (54%)-positive. Many neurons stained also for CGRP (43 and 45%) or GAL (20% and 18%) and solitary perikarya were NOS-, SOM- or VIP-positive. The myenteric plexus neurons stained for NOS (20%), VAChT (15%), GAL (10%), VIP (7%), SP (6%) or CGRP (solitary neurons), but they were SOM-negative. No intramural neurons immunoreactive to LENK were found. The most remarkable difference in the chemical coding of enteric neurons between the control and dysenteric pigs was a very increased number of GAL- and VAChT-positive nerve cells (up to 61% and 85%, respectively) in submucosal plexuses of the infected animals. The present results suggest that GAL and ACh have a specific role in local neural circuits of the inflamed porcine stomach in the course of swine dysentery.

  17. A striking local esophageal cytokine expression profile in eosinophilic esophagitis1

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Carine; Stucke, Emily M.; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Beatriz; Burwinkel, Karen; Collins, Margaret H.; Ahrens, Annette; Alexander, Eileen S.; Butz, Bridget K. Buckmeier; Jameson, Sean C.; Kaul, Ajay; Franciosi, James P.; Kushner, Jonathan P.; Putnam, Philip E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an emerging worldwide disease that mimics gastroesophageal reflux disease. Objective Early studies have suggested that esophageal eosinophilia occurs in association with T helper type 2 allergic responses, yet the local and systemic expression of relevant cytokines has not been well characterized. Methods A human inflammatory cytokine and receptor PCR array containing 84 genes followed by PCR validation and multiplex arrays were used to quantify cytokine mRNA in esophageal biopsies and blood levels. Results Esophageal transcripts of numerous chemokines [e.g. CCL1, CCL23, CCL26 (eotaxin-3), CXCL1, and CXCL2], cytokines (e.g. IL13 and ABCF1), and cytokine receptors (e.g. IL5RA) were induced at least 4-fold in individuals with EE. Analysis of esophageal biopsies (n=288) revealed that eotaxin-3 mRNA level alone had 89% sensitivity for distinguishing EE from non-EE individuals. The presence of allergy was associated with significantly increased esophageal expression of IL4 and IL5 mRNA in active EE patients. We identified 8 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p70, CD40L, IL-1α, and IL-17) whose blood levels retrospectively distinguished 12 non-EE from 13 EE patients with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. When applied to a blinded, prospectively recruited group of 36 patients, the cytokine panel scoring system had a 79% positive predictive value, 68% negative predictive value, 61% sensitivity, and 83% specificity for identifying EE. Conclusion Evidence is presented that IL13 and IL5 associate with eosinophil and eotaxin-3 levels, indicating the key role of adaptive Th2 immunity in regulating eotaxin-3-driven esophageal eosinophilia in the absence of a consistent systemic change in cytokines. PMID:21211656

  18. Screening pre-bariatric surgery patients for esophageal disease with esophageal capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashish; Boettcher, Erica; Fahmy, Marianne; Savides, Thomas; Horgan, Santiago; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Sedrak, Michael; Kalmaz, Denise

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if esophageal capsule endoscopy (ECE) is an adequate diagnostic alternative to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in pre-bariatric surgery patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective pilot study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ECE (PillCam ESO2, Given Imaging) vs conventional EGD in pre-bariatric surgery patients. Patients who were scheduled for bariatric surgery and referred for pre-operative EGD were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent ECE followed by standard EGD. Two experienced gastroenterologists blinded to the patient’s history and the findings of the EGD reviewed the ECE and documented their findings. The gold standard was the findings on EGD. RESULTS: Ten patients with an average body mass index of 50 kg/m2 were enrolled and completed the study. ECE identified 11 of 14 (79%) positive esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) findings and 14 of 17 (82%) combined esophageal and gastric findings identified on EGD. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the findings and no significant difference was found between ECE and EGD (P = 0.64 for esophageal/GEJ and P = 0.66 for combined esophageal and gastric findings respectively). Of the positive esophageal/GEJ findings, ECE failed to identify the following: hiatal hernia in two patients, mild esophagitis in two patients, and mild Schatzki ring in two patients. ECE was able to identify the entire esophagus in 100%, gastric cardia in 0%, gastric body in 100%, gastric antrum in 70%, pylorus in 60%, and duodenum in 0%. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the likelihood of identifying a positive finding using ECE compared with EGD in preoperative evaluation of bariatric patients. PMID:24115815

  19. Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis is associated with changes in esophageal microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zahm, Adam M; Menard-Katcher, Calies; Benitez, Alain J; Tsoucas, Daphne M; Le Guen, Claire L; Hand, Nicholas J; Friedman, Joshua R

    2014-10-15

    The incidence of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has increased in the past several years, yet our understanding of its pathogenesis remains limited. To test the hypothesis that microRNAs (miRNAs) are altered in children with EoE, miRNAs were profiled in esophageal mucosa biopsies obtained from patients with active disease (n = 5) and healthy control subjects (n = 6). Fourteen miRNAs were significantly altered between groups; four of these miRNAs were decreased in EoE patients. A panel of five miRNAs (miR-203, miR-375, miR-21, miR-223, and miR-142-3p) were selected for validation in an independent set of samples from control (n = 22), active disease (n = 22), inactive disease (n = 22), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (n = 6) patients. Each panel miRNA was significantly altered among groups. miRNA changes in esophageal biopsies were not reflected in the circulating RNA pool, as no differences in panel miRNA levels were observed in sera collected from the four patient groups. In addition, in contrast to previous studies, no change in esophageal miRNA levels was detected following treatment that resolved esophageal eosinophilia. In an effort to identify the ramifications of reduced esophageal miR-203, miR-203 activity was inhibited in cultured epithelial cells via expression of a tough decoy miRNA inhibitor. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-203 does not directly regulate human IL-15 through targeting of the IL-15 3'-untranslated region. From these experiments, it is concluded that miRNAs are perturbed in the esophageal mucosa, but not the serum, of pediatric EoE patients. Further investigation is required to decipher pathologically relevant consequences of miRNA perturbation in this context.

  20. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.