Science.gov

Sample records for intraoperative radioguidance technique

  1. A novel radioguided surgery technique exploiting β− decays

    PubMed Central

    Camillocci, E. Solfaroli; Baroni, G.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; Cremonesi, M.; De Lucia, E.; Ferroli, P.; Fiore, S.; Grana, C. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paganelli, G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Schiariti, M.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Voena, C.; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    The background induced by the high penetration power of the radiation is the main limiting factor of the current radio-guided surgery (RGS). To partially mitigate it, a RGS with β+-emitting radio-tracers has been suggested in literature. Here we propose the use of β−-emitting radio-tracers and β− probes and discuss the advantage of this method with respect to the previously explored ones: the electron low penetration power allows for simple and versatile probes and could extend RGS to tumours for which background originating from nearby healthy tissue makes probes less effective. We developed a β− probe prototype and studied its performances on phantoms. By means of a detailed simulation we have also extrapolated the results to estimate the performances in a realistic case of meningioma, pathology which is going to be our first in-vivo test case. A good sensitivity to residuals down to 0.1 ml can be reached within 1 s with an administered activity smaller than those for PET-scans thus making the radiation exposure to medical personnel negligible. PMID:24646766

  2. A novel radioguided surgery technique exploiting β- decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camillocci, E. Solfaroli; Baroni, G.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; Cremonesi, M.; De Lucia, E.; Ferroli, P.; Fiore, S.; Grana, C. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paganelli, G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Schiariti, M.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Voena, C.; Faccini, R.

    2014-03-01

    The background induced by the high penetration power of the radiation is the main limiting factor of the current radio-guided surgery (RGS). To partially mitigate it, a RGS with β+-emitting radio-tracers has been suggested in literature. Here we propose the use of β--emitting radio-tracers and β- probes and discuss the advantage of this method with respect to the previously explored ones: the electron low penetration power allows for simple and versatile probes and could extend RGS to tumours for which background originating from nearby healthy tissue makes probes less effective. We developed a β- probe prototype and studied its performances on phantoms. By means of a detailed simulation we have also extrapolated the results to estimate the performances in a realistic case of meningioma, pathology which is going to be our first in-vivo test case. A good sensitivity to residuals down to 0.1 ml can be reached within 1 s with an administered activity smaller than those for PET-scans thus making the radiation exposure to medical personnel negligible.

  3. 1D-3D registration for intra-operative nuclear imaging in radio-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christoph; Lasser, Tobias; Okur, Asli; Navab, Nassir

    2015-02-01

    3D functional nuclear imaging modalities like SPECT or PET provide valuable information, as small structures can be marked with radioactive tracers to be localized before surgery. This positional information is valuable during surgery as well, for example when locating potentially cancerous lymph nodes in the case of breast cancer. However, the volumetric information provided by pre-operative SPECT scans loses validity quickly due to posture changes and manipulation of the soft tissue during surgery. During the intervention, the surgeon has to rely on the acoustic feedback provided by handheld gamma-detectors in order to localize the marked structures. In this paper, we present a method that allows updating the pre-operative image with a very limited number of tracked readings. A previously acquired 3D functional volume serves as prior knowledge and a limited number of new 1D detector readings is used in order to update the prior knowledge. This update is performed by a 1D-3D registration algorithm that registers the volume to the detector readings. This enables the rapid update of the visual guidance provided to the surgeon during a radio-guided surgery without slowing down the surgical workflow. We evaluate the performance of this approach using Monte-Carlo simulations, phantom experiments and patient data, resulting in a positional error of less than 8 mm which is acceptable for surgery. The 1D-3D registration is also compared to a volumetric reconstruction using the tracked detector measurements without taking prior information into account, and achieves a comparable accuracy with significantly less measurements.

  4. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, Joanne; Kulawansa, Sagarika; McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell; Phillips, Michael; Tinning, Jill; Taylor, Donna

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  5. Characterization of a detector for β^{{-}}_{} radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomando, A.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Voena, C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new device for the radio-guided surgery technique exploiting β^{{-}}_{} emitters. A specific intraoperative β^{{-}}_{} detecting probe based on a low-density organic crystal, the diphenylbutadiene-doped para-therphenyl, coupled by optical fibres to a photomultiplier, was developed. A portable readout electronics was designed to provide the surgeons with multi real-time feedback. The aspects related to the applicability of the device, in particular the perception of the spatial resolution of the probe and the comprehension time necessary to the operator to interpret the system response were investigated. Preliminary promising results support the possibility of using this innovative probe in cancer surgery.

  6. Intraoperative stimulation techniques for functional pathway preservation and glioma resection.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Berger, Mitchel S

    2010-02-01

    Although a primary tenet of neurosurgical oncology is that survival can improve with greater tumor resection, this principle must be tempered by the potential for functional loss following a radical removal. Preoperative planning with functional and physiological imaging paradigms, combined with intraoperative strategies such as cortical and subcortical stimulation mapping, can effectively reduce the risks associated with operating in eloquent territory. In addition to identifying critical motor pathways, these techniques can be adapted to identify language function reliably. The authors review the technical nuances of intraoperative mapping for low- and high-grade gliomas, demonstrating their efficacy in optimizing resection even in patients with negative mapping data. Collectively, these surgical strategies represent the cornerstone for operating on gliomas in and around functional pathways.

  7. Intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taemin; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Fong, Brendan M; Trang, Andy; Gopen, Quinton; Parsa, Andrew T; Yang, Isaac

    2012-09-01

    Unfavorable outcomes such as facial paralysis and deafness were once unfortunate probable complications following resection of acoustic neuromas. However, the implementation of intraoperative neuromonitoring during acoustic neuroma surgery has demonstrated placing more emphasis on quality of life and preserving neurological function. A modern review demonstrates a great degree of recent success in this regard. In facial nerve monitoring, the use of modern electromyography along with improvements in microneurosurgery has significantly improved preservation. Recent studies have evaluated the use of video monitoring as an adjunctive tool to further improve outcomes for patients undergoing surgery. Vestibulocochlear nerve monitoring has also been extensively studied, with the most popular techniques including brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring, electrocochleography, and direct compound nerve action potential monitoring. Among them, direct recording remains the most promising and preferred monitoring method for functional acoustic preservation. However, when compared with postoperative facial nerve function, the hearing preservation is only maintained at a lower rate. Here, the authors analyze the major intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques available for acoustic neuroma resection. PMID:22937857

  8. [Spinal osteoblastoma resection through radioguided surgery].

    PubMed

    Infante, J R; Rayo, J I; Serrano, J; Domínguez, M L; García, L; Durán, C

    2010-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is an uncommon primary neoplasm of the bone, with histological manifestations similar to osteoid osteoma. Approximately 40% of them are located in the spine, usually involving the posterior structures. This location may be associated with scoliosis and neurologic manifestations. Diagnostic imaging includes simple X-ray, CT scan, MRI and radionuclide studies. Bone scintigraphy demonstrates an increased radiotracer accumulation. The standard treatment consists of open intralesional resection. Nevertheless, localization of nidus may be difficult and bone resection may be limited due to the proximity of the neural structures. We present the case of a patient with a spinal osteoblastoma in whom the use of radioguided surgery was performed through gamma probe and mini gamma camera. This technique made it possible to accurately locate the tumor and perform an effective removal of the nidus.

  9. A comprehensive overview of radioguided surgery using gamma detection probe technology

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P; Neff, Ryan L; Mojzisik, Cathy M; O'Malley, David M; Hinkle, George H; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Knopp, Michael V; Martin, Edward W

    2009-01-01

    The concept of radioguided surgery, which was first developed some 60 years ago, involves the use of a radiation detection probe system for the intraoperative detection of radionuclides. The use of gamma detection probe technology in radioguided surgery has tremendously expanded and has evolved into what is now considered an established discipline within the practice of surgery, revolutionizing the surgical management of many malignancies, including breast cancer, melanoma, and colorectal cancer, as well as the surgical management of parathyroid disease. The impact of radioguided surgery on the surgical management of cancer patients includes providing vital and real-time information to the surgeon regarding the location and extent of disease, as well as regarding the assessment of surgical resection margins. Additionally, it has allowed the surgeon to minimize the surgical invasiveness of many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, while still maintaining maximum benefit to the cancer patient. In the current review, we have attempted to comprehensively evaluate the history, technical aspects, and clinical applications of radioguided surgery using gamma detection probe technology. PMID:19173715

  10. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a β- detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-06-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting β- emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting β- radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a few seconds.

  11. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging and Assessment of the Macula During Cataract Surgery: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Koushik; Chawla, Rohan; Kumawat, Babulal; Sharma, Yog Raj

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe a technique to qualitatively analyze the posterior segment during cataract surgery using intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT). Macular iOCT can be done before and after intraocular lens implantation after the media is rendered clear following phacoemulsification. A handheld irrigating planoconcave contact lens is placed over the cornea with the operating microscope in retroillumination mode. After focusing the microscope and upon getting a clear view of the posterior segment, iOCT is switched on, centered at the macula, and focused. This technique enables the surgeon to intraoperatively analyze and document the macular morphology and vitreoretinal interface. Potential uses of this technique include intraoperative decision-making regarding concurrent use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents or steroids in cases with dense cataracts where preoperative OCT is difficult. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:846-847.]. PMID:27631481

  12. Temporary intra-operative reduction techniques for tibial fracture fixation: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Beazley, J C; Hull, P

    2010-12-01

    Accurate intra-operative reduction and maintenance of reduction is essential for successful fixation of tibial fractures. Although many tibial fractures can be reduced with minimal manipulation, numerous techniques have been described to facilitate fixation of more difficult fractures. These include use of a traction table, manual traction techniques, temporary distracters, reduction clamps and temporary unicortical plating. This article reviews the literature and assesses the options available for the temporary reduction and maintenance of reduction of tibial fractures prior to definitive fixation.

  13. [INVASIVE TECHNIQUES AND INTRAOPERATIVE ECHOGRAPHY IN THE LOCALIZATION OF INSULINOMAS; A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Martínez, Aura D; Padillo-Cuenca, José C; Calañas Continente, Alfonso; Bahamondes-Opazo, Rodrigo; Muñoz-Jiménez, Concepción; Gálvez Moreno, María A

    2015-07-01

    The insulinoma is the most common pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Surgery is curative in most cases, an appropriate preoperative localization allows a minimal invasive surgical technique for keeping the exo and endocrine function of the pancreas. Some authors suggest the use of invasive localization techniques just in cases with non-identified tumor lesion, others recommend their routinely use. We describe a case with clinical and biochemical diagnosis of insulinoma, conventional image studies revealed a tumor image in the pancreas which corresponded to a lipoma, the intraoperative ultrasound allowed the localization of the real tumor, but body-tail pancreatectomy was performed due to pancreatic necrosis in relation with the duration of the surgery. The systematic use of invasive localization techniques as the intra-arterial calcium stimulation and the pancreatic intraoperative ultrasound would allow a better localization of insulinoma for avoiding complications and associated morbidity.

  14. Delphi Consensus Recommendations: Intraoperative Technique and Postoperative Management of Patients with Natrelle 410 Implants

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mitchell H.; Hedén, Per; Luan, Jie; Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Carter, Mollie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomically shaped, form-stable Natrelle 410 breast implants were approved in Europe in 1993 and in the United States in 2013. Although general guidelines for breast augmentation are available, the distinctive characteristics of Natrelle 410 warrant specific guidelines for this device. The goal of this study was to generate consensus recommendations for intraoperative technique and postoperative management with Natrelle 410 in primary breast augmentation. Methods: Surgeons were invited to participate in the study, which used a modified Delphi method. Participants completed 2 rounds of online surveys; the second survey (Recommendations Survey) was generated based on first survey results. Respondents also listed top priorities for use of Natrelle 410. Results: Participants (n = 22) reached consensus on 15 of 18 perioperative and surgical techniques; dual-plane placement, tight pockets, and limiting the boundaries of dissection were among intraoperative techniques considered most important for Natrelle 410. Consensus was reached for 18 of 32 items regarding postoperative management and 6 of 9 open-ended postoperative activity restrictions. Consensus on activity restrictions with specified time limits were similar to consensus recommendations on general restrictions. Top participant-identified intraoperative and postoperative management practices for Natrelle 410 were dual-plane placement of the implant and wearing a bra postoperatively, respectively. Conclusions: The Delphi method identified consensus recommendations on a broad range of intraoperative techniques and postoperative management practices for primary breast augmentation with Natrelle 410. These recommendations and priorities provide surgeons with a framework that, together with the surgeon’s experience, will contribute to optimal clinical outcomes with Natrelle 410. PMID:26893982

  15. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S.; Onicescu, Georgiana; Clarke, Harry S.; Marshall, David T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  16. Rescue Radioguided Laparoscopy Surgery for Meckel's Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Suarez, Manuel; Gil, Ismael; Salcini, José Luis; Lahoz, Manuel; De Gregorio, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The extirpation of Meckel's diverticulum (MD) via conventional or laparoscopic surgery is the definitive treatment. However, certain circumstances may modify or alter this situation and require the application of exceptional measures. We report a case under our observation who previously had an exploratory abdominal laparotomy for a suspected MD; however, the findings were negative. At that time, the diagnosis was established based on low-level gastrointestinal bleeding and isotopic tests that confirmed the existence of the diverticulum. Given the findings of gamma-graphic exploration and the previous negative surgical exploration, a decision was made to remove the lesion by laparoscopic radioguided surgery. The patient underwent bilateral laparoscopic radioguided surgery using a gamma radiation detection probe. The exploration of the abdominal cavity noted the existence of the diverticulum about 60 to 70 cm from the ileocecal valve. In this way, it was possible to proceed with the resection of the bowel loop and perform an intracorporeal anastomosis termino lateral. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. We believe that the combination of radioguided surgery and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography could be useful for treating lesions in locations that are surgically difficult because of the characteristics of the lesion itself or the peculiarities of an individual patient. PMID:26107668

  17. Feasibility of a wireless gamma probe in radioguided surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2016-06-21

    Radioguided surgery through the use of a gamma probe is an established practice, and has been widely applied in the case of sentinel lymph node biopsies. A wide range of intraoperative gamma probes is commercially available. The primary characteristics of the gamma probes include their sensitivity, spatial resolution, and energy resolution. We present the results obtained from a prototype of a new wireless gamma probe. This prototype is composed of a 20 mm thick cerium-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (Ce:GAGG) inorganic scintillation crystal from Furukawa Denshi and a Hamamatsu S12572-100C multi-pixel photon counter equipped with a designed electronics. The measured performance characteristics include the energy resolution, energy linearity, angular aperture, spatial resolution and sensitivity. Measurements were carried out using (57)Co, (133)Ba, (22)Na, and (137)Cs sources. The energy resolutions for 0.122 and 0.511 MeV were 17.2% and 6.9%, respectively. The designed prototype consumes an energy of approximately 4.4 W, weighs about 310 g (including battery) having a dimension of 20 mm (D)  ×  130 mm (L). PMID:27245331

  18. Feasibility of a wireless gamma probe in radioguided surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2016-06-21

    Radioguided surgery through the use of a gamma probe is an established practice, and has been widely applied in the case of sentinel lymph node biopsies. A wide range of intraoperative gamma probes is commercially available. The primary characteristics of the gamma probes include their sensitivity, spatial resolution, and energy resolution. We present the results obtained from a prototype of a new wireless gamma probe. This prototype is composed of a 20 mm thick cerium-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (Ce:GAGG) inorganic scintillation crystal from Furukawa Denshi and a Hamamatsu S12572-100C multi-pixel photon counter equipped with a designed electronics. The measured performance characteristics include the energy resolution, energy linearity, angular aperture, spatial resolution and sensitivity. Measurements were carried out using (57)Co, (133)Ba, (22)Na, and (137)Cs sources. The energy resolutions for 0.122 and 0.511 MeV were 17.2% and 6.9%, respectively. The designed prototype consumes an energy of approximately 4.4 W, weighs about 310 g (including battery) having a dimension of 20 mm (D)  ×  130 mm (L).

  19. Feasibility of a wireless gamma probe in radioguided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2016-06-01

    Radioguided surgery through the use of a gamma probe is an established practice, and has been widely applied in the case of sentinel lymph node biopsies. A wide range of intraoperative gamma probes is commercially available. The primary characteristics of the gamma probes include their sensitivity, spatial resolution, and energy resolution. We present the results obtained from a prototype of a new wireless gamma probe. This prototype is composed of a 20 mm thick cerium-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (Ce:GAGG) inorganic scintillation crystal from Furukawa Denshi and a Hamamatsu S12572-100C multi-pixel photon counter equipped with a designed electronics. The measured performance characteristics include the energy resolution, energy linearity, angular aperture, spatial resolution and sensitivity. Measurements were carried out using 57Co, 133Ba, 22Na, and 137Cs sources. The energy resolutions for 0.122 and 0.511 MeV were 17.2% and 6.9%, respectively. The designed prototype consumes an energy of approximately 4.4 W, weighs about 310 g (including battery) having a dimension of 20 mm (D)  ×  130 mm (L).

  20. Intraoperative Vagus Nerve Monitoring: A Transnasal Technique during Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, Christopher A.; Paskhover, Boris; Judson, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Intraoperative vagus nerve monitoring during skull base surgery has been reported with the use of an oral nerve monitoring endotracheal tube. However, the intraoral presence of an endotracheal tube can limit exposure by its location in the operative field during transfacial approaches and by limiting superior mobilization of the mandible during transcervical approaches. We describe a transnasal vagus nerve monitoring technique. Design and Participants Ten patients underwent open skull base surgery. Surgical approaches included transcervical (five), transfacial/maxillary swing (three), and double mandibular osteotomy (two). The vagus nerve was identified, stimulated, and monitored in all cases. Main Outcome Measures Intraoperative nerve stimulation, pre- and postoperative vagus nerve function through the use of flexible laryngoscopy in conjunction with assessment of subjective symptoms of hoarseness, voice change, and swallowing difficulty. Results Three patients had extensive involvement of the nerve by tumor with complete postoperative nerve deficit, one patient had a transient deficit following dissection of tumor off of nerve with resolution, and the remaining patients had nerve preservation. One patient experienced minor epistaxis during monitor tube placement that was managed conservatively. Conclusions Transnasal vagal nerve monitoring is a simple method that allows for intraoperative monitoring during nerve preservation surgery without limiting surgical exposure. PMID:25844292

  1. Management of intraoperative fluid balance and blood conservation techniques in adult cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Vretzakis, George; Kleitsaki, Athina; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2011-02-01

    Blood transfusions are associated with adverse physiologic effects and increased cost, and therefore reduction of blood product use during surgery is a desirable goal for all patients. Cardiac surgery is a major consumer of donor blood products, especially when cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is used, because hematocrit drops precipitously during CPB due to blood loss and blood cell dilution. Advanced age, low preoperative red blood cell volume (preoperative anemia or small body size), preoperative antiplatelet or antithrombotic drugs, complex or re-operative procedures or emergency operations, and patient comorbidities were identified as important transfusion risk indicators in a report recently published by the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists. This report also identified several pre- and intraoperative interventions that may help reduce blood transfusions, including off-pump procedures, preoperative autologous blood donation, normovolemic hemodilution, and routine cell saver use.A multimodal approach to blood conservation, with high-risk patients receiving all available interventions, may help preserve vital organ perfusion and reduce blood product utilization. In addition, because positive intravenous fluid balance is a significant factor affecting hemodilution during cardiac surgery, especially when CPB is used, strategies aimed at limiting intraoperative fluid balance positiveness may also lead to reduced blood product utilization.This review discusses currently available techniques that can be used intraoperatively in an attempt to avoid or minimize fluid balance positiveness, to preserve the patient's own red blood cells, and to decrease blood product utilization during cardiac surgery. PMID:21345774

  2. Clinical impact of intraoperative navigation using a Doppler ultrasonographic guided vessel tracking technique for pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Maemura, Kosei; Mataki, Yuko; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Iino, Satoshi; Sakoda, Masahiko; Ueno, Shinichi; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Takao, Sonshin; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    During pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), early ligation of critical vessels such as the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA) has been reported to reduce blood loss. Color Doppler flow imaging has become the useful diagnostic methods for the delineation of the anatomy. In this study, we assessed the utility of the intraoperative Doppler ultrasonography (Dop-US) guided vessel detection and tracking technique (Dop-Navi) for identifying critical arteries in order to reduce operative bleeding. Ninety patients who received PD for periampullary or pancreatic disease were enrolled. After 14 patients were excluded because of combined resection of portal vein or other organs, the remaining were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: patients for whom Dop-Navi was used (n = 37) and those for whom Dop-Navi was not used (n = 39; controls). We compared the ability of Dop-Navi to identify critical vessels to that of preoperative multi-detector computed tomography (MD-CT), using MD-CT data, as well as compared the perioperative status and postoperative outcome between the 2 patient groups. Intraoperative Dop-US was significantly superior to MD-CT in terms of identifying number of vessels and the ability to discriminate the IPDA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) based on blood flow velocity. The Dop-Navi patients had shorter operation times (531 min versus 577 min; no significance) and smaller bleeding volumes (1120 mL versus 1590 mL; P < 0.01) than the control patients without increasing postoperative complications. Intraoperative Dop-Navi method allows surgeons to clearly identify the IPDA during PD and to avoid injuries to major arteries. PMID:25437586

  3. Use of {sup 99m}Tc 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile in minimally invasive radioguided surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism: A narrative review of the current literature

    SciTech Connect

    Denmeade, Kristie A; Constable, Chris; Reed, Warren M

    2013-06-15

    The use of technetium-99m 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile ({sup 99m}Tc MIBI) for assistance in minimally invasive radioguided surgery (MIRS) is growing in popularity as a safe, effective, and proficient technique used for parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) treatment. Previously, the preferred treatment for PHPT was bilateral neck exploration (BNE), a very invasive, costly, and lengthy procedure. However, as a large majority (80–85% of cases of PHPT) are attributed to a single parathyroid adenoma (PA), a simpler more direct technique such as MIRS is a far better option. The following article is an exploration of the current literature concerning varied protocols utilizing {sup 99m}Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS for patients undergoing treatment of PHPT. This technique boasts many advantageous outcomes for patients suffering from PHPT. These include a reduction in cost, operating time, and patient recovery; less evidence of post-surgical hypocalcaemia, less pain, and complications; superior cosmetic results; same-day discharge; and the possibility of local anaesthesia which is particularly beneficial in elderly patients. Better outcomes for patients with deep or ectopic PAs, reduced intra-operative complications, and improved cosmetic outcomes for patients who have previously undergone thyroid and/or parathyroid surgery are also advantageous. Of the literature reviewed it was also found that no patients suffered any major surgical complications such as laryngeal nerve palsy or permanent hypoparathyroidism using {sup 99m}Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS.

  4. Continuous Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (C-IONM) Technique with the Automatic Periodic Stimulating (APS) Accessory for Conventional and Endoscopic Thyroid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Hui, Sun; Wu, Chei-Wei; Xiaoli, Liu; Ferrari, Cesare Carlo; Mangano, Alberto; Lianos, Georgios D; Leotta, Andrea; Lavazza, Matteo; Frattini, Francesco; Annoni, Matteo; Rausei, Stefano; Boni, Luigi; Kim, Hoon Yub

    2015-05-01

    One of the most important trends in intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) in thyroid surgery is currently the real-time monitoring of the vagus nerve (VN) in order to prevent recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) iatrogenic damages. Notably, continuous intraoperative neuromonitoring (C-IONM) seems to be superior to intermitted intraoperative neural monitoring (I-IONM) because it enhances standardization by permanent vagus nerve (VN) stimulation, and it provides entire and constant RLN function monitoring as the surgeon dissects and removes the thyroid gland. It also has to be highlighted that the surgical maneuvers for the automatic periodic stimulating (APS) placement must be accurate and standardized in order to avoid a potential iatrogenic morbidity on the VN function. We recommend the experienced surgeon be very careful in each step, with cautious dissection. With this review article we provide a comprehensive analyses of C-IONM technique with the APS accessory for conventional and endoscopic thyroid surgery. PMID:26054997

  5. Continuous Intraoperative Neuromonitoring (C-IONM) Technique with the Automatic Periodic Stimulating (APS) Accessory for Conventional and Endoscopic Thyroid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Hui, Sun; Wu, Chei-Wei; Xiaoli, Liu; Ferrari, Cesare Carlo; Mangano, Alberto; Lianos, Georgios D; Leotta, Andrea; Lavazza, Matteo; Frattini, Francesco; Annoni, Matteo; Rausei, Stefano; Boni, Luigi; Kim, Hoon Yub

    2015-05-01

    One of the most important trends in intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) in thyroid surgery is currently the real-time monitoring of the vagus nerve (VN) in order to prevent recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) iatrogenic damages. Notably, continuous intraoperative neuromonitoring (C-IONM) seems to be superior to intermitted intraoperative neural monitoring (I-IONM) because it enhances standardization by permanent vagus nerve (VN) stimulation, and it provides entire and constant RLN function monitoring as the surgeon dissects and removes the thyroid gland. It also has to be highlighted that the surgical maneuvers for the automatic periodic stimulating (APS) placement must be accurate and standardized in order to avoid a potential iatrogenic morbidity on the VN function. We recommend the experienced surgeon be very careful in each step, with cautious dissection. With this review article we provide a comprehensive analyses of C-IONM technique with the APS accessory for conventional and endoscopic thyroid surgery.

  6. Influence of root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques on intra-operative pain during endodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martín-González, Jenifer; Echevarría-Pérez, Marta; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Tarilonte-Delgado, Maria L.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; López-Frías, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques on intra-operative pain experienced by patients during endodontic therapy. Method and Materials: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in Ponferrada and Sevilla, Spain, including 80 patients (46 men and 34 women), with ages ranged from 10 to 74 years, randomly recruited. Patient gender and age, affected tooth, pulpal diagnosis, periapical status, previous NSAID or antibiotic (AB) treatment, and root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques were recorded. After root canal treatment (RCT), patients completed a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) that ranked the level of pain. Results were analysed statistically using the Chi-square and ANOVA tests and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean pain level during root canal treatment was 2.9 ± 3.0 (median = 2) in a VAS between 0 and 10. Forty percent of patients experienced no pain. Gender, age, arch, previous NSAIDs or AB treatment and anaesthetic type did not influence significantly the pain level (p > 0.05). Pain during root canal treatment was significantly greater in molar teeth (OR = 10.1; 95% C.I. = 1.6 - 63.5; p = 0.013). Root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques did not affect significantly patient’s pain during root canal treatment (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Patients feel more pain when RCT is carried out on molar teeth. The root canal instrumentation and obturation techniques do not affect significantly the patients’ pain during RCT. Key words:Anaesthesia, endodontic pain, pulpitis, root canal instrumentation, root canal obturation, rotary files. PMID:22549694

  7. First Experiences with Navigated Radio-Guided Surgery Using Freehand SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, A.; Saeckl, J.; Belloni, B.; Hein, R.; Okur, A.; Scheidhauer, K.; Wendler, T.; Traub, J.; Friess, H.; Martignoni, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in melanoma using one-dimensional gamma probes is a standard of care worldwide. Reports on the performance are claimed by most groups to successfully detect the SLNs during the surgical procedure in almost 100% of the patients. In clinical practice, however, several issues remain which are usually not addressed: the difficulty of intraoperative detection of deeply located nodes, SLN detection in obese patients or in the groin and the impossibility to make a scan of the entire wound after SLN resection to avoid false negative testing for eventually remaining SLNs. Materials and Methods The concept behind freehand SPECT is to combine a gamma probe as used for conventional radio-guided surgery with a tracking system as used in neurosurgical navigation. From this combination and a proper algorithm framework the 3D reconstruction of radioactivity distributions and displaying these intraoperatively is possible. Conclusion In summary, the feasibility of freehand SPECT could be shown and provides an image-guided SLNB and a truly minimally invasive and optimized surgical procedure. PMID:21941492

  8. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. PMID:15816375

  9. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids.

  10. The GOSTT concept and hybrid mixed/virtual/augmented reality environment radioguided surgery.

    PubMed

    Valdés Olmos, R A; Vidal-Sicart, S; Giammarile, F; Zaknun, J J; Van Leeuwen, F W; Mariani, G

    2014-06-01

    The popularity gained by the sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure in the last two decades did increase the interest of the surgical disciplines for other applications of radioguided surgery. An example is the gamma-probe guided localization of occult or difficult to locate neoplastic lesions. Such guidance can be achieved by intralesional delivery (ultrasound, stereotaxis or CT) of a radiolabelled agent that remains accumulated at the site of the injection. Another possibility rested on the use of systemic administration of a tumour-seeking radiopharmaceutical with favourable tumour accumulation and retention. On the other hand, new intraoperative imaging devices for radioguided surgery in complex anatomical areas became available. All this a few years ago led to the delineation of the concept Guided intraOperative Scintigraphic Tumour Targeting (GOSTT) to include the whole spectrum of basic and advanced nuclear medicine procedures required for providing a roadmap that would optimise surgery. The introduction of allied signatures using, e.g. hybrid tracers for simultaneous detection of the radioactive and fluorescent signals did amply the GOSTT concept. It was now possible to combine perioperative nuclear medicine imaging with the superior resolution of additional optical guidance in the operating room. This hybrid approach is currently in progress and probably will become an important model to follow in the coming years. A cornerstone in the GOSTT concept is constituted by diagnostic imaging technologies like SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT was introduced halfway the past decade and was immediately incorporated into the SLN procedure. Important reasons attributing to the success of SPECT/CT were its combination with lymphoscintigraphy, and the ability to display SLNs in an anatomical environment. This latter aspect has significantly been improved in the new generation of SPECT/CT cameras and provides the base for the novel mixed reality protocols of image-guided surgery. In

  11. Preoperative Planning and Intraoperative Technique for Accurate Translation of a Distal First Metatarsal Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Jacob; Lamm, Bradley M; Andrade, Bijan J; Malay, D Scot

    2016-01-01

    We used preoperative radiographic and intraoperative anatomic measurements to predict and achieve, respectively, the precise amount of capital fragment lateral translation required to restore anatomic balance to the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Correlation was used to relate the amount of capital fragment translation and operative reduction of the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA), hallux abductus angle (HAA), tibial sesamoid position (TSP), metatarsus adductus angle, and first metatarsal length. The mean capital fragment lateral translation was 5.54 ± 1.64 mm, and the mean radiographic reductions included a first IMA of 5.04° ± 2.85°, an HAA of 9.39° ± 8.38°, and a TSP of 1.38 ± 0.9. These changes were statistically (p < .001) and clinically (≥32.55%) significant. The mean reduction of the metatarsus adductus angle was 0.66° ± 4.44° and that for the first metatarsal length was 0.33 ± 7.27 mm, and neither of these were statistically (p = .5876 and 0.1247, respectively) or clinically (≤3.5%) significant. Pairwise correlations between the amount of lateral translation of the capital fragment and the first IMA, HAA, and TSP values were moderately positive and statistically significant (r = 0.4412, p = .0166; r = 0.5391, p = .0025; and r = 0.3729, p = .0463; respectively). In contrast, the correlation with metatarsus adductus and the first metatarsal shortening were weak and not statistically significant (r = 0.2296, p = .2308 and r = -0.2394, p = .2109, respectively). The results of our study indicate that predicted preoperative and executed intraoperative lateral translation of the capital fragment correlates with statistically and clinically significant reductions in the first IMA, HAA, and TSP.

  12. Robot-assisted partial cystectomy with intraoperative frozen section examination: Evolution and evaluation of a novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Klett, Dane E.; Abdollah, Firas; Sammon, Jesse D.; Pucheril, Dan; Menon, Mani; Jeong, Wooju; Peabody, James O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel modification to robot-assisted partial cystectomy (RAPC) that allows for intraoperative surgical margin assessment by bimanual-examination and frozen-section analysis. Materials and Methods A total of 7 patients underwent RAPC at a single tertiary-care institution between 2008 and 2013. The technique evolved over the study-period and permitted real-time intraoperative surgical margin evaluation in the last 5 patients via bimanual-examination and frozen-section analysis, utilizing the GelPOINT platform (a hand-assist device). The GelPOINT platform was placed through a 4- to 5-cm vertical supraumbilical incision and allowed for rapid retrieval of the bladder specimen without compromising the pneumoperitoneum or prolonging the operative time. Perioperative, oncological and functional outcomes were evaluated; all patients had a minimum 12-month follow-up. At the time of last follow-up, a cross-sectional survey of patients was performed to evaluate regret/satisfaction utilizing validated questionnaires. Results The mean age was 72.5 years; 71.4% of the patients were men (n=5). All patients underwent RAPC for a malignant indication. The mean operative and console times were 291 and 217 minutes, respectively. No patient had a positive surgical margin. Mean length-of-stay was 1.7 days. At a median follow-up of 38.9 months, 1 patient experienced a local recurrence 6 months postsurgery. The only mortality was secondary to Lewy-body disease, in the same patient, 1 year postoperatively. Patient assessment of regret and satisfaction indicated 0% regret and 0% dissatisfaction. Conclusions The 'modified' technique of RAPC is technically feasible, safe, and reproducible; further, RAPC leads to favorable oncological, functional and quality-of-life outcomes in patients eligible for partial cystectomy. PMID:27195322

  13. Assessment of Liver Remnant Using ICG Clearance Intraoperatively during Vascular Exclusion: Early Experience with the ALIIVE Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Lawrence; Christophi, Christopher; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Starkey, Graham; Goodwin, Mark; Weinberg, Laurence; Ho, Loretta

    2015-01-01

    Background. The most significant risk following major hepatectomy is postoperative liver insufficiency. Current preoperative assessment of the future liver remnant relies upon assumptions which may not be valid in the setting of advanced resection strategies. This paper reports the feasibility of the ALIIVE technique which assesses the liver remnant with ICG clearance intraoperatively during vascular exclusion. Methods. 10 patients undergoing planned major liver resection (hemihepatectomy or greater) were recruited. Routine preoperative assessment included CT and standardized volumetry. ICG clearance was measured noninvasively using a finger spectrophotometer at various time points including following parenchymal transection during inflow and outflow occlusion before vascular division, the ALIIVE step. Results. There were one case of mortality and three cases of posthepatectomy liver failure. The patient who died had the lowest ALIIVE ICG clearance (7.1%/min versus 14.4 ± 4.9). Routine preoperative CT and standardized volumetry did not predict outcome. Discussion/Conclusion. The novel ALIIVE technique is feasible and assesses actual future liver remnant function before the point of no return during major hepatectomy. This technique may be useful as a check step to offer a margin of safety to prevent posthepatectomy liver failure and death. Further confirmatory studies are required to determine a safety cutoff level. PMID:26106254

  14. Radioguided parathyroidectomy in forearm graft for recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ardito, G; Revelli, L; Giustozzi, E; Giordano, A

    2012-01-01

    We report a peculiar case of recurrent hyperparathyroidism caused by hyperplasia of a forearm graft implanted following a total parathyroidectomy in a 38-year-old patient with chronic renal failure. The forearm graft hyperplasia was detected using (99)Tc(m)-sestamibi scanning, which identified hyperplastic transplanted parathyroid tissue in the forearm of the patient. During the initial surgery, the surgeon failed to mark the parathyroid tissue with sutures or clips to facilitate locating it. Therefore, we referred the patient for radioguided surgery. This surgical procedure allowed us to locate and completely remove the hyperfunctioning transplanted parathyroid tissue.

  15. Comparing high-resolution microscopy techniques for potential intraoperative use in guiding low-grade glioma resections

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Daphne; Wang, Danni; Wang, Yu “Winston”; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS), with contrast provided by 5-ALA-induced-PpIX, has been shown to enable a higher extent of resection of high-grade gliomas. However, conventional FIGS with low-power microscopy lacks the sensitivity to aid in low-grade glioma (LGG) resection because PpIX signal is weak and sparse in such tissues. Intraoperative high-resolution microscopy of PpIX fluorescence has been proposed as a method to guide LGG resection, where sub-cellular resolution allows for the visualization of sparse and punctate mitochondrial PpIX production in tumor cells. Here, we assess the performance of three potentially portable high-resolution microscopy techniques that may be used for the intraoperative imaging of human LGG tissue samples with PpIX contrast: high-resolution fiber-optic microscopy (HRFM), high-resolution wide-field microscopy (WFM), and dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopy. Materials and Methods Thick unsectioned human LGG tissue samples (n = 7) with ALA-induced-PpIX contrast were imaged using three imaging techniques (HRFM, WFM, DAC). The average signal-to-background ratio (SBR) was then calculated for each imaging modality (5 images per tissue, per modality). Results HRFM provides the ease of use and portability of a flexible fiber bundle, and is simple and inexpensive to build. However, in most cases (6/7), HRFM is not capable of detecting PpIX signal from LGGs due to high autofluorescence, generated by the fiber bundle under laser illumination at 405 nm, which overwhelms the PpIX signal and impedes its visualization. WFM is a camera-based method possessing high lateral resolution but poor axial resolution, resulting in sub-optimal image contrast. Conclusions Consistent successful detection of PpIX signal throughout our human LGG tissue samples (n = 7), with an acceptable image contrast (SBR > 2), was only achieved using DAC microscopy, which offers superior image resolution and contrast that is comparable to

  16. Intra-Operatively Obtained Human Tissue: Protocols and Techniques for the Study of Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Kaisorn; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Zamora-Berridi, Grettel; Achanta, Praganthi; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Jallo, George I.; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    The discoveries of neural (NSCs) and brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) in the adult human brain and in brain tumors, respectively, have led to a new era in neuroscience research. These cells represent novel approaches to studying normal phenomena such as memory and learning, as well as pathological conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke, and brain tumors. This new paradigm stresses the importance of understanding how these cells behave in vitro and in vivo. It also stresses the need to use human-derived tissue to study human disease because animal models may not necessarily accurately replicate the processes that occur in humans. An important, but often underused, source of human tissue and, consequently, both NSCs and BTSCs, is the operating room. This study describes in detail both current and newly developed laboratory techniques, which in our experience are used to process and study human NSCs and BTSCs from tissue obtained directly from the operating room. PMID:19427538

  17. Intraoperative aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Mehta, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection is a rare but fatal complication of open heart surgery. By recognizing the population at risk and by using a gentle operative technique in such patients, the surgeon can usually avoid iatrogenic injury to the aorta. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and epiaortic scanning are invaluable for prompt diagnosis and determination of the extent of the injury. Prevention lies in the strict control of blood pressure during cannulation/decannulation, construction of proximal anastomosis, or in avoiding manipulation of the aorta in high-risk patients. Immediate repair using interposition graft or Dacron patch graft is warranted to reduce the high mortality associated with this complication. PMID:26440240

  18. Intraoperative radiation therapy in patients with bladder cancer. A review of techniques allowing improved tumor doses and providing high cure rates without loss of bladder function

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Kaufman, S.D.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    Conventional external beam irradiation, using modern megavoltage techniques and doses that do not harm bladder function, will permanently eradicate local bladder cancer in 30% to 50% of patients, compared with 70% to 90% with cystectomy. In appropriately chosen patients, open surgery can safely provide excellent exposure for the selective delivery of more radiant energy directly to the tumor and less to the uninvolved portion of the bladder. Intraoperative radiation therapy, by either a removable radium or iridium implant or a large single dose of electrons, has been reported to be safe and can permanently cure the bladder of cancer and also preserve bladder function in more than 75% of patients with solitary tumors that invade into but not beyond the bladder muscle. With the increasing interest in and availability of intraoperative radiation therapy in the US, this curative and bladder-sparing treatment for operable patients with bladder cancer invading the trigone is appropriate for careful clinical trial. 13 references.

  19. Intraoperative Localization of Tantalum Markers for Proton Beam Radiation of Choroidal Melanoma by an Opto-Electronic Navigation System: A Novel Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, Christoph A.; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Foerster, Michael H.; Heufelder, Jens; Kowal, Jens H.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: External beam proton radiation therapy has been used since 1975 to treat choroidal melanoma. For tumor location determination during proton radiation treatment, surgical tantalum clips are registered with image data. This report introduces the intraoperative application of an opto-electronic navigation system to determine with high precision the position of the tantalum markers and their spatial relationship to the tumor and anatomical landmarks. The application of the technique in the first 4 patients is described. Methods and Materials: A navigated reference base was attached noninvasively to the eye, and a navigated pointer device was used to record the spatial position of the tantalum markers, the tumor, and anatomical landmarks. Measurement accuracy was assessed on ex vivo porcine eye specimen by repetitive recording of the tantalum marker positions. The method was applied intraoperatively on 4 patients undergoing routine tantalum clip surgery. The spatial position information delivered by the navigation system was compared to the geometric data generated by the EYEPLAN software. Results: In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum repetition error was 0.34 mm. For the intraoperative application, the root mean square error of paired-points matching of the marker positions from the navigation system and from the EYEPLAN software was 0.701-1.25 mm. Conclusions: Navigation systems are a feasible tool for accurate localization of tantalum markers and anatomic landmarks. They can provide additional geometric information, and therefore have the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of external beam proton radiation therapy for choroidal melanoma.

  20. 3D scintigraphic imaging and navigation in radioguided surgery: freehand SPECT technology and its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Matthies, Philipp; Herrmann, Ken; Povoski, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Freehand SPECT (fhSPECT) is a technology platform for providing 3-dimensional (3D) navigation for radioguided surgical procedures, such as sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy (SLNB). In addition to the information provided by conventional handheld gamma detection probes, fhSPECT allows for direct visualization of the distribution of radioactivity in any given region of interest, allowing for improved navigation to radioactive target lesions and providing accurate lesion depth measurements. Herein, we will review the currently available clinical data on the use of fhSPECT: (i) for SLNB of various malignancies, including difficult-to-detect SLNs, and (ii) for radioguided localization of solid tumors. Moreover, the combination of fhSPECT with other technologies (e.g., small field-of-view gamma cameras, and diagnostic ultrasound) is discussed. These technical advances have the potential to greatly expand the clinical application of radioguided surgery in the future. PMID:26878667

  1. Intraoperative Fluorescein Staining of Cryopreserved Amniotic Membrane Grafts to Improve Visualization During and After Pterygium Surgery: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, J. Alberto; Korchak, Michael; Cremers, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method of enhancing the visualization of amniotic membrane grafts with fluorescein staining during pterygium surgery. Methods: Pterygium excision surgery using intraoperatively stained cryopreserved amniotic membranes was performed on 346 eyes. A sterile 0.6 mg sodium fluorescein strip was placed directly onto the amniotic membrane in the manufacturer's original packaging, and the stained allograft was then transplanted onto the planned site. Staining intensities, at 3, 5, and 10 minutes of dye immersion, were compared. Immediate postoperative pain rating (scale 0–10), visibility of the fluorescein-stained amniotic membrane graft, and conjunctival autograft and amniotic membrane graft elevation, dehiscence, retraction, or displacement were recorded. The recurrence rate of the study population was compared with that of a previous cohort of 121 patients who underwent pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft without stained amniotic membrane. Results: Direct contact of the fluorescein strip on the amniotic membrane at 3, 5, and 10 minutes showed no differences in subjective staining intensity. Fluorescein-stained amniotic membrane was easily detected on the ocular surface during and 24 hours after pterygium surgery. The average immediate postoperative pain rating was 0.8 ± 1.8. No intraoperative complications or postoperative amniotic membrane graft dehiscence, retraction, or displacement occurred. The recurrence rate using fluorescein-stained amniotic membrane (3 patients, 0.9%, mean follow-up time 31.8 ± 18.6 weeks) did not differ from that of the previous cohort without the stained amniotic membrane (2.5%; χ2(1) = 1.837, P = 0.183). Conclusions: Fluorescein strip staining of the amniotic membrane is a novel and safe intraoperative method to enhance visualization and handling of the graft during and after ocular surgeries. PMID:26751995

  2. Radioguided localization of clinically occult breast lesions (ROLL): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Abarca-Pérez, Leonardo; Ulloa-Gómez, José L; Romero, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    Management of nonpalpable breast lesions requiring pathologic diagnosis has been with wire localization during the last few decades. Recently, radioguided localization (ROLL) became an alternative for this type of lesions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of this technique in a tertiary referral center in Mexico City. Consecutive patients requiring pathologic diagnosis from a nonpalpable breast lesion were included in the present study. On the same day of operation, all patients were injected with particles of human serum albumin. Localization of the lesion was performed in the operation theater with the aid of a hand-held gamma-probe. All lesions were identified in a control x-ray of the surgical specimen. Demographic, clinical, surgical and pathologic data were recorded. Forty patients with a mean age of 56.8 +/- 7.8 years were included. In 39 of the 40 patients (97.5%) the "hot spot" was identified easily. In all patients, the area of maximum radioactivity corresponded to the site of the lesion. Imaging confirmation of the lesion in the surgical specimen was done during the first excision in 37 patients (92.5%). In the remaining cases (7.5%), a wider excision was performed during the same procedure, finding the suspected lesion in all cases. Diagnosis of cancer was made in seven patients, (17.5%). There were no significant surgical complications. Our data suggest that ROLL offer a simple and reliable method to localize occult breast lesions, allowing complete removal of the lesion in 100% of the patients. Because of the small quantity of radioactivity, the procedure is safe for both patients and the medical staff, producing less discomfort in patients than wire localization.

  3. Biomechanical comparison of two intraoperative mobilization techniques for maxillary distraction osteogenesis: Down-fracture versus non-down-fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Suzuki, Boonsiva

    2014-01-01

    Purposes: The purpose of this study was to compare the distraction forces and the biomechanical effects between two different intraoperative surgical procedures (down-fracture [DF] and non-DF [NDF]) for maxillary distraction osteogenesis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients were assigned into two groups according to the surgical procedure: DF, n = 6 versus NDF, n = 2. Lateral cephalograms taken preoperatively (T1), immediately after removal of the distraction device (T2), and after at least a 6 months follow-up period (T3) were analyzed. Assessment of distraction forces was performed during the distraction period. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the difference in the amount of advancement, the maximum distraction force and the amount of relapse. Results: Although a significantly greater amount of maxillary movement was observed in the DF group (median 9.5 mm; minimum-maximum 7.9-14.1 mm) than in the NDF group (median 5.9 mm; minimum-maximum 4.4-7.6 mm), significantly lower maximum distraction forces were observed in the DF (median 16.4 N; minimum-maximum 15.1-24.6 N) than in the NDF (median 32.9 N; minimum-maximum 27.6-38.2 N) group. A significantly greater amount of dental anchorage loss was observed in the NDF group. Moreover, the amount of relapse observed in the NDF group was approximately 3.5 times greater than in the DF group. Conclusions: In this study, it seemed that, the use of the NDF procedure resulted in lower levels of maxillary mobility at the time of the maxillary distraction, consequently requiring greater amounts of force to advance the maxillary bone. Moreover, it also resulted in a reduced amount of maxillary movement, a greater amount of dental anchorage loss and poor treatment stability. PMID:25593865

  4. Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Raudzens, P A

    1982-01-01

    Sensory EPs were recorded intraoperatively in 173 neurosurgical procedures (71 VEPs, 66 BAEPs, and 31 SSEPs) to evaluate the utility of this technique. EPs could be safely recorded in all cases, but the yield of useful results varied with each sensory modality. BAEPs were recorded reliably in 100% of the cases and intraoperative latency changes accurately predicted postoperative hearing deficits in 10%. Potential hearing deficits were detected in another 15%. BAEP changes were associated with brainstem dysfunction in only one case. VEP changes were difficult to interpret intraoperatively because of contamination by a high degree of variability and both false negative and false positive results. Changes in VEP amplitudes related to surgical manipulation of the optic chiasm were only suggested. SSEP changes were recorded reliably in only 75% of the cases and no correlations between SSEP changes and postoperative sensory function were established. Again, intraoperative amplitude attenuation of the SSEP waveform with surgical manipulation only suggested a potential sensory deficit. Intraoperative EP monitoring is a valuable technique that provides a functional analysis of the sensory nervous system during surgical procedures. Specific sensory stimuli and improved data analysis will increase the utility of this CNS monitor.

  5. Occult breast lesions: A comparison between radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) vs. wire-guided lumpectomy (WGL).

    PubMed

    Nadeem, R; Chagla, L S; Harris, O; Desmond, S; Thind, R; Titterrell, C; Audisio, R A

    2005-08-01

    Mammographic screening increases the number of impalpable breast cancers requiring surgical excision. It is important to optimise the localisation technique to remove the smallest amount of tissue, still adequately excising the lesion. The last 65 wire-guided lumpectomies (WGLs) were compared vs. the first 65 radioguided occult lesion localisations (ROLLs) performed for impalpable breast cancers. Data collection included patient's age, radiological abnormality, pre-operative core biopsy, type of primary surgery, length of localisation and excision, hospital stay, cancer size, weight and volume of the excised specimen, clearance margins. All patients were successfully localised with ROLL and WGL. Localisation time was reduced with ROLL (P<0.001). Clear margins were achieved in 83% ROLLs and 57% WGLs (P=0.001). Pathological cancer size and specimen weight were similar in both groups, although the specimen volume was slightly smaller for ROLL. A total of 74% ROLLs had excellent cosmetic outcomes and 26% good, vs. 55% excellent and 45% good in WGLs. A larger amount of normal breast tissue was excised with WGL, without achieving any better cancer clearance. ROLL provides a feasible alternative to WGL. This quick and simple technique achieves an improved rate of clear margins.

  6. Intraoperative MRI and functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Thomas; Szelenyi, Andrea; Senft, Christian; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Sure, Ulrich; Nimsky, Christopher; Seifert, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The integration of functional and anatomical data into neuronavigation is an established standard of care in many neurosurgical departments. Yet, this method has limitations as in most cases the data are acquired prior to surgery. Due to brain-shift the accurate presentation of functional as well as anatomical structures declines in the course of surgery. In consequence, the acquisition of information during surgery about the brain's current functional state is of specific interest. The advancement of imaging technologies (e.g. fMRI, MEG, Intraoperative Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging--IOIS) and neurophysiological techniques and the advent of intraoperative MRI all had a major impact on neurosurgery. The combination of modalities such as neurophysiology and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI), as well as the acquisition of functional MRI during surgery (ifMRI) are in the focus of this work. Especially the technical aspects and safety issues are elucidated.

  7. Intraoperative virtual brain counseling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Grosky, William I.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Muzik, Otto; Diaz, Fernando

    1997-06-01

    Our objective is to offer online real-tim e intelligent guidance to the neurosurgeon. Different from traditional image-guidance technologies that offer intra-operative visualization of medical images or atlas images, virtual brain counseling goes one step further. It can distinguish related brain structures and provide information about them intra-operatively. Virtual brain counseling is the foundation for surgical planing optimization and on-line surgical reference. It can provide a warning system that alerts the neurosurgeon if the chosen trajectory will pass through eloquent brain areas. In order to fulfill this objective, tracking techniques are involved for intra- operativity. Most importantly, a 3D virtual brian environment, different from traditional 3D digitized atlases, is an object-oriented model of the brain that stores information about different brain structures together with their elated information. An object-oriented hierarchical hyper-voxel space (HHVS) is introduced to integrate anatomical and functional structures. Spatial queries based on position of interest, line segment of interest, and volume of interest are introduced in this paper. The virtual brain environment is integrated with existing surgical pre-planning and intra-operative tracking systems to provide information for planning optimization and on-line surgical guidance. The neurosurgeon is alerted automatically if the planned treatment affects any critical structures. Architectures such as HHVS and algorithms, such as spatial querying, normalizing, and warping are presented in the paper. A prototype has shown that the virtual brain is intuitive in its hierarchical 3D appearance. It also showed that HHVS, as the key structure for virtual brain counseling, efficiently integrates multi-scale brain structures based on their spatial relationships.This is a promising development for optimization of treatment plans and online surgical intelligent guidance.

  8. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, Shashini; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Taylor, Donna B

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  9. The next evolution in radioguided surgery: breast cancer related sentinel node localization using a freehandSPECT-mobile gamma camera combination.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Thijs; Winkel, Beatrice Mf; Rietbergen, Daphne Dd; KleinJan, Gijs H; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Olmos, Renato A Valdés; van den Berg, Nynke S; van Leeuwen, Fijs Wb

    2015-01-01

    Accurate pre- and intraoperative identification of the sentinel node (SN) forms the basis of the SN biopsy procedure. Gamma tracing technologies such as a gamma probe (GP), a 2D mobile gamma camera (MGC) or 3D freehandSPECT (FHS) can be used to provide the surgeon with radioguidance to the SN(s). We reasoned that integrated use of these technologies results in the generation of a "hybrid" modality that combines the best that the individual radioguidance technologies have to offer. The sensitivity and resolvability of both 2D-MGC and 3D-FHS-MGC were studied in a phantom setup (at various source-detector depths and using varying injection site-to-SN distances), and in ten breast cancer patients scheduled for SN biopsy. Acquired 3D-FHS-MGC images were overlaid with the position of the phantom/patient. This augmented-reality overview image was then used for navigation to the hotspot/SN in virtual-reality using the GP. Obtained results were compared to conventional gamma camera lymphoscintigrams. Resolution of 3D-FHS-MGC allowed identification of the SNs at a minimum injection site (100 MBq)-to-node (1 MBq; 1%) distance of 20 mm, up to a source-detector depth of 36 mm in 2D-MGC and up to 24 mm in 3D-FHS-MGC. A clinically relevant dose of approximately 1 MBq was clearly detectable up to a depth of 60 mm in 2D-MGC and 48 mm in 3D-FHS-MGC. In all ten patients at least one SN was visualized on the lymphoscintigrams with a total of 12 SNs visualized. 3D-FHS-MGC identified 11 of 12 SNs and allowed navigation to all these visualized SNs; in one patient with two axillary SNs located closely to each other (11 mm), 3D-FHS-MGC was not able to distinguish the two SNs. In conclusion, high sensitivity detection of SNs at an injection site-to-node distance of 20 mm-and-up was possible using 3D-FHS-MGC. In patients, 3D-FHS-MGC showed highly reproducible images as compared to the conventional lymphoscintigrams.

  10. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after laparoscopic low anterior resection with double stapling technique anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is one of the most devastating complications after rectal cancer surgery. The double stapling technique has greatly facilitated intestinal reconstruction especially for anastomosis after low anterior resection (LAR). Risk factor analyses for AL after open LAR have been widely reported. However, a few studies have analyzed the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR. Laparoscopic rectal surgery provides an excellent operative field in a narrow pelvic space, and enables total mesorectal excision surgery and preservation of the autonomic nervous system with greater precision. However, rectal transection using a laparoscopic linear stapler is relatively difficult compared with open surgery because of the width and limited performance of the linear stapler. Moreover, laparoscopic LAR exhibits a different postoperative course compared with open LAR, which suggests that the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR may also differ from those after open LAR. In this review, we will discuss the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR. PMID:27433085

  11. Intraoperative radiotherapy in colorectal cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis of techniques, long-term outcomes, and complications

    PubMed Central

    Mirnezami, Reza; Chang, George J.; Das, Prajnan; Chandrakumaran, Kandiah; Tekkis, Paris; Darzi, Ara; Mirnezami, Alexander H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The precise contribution of IORT to the management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC) remains uncertain. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the value of IORT in this setting. Methods Studies published between 1965 and 2011 that reported outcomes after IORT for advanced or recurrent CRC were identified by an electronic literature search. Studies were assessed for methodological quality and design, and evaluated for technique of IORT delivery, oncological outcomes, and complications following IORT. Outcomes were analysed with fixed-effect and random-effect model meta-analyses and heterogeneity and publication bias examined. Results 29 studies comprising 14 prospective and 15 retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and were assessed, yielding a total of 3003 patients. The indication for IORT was locally advanced disease in 1792 patients and locally recurrent disease in 1211 patients. Despite heterogeneity in methodology and reporting practice, IORT is principally applied for the treatment of close or positive margins. When comparative studies were evaluated, a significant effect favouring improved local control (OR 0.22; 95% CI=0.05-0.86; p=0.03), disease free survival (HR 0.51; 95% CI=0.31-0.85; p=0.009), and overall survival (HR 0.33; 95% CI=0.2-0.54; p=0.001) was noted with no increase in total (OR 1.13; 95% CI=0.77-1.65; p=0.57), urologic (OR 1.35; 95% CI=0.84-2.82; p=0.47), or anastomotic complications (OR 0.94; 95% CI=0.42-2.1; p=0.98). Increased wound complications were noted after IORT (OR 1.86; 95% CI=1.03-3.38; p=0.049). Conclusions Despite methodological weaknesses in the studies evaluated, our results suggest that IORT may improve oncological outcomes in advanced and recurrent CRC. PMID:23270946

  12. [Intraoperative colonoscopy: current indications].

    PubMed

    Stroppa, I; D'Antini, P; Rossi, L; Farinon, A M

    1993-01-01

    From January 1987 to December 1991, 37 patients underwent intraoperative colonoscopy for several indications; these latter can be summarized in the need to define the site or extension of the lesions treated or detected by endoscopy before surgery. This procedure is therefore necessary in those cases in whom intraoperative endoscopy is likely to be useful in planning the surgical treatment. The use of intraoperative colonoscopy should be however considered complementary, but not substitutive, of the preoperative colonoscopy.

  13. [Intraoperative Visual Evoked Potential Monitoring].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hironobu; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) is recorded from the back of the head, which is elicited by retinal stimulation transmitted through optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract lateral geniculate body, optic radiation and finally cortical visual area. VEP monitoring did not prevail since 1990s because marked intra-individual difference and instability of VEP recording limited the clinical usefulness under inhalation anesthetic management and techniques of VEP monitoring at the time. However, recent advances in techniques including a new light-stimulating device consisting of high-luminosity LEDs and induction of electroretinography to ascertain the arrival of the stimulus at the retina provided better conditions for stable VEP recording under general anesthesia. In addition, the introduction of total intravenous anesthesia using propofol is important for the successful VEP recordings because inhaled anesthetics have suppressive effect on VEP waveform. Intraoperative VEP has been considered to monitor the functional integrity of visual function during neurosurgical procedures, in which the optic pathway is at a risk of injury. Intraoperative VEP monitoring may allow us to detect reversible damage to the visual pathway intraoperatively and enable us to prevent permanent impairment.

  14. 99mTc-MIBI radio-guided minimally invasive parathyroid surgery planned on the basis of a preoperative combined 99mTc-pertechnetate/99mTc-MIBI and ultrasound imaging protocol.

    PubMed

    Casara, D; Rubello, D; Piotto, A; Pelizzo, M R

    2000-09-01

    The aims of this study were: (a) to define the accuracy of a preoperative parathyroid imaging protocol based on the combination of technetium-99m pertechnetate/technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTcO4/ 99mTc-MIBI) scan and neck ultrasound (US) in selecting patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) eligible for a limited neck exploration, and (b) to investigate the potential role of the intraoperative gamma probe (IGP) in radio-guided minimally invasive surgery. 99mTcO4/99mTc-MIBI subtraction scan was performed by means of potassium perchlorate administration with the aim of effecting rapid 99mTcO4 wash-out from the thyroid. Minimally invasive surgery using an IGP was commenced some minutes following the injection of a low, 70 MBq, 99mTc-MIBI dose. Intraoperative PTH (i-PTH) was measured. On the basis of preoperative imaging, 21 pHPT consecutive patients were selected for a limited neck dissection. In 18 of them, a single parathyroid adenoma was found at surgery and IGP allowed performance of parathyroidectomy through a small, 2-2.5 cm, skin incision with a relatively short surgical duration (mean 38 min). i-PTH rapidly normalised in all cases. In two patients, a parathyroid carcinoma was diagnosed at surgery; consequently, a wide neck exploration associated with a near-total thyroidectomy was performed. No loco-regional metastatic lesions were found and i-PTH rapidly normalised after carcinoma excision. In one patient, i-PTH remained elevated after removal of the enlarged parathyroid gland which was localised by 99mTcO4/99mTc-MIBI scan and US. A bilateral exploration was needed to remove a contralateral enlarged parathyroid gland. Combined, 99mTcO4/99mTc-MIBI scan and US imaging correctly localised a single parathyroid gland in 20/21 patients (95.2%); thus, this protocol appears to be accurate enough for the preoperative selection of pHPT patients eligible for limited neck surgery. Moreover, in these selected patients the IGP seems to be helpful in

  15. Performance of a small CdTe gamma camera for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Sakahara, Harmui; Hayama, Kazuhide; Funaki, Minoru; Shirahata, T.; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2001-12-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy has been shown to be highly accurate for detecting metastatic diseases, such as melanoma and breast cancer. Gamma probes that measure only the relative presence of radioactivity are commonly used to identify sentinel lymph nodes. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows the size, shape, and location of the target tissues to be visualized. The purpose of this study is to characterize the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for diagnosing other diseases amenable to the smaller- format associated with this prototype imaging system. Methods & Design: The detector head was comprised of a 32 x 32 Cadmium Telluride semiconductor array and application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. Two spherical 5 mm diameter Tc-99m radioactive sources having activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq were used to simulate sentinel lymph nodes and injection site. The relative detectability of these foci was compared using the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera. Use of the prototype was also explored on patients in a variety of clinical applications. Results: the SSGC provided better spatial resolution on phantom studies than the conventional gamma camera control. Both foci could be visualized clearly by the SSGC using a 15 second acquisition time, whereas they could not be readily identified using the conventional system under comparable conditions. Preliminary clinical tests of the SSGC were found to be successful in imaging diseases in a variety of tissues including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints, and sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion: The SSGC has significant potential for use in diagnosing diseases and for facilitating subsequent radioguided surgery. (This project was supported by a Grant- in

  16. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  17. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk and immediate management options by both the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical. PMID:26210926

  18. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  19. Trabeculectomy with intraoperative retrobulbar triamcinolone acetonide.

    PubMed

    Kahook, Malik Y; Camejo, Larissa; Noecker, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Use of topical steroids is an important component of postoperative care after filtration surgery. Efficacy of postoperative medications is affected by patient adherence and physical limitations in the elderly population often prohibit proper dosing of ophthalmic drops. We describe a technique for the use of intraoperative retrobulbar triamcinolone acetonide in trabeculectomy surgery and report on postoperative outcomes. This technique appears safe and may be an attractive method of delivering a steroid depot at the time of trabeculectomy. PMID:19668541

  20. Intraoperative endovascular ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eton, Darwin; Ahn, Samuel S.; Baker, J. D.; Pensabene, Joseph; Yeatman, Lawrence S.; Moore, Wesley S.

    1991-05-01

    The early experience using intra-operative endovascular ultrasonography (EU) is reported in eight patients undergoing lower extremity revasularization. In four patients, intra-operative EU successfully characterized inflow stenoses that were inadequately imaged with pre- operative arteriography. Two patients were found to have hemodynamically significant inflow stenoses, and were treated with intra-operative balloon angioplasty followed by repeat EU. The other two patients were found to have non-hemodynamically significant inflow stenoses requiring no treatment. Additional outflow procedures were required in all four patients. In the remaining four patients, EU was used to evaluate the completeness of TEC rotary atherectomy, of Hall oscillatory endarterectomy, of thrombectomy of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries, and of valve lysis during in situ saphenous vein grafting, respectively. In the latter case, the valve leaflets were not clearly seen. In the other cases, EU assisted the surgeon. Angioscopy and angiography were available for comparison. In one case, angioscopy failed because of inability to clear the field while inspecting retrograde the limb of an aorto-bi-femoral graft. EU however was possible. No complications of EU occurred. EU is a safe procedure indicated when characterization of a lesion is needed prior to an intervention or when evaluation of the intervention's success is desired. We did not find it useful in valve lysis for in-site grafting.

  1. Potential Usefulness of 99mTc-DMSA for Radio-Guided Surgery in Pediatric Renal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Demetrio; Di Franco, Davide; Cacciaguerra, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Antonella; Russo, Simona; Fornito, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of an ectopic/hypoplastic kidney removed by radio-guided surgery. A 7-year-old girl, with a history of vaginal drainage of urine, underwent renal scintigraphy with Tc-DMSA. SPECT/CT revealed a focal uptake in the pelvis, corresponding to hypoplastic kidney as confirmed by MRI. Based on SPECT/CT findings, the patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, using Tc-DMSA scan to help the surgeon to detect the small ectopic kidney. Intraoperatory histological report confirmed the renal origin of the specimen.

  2. Intraoperative anesthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Milam, S B

    1987-01-01

    Intraoperative anesthetic complications can be prevented or minimized if the anesthetist is able to anticipate such problems in the preanesthetic period. Therefore, an adequate preanesthetic medical history that includes previous anesthetic experiences and past and current drug therapy is extremely important. Furthermore, the anesthetist must be properly trained to anticipate undesirable reactions to anesthetic agents. The signs of an impending disaster are subtle and nonspecific in the anesthetized patient. Therefore, continuous vigilance of the patient's physiologic status coupled with a high index of suspicion are essential to safe anesthetic management of dental patients. PMID:3468015

  3. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  4. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  5. Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram Using WebCL

    PubMed Central

    YU, Alexander; DEMIREL, Doga; HALIC, Tansel; KOCKARA, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram (VIC) training platform. Intraoperative Cholangiogram (IC) is an imaging technique of biliary anatomy with using fluorescent fluids sensitive to the X-Rays. The procedure is often employed to diagnose the difficult cases such as abnormal anatomy or choledocholithiasis during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The major challenge in cholangiogram is accurate interpretation of the X-Ray image, which requires extensive case training. However, the training platforms that support generation of various IC cases have been lacking. In this study, we developed a web based platform to generate IC images from any virtual bile duct anatomy. As the generation of X-Ray image from 3D scene is a computationally intensive task, we utilized WebCL technology to parallelize the computation for achieving real-time rates. In this work, we present details of our WebCL IC generation algorithm and benchmark results. PMID:27046623

  6. Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram Using WebCL.

    PubMed

    Yu, Alexander; Demirel, Doga; Halic, Tansel; Kockara, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Virtual Intraoperative Cholangiogram (VIC) training platform. Intraoperative Cholangiogram (IC) is an imaging technique of biliary anatomy with using fluorescent fluids sensitive to the X-Rays. The procedure is often employed to diagnose the difficult cases such as abnormal anatomy or choledocholithiasis during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The major challenge in cholangiogram is accurate interpretation of the X-Ray image, which requires extensive case training. However, the training platforms that support generation of various IC cases have been lacking. In this study, we developed a web based platform to generate IC images from any virtual bile duct anatomy. As the generation of X-Ray image from 3D scene is a computationally intensive task, we utilized WebCL technology to parallelize the computation for achieving real-time rates. In this work, we present details of our WebCL IC generation algorithm and benchmark results. PMID:27046623

  7. POCI: A compact high resolution {gamma} camera for intra-operative surgical use

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, L.; Charon, Y.; Solal, M.; Laniece, P.; Mastrippolito, R.; Pinot, L.; Ploux, L.; Valentin, L. |; Ricard, M.

    1998-06-01

    The development of a hand-held {gamma} imaging probe for inside body localization of small tumors is of first interest for radio-guided operative cancer surgery. In that context, the authors have developed a sub-millimeter spatial resolution, small field of view, {gamma} per-operative compact imager (POCI). It consists of a head module composed of a high resolution tungsten collimator and a YAP:Ce crystal plate, optically coupled to an intensified position sensitive diode (IPSD). The authors report here the essential imaging performance characteristics of the POCI camera (spatial resolution, position linearity, efficiency and energy response). These were obtained by studying the influence of the collimator and the crystal design to evaluate the optimal configuration. The present version of POCI has a 24 mm diameter usable field of view and an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.9 mm to 1.2 mm FWHM at 120 keV. These good detection performance characteristics combined with the small size of the camera make the device well suited to provide intra-operative monitoring in several medical procedures, such as thyroid and breast tumor removal.

  8. Reexamining traditional intraoperative fluid administration: evolving views in the age of goal-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kaitlin; Vacchiano, Charles

    2014-06-01

    Intraoperative volume administration has long been a topic of debate in the field of anesthesia. Only recently, however, has the conversation shifted to a discussion of appropriate intraoperative volume. A thorough review of the literature explores the history of today's widely accepted fluid administration equation and discusses possible explanations and consequences of iatrogenically induced hypervolemia. Current studies exploring various volume administration techniques are reviewed, as are emerging technologies available to help guide anesthesia providers with intraoperative fluid management.

  9. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Terrence T; Johnson, J Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  10. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  11. Future perspectives in intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Jolesz, F A

    2003-01-01

    Of all the advances in imaging science in the past twenty years, none has had a greater impact than Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Since its introduction as a diagnostic tool in the mid-1980's, MRI has evolved into the premier neuroimaging modality, and with the addition of higher field magnets, we are able to achieve spatial resolution of such superb quality that even the most exquisite details of the brain anatomy can be visualized. With the implementation of intraoperative, neurosurgical MRI, we can not only monitor brain shifts and deformations; we can achieve intraoperative navigation using intraoperative image updates. In the future, intraoperative MRI can be used not only to localize, target, and resect brain tumors and other lesions but also to fully comprehend the surrounding cortical and white matter functional anatomy. In addition to the inclusion of new imaging methods such as diffusion tensor imaging, new therapeutic methods will be applied. Especially encouraging are the promising results in MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery, in which the non-invasive thermal ablation of tumors is monitored and controlled by MRI. With the clinical introduction of these advances, intraoperative MRI is changing the face of Neurosurgery today. PMID:12570132

  12. [Intraoperative OCT in ophthalmic microsurgery].

    PubMed

    Stanzel, B V; Gagalick, A; Brinkmann, C K; Brinken, R; Herwig, M C; Holz, F G

    2016-05-01

    Recent improvements in technology have enabled integration of SD-OCT into the optical path of an operating microscope. Here we present an overview of possible applications of iOCT (intraoperative optical coherence tomography) for retinal, glaucoma and corneal surgery. iOCT-based imaging can not only improve safety and quality of the surgery but also the learning curve of the surgeon. The ability to visualize barely visible or transparent structures with iOCT has achieved a significant added value intraoperatively, particularly in macular surgery, trabeculectomy and lamellar keratoplasty. Further, systematic assessment is warranted to define the usefulness of the iOCT more precisely. PMID:27126797

  13. [Intraoperative OCT in ophthalmic microsurgery].

    PubMed

    Stanzel, B V; Gagalick, A; Brinkmann, C K; Brinken, R; Herwig, M C; Holz, F G

    2016-05-01

    Recent improvements in technology have enabled integration of SD-OCT into the optical path of an operating microscope. Here we present an overview of possible applications of iOCT (intraoperative optical coherence tomography) for retinal, glaucoma and corneal surgery. iOCT-based imaging can not only improve safety and quality of the surgery but also the learning curve of the surgeon. The ability to visualize barely visible or transparent structures with iOCT has achieved a significant added value intraoperatively, particularly in macular surgery, trabeculectomy and lamellar keratoplasty. Further, systematic assessment is warranted to define the usefulness of the iOCT more precisely.

  14. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

    PubMed Central

    Linsler, Stefan; Antes, Sebastian; Senger, Sebastian; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System) which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom). Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol) were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases.

  15. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

    PubMed Central

    Linsler, Stefan; Antes, Sebastian; Senger, Sebastian; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System) which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom). Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol) were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases. PMID:27695249

  16. Use of intraoperative ultrasound in decision making during spinal operations.

    PubMed

    Theodotou, B C; Powers, S K

    1986-08-01

    The use of intraoperative spinal ultrasonography in 14 cases and its effect on decision making during laminectomy procedures is discussed. The advantages of the technique in operations for syringomyelia, trauma, spondylosis, intramedullary tumors, and neuroablative procedures of the spinal cord are elaborated. PMID:3528907

  17. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  18. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique.

  19. Intraoperative brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in humans.

    PubMed

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Bernstein, Liane; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-02-11

    Cancers are often impossible to visually distinguish from normal tissue. This is critical for brain cancer where residual invasive cancer cells frequently remain after surgery, leading to disease recurrence and a negative impact on overall survival. No preoperative or intraoperative technology exists to identify all cancer cells that have invaded normal brain. To address this problem, we developed a handheld contact Raman spectroscopy probe technique for live, local detection of cancer cells in the human brain. Using this probe intraoperatively, we were able to accurately differentiate normal brain from dense cancer and normal brain invaded by cancer cells, with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 91%. This Raman-based probe enabled detection of the previously undetectable diffusely invasive brain cancer cells at cellular resolution in patients with grade 2 to 4 gliomas. This intraoperative technology may therefore be able to classify cell populations in real time, making it an ideal guide for surgical resection and decision-making.

  20. Navigation, robotics, and intraoperative imaging in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Florian; Villard, Jimmy; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Meyer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Spinal navigation is a technique gaining increasing popularity. Different approaches as CT-based or intraoperative imaging-based navigation are available, requiring different methods of patient registration, bearing certain advantages and disadvantages. So far, a large number of studies assessed the accuracy of pedicle screw implantation in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, elucidating the advantages of image guidance. However, a clear proof of patient benefit is missing, so far. Spinal navigation is closely related to intraoperative 3D imaging providing an imaging dataset for navigational use and the opportunity for immediate intraoperative assessment of final screw position giving the option of immediate screw revision if necessary. Thus, postoperative imaging and a potential revision surgery for screw correction become dispensable.Different concept of spinal robotics as the DaVinci system and SpineAssist are under investigation.

  1. Radioactive seed localisation to guide removal of impalpable lymph nodes (Radioguided Occult Lesion Localisation using Iodine-125 seeds, “ROLLIS”)

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Lee; Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Abdul Aziz, Farah; Taylor, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Two patients with cancer requiring removal of specific impalpable lymph nodes for full pathological analysis underwent ultrasound-guided lesion localisation and marking with a low-activity I-125 seed. A gamma probe was used in theatre to localise the signal from the seed and guide excision. Successful removal of the lesions was confirmed with the probe and by specimen radiography. Radioguided Occult Lesion Localisation using I-125 Seeds (“ROLLIS”) provides a method of precisely marking impalpable lesions for surgical excision. PMID:24658526

  2. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  3. Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) in thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Blumenkopf, B; Daniels, T

    1988-01-01

    The thoracolumbar levels are the second most common region for spinal trauma. A major surgical effort often entails removal of retropulsed bone fragments with decompression of the spinal contents or realignment of vertebral subluxations. The ability to determine intraoperatively the completeness of such a procedure could impact on the surgical approach and, ultimately, the operative result. The intraoperative use of ultrasonography has gained popularity and applicability. This comparison study of intraoperative ultrasonography versus postoperative computed tomography (CT) assessed the accuracy of intraoperative ultrasonography in determining the status of the spinal canal following surgical intervention in a group of 21 patients with thoracolumbar fractures. In all cases a patent ventral subarachnoid space or complete spinal canal decompression was deduced following intraoperative ultrasonography. The postoperative assessment by CT concurred in 20 of 21 (95%) situations. Intraoperative ultrasonography proved useful during the operative management of these fractures and gave good supportive evidence that the neural elements were decompressed by surgical procedure. PMID:2980067

  4. Intraoperative squash cytology of central nervous system lesions: a single center study of 326 cases.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sushila; Vij, Mukul; Jaiswal, Awadhesh Kumar; Behari, Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    Cytology has been shown to be of great value in intraoperative consultations of central nervous system (CNS) pathology. Intraoperative smear cytology provides a rapid and reliable intraoperative diagnosis and guidance to the neurosurgeon during surgical resection and lesion targeting. It also helps the surgeon to monitor and modify the approach at surgery. The current study was undertaken to assess the accuracy and utility of intraoperative consultations for cytomorphological diagnosis by smear technique and correlate with histopathological diagnosis. A retrospective study of 326 cases of CNS intraoperative consultations was performed. Smears were prepared from the biopsy samples sent in isotonic saline for immediate processing and stained by the Haematoxylin and Eosin method. The cytomorphological features were noted and correlated with final histopathological diagnosis. Concordance between the intraoperative diagnosis and the final diagnosis was seen in 83.7% of cases. We demonstrated >95% accuracy for glioblastomas and >89% accuracy for meningiomas and schwannomas. A reduction of diagnostic accuracy was seen in oligodendrogliomas (60%) and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (57.2%). Smear technique is a fairly accurate, relatively safe, rapid, simple, easily reproducible, and cost effective tool to diagnose brain tumors. Smear cytology is of great value in intraoperative consultation of CNS pathology.

  5. Capturing intraoperative deformations: research experience at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Simon K; Haker, Steven J; Talos, Ion-Florin; Kemper, Corey A; Weisenfeld, Neil; Mewes, Andrea U J; Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Zou, Kelly H; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Wells, William M; Tempany, Clare M C; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Kikinis, Ron

    2005-04-01

    During neurosurgical procedures the objective of the neurosurgeon is to achieve the resection of as much diseased tissue as possible while achieving the preservation of healthy brain tissue. The restricted capacity of the conventional operating room to enable the surgeon to visualize critical healthy brain structures and tumor margin has lead, over the past decade, to the development of sophisticated intraoperative imaging techniques to enhance visualization. However, both rigid motion due to patient placement and nonrigid deformations occurring as a consequence of the surgical intervention disrupt the correspondence between preoperative data used to plan surgery and the intraoperative configuration of the patient's brain. Similar challenges are faced in other interventional therapies, such as in cryoablation of the liver, or biopsy of the prostate. We have developed algorithms to model the motion of key anatomical structures and system implementations that enable us to estimate the deformation of the critical anatomy from sequences of volumetric images and to prepare updated fused visualizations of preoperative and intraoperative images at a rate compatible with surgical decision making. This paper reviews the experience at Brigham and Women's Hospital through the process of developing and applying novel algorithms for capturing intraoperative deformations in support of image guided therapy.

  6. Capturing intraoperative deformations: research experience at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Simon K; Haker, Steven J; Talos, Ion-Florin; Kemper, Corey A; Weisenfeld, Neil; Mewes, Andrea U J; Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Zou, Kelly H; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Wells, William M; Tempany, Clare M C; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Kikinis, Ron

    2005-04-01

    During neurosurgical procedures the objective of the neurosurgeon is to achieve the resection of as much diseased tissue as possible while achieving the preservation of healthy brain tissue. The restricted capacity of the conventional operating room to enable the surgeon to visualize critical healthy brain structures and tumor margin has lead, over the past decade, to the development of sophisticated intraoperative imaging techniques to enhance visualization. However, both rigid motion due to patient placement and nonrigid deformations occurring as a consequence of the surgical intervention disrupt the correspondence between preoperative data used to plan surgery and the intraoperative configuration of the patient's brain. Similar challenges are faced in other interventional therapies, such as in cryoablation of the liver, or biopsy of the prostate. We have developed algorithms to model the motion of key anatomical structures and system implementations that enable us to estimate the deformation of the critical anatomy from sequences of volumetric images and to prepare updated fused visualizations of preoperative and intraoperative images at a rate compatible with surgical decision making. This paper reviews the experience at Brigham and Women's Hospital through the process of developing and applying novel algorithms for capturing intraoperative deformations in support of image guided therapy. PMID:15721230

  7. Laser Doppler imaging for intraoperative human brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Raabe, A; Van De Ville, D; Leutenegger, M; Szelényi, A; Hattingen, E; Gerlach, R; Seifert, V; Hauger, C; Lopez, A; Leitgeb, R; Unser, M; Martin-Williams, E J; Lasser, T

    2009-02-15

    The identification and accurate location of centers of brain activity are vital both in neuro-surgery and brain research. This study aimed to provide a non-invasive, non-contact, accurate, rapid and user-friendly means of producing functional images intraoperatively. To this end a full field Laser Doppler imager was developed and integrated within the surgical microscope and perfusion images of the cortical surface were acquired during awake surgery whilst the patient performed a predetermined task. The regions of brain activity showed a clear signal (10-20% with respect to the baseline) related to the stimulation protocol which lead to intraoperative functional brain maps of strong statistical significance and which correlate well with the preoperative fMRI and intraoperative cortical electro-stimulation. These initial results achieved with a prototype device and wavelet based regressor analysis (the hemodynamic response function being derived from MRI applications) demonstrate the feasibility of LDI as an appropriate technique for intraoperative functional brain imaging.

  8. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings during deep brain stimulation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Olivia O.; Watson, Robert E.; Bernstein, Matt A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Stead, S. Matt; Gorman, Debb A.; Lee, Kendall H.; Huston, John

    2012-01-01

    Object Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established neurosurgical technique used to treat a variety of neurological disorders, including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, dystonia, epilepsy, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This study reports on the use of intraoperative MR imaging during DBS surgery to evaluate acute hemorrhage, intracranial air, brain shift, and accuracy of lead placement. Methods During a 46-month period, 143 patients underwent 152 DBS surgeries including 289 lead placements utilizing intraoperative 1.5-T MR imaging. Imaging was supervised by an MR imaging physicist to maintain the specific absorption rate below the required level of 0.1 W/kg and always included T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo and T2* gradient echo sequences with selected use of T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2 fast spin echo (FSE). Retrospective review of the intraoperative MR imaging examinations was performed to quantify the amount of hemorrhage and the amount of air introduced during the DBS surgery. Results Intraoperative MR imaging revealed 5 subdural hematomas, 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 1 intra-parenchymal hemorrhage in 9 of the 143 patients. Only 1 patient experiencing a subarachnoid hemorrhage developed clinically apparent symptoms, which included transient severe headache and mild confusion. Brain shift due to intracranial air was identified in 144 separate instances. Conclusions Intraoperative MR imaging can be safely performed and may assist in demonstrating acute changes involving intracranial hemorrhage and air during DBS surgery. These findings are rarely clinically significant and typically resolve prior to follow-up imaging. Selective use of T2 FLAIR and T2 FSE imaging can confirm the presence of hemorrhage or air and preclude the need for CT examinations. PMID:21699482

  9. Physics-based shape matching for intraoperative image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Suwelack, Stefan Röhl, Sebastian; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Reichard, Daniel; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie; Santos, Thiago dos; Maier-Hein, Lena; Wagner, Martin; Wünscher, Josephine; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller, Beat P.

    2014-11-01

    method is able to accurately match partial surfaces. Finally, a phantom experiment demonstrates how the method can be combined with stereo endoscopic imaging to provide nonrigid registration during laparoscopic interventions. Conclusions: The PBSM approach for surface matching is fast, robust, and accurate. As the technique is based on a preoperative volumetric FE model, it naturally recovers the position of volumetric structures (e.g., tumors and vessels). It cannot only be used to recover soft-tissue deformations from intraoperative surface models but can also be combined with landmark data from volumetric imaging. In addition to applications in laparoscopic surgery, the method might prove useful in other areas that require soft-tissue registration from sparse intraoperative sensor data (e.g., radiation therapy)

  10. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  11. Innovative therapies: intraoperative intracavitary chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael Y; Sugarbaker, David J

    2004-11-01

    Both phase I studies demonstrated that high-dose cisplatin can be delivered safely with acceptable complication rates. The maximum tolerated doses of 225 mg/m2 and 250 mg/m2 cisplatin, respectively, are higher than any other published report of intrapleural cisplatin. The intrapleural cisplatin doses reported in other trials have been 80 mg/m2, 100 mg/m2, and 200 mg/m2. Despite the use of high-dose intraoperative chemotherapy, the group of 50 patients who underwent EPP experienced mortality and morbidity comparable to the contemporaneous group of 41 patients who did not participate in the protocol, except for increased rates of deep venous thrombosis and diaphragmatic patch failure. The 44 patients who underwent P/D experienced a slightly higher mortality rate and creatinine toxicity rate than the first phase I trial. Given the demographics of this patient cohort (higher age, lower FEV1, and inability to withstand pneumonectomy because of limited cardiopulmonary reserve), however, the mortality and morbidity rates seem acceptable. The pharmacologic data from both studies support our hypothesis that high regional doses of cisplatin can be delivered with less systemic absorption than can be achieved with intravenous administration (data not shown). With the maximum tolerated dose of intracavitary cisplatin and safety of intraoperative administration after surgical resection firmly established by these phase I trials, we are prepared to implement phase II and III studies of EPP and P/D with intraoperative cisplatin lavage. We aim to monitor tumor recurrence and patient survival prospectively and compare these results with historic controls. We also intend to document prospectively the morbidity and mortality of the treatment protocols. Finally, we plan to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin by measuring tissue and perfusate levels of active and inactive cisplatin. By approaching the problem of local recurrence after resection of MPM in a careful and methodical

  12. Intraoperative OCT in Surgical Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The global incidence of cancer is rising, putting an increasingly heavy burden upon health care. The need to effectively detect and treat cancer is one of the most significant problems faced in health care today. Effective cancer treatment typically depends upon early detection and, for most solid tumors, successful removal of the cancerous tumor tissue via surgical procedures. Difficulties arise when attempting to differentiate between normal and tumor tissue during surgery. Unaided visual examination of the tissue provides only superficial, low-resolution information and often with little visual contrast. Many imaging modalities widely used for cancer screening and diagnostics are of limited use in the operating room due to low spatial resolution. OCT provides cellular resolution allowing for more precise localization of the tumor tissue. It is also relatively inexpensive and highly portable, making it well suited for intraoperative applications.

  13. How well do cochlear implant intraoperative impedance measures predict postoperative electrode function?

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Lusk, Rodney P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Objectives were to: 1) evaluate the incidence of abnormal cochlear implant electrode impedance intraoperatively and at the initial activation, 2) identify the percentage of abnormalities that resolve by the initial activation, and 3) determine the incidence of normal intraoperative impedances that present as abnormal at the initial activation. Study Design Retrospective records review of intraoperative and postoperative cochlear implant electrode impedances. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Records were examined for 194 devices implanted in 165 pediatric and adult patients. Results Results indicate at least 1 open (OC) or short circuit (SC) in 12.4% (24/194) of devices intraoperatively, decreasing to 8.2% (16/194) postoperatively. OCs were more prevalent than SCs for intraoperative (92% vs. 8%) and postoperative (94% vs. 6%) intervals. Of the 3430 total electrodes, 78 had abnormal impedance intraoperatively. Sixty-four of those (82%) resolved by the postoperative interval (62 OC, 2 SC) while 14/78 (18%) remained abnormal postoperatively (12 OC, 2 SC). Six of 3430 (0.17%) electrodes had normal impedance intraoperatively but were abnormal postoperatively. Conclusions The incidence of SCs in the present study is likely underestimated due to poor sensitivity of monopolar coupling for detecting SCs. Intraoperative OCs have a high probability of resolving by the initial activation, particularly when contiguous electrodes are affected, and suggests limited need for the use of a backup device in these cases. Surgical technique and/or complications such as explant/reimplant or perilymphatic gushers may result in increased incidence of bubbles in the cochlea, and may play a role in abnormal intraoperative impedance results. PMID:23295726

  14. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  15. Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring during Glioma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Taiichi; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; MARUYAMA, Takashi; TAMURA, Manabu; NITTA, Masayuki; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma surgery represents a significant advance with respect to improving resection rates using new surgical techniques, including intraoperative functional mapping, monitoring, and imaging. Functional mapping under awake craniotomy can be used to detect individual eloquent tissues of speech and/or motor functions in order to prevent unexpected deficits and promote extensive resection. In addition, monitoring the patient’s neurological findings during resection is also very useful for maximizing the removal rate and minimizing deficits by alarming that the touched area is close to eloquent regions and fibers. Assessing several types of evoked potentials, including motor evoked potentials (MEPs), sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs), is also helpful for performing surgical monitoring in patients under general anesthesia (GA). We herein review the utility of intraoperative mapping and monitoring the assessment of neurological findings, with a particular focus on speech and the motor function, in patients undergoing glioma surgery. PMID:25744346

  16. Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring during Glioma Surgery.

    PubMed

    Saito, Taiichi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Nitta, Masayuki; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma surgery represents a significant advance with respect to improving resection rates using new surgical techniques, including intraoperative functional mapping, monitoring, and imaging. Functional mapping under awake craniotomy can be used to detect individual eloquent tissues of speech and/or motor functions in order to prevent unexpected deficits and promote extensive resection. In addition, monitoring the patient’s neurological findings during resection is also very useful for maximizing the removal rate and minimizing deficits by alarming that the touched area is close to eloquent regions and fibers. Assessing several types of evoked potentials, including motor evoked potentials (MEPs), sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs), is also helpful for performing surgical monitoring in patients under general anesthesia (GA). We herein review the utility of intraoperative mapping and monitoring the assessment of neurological findings, with a particular focus on speech and the motor function, in patients undergoing glioma surgery. PMID:26236798

  17. Intraoperative ERCP: What role does it have in the era of laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

    PubMed

    Rábago, Luis R; Ortega, Alejandro; Chico, Inmaculada; Collado, David; Olivares, Ana; Castro, Jose Luis; Quintanilla, Elvira

    2011-12-16

    In the treatment of patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis (CBDS) detected during intraoperative cholangiography (IOC), or when the preoperative study of a patient at intermediate risk for CBDS cannot be completed due to the lack of imaging techniques required for confirmation, or if they are available and yield contradictory radiological and clinical results, patients can be treated using intraoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) during the laparoscopic treatment or postoperative ERCP if the IOC finds CBDS. The choice of treatment depends on the level of experience and availability of each option at each hospital. Intraoperative ERCP has the advantage of being a single-stage treatment and has a significant success rate, an easy learning curve, low morbidity involving a shorter hospital stay and lower costs than the two-stage treatments (postoperative and preoperative ERCP). Intraoperative ERCP is also a good salvage treatment when preoperative ERCP fails or when total laparoscopic management also fails.

  18. Intraoperative ERCP: What role does it have in the era of laparoscopic cholecystectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Rábago, Luis R; Ortega, Alejandro; Chico, Inmaculada; Collado, David; Olivares, Ana; Castro, Jose Luis; Quintanilla, Elvira

    2011-01-01

    In the treatment of patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis (CBDS) detected during intraoperative cholangiography (IOC), or when the preoperative study of a patient at intermediate risk for CBDS cannot be completed due to the lack of imaging techniques required for confirmation, or if they are available and yield contradictory radiological and clinical results, patients can be treated using intraoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) during the laparoscopic treatment or postoperative ERCP if the IOC finds CBDS. The choice of treatment depends on the level of experience and availability of each option at each hospital. Intraoperative ERCP has the advantage of being a single-stage treatment and has a significant success rate, an easy learning curve, low morbidity involving a shorter hospital stay and lower costs than the two-stage treatments (postoperative and preoperative ERCP). Intraoperative ERCP is also a good salvage treatment when preoperative ERCP fails or when total laparoscopic management also fails. PMID:22195234

  19. Visual evoked potentials for intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring using total intravenous anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wiedemayer, Helmut; Fauser, Barbara; Armbruster, W; Gasser, Thomas; Stolke, Dietmar

    2003-01-01

    Conflicting reports on the usefulness of intraoperative monitoring of visual function by means of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) initiated this study. In 32 patients without visual problems, VEPs were recorded to evaluate the reliability for intraoperative monitoring with total intravenous anesthesia. All patients underwent noncranial surgery. Using a standard technique, VEPs were recorded preoperatively in the awake patients and after induction of anesthesia during surgery. A total of 1436 intraoperative traces were recorded and analyzed. A minor prolongation of the P100 latency of 8% and a more pronounced attenuation of the P100-N145 amplitude of 60% were observed in the anesthetized patients. In most of the anesthetized patients, a stable recording of VEPs was not obtainable. In 4 patients (12.5%), clearly identifiable VEP peaks were detected in more than 90% of the traces recorded intraoperatively. In 88% of the patients, reproducible VEPs were obtained in less than 75% of the intraoperative traces only. We concluded that with standard recording techniques and total intravenous anesthesia, intraoperative VEP monitoring in surgically anesthetized patients is not reliable.

  20. Intraoperative radiotherapy: the Japanese experience. [Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Takahashi, M.

    1981-07-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IOR) which have been obtained since 1964 in Japan were reviewed. In this radiotherapy a cancerocidal dose can be delivered safely to the lesions, since critical organs are shifted from the field so that the lesions may be exposed directly to radiation. Intraoperative radiotherapy has spread in Japan and the number of institutions in which this radiotherapy is performed has continued to increase to a total of 26 in 1979. The total number of patients treated was 717. It has been demonstrated that intraoperative radiotherapy has definite effects on locally advanced abdominal neoplasms and unresectable radioresistant tumors.

  1. [Importance of preoperative and intraoperative imaging for operative strategies].

    PubMed

    Nitschke, P; Bork, U; Plodeck, V; Podlesek, D; Sobottka, S B; Schackert, G; Weitz, J; Kirsch, M

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in preoperative and postoperative imaging have an increasing influence on surgical decision-making and make more complex surgical interventions possible. This improves the possibilities for frequently occurring challenges and promoting improved functional and oncological outcome. This manuscript reviews the role of preoperative and intraoperative imaging in surgery. Various techniques are explained based on examples from hepatobiliary surgery and neurosurgery, in particular real-time procedures, such as the online use of augmented reality and in vivo fluorescence, as well as new and promising optical techniques including imaging of intrinsic signals and vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:26939896

  2. Intraoperative Anaphylactic Reaction: Is it the Floseal?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David; Schloss, Brian; Beebe, Allan; Samora, Walter; Klamar, Jan; Stukus, David; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    When hemodynamic or respiratory instability occurs intraoperatively, the inciting event must be determined so that a therapeutic plan can be provided to ensure patient safety. Although generally uncommon, one cause of cardiorespiratory instability is anaphylactic reactions. During anesthetic care, these most commonly involve neuromuscular blocking agents, antibiotics, or latex. Floseal is a topical hemostatic agent that is frequently used during orthopedic surgical procedures to augment local coagulation function and limit intraoperative blood loss. As these products are derived from human thrombin, animal collagen, and animal gelatin, allergic phenomenon may occur following their administration. We present 2 pediatric patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion who developed intraoperative hemodynamic and respiratory instability following use of the topical hemostatic agent, Floseal. Previous reports of such reactions are reviewed, and the perioperative care of patients with intraoperative anaphylaxis is discussed. PMID:27713677

  3. Using intraoperative MRI to assess bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Hall, Walter A.; Martin, Alastair J.; Truwit, Charles L.

    2001-05-01

    Immediate detector of any surgically induced hemorrhage prior to the closure is important for minimizing the unnecessary post surgical complications. In the case of hemorrhage, the surgical site of interests often involves hemorrhagic blood in the presence of CSF as well as air pockets. It is known that the hemorrhagic blood or air has a different magnetic susceptibility from its surrounding tissue, and CSF has long T1 and T2. Based on these differences, a set of complimentary imaging techniques (T2, FLAIR, and GE) were optimized to reveal the existence of surgically induced acute hemorrhage. Among 330 neurosurgical cases, one relatively severe hemorrhage has been successfully found intra-operatively using the concept. During the case, a new hyperintense area close to the primary motor cortex was initially noticed on T2 weighted HASTE images. As soon as it was found to increase in size rapidly, the patient was treated immediately via craniotomy for aspiration of the intra-parenchymal blood. Owing to early detection and treatment, the patient was completely free of motor deficits. Besides, there were ten much less severe hemorrhages have been noticed using the method. The proper post-surgical care was planned to closely follow-up the patient for any sign of hemorrhage.

  4. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  5. Efficacy of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R S; Raudzens, P; Nunemacher, M

    1995-01-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is of benefit in protecting tissue at risk for trauma or ischemia during surgical procedures. Monitoring modalities include EEG, computer processed EEG, somatosensory (SEP), auditory (BAEP), and visual evoked potentials (VEP), and cranial nerve monitoring. The efficacy of monitoring is controversial, because no properly controlled prospective study of outcome with and without monitoring has been done. The weight of evidence suggests that loss of spontaneous EEG and SEP correlate well with critical reductions of cerebral blood flow. Meta-analysis of series comprising 3,028 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomies shows that SEP deteriorated in 5.6% of cases, with 20% of these having postoperative deficits, but more might have had deficits if they had not been shunted. SEP monitoring can be useful in surgery affecting brain and cord vasculature. Monitoring is not indicated for routine lumbosacral spine surgery. BAEPs have predictive value for preservation of hearing after acoustic neuroma surgery, and other surgery near the brainstem. VEPs have been too variable to be of major use in the operating room. For neurophysiologic monitoring to be useful, it must be performed by an experienced team, and the surgeon must be willing to act on the findings. Under these circumstances, monitoring can reduce surgical complications in selected cases.

  6. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  7. Refractory intraoperative hypotension with elevated serum tryptase

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kelly J.; Divekar, Rohit D.; Butterfield, Joseph H.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Weingarten, Toby N.

    2015-01-01

    Severe intraoperative hypotension has been reported in patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 antagonists. We describe a patient on lisinopril who developed refractory intraoperative hypotension associated with increased serum tryptase level suggesting mast cell activation (allergic reaction). However, allergology workup ruled out an allergic etiology as well as mastocytosis, and hypotension recalcitrant to treatment was attributed to uninterrupted lisinopril therapy. Elevated serum tryptase was attributed to our patient's chronic renal insufficiency. PMID:25653920

  8. Anesthesia for intraoperative radiation therapy in children

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R.H.; Morrison, J.E. Jr.; Verbrugge, J.J.; Daniel, W.E.; Aarestad, N.O.; Burrington, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a relatively new mode of cancer treatment which is being used with increasing frequency. IORT presents several challenges to the anesthesiologist, including patients who are debilitated from their disease or chemotherapy, operations involving major tumor resections, intraoperative interdepartmental transport of patients, and remote monitoring of patients during electron beam therapy. This report discusses the anesthetic management of ten children undergoing IORT. With adequate preparation and interdepartmental communication, complications can be avoided during these challenging cases.

  9. Intraoperative brain tumor resection cavity characterization with conoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Amber L.; Burgner, Jessica; Chen, Ishita; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Sun, Kay; Thompson, Reid C.; Webster, Robert J., III; Miga, Michael I.

    2012-02-01

    Brain shift compromises the accuracy of neurosurgical image-guided interventions if not corrected by either intraoperative imaging or computational modeling. The latter requires intraoperative sparse measurements for constraining and driving model-based compensation strategies. Conoscopic holography, an interferometric technique that measures the distance of a laser light illuminated surface point from a fixed laser source, was recently proposed for non-contact surface data acquisition in image-guided surgery and is used here for validation of our modeling strategies. In this contribution, we use this inexpensive, hand-held conoscopic holography device for intraoperative validation of our computational modeling approach to correcting for brain shift. Laser range scan, instrument swabbing, and conoscopic holography data sets were collected from two patients undergoing brain tumor resection therapy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The results of our study indicate that conoscopic holography is a promising method for surface acquisition since it requires no contact with delicate tissues and can characterize the extents of structures within confined spaces. We demonstrate that for two clinical cases, the acquired conoprobe points align with our model-updated images better than the uncorrected images lending further evidence that computational modeling approaches improve the accuracy of image-guided surgical interventions in the presence of soft tissue deformations.

  10. The role of intraoperative scrape cytology in vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Inuganti, Renuka Venkata; Mettu, Rami Reddy; Surath, Harsha Vardhan; Surath, Amarnath

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To assess the adequacy of intraoperative scrape cytology during percutaneous vertebroplasty by correlating results with corresponding histopathology. Settings and Design: Vertebroplasty is a procedure increasingly used to treat painful vertebral compression fractures. The history and presentation of osteoporotic fractures are straightforward, but difficulty arises in differentiating infective from neoplastic lesions, especially in cases where the magnetic resonance imaging is equivocal. The procedure involves injection of polymethyl methacrylate (bone cement) into the pathological vertebral body and gives dramatic pain relief. It is indicated in osteoporotic and neoplastic lesions but contraindicated in infections. Hence, intraoperative evaluation of a specimen is essential to aid in the decision of performing vertebroplasty. Subjects and Methods: A total of 128 patients with vertebral lesions underwent core biopsy and scrape cytology from June 2006 to June 2015. Based on the findings of cytological examination, malignant lesions were subjected to vertebroplasty. In lesions with infective etiology, vertebroplasty was abandoned and antibiotic or antituberculous therapy started. Results: The overall diagnostic accuracy of scrape cytology was excellent with 97.58% cases correlating with the final histopathological diagnosis. Specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 33.33%. Conclusion: Scrape cytology is a simple, rapid, accurate cytodiagnostic technique and should be routinely utilized in vertebral lesions for intraoperative consultation and decision making during vertebroplasty. PMID:27298628

  11. [Intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakuma, Jun; Suzuki, Kyouichi; Matsumoto, Masato; Itakura, Takeshi; Kodama, Namio; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Our success rate of intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potential (VEP) had been approximately 30% in the past. In order to improve recording rate of intraoperative VEP, we developed a new stimulating device using high power light emitting diodes. Electroretinogram was simultaneously recorded to understand whether flash stimulation reached the retina. In addition, total venous anesthesia with propofol was used to avoid the adverse effect of inhalation anesthesia. We report the results after introduction of these improvements. Intraoperative monitoring of VEP was attempted in 35 cases. We evaluated success rate of VEP recording, correlation between VEP findings and postoperative visual function, and reasons why recording was not successful. Stable and reproducible waveforms were obtained in 59 sides (84%). Two cases, whose VEP deteriorated intraoperatively, developed postoperative visual disturbance: In 11 sides (16%), stable waveforms were not obtained. There were two main causes. In 8 sides out of 11, the cause was attributed to pre-existing severe visual disturbance. In these 8 sides, VEP in the awake state was not recordable or was recordable, but with very low amplitudes under 1 microV. In the other 3 sides, the cause was attributed to movement of a stimulating device by reflecting the fronto-temporal scalp flap. In conclusion, the successful recording rate was increased to 84% from approximately 30%, after introduction of various trials. We need further improvement in recording intraoperative VEP to establish a reliable intraoperative monitoring method for VEP.

  12. Apport de la biopsie radioguidée dans le diagnostic histopathologique des tumeurs de l'enfant: expérience de l'Hôpital d'Enfant de Rabat

    PubMed Central

    El Ochi, Mohamed Réda; Bellarbi, Salma; Rouas, Lamiae; Lamalmi, Najat; Malihy, Abderrahmane; Alhamany, Zaitouna; Cherradi, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    La biopsie radioguidée constitue une alternative à la biopsie chirurgicale invasive et à la cytologie pour le diagnostic des tumeurs pédiatriques. L'intérêt de notre étude est d’évaluer la valeur diagnostique des biopsies radioguidées examinées au laboratoire d'anatomopathologie de l'hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat (HER). L’étude a porté sur 78 biopsies radioguidées recueillies dans notre laboratoire entre janvier 2008 et décembre 2011. l’âge moyen des patients était de 5 ans et 10 mois avec une prédominance masculine (65,4%). La tumeur était abdominale dans 80% des cas, thoracique dans 15% cas, thoracique et abdominale dans 2,5% et sacrée dans 1,2%. Les biopsies étaient écho-guidées dans 90% des cas et scannoguidées dans 10% des cas. Le diagnostic histopathologique était posé dans 89% des cas. L'immuno-histochimie a été indiquée dans 35% des cas. Les diagnostics les plus fréquents étaient: tumeurs neuroblastiques (42 cas), lymphomes non hodgkiniens (10 cas), rhabdomyosarcomes (6 cas), autres (sarcome d'Ewing, néphroblastomes, tumeur myofibroblastique inflammatoire, maladies de Hodgkin, leucémie aiguë, hépatoblastome et ostéosarcome). Dans notre série, la biopsie radioguidée a permis un diagnostic histopathologique certain dans 89% des cas. Elle nécessite une étroite collaboration entre clinicien, radiologue et anatomopathologiste pour discuter son indication, afin de diminuer le nombre de biopsies peu ou non représentatives. PMID:26587165

  13. Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring: Basic Principles and Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Seung Hyun; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    The recent developments of new devices and advances in anesthesiology have greatly improved the utility and accuracy of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM). Herein, we review the basic principles of the electrophysiological methods employed under IOM in the operating room. These include motor evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, electroencephalography, electromyography, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and visual evoked potentials. Most of these techniques have certain limitations and their utility is still being debated. In this review, we also discuss the optimal stimulation/recording method for each of these modalities during individual surgeries as well as the diverse criteria for alarm signs. PMID:24015028

  14. A smart method of intraoperative explantation of an aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Can C; Park, Soon J

    2009-01-01

    Structural prosthetic valve deterioration and nonstructural dysfunction are two common causes of nonfatal valve events following implantation of a bioprosthetic valve. Using caution and skill, implantation of a bioprosthesis is relatively easy. On the other hand, explantation of a bioprosthesis is a challenging and time-consuming procedure. We have developed a surgical technique by which we were able to ameliorate this troublesome situation in a 79-year-old man with aortic stenosis in whom we had to intraoperatively explant the bioprosthesis that we have put in initially. Another bioprosthesis of the same kind was used to replace the old prosthesis with the rest of his postoperative course until dismissal being eventless.

  15. [Intraoperative crisis and surgical Apgar score].

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Masakatsu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Intraoperative crisis is an inevitable event to anesthesiologists. The crisis requires effective and coordinated management once it happened but it is difficult to manage the crises properly under extreme stressful situation. Recently, it is reported that the use of surgical crisis checklists is associated with significant improvement in the management of operating-room crises in a high-fidelity simulation study. Careful preoperative evaluation, proper intraoperative management and using intraoperative crisis checklists will be needed for safer perioperative care in the future. Postoperative complication is a serious public health problem. It reduces the quality of life of patients and raises medical cost. Careful management of surgical patients is required according to their postoperative condition for preventing postoperative complications. A 10-point surgical Apgar score, calculated from intraoperative estimated blood loss, lowest mean arterial pressure, and lowest heart rate, is a simple and available scoring system for predicting postoperative complications. It undoubtedly predicts higher than average risk of postoperative complications and death within 30 days of surgery. Surgical Apgar score is a bridge between proper intraoperative and postoperative care. Anesthesiologists should make effort to reduce the postoperative complication and this score is a tool for it.

  16. Intraoperative assessment of margins in breast conserving therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Butler-Henderson, Kerryn; Lee, Andy H; Price, Roger I; Waring, Kaylene

    2014-04-01

    Approximately one quarter of patients undergoing breast conserving therapy for breast cancer will require a second operation to achieve adequate clearance of the margins. A number of techniques to assess margins intraoperatively have been reported. This systematic review examines current intraoperative methods for assessing margin status. The final pathology status, statistical measures including accuracy of tumour margin assessment, average time impact on the procedure and second operation rate, were used as criteria for comparison between studies. Although pathological methods, such as frozen section and imprint cytology performed well, they added on average 20-30 min to operation times. An ultrasound probe allows accurate examination of the margins and delivers results in a timely manner, yet it has a limited role with DCIS where calcification is present and in multifocal cancer. Further research is required in other intraoperative margin assessment techniques, such as mammography, radiofrequency spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography.

  17. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  18. Near-Infrared Intraoperative Chemiluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Gabriel E; Carney, Brandon; Shaffer, Travis M; Tang, Jun; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish; Zeglis, Brian M; Grimm, Jan; Eppinger, Jörg; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-09-20

    Intraoperative imaging technologies recently entered the operating room, and their implementation is revolutionizing how physicians plan, monitor, and perform surgical interventions. In this work, we present a novel surgical imaging reporter system: intraoperative chemiluminescence imaging (ICI). To this end, we have leveraged the ability of a chemiluminescent metal complex to generate near-infrared light upon exposure to an aqueous solution of Ce(4+) in the presence of reducing tissue or blood components. An optical camera spatially resolves the resulting photon flux. We describe the construction and application of a prototype imaging setup, which achieves a detection limit as low as 6.9 pmol cm(-2) of the transition-metal-based ICI agent. As a proof of concept, we use ICI for the in vivo detection of our transition metal tracer following both systemic and subdermal injections. The very high signal-to-noise ratios make ICI an interesting candidate for the development of new intraoperative imaging technologies.

  19. [Intraoperative injuries of the biliary tract].

    PubMed

    Burcoveanu, C; Munteanu, Iulia; Stefan, S; Bulat, C; Pădureanu, S

    2008-01-01

    Statistically speaking, the intraoperative lesions of common bile duct are rare clinical cases, but they have a high gravity potential. Our study was made on a lot of 11 operated pacients during 1995-2007 in our Clinic and it shows the tactical and technical approach used in solving these complications. The study also shows the high level of difficulty of these cases, as immediate recognition of this type of intraoperative lesions is needed. The successful evolution of these cases depends on how quickly the lesions are found and solved. PMID:20201251

  20. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  1. Intraoperative monitoring of torsion to prevent vertical deviations during augmented vertical rectus transposition surgery

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jonathan M.; Hatt, Sarah R.; Leske, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Total transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscle laterally, with augmentation sutures, may be complicated by induction of an undesirable vertical deviation. Induced vertical misalignment may be associated with changes in torsion. We have developed a simple method to monitor intraoperative torsion that may reduce the incidence of vertical deviations. Methods We reviewed consecutive cases of total abducens palsy or esotropic Duane syndrome treated with augmented lateral transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscles, where the 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock intraoperative positions were initially marked with a dot at the limbus using a surgical pen. The location of the marks was monitored during tying of the augmentation sutures; changes in torsion were monitored intraoperatively. Results Records of 9 cases of augmented vertical rectus transposition were reviewed. Based on intraoperative assessment of torsion by observing the position of the preplaced limbal dots, the inferior rectus augmentation suture was tied less tightly than the superior rectus suture, leaving a gap of 1–3 mm between the inferior and lateral rectus muscles in 8 of 9 cases. The augmentation suture was totally removed in 1 case. Following these intraoperative adjustments, there was no induced intraoperative torsion, whereas further tightening of the inferior suture induced extorsion. Six weeks postoperatively, 8 of 9 patients did not experience a symptomatic vertical deviation. Conclusions When performing augmented transposition procedures, intraoperative monitoring of torsion may reduce the incidence of inadvertent vertical deviations and torsion. This technique may also be useful in other cases where correction or avoidance of torsion is needed. PMID:22525168

  2. Predisposing Factors for Intraoperative Endplate Injury of Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kanemura, Tokumi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Segi, Naoki; Ouchida, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare intraoperative endplate injury cases and no injury cases in consecutive series and to identify predisposing factors for intraoperative endplate injury. Overview of Literature Unintended endplate violation and subsequent cage subsidence is an intraoperative complication of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF). It is still unknown whether it is derived from inexperienced surgical technique or patients' inherent problems. Methods Consecutive patients (n=102; mean age, 69.0±0.8 years) underwent XLIF at 201 levels at a single institute. Preoperative and immediately postoperative radiographs were compared and cases with intraoperative endplate injury were identified. Various parameters were reviewed in each patient and compared between the injury and no injury groups. Results Twenty one levels (10.4%) had signs of intraoperative endplate injury. The injury group had a significantly higher rate of females (p=0.002), lower bone mineral density (BMD) (p=0.02), higher rate of polyetheretherketone as cage material (p=0.04), and taller cage height (p=0.03) compared with the no injury group. Multivariate analysis indicated that a T-score of BMD as a negative (odds ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.27–0.93; p=0.03) and cage height as a positive (odds ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–3.17; p=0.03) were predisposing factors for intraoperative endplate injury. Conclusions Intraoperative endplate injury is correlated significantly with reduced BMD and taller cage height. Precise evaluation of bone quality and treatment for osteoporosis might be important and care should be taken not to choose excessively taller cage. PMID:27790319

  3. State of the art: Intraoperative neuromonitoring in spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Abe, Mitsunobu; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Hama, Shingo; Higuchi, Tadahiro; C Jha, Subash; Takahashi, Rui; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Application of deformity correction spinal surgery has increased substantially over the past three decades in parallel with improvements in surgical techniques. Intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM) techniques,including somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), muscle evoked potentials (MEPs), and spontaneous electromyography (free-run EMG), have also improved surgical outcome by reducing the risk of iatrogenic neural injury. In this article, we review IOM techniques and their applications in spinal deformity surgery. We also summarize results of selected studies including hundreds of spinal correction surgeries. These studies indicate that multimodal IOM of both motor and sensory responses is superior to either modality alone for reducing the incidence of neural injury during surgery. J. Med. Invest. 62: 103-108, August, 2015. PMID:26399330

  4. Intraoperative Imaging-Guided Cancer Surgery: From Current Fluorescence Molecular Imaging Methods to Future Multi-Modality Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chongwei; Du, Yang; Ye, Jinzuo; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. Diagnosis and treatment using precision medicine is expected to be an effective method for preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Although anatomical and functional imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role for accurate preoperative diagnostics, for the most part these techniques cannot be applied intraoperatively. Optical molecular imaging is a promising technique that provides a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in tumor margin detection. Furthermore, existing clinical applications have proven that optical molecular imaging is a powerful intraoperative tool for guiding surgeons performing precision procedures, thus enabling radical resection and improved survival rates. However, detection depth limitation exists in optical molecular imaging methods and further breakthroughs from optical to multi-modality intraoperative imaging methods are needed to develop more extensive and comprehensive intraoperative applications. Here, we review the current intraoperative optical molecular imaging technologies, focusing on contrast agents and surgical navigation systems, and then discuss the future prospects of multi-modality imaging technology for intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery. PMID:25250092

  5. Rapid Intraoperative Molecular Characterization of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh M.; Francis, Joshua M.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Huang, Franklin W.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Kang, Yun Jee; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Brown, Loreal E.; Charbonneau, Sarah K.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Hoang, Mai P.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Garraway, Levi A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Reardon, David A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Hahn, William C.; Nahed, Brian V.; Ligon, Keith L.; Louis, David N.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Conclusive intraoperative pathologic confirmation of diffuse infiltrative glioma guides the decision to pursue definitive neurosurgical resection. Establishing the intraoperative diagnosis by histologic analysis can be difficult in low-cellularity infiltrative gliomas. Therefore, we developed a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay to detect somatic single-nucleotide variants in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). OBSERVATIONS This assay was applied to tissue samples from 190 patients with diffuse gliomas, including archived fixed and frozen specimens and tissue obtained intraoperatively. Results demonstrated 96% sensitivity (95% CI, 90%–99%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 95%–100%) for World Health Organization grades II and III gliomas. In a series of live cases, glioma-defining mutations could be identified within 60 minutes, which could facilitate the diagnosis in an intraoperative timeframe. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The genotyping method described herein can establish the diagnosis of low-cellularity tumors like glioma and could be adapted to the point-of-care diagnosis of other lesions that are similarly defined by highly recurrent somatic mutations. PMID:26181761

  6. Intraoperative monitoring of Jones tube function.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M J; Mather, T R; Dryden, R M

    1989-01-01

    If intraoperative visualization is impossible when placing a secondary Jones tube, the presence of tube drainage may confirm correct intranasal positioning. A simple suction method is presented to evaluate the intranasal position of the Jones tube in the anesthetized or uncooperative patient.

  7. Intraoperative aortic dissection in pediatric heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Harada, Yorikazu; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Yasukochi, Satoshi; Satomi, Gengi

    2006-06-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection occurred in a 3-year-old-boy undergoing repair of an atrial septal defect. Transesophageal echocardiography was useful for the diagnosis, and conservative medical treatment under close observation was feasible in this case which involved a limited intimal tear. PMID:16714685

  8. Intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas for complex pancreatogenous hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong; Sun, Yongliang; Si, Shuang; Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Liguo; Zhou, Wenying; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative localization and confirmation of complete resection of the hypersecreting tissue are the 2 main challenges in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Here, we report our experience with intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Clinical courses of 2 patients with biochemical evidence of a pancreatogenous hypoglycemia were studied. The preoperative diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) and nesidioblastosis, respectively. Rapid intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas was used to localize and confirm complete excision of the hypersecreting tissue. Hypoglycemia was successfully treated in both the patients. In the MEN-1 patient, 2 small tumors in the head of pancreas were not resected, as they were deemed noninsulin secreting by intraoperative portal vein insulin assay, thus avoiding a total pancreatectomy. In the patient with nesidioblastosis, using intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas, an appropriate amount of pancreatic tissue was resected thereby avoiding recurrence and diabetes. This technique may be of particular value in patients with complex conditions such as MEN-1 and nesidioblastosis, to localize and achieve complete resection of hypersecreting pancreatic tissue. PMID:27367988

  9. Avoiding and Managing Intraoperative Complications During Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lim, Moe R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lee, Joon Y

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intraoperative complications during cervical spine surgery is low; however, if they do occur, intraoperative complications have the potential to cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Spine surgeons should be familiar with methods to minimize intraoperative complications. If they do occur, surgeons must be prepared to immediately treat each potential complication to reduce any associated morbidity. PMID:27049196

  10. Intraoperative examination of sentinel lymph nodes using scrape cytology.

    PubMed

    Mannell, Aylwyn; Wium, Brunton; Thatcher, Charles

    2014-08-08

    Background. In breast cancer, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is widely used to assess the axilla when the nodes appear normal on palpation and ultrasonography. When the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) are negative, no further dissection is required. Surgical dissection or radiotherapy of the axilla is indicated for macrometastases, as well as adjuvant therapy for macrometastases and micrometastasic spread.Aim. To determine the accuracy of scrape cytology (SC) for intraoperative examination of the SLNs.Methods. SLNB was performed in 100 patients with early breast cancer in whom the axillary nodes appeared normal on clinical examination and ultrasonography. None of the patients with negative SLNs or SLNs with micrometastases only (N1mic, 0.2 - 2 mm) had further axillary dissection. Patients with SLNs containing macrometastases (N1, >2 mm) underwent axillary lymph node dissection. The results of intraoperative cytology were compared with the histopathological findings on examination of serial paraffin-embedded sections of the SLNs.Results. Intraoperative SC identified SLN metastases in 20 patients: 17 had macrometastases and 3 micrometastases. Histopathological examination of the SLNs found macrometastases in 18 patients and micrometastases in 6. SC had a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100% for the detection of macrometastases. For micrometastatic spread, the sensitivity and specificity were 50% and 100%, respectively.Conclusion. SC is a rapid, sensitive technique for detection of macrometastases in the SLNs of women with breast cancer. The overall accuracy in identification of any metastatic spread (N1mic, N1) to the SLNs was 85%, rising to 94% in SLNs with macrometastases.

  11. Modern intraoperative imaging modalities for the vascular neurosurgeon treating intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Goren, Oded; Monteith, Stephen J; Hadani, Moshe; Bakon, Mati; Harnof, Sagi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews the current intraoperative imaging tools that are available to assist neurosurgeons in the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This review shares the authors' experience with each modality and discusses the advantages, potential limitations, and disadvantages of each. Surgery for ICH is directed at blood clot removal, reduction of intracranial pressure, and minimization of secondary damage associated with hematoma breakdown products. For effective occlusion and safe obliteration of vascular anomalies associated with ICH, vascular neurosurgeons today require a thorough understanding of the various intraoperative imaging modalities available for obtaining real-time information. Use of one or more of these modalities may improve the surgeon's confidence during the procedure, the patient's safety during surgery, and surgical outcome. The modern techniques discussed include 1) indocyanine green-based video angiography, which provides real-time information based on high-quality images showing the residual filling of vascular pathological entities and the patency of blood vessels of any size in the surgical field; and 2) intraoperative angiography, which remains the gold standard intraoperative diagnostic test in the surgical management of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations. Hybrid procedures, providing multimodality image-guided surgeries and combining endovascular with microsurgical strategies within the same surgical session, have become feasible and safe. Microdoppler is a safe, noninvasive, and reliable technique for evaluation of hemodynamics of vessels in the surgical field, with the advantage of ease of use. Intraoperative MRI provides an effective navigation tool for cavernoma surgery, in addition to assessing the extent of resection during the procedure. Intraoperative CT scanning has the advantage of very high sensitivity to acute bleeding, thereby assisting in the confirmation of the extent of hematoma evacuation and

  12. Indocyanine green for intraoperative localization of ureter.

    PubMed

    Siddighi, Sam; Yune, Junchan Joshua; Hardesty, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    Intraurethral injection of indocyanine green (ICG; Akorn, Lake Forest, IL) and visualization under near-infrared (NIR) light allows for real-time delineation of the ureter. This technology can be helpful to prevent iatrogenic ureteral injury during pelvic surgery. Patients were scheduled to undergo robot-assisted laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. Before the robotic surgery started, the tip of a 6-F ureteral catheter was inserted into the ureteral orifice. Twenty-five milligrams of ICG was dissolved in 10-mL of sterile water and injected through the open catheter. The same procedure was repeated on the opposite side. The ICG reversibly stained the inside lining of the ureter by binding to proteins on urothelial layer. During the course of robotic surgery, the NIR laser on the da Vinci Si surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) was used to excite ICG molecules, and infrared emission was captured by the da Vinci filtered lens system and electronically converted to green color. Thus, the ureter fluoresced green, which allowed its definitive identification throughout the entire case. In all cases of >10 patients, we were able to visualize bilateral ureters with this technology, even though there was some variation in brightness that depended on the depth of the ureter from the peritoneal surface. For example, in a morbidly obese patient, the ureters were not as bright green. There were no intraoperative or postoperative adverse effects attributable to ICG administration for up to 2 months of observation. In our experience, this novel method of intraurethral ICG injection was helpful to identify the entire course of ureter and allowed a safe approach to tissues that were adjacent to the urinary tract. The advantage of our technique is that it requires the insertion of just the tip of ureteral catheter. Despite our limited cohort of patients, our findings are consistent with previous reports of the excellent safety profile of intravenous and intrabiliary ICG

  13. Intraoperative Evaluation of Breast Tumor Margins with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Kotynek, Jan G.; Oliphant, Uretz J.; Bellafiore, Frank J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Johnson, Patricia A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As breast cancer screening rates increase, smaller and more numerous lesions are being identified earlier, leading to more breast-conserving surgical procedures. Achieving a clean surgical margin represents a technical challenge with important clinical implications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is introduced as an intraoperative high-resolution imaging technique that assesses surgical breast tumor margins by providing real-time microscopic images up to 2 mm beneath the tissue surface. In a study of 37 patients split between training and study groups, OCT images covering 1 cm2 regions were acquired from surgical margins of lumpectomy specimens, registered with ink, and correlated with corresponding histological sections. A 17 patient training set used to establish standard imaging protocols and OCT evaluation criteria demonstrated that areas of higher scattering tissue with a heterogeneous pattern were indicative of tumor cells and tumor tissue, in contrast to lower scattering adipocytes found in normal breast tissue. The remaining 20 patients were enrolled into the feasibility study. Of these lumpectomy specimens, 11 were identified with a positive or close surgical margin and 9 were identified with a negative margin under OCT. Based on histological findings, 9 true positives, 9 true negatives, 2 false positives, and 0 false negatives were found, yielding a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. These results demonstrate the potential of OCT as a real-time method for intraoperative margin assessment in breast conserving surgeries. PMID:19910294

  14. Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Laser Angiography in Pediatric Autologous Ear Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Skin flap vascularity is a critical determinant of aesthetic results in autologous ear reconstruction. In this study, we investigate the use of intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) as an adjunctive measure of skin flap vascularity in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. Twenty-one consecutive pediatric patients undergoing first-stage autologous total ear reconstruction were retrospectively evaluated. The first 10 patients were treated traditionally (non-ICGA), and the latter 11 patients were evaluated with ICGA intraoperatively after implantation of the cartilage construct and administration of suction. Relative and absolute perfusion units in the form of contour maps were generated. Statistical analyses were performed using independent sample Student t test. Statistically significant differences in exposure and infection were not found between the 2 groups. However, decreased numbers of surgical revisions were required in cases with ICGA versus without ICGA (P = 0.03), suggesting that greater certainty in skin flap perfusion correlated with a reduction in revision surgeries. In cases of exposure, we found an average lowest absolute perfusion unit of 14.3, whereas cases without exposure had an average of 26.1 (P = 0.02), thereby defining objective parameters for utilizing ICGA data in tailoring surgical decision making for this special population of patients. Defined quantitative parameters for utilizing ICGA in evaluating skin flap vascularity may be a useful adjunctive technique in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. PMID:27579233

  15. Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Laser Angiography in Pediatric Autologous Ear Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Martins, Deborah B; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P; Lee, Justine C

    2016-05-01

    Skin flap vascularity is a critical determinant of aesthetic results in autologous ear reconstruction. In this study, we investigate the use of intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) as an adjunctive measure of skin flap vascularity in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. Twenty-one consecutive pediatric patients undergoing first-stage autologous total ear reconstruction were retrospectively evaluated. The first 10 patients were treated traditionally (non-ICGA), and the latter 11 patients were evaluated with ICGA intraoperatively after implantation of the cartilage construct and administration of suction. Relative and absolute perfusion units in the form of contour maps were generated. Statistical analyses were performed using independent sample Student t test. Statistically significant differences in exposure and infection were not found between the 2 groups. However, decreased numbers of surgical revisions were required in cases with ICGA versus without ICGA (P = 0.03), suggesting that greater certainty in skin flap perfusion correlated with a reduction in revision surgeries. In cases of exposure, we found an average lowest absolute perfusion unit of 14.3, whereas cases without exposure had an average of 26.1 (P = 0.02), thereby defining objective parameters for utilizing ICGA data in tailoring surgical decision making for this special population of patients. Defined quantitative parameters for utilizing ICGA in evaluating skin flap vascularity may be a useful adjunctive technique in pediatric autologous ear reconstruction. PMID:27579233

  16. Lightweight distributed computing for intraoperative real-time image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwelack, Stefan; Katic, Darko; Wagner, Simon; Spengler, Patrick; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Röhl, Sebastian; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2012-02-01

    In order to provide real-time intraoperative guidance, computer assisted surgery (CAS) systems often rely on computationally expensive algorithms. The real-time constraint is especially challenging if several components such as intraoperative image processing, soft tissue registration or context aware visualization are combined in a single system. In this paper, we present a lightweight approach to distribute the workload over several workstations based on the OpenIGTLink protocol. We use XML-based message passing for remote procedure calls and native types for transferring data such as images, meshes or point coordinates. Two different, but typical scenarios are considered in order to evaluate the performance of the new system. First, we analyze a real-time soft tissue registration algorithm based on a finite element (FE) model. Here, we use the proposed approach to distribute the computational workload between a primary workstation that handles sensor data processing and visualization and a dedicated workstation that runs the real-time FE algorithm. We show that the additional overhead that is introduced by the technique is small compared to the total execution time. Furthermore, the approach is used to speed up a context aware augmented reality based navigation system for dental implant surgery. In this scenario, the additional delay for running the computationally expensive reasoning server on a separate workstation is less than a millisecond. The results show that the presented approach is a promising strategy to speed up real-time CAS systems.

  17. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc Long Hung; Garreau, Mireille; Auffret, Vincent; Le Breton, Hervé; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Haigron, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels ≈ 2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  18. [The intraoperative colonic irrigation in emergency surgery].

    PubMed

    Kiss, L

    2001-01-01

    Bowel preparations is frequently impossible in various ante colonic diseases, such as left-sided colonic obstruction. The goal of intraoperative colonic irrigation is to obtain, during surgery, a bowel preparation offering the possibility of primary resection with immediate anastomosis, when preoperative bowel preparation has not been feasible. Technical aspects of intra-operative colonic irrigation are described. Indications for this methods are presented: left-sided obstructing carcinomas, diverticulitis, more rarely inflammatory stenosis or functional obstruction. The surgical management of left colonic emergencies has evolved in the past few decades. Recently, there has been increasing interest in resection with primary anastomosis in selected cases. The post operative mortality rate was 13 per cent. The incidence of clinical anastomotic leakage was 6.65 per cent. PMID:12731192

  19. Intraoperative ultrasound-assisted peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Clayton L; Baggott, Christopher D; Hanna, Amgad S

    2015-09-01

    Historically, peripheral nerve surgery has relied on landmarks and fairly extensive dissection for localization of both normal and pathological anatomy. High-resolution ultrasonography is a radiation-free imaging modality that can be used to directly visualize peripheral nerves and their associated pathologies prior to making an incision. It therefore helps in localization of normal and pathological anatomy, which can minimize the need for extensive exposures. The authors found intraoperative ultrasound (US) to be most useful in the management of peripheral nerve tumors and neuromas of nerve branches that are particularly small or have a deep location. This study presents the use of intraoperative US in 5 cases in an effort to illustrate some of the applications of this useful surgical adjunct.

  20. Intraoperative identification of adrenal-renal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Griffin; Rattan, Rishi; Yilmaz, Osman; Tarnoff, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal - renal fusion is a rare entity defined as incomplete encapsulation of the adrenal gland and kidney with histologically adjacent functional tissue. This report describes the first published intraoperative identification of this anomaly during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The patient was a 59-year-old man with chronic hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensives found to be caused by a right-sided aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in the setting of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. During laparoscopic adrenalectomy, the normal avascular plane between the kidney and adrenal gland was absent. Pathologic evaluation confirmed adrenal - renal fusion without adrenal heterotopia. Identified intraoperatively, this may be misdiagnosed as invasive malignancy, and thus awareness of this anomaly may help prevent unnecessarily morbid resection. PMID:26195881

  1. Intraoperative coronary artery dissection in fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiaoying; Mitter, Sumeet S; Blair, John E; Benzuly, Keith; Gambardella, Ivancarmine; Malaisrie, S Chris

    2015-04-01

    A 61-year-old woman with bicuspid aortic stenosis, an ascending aortic aneurysm, and a remote history of renal fibromuscular dysplasia underwent aortic root replacement complicated by extensive dissection of the left circumflex artery extending retrograde into the left anterior descending artery. This was managed by coronary artery bypass grafting, left ventricular support, and percutaneous coronary intervention for propagation of the dissection. This case highlights the prevalence, diagnosis, and management of intraoperative coronary dissection secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia. PMID:25841833

  2. Current trends in intraoperative optical imaging for functional brain mapping and delineation of lesions of language cortex.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Neal; Uhlemann, Falk; Sheth, Sameer A; Bookheimer, Susan; Martin, Neil; Toga, Arthur W

    2009-08-01

    Resection of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), epileptic focus, or glioma, ideally has a prerequisite of microscopic delineation of the lesion borders in relation to the normal gray and white matter that mediate critical functions. Currently, Wada testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are used for preoperative mapping of critical function, whereas electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) is used for intraoperative mapping. For lesion delineation, MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) are used preoperatively, whereas microscopy and histological sectioning are used intraoperatively. However, for lesions near eloquent cortex, these imaging techniques may lack sufficient resolution to define the relationship between the lesion and language function, and thus not accurately determine which patients will benefit from neurosurgical resection of the lesion without iatrogenic aphasia. Optical techniques such as intraoperative optical imaging of intrinsic signals (iOIS) show great promise for the precise functional mapping of cortices, as well as delineation of the borders of AVMs, epileptic foci, and gliomas. Here we first review the physiology of neuroimaging, and then progress towards the validation and justification of using intraoperative optical techniques, especially in relation to neurosurgical planning of resection AVMs, epileptic foci, and gliomas near or in eloquent cortex. We conclude with a short description of potential novel intraoperative optical techniques.

  3. Current Trends in Intraoperative Optical Imaging for Functional Brain Mapping and Delineation of Lesions of Language Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Neal; Uhleman, Falk; Sheth, Sameer A.; Bookheimer, Susan; Martin, Neil; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    Resection of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), epileptic focus, or glioma, ideally has a prerequisite of microscopic delineation of the lesion borders in relation to the normal gray and white matter that mediate critical functions. Currently, Wada testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are used for preoperative mapping of critical function, whereas electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) is used for intraoperative mapping. For lesion delineation, MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) are used preoperatively, whereas microscopy and histological sectioning are used intraoperatively. However, for lesions near eloquent cortex, these imaging techniques may lack sufficient resolution to define the relationship between the lesion and language function, and thus not accurately determine which patients will benefit from neurosurgical resection of the lesion without iatrogenic aphasia. Optical techniques such as intraoperative optical imaging of intrinsic signals (iOIS) show great promise for the precise functional mapping of cortices, as well as delineation of the borders of AVMs, epileptic foci, and gliomas. Here we first review the physiology of neuroimaging, and then progress towards the validation and justification of using intraoperative optical techniques, especially in relation to neurosurgical planning of resection AVMs, epileptic foci, and gliomas near or in eloquent cortex. We conclude with a short description of potential novel intraoperative optical techniques. PMID:18786643

  4. Intraoperative C-arm fluoroscopy-based 3D navigation for intraventricular endoscopic intervention.

    PubMed

    Herbowski, L; Sagan, L; Szyłak, R; Sałapa, P; Harat, A

    2013-08-01

    The authors present the technique of retained ventricular catheter removal by means of fluoroscopy-guided neuronavigation. A disconnected free-floating intraventricular catheter is an unusual shunt complication, and in case of shunt infection it should be removed immediately. The operative procedure described here is the first such imaging technique and original approach to retained ventricular catheter endoscopic surgery. The real-time fluoroscopy-guided neuroendoscopy seems to make 3D intraoperative navigation possible.

  5. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients. PMID:27625474

  6. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients.

  7. Intraoperative lung ultrasound: A clinicodynamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, ultrasonography has emerged as an important and indispensable tool in clinical practice in various specialties including critical care. Lung ultrasound (LUS) has a wide potential in various surgical and clinical situations for timely and easy detection of an impending crisis such as pulmonary edema, endobronchial tube migration, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pleural effusion, and various other causes of desaturation before it clinically ensues to critical level. Although ultrasonography is frequently used in nerve blocks, airway handling, and vascular access, LUS for routine intraoperative monitoring and in crisis management still necessitates recognition. After reviewing the various articles regarding the use of LUS in critical care, we found, that LUS can be used in various intraoperative circumstances similar to Intensive Care Unit with some limitations. Except for few attempts in the intraoperative detection of pneumothorax, LUS is hardly used but has wider perspective for routine and crisis management in real-time. If anesthesiologists add LUS in their routine monitoring armamentarium, it can assist to move a step ahead in the dynamic management of critically ill and high-risk patients. PMID:27625474

  8. [Anaesthetic management of excision of a cervical intraspinal tumor with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in a pregnant woman at 29 weeks].

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Domínguez, R; González-González, G; Rubio-Romero, R; Federero-Martínez, F; Jiménez, I

    2016-05-01

    The intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a technique used to test and monitor nervous function. This technique has become essential in some neurosurgery interventions, since it avoids neurological injuries during surgery and reduces morbidity. The experience of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is limited in some clinical cases due to the low incidence of pregnant women undergoing a surgical procedure. A case is presented of a 29-weeks pregnant woman suffering from a cervical intraspinal tumour with intense pain, which required surgery. The collaboration of a multidisciplinary team composed of anaesthesiologists, neurosurgeons, neurophysiologists and obstetricians, the continuous monitoring of the foetus, the intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, and maintaining the neurophysiological and utero-placental variables were crucial for the proper development of the surgery. According to our experience and the limited publications in the literature, no damaging effects of this technique were detected at maternal-foetal level. On the contrary, it brings important benefits during the surgery and for the final result. PMID:26275733

  9. Quality assurance and performance improvement in intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Tamkus, Arvydas A; Rice, Kent S; McCaffrey, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Quality assurance (QA) as it relates to intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) can be defined as the systematic monitoring, evaluation, and modification of the IONM service to insure that desired standards of quality are being met. In practice, that definition is usually extended to include the concept that the quality of the IONM service will be improved wherever possible and, although there are some differences in the two terms, in this article the term QA will be understood to include quality improvement (QI) processes as well. The measurement and documentation of quality is becoming increasingly important to healthcare providers. This trend is being driven by pressures from accrediting agencies, payers, and patients. The essential elements of a QA program are described. A real-life example of QA techniques and management relevant to IONM providers is presented and discussed.

  10. Intraoperative interstitial microwave-induced hyperthermia and brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, C T; Wong, T Z; Strohbehn, J W; Colacchio, T A; Sutton, J E; Belch, R Z; Douple, E B

    1985-09-01

    Intra-operative placement of 11-gauge nylon catheters into deep-seated unresectable tumors for interstitial brachytherapy permits localized heating of tumors (hyperthermia) using microwave (915 MHz) antennas which are inserted into these catheters. Four preliminary cases are described where epithelial tumors at various sites were implanted with an antenna array and heated for 1 hour, both before and after the iridium-192 brachytherapy. Temperatures were monitored in catheters required for the appropriate radiation dosimetry but not required for the interstitial microwave antenna array hyperthermia (IMAAH) system. Additional thermometry was obtained using nonperturbed fiberoptic thermometry probes inserted into the catheters' housing antennas. No significant complications, such as bleeding or infection, were observed. This approach to cancer therapy is shown to be feasible and it produces controlled, localized hyperthermia, with temperatures of 50 degrees C or more in tumors. This technique may offer a therapeutic option for pelvic, intra-abdominal and head and neck tumors.

  11. [Intraoperative detection of the sentinel lymph nodes in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Papayan, G V; Chistyakov, I V

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the scientific data was made. It was used the literature devoted to the intraoperative visualization of the sentinel lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer. Correct detection of such lymph nodes with following pathologic investigation allowed limiting the volume of lympho-dissection in a number of patients. There is the possibility of maximal in-depth study of the sentinel lymph nodes by purposeful application of most sensible pathologic and molecular methods for detection their micrometastatic lesions. At the same time the treatment strategy and prognosis could be determined. The authors present the results of an application of dye techniques, radioactive preparation and fluorescence imaging for sentinel lymph node detection. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods are shown in the article. There are validated the prospects of technical development, study of information value of new applications and the most perspective method of fluorescence indocyanine green visualization by lymph outflow. PMID:25962306

  12. Numerical characterization of intraoperative and chronic electrodes in deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Apollonio, Francesca; d’Inzeo, Guglielmo; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    An intraoperative electrode (microelectrode) is used in the deep brain stimulation (DBS) technique to pinpoint the brain target and to choose the best parameters for the electrical stimulus. However, when the intraoperative electrode is replaced with the chronic one (macroelectrode), the observed effects do not always coincide with predictions. To investigate the causes of such discrepancies, a 3D model of the basal ganglia has been considered and realistic models of both intraoperative and chronic electrodes have been developed and numerically solved. Results of simulations of the electric potential (V) and the activating function (AF) along neuronal fibers show that the different geometries and sizes of the two electrodes do not change the distributions and polarities of these functions, but rather the amplitudes. This effect is similar to the one produced by the presence of different tissue layers (edema or glial tissue) in the peri-electrode space. Conversely, an inaccurate positioning of the chronic electrode with respect to the intraoperative one (electric centers not coincident) may induce a completely different electric stimulation in some groups of fibers. PMID:25745397

  13. A review of brain retraction and recommendations for minimizing intraoperative brain injury.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R J; Bringas, J R

    1993-12-01

    Brain retraction is required for adequate exposure during many intracranial procedures. The incidence of contusion or infarction from overzealous brain retraction is probably 10% in cranial base procedures and 5% in intracranial aneurysm procedures. The literature on brain retraction injury is reviewed, with particular attention to the use of intermittent retraction. Intraoperative monitoring techniques--brain electrical activity, cerebral blood flow, and brain retraction pressure--are evaluated. Various intraoperative interventions--anesthetic agents, positioning, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, operative approaches involving bone resection or osteotomy, hyperventilation, induced hypotension, induced hypertension, mannitol, and nimodipine--are assessed with regard to their effects on brain retraction. Because brain retraction injury, like other forms of focal cerebral ischemia, is multifactorial in its origins, a multifaceted approach probably will be most advantageous in minimizing retraction injury. Recommendations for operative management of cases involving significant brain retraction are made. These recommendations optimize the following goals: anesthesia and metabolic depression, improvement in cerebral blood flow and calcium channel blockade, intraoperative monitoring, and operative exposure and retraction efficacy. Through a combination of judicious retraction, appropriate anesthetic and pharmacological management, and aggressive intraoperative monitoring, brain retraction should become a much less common source of morbidity in the future.

  14. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  15. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-11-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  16. Interactive intraoperative localization using an infrared-based system.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, L J; Nolte, L; Kadi, A M; Jiang, Z

    1993-10-01

    We discuss new methods of localizing and treating brain lesions for both the conventional method of a base-ring fixed to the patient's skull (referred to as frame-based procedures) and the new method of frameless procedures (no base ring). Frame-based procedures are used for finding a precise instrument position during neurosurgical procedures, such as stereotactic biopsy of deep-seated lesions, placing electrodes for functional stereotaxis or catheters with radioactive seeds for brachytherapy, or even the placement of a stereotactic retractor or endoscope for removal or internal decompression of lesions. In such procedures, the intraoperative image localization of instruments becomes useful as it tracks instruments as they travel through the preplanned trajectory. Additional intraoperative digitization of surgical instruments, e.g., bipolar suction, biopsy forceps, microscope, ultrasound probe, etc, can be achieved during the stereotactic resection of eloquent areas or deep intracranial lesions by adding an infrared-based system. Frameless procedures broaden the range of surgical approaches, image guidance planning, and operative procedures, since no ring is attached to the patient's head which might interfere with the surgical approach, and offers logistic advantages in scheduling diagnostic studies. Frameless diagnostic studies employ anatomical markers and/or surface matching techniques for data registration in the computer software surgical preplanning program. This simplifies scheduling of the procedures since the image study does not need to be acquired the same day as surgery. Frameless diagnostic studies allow for the use of more than one type of imaging data for planning and optimization of surgical procedures, and greatly improve patient tolerance and comfort during these procedures and during surgery, as compared with frame-based procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7905601

  17. [The role of intraoperative flowmetry in surgery of cerebral aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, O D; Éliava, Sh Sh; Shakhnovich, V A; Pilipenko, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the study was to assess the capabilities of intraoperative ultrasonic flowmetry in cerebral aneurysm surgery for prevention and immediate correction of cerebral ischemia. Ultrasonic flowmeter (Model HT313/323, "ransonic Systems Inc.", USA) was used during surgery in patients with complicated, large and giant aneurysms for evaluation of cerebral blood flow in main arteries (internal carotid, anterior and middle cerebral) and their branches (branches of M2-M3 and A2 segments). The series included 20 adult patients (13 male and 7 female) operated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgery Institute during 2008-2011 years. Mean age was 47.4 +/- 8.6 years. Giant aneurysms (> 2.5 cm) were present in 12 (60%) patients, large (1.5-2.5 cm)--in 5 (25%). Aneurysms of internal carotid artery were found in 8 cases. 1 female patient was operated on giant aneurysm of anterior cerebral--anterior communicating artery. In 4 (20%) cases significant alterations of blood flow were registered after clipping (> 25% according to initial), the changes were not visible. This allowed to correct the position of clips. In 2 surgeries ('low' paraclinoid aneurysms) the collateral flow was sufficient during temporary clipping, this allowed trapping of aneurysms with good neurological outcome. In 3 cases flowmeter was used to evaluate blood flow after extracranial-intracranial bypass. Ultrasonic flowmetry is a simple, reproducible and safe technique for intraoperative assessment of blood flow. Despite visual sufficiency of arteries flowmetry allows detection of surgically significant alterations of blood flow after clipping. PMID:22066255

  18. Muscle relaxant use during intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Tod B

    2013-02-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents have generally been avoided during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) where muscle responses to nerve stimulation or transcranial stimulation are monitored. However, a variety of studies and clinical experience indicate partial neuromuscular blockade is compatible with monitoring in some patients. This review presents these experiences after reviewing the currently used agents and the methods used to assess the blockade. A review was conducted of the published literature regarding neuromuscular blockade during IOM. A variety of articles have been published that give insight into the use of partial pharmacological paralysis during monitoring. Responses have been recorded from facial muscles, vocalis muscles, and peripheral nerve muscles from transcranial or neural stimulation with neuromuscular blockade measured in the muscle tested or in the thenar muscles from ulnar nerve stimulation. Preconditioning of the nervous system with tetanic or sensory stimulation has been used. In patients without neuromuscular pathology intraoperative monitoring using peripheral muscle responses from neural stimulation is possible with partial neuromuscular blockade. Monitoring of muscle responses from cranial nerve stimulation may require a higher degree of stimulation and less neuromuscular blockade. The role of tetanic or sensory conditioning of the nervous system is not fully characterized. The impact of neuromuscular pathology or the effect of partial blockade on monitoring muscle responses from spontaneous neural activity or mechanical nerve stimulation has not been described.

  19. Synergistic Interactions with a High Intraoperative Expander Fill Volume Increase the Risk for Mastectomy Flap Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavanin, Nima; Jordan, Sumanas; Lovecchio, Francis; Fine, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prosthetic-based breast reconstruction is performed with increasing frequency in the United States. Major mastectomy skin flap necrosis is a significant complication with outcomes ranging from poor aesthetic appearance to reconstructive failure. The present study aimed to explore the interactions between intraoperative fill and other risk factors on the incidence of flap necrosis in patients undergoing mastectomy with immediate expander/implant-based reconstruction. Methods A retrospective review of 966 consecutive patients (1,409 breasts) who underwent skin or nipple sparing mastectomy with immediate tissue expander reconstruction at a single institution was conducted. Age, body mass index, hypertension, smoking status, premastectomy and postmastectomy radiation, acellular dermal matrix use, and application of the tumescent mastectomy technique were analyzed as potential predictors of flap necrosis both independently and as synergistic variables with high intraoperative fill. The following three measures of interaction were calculated: relative excess risk due to interaction, attributable proportion of risk due to interaction, and synergy index (SI). Results Intraoperative tissue expander fill volume was high (≥66.7% of the maximum volume) in 40.9% (576 of 1,409 breasts) of cases. The unadjusted flap necrosis rate was greater in the high intraoperative fill cohort than in the low fill cohort (10.4% vs. 7.1%, p=0.027). Multivariate logistic regression did not identify high intraoperative fill volume as an independent risk factor for flap necrosis (odds ratio 1.442, 95% confidence interval 0.973-2.137, p=0.068). However, four risk factors were identified that interacted significantly with intraoperative fill volume, namely tumescence, age, hypertension, and obesity. The SI, or the departure from additive risks, was largest for tumescence (SI, 25.3), followed by hypertension (SI, 2.39), obesity (SI, 2.28), and age older than 50 years (SI, 1.17). Conclusion

  20. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ankur N.; Miga, Michael I.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Chambless, Lola B.; Thompson, Reid C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient’s preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (~1 hour) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  1. [Intraoperative localization of space-occupying intracranial processes using ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, B N; Epstein, F J; Cooper, P R; Horii, S C; Ransohoff, J

    1984-10-01

    During a two-year period, intra-operative ultrasonic explorations were performed in 44 patients for the purpose of localisation of intracranial masses. This facilitated accurate intraoperative assessment of the location and consistency of the mass. We consider operative ultrasound to be an invaluable adjunct to surgery of small intracerebral masses.

  2. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  3. Intraoperative arterial oxygenation in obese patients.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, R W; Wise, L

    1976-01-01

    Although obese patients have been shown to represent a particularly high risk group with respect to hypoxemia both pre and postoperatively, no data exist to delineate the intraoperative arterial oxygenation pattern of these patients. Furthermore, no one has studied the effects of a change in operative position or a subdiaphragmatic laparotomy pack on arterial oxygenation (PaO2). Sixty-four adults undergoing jejunoileal bypass for morbid exogenous obesity, with a mean weight of 142.0 +/- 31.4 kg and a mean age of 33.3 +/- 10.4 years, were studied. Twenty-five patients (Group I) were maintained in the supine position throughout the operative procedure, while the remaining 39 patients (Group II) were changed to a 15 degrees head down position 15 minutes after a control blood sample was taken. Four additional markedly obese patients were studied to determine the effect of an abdominal pack of PaO2 values. The following findings were demonstrated: 1) 40% oxygen did not uniformly produce adequate arterial oxygenation for intra-abdominal surgery in otherwise healthy obese patients; 2) placement of a subdiaphragmatic abdominal laparotomy pack without a change in operative position resulted in a consistent fall in PaO2 in each patient to less than 65 mm Hg even though 40% oxygen was being administered; and 3) a change from supine to a 15 degrees head down operative position resulted in a significant (P less than 0.001) reduction in mean PaO2 (73.0 +/- 26.3 mm Hg). Seventy-seven per cent of these patients demonstrated PaO2 values of less than 80 mm Hg on 40% oxygen. Because of these findings, serious consideration should be given to the routine use of the Trendelenberg position intraoperatively in obese patients. However, if one elects this posture, prudence would dictate careful monitoring and maintenance of arterial oxygenation. Certainly, in obese patients, the intraoperative combination of the head down position and a subdiaphragmatic laparotomy pack should be avoided

  4. Coblation tonsillectomy versus dissection tonsillectomy: a comparison of intraoperative time, intraoperative blood loss and post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Izny Hafiz, Z; Rosdan, S; Mohd Khairi, M D

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the intraoperative time, intraoperative blood loss and post operative pain between coblation tonsillectomy and cold tonsillectomy in the same patient. A prospective single blind control trial was carried out on 34 patients whom underwent tonsillectomy. The patients with known bleeding disorder, history of unilateral peritonsillar abscess and unilateral tonsillar hypertrophy were excluded. Operations were done by a single surgeon using cold dissection tonsillectomy in one side while coblation tonsillectomy in the other. Intraoperative time, intraoperative blood loss and post operative pain during the first 3 days were compared between the two methods. Results showed that the intraoperative time was significantly shorter (p<0.001) and intraoperative blood loss was significantly lesser (p<0.001) in coblation tonsillectomy as compared to cold tonsillectomy. Post operative pain score was significantly less at 6 hours post operation (p<0.001) in coblation tonsillectomy as compared to cold tonsillectomy. However, there were no differences in the post operative pain scores on day 1, 2 and 3. In conclusion, coblation tonsillectomy does have superiority in improving intraoperative efficiency in term of intraoperative time and bleeding compared to cold dissection tonsillectomy. The patient will benefit with minimal post operative pain in the immediate post surgery duration.

  5. [Intraoperative frozen sections of the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Synoracki, S; Ting, S; Siebolts, U; Dralle, H; Koperek, O; Schmid, K W

    2015-07-01

    The goal of evaluation of intraoperative frozen sections of the thyroid gland is to achieve a definitive diagnosis which determines the subsequent surgical management as fast as possible; however, due to the specific methodological situation of thyroid frozen sections evaluation a conclusive diagnosis can be made in only some of the cases. If no conclusive histological diagnosis is possible during the operation, subsequent privileged processing of the specimen allows a final diagnosis at the latest within 48 h in almost all remaining cases. Applying this strategy, both pathologists and surgeons require a high level of communication and knowledge regarding the specific diagnostic and therapeutic peculiarities of thyroid malignancies because different surgical strategies must be employed depending on the histological tumor subtype.

  6. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy for larynx carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukatch, Erwin V.; Latyshevska, Galina; Fekeshgazi, Ishtvan V.

    1995-05-01

    We made an experimental and clinical researches to examine Intraoperative Photodynamic Therapy (IPT) as a method to prevent the recidives of tumors. In experimental researches on models with radio-inducated fibrosarcomas and Erlich carcinomas of mice the best method of IPT was worked out. The therapeutic effect was studied also on patients with laryngeal cancer. In researches on C3H mice the antirecidive effect of IPT established with local administration of methylene blue and Ar-laser. We found that IPT (He-Ne laser combined with methylene blue administration) was endured by patients with laryngeal cancers without problems. We got good results of treatment 42 patients with laryngeal cancers with middle localization during three years with using IPT method. This can show the perspectives of using this method in treatment of other ENT-oncological diseases.

  7. Intraoperative neuromonitoring in major vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    So, V C; Poon, C C M

    2016-09-01

    There has been a growing interest in using intraoperative neuromonitoring to reduce the incidence of stroke and paralysis in major vascular interventions. Electroencephalography, various neurophysiological evoked potential measurements, transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy are some of the modalities currently used to detect neural injuries. A good understanding of these modalities and their interactions with anaesthesia is important to maximize their value and to allow meaningful interpretation of their results. In view of the inter-individual differences in anatomy, physiological reserves, and severity of pathological processes, neuromonitoring may be a valuable method to evaluate the well-being of the nervous system during and after surgical interventions. In this review, we summarize some of their applications, efficacies, and drawbacks in major carotid and aortic surgeries. PMID:27566804

  8. Optical technologies for intraoperative neurosurgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Pablo A; Roberts, David W; Lu, Fa-Ke; Golby, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Biomedical optics is a broadly interdisciplinary field at the interface of optical engineering, biophysics, computer science, medicine, biology, and chemistry, helping us understand light-tissue interactions to create applications with diagnostic and therapeutic value in medicine. Implementation of biomedical optics tools and principles has had a notable scientific and clinical resurgence in recent years in the neurosurgical community. This is in great part due to work in fluorescence-guided surgery of brain tumors leading to reports of significant improvement in maximizing the rates of gross-total resection. Multiple additional optical technologies have been implemented clinically, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and imaging, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and advanced quantitative methods, including quantitative fluorescence and lifetime imaging. Here we present a clinically relevant and technologically informed overview and discussion of some of the major clinical implementations of optical technologies as intraoperative guidance tools in neurosurgery.

  9. Intraoperative, real-time, functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Gering, D T; Weber, D M

    1998-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) methods have been demonstrated to noninvasively identify motor-sensory, visual, and other areas of eloquent cortex for guiding surgical intervention. Typically, fMRI data are acquired preoperatively during a conventional surgical planning MRI examination. Unlike direct cortical stimulation at the time of surgery, however, preoperative fMRI methods do not account for the potential movement of tissues (relative to the time of functional imaging) that may occur in the surgical suite as a direct result of the intervention. Recently, an MRI device has been demonstrated for use in the surgical suite that has the potential to reduce the extent of cortical exposure required for the intervention. However, the invasive requirements of cortical mapping may supersede the invasive requirements of the surgical intervention itself. Consequently, we demonstrate here a modification to the intraoperative MRI device that facilitates a noninvasive, real-time, functional MR examination in the surgical suite.

  10. Electroencephalographic responses to intraoperative subthalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Luana; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Bergamasco, Bruno; Vighetti, Sergio; Zibetti, Maurizio; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2006-10-01

    This study reports the effects of intraoperative stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on brain electrical activity in advanced Parkinson's patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study about electroencephalographic responses in the very early phase of deep brain stimulation, during the implantation of the electrodes. We found an increase of gamma band bilaterally over the sensorimotor cortex in the range 45-55 Hz, which was associated with clinical improvement as assessed by means of muscle rigidity decrease. These results indicate that the electroencephalographic gamma responses to deep brain stimulation are present at the very beginning of the treatment process, and may help better understand the short and long-tem effects of deep brain stimulation.

  11. [Intraoperative sonography to exclude thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Jakab, Ferenc; Szabó, Gyozo János

    2007-08-12

    The authors present the case of a 29-year-old female with stab wound to the abdomen. After the initial fluid resuscitation and preliminary radiographic examinations immediate laparotomy was indicated due to hypovolaemic circulatory collapse. Splenectomy and gastric suture were necessary. Following the urgent interventions a wound of the left diaphragm was noticed during the extended abdominal exploration. According to the prior examinations and the operative situation it was not clear whether the injury is penetrating. In order to avoid explorative thoracotomy intraoperative ultrasonography was performed: the transducer and the acoustic gel were placed into sterile plastic bag and the organs above the diaphragm were examined from the abdominal cavity. With this method intrathoracic injury close to the diaphragm could be clearly excluded.

  12. [Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring improves outcome in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Sarnthein, J; Krayenbühl, N; Actor, B; Bozinov, O; Bernays, R

    2012-01-18

    Intraoperative Neurophysiological Mo-nitoring (IONM) identifies eloquent areas or nerves fibers during neurosurgical interventions and monitors their function. For several interventions IONM has become mandatory in neurosurgery. IONM increases patient safety during surgery as the risk of neurological deficits is reduced. Safer surgery reduces the time needed for the intervention and thereby reduces risk. IONM contributes to complete resection of tumors, which in turn prolongs patients' survival. Complicated surgical interventions associated with an elevated risk of neurological deficits have only become possible due to IONM. IONM comprises a variety of procedures that are selected for a particular intervention. With appropriate selection of the procedures IONM has been shown to improve neurological and functional outcome after neurosurgical interventions. PMID:22252591

  13. Intraoperative patient information handover between anesthesia providers

    PubMed Central

    Choromanski, Dominik; Frederick, Joel; McKelvey, George Michael; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Currently, no reported studies have evaluated intraoperative handover among anesthesia providers. Studies on anesthetic handover in the US recovery room setting observed that handover processes are insufficient and, in many instances, significant intraoperative events are disregarded. An online survey tool was sent to anesthesia providers at US anesthesia residency programs nationwide (120 out of the 132 US programs encompassing around 4500 residents and their academic MDAs) and a smaller survey selection of CRNAs (10 institutions about 300 CRNAs in the metropolitan area of Detroit, MI, USA) to collect information on handover practices. The response rate to this survey (n = 216) was comprised of approximately 5% (n = 71) of the resident population in US anesthesia programs, 5% (n = 87) of MDAs , and 20% (n = 58) of the CRNAs. Out of all respondents (n = 212), 49.1 % had no hand-over protocol at their institution and 88% of respondents who did have institutional handover protocols believed them insufficient for effective patient handover. In addiiton, 84.8% of all responders reported situations where there was insufficient information received during a patient handover. Only 7% of the respondents reported never experiencing complications or mismanagement due to poor or incomplete hand-overs. In contrast, 60% reported rarely having complications, 31% reported sometimes having complications, and 3% reported frequent complications. In conclusion, handover transition of patient care is a vulnerable and potentially life-threatening event in the operating room. Our preliminary study suggests that current intraoperatvive handover practices among anesthesia providers are suboptimal and that national patient handover guidelines are required to improve patient safety. PMID:25332710

  14. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  15. Molecular dyes used for surgical specimen margin orientation allow for intraoperative optical assessment during breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    McClatchy, David M; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Kanick, Stephen C; Elliott, Jonathan T; Wells, Wendy A; Barth, Richard J; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-04-01

    A variety of optical techniques utilizing near-infrared (NIR) light are being proposed for intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment. However, immediately following a lumpectomy excision, the margins are inked, which preserves the orientation of the specimen but prevents optical interrogation of the tissue margins. Here, a workflow is proposed that allows for both NIR optical assessment following full specimen marking using molecular dyes which have negligible absorption and scattering in the NIR. The effect of standard surgical inks in contrast to molecular dyes for an NIR signal is shown. Further, the proposed workflow is demonstrated with full specimen intraoperative imaging on all margins directly after the lumpectomy has been excised and completely marked. This work is an important step in the path to clinical feasibility of intraoperative breast tumor margin assessment using NIR optical methods without having to compromise on the current clinical practice of inking resected specimens for margin orientation.

  16. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients.

  17. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients. PMID:25702198

  18. Intraoperative urinary cyclic AMP monitoring in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, W G; Wills, M; MacLeod, M S; Hanks, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the utility of intraoperative urinary cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (UcAMP), an indicator of parathyroid (PTH) hormone end-organ activity, as a "biochemical frozen section," signaling the real-time resolution of PTH hyperactivity during surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The unsuccessful initial neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism, leaving the patient with persistent hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue, results in part from the surgeon's inability intraoperatively to correlate a gland's gross appearance and size estimation with physiologic function. Preoperative imaging, intraoperative imaging, and intraoperative histologic/cytologic surveillance have not resolved this dilemma. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients underwent a prospective intraoperative UcAMP monitoring protocol. The patients all had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and an average preoperative serum calcium of 12.0 +/- 0.3 mg/dl. UcAMP was assayed intraoperatively using 20-minute nonequilibrium radioimmunoassay providing real-time feedback to the operating team. RESULTS: All patients had an elevated UcAMP confirming PTh hyperactivity at the beginning of the procedure. One patient, subsequently found to have an supernumerary ectopic adenoma, had four normal glands identified intraoperatively, and his intraoperative UcAMP values corroborated persistent hyperparathyroidism, the UcAMP of the remaining 26 patients decreased from 7.0 +/- 1.1 to 2.7 +/- 0.7 nm.dl GF (p < .00005) after complete adenoma excision, and they remain normocalcemic. The protocol provided useful and relevant information to the operating team, and aided in surgical decision-making, in 10 of the 27 cases (37%). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative biochemical surveillance with ucAMP monitoring reliably signals resolution of PTH hyperfunction. It is a useful adjunct to the surgeon's skill, judgment, and experience in parathyroid surgery. PMID:8387765

  19. Migratory intradural disk herniation and a strategy for intraoperative localization.

    PubMed

    Daffner, Scott D; Sedney, Cara L; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Describe a case of intradural disk herniation and a method for intraoperative localization. Methods Intradural disk herniations are uncommon but well described. The diagnosis of these lesions is often difficult, and sometimes they may be diagnosed only through an intradural exploration after an expected disk fragment cannot be located. We report the case of an intradural disk herniation with an additional diagnostic difficulty-a migrated intradural disk. Results We present the first intraoperative imaging evidence of disk migration and propose a strategy to locate intradural disk fragments prior to durotomy. Conclusion Intradural disk herniations should be suspected when intraoperative findings are not congruent with imaging findings. An intraoperative myelogram may be helpful. PMID:25648315

  20. An orthopedic tissue adhesive for targeted delivery of intraoperative biologics.

    PubMed

    Simson, Jacob; Crist, Joshua; Strehin, Iossif; Lu, Qiaozhi; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-03-01

    Tissue adhesives can bind together damaged tissues and serve as tools to deliver and localize therapeutics to facilitate regeneration. One emerging therapeutic trend in orthopedics is the use of intraoperative biologics (IOB), such as bone marrow (BM) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to stimulate healing. Here, we introduce the application of the biomaterial chondroitin sulfate succinimidyl succinate (CS-NHS) to deliver IOB in a hydrogel adhesive. We demonstrate the biomaterial's ability to bind various tissue types and its cellular biocompatibility with encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Further, we examine in detail the CS-NHS adhesive combined with BM aspirate for use in bone applications. hMSCs were encapsulated in CS-BM and cultured for 5 weeks in osteogenic medium. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated osteogenesis via upregulation of the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2 and bone markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Significant deposition of calcium and osteocalcin was detected using biochemical, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. Shear testing demonstrated that the CS-BM adhesive exhibited an adhesive strength approximately an order of magnitude stronger than fibrin glue and approaching that of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. These results indicate that CS-NHS is a promising delivery tool for IOB in orthopedic applications requiring a strong, degradable, and biocompatible adhesive that supports bone growth. PMID:23097279

  1. Revision stapedectomy: intraoperative findings, results, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Han, W W; Incesulu, A; McKenna, M J; Rauch, S D; Nadol, J B; Glynn, R J

    1997-09-01

    Seventy-four revision stapedectomies performed consecutively over 10 years (1986 to 1995) were reviewed retrospectively. The most common intraoperative findings were incus erosion, prosthesis displacement, and oval window closure. Incus erosion was more frequently associated with multiple revisions. The postoperative results were reported using the conventional method (postoperative air minus preoperative bone) as well as the guidelines recently published by the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery (postoperative air minus postoperative bone), with success rates of postoperative air-bone gap closure to within 10 dB after revision surgery of 51.6% and 45.6%, respectively. Patients with persistent conductive hearing loss (large residual air-bone gaps) after primary stapedectomy had poorer postrevision hearing results. Sensorineural hearing loss (defined as a drop in bone pure-tone average of more than 10 dB) occurred in four cases (5.4%). The number of revision surgeries, variations in operative techniques using laser or drill, and the ossicle to which the prosthesis was attached did not statistically affect the postoperative air-bone gaps. These results were compared with previously published data. PMID:9292601

  2. Intraoperative Electroretinograms before and after Core Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yagura, Kazuma; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Soiti; Terauchi, Gaku; Watanabe, Emiko; Matsumoto, Harue; Akiyama, Goichi; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinal function by intraoperative electroretinograms (ERGs) before and after core vitrectomy. Design Retrospective consecutive case series. Method Full-field photopic ERGs were recorded prior to the beginning and just after core vitrectomy using a sterilized contact lens electrode in 20 eyes that underwent non-complicated vitreous surgery. A light-emitted diode was embedded into the contact lens, and a stimulus of 150 ms on and 350 ms off at 2 Hz was delivered. The amplitudes and latencies of the a-, b-, and d-waves, photopic negative response (PhNR), and oscillatory potentials (OPs) were analyzed. The intraocular temperature at the mid-vitreous was measured at the beginning and just after the surgery with a thermoprobe. Results The intraocular temperature was 33.2 ± 1.3°C before and 29.4 ± 1.7°C after the vitrectomy. The amplitudes of the PhNR and OPs were significantly smaller after surgery, and the latencies of all components were prolonged after the surgery. These changes were not significantly correlated with the changes of the temperature. Conclusion Retinal function is reduced just after core vitrectomy in conjunction with significant temperature reduction. The differences in the degree of alterations of each ERG component suggests different sensitivity of each type of retinal neuron. PMID:27010332

  3. Intraoperative determination and display of cortical function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, W. Andrew; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Maciunas, Robert J.

    1997-05-01

    One of the most important issues in neurosurgical lesion resection is margin definition. And while there is still some effort required to exactly determine lesion boundaries from tomographic images, the lesions are at least perceptible on the scans. What is not visible is the location of function. Functional imaging such as PET and fMRI hold some promise for cortical function localization; however, intraoperative cortical mapping can provide exact localization of function without ambiguity. Since tomographic images can provide lesion margin definition and cortical mapping can provide functional information we have developed a system for combining the two in our Interactive, Image-Guided system. For cortical surface mapping we need a surface description. Brain contours are extracted from a MRI volume using a deformable model approach and rendered from multiple angular positions. As the surgeon moves a probe, its position is displayed on the view closes to the angular position of the probe. During functional mapping, positive response to stimulation result in a color overlay 'dot' added to the cortical surface display. Different colored dots are used to distinguish between motor function and language function. And a third color is used to display overlapping functionality. This information is used to guide the resection around functionally eloquent areas of the cortex.

  4. A dosimetry intercomparison phantom for intraoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Armoogum, Kris; Watson, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using very low kV x-rays is a promising new treatment modality and has proven to be effective for managing breast and neurological tumours. We have treated in excess of 75 patients using four Zeiss Intrabeam x-ray sources (XRS). To date there has been no published data of any dosimetric intercomparison of this type of x-ray source used at other cancer centres worldwide. This paper describes the design of a simple dosimetry intercomparison phantom for use with these very low kV x-ray sources. A prototype polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom has been manufactured, the dimensions of which were determined by the dimensions of the XRS, the beam energy and the attenuating properties of PMMA. The phantom is used in conjunction with Gafchromic XR Type-R film (GC-XRR) and its purpose is to measure the absorbed dose at a fixed distance from the effective point source at the tip of the XRS. The utility of this phantom is further enhanced through the use of an interlock, which eliminates the need to use the mobile gantry. We have used this phantom to conduct a qualitative dosimetric intercomparison of four Zeiss Intrabeam x-ray sources with positive results. This phantom is low cost, easy to manufacture, simple to use and could be adopted as a standard method of dosimetric intercomparison for Intrabeam x-ray sources as this mode of IORT becomes more widespread. PMID:18705612

  5. Thin-Profile Transducers for Intraoperative Hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Mera, Thomas; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    Our goal has been to develop thin-profile HIFU applicators for intraoperative hemostasis. The HIFU device consisted of a concave PZT element encased in a spoon-shaped aluminum housing with the diameter of 4 cm and thickness of 1 cm. The housing front surface had a thickness of 3/4 ultrasound wavelength in aluminum (0.92 mm) to provide acoustic matching. The device had a resonant frequency of 6.26 MHZ, and efficiency of 42%. The ultrasound field was observed using hydrophone field mapping and radiation force balance. The full-width half-maximum (FWHM) dimensions of the focal region were 0.6 mm and 2.2 mm in lateral and axial direction, respectively. The maximal intensity at the focus was 9,500 W/cm2 (in water). The device was tested using BSA-polyacrylamide gel phantom and rabbit kidney in vivo. HIFU application for 10 s produced lesions in the gel phantom (lesion width of 3 mm), and rabbit kidney in vivo (lesion width of 8 mm). A thin-profile HIFU applicator has advantages of high efficiency, simple design, and small dimensions.

  6. [Intraoperative radiotherapy in malignant bone tumors].

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, T; Kotoura, Y

    1993-06-01

    When a bone tumor is confirmed to be malignant by biopsy and has not expanded into the soft tissue, intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is indicated for most parts of the four extremities. The irradiation area is exposed through an extensive skin incision, and the soft tissues are opened and retracted away from the irradiation area, leaving a layer of normal tissue directly covering the tumor. The irradiation is performed with 12-26 MeV electron beams from a betatron at a dose of 50-100 Gy, depending on the radiosensitivity of each tumor. The multifocal bilateral irradiation method is the best for minimizing complications of the soft tissues. Since 1978, we have performed IORT in combination with chemotherapy in 41 cases of malignant bone tumors and experienced only five cases of tumor recurrence one in the irradiated area and four in the non-irradiated area. Joint function in the irradiated limb was excellent. However, due to the high incidence of pathological fracture after IORT in osteolytic tumors, the limb eventually had to be replaced by a prosthesis. After 1984 when cisplatinum was introduced to our chemotherapy protocol, the cumulative 5 year survival rate increased to 81%, with the irradiated lesion preserved in situ in osteoblastic tumors and replaced with a prosthesis in osteolytic tumors.

  7. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring (IONM) for Cordotomy Procedures.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Faisal R

    2015-09-01

    This case illustrates the benefits of utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for preventing injury to sensory/motor pathways of the spinal cord during a cordotomy procedure to relieve pain. Cordotomy has been used effectively in the treatment of visceral pain but comes with a high risk of damaging motor and sensory pathways due to close proximity of lesion. The subject is a 47-year-old female with a pancoast tumor of the left lung, left brachialplexopathy, and severe neuropathic pain syndrome, refractory to medical therapy. A palliative cordotomy procedure was elected for pain control. Baseline bilateral posterior tibial and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) were present except in the left upper extremity. Transcranial electric motor evoked potential (TCeMEP) baselines were present in all extremities except the left upper. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. The spine was exposed at C2-C3 and a right single anterolateral cordotomy was performed with an immediate drop in TCeMEPs (70-80% amplitude reduction) in the right upper and right lower extremities. The surgeon decided to stop the cordotomy at that point. Postoperatively, the patient had no sensory or motor deficit. In this patient, TCeMEPs were used effectively to guide the surgeon in preventing damage to the spinal cord that could lead to motor deficits. PMID:26630809

  8. Photoacoustic intra-operative nodal staging using clinically approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootendorst, Diederik J.; Fratila, Raluca M.; Visscher, Martijn; Ten Haken, Bennie; van Wezel, Richard; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2013-02-01

    Detection of tumor metastases in the lymphatic system is essential for accurate staging of various malignancies, however fast, accurate and cost-effective intra-operative evaluation of the nodal status remains difficult to perform with common available medical imaging techniques. In recent years, numerous studies have confirmed the additional value of superparamagnetic iron oxide dispersions (SPIOs) for nodal staging purposes, prompting the clearance of different SPIO dispersions for clinical practice. We evaluate whether a combination of photoacoustic (PA) imaging and a clinically approved SPIO dispersion, could be applied for intra-operative nodal staging. Metastatic adenocarcinoma was inoculated in Copenhagen rats for 5 or 8 days. After SPIO injection, the lymph nodes were photoacoustically imaged both in vivo and ex vivo whereafter imaging results were correlated with MR and histology. Results were compared to a control group without tumor inoculation. In the tumor groups clear irregularities, as small as 1 mm, were observed in the PA contrast pattern of the nodes together with an decrease of PA response. These irregularities could be correlated to the absence of contrast in the MR images and could be linked to metastatic deposits seen in the histological slides. The PA and MR images of the control animals did not show these features. We conclude that the combination of photoacoustic imaging with a clinically approved iron oxide nanoparticle dispersion is able to detect lymph node metastases in an animal model. This approach opens up new possibilities for fast intra-operative nodal staging in a clinical setting.

  9. Intra-operative micro-electrode recording in functional neurosurgery: Past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Konar, Subhas; Bir, Shyamal; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-10-01

    The field of functional neurosurgery has experienced a rise, fall and lastly a renaissance over the past 75years. Micro-electrode recording (MER) played a key role during this eventful journey. However, as the intra-operative MRI continues to evolve, a pertinent question about the utility of MER has been raised in recent years. In this article, we critically review these current controversies. The English literature is reviewed and the complex technique of MER is discussed in a simplified manner. The improvement of neuroimaging and its application in functional neurosurgery, especially in deep brain stimulation, is discussed. Finally, the current controversies and technical advances which can direct the future are reviewed. The results of existing meta-analyses addressing the controversies are summarized. Wide variations of pre-operative and intra-operative targeting methods have been described in the literature. Though functional neurosurgery is generally safe, complications do occur and multiple passes during MER can certainly add to the risk of inadvertent hemorrhage and infection. Additionally, the recent introduction of newer MRI modalities has ensured better delineation of the target. However, MER is still useful to address brain shift, for mapping of newer targets, for ablative surgeries and in centers without an intra-operative imaging facility. In the current scenario, it is nearly impossible to conduct a prospective study to decide the utility of MER. The importance of MER may further diminish in the future as a routine procedure, but its role as a gold standard procedure may still persist.

  10. Intra-operative micro-electrode recording in functional neurosurgery: Past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Konar, Subhas; Bir, Shyamal; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-10-01

    The field of functional neurosurgery has experienced a rise, fall and lastly a renaissance over the past 75years. Micro-electrode recording (MER) played a key role during this eventful journey. However, as the intra-operative MRI continues to evolve, a pertinent question about the utility of MER has been raised in recent years. In this article, we critically review these current controversies. The English literature is reviewed and the complex technique of MER is discussed in a simplified manner. The improvement of neuroimaging and its application in functional neurosurgery, especially in deep brain stimulation, is discussed. Finally, the current controversies and technical advances which can direct the future are reviewed. The results of existing meta-analyses addressing the controversies are summarized. Wide variations of pre-operative and intra-operative targeting methods have been described in the literature. Though functional neurosurgery is generally safe, complications do occur and multiple passes during MER can certainly add to the risk of inadvertent hemorrhage and infection. Additionally, the recent introduction of newer MRI modalities has ensured better delineation of the target. However, MER is still useful to address brain shift, for mapping of newer targets, for ablative surgeries and in centers without an intra-operative imaging facility. In the current scenario, it is nearly impossible to conduct a prospective study to decide the utility of MER. The importance of MER may further diminish in the future as a routine procedure, but its role as a gold standard procedure may still persist. PMID:27396672

  11. Assessing the registration of CT-scan data to intraoperative x rays by fusing x rays and preoperative information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueziec, Andre P.

    1999-05-01

    This paper addresses a key issue of providing clinicians with visual feedback to validate a computer-generated registration of pre-operative and intra-operative data. With this feedback information, the clinician may decide to proceed with a computer-assisted intervention, revert to a manual intervention, or potentially provide information to the computer system to improve the registration. The paper focuses on total hip replacement (THR) surgery, but similar techniques could be applied to other types of interventions or therapy, including orthopedics, neurosurgery, and radiation therapy. Pre-operative CT data is used to plane the surgery (select an implant type, size and precise position), and is registered to intra-operative X-ray images, allowing to execute the plan: mill a cavity with the implant's shape. (Intra-operative X-ray images must be calibrated with respect to the surgical device executing the plan). One novel technique presented in this paper consists of simulating a post-operative X-ray image of the tissue of interest before doing the procedure, by projecting the registered implant onto an intra-operative X- ray image (corrected for distortion or not), providing clinicians with familiar and easy to interpret images. As an additional benefit, this method provides new means for comparing various strategies for registering pre-operative data to the physical space of the operating room.

  12. Intraoperative complications in pediatric neurosurgery: review of 1807 cases.

    PubMed

    van Lindert, Erik J; Arts, Sebastian; Blok, Laura M; Hendriks, Mark P; Tielens, Luc; van Bilsen, Martine; Delye, Hans

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal literature exists on the intraoperative complication rate of pediatric neurosurgical procedures with respect to both surgical and anesthesiological complications. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish intraoperative complication rates to provide patients and parents with information on which to base their informed consent and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of pediatric neurosurgical care. METHODS A clinical complication registration database comprising a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out in a general neurosurgical department from January 1, 2004, until July 1, 2012, was analyzed. During the study period, 1807 procedures were performed on patients below the age of 17 years. RESULTS Sixty-four intraoperative complications occurred in 62 patients (3.5% of procedures). Intraoperative mortality was 0.17% (n = 3). Seventy-eight percent of the complications (n = 50) were related to the neurosurgical procedures, whereas 22% (n = 14) were due to anesthesiology. The highest intraoperative complication rates were for cerebrovascular surgery (7.7%) and tumor surgery (7.4%). The most frequently occurring complications were cerebrovascular complications (33%). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative complications are not exceptional during pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Awareness of these complications is the first step in preventing them. PMID:27231823

  13. Our intraoperative boost radiotherapy experience and applications

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Semra; Alan, Ömür; Yalçın, Orhan; Türkmen, Aygen; Dizdar, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience since November 2013, and case selection criteria for intraoperative boost radiotherapy (IObRT) that significantly reduces the local recurrence rate after breast conserving surgery in patients with breast cancer. Material and Methods: Patients who were suitable for IObRT were identified within the group of patients who were selected for breast conserving surgery at our breast council. A MOBETRON (mobile linear accelerator for IObRT) was used for IObRt during surgery. Results: Patients younger than 60 years old with <3 cm invasive ductal cancer in one focus (or two foci within 2 cm), with a histologic grade of 2–3, and a high possibility of local recurrence were admitted for IObRT application. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed and advancement flaps were prepared according to the size and inclination of the conus following evaluation of tumor size and surgical margins by pathology. Distance to the thoracic wall was measured, and a radiation oncologist and radiation physicist calculated the required dose. Anesthesia was regulated with slower ventilation frequency, without causing hypoxia. The skin and incision edges were protected, the field was radiated (with 6 MeV electron beam of 10 Gy) and the incision was closed. In our cases, there were no major postoperative surgical or early radiotherapy related complications. Conclusion: The completion of another stage of local therapy with IObRT during surgery positively effects sequencing of other treatments like chemotherapy, hormonotherapy and radiotherapy, if required. IObRT increases disease free and overall survival, as well as quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26985156

  14. A light blanket for intraoperative photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yida; Wang, Ken; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2009-06-01

    A novel light source - light blanket composed of a series of parallel cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) is designed to substitute the hand-held point source in the PDT treatment of the malignant pleural or intraperitoneal diseases. It achieves more uniform light delivery and less operation time in operating room. The preliminary experiment was performed for a 9cmx9cm light blanket composed of 8 9-cm CDFs. The linear diffusers were placed in parallel fingerlike pockets. The blanket is filled with 0.2 % intralipid scattering medium to improve the uniformity of light distribution. 0.3-mm aluminum foil is used to shield and reflect the light transmission. The full width of the profile of light distribution at half maximum along the perpendicular direction is 7.9cm and 8.1cm with no intralipid and with intralipid. The peak value of the light fluence rate profiles per input power is 11.7mW/cm2/W and 8.6mW/cm2/W respectively. The distribution of light field is scanned using the isotropic detector and the motorized platform. The average fluence rate per input power is 8.6 mW/cm2/W and the standard deviation is 1.6 mW/cm2/W for the scan in air, 7.4 mW/cm2/W and 1.1 mW/cm2/W for the scan with the intralipid layer. The average fluence rate per input power and the standard deviation are 20.0 mW/cm2/W and 2.6 mW/cm2/W respectively in the tissue mimic phantom test. The light blanket design produces a reasonably uniform field for effective light coverage and is flexible to confirm to anatomic structures in intraoperative PDT. It also has great potential value for superficial PDT treatment in clinical application.

  15. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  16. Intraoperative value of the thompson test.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Daniel J; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity of the Thompson sign and determine whether the deep flexors of the foot can produce a falsely intact Achilles tendon.Ten unmatched above-the-knee lower extremity cadaveric specimens were studied. In group 1, the Achilles tendon was sectioned into 25% increments. The Thompson maneuver was performed after each sequential sectioning of the Achilles tendon, including after it had been completely sectioned. If the Thompson sign was still intact after complete release of the Achilles tendon, we proceeded to release the tendon, and tendon flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and posterior tibial tendons. The Thompson test was performed after the release of each tendon. In group 2, the tendon releases were performed in a reverse order to that of group 1, with the Thompson test performed after each release. In group 1, the Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the tendon. After complete (100%) release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens. In group 2, the Thompson sign remained intact after sectioning of the posterior tibial, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons in all specimens. The Thompson sign remained intact in all specimens after sectioning of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the Achilles tendon. After complete release of the tendon, the Thompson sign was absent in all specimens.The Thompson test is an accurate clinical test for diagnosing complete Achilles tendon ruptures. However, it might not be a useful test for diagnosing partial Achilles tendon ruptures. Our findings also call into question the usefulness of the Thompson test in the intraoperative setting.

  17. Intraoperative delivery of cell-killing boost radiation - a review of current and future methods.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Anke; van Oepen, Alexander; Friebe, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Techniques for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), the applications of tumor bed radiation immediately after surgery or utilising intracavitary access, have evolved in recent years. They are designed to substitute or complement conventional external beam radiation therapy in selected patients. IORT has become an excellent treatment option because of good long-term therapy outcomes. The combination of IORT with external beam radiation therapy has the potential to improve local control. The purpose of this paper is to present IORT techniques using gamma and electronic sources, as well as more conventional nuclide-based approaches and to evaluate their effectiveness. Common techniques for radiation of tumor cavities are listed and compared. Radionuclide IORT methods are represented by balloon and hybrid multi-catheter devices in combination with appropriate afterloaders. Electron beam therapy dedicated for use as intraoperative radiation system is reviewed and miniature x-ray sources in electronic radiation therapy are presented. These systems could further simplify IORT, because they are easy to use and require no shielding due to their relatively low photon energies. In combination with additional imaging techniques (MRI, US, CT and NucMed) the application of these miniature x-ray sources or catheter-based nuclide therapies could be the future of IORT. PMID:27161210

  18. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  19. Intra-operative electrooculographic monitoring to prevent post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Bharadwaj, Suparna; Chandramouli, BA

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intra-operative identification and preservation of extraocular motor nerves is one of the main goals of surgeries for skull base tumours and this is done by monitoring the extraocular movement (EOM). Intra-operative electromyographic monitoring has been reported, but it is a complex and skilful process. Electrooculography (EOG) is a simple and reliable technique for monitoring EOMs. We aimed to assess the utility of EOG monitoring in preventing extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, intra-operative EOG recordings were obtained using disposable needle electrodes placed on the periorbital skin and the polarity of the waves noted for interpretation. Triggered as well as continuous EOG responses were recorded after monopolar electrode stimulation of cranial nerve (CN) during tumour removal which helped the surgeon with careful dissection and avoiding potential nerve injuries. Results: Of the 11 cases monitored, oculomotor and abducent nerves were identified in all cases, but the trochlear nerve could not be definitively identified. Six patients had no pre- or post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction. The other five patients had pre-existing deficits before surgery, which recovered completely in two, significantly in one, and did not improve in two patients at 3–6 months follow-up. Conclusions: EOG was found to be a simple and reliable method of monitoring extraocular motor nerves (CNs III and VI) intraoperatively. PMID:27601738

  20. Advantages of microscope-integrated intraoperative online optical coherence tomography: usage in Boston keratoprosthesis type I surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebelmann, Sebastian; Steven, Philipp; Hos, Deniz; Hüttmann, Gereon; Lankenau, Eva; Bachmann, Björn; Cursiefen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Boston keratoprosthesis (KPro) type I is a technique to treat patients with corneal diseases that are not amenable to conventional keratoplasty. Correct assembly and central implantation of the prosthesis are crucial for postoperative visual recovery. This study investigates the potential benefit of intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor KPro surgery. Retrospective case series are presented for two patients who underwent Boston KPro type I implantation. The surgery in both patients was monitored intraoperatively using a commercially available intraoperative OCT (iOCT) device mounted on a surgical microscope. Microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT was able to evaluate the correct assembly and implantation of the KPro. All parts of the prosthesis were visible, and interfaces between the corneal graft and titanium backplate or anterior optics were clearly depictable. Moreover, iOCT visualized a gap between the backplate and graft in one case, and in the other case, a gap between the anterior optic and graft. Neither gap was visible with a conventional surgical microscope. The gap between the anterior optic and the graft could easily be corrected. Microscope-integrated iOCT delivers enhanced information, adding to the normal surgical microscope view during KPro surgery. Correct assembly can be controlled as well as the correct placement of the Boston KPro into the anterior chamber.

  1. Intra-operative electrooculographic monitoring to prevent post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Bharadwaj, Suparna; Chandramouli, BA

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intra-operative identification and preservation of extraocular motor nerves is one of the main goals of surgeries for skull base tumours and this is done by monitoring the extraocular movement (EOM). Intra-operative electromyographic monitoring has been reported, but it is a complex and skilful process. Electrooculography (EOG) is a simple and reliable technique for monitoring EOMs. We aimed to assess the utility of EOG monitoring in preventing extraocular motor nerve dysfunction during skull base surgeries. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, intra-operative EOG recordings were obtained using disposable needle electrodes placed on the periorbital skin and the polarity of the waves noted for interpretation. Triggered as well as continuous EOG responses were recorded after monopolar electrode stimulation of cranial nerve (CN) during tumour removal which helped the surgeon with careful dissection and avoiding potential nerve injuries. Results: Of the 11 cases monitored, oculomotor and abducent nerves were identified in all cases, but the trochlear nerve could not be definitively identified. Six patients had no pre- or post-operative extraocular motor nerve dysfunction. The other five patients had pre-existing deficits before surgery, which recovered completely in two, significantly in one, and did not improve in two patients at 3–6 months follow-up. Conclusions: EOG was found to be a simple and reliable method of monitoring extraocular motor nerves (CNs III and VI) intraoperatively.

  2. Intraoperative ultrasound assistance for percutaneous repair of the acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Silvio; Patricola, Alessandro Antonio; Stancati, Andrea; Santucci, Attillio

    2014-12-01

    Various methods have been used to treat the acute Achilles tendon rupture. Traditional open repair is associated with a higher rate of complications. Percutaneous methods avoid most of the disadvantages of open surgical treatment, but the degree of tendon regeneration cannot be ensured. The authors prospectively followed 40 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture who underwent percutaneous repair with intraoperative ultrasound assistance an average of 13 months after the injury. No surgery-related complications, such as wounds or deep infections, sural nerve injury, or re-rupture, were detected at follow-up. This technique avoids injury to the sural nerve, minimizes wound complications, and provides a strong repair.

  3. Intradural Intramedullary Mixed Type Hemangioma: Optimizing the Surgical Management through Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Situmeang, Adrian; Safri, Ahmad Yanuar; Fadhly, Zulfa Indah K.

    2015-01-01

    Intradural intramedullary mixed type hemangioma is a rare histotype of primary spinal cord tumors, though it can carry a severe clinical burden leading to limb dysfunction or motor and sensory disturbances. Timely intervention with radical resection is the hallmark of treatment but achieving it is not an easy task even for experienced neurosurgeons. We herein present an exemplificative case presenting with sudden paraplegia in which total resection was achieved under intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring. A thorough discussion on the operative technique and the role of neuromonitoring in allowing a safe surgical management of primary spinal cord tumors is presented. PMID:26839729

  4. Comparison of intraoperative completion flowmeter versus duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography for carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gabor A; Calligaro, Keith D; Kolakowski, Steven; Doerr, Kevin J; McAffee-Bennett, Sandy; Muller, Kathy; Dougherty, Matthew J

    Intraoperative completion studies of the internal carotid artery following carotid endarterectomy are recommended to ensure technical perfection of the repair. Transit time ultrasound flowmeter does not require trained technicians, requires less time than other completion studies such as duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography, and is noninvasive. Flowmetry was compared with duplex ultrasonography and contrast arteriography to determine if the relatively simpler flowmetry could replace these two more widely accepted completion studies in the intraoperative assessment of carotid endarterectomy. Comparative intraoperative assessment was performed in 116 carotid endarterectomies using all three techniques between December 1, 2000 and November 30, 2003. Eversion endarterectomy was performed in 51 cases and standard endarterectomy with prosthetic patching in 65 cases. Patients underwent completion flowmetry, duplex ultrasonography, and contrast arteriography studies of the exposed arteries, which were performed by vascular fellows or senior surgical residents under direct supervision of board-certified vascular surgeons. Duplex ultrasonography surveillance was performed 1 and 6 months postoperatively and annually thereafter. Mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). The combined ipsilateral stroke and death rate was 0%. The mean internal carotid artery flow using flowmetry was 249 mL/min (range, 60-750 mL/min). Five (4.3%) patients had flow < 100 mL/min as measured with flowmetry, but completion contrast arteriography and duplex ultrasonography were normal and none of the arteries were re-explored. One carotid endarterectomy was re-explored based on completion duplex ultrasonography that showed markedly elevated internal carotid artery peak systolic velocity (> 500 cm/sec); however, exploration was normal and completion flowmetry and contrast arteriography were normal. Duplex ultrasonography studies revealed internal carotid artery peak systolic

  5. Rate of intraoperative complications during cataract surgery following intravitreal injections.

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Jiramongkolchai, K; Stinnett, S; Daluvoy, M; Kim, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the effect of prior intravitreal injections on intraoperative and postoperative complication rates associated with cataract surgery.MethodsA retrospective cohort analysis reviewed 10 105 cataract surgery procedures performed by experienced surgeons at the Duke Eye Center from 1 January 2005 to 10 December 2012. A group of 197 eyes with prior intravitreal injections was compared with an equal number of matched control eyes without prior injection using the Fisher's exact test of difference in proportions and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test of difference in means. Outcomes analyzed included baseline demographic information, preoperative clinical characteristics, prevalence of intraoperative complications, and postoperative intraocular pressure, glaucoma surgery, and glaucoma medication requirement through 1 year following cataract surgery.ResultsAn increased rate of intraoperative complications was identified during cataract surgery in eyes with prior intravitreal injections compared with control eyes (3 vs 0%, P=0.030). Injection eyes required more glaucoma medications at 1 year, but no difference was identified if steroid injections were excluded. No difference in postoperative IOP or glaucoma surgery was identified. No cases of endophthalmitis were reported.ConclusionsA history of intravitreal injections may be a risk factor for cataract surgery-related intraoperative complications. We hypothesize this may be due to unidentified iatrogenic lens trauma during intravitreal injections. Particular attention to the posterior capsule during preoperative assessment and intraoperatively is recommended in eyes undergoing cataract surgery with a prior history of intravitreal injections.

  6. Intraoperative bowel cleansing tool in active locomotion capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ciuti, G; Tognarelli, S; Verbeni, A; Menciassi, A; Dario, P

    2013-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) can be considered an example of "disruptive technology" since it represents a bright alternative to traditional diagnostic methodologies. If compared with traditional endoscopy, bowel cleansing procedure in CE becomes of greater importance, due to the impossibility to intraoperatively operate on unclean gastrointestinal tract areas. Considering the promising results and benefits obtained in the field of CE for gastrointestinal diagnosis and intervention, the authors approached the bowel cleansing issue with the final aim to propose an innovative and easy-to-use intraoperative cleansing system to be applied to an active locomotion softly-tethered capsule device, already developed by the authors. The system, that has to be intended as an additional tool for intraoperatively cleansing procedure of the colonic tract, is composed by a flexible tube with a metallic deflector attached to the distal end; it can be headed to the target area through the capsule operating channel. Performances of the colonoscopic capsule and intraoperative cleansing capabilities were successfully confirmed both in an in-vitro and ex-vivo experimental session. The innovative intraoperative cleansing system demonstrated promising results in terms of water injection, colonic wall cleansing procedure and subsequent water suction, thus guaranteeing to reduce the risk of inadequate visualization of the mucosa in endoscopic procedures. PMID:24110819

  7. The difficult intraoperative nasogastric tube intubation: A review of the literature and a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Socias, Stephanie M; Ciesla, David J; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Camporesi, Enrico M; Mangar, Devanand

    2014-01-01

    Nasogastric tube intubation of a patient under general anesthesia with an endotracheal tube in place can pose a challenge to the most experienced anesthesiologist. Physiologic and pathologic variations in a patient's functional anatomy can present further difficulty. While numerous techniques to the difficult nasogastric tube intubation have been described, there is no consensus for a standard approach. Therefore, selecting the most appropriate approach requires a working knowledge of the techniques available, mindful consideration of individual patient and clinical factors, and the operator's experience and preference. This article reviews the relevant literature regarding various approaches to the difficult nasogastric tube intubation with descriptions of techniques and results from comparative studies if available. Additionally, we present a novel approach using a retrograde technique for the difficult intraoperative nasogastric tube intubation.

  8. Quantitative Intraoperative Torsional Forced Duction Test

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Ho; Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We developed a method for quantifying intraoperative torsional forced ductions and validated the new test by comparing patients with oblique dysfunction and controls. Design Comparative case series Subjects We studied 33 eyes with oblique dysfunction (9 presumed congenital superior oblique palsy (SOP), 13 acquired SOP, 7 Brown syndrome, and 4 Inverted Brown syndrome) and 31 controls. We also studied maximal excyclorotation after superior oblique (SO) disinsertion in 6 eyes and maximal incyclorotation after inferior oblique (IO) disinsertion in 2 eyes. Methods Under deep general anesthesia, the 12 and 6 o’clock positions at the limbus were marked and the globe was maximally excyclorotated and incyclorotated without retroplacement until the first resistance was felt, and the angle of rotation (in degrees) was read on a Mendez ring by the surgeon. A photograph was taken in each position to be read by a masked observer. Main outcome measures Maximal excyclorotation and maximal incyclorotation in each oblique dysfunction and in controls, by both surgeon’s report and photographic assessment. We duplicated the photographs to evaluate test-retest reliability and to evaluate agreement between the surgeon’s assessments and photographic assessment. Results Surgeon’s assessment revealed greater maximal excyclorotation in presumed congenital SOP than controls (median, 40 degrees versus 30 degrees). Maximal excyclorotation in acquired SOP was similar to controls (30 degrees in both). Eyes with Brown syndrome and Inverted Brown syndrome had lower maximal excyclorotation than controls (10 degrees and 20 degrees versus 30 degrees, respectively). Maximal incyclorotation in inverted Brown syndrome was lower than controls (12.5 degrees versus 30 degrees) whereas it was similar to controls in presumed congenital SOP, acquired SOP and Brown syndrome (30 degrees in each condition). Median maximal excyclorotation after SO disinsertion was 62.5 degrees and maximal

  9. Intraoperative Monitoring and Mapping of the Functional Integrity of the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Conejero, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic damage is very high in surgical interventions in or around the brainstem. However, surgical techniques and intraoperative neuromonitoring (ION) have evolved sufficiently to increase the likelihood of successful functional outcomes in many patients. We present a critical review of the methodologies available for intraoperative monitoring and mapping of the brainstem. There are three main groups of techniques that can be used to assess the functional integrity of the brainstem: 1) mapping, which provides rapid anatomical identification of neural structures using electrical stimulation with a hand-held probe, 2) monitoring, which provides real-time information about the functional integrity of the nervous tissue, and 3) techniques involving the examination of brainstem reflexes in the operating room, which allows for the evaluation of the reflex responses that are known to be crucial for most brainstem functions. These include the blink reflex, which is already in use, and other brainstem reflexes that are being explored, such as the masseter H-reflex. This is still under development but is likely to have important functional consequences. Today an abundant armory of ION methods is available for the monitoring and mapping of the functional integrity of the brainstem during surgery. ION methods are essential in surgery either in or around the brainstem; they facilitate the removal of lesions and contribute to notable improvements in the functional outcomes of patients. PMID:27449909

  10. Intraoperative Targeted Optical Imaging: A Guide towards Tumor-Free Margins in Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Bean, Jero; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last several decades, development of various imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography greatly facilitated the early detection of cancer. Another important aspect that is closely related to the survival of cancer patients is complete tumor removal during surgical resection. The major obstacle in achieving this goal is to distinguish between tumor tissue and normal tissue during surgery. Currently, tumor margins are typically assessed by visual assessment and palpation of the tumor intraoperatively. However, the possibility of microinvasion to the surrounding tissues makes it difficult to determine an adequate tumor-free excision margin, often forcing the surgeons to perform wide excisions including the healthy tissue that may contain vital structures. It would be ideal to remove the tumor completely, with minimal safety margins, if surgeons could see precise tumor margins during the operation. Molecular imaging with optical techniques can visualize the tumors via fluorophore conjugated probes targeting tumor markers such as proteins and enzymes that are upregulated during malignant transformation. Intraoperative use of this technique may facilitate complete excision of the tumor and tumor micromasses located beyond the visual capacity of the naked eye, ultimately improving the clinical outcome and survival rates of cancer patients. PMID:24372232

  11. Intraoperative vascular DIVA surgery reveals angiogenic hotspots in tumor zones of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Fan, Zheng; Buslei, Rolf; Merkel, Andreas; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas belong to the most threatening tumor entities and are hallmarked by rapid proliferation, hypervascularization and an invasive growth pattern. The primary obstacle in surgical treatment lies in differentiation between healthy and pathological tissue at the tumor margins, where current visualization methods reach their limits. Here, we report on a novel technique (vascular dual intraoperative visualization approach - vDIVA) enabling visualization of different tumor zones (TZ I–III) on the basis of angiogenic hotspots. We investigated glioblastoma patients who underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery with simultaneous intraoperative ICG fluorescence angiography. This vDIVA technique revealed hypervascularized areas which were further histologically investigated. Neuropathological assessments revealed tissue areas at the resection margins corresponding to TZ II, and postoperative CD34- and Map2 immunostaining confirmed these angiogenic hotspots to be occupied by glioma cells. Hence, the vascular architecture in this transitional zone could be well differentiated from both primary tumor bulk and healthy brain parenchyma. These data demonstrate that ICG fluorescence angiography improves state-of-the-art glioma surgery techniques and facilitates the future characterization of polyclonal attributes of malignant gliomas. PMID:25609379

  12. Intraoperative positioning of mobile C-arms using artificial fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Philipp; Wang, Lejing; Kutter, Oliver; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro-Michael; Navab, Nassir

    2010-02-01

    In trauma and orthopedic surgery, imaging through X-ray fluoroscopy with C-arms is ubiquitous. This leads to an increase in ionizing radiation applied to patient and clinical staff. Placing these devices in the desired position to visualize a region of interest is a challenging task, requiring both skill of the operator and numerous X-rays for guidance. We propose an extension to C-arms for which position data is available that provides the surgeon with so called artificial fluoroscopy. This is achieved by computing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from pre- or intraoperative CT data. The approach is based on C-arm motion estimation, for which we employ a Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm (CAMC) system, and a rigid registration of the patient to the CT data. Using this information we are able to generate DRRs and simulate fluoroscopic images. For positioning tasks, this system appears almost exactly like conventional fluoroscopy, however simulating the images from the CT data in realtime as the C-arm is moved without the application of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, preoperative planning can be done on the CT data and then visualized during positioning, e.g. defining drilling axes for pedicle approach techniques. Since our method does not require external tracking it is suitable for deployment in clinical environments and day-to-day routine. An experiment with six drillings into a lumbar spine phantom showed reproducible accuracy in positioning the C-arm, ranging from 1.1 mm to 4.1 mm deviation of marker points on the phantom compared in real and virtual images.

  13. How to avoid the risk of intraoperative cartilage damage in anatomic four tunnel double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Benetos, Ioannis S; Sartory, Nico; He, Zhenming; Hariri, Nawid; Pässler, Hans H

    2010-01-01

    Double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is technically demanding. In order to create four anatomical anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bone tunnels many surgeons adopt new ways of tibial and femoral bone tunnel drilling. From surgical experience, these technical changes might increase the risk for intraoperative pitfalls. An intraoperative articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle or the medial tibial plateau could be disastrous for the patient. It may be caused by an insufficient anteromedial portal technique for femoral AM and PL bone tunnel drilling or flat tibial AM or PL bone tunnel reaming. Potential pitfalls may be avoided by small modifications to the surgical technique. In this present technical note, a sequence of surgical steps are described, which may help to avoid articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau in anatomical four tunnel DB ACL reconstruction.

  14. Robust endoscopic pose estimation for intraoperative organ-mosaicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Daniel; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Suwelack, Stefan; Wagner, Martin; Kenngott, Hannes; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2016-03-01

    The number of minimally invasive procedures is growing every year. These procedures are highly complex and very demanding for the surgeons. It is therefore important to provide intraoperative assistance to alleviate these difficulties. For most computer-assistance systems, like visualizing target structures with augmented reality, a registration step is required to map preoperative data (e.g. CT images) to the ongoing intraoperative scene. Without additional hardware, the (stereo-) endoscope is the prime intraoperative data source and with it, stereo reconstruction methods can be used to obtain 3D models from target structures. To link reconstructed parts from different frames (mosaicking), the endoscope movement has to be known. In this paper, we present a camera tracking method that uses dense depth and feature registration which are combined with a Kalman Filter scheme. It provides a robust position estimation that shows promising results in ex vivo and in silico experiments.

  15. The Use of Optical Coherence Tomography in Intraoperative Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Migacz, Justin; O’Connell, Rachelle; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed diagnostic ophthalmic imaging but until recently has been limited to the clinic setting. The development of spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), with its improved speed and resolution, along with the development of a handheld OCT scanner, enabled portable imaging of patients unable to sit in a conventional tabletop scanner. This handheld SD-OCT unit has proven useful in examinations under anesthesia and, more recently, in intraoperative imaging of preoperative and postoperative manipulations. Recently, several groups have pioneered the development of novel OCT modalities, such as microscope-mounted OCT systems. Although still immature, the development of these systems is directed toward real-time imaging of surgical maneuvers in the intraoperative setting. This article reviews intraoperative imaging of the posterior and anterior segment using the handheld SD-OCT and recent advances toward real-time microscope-mounted intrasurgical imaging. PMID:21790116

  16. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction. PMID:24934513

  17. A Comprehensive System for Intraoperative 3D Brain Deformation Recovery

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    During neurosurgery, brain deformation renders preoperative images unreliable for localizing pathologic structures. In order to visualize the current brain anatomy, it is necessary to nonrigidly warp these preoperative images to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished using a biomechanical model driven by sparse intraoperative information. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed which can infer volumetric brain deformation given the cortical surface displacement. This model was tested on both a realistic brain phantom and in vivo, proving its ability to account for large brain deformations. Also, an efficient semiautomatic strategy for preoperative cortical feature detection is outlined, since accurate segmentation of cortical features can aid intraoperative cortical surface tracking. PMID:18044612

  18. [Intraoperative ultrasonography for common bile duct exploration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Bende, Sándor; Botos, Akos; Ottlakán, Aurél; Pásztor, Pál; Pálfi, Attila; Liptay-Wagner, Péter

    2003-12-01

    The "Endomedix Laparoscan" and the "Leopard" and "Panther" intraoperative ultrasounds were successfully used for the detection of unsuspected common bile duct stones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Out of 60 patients six had common bile duct (CBD) stones and in one patient sludge has been seen. In patients with CBD stones, four small calculi have been observed in one patient, despite negative intraoperative cholangiography (IC). In an other patient a stone in the retropancreatic part of the CBD was detected. Based on preoperative findings CBD stone was unsuspected. We found that intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) is useful for in investigating the CBD to detect unsuspected common bile duct stones. It can be used for the examination of other organs (liver, pancreas, hepatoduodenal ligament) as well. The method is easy to perform, fairly simple and informative so it can replace IC during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  19. [Intraoperative verification of a perforator flap vascularization by indocyanine green angiography].

    PubMed

    Royer, E; Rausky, J; Binder, J-P; May, P; Virzi, D; Revol, M

    2014-02-01

    After Koshima and Soeda first described perforator flaps in 1988, Wei has improved the technique by describing the "free style perforator flap". These flaps have the advantage of being performed on all skin perforators and in reducing donor site morbidity. The disadvantage, however is that the size of their angiosome is not defined and the evaluation of their relay on the experience of the surgeon. An evaluation of the size of an angiosome by conducting intraoperative angiography is proposed. Intraoperative angiography is performed after injection of indocyanine green. Stimulation of the indocyanine green by infrared causes the emission of fluorescent radiation. This fluorescence is then detected by a specific camera that displays real-time visualization of the skin's perfusion. We present the case of a 39-year-old patient who had an open tibial pilon fracture, for which we performed a pedicled propeller flap based on a posterior tibial perforator. Angiography was used to determine accurately the optimal skin perfusion of the propeller flap, which was based on a perforator from the posterior tibial artery. Angiography identified several levels of skin perfusion with a high fluorescence, intermediate and absent. The non-vascularized part of the skin paddle was resected. Given the unreliability of this technique, hypoperfused area was retained. Debridment of this area, however was necessary at day 5 postoperative with repositionning of the flap. Indocyanine green angiography may be a useful decision-making tool for intraoperative surgeon. It allows to adjust the size of the propeller flap's skin paddle to it angiosome. However, this evaluation method needs to be improved with the introduction of a quantitative threshold.

  20. Intraoperative Ultrasound-Fluoroscopy Fusion can Enhance Prostate Brachytherapy Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter F.; Tutar, Ismail B.; Narayanan, Sreeram; Arthurs, Sandra; Cho, Paul S.; Kim, Yongmin; Merrick, Gregory; Wallner, Kent E.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry system. Method and Materials: Twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer with Pd-103 implantation. After the execution of the treatment plan, two sets of TRUS images were collected using the longitudinal and axial transducers of a biplanar probe. Then, three fluoroscopic images were acquired at 0, -15 and +15{sup o}. The three-dimensional locations of all implanted seeds were reconstructed from fluoroscopic images. A subset of the implanted seeds was manually identified in TRUS images and used as fiducial markers to perform TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion. To improve the implant quality, additional seeds were placed if adverse isodose patterns were identified during visual inspection. If additional seeds were placed, intraoperative dosimetry was repeated. Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry was compared with final intraoperative dosimetry to validate dosimetry achieved in the implant suite. Results: An average of additional 4.0 seeds was implanted in 16 patients after initial intraoperative dose evaluation. Based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based dosimetry, the V100 improved from 86% to 93% (p = 0.005), whereas D90 increased from 94% to 109% (p = 0.011) with the guided additional seed implantation. No statistical difference was observed in V200 and V300 values. V100 and D90 values were 95 {+-} 4% and 120 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on the final intraoperative dosimetry evaluation, compared with 95 {+-} 4% and 122 {+-} 24%, respectively, based on Day 0 computed tomography-based dosimetry. Conclusions: Implantation of extra seeds based on TRUS-fluoroscopy fusion-based intraoperative dosimetry can improve the final V100 and D90 values with minimal increase in V200 and V300 values.

  1. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    PubMed

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury.

  2. Intraoperative wide bore nasogastric tube knotting: A rare incidence.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Sethi, Surendra K; Khare, Arvind; Saini, Sudheendra

    2016-01-01

    Nasogastric tubes are commonly used in anesthetic practice for gastric decompression in surgical patients intraoperatively. The indications for its use are associated with a number of potential complications. Knotting of small-bore nasogastric tubes is usually common both during insertion and removal as compared to wide bore nasogastric tubes. Knotting of wide bore nasogastric tube is a rare complication and if occurs usually seen in long standing cases. We hereby report a case of incidental knotting of wide bore nasogastric tube that occurred intraoperatively.

  3. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    PubMed

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26008880

  4. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  5. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  6. [Intraoperative protective ventilation reduces postoperative pulmonary complications - PRO].

    PubMed

    Güldner, Andreas; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications add to higher mortality and morbidity. This risk could be lowered with intraoperative protective ventilation, especially with low tidal volumes. The application of PEEP and the use of recruitment maneuvers can enhance the lung function during surgery, but can also cause haemodynamic instability. In patients with open abdominal surgery and no lung damage or obesity, PEEP and recruitment maneuvers have no protective effect against postoperative pulmonary complications. It is still unclear, wether the use of intraoperative PEEP in other patient groups and during different surgery procedures is relevant for lung protection.

  7. Automatic localization of endoscope in intraoperative CT image: A simple approach to augmented reality guidance in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Sylvain; Nicolau, Stéphane A; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Doignon, Christophe; Marescaux, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    The use of augmented reality in minimally invasive surgery has been the subject of much research for more than a decade. The endoscopic view of the surgical scene is typically augmented with a 3D model extracted from a preoperative acquisition. However, the organs of interest often present major changes in shape and location because of the pneumoperitoneum and patient displacement. There have been numerous attempts to compensate for this distortion between the pre- and intraoperative states. Some have attempted to recover the visible surface of the organ through image analysis and register it to the preoperative data, but this has proven insufficiently robust and may be problematic with large organs. A second approach is to introduce an intraoperative 3D imaging system as a transition. Hybrid operating rooms are becoming more and more popular, so this seems to be a viable solution, but current techniques require yet another external and constraining piece of apparatus such as an optical tracking system to determine the relationship between the intraoperative images and the endoscopic view. In this article, we propose a new approach to automatically register the reconstruction from an intraoperative CT acquisition with the static endoscopic view, by locating the endoscope tip in the volume data. We first describe our method to localize the endoscope orientation in the intraoperative image using standard image processing algorithms. Secondly, we highlight that the axis of the endoscope needs a specific calibration process to ensure proper registration accuracy. In the last section, we present quantitative and qualitative results proving the feasibility and the clinical potential of our approach.

  8. Automatic localization of endoscope in intraoperative CT image: A simple approach to augmented reality guidance in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Sylvain; Nicolau, Stéphane A; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Doignon, Christophe; Marescaux, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    The use of augmented reality in minimally invasive surgery has been the subject of much research for more than a decade. The endoscopic view of the surgical scene is typically augmented with a 3D model extracted from a preoperative acquisition. However, the organs of interest often present major changes in shape and location because of the pneumoperitoneum and patient displacement. There have been numerous attempts to compensate for this distortion between the pre- and intraoperative states. Some have attempted to recover the visible surface of the organ through image analysis and register it to the preoperative data, but this has proven insufficiently robust and may be problematic with large organs. A second approach is to introduce an intraoperative 3D imaging system as a transition. Hybrid operating rooms are becoming more and more popular, so this seems to be a viable solution, but current techniques require yet another external and constraining piece of apparatus such as an optical tracking system to determine the relationship between the intraoperative images and the endoscopic view. In this article, we propose a new approach to automatically register the reconstruction from an intraoperative CT acquisition with the static endoscopic view, by locating the endoscope tip in the volume data. We first describe our method to localize the endoscope orientation in the intraoperative image using standard image processing algorithms. Secondly, we highlight that the axis of the endoscope needs a specific calibration process to ensure proper registration accuracy. In the last section, we present quantitative and qualitative results proving the feasibility and the clinical potential of our approach. PMID:26925804

  9. The use of soft silicone solid implant molded intraoperatively for pectus excavatum surgical repair

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jaime; Alcalde, Raphael Francisco Vesterman; de Campos, Jose Ribas Milanez

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe a new surgical technique to treat pectus excavatum utilizing low hardness solid silicone block that can be carved during the intraoperative period promoting a better aesthetic result. Methods: Between May 1994 and February 2013, 34 male patients presenting pectus excavatum were submitted to surgical repair with the use of low hardness solid silicone block, 10 to 30 Shore A. A block-shaped parallelepiped was used with height and base size coinciding with those of the bone defect. The block was carved intraoperatively according to the shape of the dissected space. The patients were followed for a minimum of 120 days postoperatively. The results and the complications were recorded. Results: From the 34 patients operated on, 28 were primary surgeries and 6 were secondary treatment, using other surgical techniques, bone or implant procedures. Postoperative complications included two case of hematomas and eight of seromas. It was necessary to remove the implant in one patient due to pain, and review surgery was performed in another to check prothesis dimensions. Two patients were submitted to fat grafting to improve the chest wall contour. The result was considered satisfactory in 33 patients. Conclusion: The procedure proved to be fast and effective. The results of carved silicone block were more effective for allowing a more refined contour as compared to custom made implants. PMID:25003924

  10. In Vivo Dosimetry for Single-Fraction Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (TARGIT) for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, David J.; Best, Bronagh; Brew-Graves, Chris; Duck, Stephen; Ghaus, Tabasom; Gonzalez, Regina; Pigott, Katharine; Reynolds, Claire; Williams, Norman R.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In vivo dosimetry provides an independent check of delivered dose and gives confidence in the introduction or consistency of radiotherapy techniques. Single-fraction intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast can be performed with the Intrabeam compact, mobile 50 kV x-ray source (Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) can be used to estimate skin doses during these treatments. Methods and Materials: Measurements of skin doses were taken using TLDs for 72 patients over 3 years of clinical treatments. Phantom studies were also undertaken to assess the uncertainties resulting from changes in beam quality and backscatter conditions in vivo. Results: The mean measured skin dose was 2.9 {+-} 1.6 Gy, with 11% of readings higher than the prescription dose of 6 Gy, but none of these patients showed increased complications. Uncertainties due to beam hardening and backscatter reduction were small compared with overall accuracy. Conclusions: TLDs are a useful and effective method to measure in vivo skin doses in intraoperative radiotherapy and are recommended for the initial validation or any modification to the delivery of this technique. They are also an effective tool to show consistent and safe delivery on a more frequent basis or to determine doses to other critical structures as required.

  11. Assessment of Macular Function during Vitrectomy: New Approach Using Intraoperative Focal Macular Electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a new technique to record focal macular electroretinograms (FMERGs) during vitrectomy to assess macular function. Methods Intraoperative FMERGs (iFMERGs) were recorded in ten patients (10 eyes) who undergo vitrectomy. iFMERGs were elicited by focal macular stimulation. The stimulus light was directed to the macular area through a 25 gauge (25G) glass fiber optic bundle. Background light was delivered through a dual chandelier-type light fiber probe. Focal macular responses elicited with combinations of stimulus and background luminances were analyzed. Results A stimulus luminance that was approximately 1.75 log units brighter than the background light was able to elicit focal macular responses that were not contaminated by stray light responses. Thus, a stimulus luminance of 160 cd/m2 delivered on a background of 3 cd/m2 elicited iFMEGs from only the stimulated area. This combination of stimulus and background luminances did not elicit a response when the stimulus was projected onto the optic nerve head. The iFMERGs elicited by a 10° stimulus with a duration of 100 ms and an interstimulus interval of 150 ms consisted of an a-, b-, and d-waves, the oscillatory potentials, and the photopic negative response (PhNR). Conclusions Focal ERGs with all components can be recorded from the macula and other retinal areas during vitreous surgery. This new technique will allow surgeons to assess the function of focal areas of the retina intraoperatively. PMID:26658489

  12. Intraoperative Image Guidance in Neurosurgery: Development, Current Indications, and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Chris; Waldeck, Stephan; Mauer, Uwe Max

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. As minimally invasive surgery becomes the standard of care in neurosurgery, it is imperative that surgeons become skilled in the use of image-guided techniques. The development of image-guided neurosurgery represents a substantial improvement in the microsurgical treatment of tumors, vascular malformations, and other intracranial lesions. Objective. There have been numerous advances in neurosurgery which have aided the neurosurgeon to achieve accurate removal of pathological tissue with minimal disruption of surrounding healthy neuronal matter including the development of microsurgical, endoscopic, and endovascular techniques. Neuronavigation systems and intraoperative imaging should improve success in cranial neurosurgery. Additional functional imaging modalities such as PET, SPECT, DTI (for fiber tracking), and fMRI can now be used in order to reduce neurological deficits resulting from surgery; however the positive long-term effect remains questionable for many indications. Method. PubMed database search using the search term “image guided neurosurgery.” More than 1400 articles were published during the last 25 years. The abstracts were scanned for prospective comparative trials. Results and Conclusion. 14 comparative trials are published. To date significant data amount show advantages in intraoperative accuracy influencing the perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome only for cerebral glioma surgery. PMID:22655196

  13. CT-assisted stereotactic brain biopsy: value of intraoperative frozen section diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colbassani, H J; Nishio, S; Sweeney, K M; Bakay, R A; Takei, Y

    1988-01-01

    In 100 recent CT-guided brain biopsies, the value of intraoperative histologic examination using frozen section technique was evaluated. In 87 of these cases, the biopsy was performed stereotactically. In the remaining 13 cases, a CT-guided free hand technique was used. Of the 100 biopsies performed, adequate tissue for histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 97, and in three the biopsy was nondiagnostic. In 61 procedures the initial biopsy specimen was adequate for diagnosis. Two specimens were required in 25 and in the remaining cases it was necessary to obtain three to four biopsy specimens before a definitive diagnosis could be made. Ultimately, the histologic diagnosis was made on frozen section examination in 93 of the cases. The lesions identified were neoplastic disease in 83 cases, vascular disease in seven, infectious disease in five, demyelinating disease in one, and radiation necrosis in one. Comparison between the frozen section diagnosis and the final diagnosis based on the permanent sections revealed that they matched in 89 cases (92%). Of the 83 cases of neoplasms the exact grade of malignancy was determined by frozen section to make a final diagnosis revealed that even if the specimen volume was less than 2 mm3, the biopsy was generally successful. The disadvantages of the small sample size obtained through needle biopsy are best overcome by careful targeting and assessment of sample quality by intraoperative frozen section examinations, which will give the definitive diagnosis in most of the cases without paraffin-embedded sections. Images PMID:3283295

  14. Factors influencing intraoperative blood loss in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Thastum, M; Andersen, K; Rude, K; Nørholt, S E; Blomlöf, J

    2016-09-01

    This retrospective study aimed to identify factors of importance for intraoperative blood loss relative to total blood volume in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. The study included 356 patients treated consecutively at a Danish university hospital between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Inclusion criteria were (1) patient age ≥18 years and (2) patient undergoing a three-piece Le Fort I osteotomy, a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, or a combination of the two. The patient-specific relative blood loss was calculated as a percentage by dividing the intraoperative blood loss by the estimated preoperative total blood volume, and then correlated with body mass index (BMI), age, sex, operating time, and treatment modality in a multivariate stepwise regression analysis. Operating time (P<0.001), BMI (P<0.001), and treatment modality (P<0.001) had a significant impact on relative blood loss; no significant effect of age or sex was observed. The coefficient of determination of relative blood loss was R(2)=0.34. In conclusion, this study introduces relative blood loss as a patient-specific measure of intraoperative blood loss. Average relative blood loss in this patient sample was 6.5%. Extensive surgery, a prolonged operating time, and reduced BMI significantly increase the intraoperative relative blood loss in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery.

  15. High-accuracy registration of intraoperative CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oentoro, A.; Ellis, R. E.

    2010-02-01

    Image-guided interventions using intraoperative 3D imaging can be less cumbersome than systems dependent on preoperative images, especially by needing neither potentially invasive image-to-patient registration nor a lengthy process of segmenting and generating a 3D surface model. In this study, a method for computer-assisted surgery using direct navigation on intraoperative imaging is presented. In this system the registration step of a navigated procedure was divided into two stages: preoperative calibration of images to a ceiling-mounted optical tracking system, and intraoperative tracking during acquisition of the 3D medical image volume. The preoperative stage used a custom-made multi-modal calibrator that could be optically tracked and also contained fiducial spheres for radiological detection; a robust registration algorithm was used to compensate for the very high false-detection rate that was due to the high physical density of the optical light-emitting diodes. Intraoperatively, a tracking device was attached to plastic bone models that were also instrumented with radio-opaque spheres; A calibrated pointer was used to contact the latter spheres as a validation of the registration. Experiments showed that the fiducial registration error of the preoperative calibration stage was approximately 0.1 mm. The target registration error in the validation stage was approximately 1.2 mm. This study suggests that direct registration, coupled with procedure-specific graphical rendering, is potentially a highly accurate means of performing image-guided interventions in a fast, simple manner.

  16. Intraoperative monitoring of motor cranial nerves in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Pelster, H; Amedee, R G; Mann, W J

    1995-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiologic monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of four cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was used during 102 skull base operations. Of these, 44 operations were acoustic neuroma removals by translabyrinthine approach and 36 by a middle fossa approach. Various operations, including removal of tumors of the jugular foramen and the infratemporal fossa, were performed in the remaining 22 patients. The facial nerve, being the most frequently monitored nerve, was evaluated both preoperatively and intraoperatively. Electrophysiologic data were evaluated with respect to their predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. The relative percent decrease in amplitude of the electromyogram after resection compared to that observed before resection seems to be of some predictive value for the postoperative facial nerve function. A 50 to 60% decrease or more is associated with an increase in the House classification. Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in skull base surgery, allowing for safer and faster identification of motor nerves in pathologic-anatomic conditions. It allows the surgeon a degree of comfort by providing immediate information regarding the status of the nerve. It may also improve postoperative nerve function and shorten operating time. Additionally, neuromonitoring provides some information about expected postoperative facial nerve function.

  17. Avoiding and Managing Intraoperative Complications During Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lim, Moe R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lee, Joon Y

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of intraoperative complications in cervical spine surgery is low. However, when they do occur, such complications have the potential for causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Spine surgeons should be familiar with methods of minimizing such complications. Furthermore, if they do occur, surgeons must be prepared to immediately treat each potential complication to reduce any associated morbidity. PMID:26519429

  18. Fusion of intraoperative force sensoring, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Küderle, C.; Suwelack, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B. P.; Dillmann, R.; Speidel, S.

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is medically complex and can heavily benefit from computer assistance. One way to help the surgeon is to integrate preoperative planning data into the surgical workflow. This information can be represented as a customized preoperative model of the surgical site. To use it intraoperatively, it has to be updated during the intervention due to the constantly changing environment. Hence, intraoperative sensor data has to be acquired and registered with the preoperative model. Haptic information which could complement the visual sensor data is still not established. In addition, biomechanical modeling of the surgical site can help in reflecting the changes which cannot be captured by intraoperative sensors. We present a setting where a force sensor is integrated into a laparoscopic instrument. In a test scenario using a silicone liver phantom, we register the measured forces with a reconstructed surface model from stereo endoscopic images and a finite element model. The endoscope, the instrument and the liver phantom are tracked with a Polaris optical tracking system. By fusing this information, we can transfer the deformation onto the finite element model. The purpose of this setting is to demonstrate the principles needed and the methods developed for intraoperative sensor data fusion. One emphasis lies on the calibration of the force sensor with the instrument and first experiments with soft tissue. We also present our solution and first results concerning the integration of the force sensor as well as accuracy to the fusion of force measurements, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling.

  19. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  20. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  1. Statistical characterization of C-arm distortion with application to intra-operative distortion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintalapani, Gouthami; Jain, Ameet K.; Taylor, Russell H.

    2007-03-01

    C-arm images suffer from pose dependant distortion, which needs to be corrected for intra-operative quantitative 3D surgical guidance. Several distortion correction techniques have been proposed in the literature, the current state of art using a dense grid pattern rigidly attached to the detector. These methods become cumbersome for intra-operative use, such as 3D reconstruction, since the grid pattern interferes with patient anatomy. The primary contribution of this paper is a framework to statistically analyze the distortion pattern which enables us to study alternate intra-operative distortion correction methods. In particular, we propose a new phantom that uses very few BBs, and yet accurately corrects for distortion. The high dimensional space of distortion pattern can be effectively characterized by principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis shows that only first three eigen modes are significant and capture about 99% of the variation. Phantom experiments indicate that distortion map can be recovered up to an average accuracy of less than 0.1 mm/pixel with these three modes. With this prior statistical knowledge, a subset of BBs can be sufficient to recover the distortion map accurately. Phantom experiments indicate that as few as 15 BBs can recover distortion with average error of 0.17 mm/pixel, accuracy sufficient for most clinical applications. These BBs can be arranged on the periphery of the C-arm detector, minimizing the interference with patient anatomy and hence allowing the grid to remain attached to the detector permanently. The proposed method is fast, economical, and C-arm independent, potentially boosting the clinical viability of applications such as quantitative 3D fluoroscopic reconstruction.

  2. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during 409 lumbosacral surgical procedures in 409 patients

    PubMed Central

    Eggspuehler, Andreas; Grob, Dieter; Porchet, Francois; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study on 409 patients who received multimodel intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during lumbosacral surgical procedures between March 2000 and December 2005 was carried out. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor conus medullaris, cauda equina and nerve root function during lumbosacral decompression surgery. MIOM has increasingly become important to monitor ascending and descending pathways, giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficit during the decompression and stabilisation procedure in the lumbosacral region. Intraoperative spinal- and cortical-evoked potentials, combined with continuous EMG- and motor-evoked potentials of the muscles, were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 409 consecutive patients with lumbosacral spinal stenosis with or without instability were monitored by MIOM during the entire surgical procedure. A total of 388 patients presented true-negative findings while two patients presented false negative and 1 patient false-positive findings. Eighteen patients presented true-positive findings where neurological deficit after the operation was intraoperatively predicted. Of the 18 true-positive findings, 12 patients recovered completely; however, 6 patients recovered only partially. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during decompression and fusion surgery of the lumbosacral region was calculated as 90%, and the specificity was calculated as 99.7%. On the basis of the results of this study, MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the conus medullaris, cauda equina and nerve root function during surgery at the lumbosacral junctions and might reduce postoperative surgical-related complications and therefore improve the long-term results. PMID:17912559

  3. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  4. Robotic nephrectomy for central renal tumors with intraoperative evaluation of tumor histology.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Leedor; Barod, Ravi; Tapper, Alex; Kumar, Ramesh; Rogers, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Patients undergoing nephrectomy for central renal tumors suspicious for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may carry a small risk of having transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) on final pathology, even in the absence of filling defects or abnormal cytology. We describe outcomes in such patients undergoing robotic nephrectomy for suspected RCC, with intraoperative specimen assessment to guide completion ureterectomy if TCC is present. Between September 2010 and August 2015, ten patients had central renal masses suspicious for RCC, which were not amenable to nephron-sparing surgery. Patients underwent a four-arm robotic nephrectomy technique using a GelPOINT(®) access port. Following hilar ligation, the ureter was divided between adjacent hem-o-lok clips, placed in an endocatch bag, and extracted through the GelPOINT incision for the frozen section analysis. If intraoperative assessment confirmed TCC, a robotic completion ureterectomy and a bladder cuff excision were performed. Of the ten patients with central tumors who underwent robotic nephrectomy for suspected RCC, four (40 %) had TCC on the frozen section analysis and underwent completion ureterectomy. Five patients had RCC, and one patient had an oncocytoma. Mean age was 63.1 years (49-76) and mean tumor size was 4.0 cm (1.9-7.6). Mean operating time was 246 min (135-328). All patients had negative margins. Mean length of stay was 2.5 days. No recurrences were documented at median 8.5 months follow-up. For patients undergoing robotic nephrectomy for central renal tumors, intraoperative specimen evaluation can help determine the need for minimally invasive completion ureterectomy. PMID:27146858

  5. Stretching skin: undermining is more important than intraoperative expansion.

    PubMed

    Mackay, D R; Saggers, G C; Kotwal, N; Manders, E K

    1990-10-01

    The efficacy of intraoperative expansion in reducing the tension of wound closure was tested in young pigs. The young piglet as a model for studying human skin was characterized by finding a close similarity between the modulus of elasticity of young piglet skin and human abdominoplasty and mammaplasty skin (range 12.8 to 23.7 N/mm2 for piglet skin, 14.3 to 19 N/mm2 for human skin). The tension required to close a standardized wound was determined before undermining, after undermining, and finally after intraoperative expansion. These measurements were performed in 10 young pigs with an average weight of 11.5 kg. Undermining the wound edges resulted in a significant decrease in the force required to close the wounds (p less than 0.0001). Intraoperative expansion did not significantly decrease the tension. Previous work showing the importance of site and direction of pull on the tension for wound closure was confirmed in this study. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the tension required to close a standard wound is greater high on the pig's back than near the belly and near the shoulder as opposed to the hip for midflank wounds (p less than 0.0001). Increasing the extent of undermining from 62 to 136 cm2 significantly decreased the tension for wound closure (p less than 0.05). Further undermining did not result in a significant decrease in wound closure tension. In this model, intraoperative expansion offers no advantage over simple undermining. We suggest that the benefit reported by clinicians using intraoperative expansion may derive from an increase in the extent of undermining required to place expanders under the wound margins.

  6. Transcutaneous vs. intraoperative quantitative ultrasound for staging bovine hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Weijers, Gert; Starke, Alexander; Thijssen, Johan M; Haudum, Alois; Wohlsein, Peter; Rehage, Juergen; de Korte, Chris L

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that quantitative analysis of transcutaneous (Transc) ultrasound (US) images can predict the liver fat content with similar accuracy and precision as using intraoperative (Intraop) US. The second goal was to investigate if a tissue mimicking phantom (TMP) might be used as reference for automatic gain compensation (AGC) vs. depth instead of using the data of a set of cows without hepatic alterations. A study was performed in post partum dairy cows (N = 151), as an animal model of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), to test these hypotheses. Five Transc and five Intraop US liver images were acquired in each animal and a liver biopsy was taken. In liver tissue samples, triacylglycerol (TAG) content was measured by biochemical analysis and hepatic alterations, other than hepatic steatosis, were excluded by clinical examination. Several preprocessing steps were performed before the ultrasound tissue characteristics (UTC) parameters of B-mode images were derived. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed on a training set (N = 76) and the results were used on the test group (N = 75) to predict the TAG content in the liver. In all cases, the residual attenuation coefficient (ResAtt) was the only selected parameter. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was applied to assess the performance and area under the curve (AUC) of predicting TAG and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the methods used. High ROC values for AUC (95%), sensitivity (87%) and specificity (83%) for both Intraop and Transc applications with control group as well as with phantom-based AGC were obtained. Consequently, it can be concluded that Transc results are equivalent to Intraop results. Furthermore, equivalent ROC values, when using TMP AGC, indicates the potential use of TMP-based corrections instead of normal group-based corrections. The high predictive values indicate that noninvasive quantitative

  7. Does ultrasongraphy predict intraoperative findings at cholecystectomy? An institutional review

    PubMed Central

    Stogryn, Shannon; Metcalfe, Jennifer; Vergis, Ashley; Hardy, Krista

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of biliary tract imaging, but few recent studies have tested its ability to diagnose acute cholecystitis (AC). Our objective was to determine how well a US diagnosis of AC correlates with the intraoperative diagnosis. We hypothesize that US underestimates this diagnosis, potentially leading to unexpected findings in the operating room (OR). Methods This retrospective review included all patients admitted to the acute care surgical service of a tertiary hospital in 2011 with suspected biliary pathology who underwent US and subsequent cholecystectomy. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of US using the intraoperative diagnosis as the gold standard. Further analysis identified which US findings were most predictive of an intraoperative diagnosis of AC. We used a recursive partitioning method with random forests to identify unique combinations of US findings that, together, are most predictive of AC. Results In total, 254 patients underwent US for biliary symptoms; 152 had AC diagnosed, and 143 (94%) of them underwent emergency surgery (median time to OR 23.03 hr). Ultrasonography predicted intraoperative findings with a sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 85.5% and PPV of 93.7%. The NPV (52.0%) was quite low. The US indicators most predictive of AC were a thick wall, a positive sonographic Murphy sign and cholelithiasis. Recursive partitioning demonstrated that a positive sonographic Murphy sign is highly predictive of intraoperative AC. Conclusion Ultrasonography is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing AC. The poor NPV confirms our hypothesis that US can underestimate AC. PMID:26574703

  8. Role of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jijeh, Abdulraouf M.Z.; Omran, Ahmad S.; Najm, Hani K.; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has a major role in detecting residual lesions during and/or after pediatric cardiac surgery. Methods All pediatric patients who underwent cardiac surgery between July 2001 and December 2008 were reviewed. The records of surgical procedure, intraoperative TEE, and predischarge transthoracic echocardiograms were reviewed to determine minor and major residual cardiac lesions after surgical repair. Results During the study period, a total of 2268 pediatric cardiac patients were operated in our center. Mean age was 21 months (from 1 day to 14 years). Of these patients, 1016 (48%) had preoperative TEE and 1036 (46%) were evaluated by intraoperative echocardiography (TEE or epicardial study). We identified variations between TEE and preoperative transthoracic echocardiography in 14 patients (1.3%). Only one surgical procedure was cancelled after atrial septal defect exclusion. The other 13 patients had minor variation from their surgical plan. Major residual lesions requiring surgical revision were detected in 41 patients (3.9%), with the following primary diagnoses: tetralogy of Fallot in 12 patients (29%), atrioventricular septal defect in seven patients (17%), ventricular septal defect in seven patients (17%), double outlet right ventricle in two patients (5%), Shone complex in two patients (5%), subaortic stenosis in two patients (5%), mitral regurgitation in two patients (5%), pulmonary atresia in two patients (5%), and five patients (12%) with other diagnoses. Conclusion Intraoperative TEE has a major impact in pediatric cardiac surgery to detect significant residual lesions. Preoperative TEE has a limited role in case of a high quality preoperative transthoracic echocardiography. We recommend routine use of intraoperative TEE during and/or after intracardiac repair in children. PMID:27053898

  9. Supra-complete surgery via dual intraoperative visualization approach (DiVA) prolongs patient survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Hore, Nirjhar; Merkel, Andreas; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-05-01

    Safe and complete resection represents the first step in the treatment of glioblastomas and is mandatory in increasing the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy to prolong overall survival. With gross total resection currently limited in extent to MRI contrast enhancing areas, the extent to which supra-complete resection beyond obvious contrast enhancement could have impact on overall survival remains unclear. DiVA (dual intraoperative visualization approach) redefines gross total resection as currently accepted by enabling for the first time supra-complete surgery without compromising patient safety. This approach exploits the advantages of two already accepted surgical techniques combining intraoperative MRI with integrated functional neuronavigation and 5-ALA by integrating them into a single surgical approach. We investigated whether this technique has impact on overall outcome in GBM patients. 105 patients with GBM were included. We achieved complete resection with intraoperative MRI alone according to current best-practice in glioma surgery in 75 patients. 30 patients received surgery with supra-complete resection. The control arm showed a median life expectancy of 14 months, reflecting current standards-of-care and outcome. In contrast, patients receiving supra-complete surgery displayed significant increase in median survival time to 18.5 months with overall survival time correlating directly with extent of supra-complete resection. This extension of overall survival did not come at the cost of neurological deterioration. We show for the first time that supra-complete glioma surgery leads to significant prolongation of overall survival time in GBM patients.

  10. Supra-complete surgery via dual intraoperative visualization approach (DiVA) prolongs patient survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Merkel, Andreas; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    Safe and complete resection represents the first step in the treatment of glioblastomas and is mandatory in increasing the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy to prolong overall survival. With gross total resection currently limited in extent to MRI contrast enhancing areas, the extent to which supra-complete resection beyond obvious contrast enhancement could have impact on overall survival remains unclear. DiVA (dual intraoperative visualization approach) redefines gross total resection as currently accepted by enabling for the first time supra-complete surgery without compromising patient safety. This approach exploits the advantages of two already accepted surgical techniques combining intraoperative MRI with integrated functional neuronavigation and 5-ALA by integrating them into a single surgical approach. We investigated whether this technique has impact on overall outcome in GBM patients. 105 patients with GBM were included. We achieved complete resection with intraoperative MRI alone according to current best-practice in glioma surgery in 75 patients. 30 patients received surgery with supra-complete resection. The control arm showed a median life expectancy of 14 months, reflecting current standards-of-care and outcome. In contrast, patients receiving supra-complete surgery displayed significant increase in median survival time to 18.5 months with overall survival time correlating directly with extent of supra-complete resection. This extension of overall survival did not come at the cost of neurological deterioration. We show for the first time that supra-complete glioma surgery leads to significant prolongation of overall survival time in GBM patients. PMID:27036027

  11. Autofluorescence of normal and neoplastic human brain tissue: an aid for intraoperative delineation of tumor resection margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Croce, Anna C.; Locatelli, Donata; Nano, Rosanna; Giombelli, Ermanno; Messina, Alberto; Benericetti, Eugenio

    1998-01-01

    Light-induced autofluorescence measurements were made on normal and tumor brain tissues to assess their spectroscopic properties and to verify the potential of this parameter for an intraoperative delineation of tumor resection margins. Spectrofluorometric analysis was performed both at the microscope on tissue sections from surgical resection, and on patients affected by glioblastoma, during surgical operation. Significant differences in autofluorescence emission properties were found between normal and tumor tissues in both ex vivo and in vivo measurements, indicating that the lesion can be distinguished from the informal surrounding tissues by the signal amplitude and the spectral shape. The non-invasiveness of the technique opens interesting prospects for improving the efficacy of neurosurgical operation, by allowing an intraoperative delimitation of tumor resection margins.

  12. Comparison of open and percutaneous lumbar pedicle screw revision rate using 3-D image guidance and intraoperative CT.

    PubMed

    Santos, Edward Rainier G; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Yson, Sharon C; Polly, David W

    2015-02-01

    Complications arising from a malpositioned screw can be both devastating and costly. The incidence of neurologic injury secondary to a malpositioned screw is reported to be as high as 7% to 12%. The advancement of image-guided technology has allowed surgeons to place screws more accurately and confirm correct placement prior to leaving the operating room. Only a small number of studies have examined image-guided pedicle screw accuracy in terms of intraoperative revision and reoperation rates. The purpose of this study was to determine the intraoperative revision and return to surgery rates for navigated lumbar pedicle screws and to compare navigated open and percutaneous techniques. The authors reviewed 199 cases of 3-dimensional image-guided lumbar pedicle screw instrumentation from November 2006 to December 2011. Screw or K-wire removal, repositioning, or eventual abandonment of insertion were noted. Chi-square test was used to determine statistical significance in rates between the 2 groups (alpha=0.05). The authors also noted return to surgery secondary to complications from a malpositioned screw. The overall intraoperative revision rate of navigated lumbar pedicle screws was 4.6%. There were significantly more revisions in the percutaneously inserted screws (7.5%) than with the open technique (2.7%) (P=.0004). If K-wire revisions are excluded, there was no statistically significant difference in intraoperative revision rates between the percutaneous and open groups (2.1% vs 2.7%, respectively) (P=.0004). No patients underwent reoperation for a malpositioned screw. This technology has virtually eliminated the need for reoperation for screw malposition. It may suggest a more cost-effective way of preventing neurovascular injuries and revision surgeries.

  13. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia. PMID:18390241

  14. Intraoperative /sup 99m/Tc bone imaging in the treatment of benign osteoblastic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.; Simons, G.

    1982-05-01

    Benign bone tumors can be successfully treated by local resection with the use of intraoperative bone imaging. Intraoperative bone imaging provided accurate localization of an osteoid osteoma in a patella of a 16-year-old girl when standard radiographs failed to demonstrate the lesion. In a case of osteoblastoma of the sacrum in a 12-year old girl, intraoperative scanning was used repeatedly to guide completeness of resection. In these cases in which routine intraoperative radiographs would have failed, intraoperative scanning proved to be essential for success.

  15. Intraoperative bleeding control during cesarean delivery of complete placenta previa with transient occlusion of uterine arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Hyun; Joung, Eun-Ju; Lee, Soo-Jung; Kwack, Jae Young; Kwon, Yong Soon

    2015-11-01

    There are few methods to control heavy intra-operative bleeding during cesarean delivery of placenta previa. Transient occlusion of uterine arteries (TOUA) during operation has previously been reported as a quick and safe method to control intra-operative uterine bleeding. We reported 2 cases of cesarean delivery with complete placenta previa in which TOUA was performed to safely reduce intra-operative complication, especially heavy intra-operative bleeding. In the 2 cases, cesarean deliveries were safe and without any complications under the TOUA method. TOUA can be a good method to control heavy intra-operative bleeding during cesarean delivery of complete placenta previa with risk of heavy bleeding.

  16. A novel silicon array designed for intraoperative charged particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Tornai, Martin P; Patt, Bradley E; Iwanczyk, Jan S; Tull, Carolyn R; MacDonald, Lawrence R; Hoffman, Edward J

    2002-11-01

    A novel Si-PIN imaging array is under investigation for a charged particle (beta, positron, or alpha) sensitive intraoperative camera to be used for (residual) tumor identification during surgery. This class of collimator-less nuclear imaging device has a higher signal response for direct interactions than its scintillator-optical detector-based counterparts. Monte Carlo simulations with 635 keV betas were performed, yielding maximum and projected ranges of 1.64 and 0.55 mm in Si. Up to 90% of these betas were completely absorbed in the first 0.30 mm. Based on these results, 300 microm thick prototype Si detector arrays were designed in a 16 x 16 crossed-grid arrangement with 0.8 mm wide orthogonal strips on 1.0 mm pitch. A NIM- and CAMAC-based high-density data acquisition and processing system was used to collect the list mode data. The system was calibrated by comparisons of measured spectra to energy deposition simulations or by direct measurement of various >100 keV conversion electron or beta emitters. Mean electronic noise per strip was <3.6 keV FWHM at room temperature. When detecting positrons, which have an accompanying 511 keV annihilation background, the flood irradiated beta/gamma ratio was approximately 40, indicating that beta images could be made without the use of background rejection techniques. The intrinsic spatial resolution corresponds to the 1 x 1 mm2 pixel size, and measurements of beta emitting point and line sources yielded FWHM resolutions of 1.5 (lateral) and 2.5 mm (diagonal), respectively, with the larger widths due to particle range blurting effects. Deconvolution of the finite source size yielded intrinsic resolutions that corresponded to the image pixel size. Transmission images of circle and line phantoms with various hole sizes and pitch were resolved with either pure beta or positron irradiation without a background correction. This novel semiconductor imaging device facilitates high charged particle and low gamma sensitivity

  17. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data.

    PubMed

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-04-08

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUS(start) and after (3D-iCEUS(end) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUS(start) and 3D-iCEUS(end) data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified.

  18. Intraoperative perfusion contrast echocardiography. Initial experience during coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kabas, J S; Kisslo, J; Flick, C L; Johnson, S H; Craig, D M; Stanley, T E; Smith, P K

    1990-03-01

    Intraoperative evaluation of the effectiveness of myocardial revascularization has been limited by an inability to assess regional myocardial perfusion. Microbubbles of sonicated diatrizoate sodium and diatrizoate meglumine (Renografin) have been an effective echocardiographic contrast agent and have been employed clinically during cardiac catheterization. This recent development in contrast-enhanced two-dimensional echocardiography permits real-time imaging of transmural myocardial blood flow but has not been evaluated in the operating room. This study represents the initial surgical application of this directed technique and was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intraoperative perfusion contrast echocardiography in assessing the results of coronary artery bypass grafting. Twenty men with significant coronary artery disease ranging in age from 49 to 73 years were studied. Direct contrast agent injection into completed saphenous vein bypass grafts caused the myocardium supplied by each graft to be well delineated and provided a tomographic view of contrast distribution. The enhanced region was well correlated with the size and distribution of the native vessel. Rapid contrast washout (less than 20 seconds) indicated satisfactory regional perfusion. Contrast echocardiography prolonged the operation less than 10 minutes and did not result in any perioperative complications.

  19. Implantable sensor for intraoperative and postoperative monitoring of blood flow: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitz, R S; Hartley, C J; Michael, L H; Entman, M L; Hawkins, H K; Sekela, M E; Noon, G P

    1990-08-01

    We have developed an implantable 20 MHz Doppler flow sensor, to monitor blood flow in patients after operation. During surgery the sensor is wrapped around a blood vessel and secured in place with a releasable tie. No tissue puncturing techniques are required. The lead wires, together with a release cable, are exteriorized through the chest wall. Several days after operation, the tie is externally released, and the sensor is pulled out. Twenty-seven sensors were implanted in 24 dogs for up to 16 days. All were extracted successfully with minimal visible behavioral reaction in the awake dogs and caused no thrombosis or vascular damage. The Doppler velocity signals had excellent linear correlations (r = 0.99) with data from electromagnetic flow sensors and timed blood collections. In addition, the sensors were applied to coronary artery bypass grafts in 31 patients for up to 2 days after operation. High-quality signals were obtained, and intraoperatively recorded signals agreed well with simultaneous electromagnetic flow tracings. All sensors were extracted with minimal discomfort to the awake patients and with no complications. Thus, the implantable flow sensor is a safe, reliable, accurate, and simple method for intraoperative and postoperative monitoring of blood flow in vessels 2.5 to 5 mm in diameter. PMID:2199684

  20. Temperatures Achieved in Human and Canine Neocortex During Intraoperative Passive or Active Focal Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rowland H.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Patterson, Edward E.; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W.; Rothman, Steven M.; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6–2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10–15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  1. Residual, unresectable, or recurrent colorectal cancer: external beam irradiation and intraoperative electron beam boost +- resection

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.L.; Cohen, A.C.; Dosoretz, D.D.; Shipley, W.U.; Hedberg, S.E.; Wood, W.C.; Rodkey, G.V.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-11-01

    While combinations of external beam radiation (XRT) and surgery decrease pelvic recurrence and improve survival in the subgroups with residual disease (postop XRT) or initially unresectable disease (preop XRT), local recurrence is still unacceptably high, and survival could be improved. In view of this, pilot studies were instituted at Massachusetts General Hospital in which 32 patients received the standard previous treatment of external beam irradiation and surgery but in addition had an intraoperative electron beam boost of 1000 to 1500 rad to the remaining tumor or tumor bed. For the 16 patients who presented with unresectable primary lesions, the addition of intraoperative radiotherapy has resulted in a total absence of local recurrence with a minimum 20 month follow-up, and survival rates are statistically better than for the previous group treated with only external beam irradiation and surgical resection. In the group with residual disease, again there have not been any local recurrences in the 7 patients who received all treatment modalities versus 54% and 26% for the group with gross and microscopic residual treated with only external beam techniques. The remaining 9 patients presented with recurrent unresectable lesions - 3 are alive (2 NED) at greater than or equal to 3 years.

  2. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds.

    PubMed

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ∼16 . Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR<2 , P<0.001 ). None had a local recurrence at >1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15 , and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  3. Effect of intraoperative navigation on operative time in 1-level lumbar fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Arjun R; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2016-10-01

    The use of intraoperative image guided navigation (NAV) in spine surgery is increasing. NAV is purported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement but has been criticized for potentially increasing surgical cost, a component of which may be prolongation of total operative time due to time required for setup and intra-operative imaging and registration. In this study, we examine the effect of the introduction of O-Arm conical CT spinal navigation on surgical duration. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive freehand (FH) (n=63) and NAV (n=70) 1-level lumbar transpedicular instrumentation cases at a single institution by a single surgeon. We recorded setup and procedure time for each case. NAV was associated with significantly shorter total operative time for 1-level lumbar fusions compared to FH (4:30+/-0:42 hours vs. 4:53+/-0:39hours, p=0.0013). This shortening of total operative time was realized despite a trend toward slightly longer setup times with NAV. We also found a significant decrease in operative length over time in NAV but not FH cases, indicative of a "learning curve" associated with NAV. The use of NAV in 1-level lumbar transpedicular instrumentation surgery is associated with significantly shorter total operative time compared to the FH technique, and its efficiency improves over time. These data should factor into cost-effectiveness analyses of the use of NAV for these cases. PMID:27364319

  4. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during cervical spine surgical procedures in 246 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Porchet, François; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 246 patients who received multimodal intraoperative monitoring during cervical spine surgery between March 2000 and December 2005. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during cervical spine surgery. It is appreciated that complication rate of cervical spine surgery is low, however, there is a significant risk of neurological injury. The combination of monitoring of ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results giving immediate feedback information and/or alert regarding any neurological changes during the operation to the surgeon. Intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials combined with continuous EMG and motor-evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 246 consecutive patients with cervical pathologies, majority spinal stenosis due to degenerative changes of cervical spine were monitored by means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. About 232 patients presented true negative while 2 patients false negative responses. About ten patients presented true positive responses where neurological deficit after the operation was predicted and two patients presented false positive findings. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during cervical spine procedure (anterior and/or posterior) was 83.3% and specificity of 99.2%. MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord functional integrity during cervical spine surgery and can help to reduce the risk of neurological deficit by alerting the surgeon when monitoring changes are observed. PMID:17610090

  5. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during surgical decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis in 36 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Porchet, F.; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 36 patients who received multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis between March 2000 and December 2005 was chosen as the study design. The objective was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used for monitoring spinal cord during surgical thoracic decompression. The background data revealed that the surgical decompression for thoracic spinal stenosis is less frequent than in other regions of the spine. However, due to the relative narrow spinal canal, neurological complications could be severe. The combination of monitoring ascending and descending pathways may provide an early alert to the surgeon in order to alter the surgical procedure, and avoid neurological complications. The methods involved evaluation of intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials and motor evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles that were compared with post operative clinical neurological changes. 36 consecutive patients with thoracic spinal stenosis of different aetiologies were monitored by the means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. 31 patients had true negative while one patient had false positive findings. Three patients had true positive and one patient had false negative findings. This indicates a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 97%. The one case of false negative findings recovered completely within 3 months. In conclusion, the MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord during surgical decompression of the thoracic spine. PMID:17610089

  6. Utility and challenges in intraoperative consultation of spinal lesions by crush smear cytology

    PubMed Central

    Dikondwar, Aparna R.; Dani, Aarti A.; Gaikwad, Saroj A.; Tathe, Shilpa P.; Randale, Archana A.; Chawhan, Sanjay M.; Kumbhalkar, Dinkar T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various methods are used for intraoperative consultation of spinal lesions. Crush smear cytology is one such method that is accurate, rapid, and allows preservation of tissue for paraffin-embedded sections. Aims: To study the cytomorphology of various neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions involving and compressing the spinal cord. To evaluate accuracy and discuss diagnostic pitfalls of crush smear cytology. Materials and Methods: Over a period of 5 years (January 2008 to October 2012), a total of 57 spinal lesions were referred for intraoperative cytology. In four cases, material was inadequate for evaluation, so we analyzed 53 cases. Results: Majority of lesions were neoplastic accounting for 86.79% whereas nonneoplastic lesions constituted 13.20%. Most of the tumors were low grade (82.92%). Overall accuracy rate was 90.56% with accuracy of 91.30% and 85.71% for neoplastic and inflammatory lesions, respectively. Conclusion: Crush smear technique is a simple, reliable, easy, and rapid method for diagnosing neoplastic and inflammatory lesions involving and compressing the spinal cord. It gives an immediate idea of prognosis so that surgeon can modify the operative procedure, if necessary. PMID:27057218

  7. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    PubMed Central

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUSstart) and after (3D-iCEUSend) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUSstart and 3D-iCEUSend data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  8. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G.; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ˜16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR<2, P<0.001). None had a local recurrence at >1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  9. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

    PubMed Central

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G.; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ∼16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR<2, P<0.001). None had a local recurrence at >1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations. PMID:26160347

  10. Principles for Management of Intraoperative Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Gukop, Philemon; Chandrasekaran, Vankatachalam

    2015-12-01

    Intraoperative Type A aortic dissection is a rare pathology with incidence of 0.06-0.32%. It is associated with a high mortality between 30-50%. Some associated risk factors, including hypertension, enlarged aorta, peripheral vascular disease, advanced age, atheroma, and high arterial pressure on cardiopulmonary bypass, have been identified. Modification of these risk factors could reduce the incidence of this event. Prompt diagnosis and management, with the aid of intraoperative trans-esophageal echocardiography and/or epi-aortic ultrasound has been shown to reduce the mortality to 17%. We illustrate the principles of management of this pathology with the case of a 62-year-old female who developed acute Type A aortic dissection while undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair.

  11. Angled rigid neuroendoscope for continuous intraoperative visual monitoring: technical note.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, N; Hara, Y; Takaishi, Y; Shimada, S

    2001-03-01

    We developed and tested a new, angled rigid endoscope as a tool for performing continuous visual monitoring during microsurgery. The shaft of the scope is angled 110 degrees at its midportion using a prism. We used the scope continuously in 30 cases including 15 pituitary tumours, 7 brain tumours, 7 cerebral aneurysms, and one hemifacial spasm. For pituitary tumours the tip of the scope was positioned in the sphenoid sinus or in the cavity formed by tumour removal; for cerebral aneurysms it was placed behind the parent artery or the aneurysmal neck. Image quality was acceptable for intraoperative monitoring. In no case did the neuroendoscope have a deleterious impact on th e proper function of the microscope or surgical instruments. This angled rigid scope was more effective for intraoperative monitoring than conventional straight scopes. PMID:11243766

  12. Intraoperative perfluorocarbon liquids in the management of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Ozmert, E; Zimmerman, N J

    1988-12-15

    Three low-viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids were used intraoperatively for hydrokinetic manipulation of the retina during vitreous surgery for retinal detachment with advanced proliferative vitreoretinopathy. All 23 patients had massive proliferative vitreoretinopathy (Grade D, Retina Society classification), and 16 (69.6%) had Grade D-3 with a closed-funnel configuration. In 21 eyes the retina could be flattened intraoperatively by perfluorocarbon liquids without requiring posterior retinotomy for internal drainage of subretinal fluid. The temporary mechanical fixation of the retina provided by this tool facilitated the removal of epiretinal membranes and release of traction. Fifteen eyes (65.2%) maintained long-term retinal reattachment with follow-up of six months or more. These liquids are useful adjuncts in the management of retinal detachment with severe proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  13. Noise suppressed, multifocus image fusion for enhanced intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Vinegoni, Claudio; Fexon, Lioubov; Thurber, Greg; Sbarbati, Andrea; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-04-01

    Current intraoperative imaging systems are typically not able to provide 'sharp' images over entire large areas or entire organs. Distinct structures such as tissue margins or groups of malignant cells are therefore often difficult to detect, especially under low signal-to-noise-ratio conditions. In this report, we introduce a noise suppressed multifocus image fusion algorithm, that provides detailed reconstructions even when images are acquired under sub-optimal conditions, such is the case for real time fluorescence intraoperative surgery. The algorithm makes use of the Anscombe transform combined with a multi-level stationary wavelet transform with individual threshold-based shrinkage. While the imaging system is integrated with a respiratory monitor triggering system, it can be easily adapted to any commercial imaging system. The developed algorithm is made available as a plugin for Osirix. PMID:22887724

  14. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  15. Transsphenoidal pituitary resection with intraoperative MR guidance: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergolizzi, Richard S., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Hsu, Liangge; Wong, Terence Z.; Black, Peter M.; Martin, Claudia; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1999-05-01

    The use of intraoperative MR image guidance has the potential to improve the precision, extent and safety of transsphenoidal pituitary resections. At Brigham and Women's Hospital, an open-bore configuration 0.5T MR system (SIGNA SP, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) has been used to provide image guidance for nine transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resections. The intraoperative MR system allowed the radiologist to direct the surgeon toward the sella turcica successfully while avoiding the cavernous sinus, optic chiasm and other sensitive structures. Imaging performed during the surgery monitored the extent of resection and allowed for removal of tumor beyond the surgeon's view in five cases. Dynamic MR imaging was used to distinguish residual tumor from normal gland and postoperative changes permitting more precise tumor localization. A heme-sensitive long TE gradient echo sequence was used to evaluate for the presence of hemorrhagic debris. All patients tolerated the procedure well without significant complications.

  16. Trajectory optimization for intra-operative nuclear tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Gardiazabal, José; Navab, Nassir

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic nuclear imaging modalities like SPECT typically employ gantries to ensure a densely sampled geometry of detectors in order to keep the inverse problem of tomographic reconstruction as well-posed as possible. In an intra-operative setting with mobile freehand detectors the situation changes significantly, and having an optimal detector trajectory during acquisition becomes critical. In this paper we propose an incremental optimization method based on the numerical condition of the system matrix of the underlying iterative reconstruction method to calculate optimal detector positions during acquisition in real-time. The performance of this approach is evaluated using simulations. A first experiment on a phantom using a robot-controlled intra-operative SPECT-like setup demonstrates the feasibility of the approach. PMID:23706624

  17. Toward Intraoperative Image-Guided Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen P; Reaugamornrat, Sureerat; Deguet, Anton; Sorger, Jonathan M; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Richmon, Jeremy; Taylor, Russell H

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of video augmentation on the stereoscopic da Vinci S system with intraoperative image guidance for base of tongue tumor resection in transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Proposed workflow for image-guided TORS begins by identifying and segmenting critical oropharyngeal structures (e.g., the tumor and adjacent arteries and nerves) from preoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These preoperative planned data can be deformably registered to the intraoperative endoscopic view using mobile C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) [1, 2]. Augmentation of TORS endoscopic video defining surgical targets and critical structures has the potential to improve navigation, spatial orientation, and confidence in tumor resection. Experiments in animal specimens achieved statistically significant improvement in target localization error when comparing the proposed image guidance system to simulated current practice. PMID:25525474

  18. Segmentation-Based Registration of Organs in Intraoperative Video Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Gee, Timothy Felix; Wang, Hengliang; Gorbach, Alexander M

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative optical imaging of exposed organs in visible, near-infrared, and infrared (IR) wavelengths in the body has the potential to be use-ful for real-time assessment of organ viability and image guidance during surgical intervention. However, the motion of the internal organs presents significant challenges for fast analysis of recorded 2D video sequences. The movement observed during surgery, due to respiration, cardiac motion, blood flow, and mechanical shift accompanying the surgical intervention, causes organ reflection in the image sequence, making optical measurements for further analysis challenging. Correcting alignment is difficult in that the motion is not uniform over the image. This paper describes a Canny edge-based method for segmentation of the specific organ or region under study, along with a moment-based registration method for the segmented region. Experimental results are provided for a set of intraoperative IR image sequences.

  19. [Intraoperative graft assessment using fluorescent imaging system (SPY)].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, T; Naraoka, S; Kakizaki, T

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy of intraoperative fluorescent imaging system for the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We used SPY imaging system in 100 CABG (57 off-pump and 43 on-pump CABG), totalling 287 distal anastomoses. The total graft patency rate on postoperative angiography in this series was 96.2% (276/287). Graft revision was done in 10 cases (10.0%) and 13 anastomoses (4.5%) by SPY imaging, which all resulted in good patency at postoperative angiography. On the other hand, 7 distal anastomoses and 1 mammary graft (2.8%) appeared to be successful on intraoperative SPY imaging, but were revealed to be occluded by postoperative angiography. SPY imaging system is useful for graft validation, and may contribute to improvement of coronary bypass graft patency.

  20. Intraoperative perfluorocarbon liquids in the management of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Ozmert, E; Zimmerman, N J

    1988-12-15

    Three low-viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids were used intraoperatively for hydrokinetic manipulation of the retina during vitreous surgery for retinal detachment with advanced proliferative vitreoretinopathy. All 23 patients had massive proliferative vitreoretinopathy (Grade D, Retina Society classification), and 16 (69.6%) had Grade D-3 with a closed-funnel configuration. In 21 eyes the retina could be flattened intraoperatively by perfluorocarbon liquids without requiring posterior retinotomy for internal drainage of subretinal fluid. The temporary mechanical fixation of the retina provided by this tool facilitated the removal of epiretinal membranes and release of traction. Fifteen eyes (65.2%) maintained long-term retinal reattachment with follow-up of six months or more. These liquids are useful adjuncts in the management of retinal detachment with severe proliferative vitreoretinopathy. PMID:3195646

  1. Noise suppressed, multifocus image fusion for enhanced intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Vinegoni, Claudio; Fexon, Lioubov; Thurber, Greg; Sbarbati, Andrea; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-04-01

    Current intraoperative imaging systems are typically not able to provide 'sharp' images over entire large areas or entire organs. Distinct structures such as tissue margins or groups of malignant cells are therefore often difficult to detect, especially under low signal-to-noise-ratio conditions. In this report, we introduce a noise suppressed multifocus image fusion algorithm, that provides detailed reconstructions even when images are acquired under sub-optimal conditions, such is the case for real time fluorescence intraoperative surgery. The algorithm makes use of the Anscombe transform combined with a multi-level stationary wavelet transform with individual threshold-based shrinkage. While the imaging system is integrated with a respiratory monitor triggering system, it can be easily adapted to any commercial imaging system. The developed algorithm is made available as a plugin for Osirix.

  2. Intraoperative tumor lysis syndrome in a child with Wilms' tumor.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Mridul; Prakash, Shashi; Pandey, Vaibhav; Pai, Vishal Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome in an onco-metabolic emergency resulting from massive lysis of rapidly proliferating malignant cells seen commonly in patients with hematological malignancies such as acute lymphocytic leukemia and Burkitt's lymphoma and is quite rare in solid tumors. Spontaneous development of tumor lysis has been described among other trigger factors such as corticosteroid therapy, anesthesia, tumor manipulation during surgery and pyrexia. We describe such a case in a 5-year-old boy posted for excision and staging of a massive Wilms' tumor who developed a hyperkalemic cardiac arrest during the procedure and its subsequent intraoperative and postoperative management. Intraoperative cardiac arrest is a stressful situation for both the anesthesiologist and the surgeon, more so when it involves a child. The aim of this report is to make the anesthesiologist aware of the possibility and occurrence of such a phenomenon in children and be adequately prepared for such an emergency. PMID:26957712

  3. The use of Raman spectroscopy for the intra-operative assessment of axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsnell, Jonathan

    Breast cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Assessment of the axillary lymph nodes is part of the staging of the disease. Advances in surgical management of breast cancer have seen a move towards intra-operative lymph node assessment that facilitates an immediate axillary clearance if it is indicated. Raman spectroscopy, a technique based on the inelastic scattering of light, has previously been shown to be capable of differentiating between normal and malignant tissue. These results, based on the biochemical composition of the tissue, potentially allow for this technique to be utilised in this clinical context. The aim of this study was to evaluate the facility of Raman spectroscopy to both assess axillary lymph node tissue within the theatre setting and to achieve results that were comparable to other intra-operative techniques within a clinically relevant time frame. Initial experiments demonstrated that these aims were feasible within the context of both the theatre environment and current surgical techniques. A laboratory based feasibility study involving 17 patients and 38 lymph node samples achieved sensivities and specificities of >90% in unsupervised testing. 339 lymph node samples from 66 patients were subsequently assessed within the theatre environment. Chemometric analysis of this data demonstrated sensitivities of up to 94% and specificities of up to 99% in unsupervised testing. The best results were achieved when comparing negative nodes from N0 patients and nodes containing macrometastases. Spectral analysis revealed increased levels of lipid in the negative nodes and increased DNA and protein levels in the positive nodes. Further studies highlighted the reproducibility of these results using different equipment, users and time from excision. This study uses Raman spectroscopy for the first time in an operating theatre and demonstrates that the results obtained, in real-time, are comparable, if not superior, to current

  4. Intraoperative Ultrasound in the Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eggemann, H; Ignatov, T; Beni, A; Costa, S D; Ortmann, O; Ignatov, A

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the value of intraoperative ultrasound in breast-conserving operations and to compare it with standard procedures. Methods: For this purpose 307 women with palpable breast cancers and 116 patients with non-palpable breast cancers were compared retrospectively. In the group with palpable breast cancers 177 patients were treated by US-guided operations and 130 patients underwent palpation-guided breast-conserving operations. As primary outcomes, the resection margins and the rate of re-operations were evaluated. Results: With regard to disease-free resection margins, intraoperative ultrasound was significantly superior to palpation alone. In the group of patients in whom the tumours were extirpated with the help of palpation, R1 resections were observed almost twice as often (16.9 %) as in the US-guided group (8.5 %). In the group with non-palpable breast cancers, intraoperative ultrasound was employed in 61 patients. As a control, 43 cases were evaluated in whom the breast-conserving operation was performed after wire marking. In this group US-guided tumour removal proved to be superior to that after wire marking for tumours that did not exhibit any intraductal components. Otherwise the redo resection rate was reduced by use of ultrasound. Furthermore, the surgeon was able by means of intraoperative ultrasound to identify "problematic" margins and to excise them in the same sitting. Conclusions: The US-guided, breast-conserving operations led to a lower rate of R1 resections and redo operations in comparison to operations with palpation alone or those after wire marking.

  5. Intraoperative positioning and care of the obese patient.

    PubMed

    Dybec, Robert B

    2004-01-01

    The perioperative nurse involved in the intraoperative care of the obese patient is faced with numerous issues and challenges. As a growing number of these patients present for medical care, the nurse must consider the special positioning needs for surgery and the equipment needed to promote the safest environment for the patient. This article addresses positioning considerations for the obese patient and special equipment needs and selection in the operating room.

  6. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric neurosurgery—an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (ioMRI) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1994, ioMRI has spread widely and in many different forms. This article traces the developmental history of ioMRI and reviews the relevant literature regarding it’s effectiveness in pediatric neurosurgery. While of considerable expense, current trends in healthcare essentially mandate the use of ioMRI in a growing number of cases. PMID:26835341

  7. [Intraoperative navigation, with focus on the skull base].

    PubMed

    Wirtz, C R

    2016-09-01

    Intraoperative navigation systems are widely used in ENT, oral and maxillofacial, and neurosurgery. The benefits of such systems have been demonstrated in various applications, including intracranial and skull base surgery. Intraoperative shift, "brain shift" and changes in anatomy caused by the surgical procedure itself impair the accuracy of navigation and represent factors limiting its application, particularly in glioma and metastatic brain surgery. For this reason, intraoperative imaging was incorporated into neurosurgery. A specific application of navigation is thus skull base surgery, where shifts are often negligible due to the bony structures in which pathologies are embedded. Development of new systems with seamless integration into the operative workflow propagated routine use of navigation in neuro- and ENT surgery. Navigation proved especially helpful in interdisciplinary surgery with pathologies located in anatomic regions where competences of different surgical disciplines overlap, as in the skull base. While this increased radicality in tumour resection, there was a high risk of morbidity. The integration of electrophysiological function monitoring served to preserve function and reduce morbidity, and has led to less invasive and radical strategies in skull base surgery. New radiosurgical methods to adjuvantly treat possible tumour remnants have also supported this development. Systems allowing resection borders to be marked in the navigational coordinates would enable direct linking of these data to radiotherapy planning and better interpretation of follow-up imaging. Navigation is thus a valuable tool supporting interdisciplinary cooperation in skull base surgery for the benefit of patients. PMID:27566369

  8. SEP Montage Variability Comparison during Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Christine; Lolis, Athena Maria; Beric, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring is performed to provide real-time assessment of the neural structures that can be at risk during spinal surgery. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are the most commonly used modality for intraoperative monitoring. SEP stability can be affected by many factors during the surgery. This study is a prospective review of SEP recordings obtained during intraoperative monitoring of instrumented spinal surgeries that were performed for chronic underlying neurologic and neuromuscular conditions, such as scoliosis, myelopathy, and spinal stenosis. We analyzed multiple montages at the baseline, and then followed their development throughout the procedure. Our intention was to examine the stability of the SEP recordings throughout the surgical procedure on multiple montages of cortical SEP recordings, with the goal of identifying the appropriate combination of the least number of montages that gives the highest yield of monitorable surgeries. Our study shows that it is necessary to have multiple montages for SEP recordings, as it reduces the number of non-monitorable cases, improves IOM reliability, and therefore could reduce false positives warnings to the surgeons. Out of all the typical montages available for use, our study has shown that the recording montage Cz-C4/Cz-C3 (Cz-Cc) is the most reliable and stable throughout the procedure and should be the preferred montage followed throughout the surgery. PMID:27445969

  9. Predictors of intraoperative-acquired surgical wound infections.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, R A; Cushing, D; Lerer, T

    1991-06-01

    During a 4-year period, we collected prospective epidemiological data and intraoperative wound cultures from 1852 surgery patients at a university-affiliated community hospital in order to identify the critical risk factors for postoperative wound infections and study the impact of perioperative antibiotics on the bacteriology of infected wounds. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed four risk factors that were independent of each other and highly predictive for subsequent wound infection. These were the surgical wound class, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status grouping, duration of surgery and results of intraoperative cultures. Addition of other variables to our model did not increase the predicted probability of infection. Even though patients with positive intraoperative cultures had an increased rate of infection, this information had limited clinical utility because of its low predictive value, high false-positive rate and poor concordance with isolates from infected wounds. Patients who had received perioperative antibiotics and who developed infections were frequently infected with organisms that were resistant to the perioperative drug regimen, compared with patients who had not received antibiotics.

  10. A New Measure for Monitoring Intraoperative Somatosensory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Choi, Young Doo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To propose a new measure for effective monitoring of intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and to validate the feasibility of this measure for evoked potentials (EP) and single trials with a retrospective data analysis study. Methods The proposed new measure (hereafter, a slope-measure) was defined as the relative slope of the amplitude and latency at each EP peak compared to the baseline value, which is sensitive to the change in the amplitude and latency simultaneously. We used the slope-measure for EP and single trials and compared the significant change detection time with that of the conventional peak-to-peak method. When applied to single trials, each single trial signal was processed with optimal filters before using the slope-measure. In this retrospective data analysis, 7 patients who underwent cerebral aneurysm clipping surgery for unruptured aneurysm middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcation were included. Results We found that this simple slope-measure has a detection time that is as early or earlier than that of the conventional method; furthermore, using the slope-measure in optimally filtered single trials provides warning signs earlier than that of the conventional method during MCA clipping surgery. Conclusion Our results have confirmed the feasibility of the slope-measure for intraoperative SEP monitoring. This is a novel study that provides a useful measure for either EP or single trials in intraoperative SEP monitoring. PMID:25628803

  11. [Intraoperative navigation, with focus on the skull base].

    PubMed

    Wirtz, C R

    2016-09-01

    Intraoperative navigation systems are widely used in ENT, oral and maxillofacial, and neurosurgery. The benefits of such systems have been demonstrated in various applications, including intracranial and skull base surgery. Intraoperative shift, "brain shift" and changes in anatomy caused by the surgical procedure itself impair the accuracy of navigation and represent factors limiting its application, particularly in glioma and metastatic brain surgery. For this reason, intraoperative imaging was incorporated into neurosurgery. A specific application of navigation is thus skull base surgery, where shifts are often negligible due to the bony structures in which pathologies are embedded. Development of new systems with seamless integration into the operative workflow propagated routine use of navigation in neuro- and ENT surgery. Navigation proved especially helpful in interdisciplinary surgery with pathologies located in anatomic regions where competences of different surgical disciplines overlap, as in the skull base. While this increased radicality in tumour resection, there was a high risk of morbidity. The integration of electrophysiological function monitoring served to preserve function and reduce morbidity, and has led to less invasive and radical strategies in skull base surgery. New radiosurgical methods to adjuvantly treat possible tumour remnants have also supported this development. Systems allowing resection borders to be marked in the navigational coordinates would enable direct linking of these data to radiotherapy planning and better interpretation of follow-up imaging. Navigation is thus a valuable tool supporting interdisciplinary cooperation in skull base surgery for the benefit of patients.

  12. Intraoperative Brain Shift Compensation: Accounting for Dural Septa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ishita; Coffey, Aaron M.; Ding, Siyi; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Dawant, Benoit M.; Thompson, Reid C.

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanical models that describe soft tissue deformation provide a relatively inexpensive way to correct registration errors in image-guided neurosurgical systems caused by nonrigid brain shift. Quantifying the factors that cause this deformation to sufficient precision is a challenging task. To circumvent this difficulty, atlas-based methods have been developed recently that allow for uncertainty, yet still capture the first-order effects associated with deformation. The inverse solution is driven by sparse intraoperative surface measurements, which could bias the reconstruction and affect the subsurface accuracy of the model prediction. Studies using intraoperative MR have shown that the deformation in the midline, tentorium, and contralateral hemisphere is relatively small. The dural septa act as rigid membranes supporting the brain parenchyma and compartmentalizing the brain. Accounting for these structures in models may be an important key to improving subsurface shift accuracy. A novel method to segment the tentorium cerebelli will be described, along with the procedure for modeling the dural septa. Results in seven clinical cases show a qualitative improvement in subsurface shift accuracy making the predicted deformation more congruous with previous observations in the literature. The results also suggest a considerably more important role for hyperosmotic drug modeling for the intraoperative shift correction environment. PMID:21097376

  13. Intraoperative diagnostics and elimination of residual microtumours with plasmonic nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Belatsarkouski, Ihor; Gillenwater, Ann M.; O'Neill, Brian E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2016-06-01

    Failure of cancer surgery to intraoperatively detect and eliminate microscopic residual disease (MRD) causes lethal recurrence and metastases, and the removal of important normal tissues causes excessive morbidity. Here, we show that a plasmonic nanobubble (PNB), a non-stationary laser pulse-activated nanoevent, intraoperatively detects and eliminates MRD in the surgical bed. PNBs were generated in vivo in head and neck cancer cells by systemically targeting tumours with gold colloids and locally applying near-infrared, low-energy short laser pulses, and were simultaneously detected with an acoustic probe. In mouse models, between 3 and 30 residual cancer cells and MRD (undetectable with current methods) were non-invasively detected up to 4 mm deep in the surgical bed within 1 ms. In resectable MRD, PNB-guided surgery prevented local recurrence and delivered 100% tumour-free survival. In unresectable MRD, PNB nanosurgery improved survival twofold compared with standard surgery. Our results show that PNB-guided surgery and nanosurgery can rapidly and precisely detect and remove MRD in simple intraoperative procedures.

  14. Noise suppressed, multifocus image fusion for enhanced intraoperative navigation

    PubMed Central

    Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Vinegoni, Claudio; Fexon, Lyuba; Thurber, Greg; Sbarbati, Andrea; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Current intraoperative imaging systems are typically not able to provide ‘sharp’ images over entire large areas or entire organs. Distinct structures such as tissue margins or groups of malignant cells are therefore often difficult to detect, especially under low signal-to-noise-ratio conditions. In this report, we introduce a noise suppressed multifocus image fusion algorithm, that provides detailed reconstructions even when images are acquired under sub-optimal conditions, such is the case for real time fluorescence intraoperative surgery. The algorithm makes use of the Anscombe transform combined with a multi-level stationary wavelet transform with individual threshold-based shrinkage. While the imaging system is integrated with a respiratory monitor triggering system, it can be easily adapted to any commercial imaging system. The developed algorithm is made available as a plugin for Osirix. Intraoperative detection of small malignant fluorescent cells using the proposed noise suppressed multifocus image fusion system. Red/Yellow circles indicate small groups of malignant cells. PMID:22887724

  15. A geometric analysis of mastectomy incisions: Optimizing intraoperative breast volume

    PubMed Central

    Chopp, David; Rawlani, Vinay; Ellis, Marco; Johnson, Sarah A; Buck, Donald W; Khan, Seema; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Kim, John YS

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The advent of acellular dermis-based tissue expander breast reconstruction has placed an increased emphasis on optimizing intraoperative volume. Because skin preservation is a critical determinant of intraoperative volume expansion, a mathematical model was developed to capture the influence of incision dimension on subsequent tissue expander volumes. METHODS: A mathematical equation was developed to calculate breast volume via integration of a geometrically modelled breast cross-section. The equation calculates volume changes associated with excised skin during the mastectomy incision by reducing the arc length of the cross-section. The degree of volume loss is subsequently calculated based on excision dimensions ranging from 35 mm to 60 mm. RESULTS: A quadratic relationship between breast volume and the vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision exists, such that incrementally larger incisions lead to a disproportionally greater amount of volume loss. The vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision – more so than the horizontal dimension – is of critical importance to maintain breast volume. Moreover, the predicted volume loss is more profound in smaller breasts and primarily occurs in areas that affect breast projection on ptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to model the relationship between the vertical dimensions of the mastectomy incision and subsequent volume loss. These geometric principles will aid in optimizing intra-operative volume expansion during expander-based breast reconstruction. PMID:22654531

  16. SEP Montage Variability Comparison during Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Christine; Lolis, Athena Maria; Beric, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring is performed to provide real-time assessment of the neural structures that can be at risk during spinal surgery. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) are the most commonly used modality for intraoperative monitoring. SEP stability can be affected by many factors during the surgery. This study is a prospective review of SEP recordings obtained during intraoperative monitoring of instrumented spinal surgeries that were performed for chronic underlying neurologic and neuromuscular conditions, such as scoliosis, myelopathy, and spinal stenosis. We analyzed multiple montages at the baseline, and then followed their development throughout the procedure. Our intention was to examine the stability of the SEP recordings throughout the surgical procedure on multiple montages of cortical SEP recordings, with the goal of identifying the appropriate combination of the least number of montages that gives the highest yield of monitorable surgeries. Our study shows that it is necessary to have multiple montages for SEP recordings, as it reduces the number of non-monitorable cases, improves IOM reliability, and therefore could reduce false positives warnings to the surgeons. Out of all the typical montages available for use, our study has shown that the recording montage Cz-C4/Cz-C3 (Cz-Cc) is the most reliable and stable throughout the procedure and should be the preferred montage followed throughout the surgery. PMID:27445969

  17. Intraoperative augmented reality for minimally invasive liver interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuering, Michael; Schenk, Andrea; Schneider, Armin; Preim, Bernhard; Greiner, Guenther

    2003-05-01

    Minimally invasive liver interventions demand a lot of experience due to the limited access to the field of operation. In particular, the correct placement of the trocar and the navigation within the patient's body are hampered. In this work, we present an intraoperative augmented reality system (IARS) that directly projects preoperatively planned information and structures extracted from CT data, onto the real laparoscopic video images. Our system consists of a preoperative planning tool for liver surgery and an intraoperative real time visualization component. The planning software takes into account the individual anatomy of the intrahepatic vessels and determines the vascular territories. Methods for fast segmentation of the liver parenchyma, of the intrahepatic vessels and of liver lesions are provided. In addition, very efficient algorithms for skeletonization and vascular analysis allowing the approximation of patient-individual liver vascular territories are included. The intraoperative visualization is based on a standard graphics adapter for hardware accelerated high performance direct volume rendering. The preoperative CT data is rigidly registered to the patient position by the use of fiducials that are attached to the patient's body, and anatomical landmarks in combination with an electro-magnetic navigation system. Our system was evaluated in vivo during a minimally invasive intervention simulation in a swine under anesthesia.

  18. Intraoperative echocardiographic detection of regurgitant jets after valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, A. J.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J.; Armstrong, G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paravalvular jets, documented by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, have prompted immediate valve explantation by others, yet the significance of these jets is unknown. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients had intraoperative transesophageal two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography, performed to assess the number and area of regurgitant jets after valve replacement, before and after protamine. Patients were grouped by first time versus redo operation, valve position and type. RESULTS: Before protamine, 55 jets were identified (2.04+/-1.4 per patient) versus 29 jets after (1.07+/-1.2 per patient, p = 0.0002). Total jet area improved from 2.0+/-2.2 cm2 to 0.86+/-1.7 cm2 with protamine (p<0.0001). In all patients jet area decreased (average decrease, 70.7%+/-27.0%). First time and redo operations had similar improvements in jet number and area (both p>0.6). Furthermore, mitral and mechanical valves each had more jets and overall greater jet area when compared to aortic and tissue valves, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Following valve replacement, multiple jets are detected by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. They are more common and larger in the mitral position and with mechanical valves. Improvement occurs with reversal of anticoagulation.

  19. Precision of image-based registration for intraoperative navigation in the presence of metal artifacts: Application to corrective osteotomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; Curnier, F; Rondeau, X; Streekstra, G J

    2015-06-01

    Navigation for corrective osteotomy surgery requires patient-to-image registration. When registration is based on intraoperative 3-D cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging, metal landmarks may be used that deteriorate image quality. This study investigates whether metal artifacts influence the precision of image-to-patient registration, either with or without intermediate user intervention during the registration procedure, in an application for corrective osteotomy of the distal radius. A series of 3-D CBCT scans is made of a cadaver arm with and without metal landmarks. Metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on inpainting techniques is used to improve 3-D CBCT images hampered by metal artifacts. This provides three sets of images (with metal, with MAR, and without metal), which enable investigating the differences in precision of intraoperative registration. Gray-level based point-to-image registration showed a better correlation coefficient if intraoperative images with MAR are used, indicating a better image similarity. The precision of registration without intermediate user intervention during the registration procedure, expressed as the residual angulation and displacement error after repetitive registration was very low and showed no improvement when MAR was used. By adding intermediate user intervention to the registration procedure however, precision was very high but was not affected by the presence of metal artifacts in the specific application.

  20. Intraoperative Identification of Liver Cancer Microfoci Using a Targeted Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe for Imaging-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chaoting; Shang, Wenting; Wang, Kun; Chi, Chongwei; Jia, Xiaohua; Fang, Cheng; Yang, Du; Ye, Jinzuo; Fang, Chihua; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Difficulties in the highly sensitive detection of tumour microfoci represent a critical obstacle toward improved surgical intervention in liver cancer. Conventional preoperative imaging methods and surgeons’ subjective experience are limited by their inability to effectively detect tumour lesions measuring less than 2 mm; however, intraoperative fluorescence molecular imaging may overcome this limitation. Here, we synthesised an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-conjugated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) highly loaded with indocyanine green (ICG) dye that could accurately delineate liver cancer margins and provide excellent tumour-to-normal tissue contrast intraoperatively. The increased ICG loading capacity and tumour specificity enabled the identification of residual microtumours and satellite lesions measuring less than 1 mm in living mice. Histological analysis validated the sensitivity and accuracy of this approach. We believe this technique utilising a new fluorescent nanoprobe with intraoperative optical imaging may offer a more sensitive and accurate method for liver cancer resection guidance, resulting in better surgical outcomes. PMID:26923919

  1. Comparison of the accuracy and proximal shunt failure rate of freehand placement versus intraoperative guidance in parietooccipital ventricular catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas J; McCoy, Kathleen E; Al-Holou, Wajd N; Molina, Sergio L; Smyth, Matthew D; Sullivan, Stephen E

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this paper is to compare the accuracy of the freehand technique versus the use of intraoperative guidance (either ultrasound guidance or frameless stereotaxy) for placement of parietooccipital ventricular catheters and to determine factors associated with reduced proximal shunt failure. METHODS This retrospective cohort study included all patients from 2 institutions who underwent a ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting procedure in which a new parietooccipital ventricular catheter was placed between January 2005 and December 2013. Data abstracted for each patient included age, sex, method of ventricular catheter placement, side of ventricular catheter placement, Evans ratio, and bifrontal ventricular span. Postoperative radiographic studies were reviewed for accuracy of ventricular catheter placement. Medical records were also reviewed for evidence of shunt failure requiring revision. Standard statistical methods were used for analysis. RESULTS A total of 257 patients were included in the study: 134 from the University of Michigan and 123 from Washington University in St. Louis. Accurate ventricular catheter placement was achieved in 81.2% of cases in which intraoperative guidance was used versus 67.3% when the freehand technique was used. Increasing age reduced the likelihood of accurate catheter placement (OR 0.983, 95% CI 0.971-0.995; p = 0.005), while the use of intraoperative guidance significantly increased the likelihood (OR 2.809, 95% CI 1.406-5.618; p = 0.016). During the study period, 108 patients (42.0%) experienced shunt failure, 79 patients (30.7%) had failure involving the proximal catheter, and 53 patients (20.6%) had distal failure (valve or distal catheter). Increasing age reduced the likelihood of being free from proximal shunt failure (OR 0.983, 95% CI 0.970-0.995; p = 0.008), while both the use of intraoperative guidance (OR 2.385, 95% CI 1.227-5.032; p = 0.011), and accurate ventricular catheter placement (OR 3

  2. Use of the Esophageal Doppler Machine to help guide the intraoperative management of two children with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hack, Henrik

    2006-08-01

    The anesthetic management of pheochromocytoma has been based upon the intraoperative control of blood pressure and fluid balance following adequate preoperative preparation. This can be difficult, especially in the presence of significant comorbidity such as cardiac or renal dysfunction. Two cases of children with pheochromocytoma are reported where the introperative management of fluid balance and blood pressure control were guided by measurement of changes in descending aortic blood flow using an esophageal Doppler probe. The advantages of such a technique compared with more invasive monitors are discussed.

  3. Intraoperative Optical Imaging and Tissue Interrogation During Urologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mark; Gupta, Mohit; Su, Li-Ming; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review optical imaging technologies in urologic surgery aimed to facilitate intraoperative imaging and tissue interrogation. Recent findings Emerging new optical imaging technologies can be integrated in the operating room environment during minimally invasive and open surgery. These technologies include macroscopic fluorescence imaging that provides contrast enhancement between normal and diseased tissue and microscopic imaging that provides tissue characterization. Summary Optical imaging technologies that have reached the clinical arena in urologic surgery are reviewed, including photodynamic diagnosis, near infrared fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. PMID:24240512

  4. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy in laryngeal part of pharynx cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukatch, Erwin V.; Trojan, Vasily; Loukatch, Vjacheslav

    1996-12-01

    In clinic intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IPT) was done in patients with primal squamous cells cancer of the laryngeal part of the pharynx. The He-Ne laser and methylene blue as a photosensibilizator were used. Cobalt therapy in the postoperative period was done in dose 45 Gr. Patients of control groups (1-th group) with only laser and (2-th group) only methylene blue were controlled during three years with the main group. The statistics show certain differences of recidives in the main group compared to the control groups. These facts are allowing us to recommend the use of IPT as an additional method in ENT-oncology diseases treatment.

  5. A CASE OF GRANISETRON ASSOCIATED INTRAOPERATIVE CARDIAC ARREST.

    PubMed

    Al Harbi, Mohammed; Al Rifai, Derar; Al Habeeb, Hassan; Wambi, Freddie; Geldhof, Georges; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of intraoperative severe bradycardia that resulted in asystole and cardiac arrest shortly after (<2 min) intravenous granisetron 1mg for postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis, that occurred in a female patient who underwent an elective total thyroidectomy. After two cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, spontaneous circulation and sinus rhythm returned successfully. Postoperatively, the patient was diagnosed with a drug-induced long QT syndrome. At the time of the event, granisetron was the only medication administered. Furthermore, there was no reason to suspect electrolyte abnormalities. We explore the association of the onset of severe sinus bradycardia with the intravenous administration of granisetron. PMID:27382819

  6. Does the Surgical Apgar Score Measure Intraoperative Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Regenbogen, Scott E.; Lancaster, R. Todd; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Hutter, Matthew M.; Gawande, Atul A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether Surgical Apgar Scores measure the relationship between intraoperative care and surgical outcomes. Summary Background Data With preoperative risk-adjustment now well-developed, the role of intraoperative performance in surgical outcomes may be considered. We previously derived and validated a ten-point Surgical Apgar Score—based on intraoperative blood loss, heart rate, and blood pressure—that effectively predicts major postoperative complications within 30 days of general and vascular surgery. This study evaluates whether the predictive value of this score comes solely from patients’ preoperative risk, or also measures care in the operating room. Methods Among a systematic sample of 4,119 general and vascular surgery patients at a major academic hospital, we constructed a detailed risk-prediction model including 27 patient-comorbidity and procedure-complexity variables, and computed patients’ propensity to suffer a major postoperative complication. We evaluated the prognostic value of patients’ Surgical Apgar Scores before and after adjustment for this preoperative risk. Results After risk-adjustment, the Surgical Apgar Score remained strongly correlated with postoperative outcomes (p<0.0001). Odds of major complications among average-scoring patients (scores 7–8) were equivalent to preoperative predictions (likelihood ratio (LR) 1.05, 95%CI 0.78–1.41), significantly decreased for those who achieved the best scores of 9–10 (LR 0.52, 95%CI 0.35–0.78), and were significantly poorer for those with low scores—LRs 1.60 (1.12–2.28) for scores 5–6, and 2.80 (1.50–5.21) for scores 0–4. Conclusions Even after accounting for fixed preoperative risk—due to patients’ acute condition, comorbidities and/or operative complexity—the Surgical Apgar Score appears to detect differences in intraoperative management that reduce odds of major complications by half, or increase them by nearly three-fold. PMID:18650644

  7. Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence: cell detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Fazly S.; Gokozan, Hamza N.; Goksel, Behiye; Otero, Jose J.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative neuropathology of glioma recurrence represents significant visual challenges to pathologists as they carry significant clinical implications. For example, rendering a diagnosis of recurrent glioma can help the surgeon decide to perform more aggressive resection if surgically appropriate. In addition, the success of recent clinical trials for intraoperative administration of therapies, such as inoculation with oncolytic viruses, may suggest that refinement of the intraoperative diagnosis during neurosurgery is an emerging need for pathologists. Typically, these diagnoses require rapid/STAT processing lasting only 20-30 minutes after receipt from neurosurgery. In this relatively short time frame, only dyes, such as hematoxylin and eosin (H and E), can be implemented. The visual challenge lies in the fact that these patients have undergone chemotherapy and radiation, both of which induce cytological atypia in astrocytes, and pathologists are unable to implement helpful biomarkers in their diagnoses. Therefore, there is a need to help pathologists differentiate between astrocytes that are cytologically atypical due to treatment versus infiltrating, recurrent, neoplastic astrocytes. This study focuses on classification of neoplastic versus non-neoplastic astrocytes with the long term goal of providing a better neuropathological computer-aided consultation via classification of cells into reactive gliosis versus recurrent glioma. We present a method to detect cells in H and E stained digitized slides of intraoperative cytologic preparations. The method uses a combination of the `value' component of the HSV color space and `b*' component of the CIE L*a*b* color space to create an enhanced image that suppresses the background while revealing cells on an image. A composite image is formed based on the morphological closing of the hue-luminance combined image. Geometrical and textural features extracted from Discrete Wavelet Frames and combined to classify

  8. Intraoperative consultation for the retroperitoneum and adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Klein, E A; Streem, S B; Novick, A C

    1985-08-01

    An incidentally discovered mass lesion is the most frequent indication for intraoperative consultation involving the retroperitoneum or adrenal gland. The goal of the surgeon is to determine the nature and extent of the lesion and, for solid lesions, to obtain a biopsy adequate for histopathologic diagnosis. Benign lesions may be excised locally, whereas therapy for malignancies depends upon the individual circumstances of the patient, the histology of the lesion, and involvement of adjacent organs. Treatment of hematomas requires early vascular control. Adrenal tissue should be preserved whenever possible.

  9. [Reconstruction of scar hernias--intraoperative tensiometry for objective determination of procedure of choice].

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Konzen, G; Schmidt, O; Hohenberger, W

    1996-10-01

    The reappearance of incisional hernias after reconstruction depends on the size and tension of the hernia. An additional risk factor is the number of operations that have been performed before. There are two decisive factors that influence the rate of recurrence: the operation technique and the tension applied. To reach a functional reconstruction the incisional hernia must be closed and the abdominal wall must be joined together in an anatomical way. The technique used must be able to tolerate the tension which is necessary to close the abdominal wall. Application of arbitrary tension produces a high rate of recurrence, irrespective of the kind of reconstruction used. Through the intraoperative measurement of the tension applied one can match each hernia (according to size, value and tension) to the most suitable technique. Here the inlay/onlay technique tolerates the highest tension, up to 3.5 kp. With this method and a maximum tension of 3.5 kp we achieved a complete functional reconstruction in 65% of cases and our rate of recurrence amounted to 2.3%.

  10. Spondylodiscitis after lumbar microdiscectomy: effectiveness of two protocols of intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in 1167 cases.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Rychlicki, Franco; Tatta, Carlo; Morabito, Letterio; Agrillo, Umberto; Ducati, Alessandro

    2005-10-01

    The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing postoperative lumbar spondylodiscitis is still controversial in medical, ethical, economic, and legal terms. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of two intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis protocols in a large series of lumbar microdiscectomies performed in two different neurosurgical centres. We reviewed the outcome of 1167 patients operated on for a lumbar disc herniation with microsurgical technique, in order to detect the incidence of postoperative spondylodiscitis. Group A included 450 patients operated on in a 3-year period in the Neurosurgical Division of the University Hospital of Ancona; group P consisted of 717 patients operated on in a 4-year period in the Neurosurgical Division of the Sandro Pertini Hospital of Rome. In both groups intraoperative antibiotics for prophylaxis were administered, whereas postoperative prophylaxis was not performed. Protocol of group A: single intravenous dose of cefazoline 1 g at induction of general anesthesia and generous washing with saline solution and irrigation with a solution containing rifamicin at the end of microsurgical procedure. Protocol of group P: single-dose of intravenous ampicillin 1000 mg and sulbactam 500 mg at induction of anesthesia and generous irrigation with saline solution at the end of microsurgical procedure. A diagnosis of postoperative spondylodiscitis was made in three out of 450 patients in group A (0.67%) and in 5 out of 717 patients in group P (0.69%). In all cases, treatment consisted of rigid thoraco-lumbar orthesis and 4- to 6-week administration of amoxicillin/clavulanate compound (500/125 mg). The low incidence of postoperative spondylodiscitis obtained with both our protocols seems to confirm that intraoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is associated with the same rate of discitis of prolonged prophylaxis usually still adopted in many centres, but is more advantageous both in terms of welfare and comfort for

  11. Clinical implementation of a digital tomosynthesis-based seed reconstruction algorithm for intraoperative postimplant dose evaluation in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet-Benkhoucha, Malik; Verhaegen, Frank; Lassalle, Stephanie; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Reniers, Brigitte; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The low dose rate brachytherapy procedure would benefit from an intraoperative postimplant dosimetry verification technique to identify possible suboptimal dose coverage and suggest a potential reimplantation. The main objective of this project is to develop an efficient, operator-free, intraoperative seed detection technique using the imaging modalities available in a low dose rate brachytherapy treatment room. Methods: This intraoperative detection allows a complete dosimetry calculation that can be performed right after an I-125 prostate seed implantation, while the patient is still under anesthesia. To accomplish this, a digital tomosynthesis-based algorithm was developed. This automatic filtered reconstruction of the 3D volume requires seven projections acquired over a total angle of 60 deg. with an isocentric imaging system. Results: A phantom study was performed to validate the technique that was used in a retrospective clinical study involving 23 patients. In the patient study, the automatic tomosynthesis-based reconstruction yielded seed detection rates of 96.7% and 2.6% false positives. The seed localization error obtained with a phantom study is 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The average time needed for reconstruction is below 1 min. The reconstruction algorithm also provides the seed orientation with an uncertainty of 10 deg. {+-}8 deg. The seed detection algorithm presented here is reliable and was efficiently used in the clinic. Conclusions: When combined with an appropriate coregistration technique to identify the organs in the seed coordinate system, this algorithm will offer new possibilities for a next generation of clinical brachytherapy systems.

  12. Intra-op measurement of the mechanical axis deviation: an evaluation study on 19 human cadaver legs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lejing; Fallavollita, Pascal; Brand, Alexander; Erat, Okan; Weidert, Simon; Thaller, Peter-Helmut; Euler, Ekkehard; Navab, Nassir

    2012-01-01

    The alignment of the lower limb in high tibial osteotomy (HTO) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) must be determined intraoperatively. One way to do so is to deform the mechanical axis deviation (MAD), for which a tolerance measurement of 10 mm is widely accepted. Many techniques are proposed in clinical practice such as visual inspection, cable method, grid with lead impregnated reference lines, or more recently, navigation systems. Each has their disadvantages including reliability of the MAD measurement, excess radiation, prolonged operation time, complicated setup and high cost. To alleviate such shortcomings, we propose a novel clinical protocol that allows quick and accurate intraoperative calculation of MAD. This is achieved by an X-ray stitching method requiring only three X-ray images placed into a panoramic image frame during the entire procedure. The method has been systematically analyzed in a simulation framework in order to investigate its accuracy and robustness. Furthermore, we validated our protocol via a preclinical study comprising 19 human cadaver legs. Four surgeons determined MAD measurements using our X-ray panorama and compared these values to a gold-standard CT-based technique. The maximum average MAD error was 3.5mm which shows great potential for the technique.

  13. Three-dimensional computer-assisted surgical simulation and intraoperative navigation in orthognathic surgery: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-04-01

    By incorporating three-dimensional (3D) imaging and computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques, 3D computer-assisted technology has been applied widely to provide accurate guidance for assessment and treatment planning in clinical practice. This technology has recently been used in orthognathic surgery to improve surgical planning and outcome. The modality will gradually become popular. This study reviewed the literature concerning the use of computer-assisted techniques in orthognathic surgery including surgical planning, simulation, intraoperative translation of the virtual surgery, and postoperative evaluation. A Medline, PubMed, ProQuest, and ScienceDirect search was performed to find relevant articles with regard to 3D computer-assisted orthognathic surgery in the past 10 years. A total of 460 articles were revealed, out of which 174 were publications addressed the topic of this study. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the state-of-art methods for 3D computer-assisted technology in orthognathic surgery. From the review we can conclude that the use of computer-assisted technique in orthognathic surgery provides the benefit of optimal functional and aesthetic results, patient satisfaction, precise translation of the treatment plan, and facilitating intraoperative manipulation.

  14. Intraoperative assessment of ovarian tumors: a 5-year review with assessment of discrepant diagnostic cases.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Colin J R; Brennan, Barbara A; Hammond, Ian G; Leung, Yee C; McCartney, Anthony J

    2006-07-01

    Frozen section is often requested in the intraoperative assessment of patients, presenting with ovarian masses, to provide guidance for appropriate surgical management. To assess the accuracy of frozen section and identify causes of diagnostic error, we reviewed 914 consecutive ovarian frozen sections performed over a 5-year period in 2 laboratories; one of which provides a general surgical pathology service and, the other, a specialist gynecologic pathology service. Cases, in which there were significant diagnostic discrepancies between the intraoperative and the final histological diagnoses, were reviewed. The series included 552 benign lesions (60.4%), 96 borderline (atypical proliferating) epithelial tumors (10.5%), and 266 malignancies (29.1%). The overall accuracy of frozen section diagnosis was 95.3%. There were 43 cases with diagnostic discrepancy; 20 (3.8% cases) of which were reported in the specialist laboratory and 23 (5.9% cases) in the general laboratory. Underdiagnosis of tumor type accounted for 32 of 43 discrepant cases and was most frequent in borderline mucinous tumors. The most common cause of overdiagnosis was the misinterpretation of serous cystadenofibroma as borderline serous tumor. Slide review of the 41 assessable cases indicated that sampling error, pathologist misinterpretation, and suboptimal slide preparations contributed to misdiagnoses in 17, 23, and 9 tumors, respectively (in 9 cases, 2 factors were contributory), whereas no specific error was identified in the remaining case. Technical factors and pathologist misinterpretation were more common in the general pathology laboratory. This study confirms that ovarian frozen section is a generally reliable technique, but there are problematic areas, particularly involving the assessment of borderline tumors.

  15. Potential predictors for the amount of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datteri, Ryan; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; D'Haese, Pierre-François; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2011-03-01

    A number of groups have reported on the occurrence of intra-operative brain shift during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. This has a number of implications for the procedure including an increased chance of intra-cranial bleeding and complications due to the need for more exploratory electrodes to account for the brain shift. It has been reported that the amount of pneumocephalus or air invasion into the cranial cavity due to the opening of the dura correlates with intraoperative brain shift. Therefore, pre-operatively predicting the amount of pneumocephalus expected during surgery is of interest toward accounting for brain shift. In this study, we used 64 DBS patients who received bilateral electrode implantations and had a post-operative CT scan acquired immediately after surgery (CT-PI). For each patient, the volumes of the pneumocephalus, left ventricle, right ventricle, third ventricle, white matter, grey matter, and cerebral spinal fluid were calculated. The pneumocephalus was calculated from the CT-PI utilizing a region growing technique that was initialized with an atlas-based image registration method. A multi-atlas-based image segmentation method was used to segment out the ventricles of each patient. The Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software package was utilized to calculate the volumes of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), white matter and grey matter. The volume of individual structures had a moderate correlation with pneumocephalus. Utilizing a multi-linear regression between the volume of the pneumocephalus and the statistically relevant individual structures a Pearson's coefficient of r = 0.4123 (p = 0.0103) was found. This study shows preliminary results that could be used to develop a method to predict the amount of pneumocephalus ahead of the surgery.

  16. Laparoscopic diverticulectomy with the aid of intraoperative gastrointestinal endoscopy to treat epiphrenic diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Wu, Ji-xiang; Chen, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Yun-Feng; Ke, Ji

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Most researchers believe that the presence of large epiphrenic diverticulum (ED) with severe symptoms should lead to the consideration of surgical options. The choice of minimally invasive techniques and whether Heller myotomy with antireflux fundoplication should be employed after diverticulectomy became points of debate. The aim of this study was to describe how to perform laparoscopic transhiatal diverticulectomy (LTD) and oesophagomyotomy with the aid of intraoperative gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and how to investigate whether the oesophagomyotomy should be performed routinely after LTD. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 2008 to 2013, 11 patients with ED underwent LTD with the aid of intraoperative GI endoscopy at our department. Before surgery, 4 patients successfully underwent oesophageal manometry: Oesophageal dysfunction and an increase of the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) were found in 2 patients. RESULTS: There were 2 cases of conversion to an open transthoracic procedure. Six patients underwent LTD, Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication; and 3 patients underwent only LTD. The dysphagia and regurgitation 11 patients experienced before surgery improved significantly. Motor function studies showed that there was no oesophageal peristalsis in 5 patients during follow-up, while 6 patients showed seemingly normal oesophageal motility. The LESP of 6 patients undergoing LTD, myotomy and Dor fundoplication was 16.7 ± 10.2 mmHg, while the LESPs of 3 patients undergoing only LTD were 26 mmHg, 18 mmHg and 21 mmHg, respectively. In 4 cases experiencing LTD, myotomy and Dor fundoplication, the gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred during the sleep stage. CONCLUSIONS: LTD constitutes a safe and valid approach for ED patients with severe symptoms. As not all patients with large ED have oesophageal disorders, according to manometric and endoscopic results, surgeons can categorise and decide whether or not myotomy and antireflux surgery after LTD will

  17. Intravenous dexmedetomidine versus propofol for intraoperative moderate sedation during spinal anesthesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pratibha Jain; Dubey, Kamta Prasad; Sahare, Kamal Kishore; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: There has been a paradigm shift of focus toward quality of spinal anesthesia with sedation being an integral aspect of this regional anesthesia technique. Thus, this study was designed to compare efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine and propofol for moderate sedation during spinal anesthesia. Material and Methods: A total of 120 patients of age group 18-60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I & II, posted for surgeries under spinal anesthesia were randomly divided in to three groups (n = 40 each); Group D received infusion of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by maintenance infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h. Group P received infusion of propofol 6 mg/kg/h for 10 min followed by the infusion maintenance of 2.5 mg/kg/h. Group C (control group) received normal saline. Level of sedation (using observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score), pain intensity (by visual analogue scale), onset and recovery from sedation, hemodynamic changes, and overall patient's satisfaction were assessed. Results: The onset and recovery from sedation were significantly earlier with propofol (15.57 ± 1.89 min vs. 27.06 ± 2.26 min; P < 0.001) however intraoperative sedation (level 4), and overall patient's satisfaction was significantly better with dexmedetomidine group (p < 0.05). Duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly prolonged with dexmedetomidine (225.53 ± 5.61 min vs. 139.60 ± 3.03 min; P = 0.0013). Mean heart rate and blood pressure were significantly lower in the propofol group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine with its stable cardio-respiratory profile, better sedation, overall patient's satisfaction, and analgesia could be a valuable adjunct for intraoperative sedation during spinal anesthesia. PMID:27275058

  18. Intraoperative radiation therapy in malignant glioma: early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Urbina, D; Santos, M; Garcia-Berrocal, I; Bustos, J C; Samblas, J; Gutierrez-Diaz, J A; Delgado, J M; Donckaster, G; Calvo, F A

    1995-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with high energy electron beams is a treatment modality that has been included in multimodal programs in oncology to improve local tumor control. From August 1991 to December 1993, 17 patients with primary (8) or recurrent (9) high grade malignant gliomas, anaplastic astrocytoma (4), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (6) and glioblastoma multiforme (7), underwent surgical resection and a single dose of 10-20 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy was delivered in tumor bed. Fourteen patients received either pre-operative (8) or post-operative (6) external beam radiation therapy. Primary gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate has been 56% (range: 1-21+ months) and the median survival time has not yet been achieved. Four patients developed tumor progression (median time to tumor progression: 9 months). Recurrent gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate and median survival time has been 47% and 13 months (range: 6-32+ months) respectively. The median time to tumor progression was 11 months. No IORT related mortality has been observed. IORT is an attractive, tolerable and feasible treatment modality as antitumoral intensification procedure in high grade malignant gliomas.

  19. Simulated microsurgery monitoring using intraoperative multimodal surgical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an intraoperative multimodal surgical microscopy system that provides simultaneous real-time enlarged surface views and subsurface anatomic information during surgeries by integrating spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and conventional surgical microscopy. By sharing the same optical path, both OCT and PAM images were simultaneously acquired. Additionally, the custom-made needle-type transducer received the generated PA signals enabling convenient surgical operation without using a water bath. Using a simple augmented device, the OCT and PAM images were projected on the view plane of the surgical microscope. To quantify the performance of our system, we measured spatial resolutions of our system. Then, three microsurgery simulation and analysis were processed: (1) ex vivo needle tracking and monitoring injection of carbon particles in biological tissues, (2) in vivo needle tracking and monitoring injection of carbon particles in tumor-bearing mice, and (3) in vivo guiding of melanoma removal in melanoma-bearing mice. The results indicate that this triple modal system is useful for intraoperative purposes, and can potentially be a vital tool in microsurgeries.

  20. Toward Microendoscopic Electrical Impedance Tomography for Intraoperative Surgical Margin Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Halter, Ryan J.; Kim, Young-Joong

    2015-01-01

    No clinical protocols are routinely used to intraoperatively assess surgical margin status during prostate surgery. Instead, margins are evaluated through pathological assessment of the prostate following radical prostatectomy, when it is too late to provide additional surgical intervention. An intraoperative device potentially capable of assessing surgical margin status based on the electrical property contrast between benign and malignant prostate tissue has been developed. Specifically, a microendoscopic electrical impedance tomography (EIT) probe has been constructed to sense and image, at near millimeter resolution, the conductivity contrast within heterogeneous biological tissues with the goal of providing surgeons with real-time assessment of margin pathologies. This device consists of a ring of eight 0.6-mm diameter electrodes embedded in a 5-mm diameter probe tip to enable access through a 12-mm laparoscopic port. Experiments were performed to evaluate the volume of tissue sensed by the probe. The probe was also tested with inclusions in gelatin, as well as on a sample of porcine tissue with clearly defined regions of adipose and muscle. The probe's area of sensitivity consists of a circular area of 9.1 mm2 and the maximum depth of sensitivity is approximately 1.5 mm. The probe is able to distinguish between high contrast muscle and adipose tissue on a sub-mm scale (~500 μm). These preliminary results suggest that EIT is possible in a probe designed to fit within a 12-mm laparoscopic access port. PMID:24951675

  1. Prevention of intraoperative wound contamination with chlorhexidine shower and scrub.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, R A

    1988-04-01

    In a prospective, controlled, clinical trial, we found that preoperative showering and scrubbing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate was more effective than povidone-iodine or triclocarban medicated soap in reducing skin colonization at the site of surgical incision. Mean log colony counts of the incision site were one half to one log lower for patients who showered with chlorhexidine compared to those who showered with the other regimens. No growth was observed on 43% of the post shower skin cultures from patients in the chlorhexidine group compared with 16% of the cultures from patients who had povidone-iodine showers and 5% of those from patients who used medicated soap and water. The frequency of positive intraoperative wound cultures was 4% with chlorhexidine, 9% with povidone-iodine and 14% with medicated soap and water. This study demonstrates that chlorhexidine gluconate is a more effective skin disinfectant than either povidone-iodine or triclocarban soap and water and that its use is associated with lower rates of intraoperative wound contamination.

  2. Nonrecurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Era of Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gurleyik, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    Nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (non-RLN) is an anatomical variation increasing the risk of vocal cord palsy. Prediction and early identification of non-RLN may minimize such a risk of injury. This study assessed the effect of intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) on the detection of non-RLN. A total of 462 (236 right) nerves in 272 patients were identified and totally exposed, and all intraoperative steps of IONM were sequentially applied on the vagus nerve (VN) and RLN. Right predissection VN stimulation at a distal point did not create a sound signal in three cases (3/236; 1.27%). Proximal dissection of the right VN under IONM guidance established a proximal point, creating a positive signal. The separation point of non-RLN from VN was discovered in all three patients. Non-RLNs were exposed from separation to laryngeal entry. Positive IONM signals were obtained after resection of thyroid lobes, and postoperative period was uneventful in patients with non-RLN. Absence of distal VN signal is a precise predictor of the non-RLN. IONM-guided proximal dissection of the right VN leads to identification of the non-RLN. The prediction of non-RLN by the absence of the VN signal at an early stage of surgery may prevent or minimize the risk of nerve injury.

  3. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Mela, Christopher A.; Patterson, Carrie; Thompson, William K.; Papay, Francis; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a) the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b) the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously, (c) the first wearable system that offers both ultrasound imaging and fluorescence imaging capacities, and (d) the first demonstration of goggle-to-goggle communication to share stereoscopic views for medical guidance. PMID:26529249

  4. MEMS-Based Handheld Fourier Domain Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography for Intraoperative Microvascular Anastomosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of a miniature handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) imager for real time intraoperative vascular patency evaluation in the setting of super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis. Methods A novel handheld imager Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography based on a 1.3-µm central wavelength swept source for extravascular imaging was developed. The imager was minimized through the adoption of a 2.4-mm diameter microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, additionally a 12.7-mm diameter lens system was designed and combined with the MEMS mirror to achieve a small form factor that optimize functionality as a handheld extravascular OCT imager. To evaluate in-vivo applicability, super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis was performed in a mouse femoral vessel cut and repair model employing conventional interrupted suture technique as well as a novel non-suture cuff technique. Vascular anastomosis patency after clinically successful repair was evaluated using the novel handheld OCT imager. Results With an adjustable lateral image field of view up to 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm, high-resolution simultaneous structural and flow imaging of the blood vessels were successfully acquired for BALB/C mouse after orthotopic hind limb transplantation using a non-suture cuff technique and BALB/C mouse after femoral artery anastomosis using a suture technique. We experimentally quantify the axial and lateral resolution of the OCT to be 12.6 µm in air and 17.5 µm respectively. The OCT has a sensitivity of 84 dB and sensitivity roll-off of 5.7 dB/mm over an imaging range of 5 mm. Imaging with a frame rate of 36 Hz for an image size of 1000(lateral)×512(axial) pixels using a 50,000 A-lines per second swept source was achieved. Quantitative vessel lumen patency, lumen narrowing and thrombosis analysis were performed based on acquired structure and Doppler images. Conclusions A miniature handheld OCT imager that can be used for

  5. Basic Principles and Recent Trends of Transcranial Motor Evoked Potentials in Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2016-08-15

    Transcranial motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs), which are muscle action potentials elicited by transcranial brain stimulation, have been the most popular method for the last decade to monitor the functional integrity of the motor system during surgery. It was originally difficult to record reliable and reproducible potentials under general anesthesia, especially when inhalation-based anesthetic agents that suppressed the firing of anterior horn neurons were used. Advances in anesthesia, including the introduction of intravenous anesthetic agents, and progress in stimulation techniques, including the use of pulse trains, improved the reliability and reproducibility of TcMEP responses. However, TcMEPs are much smaller in amplitude compared with compound muscle action potentials evoked by maximal peripheral nerve stimulation, and vary from one trial to another in clinical practice, suggesting that only a limited number of spinal motor neurons innervating the target muscle are excited in anesthetized patients. Therefore, reliable interpretation of the critical changes in TcMEPs remains difficult and controversial. Additionally, false negative cases have been occasionally encountered. Recently, several facilitative techniques using central or peripheral stimuli, preceding transcranial electrical stimulation, have been employed to achieve sufficient depolarization of motor neurons and augment TcMEP responses. These techniques might have potentials to improve the reliability of intraoperative motor pathway monitoring using TcMEPs. PMID:26935781

  6. [Intraoperative monitoring: visual evoked potentials in surgery of the sellar region].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Renella, R R

    1989-01-01

    During 18 sellar and perisellar operations the optic tract was monitored by visual evoked potentials (VEP). Deteriorations of the cortical responses were recorded in 73%. In this patients there was no close correlation between the intraoperative findings and the postoperative visual function. Only in those patients who showed no remarkable intraoperative changes VEP seemed to be of reliable prognostic value.

  7. Membrane Peeling-Induced Retinal Alterations on Intraoperative OCT in Vitreomacular Interface Disorders From the PIONEER Study

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Justis P.; Han, Jaehong; Petkovsek, Daniel; Kaiser, Peter K.; Singh, Rishi P.; Srivastava, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess retinal architectural alterations that occur following membrane peeling procedures and the impact of peel technique on these alterations utilizing intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT). Methods This is a subanalysis of the prospective PIONEER iOCT study of eyes undergoing a membrane peeling for a vitreomacular interface (VMI) disorder. Intraoperative scanning was performed with a microscope-mounted OCT system. Macroarchitectural alterations (e.g., full-thickness retinal elevations) and microarchitectural alterations (e.g., relative layer thickness alterations) were analyzed. Video/iOCT correlation was performed to identify instrument-tissue manipulations resulting in macroarchitectural alterations. Results One hundred sixty-three eyes were included in the macroarchitectural analysis. Instrumentation utilized for membrane peeling included forceps alone for 73 eyes (45%), combined diamond-dusted membrane scraper (DDMS) and forceps for 87 eyes (53%), and other techniques in three eyes (2%). Focal retinal elevations were identified in 45 of 163 eyes (28%). Video/iOCT correlation identified 69% of alterations involved forceps compared to 26% due to DDMS. Sixteen percent of retinal alterations persisted 1 month following surgery. The microarchitectural analysis included 134 eyes. Immediately following membrane peeling, there was a significant increase in the ellipsoid zone to retinal pigment epithelium height (+20%, P < 0.00001) and the cone outer segment tips to retinal pigment epithelium height (+18%, P < 0.00001). Conclusions Significant subclinical retinal architectural changes occur during membrane peeling for VMI conditions. Differences in surgical instruments may impact these architectural alterations. PMID:26559478

  8. A simplified technique of performing splenorenal shunt (Omar's technique).

    PubMed

    Shah, Omar Javed; Robbani, Irfan

    2005-01-01

    The splenorenal shunt procedure introduced by Robert Linton in 1947 is still used today in those regions of the world where portal hypertension is a common problem. However, because most surgeons find Linton's shunt procedure technically difficult, we felt that a simpler technique was needed. We present the surgical details and results of 20 splenorenal anastomosis procedures performed within a period of 30 months. Half of the patients (Group I) underwent Linton's conventional technique of splenorenal shunt; the other half (Group II) underwent a newly devised, simplified shunt technique. This new technique involves dissection of the fusion fascia of Toldt. The outcome of the 2 techniques was identical with respect to the reduction of preshunt portal pressure. However, our simplified technique was advantageous in that it significantly reduced the duration of surgery (P <0.001) and the amount of intraoperative blood loss (P <0.003). No patient died after either operation. Although Linton's splenorenal shunt is difficult and technically demanding, it is still routinely performed. The new technique described here, in addition to being simpler, helps achieve good vascular control, permits easier dissection of the splenic vein, enables an ideal anastomosis, decreases intraoperative blood loss, and reduces the duration of surgery. Therefore, we recommend the routine use of this simplified technique (Omar's technique) for the surgical treatment of portal hypertension. PMID:16429901

  9. Intraoperative Periprosthetic Femur Fracture: A Biomechanical Analysis of Cerclage Fixation.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Charters, Michael A; Sikora-Klak, Jakub; Banglmaier, Richard F; Oravec, Daniel J; Silverton, Craig D

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative periprosthetic femur fracture is a known complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and a variety of cerclage systems are available to manage these fractures. The purpose of this study was to examine the in situ biomechanical response of cerclage systems for fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures that occur during cementless THA. We compared cobalt chrome (CoCr) cables, synthetic cables, monofilament wires and hose clamps under axial compressive and torsional loading. Metallic constructs with a positive locking system performed the best, supporting the highest loads with minimal implant subsidence (both axial and angular) after loading. Overall, the CoCr cable and hose clamp had the highest construct stiffness and least reduction in stiffness with increased loading. They were not demonstrably different from each other.

  10. Compact intraoperative imaging device for sentinel lymph node mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Shen, Duanwen; Berezin, Mikhail; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a novel real-time intraoperative fluorescence imaging device that can detect near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and map sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). In contrast to conventional imaging systems, this device is compact, portable, and battery-operated. It is also wearable and thus allows hands-free operation of clinicians. The system directly displays the fluorescence in its goggle eyepiece, eliminating the need for a remote monitor. Using this device in murine lymphatic mapping, the SLNs stained with indocyanine green (ICG) can be readily detected. Fluorescence-guided SLN resection under the new device was performed with ease. Ex vivo examination of resected tissues also revealed high fluorescence level in the SLNs. Histology further confirmed the lymphatic nature of the resected SLNs.

  11. Intra-operative radiation therapy for osteosarcoma in the extremities.

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama, T; Toguchida, J; Kotoura, Y; Kasahara, K; Hiraoka, M; Nakamura, T

    2000-01-01

    The outcome following intra-operative radiation therapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma in the extremity in 33 patients was evaluated for oncological and functional results. Local recurrence occurred in seven cases, six of which were in a non-irradiated region, indicating inappropriate planning of the radiation field. Twenty-one patients underwent either prosthetic replacement (14) or amputation (7). Irradiated tumours were left in situ in the remaining 12 patients. In this latter group no degenerative joint changes were observed radiologically. Twenty-six patients experienced local complications, of which fracture of the irradiated bone was the most significant. Associated intramedullary nailing showed encouraging results in preventing fracture. Although IORT is effective for the local control of osteosarcoma in extremities, critical patient selection and improvements of treatment protocol are required in order to obtain a satisfactory outcome.

  12. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajdeep; Husain, Aatif M

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring (NIOM) of the glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves (CN IX and X) is often used during surgeries involving the lower brain stem. Although both of these nerves contain sensory, autonomic, and motor fibers, it is the motor fibers that are most amenable to NIOM. CN IX supplies the stylopharyngeus muscle, and CN X supplies striated muscles in the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx. Monitoring of these CN can be performed by monitoring free running and stimulated electromyography (EMG) from the stylopharyngeus muscle (CN IX) and the vocal cords (CN X). Various surface and needle electrodes can be used to monitor these muscle groups. When CN IX is monitored, CN X should also be monitored, as it is often needed to differentiate when CN IX is selectively activated. Data are accumulating noting the use of monitoring these CN in tumor surgeries involving the lower brain stem. PMID:22146360

  13. Positron detection for the intraoperative localisation of cancer deposits

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Maria; Meisetschläger, Günther; Stein, Hubert J.; Ziegler, Sibylle; Nährig, Jörg; Picchio, Maria; Buck, Andreas; Siewert, Joerg R.; Schwaiger, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The study investigated the feasibility of a positron-sensitive hand-held detector system for the intraoperative localisation of tumour deposits resulting from intravenous [18F]FDG administration. Methods A total of 17 patients (12 receiving preoperative [18F]FDG PET imaging) with various histologically proven malignancies were included. Radioactivity from tumours and surrounding normal tissue was measured on average 3 h after administration of 36–110 MBq [18F]FDG and the tumour-to-background (T/B) ratio was calculated. In addition, phantom studies were performed to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the probe. Results All known targeted tumour sites were identified by the positron probe. T/B ratios were generally high, with a mean T/B ratio of 6.6, allowing easy identification of most tumour sites. In one case of a hepatic metastasis, the T/B ratio of 1.34 was below expectations, since the preoperative [18F]FDG PET scan was positive. The probe was instrumental in the localisation of three additional tumour lesions (two lymph nodes, one anastomotic ring) that were not immediately apparent at surgery. Phantom studies revealed that [18F]FDG-containing gel (simulating tumour tissue), having 10 times more [18F]FDG than surrounding “normal” background gel, was clearly detectable in quantities as low as 15 mg. As measured in two cases, the absorbed radiation doses ranged from 2.5 to 8.6 μSv/h for the surgical team to 0.8 μSv/h for the aesthetician. Conclusion [18F]FDG-accumulating tumour tissues can be localised with positron probes intraoperatively with a low radiation burden to the patient and medical personnel. The methodology holds promise for further clinical testing. PMID:17431612

  14. Tolerance of canine anastomoses to intraoperative radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tepper, J.E.; Sindelar, W.; Travis, E.L.; Terrill, R.; Padikal, T.

    1983-07-01

    Radiation has been given intraoperatively to various abdominal structures in dogs, using a fixed horizontal 11 MeV electron beam at the Armed Forces Radiobiologic Research Institute. Animals were irradiated with single doses of 2000, 3000 and 4500 rad to a field which extended from the bifurcation of the aorta to the rib cage. All animals were irradiated during laparotomy under general anesthesia. Because the clinical use of intraoperative radiotherapy in cancer treatment will occasionally require irradiation of anastomosed large vessels and blind loops of bowel, the tolerance of aortic anastomoses and the suture lines of blind loops of jejunum to irradiation were studied. Responses in these experiments were scored at times up to one year after irradiation. In separate experiments both aortic and intestinal anastomoses were performed on each animal for evaluation of short term response. The dogs with aortic anastomoses showed adequate healing at all doses with no evidence of suture line weakening. On long-term follow-up one animal (2000 rad) had stenosis at the anastomosis and one animal (4500 rad) developed an arteriovenous fistula. Three of the animals that had an intestinal blind loop irradiated subsequently developed intussusception, with the irradiated loop acting as the lead point. One week after irradiation, bursting pressure of an intestinal blind loop was normal at 3000 rad, but markedly decreased at 4500 rad. No late complications were noted after the irradiation of the intestinal anastomosis. No late complicatons were observed after irradiation of intestinal anastomoses, but one needs to be cautious with regards to possible late stenosis at the site of an irradiated vascular anastomosis.

  15. Treatment of symptomatic intraosseous pneumatocyst using intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Formby, Peter M; Kang, Daniel G; Potter, Benjamin K; Forsberg, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Intraosseous pneumatocysts are benign air-containing lesions that are most often found in the spine and pelvis and are nearly always treated nonoperatively. Although rarely clinically symptomatic, studies have shown pneumatocysts to be present in up to 10% of computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis and spine. Radiographic characteristics of these lesions include a localized collection of gas with a thin sclerotic rim, no bony destruction, no soft tissue masses, and no medullary abnormalities. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice, with Hounsfield units ranging from -580 to -950, showing a gas-containing lesion. Few studies have described the management of symptomatic pneumatocysts, and all reported cases concern underwater divers, presumably because of greater pressure cycling and barotrauma encountered while underwater diving. The goal of this report is to describe the intraoperative CT-guided navigation and percutaneous injection of calcium sulfate-calcium phosphate composite bone graft substitute material for the treatment of a symptomatic pneumatocyst in the ilium of a Navy dive instructor. The patient reported a 1-year history of increasing buttock pain with increased depth of diving, consistently reproduced by diving past a depth of 20 to 30 feet. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description in the English literature of the operative treatment of an intraosseous pneumatocyst of the ilium. The use of intraoperative CT guidance permitted accurate percutaneous localization, decompression, and filling of the lesion with synthetic bone graft substitute, with complete early relief of symptoms. At 6-month follow up, the patient had reached diving depths of 170 feet without pain. PMID:25760515

  16. Single-trial detection for intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Liu, H T; Luk, K D K; Hu, Y

    2015-12-01

    Abnormalities of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) provide effective evidence for impairment of the somatosensory system, so that SEPs have been widely used in both clinical diagnosis and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. However, due to their low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), SEPs are generally measured using ensemble averaging across hundreds of trials, thus unavoidably producing a tardiness of SEPs to the potential damages caused by surgical maneuvers and a loss of dynamical information of cortical processing related to somatosensory inputs. Here, we aimed to enhance the SNR of single-trial SEPs using Kalman filtering and time-frequency multiple linear regression (TF-MLR) and measure their single-trial parameters, both in the time domain and in the time-frequency domain. We first showed that, Kalman filtering and TF-MLR can effectively capture the single-trial SEP responses and provide accurate estimates of single-trial SEP parameters in the time domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. Furthermore, we identified significant correlations between the stimulus intensity and a set of indicative single-trial SEP parameters, including the correlation coefficient (between each single-trial SEPs and their average), P37 amplitude, N45 amplitude, P37-N45 amplitude, and phase value (at the zero-crossing points between P37 and N45). Finally, based on each indicative single-trial SEP parameter, we investigated the minimum number of trials required on a single-trial basis to suggest the existence of SEP responses, thus providing important information for fast SEP extraction in intraoperative monitoring. PMID:26557929

  17. Single-trial detection for intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Liu, H T; Luk, K D K; Hu, Y

    2015-12-01

    Abnormalities of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) provide effective evidence for impairment of the somatosensory system, so that SEPs have been widely used in both clinical diagnosis and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. However, due to their low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), SEPs are generally measured using ensemble averaging across hundreds of trials, thus unavoidably producing a tardiness of SEPs to the potential damages caused by surgical maneuvers and a loss of dynamical information of cortical processing related to somatosensory inputs. Here, we aimed to enhance the SNR of single-trial SEPs using Kalman filtering and time-frequency multiple linear regression (TF-MLR) and measure their single-trial parameters, both in the time domain and in the time-frequency domain. We first showed that, Kalman filtering and TF-MLR can effectively capture the single-trial SEP responses and provide accurate estimates of single-trial SEP parameters in the time domain and time-frequency domain, respectively. Furthermore, we identified significant correlations between the stimulus intensity and a set of indicative single-trial SEP parameters, including the correlation coefficient (between each single-trial SEPs and their average), P37 amplitude, N45 amplitude, P37-N45 amplitude, and phase value (at the zero-crossing points between P37 and N45). Finally, based on each indicative single-trial SEP parameter, we investigated the minimum number of trials required on a single-trial basis to suggest the existence of SEP responses, thus providing important information for fast SEP extraction in intraoperative monitoring.

  18. Intraoperative Radiation Exposure During Revision Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Iceman, Kelli; Elliott, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative C-arm image intensification is required for primary total ankle replacement implantation. Significant radiation exposure has been linked to these procedures; however, the radiation exposure during revision total ankle replacement remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the radiation exposure encountered during revision total ankle replacement. The data from 41 patients were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database: 19 Agility(™) to Agility(™); 4 Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™); 9 Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II; 5 Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT; 2 Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT; and 2 INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II revision total ankle replacements were performed. Two broad categories were identified: partial revision (Agility(™) to Agility(™), Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™), INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II) and complete conversion (Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT, Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT). The mean radiation exposure per case was significant at 3.49 ± 2.21 mGy. Complete conversions, specifically Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, exhibited the greatest radiation exposure and C-arm time. Revision implant selection and revision type (complete or partial) directly contributed to radiation exposure. Accordingly, revision systems requiring less radiation exposure are preferable. Surgeons should strive to minimize intraoperative complications and limit additional procedures to those necessary, because both lead to additional radiation exposure.

  19. Computer assistance for intraoperative navigation in ENT surgery.

    PubMed

    Caversaccio; Freysinger

    2003-03-01

    The intraoperative need for exact orientation during interventions in the paranasal sinuses and the augmented need for navigational aids in lateral skull base surgery have lead to the development of computer-aided tools during the last fifteen years. These tools, which provide the position of a tool or a pointer in the patient's preoperative radiologic imaging, have quickly gained a wide acceptance for revision surgeries and the surgical treatment of complex pathologies in Ear-, Nose- and Throat (ENT-) surgery. Currently, the use of such systems is spreading from academic centers to smaller hospitals and will become a standard tool in the near future. We review the present state of computer-aided surgery (CAS) systems, based on our experience as clinical and research centers with a long experience in the field, provide some technological background information and, based on selected cases, show the merits of this technology. The systems we have been working with cover a wide variety of intraoperative navigational systems in ENT surgery (Easy Guide, MedScan II, MKM, SNN, STN, SurgiGATE ORL, Treon, VectorVision, Viewing Wand, [without claiming completeness]), and virtually the whole area of ENT surgeries: macroscopic, (video-)endoscopic and microscopic procedures. The 3D tracking technologies involved cover mechanical, optical (active and passive), magnetic and robotic principles. The visualization tools used are computer monitors, video monitors, head-up-displays and the microscope's oculars, thus spanning the area from pointer-systems to real navigators and a surgical telepresence demonstrator, implementing the majority of available patient-to-image referencing strategies. Clinically, the systems can be operated with an acceptable accuracy of around 1 mm, whereas in laboratory settings and in cadaver studies application accuracy may be pushed to its limits: the physical resolution of the radiologic imaging used for navigation.

  20. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Valdivieso, Manlio F; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  1. Intraoperative imaging for patient safety and QA: detection of intracranial hemorrhage using C-arm cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Wang, Adam; Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Xia, Xuewei; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-03-01

    Intraoperative imaging could improve patient safety and quality assurance (QA) via the detection of subtle complications that might otherwise only be found hours after surgery. Such capability could therefore reduce morbidity and the need for additional intervention. Among the severe adverse events that could be more quickly detected by high-quality intraoperative imaging is acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), conventionally assessed using post-operative CT. A mobile C-arm capable of high-quality cone-beam CT (CBCT) in combination with advanced image reconstruction techniques is reported as a means of detecting ICH in the operating room. The system employs an isocentric C-arm with a flat-panel detector in dual gain mode, correction of x-ray scatter and beam-hardening, and a penalized likelihood (PL) iterative reconstruction method. Performance in ICH detection was investigated using a quantitative phantom focusing on (non-contrast-enhanced) blood-brain contrast, an anthropomorphic head phantom, and a porcine model with injection of fresh blood bolus. The visibility of ICH was characterized in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitative evaluation of images by a neurosurgeon. Across a range of size and contrast of the ICH as well as radiation dose from the CBCT scan, the CNR was found to increase from ~2.2-3.7 for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) to ~3.9-5.4 for PL at equivalent spatial resolution. The porcine model demonstrated superior ICH detectability for PL. The results support the role of high-quality mobile C-arm CBCT employing advanced reconstruction algorithms for detecting subtle complications in the operating room at lower radiation dose and lower cost than intraoperative CT scanners and/or fixedroom C-arms. Such capability could present a potentially valuable aid to patient safety and QA.

  2. Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J. . E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Shippy, Alison; Chan, Heather; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year tumor control and toxicity outcomes for patients with localized prostate treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2002, 367 patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning which incorporated inverse planning optimization was used. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Results: The median V100 and D90 were 96% and 173 Gy, respectively. In 96% of cases a D90 of >140 Gy was achieved. The median urethral and rectal doses were 100% and 33% of the prescription doses, respectively. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival outcomes for favorable and intermediate risk patients according to the ASTRO definition were 96% and 89%, respectively. In these patients no dosimetric parameter was identified which influenced the biochemical outcome. Of 38% who developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, 63% had resolution of their symptoms within a median time of 6 months. The incidence of late rectal and urinary Grade 3 or higher toxicities were 1% and 4%, respectively. Seven percent (n = 27) developed late rectal bleeding (Grade 2) and 19% experienced late Grade 2 urinary symptoms. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning consistently achieved optimal coverage of the prostate with the prescription dose with concomitant low doses delivered to the urethra and rectum. Biochemical control outcomes were excellent at 5 years and late toxicity was unusual. These data demonstrate that real-time planning methods can consistently and reliably deliver the intended dose distribution to achieve an optimal therapeutic ratio between the target and normal tissue structures.

  3. Comparison of computational fluid dynamics findings with intraoperative microscopy findings in unruptured intracranial aneurysms- An initial analysis

    PubMed Central

    Talari, Sandeep; Kato, Yoko; Shang, Hanbing; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamashiro, Kei; Suyama, Daisuke; Kawase, Tsukasa; Balik, Vladimir; Rile, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Context: The increase in the detection of unruptured cerebral aneurysms has led to management dilemma. Prediction of risk based on the size of the aneurysm is not always accurate. There is no objective way of predicting rupture of aneurysm so far. Computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) was proposed as a tool to identify the rupture risk. Aims: To know the correlation of CFD findings with intraoperative microscopic findings and to know the relevance of CFD in the prediction of rupture risk and in the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Settings and Design: A prospective study involving nine cases over a period of 6 months as an initial analysis. Subjects and Methods: Both males and females were included in the study. Preoperative analysis was performed using computed tomography angiogram, magnetic resonance imaging in all cases and digital substraction angiogram in some cases. Intraoperatively microscopic examination of the aneurysm wall was carried out and images recorded. The correlation was done between microscopic and CFD images. Results: Seven cases were found intraoperatively to have a higher risk of rupture based on the thinning of the wall. Two cases had an atherosclerotic wall. All cases had low wall shear stress (WSS).Only two cases with atherosclerotic wall had a correlation with low WSS. Conclusions: While the pressure measured with CFD technique is a good predictor of rupture risk, the WSS component is controversial. Multicentric trials involving a larger subset of population are needed before drawing any definite conclusions. On-going development in the CFD analysis may help to predict the rupture chances accurately in future.

  4. Comparison of computational fluid dynamics findings with intraoperative microscopy findings in unruptured intracranial aneurysms- An initial analysis

    PubMed Central

    Talari, Sandeep; Kato, Yoko; Shang, Hanbing; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamashiro, Kei; Suyama, Daisuke; Kawase, Tsukasa; Balik, Vladimir; Rile, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Context: The increase in the detection of unruptured cerebral aneurysms has led to management dilemma. Prediction of risk based on the size of the aneurysm is not always accurate. There is no objective way of predicting rupture of aneurysm so far. Computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) was proposed as a tool to identify the rupture risk. Aims: To know the correlation of CFD findings with intraoperative microscopic findings and to know the relevance of CFD in the prediction of rupture risk and in the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Settings and Design: A prospective study involving nine cases over a period of 6 months as an initial analysis. Subjects and Methods: Both males and females were included in the study. Preoperative analysis was performed using computed tomography angiogram, magnetic resonance imaging in all cases and digital substraction angiogram in some cases. Intraoperatively microscopic examination of the aneurysm wall was carried out and images recorded. The correlation was done between microscopic and CFD images. Results: Seven cases were found intraoperatively to have a higher risk of rupture based on the thinning of the wall. Two cases had an atherosclerotic wall. All cases had low wall shear stress (WSS).Only two cases with atherosclerotic wall had a correlation with low WSS. Conclusions: While the pressure measured with CFD technique is a good predictor of rupture risk, the WSS component is controversial. Multicentric trials involving a larger subset of population are needed before drawing any definite conclusions. On-going development in the CFD analysis may help to predict the rupture chances accurately in future. PMID:27695537

  5. Intraoperative Navigation for Minimally Invasive Resection of Periarticular and Pelvic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kevin; Webber, Nicholas P.; Ward, Russell A.; Jones, Kevin B.; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    The surgical approach to benign, metastatic, and some low-grade malignant tumors is often difficult due to their typically precarious locations. This article presents a series of cases where intraoperative stealth navigation was used to treat periarticular tumors. The use of paired point imaging with image fusion has made approaching tumors through an accurate and minimally invasive technique a viable option for the treatment of a subset of musculoskeletal tumors. Conventional resection of periarticular and pelvic tumors of bone usually requires an extensive surgical approach to adequately visualize the tumor and protect the nearby neurovascular structures. When tumors in periarticular locations are encountered, dislocation of the affected joint may be necessary, putting periarticular and subchondral bone at risk for osseous necrosis and articular surfaces at risk of mechanical insult at the time of dislocation. While arthroscopic techniques may enable a minimally invasive mode of surgical approach in certain anatomic locations, this is not always feasible and can add additional operative time and morbidity to the patient. This article describes 5 cases where locally aggressive tumors in challenging periarticular anatomic locations were treated in a minimally invasive manner with the assistance of image fusion and paired-point registration. PMID:21553742

  6. Intraoperative neurophysiological mapping and monitoring in spinal tumor surgery: sirens or indispensable tools?

    PubMed

    Scibilia, Antonino; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Raffa, Giovanni; Morelli, Adolfo; Esposito, Felice; Mallamace, Raffaella; Buda, Gaetano; Conti, Alfredo; Quartarone, Angelo; Germanò, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    Spinal tumor (ST) surgery carries the risk of new neurological deficits in the postoperative period. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and mapping (IONM) represents an effective method of identifying and monitoring in real time the functional integrity of both the spinal cord (SC) and the nerve roots (NRs). Despite consensus favoring the use of IONM in ST surgery, in this era of evidence-based medicine, there is still a need to demonstrate the effective role of IONM in ST surgery in achieving an oncological cure, optimizing patient safety, and considering medicolegal aspects. Thus, neurosurgeons are asked to establish which techniques are considered indispensable. In the present study, the authors focused on the rationale for and the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of IONM in ST surgery in light of more recent evidence in the literature, with specific emphasis on the role of IONM in reducing the incidence of postoperative neurological deficits. This review confirms the role of IONM as a useful tool in the workup for ST surgery. Individual monitoring and mapping techniques are clearly not sufficient to account for the complex function of the SC and NRs. Conversely, multimodal IONM is highly sensitive and specific for anticipating neurological injury during ST surgery and represents an important tool for preserving neuronal structures and achieving an optimal postoperative functional outcome. PMID:27476842

  7. Combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy approach for excision of pelvic nitinol fragment from Essure contraceptive device: Role of intraoperative fluoroscopy for uterine conservation

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Gianpiero D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the successful removal of a pelvic contraceptive coil in a symptomatic 46-year-old patient who had Essure devices for four years, using a combined hysteroscopy-laparoscopy-fluoroscopy approach. Following normal hysteroscopy, at laparoscopy the right Essure implant was disrupted and its outer nitinol coil had perforated the fallopian tube. However, the inner rod (containing polyethylene terephthalate) had migrated to an extrapelvic location, near the proximal colon. In contrast, the left implant was situated within the corresponding tube. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to confirm complete removal of the device, which was further verified by postoperative computed tomography. The patient's condition improved after surgery and she continues to do well. This is the first report to describe this technique in managing Essure complications remote from time of insertion. Our case highlights the value and limitations of preoperative and intraoperative imaging to map Essure fragment location before surgery. PMID:27462605

  8. In vivo dosimetry with radiochromic films in low-voltage intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Avanzo, M.; Rink, A.; Dassie, A.; Massarut, S.; Roncadin, M.; Borsatti, E.; Capra, E.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: EBT2 radiochromic films were studied and used for in vivo dosimetry in targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT), a technique in which the Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) is used to perform intraoperative partial breast irradiation with x-rays of 50 kV{sub p}. Methods: The energy of the radiation emitted by the Intrabeam with the different spherical applicators, under 1 and 2 cm of solid water, and under the tungsten impregnated rubber used for shielding of the heart in TARGIT of the breast, was characterized with measurements of half-value layer (HVL). The stability of response of EBT2 was verified inside this range of energies. EBT2 films were calibrated using the red and green channels of the absorption spectrum in the 0-20 Gy dose range delivered by the Intrabeam x-rays. The dependence of film response on temperature during irradiation was measured. For in vivo dosimetry, pieces of radiochromic films wrapped in sterile envelopes were inserted after breast conserving surgery and before TARGIT into the excision cavity, on the skin and on the shielded pectoralis fascia for treatments of the left breast. Results: HVLs of the Intrabeam in TARGIT of the breast correspond to effective energies of 20.7-36.3 keV. The response of EBT2 was constant inside this range of energies. We measured the dose to the target tissue and to organs at risk in 23 patients and obtained an average dose of 13.52 {+-} 1.21 Gy to the target tissue. Dose to the skin in close proximity to the applicator was 2.22 {+-} 0.97 Gy, 0.29 {+-} 0.17 Gy at 5-10 cm from the applicator, and 0.08 {+-} 0.07 Gy at more than 10 cm from the applicator. Dose to the pectoral muscle for left breast treatment was 0.57 {+-} 0.23 Gy. Conclusions: Our results show that EBT2 films are accurate at the beam energies, dose range, and irradiation temperature found in TARGIT and that in vivo dosimetry in TARGIT with EBT2 films wrapped in sterile envelopes is a feasible procedure. Measured

  9. Intraoperative platelet-rich plasma does not improve outcomes of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Masayuki; Ishida, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Tsumura, Nobuhiro

    2014-12-01

    This randomized controlled study was conducted to assess the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Forty patients who underwent unilateral TKA were evaluated prospectively; 20 received intraoperative PRP and 20 served as control subjects. The results showed no significant differences in reduction of bleeding, range of motion, swelling around the knee joint, muscle power recovery, pain, Knee Society Scores, and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score between the 2 groups. Additionally, no distinct clinical characteristics were found in patients who received intraoperative PRP. Therefore, we conclude that intraoperative PRP does not improve outcomes of TKA.

  10. How perioperative nurses define, attribute causes of, and react to intraoperative nursing errors.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Errors in nursing practice pose a continuing threat to patient safety. A descriptive, correlational study was conducted to examine the definitions, circumstances, and perceived causes of intraoperative nursing errors; reactions of perioperative nurses to intraoperative nursing errors; and the relationships among coping with intraoperative nursing errors, emotional distress, and changes in practice made as a result of error. The results indicate that strategies of accepting responsibility and using self-control are significant predictors of emotional distress. Seeking social support and planful problem solving emerged as significant predictors of constructive changes in practice. Most predictive of defensive changes was the strategy of escape/avoidance.

  11. SU-E-T-285: Revisiting the Nomogram for Intra-Operative Planning Based Pd-103 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S; Cho, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The seed implant technique at our institution involves using a published nomogram for seed ordering based on CT based volume studies of the prostate. Ultrasound volume studies are subsequently used in the operating room for planning a modified peripheral loading with urethra sparing seed implant. The purpose of this study is to determine the appropriate modality for prostate volume measurement and creating an updated nomogram for intra-operative planning specific to our technique for pd-103 brachytherapy for efficient seed ordering. Methods: Prostate volumes based on pre-implant CT (Pre-CT), intra-operative ultrasound (TRUS), and post-implant CT (post-CT) studies as well as the total airkerma strength (AKS) of the implants were analyzed for 135 seed implant cases (69 monotherapy, 66 boost). Regression analysis was performed to derive the relationship between the total AKS and pre-CT and TRUS volumes. The correlation between TRUS and pre-CT volumes and TRUS and post-CT volumes were also studied. Results: Ultrasound based prostate volume exhibited a stronger correlation with total AKS than the pre-implant CT volume (R{sup 2} = 0.97 vs 0.88 for monotherapy and 0.96 vs 0.89 for boost). In general the pre-CT overestimated the prostate volume leading to ordering of a larger number of seeds and thus leading to higher number of unused/wasted seeds. Newly derived TRUS based nomogram was better suited for our technique than the published data. The post-implant CT volume closely followed the ultrasound volume (R{sup 2} = 0.88) as compared to pre-implant CT volumes (R{sup 2} = 0.57). Conclusion: In an era of costconscious health care where waste reduction is of utmost importance, an updated technique-specific nomogram is useful for ordering optimal number of seeds resulting in significant cost savings. In addition, our study shows that ultrasound based prostate volume is a better predictor for seed ordering for intra-operative planning than pre-implant CT.

  12. An experimental attenuation plate to improve the dose distribution in intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Shimozato, T.; Sawaki, M.; Imai, T.; Ito, Y.; Obata, Y.; Tabushi, K.

    2009-06-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) is a technique in which a single-fraction high dose is intraoperatively delivered to subclinical tumour cells using an electron beam after breast-conserving surgery. In IOERT, an attenuation plate consisting of a pair of metal disks is commonly used to protect the normal tissues posterior to the breast. However, the dose in front of the plate is affected by backscatter, resulting in an unpredictable delivered dose to the tumour cells. In this study, an experimental attenuation plate, termed a shielding plate, was designed using Monte Carlo simulation, which significantly diminished the electron beam without introducing any backscatter radiation. The plate's performance was verified by measurements. It was made of two layers, a first layer (source side) of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a second layer of copper, which was selected from among other metals (aluminium, copper and lead) after testing for shielding capability and the range and magnitude of backscatter. The optimal thicknesses of the PMMA (0.71 cm) and copper (0.3 cm) layers were determined by changing their thicknesses during simulations. On the basis of these results, a shielding plate was prototyped and depth doses with and without the plate were measured by radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters using a conventional stationary linear accelerator and a mobile linear accelerator dedicated for IOERT. The trial shielding plate functioned as intended, indicating its applicability in clinical practice.

  13. Intraoperative diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tissues by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and support vector machine classification

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Peirong; Zhang, Weitao; Zhao, Hongmei; Lei, Yutao; Cui, Long; Wang, Wei; Li, Qingbo; Zhu, Qing; Zhang, Yuanfu; Xu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has shown its unique advantages in distinguishing cancerous tissue from normal one. The aim of this study was to establish a quick and accurate diagnostic method of FTIR spectroscopy to differentiate malignancies from benign breast tissues intraoperatively. Materials and methods: In this study, a total of 100 breast tissue samples obtained from 100 patients were taken on surgery. All tissue samples were scanned for spectra intraoperatively before being processed for histopathological diagnosis. Standard normal variate (SNV) method was adopted to reduce scatter effects. Support vector machine (SVM) classification was used to discriminate spectra between malignant and benign breast tissues. Leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) was used to evaluate the discrimination. Results: According to histopathological examination, 50 cases were diagnosed as fibroadenoma and 50 cases as invasive ductal carcinoma. The results of SVM algorithm showed that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of this method are 90.0%, 98.0% and 94.0%, respectively. Conclusions: FTIR spectroscopy technique in combination with SVM classification could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to differentiate malignant from benign tumors during operation. Our studies establish the feasibility of FTIR spectroscopy with chemometrics method to guide surgeons during the surgery as an effective supplement for pathological diagnosis on frozen section. PMID:25785083

  14. Is there a Role for Preoperative Infusion or Intraoperative Cholangiography?

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Li, Arthur K. C.

    1997-01-01

    Background: There has been a resurgence of interest in recent years in preoperative infusion cholangiography (PIC). The role of routine PIC compared to routine intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) has not been clearly defined. Study design: In our department between 1985 and 1991, 1,042 of 1,576 consecutive patients with biliary calculous disease had elective cholecystectomy: 694 patients were prospectively scheduled for PIC, and 348 patients were randomly allocated to IOC. The patients in the PIC and IOC groups were similar with regard to age, history of biliopancreatic complications, and laboratory findings. The cost of PIC in Sweden is nearly five times greater than the cost of IOC. Results: Satisfactory opacification of the biliary system was obtained in 90.1 and 96.8 percent of patients who underwent PIC and IOC, respectively. Preoperative infusion cholangiography required support by IOC in 19.5 percent of patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the PIC and IOC groups with regard to the incidence (7 percent in both groups) of or positive predictive value (68 and 80 percent, respectively) for bile duct stones, rate of retained stones (6 and 20 percent, respectively), intraoperative (5.6 and 6.3 percent, respectively) or postoperative (13.3 and 15.9 percent, respectively) morbidity, or incidence of bile duct anomalies (0.9 and 0.3 percent, respectively). Median operative time was longer in .patients with (95 minutes) compared to those without (75 minutes) IOC (p<0.001). More postoperative complications occurred after bile duct exploration (26 of 75 patients) compared to cholecystectomy alone (114 of 917 patients, p<0.001). The 30-day mortality was zero. Minor bile duct injuries occurred in two patients (0.2 percent) at cholecystectomy, (one with and one without bile duct exploration). In no patient was the cholangiographic finding of a biliary anomaly crucial for the safe execution of cholecystectomy. Conclusions: In our study, PIC

  15. Results of intraoperative mitomycin C application in dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S.; Kao, S.; Tseng, J.; Chen, M.; Hou, P.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the long term results of intraoperative mitomycin C application in dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery compared with results of the conventional procedure.
METHODS—In this prospective randomised controlled study, a total of 88 eyes diagnosed with acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction were randomly divided into a conventional DCR group and a mitomycin C group in which mitomycin C was used during DCR surgery. The surgical procedures in both groups were exactly the same, except that in the patients in the mitomycin C group, a piece of neurosurgical cottonoid soaked with 0.2 mg/ml mitomycin C was applied to the osteotomy site for 30 minutes. The results of the DCR surgeries were evaluated by objective findings such as irrigation and the height of tear meniscus and subjective symptoms by asking patients the condition of tearing improvement.
RESULTS—Among the 44 eyes in the mitomycin C group, 95.5% of patients remained totally symptom free after 10 months of follow up; while in the conventional group, 70.5% of patients were reported to be symptom free and 18% of patients to have an improvement in their symptoms. There was a significant difference between these two groups. As far as objective findings were concerned, there were 41 eyes in the mitomycin C group classified as having a normal and one eye with moderate tear meniscus level, compared with 32 eyes and seven eyes, respectively, in the conventional group. There was also a significant difference between these two groups. The non-patency rate in the mitomycin C group is 4.5% compared with 11.4% in the conventional group. There were no complications such as abnormal nasal bleeding, mucosal necrosis, or infection except one patient with delayed wound healing.
CONCLUSIONS—Intraoperative mitomycin C application is effective in increasing the success rate of DCR surgery in standard nasolacrimal duct obstruction, and no significant complications resulted from its use.

 PMID

  16. See the brain at work: intraoperative laser Doppler functional brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Williams, E. J.; Raabe, A.; Van De Ville, D.; Leutenegger, M.; Szelényi, A.; Hattingen, E.; Gerlach, R.; Seifert, V.; Hauger, C.; Lopez, A.; Leitgeb, R.; Unser, M.; Lasser, T.

    2009-07-01

    During open brain surgery we acquire perfusion images non-invasively using laser Doppler imaging. The regions of brain activity show a distinct signal in response to stimulation providing intraoperative functional brain maps of remarkably strong contrast.

  17. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    PubMed

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located.

  18. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    PubMed

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located. PMID:25526520

  19. Use of BIS VISTA bilateral monitor for diagnosis of intraoperative seizures, a case report.

    PubMed

    Iturri Clavero, F; Tamayo Medel, G; de Orte Sancho, K; González Uriarte, A; Iglesias Martínez, A; Martínez Ruíz, A

    2015-12-01

    Changes in BIS (bispectral index) VISTA bilateral monitoring system associated with intraoperative episodes of generalized and focal seizures, during total intravenous anesthesia for resection of a left frontal parasagittal meningioma, are herein described.

  20. [Intraoperative complications of surgical treatment of cervical cancer stages I and II in FIGO].

    PubMed

    Kornovski, Y; Iamail, E; Ivanov, S; Kovachev, E

    2013-01-01

    With this study are presented the types of intraoperative complications and their frequency in radical hysterectomy and lymph node dissection (pelvic and paraaortic) as surgical treatment of 294 patients with invasive cervical cancer FIGO stages I and II.

  1. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  2. A novel method and workflow for stereotactic surgery with a mobile intraoperative CT imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Clinthorne, Neal

    2015-03-01

    xCAT®, (Xoran Technologies, LLC., Ann Arbor, MI) is a CT imaging device that has been used for minimally invasive surgeries. Designed with flat panel and cone-beam imaging technique, it provides a fast, low-dose CT imaging alternative for diagnosis and examination purposes at hospitals. With its unique compact and mobile characteristics, it allows scanning inside crowded operating rooms (OR). The xCAT allows acquisition of images in the OR that show the most recent morphology during the procedure. This can potentially improve outcomes of surgical procedures such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and other neurosurgeries, since brain displacement and deformation (brain shift) often occur between pre-operative imaging and electrode placement during surgery. However, the small gantry size of the compact scanner obstructs scanning of patients with stereotactic frames or skull clamp. In this study, we explored a novel method, in which we first utilized the xCAT to obtain CT images with fiducial markers, registered the stereotactic frame with those markers, and finally, target measurements were calculated and set up on the frame. The new procedure workflow provides a means to use CT images obtained inside of OR for stereotactic surgery and can be used in current intraoperative settings. Our phantom validation study in lab shows that the procedure workflow with this method is easy to conduct.

  3. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  4. [Amyand hernia--a rare anatomic and clinical entity diagnosed intraoperatively].

    PubMed

    Grecu, F; Filip, B; Moţoc, I; Andriescu, Nadia; Lăpuşneanu, A; Ursaru, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The Amyand hernia is an uncommon variant of the inguinal hernia, rarely recognised before the surgical treatment because of the confusion with a strangled hernia. In spite of this, the clinical presentation seems to follow a well determined pathway, so it is possible to state that the uncorrect diagnosis is to be attributed to the ignorance of this variant of hernia. We present two consecutive case reports of acute appendicitis founded in an inguinal hernia sac. The clinical presentation depended on the inflammation extension inside the hernia sac and the presence or not of peritoneal contamination. The patients were admitted for a painful pseudotumor in the inguinal region with irreducibility, mimicking strangled inguinal hernia with acute inflammatory syndrome. Intraoperatively we have found a hernia sac with a phlegmonous/gangrenous appendix inside. Appendectomy was performed, followed by hernioplasty (retrofunicular technique) without prosthetic material). The operation followings were favorable. We conclude that amyand hernia must be considered as differential diagnosis of apparently strangled inguinal hernias. Technical precautions and antibioprophylaxy applied during surgery may prevent septic complications after hernioplasty. The hernia repair must be performed without prosthetic material and using exclusively resorbable sutures.

  5. Quantitative molecular phenotyping with topically applied SERS nanoparticles for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer lumpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Soyoung; Khan, Altaz; Ruttner, Gabriel; Leigh, Steven Y.; Murray, Melissa; Abeytunge, Sanjee; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dintzis, Suzanne; Javid, Sara; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to image excised tissues during tumor-resection procedures in order to identify residual tumors at the margins and to guide their complete removal. The imaging of dysregulated cell-surface receptors is a potential means of identifying the presence of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. However, due to heterogeneities in the expression of protein biomarkers in tumors, molecular-imaging technologies should ideally be capable of visualizing a multiplexed panel of cancer biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate that the topical application and quantification of a multiplexed cocktail of receptor-targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) enables rapid quantitative molecular phenotyping (QMP) of the surface of freshly excised tissues to determine the presence of disease. In order to mitigate the ambiguity due to nonspecific sources of contrast such as off-target binding or uneven delivery, a ratiometric method is employed to quantify the specific vs. nonspecific binding of the multiplexed NPs. Validation experiments with human tumor cell lines, fresh human tumor xenografts in mice, and fresh human breast specimens demonstrate that QMP imaging of excised tissues agrees with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, and that this technique may be achieved in less than 15 minutes for potential intraoperative use in guiding breast-conserving surgeries. PMID:26878888

  6. The validity of multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) in surgery of 109 spine and spinal cord tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eggspuehler, Andreas; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Benini, Arnaldo; Porchet, Francois; Mueller, Alfred; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective study of 109 patients with tumor of the spine MIOM was performed during the surgical procedure between March 2000 and December 2005. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during surgical procedure of spinal tumors. MIOM become an integrated procedure during surgical approach to intramedullar and extramedullar spine tumors. The combination of monitoring ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results than SEP alone giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficit during the operation. Intraoperative sensory spinal and cerebral evoked potential combined with EMG recordings and motor evoked potential of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with spinal tumors of different aetiologies were monitored by the means of MIOM during the entire surgical procedure. Eighty-two patients presented true negative findings while two patients monitored false negative, one false positive and 24 patients true positive findings where neurological deficits after the operation were present. All patients with neurological deficit recovered completely or to pre-existing neurological situation. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during surgery of spinal tumors has been calculated of 92% and specificity 99%. Based upon the results of the study MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord and nerve root function during surgical approach of spinal tumors and consequently can reduce or prevent the occurrence of postoperative neurological deficit. PMID:17661095

  7. Intraoperative measurement of indenter-induced brain deformation: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurement of soft tissue material properties is critical for characterizing its biomechanical behaviors but can be challenging especially for the human brain in vivo. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of inducing and detecting cortical surface deformation intraoperatively for patients undergoing open skull neurosurgeries. A custom diskshaped indenter made of high-density tungsten (diameter of 15 mm with a thickness of 6 mm) was used to induce deformation on the brain cortical surface immediately after dural opening. Before and after placing the indenter, sequences (typically 250 frames at 15 frames-per-second, or ~17 seconds) of high-resolution stereo image pairs were acquired to capture the harmonic motion of the exposed cortical surface as due to blood pressure pulsation and respiration. For each sequence with the first left image serving as a baseline, an optical-flow motion-tracking algorithm was used to detect in-sequence cortical surface deformation. The resulting displacements of the exposed features within the craniotomy were spatially averaged to identify the temporal frames corresponding to motion peak magnitudes. Corresponding image pairs were then selected to reconstruct full-field three-dimensional (3D) cortical surfaces before and after indentation, respectively, from which full 3D displacement fields were obtained by registering their projection images. With one clinical patient case, we illustrate the feasibility of the technique in detecting indenter-induced cortical surface deformation in order to allow subsequent processing to determine material properties of the brain in vivo.

  8. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging to localize tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Handgraaf, Henricus J M; Boogerd, Leonora S F; Verbeek, Floris P R; Tummers, Quirijn R J G; Hardwick, James C H; Baeten, Coen I M; Frangioni, John V; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor involvement at the resection margin remains the most important predictor for local recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. A careful description of tumor localization is therefore essential. Currently, endoscopic tattooing with ink is customary, but visibility during laparoscopic resections is limited. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) could be an improvement. In addition to localize tumors, ICG can also be used to identify sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). The feasibility of this new technique was explored in five patients undergoing laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Intraoperative tumor visualization was possible in four out of five patients. Fluorescence signal could be detected 32 ± 18 minutes after incision, while ink could be detected 42 ± 21 minutes after incision (p = 0.53). No recurrence was diagnosed within three months after surgery. Ex vivo imaging identified a mean of 4.2 ± 2.7 fluorescent lymph nodes, which were appointed SLNs. One out of a total of 83 resected lymph nodes contained a micrometastasis. This node was not fluorescent. This technical note describes the feasibility of endoscopic tattooing of rectal cancer using ICG:nanocolloid and NIR fluorescence imaging during laparoscopic resection. Simultaneous SLN mapping was also feasible, but may be less reliable due to neoadjuvant therapy.

  9. Robotically assisted intraoperative ultrasound with application to ablative therapy of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Taylor, Russell H.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Management of primary and metastatic tumors of the liver remains a significant challenge to the health care community worldwide. There has been an increasing interest in minimally invasive ablative approaches that typically require precise placement of the tissue ablator within the volumetric center of the tumor, in order to achieve adequate destruction. Standard clinical technique involves manual free hand ultrasonography (US) in conjunction with free hand positioning of the tissue ablator. Several investigational systems exist that simultaneously track a transcutaneous ultrasound (TCUS) probe and an ablator and provide visual overlay of the two on a computer screen, and some of those systems also register the TCUS images with pre-operative CT and/or MRI. Unfortunately, existing TCUS systems suffer from many limitations. TCUS fails to identify nearly half of all treatable liver lesions, whereas intraoperative or laparoscopic US provides excellent tissue differentiation. Furthermore, freehand manipulation of the US probe critically lacks the level of control, accuracy, and stability required for guiding liver ablation. Volumetric reconstruction from sparse and irregular 2D image data is suboptimal. Variable pressure from the sonographer's hand also causes anatomic deformation. Finally, maintaining optimal scanning position with respect to the target lesion is critical, but virtually impossible to achieve with freehand guidance. In response to these limitations, we propose the use of a fully encoded dexterous robotic arm to manipulate the US probe during surgery.

  10. Intraoperative Computed Tomography versus Perdriolle and Scoliometer Evaluation of Spine Rotation in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Rafal; Wałejko, Szymon; Rocławski, Marek; Ceynowa, Marcin; Mazurek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Numerous indirect methods for apical vertebral rotation (AVR) measurement have been reported and none of them seems to be as accurate as computed tomography evaluation. The aim of this study was to compare spinal rotation changes during innovative technique of intraoperative computed tomography (ICT) evaluation with indirect methods such as Perdriolle and clinical evaluation with scoliometer. We examined 42 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated with posterior scoliosis surgery (PSS). The mean age at the time of surgery was 16 years. ICT evaluation was performed before and after scoliosis correction in prone position. Clinical rib hump measure with scoliometer and radiographic Perdriolle were performed before and after surgery. There was 71,5% of average rib hump correction with scoliometer but only 31% of correction with ICT (P=0,026) and there was no significant correlation between them (R=0,297, p=0,26). Mean postcorrectional Perdriolle AVR had a decrease of 16,5°. The average ICT AVR had a decrease of only 1,2° (P=0,003). There was no significant statistic correlation between ICT and Perdriolle AVR evaluation (R=0,297, p=0,2). There is a significant discrepancy in AVR and rib hump assessment between scoliometer and Perdriolle methods and ICT evaluation, which seems to be the most accurate tool for spinal derotation measurement. PMID:25861628

  11. Quantitative molecular phenotyping with topically applied SERS nanoparticles for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer lumpectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Soyoung; Khan, Altaz; Ruttner, Gabriel; Leigh, Steven Y.; Murray, Melissa; Abeytunge, Sanjee; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dintzis, Suzanne; Javid, Sara; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2016-02-01

    There is a need to image excised tissues during tumor-resection procedures in order to identify residual tumors at the margins and to guide their complete removal. The imaging of dysregulated cell-surface receptors is a potential means of identifying the presence of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. However, due to heterogeneities in the expression of protein biomarkers in tumors, molecular-imaging technologies should ideally be capable of visualizing a multiplexed panel of cancer biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate that the topical application and quantification of a multiplexed cocktail of receptor-targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) enables rapid quantitative molecular phenotyping (QMP) of the surface of freshly excised tissues to determine the presence of disease. In order to mitigate the ambiguity due to nonspecific sources of contrast such as off-target binding or uneven delivery, a ratiometric method is employed to quantify the specific vs. nonspecific binding of the multiplexed NPs. Validation experiments with human tumor cell lines, fresh human tumor xenografts in mice, and fresh human breast specimens demonstrate that QMP imaging of excised tissues agrees with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, and that this technique may be achieved in less than 15 minutes for potential intraoperative use in guiding breast-conserving surgeries.

  12. Foundations for evidence-based intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Howick, Jeremy; Cohen, Bernard Allan; McCulloch, Peter; Thompson, Matthew; Skinner, Stanley A

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we recommend means to enhance the evidence-base for intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). We address two preliminary issues: (1) whether IONM should be evaluated as a diagnostic test or an intervention, and (2) the state of the evidence for IONM (as presented in systematic reviews, for example). Three reasons may be suggested to evaluate at least some IONM applications as interventions (or as part of an "interventional cascade"). First, practical barriers limit our ability to measure IONM diagnostic accuracy. Second, IONM results are designed to be correlated with interventions during surgery. Third, IONM should improve patient outcomes when IONM-directed intervention alters the course of surgery. Observational evidence for IONM is growing yet more is required to understand the conditions under which IONM, in its variety of settings, can benefit patients. A multi-center observational cohort study would represent an important initial compromise between the pragmatic difficulties with conducting controlled trials in IONM and the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) view that large scale randomized trials are required. Such a cohort study would improve the evidence base and (if justified) provide the rationale for controlled trials.

  13. Intraoperative management of patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kappa, J R; Fisher, C A; Todd, B; Stenach, N; Bell, P; Campbell, F; Ellison, N; Addonizio, V P

    1990-05-01

    For 11 patients with confirmed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, we used reversible platelet inhibition with iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analogue, to permit safe heparin administration for cardiac (n = 9) or vascular (n = 2) operations. In vitro, iloprost (0.01 mumol/L) prevented both heparin-induced platelet aggregation and 14C-serotonin release in all patients. Therefore, intraoperatively, a continuous infusion of iloprost was started before administration of heparin and was continued until 15 minutes after administration of protamine. For cardiac patients, after heparin administration, the whole blood platelet count did not change (171,000 +/- 29,000/microL versus 174,000 +/- 29,000/microL, mean +/- standard error of the mean); no spontaneous platelet aggregation was observed, and plasma levels of the alpha-granule constituents platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin increased from 38 +/- 14 and 140 +/- 18 ng/mL to 591 +/- 135 and 235 +/- 48 ng/mL, respectively. Fibrinopeptide A levels actually decreased from 287 +/- 150 to 27 +/- 6 ng/mL. Furthermore, adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet activation was preserved, postoperative bleeding times were unchanged, and no heparin-related deaths occurred. Similar results were obtained in both vascular patients. We conclude that temporary platelet inhibition with iloprost now permits safe heparin administration in all patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia who require a cardiac or vascular operation. PMID:1692679

  14. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for neurosurgical procedures: anesthetic implications.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Bernadette; Walsh, Robert P

    2011-02-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IMRI) for tumor resection allows a neurosurgeon to pinpoint the exact location of the tumor before resection and to navigate to the tumor after the incision is made. Although the anesthetic management is not substantially different from that for other neurosurgical procedures, strategies to keep the patient and operating room personnel safe can be challenging. Because of the risk of injury by the strong force of the magnet, safety precautions with respect to anesthetic delivery must be taken. Ferrous objects must be removed and kept outside the operating room. Only MRI-compatible equipment is allowed in the MRI operating room. This includes the anesthesia machine, anesthesia cart, intubating equipment, monitors, stethoscopes, poles for intravenous solutions, and body warmers. Surgical equipment and instruments must be MRI-compatible. Absolute contraindications to entering the MRI suite include pacemakers, cochlear implants, certain cranial aneurysm clips, and metal joints or implants. Goals of anesthesia delivery during IMRI procedures include the following: (1) promoting the safety of patients and staff, (2) preventing MRI-associated accidents, (3) identifying potential equipment-related hazards, (4) recognizing limitations of physiologic monitoring, and (5) acknowledging other potential hazards such as noise. PMID:21473229

  15. Robust nonrigid registration to capture brain shift from intraoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Clatz, Olivier; Delingette, Hervé; Talos, Ion-Florin; Golby, Alexandra J; Kikinis, Ron; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Ayache, Nicholas; Warfield, Simon K

    2005-11-01

    We present a new algorithm to register 3-D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to intraoperative MR images of the brain which have undergone brain shift. This algorithm relies on a robust estimation of the deformation from a sparse noisy set of measured displacements. We propose a new framework to compute the displacement field in an iterative process, allowing the solution to gradually move from an approximation formulation (minimizing the sum of a regularization term and a data error term) to an interpolation formulation (least square minimization of the data error term). An outlier rejection step is introduced in this gradual registration process using a weighted least trimmed squares approach, aiming at improving the robustness of the algorithm. We use a patient-specific model discretized with the finite element method in order to ensure a realistic mechanical behavior of the brain tissue. To meet the clinical time constraint, we parallelized the slowest step of the algorithm so that we can perform a full 3-D image registration in 35 s (including the image update time) on a heterogeneous cluster of 15 personal computers. The algorithm has been tested on six cases of brain tumor resection, presenting a brain shift of up to 14 mm. The results show a good ability to recover large displacements, and a limited decrease of accuracy near the tumor resection cavity.

  16. Response of canine esophagus to intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, W.F.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Barnes, M.; DeLuca, A.M.; Tochner, Z.; Pass, H.I.; Kranda, K.C.; Terrill, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Tolerance of esophagus to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in dogs. Thirteen adult foxhounds were subjected to right thoractomy, mobilization of the intrathoracic esophagus, and IORT to a 6 cm full-thickness esophageal segment using 9 MeV electrons at doses of 0, 2,000, or 3,000 cGy. Dogs were followed clinically and were evaluated at regular intervals after treatment with fiberoptic esophagoscopy, barium swallows, and postmortem histologic evaluations. One sham-irradiated control dog showed no abnormalities during follow-up of 24 months. Seven dogs receiving 2,000 cGy IORT showed transient mild dysphagia and mild esophagitis, but no clinically or pathologically significant complications. Five dogs receiving 3,000 cGy demonstrated severe ulcerative esophagitis within 6 weeks of treatment which progressed to chronic ulcerative esophagitis with stricture formation by 9 months following IORT. One 3,000 cGy dog died at 13 months from an esophageal perforation. On the basis of a pilot experience using 13 experimental animals, it was concluded that intact canine esophagus tolerates IORT well to doses of 2,000 cGy, but doses of 3,000 cGy pose serious and potentially lethal risks. The clinical application of IORT to the treatment of human intrathoracic neoplasms requiring esophageal irradiation should be approached with caution, particularly at doses exceeding 2,000 cGy.

  17. Multimodal correlation and intraoperative matching of virtual models in neurosurgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceresole, Enrico; Dalsasso, Michele; Rossi, Aldo

    1994-01-01

    The multimodal correlation between different diagnostic exams, the intraoperative calibration of pointing tools and the correlation of the patient's virtual models with the patient himself, are some examples, taken from the biomedical field, of a unique problem: determine the relationship linking representation of the same object in different reference frames. Several methods have been developed in order to determine this relationship, among them, the surface matching method is one that gives the patient minimum discomfort and the errors occurring are compatible with the required precision. The surface matching method has been successfully applied to the multimodal correlation of diagnostic exams such as CT, MR, PET and SPECT. Algorithms for automatic segmentation of diagnostic images have been developed to extract the reference surfaces from the diagnostic exams, whereas the surface of the patient's skull has been monitored, in our approach, by means of a laser sensor mounted on the end effector of an industrial robot. An integrated system for virtual planning and real time execution of surgical procedures has been realized.

  18. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  19. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes. PMID:27013816

  20. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes. PMID:27013816

  1. Incorporation of surface-based deformations for updating images intraoperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miga, Michael I.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2001-05-01

    Patient-to-image misalignment becomes exacerbated by common surgical events such as brain sag, drug interactions, retraction, and resection. One strategy to remedy this mis- registration is to employ computational models in conjunction with low-cost intraoperatively-acquired data (e.g. surface tracking, and co-registered ultrasound) to deform preoperative imaging data to account for OR actions. In this paper, we present preliminary data from a cortical surface scanning system and study the impact of surface- based information on model-updates. Preliminary data is presented using a 3D laser scanning technology in conjunction with an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm to register and track phantom and ex vivo data. Simulations are presented to analyze the direct use of displacement data versus modeling the underlying physical load in a clinical example of gravity-induced deformation. Results demonstrate dramatic differences in subsurface deformation fields highlighting that the nature of the surgical load (i.e. surface or body force) must be thoughtfully discriminated to accurately update images. Furthermore, the results suggest that the application of surface displacements to update image volumes must be consistent with the physical origin of deformation rather than applied in a direct interpolative sense.

  2. Dosimetry characteristics of metallic cones for intraoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nyerick, C E; Ochran, T G; Boyer, A L; Hogstrom, K R

    1991-07-01

    Dosimetry data were obtained on the first dedicated linear accelerator of its type designed for electron intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) within an operating room. The linear accelerator uses a high dose rate, 9 Gy.min-1, to reduce the treatment time. Its chrome-plated brass treatment cones, designed with straight ends and 22.5 degrees beveled ends, are not mechanically attached to the collimator head, but are aligned using a laser projection system. Dosimetry measurements were made for each combination of energy (6, 9, 12, 15, and 16 MeV), cone size (diameters range from 5 to 12 cm), and cone type (22.5 degrees beveled or straight). From these data, depth-dose curves, cone output, and air-gap correction factors were generated that allow the calculation of the monitor setting for delivering a prescribed dose at any depth for any irradiation condition (energy, cone, air gap). Isodose data were measured for every cone using film in a solid water phantom. Scatter off the inside wall of the cone resulted in peripheral dose horns near the surface that were energy and cone dependent, being as large as 120%.

  3. Dosimetry characteristics of metallic cones for intraoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nyerick, C.E.; Ochran, T.G.; Boyer, A.L.; Hogstrom, K.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Dosimetry data were obtained on the first dedicated linear accelerator of its type designed for electron intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) within an operating room. The linear accelerator uses a high dose rate, 9 Gy.min-1, to reduce the treatment time. Its chrome-plated brass treatment cones, designed with straight ends and 22.5 degrees beveled ends, are not mechanically attached to the collimator head, but are aligned using a laser projection system. Dosimetry measurements were made for each combination of energy (6, 9, 12, 15, and 16 MeV), cone size (diameters range from 5 to 12 cm), and cone type (22.5 degrees beveled or straight). From these data, depth-dose curves, cone output, and air-gap correction factors were generated that allow the calculation of the monitor setting for delivering a prescribed dose at any depth for any irradiation condition (energy, cone, air gap). Isodose data were measured for every cone using film in a solid water phantom. Scatter off the inside wall of the cone resulted in peripheral dose horns near the surface that were energy and cone dependent, being as large as 120%.

  4. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  5. Risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture in cementless total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Simo S A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Kostensalo, Inari; Mäkelä, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Kettunen, Jukka S; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Intraoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture is a known complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). We determined the incidence of—and risk factors for—intraoperative calcar fracture, and assessed its influence on the risk of revision. Patients and methods — This retrospective analysis included 3,207 cementless THAs (in 2,913 patients). 118 intraoperative calcar fractures were observed in these hips (3.7%). A control group of 118 patients/hips without calcar fractures was randomly selected. The mean follow-up was 4.2 (1.8–8.0) years. Demographic data, surgical data, type of implant, and proximal femur morphology were evaluated to determine risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. Results — The revision rates in the calcar fracture group and the control group were 10% (95% CI: 5.9–17) and 3.4% (CI: 1.3–8.4), respectively. The revision rate directly related to intraoperative calcar fracture was 7.6%. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for calcar fracture. In the fracture group, 55 of 118 patients (47%) had at least one risk factor, while only 23 of118 patients in the control group (20%) had a risk factor (p = 0.001). Radiological analysis showed that in the calcar fracture group, there were more deviated femoral anatomies and proximal femur bone cortices were thinner. Interpretation — Intraoperative calcar fracture increased the risk of revision. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. To avoid intraoperative fractures, special attention should be paid when cementless stems are used with deviant-shaped proximal femurs and with thin cortices. PMID:26541230

  6. Intraoperative Ir-192 implantation for early breast cancer. Techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, C.M. )

    1990-07-01

    Patients with early breast cancer (T1-2 N0-1) can be treated by lumpectomy and irradiation with a local control and survival equal to more radical surgery. Between 1982 and 1988, 323 patients with early breast cancer were treated, when possible, with Ir-192 implants at the time of lumpectomy to a local dose of 2000 cGy in 40-50 hours. Ten to 14 days later, the whole breast was treated to 4500 cGy at 180 per fraction in 5 weeks. The 6-year actuarial survival for stages I and II disease was 98% and 91%, respectively, and the recurrence-free survival was 96% and 98%, respectively. When these 323 patients were evaluated by T status, a local control of 97% was the same for T1 and T2 lesions. The cosmetic results were good to excellent in 95% of the patients. This approach has improved our ability to accurately place the boost dose in the breast.

  7. Digital Photographic Measurement in Hypospadias: Validation and Comparison to Intraoperative Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Ardavan; Merguerian, Paul A; Grady, Richard W; DiSandro, Michael; Shnorhavorian, Margarett

    2013-01-01

    Background We propose a standardized method of photographing the hypospadias penis to capture penile dimensions that may be relevant for surgery. We also validate the use of digital imaging software for calculating penile dimensions as a substitute for intraoperative caliper-based measurements. Methods Photographs were taken of hypospadias penises in four different views after placement of a traction stitch and retraction of the preputial hood. Intraoperative measurements were obtained with a caliper. Digital measurements were taken of the same parameters postoperatively. All measurements were obtained in triplicate by multiple participants, and averages were tested for equivalency by determining the correlation coefficient for each parameter. Inter-observer correlation was also calculated for each parameter. Results 180 intraoperative and 180 digital measurements were taken from 60 dimensions on 10 hypospadiac penises. Strong correlation existed between most digital and intraoperative measurements. Average inter-observer correlations ranged from 0.91 to 0.99 for each of the intraoperative measurements, and 0.90 to 1.00 for each of the digital measurements. Conclusions Standardized imaging is effective in capturing penile dimensions and measurements during hypospadias surgery. When compared with intraoperative measurements, digital measurements are reliable and precise; digital photography has the potential to both aid in surgical planning and improve documentation. PMID:24291248

  8. Combined use of intraoperative indocyanine green and dynamic angiography in rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Ambekar, Sudheer; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-08-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, also known as bow hunter's syndrome, is a well-documented surgically amenable cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Traditionally, patients have been imaged using dynamic rotational angiography. The authors sought to determine whether intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography could reliably assess the adequacy of surgical decompression of the vertebral artery (VA). The authors report two patients who presented with multiple transient episodes of syncope provoked by turning their head to the right. Rotational dynamic angiography revealed a dominant VA that became occluded with head rotation to the right side. The patients underwent successful surgical decompression of the VA via an anterior cervical approach. Intraoperative ICG angiography demonstrated patency of the VA with head rotation. This was further confirmed by intraoperative dynamic catheter angiography. To our knowledge, we present the first two cases of the use of ICG combined with intraoperative dynamic rotational angiography to document the adequacy of surgical decompression of the VA in a patient with rotational vertebral artery occlusion. Intraoperative ICG angiography is a useful adjunct and may potentially supplant the need for intraoperative catheter angiography. PMID:27041076

  9. Predictive roles of intraoperative blood glucose for post-transplant outcomes in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul Soo

    2015-06-14

    Diabetogenic traits in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) are exacerbated intraoperatively by exogenous causes, such as surgical stress, steroids, blood transfusions, and catecholamines, which lead to intraoperative hyperglycemia. In contrast to the strict glucose control performed in the intensive care unit, no systematic protocol has been developed for glucose management during LT. Intraoperative blood glucose concentrations typically exceed 200 mg/dL in LT, and extreme hyperglycemia (> 300 mg/dL) is common during the neohepatic phase. Only a few retrospective studies have examined the relationship between intraoperative hyperglycemia and post-transplant complications, with reports of infectious complications or mortality. However, no prospective studies have been conducted regarding the influence of intraoperative hyperglycemia in LT on post-transplant outcome. In addition to absolute blood glucose values, the temporal patterns in blood glucose levels during LT may serve as prognostic features. Persistent neohepatic hyperglycemia (without a decline) throughout LT is a useful indicator of early graft dysfunction. Moreover, intraoperative variability in glucose levels may predict the need for reoperation for hemorrhage after LT. Thus, there is an urgent need for guidelines for glucose control in these patients, as well as prospective studies on the impact of glucose control on various post-transplant complications. This report highlights some of the recent studies related to perioperative blood glucose management focused on LT and liver disease. PMID:26078559

  10. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report.

    PubMed

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-Won; Shin, Won-Jung; Gwak, Mijeung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  11. A fully automatic image-to-world registration method for image-guided procedure with intraoperative imaging updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Sarment, David

    2016-03-01

    Image-guided procedure with intraoperative imaging updates has made a big impact on minimally invasive surgery. Compact and mobile CT imaging device combining with current commercial available image guided navigation system is a legitimate and cost-efficient solution for a typical operating room setup. However, the process of manual fiducial-based registration between image and physical spaces (image-to-world) is troublesome for surgeons during the procedure, which results in much procedure interruptions and is the main source of registration errors. In this study, we developed a novel method to eliminate the manual registration process. Instead of using probe to manually localize the fiducials during the surgery, a tracking plate with known fiducial positions relative to the reference coordinates is designed and fabricated through 3D printing technique. The workflow and feasibility of this method has been studied through a phantom experiment.

  12. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-won; Shin, Won-Jung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  13. Intraoperative electrophysiological evaluations of macular function during peripheral scleral indentation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Goichi; Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Watanabe, Emiko; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2016-01-01

    Scleral indentation is widely used to examine the peripheral fundus, however it can increase the intraocular pressure (IOP) to high levels which can then affect retinal function. We evaluated the effects of scleral indentation on the macular function electrophysiologically. Intraoperative focal macular electroretinograms (iFMERGs) were recorded with and without controlling the IOP in 7 eyes. Without IOP control, the IOP increased from 21.7 ± 4.9 to 92.7 ± 20.2 mmHg significantly (P = 0.020) and the amplitudes of the b-wave (from 6.29 ± 1.160 to 3.71 ± 1.98 uV, P = 0.007), on-photopic negative response (from 2.29 ± 0.99 to 0.72 ± 0.47 uV, on-PhNR, P = 0.005), and d-wave (from 2.57 ± 0.41 to 1.64 ± 0.69 uV, P = 0.007) decreased significantly soon after beginning the indentation. All values returned to the baseline levels after releasing the indentation. In the eyes with IOP controlled, the IOP and the amplitude of all components did not change significantly during and after the indentation except the on-PhNR amplitude which was significantly reduced during the indentation. The changes in the iFMERGs and macular function caused by scleral indentation were transient and reversible. The changes can be minimized by controlling the IOP. PMID:27762313

  14. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidan, Youssef H.; Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel; Johnstone, Peter A.; Terry, Colin; Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod; Yeh, Alex

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  15. Quantification of tumor fluorescence during intraoperative optical cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Judy, Ryan P; Keating, Jane J; DeJesus, Elizabeth M; Jiang, Jack X; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Nie, Shuming; Holt, David E; Arlauckas, Sean P; Low, Phillip S; Delikatny, E James; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-11-13

    Intraoperative optical cancer imaging is an emerging technology in which surgeons employ fluorophores to visualize tumors, identify tumor-positive margins and lymph nodes containing metastases. This study compares instrumentation to measure tumor fluorescence. Three imaging systems (Spectropen, Glomax, Flocam) measured and quantified fluorescent signal-to-background ratios (SBR) in vitro, murine xenografts, tissue phantoms and clinically. Evaluation criteria included the detection of small changes in fluorescence, sensitivity of signal detection at increasing depths and practicality of use. In vitro, spectroscopy was superior in detecting incremental differences in fluorescence than luminescence and digital imaging (Ln[SBR] = 6.8 ± 0.6, 2.4 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.1, p = 0.0001). In fluorescent tumor cells, digital imaging measured higher SBRs than luminescence (6.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4, p = 0.001). Spectroscopy was more sensitive than luminometry and digital imaging in identifying murine tumor fluorescence (SBR = 41.7 ± 11.5, 5.1 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 0.9, p = 0.0001), and more sensitive than digital imaging at detecting fluorescence at increasing depths (SBR = 7.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). Lastly, digital imaging was the most practical and least time-consuming. All methods detected incremental differences in fluorescence. Spectroscopy was the most sensitive for small changes in fluorescence. Digital imaging was the most practical considering its wide field of view, background noise filtering capability, and sensitivity to increasing depth.

  16. Intraoperative Near-Infrared Imaging Can Identify Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Okusanya, Olugbenga T.; Holt, David; Heitjan, Daniel; Deshpande, Charuhas; Venegas, Ollin; Jiang, Jack; Judy, Ryan; DeJesus, Elizabeth; Madajewski, Brian; Oh, Kenny; Albelda, Steven M.; Nie, Shuming; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 80,000 people undergo pulmonary resection for a lung nodule in the United States each year. Small nodules are frequently missed or difficult to find despite preoperative imaging. We hypothesized that near-infrared (NIR) imaging technology could be used to identify and locate lung nodules during surgery. Methods We enrolled 18 patients who were diagnosed with a pulmonary nodule that required resection. All patients had a fine-cut 1mm computed tomography scan preoperatively. The patients were given systemic 5 mg/kg indocyanine green (ICG) and then underwent an open thoracotomy 24 hours later. NIR imaging was used to identify the primary nodule and search for additional nodules that were not found by visual inspection or manual palpation of the ipsilateral lung. Results Manual palpation and visual inspection identified all 18 primary pulmonary nodules and no additional lesions. Intraoperative NIR imaging detected 16 out of the 18 primary nodules. NIR imaging also identified 5 additional subcentimeter nodules: 3 metastatic adenocarcinomas and 2 metastatic sarcomas. This technology could identify nodules as small as 0.2 cm and as deep as 1.3 cm from the pleural surface. This approach discovered 3 nodules that were in different lobes than the primary tumor. Nodule fluorescence was independent of size, metabolic activity, histology, tumor grade and vascularity. Conclusions This is the first-in-human demonstration of identifying pulmonary nodules during Thoracic surgery with NIR imaging without a priori knowledge of their location or existence. NIR imaging can detect pulmonary nodules during lung resections that are poorly visualized on computed tomography and difficult to discriminate on finger palpation. PMID:25106680

  17. Quantification of tumor fluorescence during intraoperative optical cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Judy, Ryan P.; Keating, Jane J.; DeJesus, Elizabeth M.; Jiang, Jack X.; Okusanya, Olugbenga T.; Nie, Shuming; Holt, David E.; Arlauckas, Sean P.; Low, Phillip S.; Delikatny, E. James; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative optical cancer imaging is an emerging technology in which surgeons employ fluorophores to visualize tumors, identify tumor-positive margins and lymph nodes containing metastases. This study compares instrumentation to measure tumor fluorescence. Three imaging systems (Spectropen, Glomax, Flocam) measured and quantified fluorescent signal-to-background ratios (SBR) in vitro, murine xenografts, tissue phantoms and clinically. Evaluation criteria included the detection of small changes in fluorescence, sensitivity of signal detection at increasing depths and practicality of use. In vitro, spectroscopy was superior in detecting incremental differences in fluorescence than luminescence and digital imaging (Ln[SBR] = 6.8 ± 0.6, 2.4 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.1, p = 0.0001). In fluorescent tumor cells, digital imaging measured higher SBRs than luminescence (6.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4, p = 0.001). Spectroscopy was more sensitive than luminometry and digital imaging in identifying murine tumor fluorescence (SBR = 41.7 ± 11.5, 5.1 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 0.9, p = 0.0001), and more sensitive than digital imaging at detecting fluorescence at increasing depths (SBR = 7.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). Lastly, digital imaging was the most practical and least time-consuming. All methods detected incremental differences in fluorescence. Spectroscopy was the most sensitive for small changes in fluorescence. Digital imaging was the most practical considering its wide field of view, background noise filtering capability, and sensitivity to increasing depth. PMID:26563091

  18. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  19. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye. PMID:27621782

  20. Noninvasive Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI): Comparison to intraoperative mapping in patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Raja N.; Jia, Ping; Ramanathan, Charulatha; Ryu, Kyungmoo; Markowitz, Alan; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND Cardiac arrhythmias are a leading cause of death and disability. Electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs potentials, electrograms, and isochrones on the epicardial surface from body surface measurements. We previously demonstrated in animal experiments through comparison with simultaneously measured epicardial data the high accuracy of ECGI in imaging cardiac electrical events. Here, images obtained by noninvasive ECGI are compared to invasive direct epicardial mapping in open heart surgery patients. METHODS Three patients were studied during sinus rhythm and right ventricular endocardial and epicardial pacing (total of five datasets). Body surface potentials were acquired preoperatively or postoperatively using a 224-electrode vest. Heart-torso geometry was determined preoperatively using computed tomography. Intraoperative mapping was performed with two 100-electrode epicardial patches. RESULTS Noninvasive potential maps captured epicardial breakthrough sites and reflected general activation and repolarization patterns, localized pacing sites to ∼1 cm and distinguished between epicardial and endocardial origin of activation. Noninvasively reconstructed electrogram morphologies correlated moderately with their invasive counterparts (cross correlation = 0.72 ± 0.25 [sinus rhythm], 0.67 ± 0.23 [endocardial pacing], 0.71 ± 0.21 [epicardial pacing]). Noninvasive isochrones captured the sites of earliest activation, areas of slow conduction, and the general excitation pattern. CONCLUSIONS Despite limitations due to nonsimultaneous acquisition of the surgical and noninvasive data under different conditions, the study demonstrates that ECGI can capture important features of cardiac electrical excitation in humans noninvasively during a single beat. It also shows that general excitation patterns and electrogram morphologies are largely preserved in open chest conditions. PMID:15851333

  1. Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for the Management of Aggressive Fibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Oertel, Susanne; Hensley, Frank W.; Bischof, Marc; Muenter, Marc W.; Weitz, Juergen; Buchler, Markus W.; Lehner, Burkhard; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after organ-sparing surgery in patients with primary or recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and Materials: Indication for IOERT and postoperative EBRT as an individual treatment approach to avoid mutilating surgical procedures was seen when complete surgical removal seemed to be unlikely or impossible. A total of 31 lesions in 30 patients were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 12 Gy. Median age was 31 years (range, 13-59 years). Resection status was close margin in six lesions, microscopically positive in 13, and macroscopically positive in 12. Median tumor size was 9 cm. In all, 25 patients received additional EBRT, with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 36-54 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-139 months), no disease-related deaths occurred. A total of five local recurrences were seen, resulting in actuarial 3-year local control rates of 82% overall and 91% inside the IOERT areas. Trends to improved local control were seen for older age (>31 years) and negative margins, but none of these factors reached significance. Perioperative complications were found in six patients, in particular as wound healing disturbances in five patients and venous thrombosis in one patient. Late toxicity was seen in five patients. Conclusion: Introduction of IOERT into a multimodal treatment approach in patients with aggressive fibromatosis is feasible with low toxicity and yielded good local control rates even in patients with microscopical or gross residual disease.

  2. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  3. Feasibility of Extracted-Overlay Fusion Imaging for Intraoperative Treatment Evaluation of Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Yuki; Imai, Yasuharu; Igura, Takumi; Kogita, Sachiyo; Sawai, Yoshiyuki; Fukuda, Kazuto; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Okabe, Junya; Takamura, Manabu; Fujita, Norihiko; Hori, Masatoshi; Takehara, Tetsuo; Kudo, Masatoshi; Murakami, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Extracted-overlay fusion imaging is a novel computed tomography/magnetic resonance-ultrasonography (CT/MR-US) imaging technique in which a target tumor with a virtual ablative margin is extracted from CT/MR volume data and synchronously overlaid on US images. We investigated the applicability of the technique to intraoperative evaluation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods This retrospective study analyzed 85 HCCs treated with RFA using extracted-overlay fusion imaging for guidance and evaluation. To perform RFA, an electrode was inserted targeting the tumor and a virtual 5-mm ablative margin overlaid on the US image. Following ablation, contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) was performed to assess the ablative margin, and the minimal ablative margins were categorized into three groups: (I) margin <0 mm (protrusion), (II) margin 0 to <5 mm, and (III) margin ≥5 mm. Margin assessment was based on the positional relationship between the overlaid tumor plus margin and the perfusion defect of the ablation zone. Tumors in group I underwent repeat ablation until they were in groups II or III. The final classifications were compared with those obtained by retrospectively created fusion images of pre- and post-RFA CT or MR imaging (CT-CT/MR-MR fusion imaging). Results Treatment evaluation was impossible using CEUS in six HCCs because the tumors were located far below the body surface. Of the remaining 79 HCCs, the categorizations of minimal ablative margins between CEUS extracted-overlay fusion imaging and CT-CT/MR-MR fusion imaging were in agreement for 72 tumors (91.1%) (Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa coefficient 0.66, good agreement, p<0.01). Conclusions Extracted-overlay fusion imaging combined with CEUS is feasible for the evaluation of RFA and enables intraoperative treatment evaluation without the need to perform contrast-enhanced CT. PMID:27781199

  4. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential recovery following opening of the fourth ventricle during posterior fossa decompression in Chiari malformation: case report.

    PubMed

    Grossauer, Stefan; Koeck, Katharina; Vince, Giles H

    2015-03-01

    The most appropriate surgical technique for posterior fossa decompression in Chiari malformation (CM) remains a matter of debate. Intraoperative electrophysiological studies during posterior fossa decompression of Type I CM (CM-I) aim to shed light on the entity's pathomechanism as well as on the ideal extent of decompression. The existing reports on this issue state that significant improvement in conduction occurs after craniotomy in all cases, but additional durotomy contributes a further improvement in only a minority of cases. This implies that craniotomy alone might suffice for clinical improvement without the need of duraplasty or even subarachnoid manipulation at the level of the craniocervical junction. In contrast to published data, the authors describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who underwent surgery for CM associated with extensive cervicothoracic syringomyelia and whose intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) did not notably improve after craniotomy or following durotomy; rather, they only improved after opening of the fourth ventricle and restoration of CSF flow through the foramen of Magendie. Postoperatively, the patient recovered completely from her preoperative neurological deficits. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of significant SSEP recovery after opening the fourth ventricle in the decompression of a CM-I. The electrophysiological and operative techniques are described in detail and the findings are discussed in the light of available literature. The authors conclude that there might be a subset of CM-I patients who require subarachnoid dissection at the level of the craniocervical junction to benefit clinically. Prospective studies with detailed electrophysiological analyses seem warranted to answer the question regarding the best surgical approach in CM-I decompression.

  5. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography-Assisted Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty in the DISCOVER Study

    PubMed Central

    Cost, Brian; Goshe, Jeffrey M.; Srivastava, Sunil; Ehlers, Justis P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) for Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK) surgery. Design Prospective consecutive interventional case series. Methods DISCOVER (NCT02423213) is a prospective consecutive interventional case series examining the feasibility and utility microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT in ophthalmic surgery. This report focuses on those eyes in the DISCOVER study undergoing DMEK surgery. The eight cases were the first DMEK cases performed by the primary surgeon (J.M.G.) with microscope integrated intraoperative OCT feedback (Rescan 700, Carl Zeiss Meditec). Qualitative OCT analysis was performed at multiple surgeon-defined time points, including host and donor tissue preparation, graft orientation, graft apposition, and tissue interface fluid dynamics. Results Correct graft orientation was confirmed by intraoperative OCT prior to unscrolling in 100% of cases. Seven of eight grafts were fully attached at the conclusion of surgery and on postoperative day one. One graft had a linear paracentral fixed area of interface separation corresponding to posterior stromal irregularities which was visible during surgery and unchanged on postoperative day one. Two eyes developed significant peripheral graft dehiscence visible by the first postoperative week. Both grafts were successfully re-attached with repeat gas injection. All eyes demonstrated improvement in best corrected visual acuity and there was a 100% graft survival rate at last follow-up (minimum = 4 months). Surgeon feedback indicated that intraoperative OCT provided valuable information in all eight cases. Conclusions Real-time intraoperative OCT can provide useful information, which may directly impact surgical decision-making during DMEK surgery. Intraoperative OCT may facilitate the transition for novice DMEK surgeons by increasing surgeon confidence and reducing the risk of iatrogenic graft failure. PMID:26026264

  6. Intraoperative augmented reality for laparoscopic colorectal surgery by intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cahill, R A; Mortensen, N J

    2010-08-01

    Advances in imaging quality and capability have been the major driver of the laparoscopic revolution that has dramatically impacted upon operative strategies and surgical patient care in recent years. Increasingly now the technological capacity is becoming available to supraselect or extend the useful clinical range of the electromagnetic spectrum beyond visible or white light. This has markedly broadened the intraprocedural optical information available at intraluminal endoscopy and there is likely to be considerable similar benefit for laparoscopy. Rather than narrow band or ultraviolet imaging however, it is the near infrared (NIR) spectrum that seems of most potential to exploit during intra-abdominal endoscopy in particular as this energy range is capable of penetrating relatively deeply into tissues such as the mesentery and bowel wall without inducing thermal damage due to heat dissipation or indeed the intracellular effects associated with higher energy, shorter wavelength energies. By incorporating the NIR spectrum alongside more conventional laparoscopic imaging, a greater appreciation of tissue architecture, character and quality is possible in particular with respect to lymphatic and vascular channel anatomy and flow dynamics and also real-time optical histology (by NIR optical coherence tomography). Such a facility may significantly aid critical intraoperative decision making during colorectal operations by informing the surgeon regarding the most biologically relevant lymphatic basin and lymph nodes for any target area of interest (especially important if considering tailored operative extent for colorectal neoplasia), the sufficiency and quality of arterial supply (and hence inform re the perfusion of stapled intestinal ends prior to reanastomosis) and perhaps even in situ pathological assessment. This article provides a state of art overview of the fascinating potential of this emergent technological capability. PMID:20802433

  7. Use of intraoperative computed tomography in complex craniofacial trauma: an example of on-table change in management.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Clinton S; Taylor, Helena O; Collins, Scott; Oyelese, Adetokunbo; Sullivan, Stephen R

    2014-12-01

    The primary goals in repairing complex craniofacial fractures are restoration of occlusion and mastication, and anatomic reconstruction of a symmetric facial skeleton. Failure to accomplish these goals may result in the need for secondary operations. Recognition of malreduction may not be appreciated until review of a postoperative computed tomographic (CT) scan. Intraoperative CT scanning enables immediate on-table assessment of reduction and fixation, allowing alteration of the surgical plan as needed. We report using intraoperative CT scanning while repairing a panfacial injury in which malreduction was appreciated intraoperatively and corrected. Intraoperative CT can be used to improve outcomes and quality of complex facial fracture repair. PMID:25383151

  8. Excimer versus Femtosecond Laser Assisted Penetrating Keratoplasty in Keratoconus and Fuchs Dystrophy: Intraoperative Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    El-Husseiny, Moatasem; Seitz, Berthold; Langenbucher, Achim; Akhmedova, Elena; Szentmary, Nora; Hager, Tobias; Tsintarakis, Themistoklis; Janunts, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the intraoperative results comparing two non-mechanical laser assisted penetrating keratoplasty approaches in keratoconus and Fuchs dystrophy. Patients and Methods. 68 patients (age 18 to 87 years) with keratoconus or Fuchs dystrophy were randomly distributed to 4 groups. 35 eyes with keratoconus and 33 eyes with Fuchs dystrophy were treated with either excimer laser ([Exc] groups I and II) or femtosecond laser-assisted ([FLAK] groups III and IV) penetrating keratoplasty. Main intraoperative outcome measures included intraoperative decentration, need for additional interrupted sutures, alignment of orientation markers, and intraocular positive pressure (vis a tergo). Results. Intraoperative recipient decentration occurred in 4 eyes of groups III/IV but in none of groups I/II. Additional interrupted sutures were not necessary in groups I/II but in 5 eyes of groups III/IV. Orientation markers were all aligned in groups I/II but were partly misaligned in 8 eyes of groups III/IV. Intraocular positive pressure grade was recognized in 12 eyes of groups I/II and in 19 eyes of groups III/IV. In particular, in group III, severe vis a tergo occurred in 8 eyes. Conclusions. Intraoperative decentration, misalignment of the donor in the recipient bed, and need for additional interrupted sutures as well as high percentage of severe intraocular positive pressure were predominantly present in the femtosecond laser in keratoconus eyes. PMID:26483974

  9. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography in cerebral aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, R.; Pietila, T.; Al, H; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Outcome of surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms may be severely compromised by local cerebral ischaemia or infarction resulting from the inadvertent occlusion of an adjacent vessel by the aneurysm clip, or by incomplete aneurysm closure. It is therefore mandatory to optimise clip placement in situ to reduce the complication rate. The present study was performed to investigate the reliability of intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) in cerebral aneurysm surgery, and to assess the impact of this method on the surgical procedure itself.
METHODS—Seventy five patients (19 men, 56 women, mean age 54.8 years, range 22-84 years) with 90 saccular cerebral aneurysms were evaluated. Blood flow velocities in the aneurysmal sac and in the adjacent vessels were determined by MDU before and after aneurysm clipping. The findings of MDU were analysed and compared with those of visual inspection of the surgical site and of postoperative angiography. Analysis was also made of the cases in which the clip was repositioned due to MDU findings.
RESULTS—A relevant stenosis of an adjacent vessel induced by clip positioning that had escaped detection by visual inspection was identified by Doppler ultrasonography in 17 out of 90 (18.9%) aneurysms. In addition, Doppler ultrasound demonstrated a primarily unoccluded aneurysm in 11 out of 90 (12.2%) patients. The aneurysm clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU findings in 26 out of 90 (28.8%) cases. In middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, the MDU results were relevant to the surgical procedure in 17out of 44 (38.6%) cases. Whereas with aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery significant findings occurred in only five of 32cases (15.6%; p<0.05). The clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU results in 18 out of 50 (36%) aneurysms in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) grade I-V compared with only eight out of 40 (20%) aneurysms in patients without SAH (p<0.05).

  10. Intraoperative application of thermal camera for the assessment of during surgical resection or biopsy of human's brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Piatkowski, T.; Polakowski, H.; Kaczmarska, K.; Czernicki, Z.; Bogucki, J.; Zebala, M.

    2014-05-01

    Motivation to undertake research on brain surface temperature in clinical practice is based on a strong conviction that the enormous progress in thermal imaging techniques and camera design has a great application potential. Intraoperative imaging of pathological changes and functionally important areas of the brain is not yet fully resolved in neurosurgery and remains a challenge. A study of temperature changes across cerebral cortex was performed for five patients with brain tumors (previously diagnosed using magnetic resonance or computed tomography) during surgical resection or biopsy of tumors. Taking into account their origin and histology the tumors can be divided into the following types: gliomas, with different degrees of malignancy (G2 to G4), with different metabolic activity and various temperatures depending on the malignancy level (3 patients), hypervascular tumor associated with meninges (meningioma), metastatic tumor - lung cancer with a large cyst and noticeable edema. In the case of metastatic tumor with large edema and a liquid-filled space different temperature of a cerebral cortex were recorded depending on metabolic activity. Measurements have shown that the temperature on the surface of the cyst was on average 2.6 K below the temperature of surrounding areas. It has been also observed that during devascularization of a tumor, i.e. cutting off its blood vessels, the tumor temperature lowers significantly in spite of using bipolar coagulation, which causes additional heat emission in the tissue. The results of the measurements taken intra-operatively confirm the capability of a thermal camera to perform noninvasive temperature monitoring of a cerebral cortex. As expected surface temperature of tumors is different from surface temperature of tissues free from pathological changes. The magnitude of this difference depends on histology and the origin of the tumor. These conclusions lead to taking on further experimental research, implementation

  11. Patient Registration Using Intraoperative Stereovision in Image-guided Open Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Mirza, Sohail K.; Lollis, S. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread availability and success in open cranial neurosurgery, image-guidance technology remains more limited in use in open spinal procedures, in large part because of patient registration challenges. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using intraoperative stereovision (iSV) for accurate, efficient and robust patient registration in open spinal fusion surgery. Geometrical surfaces of exposed vertebrae were first reconstructed from iSV. A classical multi-start registration was then executed between point clouds generated from iSV and preoperative CT (pCT) images of the spine. With two pairs of feature points manually identified to facilitate the registration, an average registration accuracy of 1.43 mm in terms of surface-to-surface distance error was achieved in 8 patient cases using a single iSV image pair sampling 2–3 vertebral segments. The iSV registration error was consistently smaller than the conventional landmark approach for every case (average of 2.02 mm with the same error metric). The large capture ranges (average of 23.8 mm in translation and 46.0 deg in rotation) found in the iSV patient registration suggest the technique may offer sufficient robustness for practical application in the operating room. Although some manual effort was still necessary, the manually-derived inputs for iSV registration only needed to be approximate as opposed to be precise and accurate for the manual efforts required in landmark registration. The total computational cost of the iSV registration was 1.5 min on average, significantly less than the typical ~30 min required for the landmark approach. These findings support the clinical feasibility of iSV to offer accurate, efficient and robust patient registration in open spinal surgery, and therefore, its potential to further increase the adoption of image-guidance in this surgical specialty. PMID:25826802

  12. Patient Registration Using Intraoperative Stereovision in Image-guided Open Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Paulsen, Keith D; Roberts, David W; Mirza, Sohail K; Lollis, S Scott

    2015-09-01

    Despite its widespread availability and success in open cranial neurosurgery, image-guidance technology remains more limited in use in open spinal procedures, in large part, because of patient registration challenges. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using intraoperative stereovision (iSV) for accurate, efficient, and robust patient registration in an open spinal fusion surgery. Geometrical surfaces of exposed vertebrae were first reconstructed from iSV. A classical multistart registration was then executed between point clouds generated from iSV and preoperative computed tomography images of the spine. With two pairs of feature points manually identified to facilitate the registration, an average registration accuracy of 1.43 mm in terms of surface-to-surface distance error was achieved in eight patient cases using a single iSV image pair sampling 2-3 vertebral segments. The iSV registration error was consistently smaller than the conventional landmark approach for every case (average of 2.02 mm with the same error metric). The large capture ranges (average of 23.8 mm in translation and 46.0° in rotation) found in the iSV patient registration suggest the technique may offer sufficient robustness for practical application in the operating room. Although some manual effort was still necessary, the manually-derived inputs for iSV registration only needed to be approximate as opposed to be precise and accurate for the manual efforts required in landmark registration. The total computational cost of the iSV registration was 1.5 min on average, significantly less than the typical ∼30 min required for the landmark approach. These findings support the clinical feasibility of iSV to offer accurate, efficient, and robust patient registration in open spinal surgery, and therefore, its potential to further increase the adoption of image guidance in this surgical specialty.

  13. Improving accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis of endometriosis: Role of firefly in minimal access robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lue, John R; Pyrzak, Adam; Allen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis continues to be a major primary gynecologic etiology of chronic pelvic pain. The symptom profile, which includes cyclic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia or dyschezia, is nonspecific and does not correlate with the extent or severity of disease. Trans-vaginal or trans-rectal ultrasound, as well as magnetic resonance imaging, can help visualize endometriomas and deeply infiltrating endometriosis. Additionally, there have been no serum marker tests available so far. However, even intraoperatively, the diagnosis may be missed, leading to under diagnosis and delayed or noninitiation of treatment. There are thought to be three distinct endometriotic lesions of the pelvis that are seen laparoscopically. The first is that which is visible on the pelvic peritoneal surface or the surface of the ovary, which is commonly termed peritoneal endometriosis. Second, endometriotic lesions that occur within the ovary and form cysts that are often lined with endometrioid mucosa are termed endometriomas. Lastly, rectovaginal endometriomas are endometriotic lesions that contain a mixture of adipose and fibrous tissue located between the rectum and vagina. All of these lesions can be singular or multiple and the pelvis may contain one or all three types of lesions. The shared histologic feature with all three lesions is the presence of endometrial epithelial cells or endometrial stroma. During a diagnostic procedure, the da-Vinci robot and its firefly mode allow for three dimensional visualization and seven degrees of instrument articulation for meticulous dissection of fibrotic areas of peritoneum that may contain deep infiltrating lesions of endometriosis. This case report describes a relatively new and innovative technique for effectively diagnosing and successfully treating endometriosis when other less invasive methods have failed. PMID:27073317

  14. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring during surgery of spinal deformities in 217 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 217 patients who received MIOM during corrective surgery of spinal deformities between March 2000 and December 2005. Aim is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during corrective spine surgery. MIOM is becoming an increasingly used method of monitoring function during corrective spine surgery. The combination of monitoring of ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficits during the operation. Intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials combined with continuous EMG and motor evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 217 consecutive patients with spinal deformities of different aetiologies were monitored by means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. Out of which 201 patients presented true negative findings while one patient presented false negative and three patients presented false positive findings. Twelve patients presented true positive findings where neurological deficit after the operation was predicted. All neurological deficits in those 12 patients recovered completely. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during surgery of spinal deformities has been calculated of 92.3% and the specificity 98.5%. Based upon the results of this study MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord and nerve root function during corrective surgery of spinal deformities and consequently improves postoperative results. The Wake-up test for surgical procedure of spinal deformities became obsolete in our institution. PMID:17632737

  15. A novel intra-operative positron imager for rapid localization of tumor margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabet, Hamid; Stack, Brendan C.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an intra-operative and compact imaging tool for surgeons to detect PET- positive lesions. Currently, most such probes on the market are non-imaging, and provide no ancillary information of surveyed areas, such as clear delineations of malignant tissues. Our probe consists of a novel hybrid scintillator coupled to a compact silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array with associated front-end electronics encapsulated in an ergonomic housing. Pulse shape discrimination electronics has been implemented and integrated into the downstream data acquisition system. The hybrid scintillator consists of a 0.4 mm thick layer of CsI:Tl scintillator coupled to a 1 mm thick LYSO crystal. To achieve high spatial resolution, CsI:Tl is pixelated to 0.5×0.5 mm2 pixels using laser ablation technique. While CsI:Tl act as beta-sensitive scintillator, LYSO senses the gamma radiation and can be used to navigate the probe to the locations of interest. The gamma response is also subtracted from the beta image for improved SNR and contrast. To achieve accurate centroid position estimation and uniform beta sensitivity over the entire imaging area, the LYSO thickness is optimized such that it acts as scintillation light diffuser by spreading CsI:Tl light over multiple SiPM pixels. The results show that the response of the two scintillators exposed to radiation could be easily distinguished based on their pulse shapes. The probe's spatial resolution is <1.5 mm FWHM in its 10×10 mm2 effective imaging area. The probe can rapidly detect and localize nCi levels of F-18 beta radiation even in presence of strong gamma background.

  16. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  17. Improving accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis of endometriosis: Role of firefly in minimal access robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lue, John R.; Pyrzak, Adam; Allen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis continues to be a major primary gynecologic etiology of chronic pelvic pain. The symptom profile, which includes cyclic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia or dyschezia, is nonspecific and does not correlate with the extent or severity of disease. Trans-vaginal or trans-rectal ultrasound, as well as magnetic resonance imaging, can help visualize endometriomas and deeply infiltrating endometriosis. Additionally, there have been no serum marker tests available so far. However, even intraoperatively, the diagnosis may be missed, leading to under diagnosis and delayed or noninitiation of treatment. There are thought to be three distinct endometriotic lesions of the pelvis that are seen laparoscopically. The first is that which is visible on the pelvic peritoneal surface or the surface of the ovary, which is commonly termed peritoneal endometriosis. Second, endometriotic lesions that occur within the ovary and form cysts that are often lined with endometrioid mucosa are termed endometriomas. Lastly, rectovaginal endometriomas are endometriotic lesions that contain a mixture of adipose and fibrous tissue located between the rectum and vagina. All of these lesions can be singular or multiple and the pelvis may contain one or all three types of lesions. The shared histologic feature with all three lesions is the presence of endometrial epithelial cells or endometrial stroma. During a diagnostic procedure, the da-Vinci robot and its firefly mode allow for three dimensional visualization and seven degrees of instrument articulation for meticulous dissection of fibrotic areas of peritoneum that may contain deep infiltrating lesions of endometriosis. This case report describes a relatively new and innovative technique for effectively diagnosing and successfully treating endometriosis when other less invasive methods have failed. PMID:27073317

  18. Patient preferences regarding intraoperative versus external beam radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael D; Conolly, Jay; Park, Catherine; Sakata, Theadora; Mohan, Aron J; Harrison, Brittany L; Hayes, Mitchell; Esserman, Laura J; Ozanne, Elissa M

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A Trial is an international randomized, prospective trial comparing intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for equivalence to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in selected low-risk patients; early results suggest that outcomes are similar. In addition to effectiveness data and cost considerations, the preferences of patients should help inform practice. This study was undertaken to explore and quantify preference in choosing between IORT and the current standard, EBRT. Eligible subjects were current or past candidates for breast-conserving surgery and radiation being seen at the University of California, San Francisco Breast Care Center. A trade-off technique varying the risk of local recurrence for IORT was used to quantify any additional accepted risk that these patients would accept to receive either treatment. Patients were first presented with a slideshow comparing EBRT with the experimental IORT option before being asked their preferences given hypothetical 10-year local recurrence risks. Patients were then given a questionnaire on demographic, social and clinical factors. Data from 81 patients were analyzed. The median additional accepted risk to have IORT was 2.3 % (-9 to 39 %), mean 3.2 %. Only 7 patients chose to accept additional risk for EBRT; 22 accepted IORT at no additional risk; and the remaining 52 chose IORT with some additional risk. Patients weigh trade-offs of risks and benefits when presented with medical treatment choices. Our results show that the majority of breast cancer patients will accept a small increment of local risk for a simpler delivery of radiation. Further studies that incorporate outcome and side effect data from the TARGIT-A trial clarify the expected consequences of a local recurrence, and include an expanded range of radiation options that could help guide clinical decision making in this area. PMID:24292868

  19. Comparison of Intraoperative C-Arm Fluoroscopy to Postoperative Radiographs in Operative Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Mooney, James F; Hooker, Jennifer A; Barfield, William R; Glaser, John A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between intraoperative C-arm images and postoperative plain film radiographs and the utility of each in assessing fracture fixation and determining postoperative management. Intraoperative and postoperative images with varying fracture types and locations were analyzed. C-arm images were compared to postoperative plain film radiographs for each treated fracture and reviewed by two orthopaedic surgeons. Image adequacy and quality for each radiograph were analyzed. The quality of reduction and fixation was also analyzed. Information was apparent on the postoperative radiographs, such that a reviewer felt that the postoperative treatment plan should change in 8.2% of cases. In the cases where treatment change was recommended, fracture gap, rotation, and angulation were found to be the strongest predictors. The ability of intraoperative and postoperative images to reflect fracture gap, rotation, and angulation may vary between images.

  20. Usefulness of Intraoperative Computer Tomography-Assisted Thoracoscopic Segmentectomy for Small-Sized Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Takayuki; Okamoto, Taku

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had synchronous primary lung cancers in the left upper lobe (S1+2a, S1+2c), and underwent S1+2 segmentectomy. The lesion in S1+2c was non-palpable, and the location was confirmed using intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scan. After A1+2 and B1+2 had been cut, the intersegmental border was marked with clips and intraoperative CT was performed. After confirming the correct anatomical intersegmental border and the resection margin was sufficient, we cut the intersegmental border. The two lesions were both adenocarcinomas. Intraoperative CT was useful for confirming the locations of non-palpable lesions and anatomical intersegmental borders. PMID:26499906

  1. Intraoperative C-arm CT imaging in angular stable plate osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Mehling, I; Rittstieg, P; Mehling, A P; Küchle, R; Müller, L P; Rommens, P M

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the practicability and benefit of intraoperative C-arm computed tomography (CT) imaging in volar plate osteosynthesis of unstable distal radius fractures. During a 1 year period, intraoperative three dimensional (3D) imaging with the ARCADIS Orbic 3D was performed in addition to standard fluoroscopy in 51 cases. The volar angular stable plate oesteosyntheses were analyzed intraoperatively and, if necessary, improved immediately. The duration of the scan and radiation exposure dose were measured. On average, performance of the scan and analysis of the CT dataset took 6.7 minutes. In 31.3% of the surgeries a misplacement of screws was detected and correction was done immediately. C-arm CT imaging can easily be integrated in the normal course of surgery. As a complement to the standard 2D-fluoroscopy, the C-arm CT is a useful tool to evaluate the quality of osteosynthesis.

  2. Quantitative Wavelength Analysis and Image Classification for Intraoperative Cancer Diagnosis with Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Complete surgical removal of tumor tissue is essential for postoperative prognosis after surgery. Intraoperative tumor imaging and visualization are an important step in aiding surgeons to evaluate and resect tumor tissue in real time, thus enabling more complete resection of diseased tissue and better conservation of healthy tissue. As an emerging modality, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds great potential for comprehensive and objective intraoperative cancer assessment. In this paper, we explored the possibility of intraoperative tumor detection and visualization during surgery using HSI in the wavelength range of 450 nm - 900 nm in an animal experiment. We proposed a new algorithm for glare removal and cancer detection on surgical hyperspectral images, and detected the tumor margins in five mice with an average sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 98.3%, respectively. The hyperspectral imaging and quantification method have the potential to provide an innovative tool for image-guided surgery. PMID:26523083

  3. Quantitative wavelength analysis and image classification for intraoperative cancer diagnosis with hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Complete surgical removal of tumor tissue is essential for postoperative prognosis after surgery. Intraoperative tumor imaging and visualization are an important step in aiding surgeons to evaluate and resect tumor tissue in real time, thus enabling more complete resection of diseased tissue and better conservation of healthy tissue. As an emerging modality, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds great potential for comprehensive and objective intraoperative cancer assessment. In this paper, we explored the possibility of intraoperative tumor detection and visualization during surgery using HSI in the wavelength range of 450 nm - 900 nm in an animal experiment. We proposed a new algorithm for glare removal and cancer detection on surgical hyperspectral images, and detected the tumor margins in five mice with an average sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 98.3%, respectively. The hyperspectral imaging and quantification method have the potential to provide an innovative tool for image-guided surgery.

  4. Noninvasive CT to Iso-C3D registration for improved intraoperative visualization in computer assisted orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Tobias; Ebert, Lars; Kowal, Jens

    2006-03-01

    Supporting surgeons in performing minimally invasive surgeries can be considered as one of the major goals of computer assisted surgery. Excellent intraoperative visualization is a prerequisite to achieve this aim. The Siremobil Iso-C 3D has become a widely used imaging device, which, in combination with a navigation system, enables the surgeon to directly navigate within the acquired 3D image volume without any extra registration steps. However, the image quality is rather low compared to a CT scan and the volume size (approx. 12 cm 3) limits its application. A regularly used alternative in computer assisted orthopedic surgery is to use of a preoperatively acquired CT scan to visualize the operating field. But, the additional registration step, necessary in order to use CT stacks for navigation is quite invasive. Therefore the objective of this work is to develop a noninvasive registration technique. In this article a solution is being proposed that registers a preoperatively acquired CT scan to the intraoperatively acquired Iso-C 3D image volume, thereby registering the CT to the tracked anatomy. The procedure aligns both image volumes by maximizing the mutual information, an algorithm that has already been applied to similar registration problems and demonstrated good results. Furthermore the accuracy of such a registration method was investigated in a clinical setup, integrating a navigated Iso-C 3D in combination with an tracking system. Initial tests based on cadaveric animal bone resulted in an accuracy ranging from 0.63mm to 1.55mm mean error.

  5. Feasibility study for image guided kidney surgery: assessment of required intraoperative surface for accurate image to physical space registrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benincasa, Anne B.; Clements, Logan W.; Herrell, S. Duke; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Currently, the removal of kidney tumor masses uses only direct or laparoscopic visualizations, resulting in prolonged procedure and recovery times and reduced clear margin. Applying current image guided surgery (IGS) techniques, as those used in liver cases, to kidney resections (nephrectomies) presents a number of complications. Most notably is the limited field of view of the intraoperative kidney surface, which constrains the ability to obtain a surface delineation that is geometrically descriptive enough to drive a surface-based registration. Two different phantom orientations were used to model the laparoscopic and traditional partial nephrectomy views. For the laparoscopic view, fiducial point sets were compiled from a CT image volume using anatomical features such as the renal artery and vein. For the traditional view, markers attached to the phantom set-up were used for fiducials and targets. The fiducial points were used to perform a point-based registration, which then served as a guide for the surface-based registration. Laser range scanner (LRS) obtained surfaces were registered to each phantom surface using a rigid iterative closest point algorithm. Subsets of each phantom's LRS surface were used in a robustness test to determine the predictability of their registrations to transform the entire surface. Results from both orientations suggest that about half of the kidney's surface needs to be obtained intraoperatively for accurate registrations between the image surface and the LRS surface, suggesting the obtained kidney surfaces were geometrically descriptive enough to perform accurate registrations. This preliminary work paves the way for further development of kidney IGS systems.

  6. /sup 133/Xe blood flow monitoring during arteriovenous malformation resection: a case of intraoperative hyperperfusion with subsequent brain swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W.L.; Solomon, R.A.; Prohovnik, I.; Ornstein, E.; Weinstein, J.; Stein, B.M.

    1988-04-01

    Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using the i.v. 133Xe technique was carried out during resection of a right temporooccipital arteriovenous malformation (AVM) with ipsilateral middle and posterior cerebral arterial supply. Intraoperatively, a rCBF detector was in place over the right frontotemporal area, about 5 to 6 cm from the border of the AVM. Anesthesia was 0.75% isoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide. After dural exposure, the rCBF was 27 ml/100 g/min at a pCO2 of 29 mm Hg and a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 90 mm Hg. The pCO2 was then elevated to 40 mm Hg, and the rCBF was increased to 55 ml/100 g/min at a MAP of 83 mm Hg. After AVM removal, the rCBF rose to 50 ml/100 g/min at a pCO2 of 27 mm Hg and a MAP of 75 mm Hg. The pCO2 was elevated to 33 mm Hg and the rCBF increased to 86 ml/100 g/min at a MAP of 97 mm Hg. During skin closure, the rCBF was 94 ml/100 g/min at a pCO2 of 26 mm Hg and a MAP of 97 mm Hg. The patient was neurologically normal postoperatively except for a mild, new visual field defect. After 2 to 3 days, the patient gradually developed lethargy, confusion, and nausea with relatively normal blood pressure. An angiogram revealed residual enlargement of the posterior cerebral artery feeding vessel. Computed tomography showed edema extending from the area of AVM resection as far as the frontal region, producing a significant midline shift anteriorly. Intraoperative rCBF monitoring revealed significant hyperperfusion after AVM resection, which was associated with signs and symptoms of the normal perfusion pressure breakthrough syndrome.

  7. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity with intra-operative endoscopic guidance. Immediate peri-operative and 1-year results after 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, T; Alexandrou, A; Pikoulis, E; Diamantis, D; Griniatsos, J; Felekouras, E; Papalambros, E

    2010-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) represents a promising alternative option for the surgical treatment of morbid obesity. Its standard technique includes the longitudinal division of the stomach along a bougie of varying diameter. We report in this retrospective study our experience with LSG being performed with the use of intra-operative endoscopy instead of the bougie. Twenty-five consecutive patients (18 women, seven men) with a mean age of 40.2 years and mean body weight of 152.1 kg were submitted to LSG with intra-operative endoscopy in our hospital. The mean preoperative BMI was 53.5 kg/m(2). There were no conversions. Mean operative time was 117.5 min. There was no morbidity or mortality. The mean loss of excess body weight (EBW) at 3 months post-op was 19 +/- 1.8 kg, at 6 months was 28.6 +/- 4.5 kg, and at 1 year post-op was 48.9 +/- 3.7 kg (min 11-max 92). In other words the patients had lost 30 +/- 5%, 45 +/- 7.7%, and 60.8 +/- 4.3% of their EBW, respectively. The mean excess body weight loss at the day of the last visit to our outpatient clinic was 52.3 +/- 4.3 kg which corresponded to 66.4 +/- 4.3% of the total excess weight. LSG with intra-operative endoscopic guidance is a safe and efficient alternative method to treat morbid obesity and is a viable option for surgical units familiar with endoscopic techniques. PMID:20464526

  8. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity with intra-operative endoscopic guidance. Immediate peri-operative and 1-year results after 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, T; Alexandrou, A; Pikoulis, E; Diamantis, D; Griniatsos, J; Felekouras, E; Papalambros, E

    2010-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) represents a promising alternative option for the surgical treatment of morbid obesity. Its standard technique includes the longitudinal division of the stomach along a bougie of varying diameter. We report in this retrospective study our experience with LSG being performed with the use of intra-operative endoscopy instead of the bougie. Twenty-five consecutive patients (18 women, seven men) with a mean age of 40.2 years and mean body weight of 152.1 kg were submitted to LSG with intra-operative endoscopy in our hospital. The mean preoperative BMI was 53.5 kg/m(2). There were no conversions. Mean operative time was 117.5 min. There was no morbidity or mortality. The mean loss of excess body weight (EBW) at 3 months post-op was 19 +/- 1.8 kg, at 6 months was 28.6 +/- 4.5 kg, and at 1 year post-op was 48.9 +/- 3.7 kg (min 11-max 92). In other words the patients had lost 30 +/- 5%, 45 +/- 7.7%, and 60.8 +/- 4.3% of their EBW, respectively. The mean excess body weight loss at the day of the last visit to our outpatient clinic was 52.3 +/- 4.3 kg which corresponded to 66.4 +/- 4.3% of the total excess weight. LSG with intra-operative endoscopic guidance is a safe and efficient alternative method to treat morbid obesity and is a viable option for surgical units familiar with endoscopic techniques.

  9. Intraoperative detection of radiolabeled compounds using a hand held gamma probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Marcel

    2001-02-01

    Scintillation cameras in Nuclear Medicine allow external detection of cancerous lesions after administration of a specific radiopharmaceutical to the patient. In some particular cases the affinity of the tracer is sufficient to consider the use of an intraoperative probe which enables the surgeon to identify radioactive tissues. A radiopharmaceutical consists of a radioisotope bound to a carrier molecule. The radioactive emissions must represent certain criteria in terms of half-life and energy to be detected during an operation. In the field of intraoperative detection radionuclides like 99mTc, 111In, 125I and 131I fall into this category. Their energy, which ranges from some 10 to 364 keV, cannot be properly detected by a single type of detector. Two technologies have been developed to yield detectors which are handy and sufficiently sensitive: semiconductor CdTe or CdZnTe to detect low energies and scintillator CsI(Tl) for higher energies. Today the intraoperative detection has been evaluated in the case of several pathologies such as osteoid osteoma, colorectal cancer, neuroblastoma, reoperation of differentiated thyroid carcinoma and localization of sentinel node in breast cancer and cutaneous melanoma. Obviously, the results obtained are not comparable from one indication to the other. Nevertheless, the surgeons have noted a considerable advantage in using the intraoperative probe in the case of neuroblastoma and thyroid surgery, especially when the reoperation is difficult or the localizations are ectopic or unusual. As regards the sentinel node, this concept represents a major new opportunity in the field of intraoperative detection and the results actually reported in the literature demonstrate that, when it is detected, elective node excision renders the staging of the disease more accurate. In conclusion, intraoperative detection supplies the surgeon with additional knowledge to be used in correlation with the patient's medical history.

  10. The impact of use of an intraoperative margin assessment device on re-excision rates.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Molly; Akbari, Stephanie; Anglin, Beth; Lin, Erin H; Police, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Historically there has been a high rate of surgical interventions to obtain clear margins for breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving local therapy. An intraoperative margin assessment tool (MarginProbe) has been approved for use in the US since 2013. This study is the first compilation of data from routine use of the device, to assess the impact of device utilization on re-excision rates. We present a retrospective, observational, review from groups of consecutive patients, before and after the implementation of intraoperative use of the device during lumpectomy procedures. Lesions were localized by standard methods. The intraoperative margin assessment device was used on all circumferential margins of the main specimen, but not on any additional shavings. A positive reading by the device led to an additional shaving of the corresponding cavity location. Specimens were also, when feasible, imaged intra-operatively by X-ray, and additional shavings were taken if needed based on clinical assessment. For each surgeon, historical re-excision rates were established based on a consecutive set of patients from a time period proximal to initiation of use of the device. From March 2013 to April 2014 the device was routinely used by 4 surgeons in 3 centers. In total, 165 cases lumpectomy cases were performed. Positive margins resulted in additional re-excision procedures in 9.7% (16/165) of the cases. The corresponding historical set from 2012 and 2013 consisted of 186 Lumpectomy cases, in which additional re-excision procedures were performed in 25.8% (48/186) of the cases. The reduction in the rate of re-excision procedures was significant 62% (P < 0.0001). Use of an intraoperative margin assessment device contributes to achieving clear margins and reducing re-excision procedures. As in some cases positive margins were found on shavings, future studies of interest may include an analysis of the effect of using the device on the shavings intra-operatively

  11. Clinical Utility and Limitations of Intraoperative Monitoring of Visual Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yeda; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver; Sarnthein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives During surgeries that put the visual pathway at risk of injury, continuous monitoring of the visual function is desirable. However, the intraoperative monitoring of the visual evoked potential (VEP) is not yet widely used. We evaluate here the clinical utility of intraoperative VEP monitoring. Methods We analyzed retrospectively 46 consecutive surgeries in 2011-2013. High luminance stimulating devices delivered flash stimuli on the closed eyelid during intravenous anesthesia. We monitored VEP features N75 and P100 and took patients' preoperative and postoperative visual function from patient charts. Postoperative ophthalmologic workup was performed in 25 (54%) patients and preoperatively in 28 (61%) patients. Results VEP recordings were feasible in 62 of 85 eyes (73%) in 46 patients. All 23 eyes without VEP had impaired vision. During surgery, VEPs remained stable throughout surgery in 50 eyes. In 44 of these, visual function did not deteriorate and three patients (6 eyes) developed hemianopia. VEP decreased transiently in 10 eyes and visual function of all was preserved. VEPs were lost permanently in 2 eyes in two patients without new postoperative visual impairment. Conclusions Satisfactory intraoperative VEP monitoring was feasible in all patients except in those with severe visual impairment. Preservation of VEPs predicted preserved visual function. During resection of lesions in the visual cortex, VEP monitoring could not detect new major visual field defects due to injury in the posterior visual pathway. Intraoperative VEPs were sensitive enough to detect vascular damage during aneurysm clipping and mechanical manipulation of the anterior visual pathway in an early reversible stage. Intraoperative VEP monitoring influenced surgical decisions in selected patients and proved to be a useful supplement to the toolbox of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. PMID:25803287

  12. Visual intraoperative estimation of cup and stem position is not reliable in minimally invasive hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Woerner, Michael; Sendtner, Ernst; Springorum, Robert; Craiovan, Benjamin; Worlicek, Michael; Renkawitz, Tobias; Grifka, Joachim; Weber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose In hip arthroplasty, acetabular inclination and anteversion—and also femoral stem torsion—are generally assessed by eye intraoperatively. We assessed whether visual estimation of cup and stem position is reliable. Patients and methods In the course of a subgroup analysis of a prospective clinical trial, 65 patients underwent cementless hip arthroplasty using a minimally invasive anterolateral approach in lateral decubitus position. Altogether, 4 experienced surgeons assessed cup position intraoperatively according to the operative definition by Murray in the anterior pelvic plane and stem torsion in relation to the femoral condylar plane. Inclination, anteversion, and stem torsion were measured blind postoperatively on 3D-CT and compared to intraoperative results. Results The mean difference between the 3D-CT results and intraoperative estimations by eye was −4.9° (−18 to 8.7) for inclination, 9.7° (−16 to 41) for anteversion, and −7.3° (−34 to 15) for stem torsion. We found an overestimation of > 5° for cup inclination in 32 hips, an overestimation of > 5° for stem torsion in 40 hips, and an underestimation < 5° for cup anteversion in 42 hips. The level of professional experience and patient characteristics had no clinically relevant effect on the accuracy of estimation by eye. Altogether, 46 stems were located outside the native norm of 10–20° as defined by Tönnis, measured on 3D-CT. Interpretation Even an experienced surgeon’s intraoperative estimation of cup and stem position by eye is not reliable compared to 3D-CT in minimally invasive THA. The use of mechanical insertion jigs, intraoperative fluoroscopy, or imageless navigation is recommended for correct implant insertion. PMID:26848628

  13. Intra-operative awareness in children and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Lopez, U; Habre, W; Van der Linden, M; Iselin-Chaves, I A

    2008-05-01

    Adults who experience intra-operative awareness can develop disturbing long-lasting after-effects, such as daytime anxiety, sleep disturbances, nightmares, flashbacks and, in the worst case, a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unknown whether intra-operative awareness has a similar psychological impact in children. We designed the present study in order to evaluate the incidence of psychological symptoms in children who had either confirmed or possible intra-operative awareness. Attempts were made to locate 11 children who had been identified in a previous study, approximately 1 year following their experience. A PTSD questionnaire was administered to the children and their parents in order to detect any long-term or short-term psychological symptoms (the 1-month postoperative data were evaluated retrospectively). Factors believed to be associated with PTSD, such as intra-operative perceptions, the children's temperament and cognitive strategies, and the parents' coping strategies, were also analysed. Seven children were successfully located and interviewed and no short or long-term psychological symptoms were identified. None of them offered negative appraisals of the traumatic event and none had displayed dysfunctional behaviour or cognitive strategies. Thus, none of them had developed a PTSD syndrome. In contrast with what has been reported in adults, these children claimed not to have experienced major pain, terror or helplessness during their surgery. Despite the small sample size, the results of the present study suggest that children suffer less psychological sequelae than adults following intra-operative awareness. This may be due to the fact that the children reported less frightening intra-operative sensations as compared with the adults, and had less understanding of the anaesthesia procedure, and this may have influenced their appraisal of their awareness and protected them from the full impact of this potentially traumatic experience. PMID

  14. Safety, effectiveness and economic evaluation of intra-operative radiation therapy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najafipour, Farshad; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Arabloo, Jalal; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Norouzi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) is the transfer of a single large radiation dose to the tumor bed during surgery with the final goal of improving regional tumor control. This study aimed to investigate the safety, effectiveness and economic evaluation of intra-operative radiation therapy. Methods: The scientific literature was searched in the main biomedical databases (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Cochrane Library and PubMed) up to March 2014. Two independent reviewers selected the papers based on pre-established inclusion criteria, with any disagreements being resolved by consensus. Data were then extracted and summarized in a structured form. Results from studies were analyzed and discussed within a descriptive synthesis. Results: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. It seems that outcomes from using intraoperative radiation therapy can be considered in various kinds of cancers like breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancers. The application of this method may provide significant survival increase only for colorectal cancer, but this increase was not significant for other types of cancer. This technology had low complications; and it is relatively safe. Using intra-operative radiation therapy could potentially be accounted as a cost-effective strategy for controlling and managing breast cancer. Conclusion: According to the existing evidences, that are the highest medical evidences for using intra-operative radiation therapy, one can generally conclude that intra-operative radiation therapy is considered as a relatively safe and cost-effective method for managing early-stage breast cancer and it can significantly increase the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Also, the results of this study have policy implications with respect to the reimbursement of this technology. PMID:26793649

  15. Donor disc attachment assessment with intraoperative spectral optical coherence tomography during descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wylegala, Edward; Nowinska, Anna K; Wroblewska-Czajka, Ewa; Janiszewska, Dominika

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography has already been proven to be useful for pre- and post-surgical anterior eye segment assessment, especially in lamellar keratoplasty procedures. There is no evidence for intraoperative usefulness of optical coherence tomography (OCT). We present a case report of the intraoperative donor disc attachment assessment with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in case of Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) surgery combined with corneal incisions. The effectiveness of the performed corneal stab incisions was visualized directly by OCT scan analysis. OCT assisted DSAEK allows the assessment of the accuracy of the Descemet stripping and donor disc attachment. PMID:24104711

  16. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Extracorporeal Life Support for Emergent Intraoperative Thoracic Situations.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative thoracic surgical catastrophes may require extracorporeal circulation modes to support the patient while the appropriate repair is made. Teamwork is key and, given the evidence supporting better performance with the use of simulation and surgical-crisis checklists, their use should be encouraged. Anticipation is another important factor because the results of intrathoracic malignancy resection are clearly superior in the setting of planned cardiopulmonary support. In addition, familiarity with the different modes of support that are currently available can direct the decision-making process toward the best option to facilitate resolution of the intraoperative catastrophe with the least related morbidity. PMID:26210928

  17. Infratentorial benign cystic meningioma mimicking a hemangioblastoma radiologically and a pilocytic astrocytoma intraoperatively: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cystic meningiomas are rare variants of meningiomas; they can pose a radiological diagnostic dilemma. Case presentation We present a rare case of a 30-year-old Chinese woman with a histopathological diagnosis of infratentorial cystic meningioma (World Health Organization Grade 1) in which the features in imaging modalities were suggestive of a hemangioblastoma. Intraoperatively, however, the gross macroscopic features were more in keeping with a pilocytic astrocytoma. Conclusion In benign cystic meningiomas, particularly the infratentorial variety, radiological findings utilizing the various imaging modalities and intraoperative impressions may not be reflective of or in keeping with the final histopathological diagnosis. PMID:23537099

  18. Intraoperative imaging and fluorescence image guidance in oncologic surgery using a wearable fluorescence goggle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liu, Yang; Sudlow, Gail P.; Akers, Walter J.; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a wearable, fluorescence goggle based system for intraoperative imaging of tumors and image guidance in oncologic surgery. Our system can detect fluorescence from cancer selective near infra-red (NIR) contrast agent, facilitating intraoperative visualization of surgical margins and tumors otherwise not apparent to the surgeon. The fluorescence information is displayed directly to the head mounted display (HMD) of the surgeon in real time, allowing unhindered surgical procedure under image guidance. This system has the potential of improving surgical outcomes in oncologic surgery and reduce the chances of cancer recurrence.

  19. Analysis of endocardial acceleration during intraoperative optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Alfredo I.; Ziglio, Filippo; Amblard, Amel; Senhadji, Lotfi; Leclercq, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is the therapy of choice for selected patients suffering from drug-refractory congestive heart failure and presenting an interventricular desynchronization. CRT is delivered by an implantable biventricular pacemaker, which stimulates the right atrium and both ventricles at specific timings. The optimization and personalization of this therapy requires to quantify both the electrical and the mechanical cardiac functions during the intraoperative and postoperative phases. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of the calculation of features extracted from endocardial acceleration (EA) signals and the potential utility of these features for the intraoperative optimization of CRT. Endocardial intraoperative data from one patient are analyzed for 33 different pacing configurations, including changes in the atrio-ventricular and inter-ventricular delays and different ventricular stimulation sites. The main EA features are extracted for each pacing configuration and analyzed so as to estimate the intra-configuration and inter-configuration variability. Results show the feasibility of the proposed approach and suggest the potential utility of EA for intraoperative monitoring of the cardiac function and defining optimal, adaptive pacing configurations. PMID:24111356

  20. Clinical toxicity of peripheral nerve to intraoperative radiotherapy in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, P.A.S.; DeLuca, A.M.; Terrill, R.E.

    1995-07-15

    The clinical late effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on peripheral nerve were investigated in a foxhound model. Between 1982 and 1987, 40 animals underwent laparotomy with intraoperative radiotherapy of doses from 0-75 Gy administered to the right lumbosacral plexus. Subsequently, all animals were monitored closely and sacrificed to assess clinical effects to peripheral nerve. This analysis reports final clinical results of all animals, with follow-up to 5 years. All animals treated with {>=} 25 Gy developed ipsilateral neuropathy. An inverse relationship was noted between intraoperative radiotherapy dose and time to neuropathy, with an effective dose for 50% paralysis (ED{sub 50}) of 17.2 Gy. One of the animals treated with 15 Gy IORT developed paralysis, after a much longer latency than the other animals. Doses of 15 Gy delivered intraoperatively may be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy with long-term follow-up. This threshold is less than that reported with shorter follow-up. The value of ED{sub 50} determined here is in keeping with data from other animal trials, and from clinical trials in humans. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Preoperative and Intraoperative Evaluation of the Eustachian Tube in Chronic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tarabichi, Muaaz; Kapadia, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the authors' approach to the assessment of the eustachian tube using opening pressure measurement, endoscopic assessment of the protympanic segment of the eustachian tube, and Valsalva computed tomography. A possible algorithm for the evaluation of eustachian tube obstructive disorders is detailed both preoperatively and intraoperatively. PMID:27468635

  2. Comparing the dosimetric characteristics of the electron beam from dedicated intraoperative and conventional radiotherapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Baghani, Hamid Reza; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud Reza; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi; Akbari, Mohammad Esmail; Mirzaei, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    The specific design of the mobile dedicated intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) accelerators and different electron beam collimation system can change the dosimetric characteristics of electron beam with respect to the conventional accelerators. The aim of this study is to measure and compare the dosimetric characteristics of electron beam produced by intraoperative and conventional radiotherapy accelerators. To this end, percentage depth dose along clinical axis (PDD), transverse dose profile (TDP), and output factor of LIAC IORT and Varian 2100C/D conventional radiotherapy accelerators were measured and compared. TDPs were recorded at depth of maximum dose. The results of this work showed that depths of maximum dose, R90, R50, and RP for LIAC beam are lower than those of Varian beam. Furthermore, for all energies, surface doses related to the LIAC beam are substantially higher than those of Varian beam. The symmetry and flatness of LIAC beam profiles are more desirable compared to the Varian ones. Contrary to Varian accelerator, output factor of LIAC beam substantially increases with a decrease in the size of the applicator. Dosimetric characteristics of beveled IORT applicators along clinical axis were different from those of the flat ones. From these results, it can be concluded that dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative electron beam are substantially different from those of conventional clinical electron beam. The dosimetric characteristics of the LIAC electron beam make it a useful tool for intraoperative radiotherapy purposes.

  3. [Intraoperative monitoring of motor cranial nerves in operations of the neck and cranial base].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Pelster, H; Mann, W

    1994-11-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiological monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of 4 cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was employed during 102 skull base operations. Of these 102 operations, 44 were acoustic neuroma removals by translabyrinthine approach and 36 by a middle fossa approach. Various operations including removal of tumours of the jugular foramen and the infratemporal fossa were performed in the remaining 22 patients. The facial nerve, being the most frequently monitored nerve, was evaluated both pre- and intraoperatively. Electrophysiologic data were evaluated with respect to their predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. The relative per cent decrease in amplitude of the EMG after resection compared to that observed before resection seems to be of some predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. A 50-60% decrease or more is associated with an increase in the House classification. Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in skull base surgery allowing for safer and faster identification of motor nerves in pathologic anatomic conditions. It allows the surgeon a degree of comfort by providing immediate information regarding the status of the nerve. It may also improve post-operative nerve function and shorten operating time. Additionally, neuromonitoring provides some information about expected postoperative facial nerve function.

  4. Intraoperative measurement of graft blood flow--a necessity in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, A; Hjortrup, A; Kirkegaard, P

    1997-01-01

    Portal venous and hepatic arterial flow was measured intraoperatively in the 70 most recent patients undergoing liver transplantation in our institution. Impaired graft flow due to vascular abnormalities was detected in six patients. One patient suffered from arterial steal due to stenosis of the recipient celiac trunk with blood shunting from the hepatic to the splenic artery. Ligation of the recipient hepatic artery restored the arterial graft flow. In two patients we found reduced portal venous flow due to large portosystemic collaterals. The collaterals accountable for the impaired portal flow were identified and ligated, which restored portal venous graft flow. Excessive sensitivity of the portal venous flow to the position of the graft was found in a 6-month-old boy. Portal venous flow varied considerably, depending upon the position of the graft, and intraoperative flow measurement allowed the best position of the graft to be identified. Two patients developed arterial thrombosis in the early postoperative course. Immediate laparatomy with thrombectomy resulted in good, palpable pulsation in the graft artery in both patients. Intraoperative flow measurement demonstrated satisfactory arterial flow in one patient, whereas there was no net flow in the other patient's graft artery. Pulsation in this patient was caused by blood oscillating in and out of the liver. In conclusion, we find that causes of primary graft dysfunction due to technically flawed reperfusion of the graft can be identified and alleviated by intraoperative measurement of the flow in the graft vessels.

  5. Dissociation of Subtraction and Multiplication in the Right Parietal Cortex: Evidence from Intraoperative Cortical Electrostimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xiaodan; Chen, Chuansheng; Pu, Song; Wu, Chenxing; Li, Yongnian; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinlin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that the left parietal cortex is critical for numerical processing, but the role of the right parietal lobe has been much less clear. This study used the intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation approach to investigate neural dissociation in the right parietal cortex for subtraction and…

  6. Excision of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma facilitated by intra-operative 3D-image guidance.

    PubMed

    Murray, A; Falconer, M; McGarry, G W

    2000-04-01

    The latest 3D-image guidance systems to assist surgeons have greatly improved over earlier models. We describe the use of an optical infra-red system to assist in the removal of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. The specific advantages of this system in pre-operative assessment, intra-operative evaluation and excision of the angiofibroma are discussed.

  7. Can intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring during cervical spine decompression predict post-operative segmental C5 palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Blaskiewicz, Donald J.; Ramirez, Bertha; Zhang, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background C5 nerve root palsy is a known complication after cervical laminectomy or laminoplasty, characterized by weakness of the deltoid and bicep brachii muscles. The efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of these muscles is currently unclear. In the current prospective study, intraoperative monitoring through somatosensory (SSEPs), motor (TcMEPs) evoked potentials and real-time electromyography activity (EMG) were analyzed for their ability to detect or prevent deltoid muscle weakness after surgery. Methods One hundred consecutive patients undergoing laminectomy/laminoplasty with or without fusion were enrolled. Intraoperative SSEPs, TcMEPs and EMGs from each patient were studied and analyzed. Results Intraoperative EMG activity of the C5 nerve root was detected in 34 cases, 10 of which demonstrated a sustained and repetitive EMG activity lasting 5 or more minutes. Paresis of the unilateral deltoid muscle developed in 5 patients, all from the group with sustained C5 EMG activity. None of the patients with weakness of deltoid muscle after surgery demonstrated any abnormal change in TcMEP or SSEP. Conclusions Real-time EMG recordings were sensitive to C5 nerve root irritation, whilst SSEPs and TcMEPs were not. Sustained EMG activity of the C5 nerve root during surgery is a possible warning sign of irritation or injury to the nerve. PMID:27757428

  8. Intraoperative MRI: the challenges of providing a safe environment for patients and personnel.

    PubMed

    Porteous, Joan

    2014-06-01

    Real-time intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) provides a tremendous benefit to patients undergoing brain tumour surgery. This paper will discuss the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre's experience implementing a new iMRI program in a new neurosurgery operating room suite. It will review MRI technology and discuss related safety considerations for patients and personnel.

  9. Impact of Intraoperative Acetaminophen Administration on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Cathy; McGee, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Opioid utilization for acute pain has been associated with numerous adverse events, potentially resulting in longer inpatient stays and increased costs. Objective: To examine the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen administered intraoperatively on postoperative opioid consumption in adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement. Methods: This retrospective cohort study evaluated postoperative opioid consumption in 176 randomly selected adult subjects who underwent hip or knee replacement at Duke University Hospital (DUH). Eighty-eight subjects received a single, intraoperative, 1 g dose of IV acetaminophen. The other subjects did not receive any IV acetaminophen. This study evaluated mean opioid consumption (in oral morphine equivalents) during the 24-hour postoperative period in the 2 groups. Other endpoints included length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), incidence of oversedation, need for acute opioid reversal, and adjunctive analgesic utilization. Results: Subjects who were given a single dose of intraoperative acetaminophen received an average of 149.3 mg of oral morphine equivalents during the 24 hours following surgery compared to 147.2 mg in participants who were not exposed to IV acetaminophen (P = .904). The difference in average length of PACU stay between the IV acetaminophen group (163 minutes) and those subjects not exposed to IV acetaminophen (169 minutes) was not statistically significant (P = .588). No subjects in the study experienced oversedation or required acute opioid reversal. Conclusion: There was not a statistically significant difference in postoperative opioid consumption between patients receiving and not receiving IV acetaminophen intraoperatively. PMID:25673891

  10. Intraoperative Monitoring: Recent Advances in Motor Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Koht, Antoun; Sloan, Tod B

    2016-09-01

    Advances in electrophysiological monitoring have improved the ability of surgeons to make decisions and minimize the risks of complications during surgery and interventional procedures when the central nervous system (CNS) is at risk. Individual techniques have become important for identifying or mapping the location and pathway of critical neural structures. These techniques are also used to monitor the progress of procedures to augment surgical and physiologic management so as to reduce the risk of CNS injury. Advances in motor evoked potentials have facilitated mapping and monitoring of the motor tracts in newer, more complex procedures.

  11. Intraoperative Monitoring: Recent Advances in Motor Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Koht, Antoun; Sloan, Tod B

    2016-09-01

    Advances in electrophysiological monitoring have improved the ability of surgeons to make decisions and minimize the risks of complications during surgery and interventional procedures when the central nervous system (CNS) is at risk. Individual techniques have become important for identifying or mapping the location and pathway of critical neural structures. These techniques are also used to monitor the progress of procedures to augment surgical and physiologic management so as to reduce the risk of CNS injury. Advances in motor evoked potentials have facilitated mapping and monitoring of the motor tracts in newer, more complex procedures. PMID:27521196

  12. F6H8 as an Intraoperative Tool and F6H8/Silicone Oil as a Postoperative Tamponade in Inferior Retinal Detachment with Inferior PVR

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Gian Marco; Bacci, Tommaso; Romeo, Napoleone; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Martone, Gianluca; Caporossi, Tomaso

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8) for intraoperative flattening of the retina and of F6H8/silicone oil (SO) 1000 cSt as a postoperative tamponade for inferior retinal detachment with inferior proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 22 patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy using F6H8 as an intraoperative tool to flatten the retina. At the end of the surgery a direct partial exchange between F6H8 and SO 1000 cSt was performed, tamponing the eye with different ratios of F6H8/SO (70/30, 60/40, 50/50, 40/30, and 30/70). Anatomical and functional results and complications were evaluated over the follow-up period (mean 22.63 months). Results. F6H8 was efficacious for intraoperative flattening of the retina. Twenty-one of the 22 patients achieved a complete retinal reattachment. Postoperative visual acuity (VA) ranged from light perception to 20/70, with 72% of patients obtaining VA better than 20/400. No emulsification/inflammation was observed whatever the ratio of F6H8/SO used. With higher ratios of F6H8/SO (70/30 and 60/40) cloudiness of the tamponade was observed. A transparent mixture was present with all the other ratios. Conclusions. The surgical technique adopted is very simple and safe. The optimal F6H8/SO ratio seems to be between 50/50 and 30/70. PMID:24672710

  13. Motor and non-motor circuitry activation induced by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson’s disease patients: Intraoperative fMRI for DBS

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Emily J.; Testini, Paola; Min, Hoon-Ki; Gibson, William S.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Favazza, Christopher P.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Kim, Inyong; Welker, Kirk M.; Clayton, Daniel A.; Klassen, Bryan T.; Chang, Su-youne; Lee, Kendall H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis suggested by previous studies that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with PD would affect the activity of both motor and non-motor networks, we applied intraoperative fMRI to patients receiving DBS. Patients and Methods Ten patients receiving STN DBS for PD underwent intraoperative 1.5T fMRI during high frequency stimulation delivered via an external pulse generator. The study was conducted between the dates of January 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014. Results We observed blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes (FDR<.001) in the motor circuitry, including primary motor, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices, thalamus, pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), and cerebellum, as well as in the limbic circuitry, including cingulate and insular cortices. Activation of the motor network was observed also after applying a Bonferroni correction (p<.001) to our dataset, suggesting that, across subjects, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared to those occurring in the non-motor network. Conclusions These findings support the modulatory role of STN DBS on the activity of motor and non-motor networks, and suggest complex mechanisms at the basis of the efficacy of this treatment modality. Furthermore, these results suggest that, across subjects, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared to those occurring in the non-motor network. With further studies combining the use of real time intraoperative fMRI with clinical outcomes in patients treated with DBS, functional imaging techniques have the potential not only to elucidate the mechanisms of DBS functioning, but also to guide and assist in the surgical treatment of patients affected by movement and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26046412

  14. Discordance of Intraoperative Frozen Section Analysis with Definitive Histology of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer Surgery: Complementary Axillary Lymph Node Dissection is Irrelevant for Subsequent Systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, D.; Gobardhan, P. D.; Madsen, E. V. E.; Albregts, M.; van Gorp, J.; de Hooge, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background In breast cancer surgery, intraoperative frozen section (FS) analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) enables axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) during the same operative procedure. In case of discordance between a “negative” FS analysis and definitive histology, an ALND as a second operation is advocated since additional lymph node metastases may be present. The clinical implications of the subsequent ALND in these patients were evaluated. Materials and Methods Between November 2000 and May 2008, 879 consecutive breast cancer patients underwent surgery including sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) with intraoperative FS analysis of 2 central cuts from axillary SLNs. Following fixation and serial sectioning, SLNs were further examined postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical techniques. For patients with a discordant FS examination, the effect of the pathology findings of the subsequent ALND specimen on subsequent nonsurgical therapy were evaluated. Results FS analysis detected axillary metastases in the SLN(s) in 200 patients (23%), while the definitive pathology examination detected metastases in SLNs in another 151 patients (17%). A complementary ALND was performed in 108 of the 151 patients with discordant FS. Additional tumor positive axillary lymph nodes were found in 17 patients (16%), leading to “upstaging” in 7 (6%). Subsequent nonsurgical treatment was adjusted in 4 patients (4%): all 4 had more extensive locoregional radiotherapy; no patient received additional hormonal and/or chemotherapy. Conclusion Discordance between intraoperative FS analysis and definitive histology of SLNs is common. In this selection of patients, a substantial proportion had additional lymph node metastases, but postsurgical treatment was rarely adjusted based on the findings of the complementary ALND. PMID:20422461

  15. A preliminary study of the clinical application of optic pathway diffusion tensor tractography in suprasellar tumor surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative assessment.

    PubMed

    Hajiabadi, Mohamadreza; Samii, Madjid; Fahlbusch, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    OBJECT Visual impairments are the most common objective manifestations of suprasellar lesions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive MRI modality that depicts the subcortical white matter tracts in vivo. In this study the authors tested the value of visual pathway tractography in comparison with visual field and visual acuity analyses. METHODS This prospective study consisted of 25 patients with progressive visual impairment due to suprasellar mass lesions and 6 control patients with normal vision without such lesions. Visual acuity, visual field, and the optic fundus were examined preoperatively and repeated 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Visual pathway DTI tractography was performed preoperatively, intraoperatively immediately after tumor resection, and 1 week and 3 months after surgery. RESULTS In the control group, pre- and postoperative visual status were normal and visual pathway tractography revealed fibers crossing the optic chiasm without any alteration. In patients with suprasellar lesions, vision improved in 24 of 25. The mean distance between optic tracts in tractography decreased after tumor resection and detectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm increased from 12% preoperatively to 72% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection, and undetectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm decreased from 88% preoperatively to 27% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection. Visual improvement after tumor removal 1 week and 3 months after surgery was significantly correlated with the distance between optic tracts in intraoperative tractography (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Visual pathway DTI tractography appears to be a promising adjunct to the standard clinical and paraclinical visual examinations in patients with suprasellar mass lesions. The intraoperative findings, in particular the distance between optic tract fibers, can predict visual outcome after tumor resection. Furthermore, postoperative application of this technique may be useful in

  16. Research on intraoperative iris behavior in rabbits treated with tamsulosin and finasteride

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, K; Vultur, F; Simon, V; Voidazan, S; Mühlfay, Gh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate intraoperative iris behavior during some phacoemulsification maneuvers in rabbits treated with tamsulosin or finasteride. Material and Method: An experimental study was conducted on 26 Metis male rabbits aged 1.5 - 2 years, body weight between 3.4 and 5.6 kg, divided into three groups: Group 1 - Control, 6 rabbits; Group 2 - tamsulosin, 10 rabbits; Group 3 - finasteride, 10 rabbits. Dose calculation was performed according to body surface area ratio man/rabbit, taking into account the median lethal dose LD50. Surgery study in rabbits was done over two days by the same specialist using an adapted protocol. He was not informed before or during surgeries which group the animal belonged to, the order being random with a quasi-uniform distribution. Valid results for a modified iris behavior were obtained from two steps of the procedure (cannula irrigation maneuver and irrigation-aspiration). The iris billowing was graded from 0 to 3, according to severity. Results: The risk of intraoperative iris billowing was higher in rabbits included in tamsulosin group [OR=8.33 (CI 95% 0.63-110.09)], but insignificant statistically compare with control group (p= 0.13). In rabbits treated with finasteride the risk of intraoperative iris billowing is increased compared with those without treatment [OR=11.6 (CI 95% 0.92-147.6)], but insignificant statistically (p= 0.11). Conclusion: In our research, we showed an increased risk of intraoperative iris billowing in rabbits treated with finasteride, almost similar with those obtained in rabbits treated with tamsulosin. Further experimental or clinical studies to confirm the role of finasteride in the etiology of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome in humans are needed. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 20-24. PMID:26435641

  17. Strategy of Surgical Resection for Glioma Based on Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Manabu; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; SAITO, Taiichi; MARUYAMA, Takashi; NITTA, Masayuki; TSUZUKI, Shunsuke; ISEKI, Hiroshi; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of papers have pointed out the relationship between aggressive resection of gliomas and survival prognosis. For maximum resection, the current concept of surgical decision-making is in “information-guided surgery” using multimodal intraoperative information. With this, anatomical information from intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and navigation, functional information from brain mapping and monitoring, and histopathological information must all be taken into account in the new perspective for innovative minimally invasive surgical treatment of glioma. Intraoperative neurofunctional information such as neurophysiological functional monitoring takes the most important part in the process to acquire objective visual data during tumor removal and to integrate these findings as digitized data for intraoperative surgical decision-making. Moreover, the analysis of qualitative data and threshold-setting for quantitative data raise difficult issues in the interpretation and processing of each data type, such as determination of motor evoked potential (MEP) decline, underestimation in tractography, and judgments of patient response for neurofunctional mapping and monitoring during awake craniotomy. Neurofunctional diagnosis of false-positives in these situations may affect the extent of resection, while false-negatives influence intra- and postoperative complication rates. Additionally, even though the various intraoperative visualized data from multiple sources contribute significantly to the reliability of surgical decisions when the information is integrated and provided, it is not uncommon for individual pieces of information to convey opposing suggestions. Such conflicting pieces of information facilitate higher-order decision-making that is dependent on the policies of the facility and the priorities of the patient, as well as the availability of the histopathological characteristics from resected tissue. PMID:26185825

  18. Submandibular intubation as an alternative for intra-operative airway management in maxillofacial fractures - our institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Praveer K; Jain, Abhineet; Behera, Bikram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Airway management in anaesthesia for maxillofacial surgical procedures is tricky at times when the nasal/oral routes are contraindicated or are impossible. Tracheostomy as an alternative inherits its own complications. We present a case series of the submandibular route for tracheal intubation as an alternative. Methods: The procedure was performed in ten selected adult patients with maxillofacial/mandibular fractures associated with a fracture of skull base or nasal bone. All of them were medically stable with no need of intensive care or mechanical ventilation in post-operative period. Results: Submandibular intubation in all ten patients of panfacial fractures allowed uninterrupted surgical techniques with a secured airway. All patients were reverted to oro-tracheal tube at the end of surgery as immediate maxillomandibular fixation was not necessary. The patients were extubated after recovery from anaesthesia before they left the operating theatre. One patient in the post-operative period had a superficial infection of incision site that responded well to local treatment. No other complications were encountered in the intra-operative or post-operative period. Conclusion: In complex maxillofacial injuries, when oral or nasal intubation hampers surgeon's field of view, submandibular intubation offers an effective alternative to short-term tracheostomy along with small risk potential. There is a need to emphasise its regular application in such cases so that technique can be mastered by both surgeons and anaesthesiologist. PMID:27601740

  19. The diagnostic value of multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during spine surgery: a prospective study of 1,017 patients

    PubMed Central

    Eggspuehler, Andreas; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsoe; Benini, Arnaldo; Porchet, François; Mueller, Alfred; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 1,017 patients who received MIOM during spine surgery procedures between March 2000 and December 2005. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve roots function during spine surgery. MIOM has become a widely used method of monitoring neural function during spine surgery. Several techniques only monitor either ascending or descending pathways and thus may not provide sensitive or specific results. MIOM aims to monitor both ascending and descending pathways therefore giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficits during the operation. Intraoperative sensory spinal and cortical evoked potentials, combined with monitoring of EMG and motor evoked potentials recorded from the spinal cord and muscles elicited by electrical motor cortex, spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root stimulation, was evaluated and compared with post-operative clinical neurological changes. One thousand and seventeen consecutive patients underwent a total of 4,731 h of MIOM to evaluate any neural deficits that may have occurred during spine surgery. Of these, 935 were true negative cases, 8 were false negative cases, 66 were true positive cases and 8 were false positive cases, resulting in a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 99%. Based on the results of this study, MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord functional integrity during spine surgery and therefore can lead to reduction of neurological deficit and consequently improve postoperative results. PMID:17665225

  20. Submandibular intubation as an alternative for intra-operative airway management in maxillofacial fractures - our institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Praveer K; Jain, Abhineet; Behera, Bikram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Airway management in anaesthesia for maxillofacial surgical procedures is tricky at times when the nasal/oral routes are contraindicated or are impossible. Tracheostomy as an alternative inherits its own complications. We present a case series of the submandibular route for tracheal intubation as an alternative. Methods: The procedure was performed in ten selected adult patients with maxillofacial/mandibular fractures associated with a fracture of skull base or nasal bone. All of them were medically stable with no need of intensive care or mechanical ventilation in post-operative period. Results: Submandibular intubation in all ten patients of panfacial fractures allowed uninterrupted surgical techniques with a secured airway. All patients were reverted to oro-tracheal tube at the end of surgery as immediate maxillomandibular fixation was not necessary. The patients were extubated after recovery from anaesthesia before they left the operating theatre. One patient in the post-operative period had a superficial infection of incision site that responded well to local treatment. No other complications were encountered in the intra-operative or post-operative period. Conclusion: In complex maxillofacial injuries, when oral or nasal intubation hampers surgeon's field of view, submandibular intubation offers an effective alternative to short-term tracheostomy along with small risk potential. There is a need to emphasise its regular application in such cases so that technique can be mastered by both surgeons and anaesthesiologist.

  1. Intraoperative bronchoscopic visualization of left ventricular assist device thrombus.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner; Bhat, Geetha; Modi, Sejal; Pappas, Pat; Tatooles, Antone

    2016-07-01

    Despite advancements in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) design and clinical management, device thrombosis remains a pertinent complication. Limited imaging makes precise visualization of clot location and shape very challenging. We report the usage of videobronchoscopic exploration of explanted LVADs for direct visualization of clot in two patients. This technique is a rapid and inexpensive means of improving our understanding of LVAD clot formation and may be useful in surgical exploration of inflow and outflow tracts during LVAD exchange. PMID:26452760

  2. Urethra-Sparing, Intraoperative, Real-Time Planned, Permanent-Seed Prostate Brachytherapy: Toxicity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Taussky, Daniel; Donath, David; Le, Hoa Phong; Larouche, Renee-Xaviere; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Hervieux, Yannick; Delouya, Guila

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the toxicity outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing {sup 125}I permanent-seed brachytherapy (BT) according to a urethra-sparing, intraoperative (IO), real-time planned conformal technique. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed on 250 patients treated consecutively for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2005 and 2009. The planned goal was urethral V{sub 150} = 0. Acute and late genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI), and erectile toxicities were scored with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Median follow-up time for patients with at least 2 years of follow-up (n = 130) was 34.4 months (range, 24-56.9 months). Results: Mean IO urethra V{sub 150} was 0.018% {+-} 0.08%. Mean prostate D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} on day-30 computed tomography scan were 158.0 {+-} 27.0 Gy and 92.1% {+-} 7.2%, respectively. Mean IPSS peak was 9.5 {+-} 6.3 1 month after BT (mean difference from baseline IPSS, 5.3). No acute GI toxicity was observed in 86.8% of patients. The 3-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity-free survival was 77.4% {+-} 4.0%, with Grade 3 late GU toxicity encountered in only 3 patients. Three-year Grade 1 late GI toxicity-free survival was 86.1% {+-} 3.2%. No patient presented Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicity. Of patients with normal sexual status at baseline, 20.7% manifested Grade {>=}2 erectile dysfunction after BT. On multivariate analysis, elevated baseline IPSS (p = 0.016) and high-activity sources (median 0.61 mCi) (p = 0.033) predicted increased Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity. Conclusions: Urethra-sparing IO BT results in low acute and late GU toxicity compared with the literature. High seed activity and elevated IPSS at baseline increased long-term GU toxicity.

  3. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  4. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  5. Practical intraoperative pathologic evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes during sentinel node navigation surgery in gastric cancer patients - Proposal of the pathologic protocol for the upcoming SENORITA trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Eom, Bang Wool; Yoon, Hong Man; Kim, Soo Jin; Rho, Ji Yoon; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Young-Il; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Young-Woo; Ryu, Keun Won

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade, as the number of patients with early gastric cancer increased and the subsequent survival rate improved, there has been a consistent effort to verify the applicability of the sentinel node concept in gastric cancer in a bid to improve postoperative quality of life in these patients. During sentinel node navigation surgery in gastric cancer patients, intraoperative pathologic examination of the retrieved sentinel nodes plays a critical role in determining the extent of surgery, but the optimal method is still under debate. Currently, a multicenter, phase III clinical trial is underway to compare laparoscopic sentinel basin dissection with stomach preserving surgery and standard laparoscopic gastrectomy in terms of oncologic outcomes in patients with clinical stage T1N0 gastric cancer. Herein, the currently available intraoperative pathologic techniques are reviewed and their clinical significance and applicability are appraised based on the published literature. The proper pathologic examination of the sentinel lymph nodes in an upcoming clinical trial (SENORITA trial) is also proposed here based on this review. PMID:27566014

  6. Effects of intraoperatively applied glucocorticoid-hydrogels on residual hearing and foreign-body reaction in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Honeder, Clemens; Landegger, Lukas David; Engleder, Elisabeth; Gabor, Franz; Plasenzotti, Roberto; Plenk, Hanns; Kaider, Alexandra; Hirtler, Lena; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Arnoldner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion The intraoperative application of glucocorticoid-loaded hydrogels seems to cause a reduction in neutrophil infiltration. No beneficial effect on hearing thresholds was detected. Objectives To evaluate the application of dexamethasone- and triamcinolone-acetonide- loaded hydrogels for effects on hearing-preservation and foreign-body reaction in a guinea pig model for cochlear implantation. Methods 48 guinea pigs (n= 12/group) were implanted with a single channel electrode and intraoperatively treated with 50 µl of a 20% w/v poloxamer 407 hydrogel loaded with 6% dexamethasone or 30% triamcinolone-acetonide, a control hydrogel, or physiological saline. Click- and tone burst-evoked compound action potential thresholds were determined pre- and directly postoperatively as well as on days 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. At the end of the experiment, temporal bones prepared for histological evaluation by a grinding/polishing technique with the electrode in situ. Three ears per treatment group were serially sectioned and evaluated for histological alterations. Results The intratympanic application of glucocorticoid-loaded hydrogels did not improve the preservation of residual hearing in this cochlear implant model. The foreign body reaction to the electrode appeared reduced in the glucocorticoid treated animals. No correlation was found between the histologically described trauma to the inner ear and the resulting hearing threshold-shifts. PMID:25720453

  7. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy on spontaneous canine nasal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Diego; Mortellaro, Carlo M.; Romussi, Stefano; Taroni, Paola; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    1994-09-01

    Promising results obtained by photodynamic therapy (PDT) with porphyrins on superficial spontaneous canine tumors suggested the experiment of this technique on intracavitary tumors, specifically at the endonasal site. The supposed neoplastic residual bed was irradiated directly during surgery at the end of the debulking. Five dogs referred to the surgical department of the veterinary school, University of Milan and affected by endonasal neoplasias were submitted to PDT after radiologic and cyto-histologic diagnosis and TNM stadiation. All the selected tumors were included in the clinical stage 1 (T1NOMO). Mean and median survival time (from the day of treatment) were 11.6 - 5.4 and 12 months, respectively. Different staging of the treated tumors limits the possibility of an objective comparison with other alternative therapeutic procedures.

  8. Management of intraoperative iris prolapse: stepwise practical approach.

    PubMed

    Tint, Naing L; Dhillon, Amritpaul S; Alexander, Philip

    2012-10-01

    Iris prolapse is not an uncommon occurrence during cataract surgery. It usually occurs through the main incision during hydrodissection and is commonly associated with floppy-iris syndrome; however, it can manifest in cases with no known predisposition and can occur at any stage during surgery. The mechanism is explained by the Bernoulli principle and its effect on iris position during the movement of fluid within the eye. Predisposing factors are iris configuration, anterior chamber depth, and position and architecture of the corneal tunnel. Strategies for prevention and management include the use of pharmacological agents, ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, and iris retractors. These strategies can be augmented by alteration and adaptation of the surgeon's technique. PMID:22929088

  9. Intraoperative intracardiac thrombosis in a liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Sibulesky, Lena; Peiris, Prith; Taner, C Burcin; Kramer, David J; Canabal, Juan M; Nguyen, Justin H

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old female with cryptogenic cirrhosis complicated by ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, variceal bleeding and malnutrition with MELD of 34 underwent orthotopic deceased donor liver transplantation performed with piggyback technique. Extensive eversion thromboendovenectomy was performed for a portal vein thrombus which resulted in an excellent portal vein flow. The liver graft was recirculated without any hemodynamic instability. Subsequently, the patient became hypotensive progressing to asystole. She was resuscitated and a transesophageal probe was inserted which revealed a mobile right atrial thrombus and an underfilled poorly contractile right ventricle. The patient was noted to be coagulopathic at the time. She became progressively more stable with a TEE showing complete resolution of the intracardiac thrombus. PMID:21160996

  10. Self-inflicted nail-gun injury with cranial penetration and use of intraoperative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, Joseph A.; Morrison, John F.; Choi, David B.; Klinge, Petra M.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Oyelese, Adetokunbo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of penetrating cranial trauma remains a high acuity and imaging intense neurosurgical disorder. Imaging of vital structures, including angiography, is typically conducted to understand the proximity of vital structures in comparison to a foreign body and prepare for intraoperative complications such as hemorrhage. Preservation of function following initial injury in cases where minimal neurological deficit exists is essential. Case Description: Here, we present a case using intraoperative computed tomography to assist in early detection and resolution of hemorrhage in the surgical management of an intact patient with self-inflicted penetrating cranial trauma. Conclusions: This method may aid in early detection of hemorrhage and prevention of consequential neurological deterioration or emergent need for secondary surgery. PMID:27213112

  11. A Narrative of Intraoperative Staple Line Leaks and Bleeds During Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip K; Roy, Sanjoy; Chekan, Ed; Fegelman, Elliott J

    2016-07-01

    The primary objective of this review was to assess the incidence of intraoperative staple line leaks and bleeds during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). A literature search of MEDLINE®, EMBASE™, and Biosis from January 2010 to November 2014, plus secondary citations extending to 2008, identified 16 relevant articles. For LSG, the incidence of intraoperative leaks and bleeds was as high as 3.93 and 4.07 %, respectively. For LRYGB, leaks occurred in up to 8.26 % and bleeds in 3.45 % of cases. Stapler misfire was commonly cited as a cause. Widespread, precautionary use of staple line reinforcement (SLR), lack of standardized testing, and underreporting suggest the incidence may be underestimated. Published studies were insufficient to address the economic impact of bleeds and leaks or interventions, but development of improved stapler designs that obviate the need for SLR may reduce costs and improve outcomes.

  12. A Case Report of Preoperative, Intraoperative, and Postoperative Anterior Chamber Shallowing Resulting from Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yujiro; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Sano, Ichiya; Fujihara, Etsuko; Tanito, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman with an epiretinal membrane in her left eye accompanied by a shallow anterior chamber due to primary angle closure glaucoma underwent vitrectomy and cataract surgery. During the cataract surgery, immediately after the ultrasonic tip had been removed from the anterior chamber, anterior chamber flattening occurred. An intraoperative fundus examination showed the development of acute intraoperative choroidal effusion. Postoperatively, the anterior chamber remained shallow even after the choroidal detachment had subsided; capsular bag distension seen by ultrasound biomicroscopy suggested the development of early postoperative capsular block syndrome. After neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser capsulotomy, the anterior chamber deepened. Depending on the perioperative period, the mechanism of a flat anterior chamber can change, and understanding the underlying mechanisms is required for appropriate treatment. PMID:27293412

  13. Intraoperative 16-Channel Electroencephalography and Bilateral Near Infrared Spectroscopy Monitorization in Aortic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Demir, Aslı; Aydınlı, Bahar; Ünal, Ertekin Utku; Bindal, Mustafa; Koçulu, Rabia; Sarıtaş, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Ümit

    2015-08-01

    Transient neurologic dysfunction is common after aortic surgery. Major causes of postoperative complications followed by cardiac surgery are due to hypoperfusion states such as selective cerebral perfusion, embolic debris during cardiopulmonary bypass and ulcerated plaque emboli originated from carotid arteries. Neurologic complications prolong periods of intensive care unit and hospital stay, worsens quality of life and unfortunately they are an important cause of morbidity. Anaesthesia during a carotid and aortic surgery constitutes of providing adequate brain perfusion pressure, attenuating cerebral metabolism by anaesthetic agents and monitoring the cerebral metabolic supply and demand relationship during the intraoperative period. We present a monitoring approach with an intraoperative 16-channel electroencephalography and bilateral near infrared spectroscopy during redo aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva surgery. PMID:27366510

  14. Analysis of intra-operative bleeding and recurrence of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, R; Huang, D; Han, D; Ferguson, E J; Shi, H; Yang, W

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to present our experience with 34 patients diagnosed with juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas and treated in the Chinese PLA General Hospital between 1986 and 1999, and to examine the factors influencing intra-operative bleeding and tumour recurrence. The age of the patient, the duration of symptoms and tumour stage were related to the amount of intra-operative bleeding. The tumours were totally resected in 30 patients and recurred in five patients (16.7%), with a mean follow-up time of 77 months. The mean time to tumour recurrence after operation was 3.2 months (1-6 months). The incidence of recurrence had no correlation with the age of the patient, duration of symptoms, peri-operative treatment or surgical approaches (P > 0.05); but strongly correlated with tumour stage (P < 0.05).

  15. Intraoperative Management of Hypercapnia With an Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal Device During Giant Bullectomy.

    PubMed

    Dell'Amore, Andrea; D'Andrea, Rocco; Caroli, Guido; Mazzoli, Carlo Alberto; Rocca, Alberto; Stella, Franco; Bini, Alessandro; Melotti, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal CO2-removal devices have been introduced in clinical practice to provide protective and ultraprotective ventilation strategies in different settings to avoid retention of carbon dioxide. The need to facilitate lung-protective ventilation is required not only for the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome but also in thoracic surgery during complex operations, especially in respiratory compromised patients. This report describes a case of giant bullectomy for vanishing lung syndrome in which intraoperative hypercapnia secondary to protective ventilation was managed with a CO2-removal device (Decap-Hemodec s.r.l., Salerno, Italy). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of the intraoperative use of the Decap system for giant bullectomy.

  16. Intraoperative measurement of parathyroid hormone: A Copernican revolution in the surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gioviale, Maria Concetta; Damiano, Giuseppe; Altomare, Roberta; Maione, Carolina; Buscemi, Salvatore; Buscemi, Giuseppe; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring in the setting of the operating room represents a valuable example of the rationale use of the laboratory diagnostic in a patient-oriented approach. Rapid intraoperative PTH (ioPTH) assay is a valid tool for an accurate evaluation of the success of parathyroid surgery. The reliability of the user-friendly portable systems as well as the collaboration between operators and surgical staff allow the one-site monitoring of the ioPTH decrements on the course of the surgical management of hyperparathyroidism. The rapid answer provided by an effective decrement of PTH during parathyroidectomy contributes dramatically to the efficacy of parathyroid surgery and the reduction of the number of re-operations. Therefore the dose of ioPTH is a valid and reliable support for the success of the intervention of parathyroidectomy at controlled costs. PMID:26708859

  17. Survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated by intraoperative high-activity cobalt 60 endocurietherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Jones, E.O.; Patil, A.A.; Leibrock, L.G.; McComb, R.D. )

    1989-10-01

    The authors report their initial treatment results in 49 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GM) who received intraoperative endocurietherapy (ECT) with high-activity cobalt 60 ({sup 60}Co) probe. Thirty poor prognosis (unresectable tumor) patients (Group I) with newly diagnosed GM were treated by either biopsy or subtotal excision, followed by 20.00-Gy single-fraction {sup 60}Co probe ECT, and 60.00-Gy external-beam radiation therapy (EXRT) (80.00 Gy total tumor dose). Nineteen patients (Group II) with recurrent, previously resected and externally irradiated GM were retreated with 20.00-Gy single-fraction {sup 60}Co probe ECT alone. The authors' initial experience with intraoperative ECT of GM is discussed.

  18. Intraoperative smile in a multiple sclerosis patient with medication-refractory tremor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amanda J; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Pastrana, Marlon; Foote, Kelly D; Haq, Ihtsham; Okun, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized to improve disease symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor, and other neuropsychiatric syndromes such as depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Deep brain stimulation has also been observed to improve tremor for select patients with multiple sclerosis. During intraoperative stimulation in these multiple sclerosis patients, researchers have observed a wide spectrum of motor and sensory phenomena, but no stimulation-induced emotional responses have been reported. We detailed intraoperative smiling associated with stimulation of the ventralis oralis anterior/ventralis oralis posterior border region of the left thalamus.  A single patient with medication-resistant multiple sclerosis tremor experienced smiling, laughing, and subjective euphoria during intraoperative stimulation of the left thalamus. Specifically, during intraoperative stimulation of the left thalamic ventralis oralis anterior border, the patient developed a contralateral smile which progressed to a bilateral smile and was accompanied by a feeling of subjective happiness. The smile habituated in approximately 60 seconds and it was reproducible on a repeat stimulation. The patient could subjectively feel the facial movement, and, at higher voltages, the movement was described as a pulling sensation. Stimulation of the anterior ventralis oralis anterior border of the left thalamus in an multiple sclerosis patient produced a unilateral smile that rapidly developed into a bilateral smile accompanied by euphoria. There were presumed capsular side effects at higher voltages. The exact mechanism by which stimulation of the thalamus produced a smile and mood elevation is unknown, but we speculate that the smile could be induced by stimulation of corticobulbar fibers arising from the caudal cingulate motor area connecting the contralateral facial nerve nucleus.

  19. Television system for verification and documentation of treatment fields during intraoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B A; Harrington, F S; Kinsella, T J; Sindelar, W F

    1983-09-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) involves direct treatment of tumors or tumor beds with large single doses of radiation. The verification of the area to be treated before irradiation and the documentation of the treated area are critical for IORT, just as for other types of radiation therapy. A television system which allows the target area to be directly imaged immediately before irradiation has been developed. Verification and documentation of treatment fields has made the IORT television system indispensable.

  20. Experience of Intraoperative Cell Salvage in Surgical Correction of Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changsheng; Wang, Jianru; Zheng, Zhaomin; Zhang, Zhongmin; Liu, Hui; Wang, Hua; Li, Zemin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intraoperative cell salvage (ICS) in surgical correction of spinal deformity remained controversial. This study was to quantitatively demonstrate its effect. In all, 124 patients having ICS in surgical correction of spinal deformity were included. These patients would be divided into 3 groups. Group 1—blood loss less than 15 mL/kg; group 2—between 15 and 37.5 mL/kg; and group 3—more than 37.5 mL/kg. The mean blood loss was 37.2 mL/kg and patients received 872.2 mL salvaged blood on average. The prevalence of intraoperative transfusion of allogenic RBC was 62.9% and the amount averaged 3.4 U. In groups 1 to 3, the prevalence of intraoperative allogenic transfusion was 23.5%, 66.7%, and 100%, respectively. Logistic analysis showed blood loss minus autotransfusion was of significance in predicting intraoperative transfusion, whereas the blood loss or autotransfusion alone was not, implicating an important role of ICS in saving allogenic RBC. The maximum decrease of hemoglobin after operation occurred in the third day, and the magnitude was 45.7 g/L. No severe complications related to ICS were observed. In summary, ICS could decrease the amount of allogenic transfusion in surgical correction of spinal deformity. However, in terms of reducing prevalence of allogenic transfusion, it had a protective effect only in patients with small blood loss. PMID:27227909

  1. A case of diffused malignant pleural mesothelioma forming small multiple disseminations with intraoperatively suspicious carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Suemitsu, Ryuichi; Takeo, Sadanori; Hamatake, Motoharu; Furuya, Kiyomi; Uesugi, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    A 65-year-old male, having symptoms suggestive of pulmonary malignant tumor, underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Surgery revealed a solid tumor originating from the thoracic wall, with many small solid tumors in the thoracic wall and diaphragm near the tumor. The intraoperative observation of a frozen section typed the tumor as carcinoid; however, hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistological findings provided the definitive diagnosis of diffused, malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

  2. Thermal burn associated with intraoperative convective forced-air warming blanket (bair paws™ flex gown system).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Elizabeth K; Apostolidou, Ioanna; Layton, Heather; Prielipp, Richard

    2014-10-01

    A 44-year-old man undergoing ambulatory surgery sustained a 5% total body surface first-degree burn on his lower and lateral torso and upper thigh during routine use of a new forced-air warming Bair Paws™ flex gown system. We describe the likely mechanism of injury, intraoperative events suggesting special variation in the warming process, and a brief review of adverse events associated with forced-air warming systems. PMID:25611618

  3. Computed tomography, endoscopic, laparoscopic, and intra-operative sonography for assessing resectability of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Eliza E; Van Dam, Jacques; Weinstein, Stefanie; Jeffrey, Brooke; Desser, Terry; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2005-08-01

    Pancreas cancer is the fourth leading cancer killer in adults. Cure of pancreas cancer is dependent on the complete surgical removal of localized tumor. A complete surgical resection is dependent on accurate preoperative and intra-operative imaging of tumor and its relationship to vital structures. Imaging of pancreatic tumors preoperatively and intra-operatively is achieved by pancreatic protocol computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), laparoscopic ultrasound (LUS), and intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). Multi-detector CT with three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of images is the most useful preoperative modality to assess resectability. It has a sensitivity and specificity of 90 and 99%, respectively. It is not observer dependent. The images predict operative findings. EUS and LUS have sensitivities of 77 and 78%, respectively. They both have a very high specificity. Further, EUS has the ability to biopsy tumor and obtain a definitive tissue diagnosis. IOUS is a very sensitive (93%) method to assess tumor resectability during surgery. It adds little time and no morbidity to the operation. It greatly facilitates the intra-operative decision-making. In reality, each of these methods adds some information to help in determining the extent of tumor and the surgeon's ability to remove it. We rely on pancreatic protocol CT with 3-D reconstruction and either EUS or IOUS depending on the tumor location and operability of the tumor and patient. With these modern imaging modalities, it is now possible to avoid major operations that only determine an inoperable tumor. With proper preoperative selection, surgery is able to remove tumor in the majority of patients.

  4. Surgery for traumatic facial nerve paralysis: does intraoperative monitoring have a role?

    PubMed

    Ashram, Yasmine A; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed M K

    2014-09-01

    The use of intraoperative facial nerve (FN) monitoring during surgical decompression of the FN is underscored because surgery is indicated when the FN shows more than 90 % axonal degeneration. The present study proposes including intraoperative monitoring to facilitate decision taking and provide prognostication with more accuracy. This prospective study was conducted on ten patients presenting with complete FN paralysis due to temporal bone fracture. They were referred after variable time intervals for FN exploration and decompression. Intraoperative supramaximal electric stimulation (2-3 mA) of the FN was attempted in all patients both proximal and distal to the site of injury. Postoperative FN function was assessed using House-Brackmann (HB) scale. All patients had follow-up period ranging from 7 to 42 months. Three different patterns of neurophysiological responses were characterized. Responses were recorded proximal and distal to the lesion in five patients (pattern 1); only distal to the lesion in two patients (pattern 2); and neither proximal nor distal to the lesion in three patients (pattern 3). Sporadic, mechanically elicited EMG activity was recorded in eight out of ten patients. Patients with pattern 1 had favorable prognosis with postoperative function ranging between grade I and III. Pattern 3 patients showing no mechanically elicited activity had poor prognosis. Intraoperative monitoring affects decision taking during surgery for traumatic FN paralysis and provides prognostication with sufficient accuracy. The detection of mechanically elicited EMG activity is an additional sign predicting favorable outcome. However, absence of responses did not alter surgeon decision when the nerve was found evidently intact.

  5. The value of intraoperative electrocorticography in surgical decision making for temporal lobe epilepsy with normal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Neal; Rubens, Elayna; Sethi, Nitin; Kandula, Padmaja; Labar, Douglas R.; Harden, Cynthia; Perrine, Kenneth; Christos, Paul J.; Iorgulescu, J. Bryan; Lancman, Guido; Schaul, Neil S.; Kolesnik, Dmitriy V.; Nouri, Shahin; Dawson, Andrew; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose We hypothesized that acute intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) might identify a subset of patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–negative temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who could proceed directly to standard anteromesial resection (SAMR), obviating the need for chronic electrode implantation to guide resection. Methods Patients with TLE and a normal MRI who underwent acute ECoG prior to chronic electrode recording of ictal onsets were evaluated. Intraoperative interictal spikes were classified as mesial (M), lateral (L), or mesial/lateral (ML). Results of the acute ECoG were correlated with the ictal-onset zone following chronic ECoG. Onsets were also classified as “M,” “L,” or “ML.” Positron emission tomography (PET), scalp-EEG (electroencephalography), and Wada were evaluated as adjuncts. Key Findings Sixteen patients fit criteria for inclusion. Outcomes were Engel class I in nine patients, Engel II in two, Engel III in four, and Engel IV in one. Mean postoperative follow-up was 45.2 months. Scalp EEG and PET correlated with ictal onsets in 69% and 64% of patients, respectively. Wada correlated with onsets in 47% of patients. Acute intraoperative ECoG correlated with seizure onsets on chronic ECoG in all 16 patients. All eight patients with “M” pattern ECoG underwent SAMR, and six (75%) experienced Engel class I outcomes. Three of eight patients with “L” or “ML” onsets (38%) had Engel class I outcomes. Significance Intraoperative ECoG may be useful in identifying a subset of patients with MRI-negative TLE who will benefit from SAMR without chronic implantation of electrodes. These patients have uniquely mesial interictal spikes and can go on to have improved postoperative seizure-free outcomes. PMID:21480886

  6. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid flow assessed using intraoperative MRI during posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Bond, Aaron E; Jane, John A; Liu, Kenneth C; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors completed a prospective, institutional review board-approved study using intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression (PFD) for Chiari I malformation. The purpose of the study was to examine the utility of iMRI in determining when an adequate decompression had been performed. METHODS Patients with symptomatic Chiari I malformations with imaging findings of obstruction of the CSF space at the foramen magnum, with or without syringomyelia, were considered candidates for surgery. All patients underwent complete T1, T2, and cine MRI studies in the supine position preoperatively as a baseline. After the patient was placed prone with the neck flexed in position for surgery, iMRI was performed. The patient then underwent a bone decompression of the foramen magnum and arch of C-1, and the MRI was repeated. If obstruction was still present, then in a stepwise fashion the patient underwent dural splitting, duraplasty, and coagulation of the tonsils, with an iMRI study performed after each step guiding the decision to proceed further. RESULTS Eighteen patients underwent PFD for Chiari I malformations between November 2011 and February 2013; 15 prone preincision iMRIs were performed. Fourteen of these patients (93%) demonstrated significant improvement of CSF flow through the foramen magnum dorsal to the tonsils with positioning only. This improvement was so notable that changes in CSF flow as a result of the bone decompression were difficult to discern. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed significant CSF flow changes when simply positioning the patient for surgery. These results put into question intraoperative flow assessments that suggest adequate decompression by PFD, whether by iMRI or intraoperative ultrasound. The use of intraoperative imaging during PFD for Chiari I malformation, whether by ultrasound or iMRI, is limited by CSF flow dynamics across the foramen magnum that change significantly when the patient is

  7. Language areas involving the inferior temporal cortex on intraoperative mapping in a bilingual patient with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hidehiro; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Takano, Shingo; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Matsushita, Akira; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Aiyama, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old bilingual man underwent removal of glioblastoma multiforme with intraoperative language mapping, mainly using the picture-naming and auditory responsive-naming tasks under cortical stimulation. Multiple language areas were identified, including one located in the middle of the inferior temporal cortex (ITC). Individual mapping for glioma patients must be performed because language areas might be located in various and unexpected regions, including the ITC.

  8. Effects of intraoperative single bolus fentanyl administration and remifentanil infusion on postoperative nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungsun; Doo, A Ram; Son, Ji-Seon; Kim, Jin-Wan; Lee, Ki-Jae; Kim, Dong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the use of postoperative opioids is a well-known risk factor for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), few studies have been performed on the effects of intraoperative opioids on PONV. We examined the effects of a single bolus administration of fentanyl during anesthesia induction and the intraoperative infusion of remifentanil on PONV. Methods Two hundred and fifty women, aged 20 to 65 years and scheduled for thyroidectomy, were allocated to a control group (Group C), a single bolus administration of fentanyl 2 µg/kg during anesthesia induction (Group F), or 2 ng/ ml of effect-site concentration-controlled intraoperative infusion of remifentanil (Group R) groups. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and 50% N2O. The incidence and severity of PONV and use of rescue antiemetics were recorded at 2, 6, and 24 h postoperatively. Results Group F showed higher incidences of nausea (60/82, 73% vs. 38/77, 49%; P = 0.008), vomiting (40/82, 49% vs. 23/77 30%; P = 0.041) and the use of rescue antiemetics (47/82, 57% vs. 29/77, 38%; P = 0.044) compared with Group C at postoperative 24 h. However, there were no significant differences in the incidence of PONV between Groups C and R. The overall incidences of PONV for postoperative 24 h were 49%, 73%, and 59% in Groups C, F, and R, respectively (P = 0.008). Conclusions A single bolus administration of fentanyl 2 µg/kg during anesthesia induction increases the incidence of PONV, but intraoperative remifentanil infusion with 2 ng/ml effect-site concentration did not affect the incidence of PONV. PMID:26885302

  9. Pose-independent surface matching for intra-operative soft-tissue marker-less registration.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Thiago Ramos; Seitel, Alexander; Kilgus, Thomas; Suwelack, Stefan; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Kenngott, Hannes; Speidel, Stefanie; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Heimann, Tobias; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2014-10-01

    One of the main challenges in computer-assisted soft tissue surgery is the registration of multi-modal patient-specific data for enhancing the surgeon's navigation capabilities by observing beyond exposed tissue surfaces. A new approach to marker-less guidance involves capturing the intra-operative patient anatomy with a range image device and doing a shape-based registration. However, as the target organ is only partially visible, typically does not provide salient features and underlies severe non-rigid deformations, surface matching in this context is extremely challenging. Furthermore, the intra-operatively acquired surface data may be subject to severe systematic errors and noise. To address these issues, we propose a new approach to establishing surface correspondences, which can be used to initialize fine surface matching algorithms in the context of intra-operative shape-based registration. Our method does not require any prior knowledge on the relative poses of the input surfaces to each other, does not rely on the detection of prominent surface features, is robust to noise and can be used for overlapping surfaces. It takes into account (1) similarity of feature descriptors, (2) compatibility of multiple correspondence pairs, as well as (3) the spatial configuration of the entire correspondence set. We evaluate the algorithm on time-of-flight (ToF) data from porcine livers in a respiratory liver motion simulator. In all our experiments the alignment computed from the established surface correspondences yields a registration error below 1cm and is thus well suited for initializing fine surface matching algorithms for intra-operative soft-tissue registration. PMID:25038492

  10. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  11. Intraoperative finding of gross lymph node metastasis during robot-assisted prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wooju; Sukumar, Shyam; Petros, Firas; Menon, Mani; Peabody, James O; Rogers, Craig G

    2012-12-01

    Discovery of macroscopically positive lymph nodes (LN) during radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa) is a rare event. We describe our experience of intraoperative finding of grossly positive LN during radical prostatectomy and evaluate outcomes and predictors. A total of 4,480 patients underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for clinically localized PCa from 2001 to 2010, and pelvic LN dissection was performed in 4,090 of these patients (91.3%). Patients with macroscopically positive LN discovered and confirmed intraoperatively were assessed, as was surgical decision (abort versus continue RARP). Patients with macroscopic LN-positive disease were also evaluated and oncologic outcomes were